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Sample records for tca cycle function

  1. Localisation of gluconeogenesis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-cycle enzymes and first functional analysis of the TCA cycle in Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fleige, Tobias; Pfaff, Nils; Gross, Uwe; Bohne, Wolfgang

    2008-08-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii displays some unusual localisations of carbohydrate converting enzymes, which is due to the presence of a vestigial, non-photosynthetic plastid, referred to as the apicoplast. It was recently demonstrated that the single pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH) in T. gondii is exclusively localised inside the apicoplast but absent in the mitochondrion. This raises the question about expression, localisation and function of enzymes for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA)-cycle, which normally depends on PDH generated acetyl-CoA. Based on the expression and localisation of epitope-tagged fusion proteins, we show that all analysed TCA cycle enzymes are localised in the mitochondrion, including both isoforms of malate dehydrogenase. The absence of a cytosolic malate dehydrogenase suggests that a typical malate-aspartate shuttle for transfer of reduction equivalents is missing in T. gondii. We also localised various enzymes which catalyse the irreversible steps in gluconeogenesis to a cellular compartment and examined mRNA expression levels for gluconeogenesis and TCA cycle genes between tachyzoites and in vitro bradyzoites. In order to get functional information on the TCA cycle for the parasite energy metabolism, we created a conditional knock-out mutant for the succinyl-CoA synthetase. Disruption of the sixth step in the TCA cycle should leave the biosynthetic parts of the cycle intact, but prevent FADH2 production. The succinyl-CoA synthetase depletion mutant displayed a 30% reduction in growth rate, which could be restored by supplementation with 2 microM succinate in the tissue culture medium. The mitochondrial membrane potential in these parasites was found to be unaltered. The lack of a more severe phenotype suggests that a functional TCA cycle is not essential for T. gondii replication and for maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:18336823

  2. Elevated TCA cycle function in the pathology of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and fatty liver[S

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Sunny, Nishanth E.; Kucejova, Blanka; Fu, Xiaorong; He, Tian Teng; Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Shelton, John M.; Perales, Jose C.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The manner in which insulin resistance impinges on hepatic mitochondrial function is complex. Although liver insulin resistance is associated with respiratory dysfunction, the effect on fat oxidation remains controversial, and biosynthetic pathways that traverse mitochondria are actually increased. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the site of terminal fat oxidation, chief source of electrons for respiration, and a metabolic progenitor of gluconeogenesis. Therefore, we tested whether insulin resistance promotes hepatic TCA cycle flux in mice progressing to insulin resistance and fatty liver on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 32 weeks using standard biomolecular and in vivo 2H/13C tracer methods. Relative mitochondrial content increased, but respiratory efficiency declined by 32 weeks of HFD. Fasting ketogenesis became unresponsive to feeding or insulin clamp, indicating blunted but constitutively active mitochondrial β-oxidation. Impaired insulin signaling was marked by elevated in vivo gluconeogenesis and anaplerotic and oxidative TCA cycle flux. The induction of TCA cycle function corresponded to the development of mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, hepatic oxidative stress, and inflammation. Thus, the hepatic TCA cycle appears to enable mitochondrial dysfunction during insulin resistance by increasing electron deposition into an inefficient respiratory chain prone to reactive oxygen species production and by providing mitochondria-derived substrate for elevated gluconeogenesis. PMID:22493093

  3. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid, and gibberellin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Martins, Auxiliadora O.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Tohge, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD) was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA). Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs. PMID:25360142

  4. A Process-Based Model of TCA Cycle Functioning to Analyze Citrate Accumulation in Pre- and Post-Harvest Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Audrey; Génard, Michel; Bugaud, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Citrate is one of the most important organic acids in many fruits and its concentration plays a critical role in organoleptic properties. The regulation of citrate accumulation throughout fruit development, and the origins of the phenotypic variability of the citrate concentration within fruit species remain to be clarified. In the present study, we developed a process-based model of citrate accumulation based on a simplified representation of the TCA cycle to predict citrate concentration in fruit pulp during the pre- and post-harvest stages. Banana fruit was taken as a reference because it has the particularity of having post-harvest ripening, during which citrate concentration undergoes substantial changes. The model was calibrated and validated on the two stages, using data sets from three contrasting cultivars in terms of citrate accumulation, and incorporated different fruit load, potassium supply, and harvest dates. The model predicted the pre and post-harvest dynamics of citrate concentration with fairly good accuracy for the three cultivars. The model suggested major differences in TCA cycle functioning among cultivars during post-harvest ripening of banana, and pointed to a potential role for NAD-malic enzyme and mitochondrial malate carriers in the genotypic variability of citrate concentration. The sensitivity of citrate accumulation to growth parameters and temperature differed among cultivars during post-harvest ripening. Finally, the model can be used as a conceptual basis to study citrate accumulation in fleshy fruits and may be a powerful tool to improve our understanding of fruit acidity. PMID:26042830

  5. Mitochondria-Translocated PGK1 Functions as a Protein Kinase to Coordinate Glycolysis and the TCA Cycle in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yuhui; Meisenhelder, Jill; Yang, Weiwei; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Xia, Yan; Aldape, Kenneth; He, Jie; Hunter, Tony; Wang, Liwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear how the Warburg effect that exemplifies enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol is coordinated with suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism. We demonstrate here that hypoxia, EGFR activation, and expression of K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E induce mitochondrial translocation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1); this is mediated by ERK-dependent PGK1 S203 phosphorylation and subsequent PIN1-mediated cis-trans isomerization. Mitochondrial PGK1 acts as a protein kinase to phosphorylate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) at T338, which activates PDHK1 to phosphorylate and inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. This reduces mitochondrial pyruvate utilization, suppresses reactive oxygen species production, increases lactate production, and promotes brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 S203 and PDHK1 T338 phosphorylation levels correlate with PDH S293 inactivating phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. This work highlights that PGK1 acts as a protein kinase in coordinating glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is instrumental in cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942675

  6. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State

    PubMed Central

    Cardaci, Simone; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), fumarate hydratase (FH), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology. PMID:22888353

  7. Metabolic Engineering of TCA Cycle for Production of Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Vuoristo, Kiira S; Mars, Astrid E; Sanders, Johan P M; Eggink, Gerrit; Weusthuis, Ruud A

    2016-03-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle has been used for decades in the microbial production of chemicals such as citrate, L-glutamate, and succinate. Maximizing yield is key for cost-competitive production. However, for most TCA cycle products, the maximum pathway yield is lower than the theoretical maximum yield (Y(E)). For succinate, this was solved by creating two pathways to the product, using both branches of the TCA cycle, connected by the glyoxylate shunt (GS). A similar solution cannot be applied directly for production of compounds from the oxidative branch of the TCA cycle because irreversible reactions are involved. Here, we describe how this can be overcome and what the impact is on the yield. PMID:26702790

  8. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids. PMID:26221781

  9. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  10. Mitochondrial engineering of the TCA cycle for fumarate production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Zhao, Zihao; Liu, Liming

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fumarate production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here, mitochondrial engineering was used to construct the oxidative pathway for fumarate production starting from the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate in Candida glabrata. Accordingly, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (SUCLG), and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) were selected to be manipulated for strengthening the oxidative pathway, and the engineered strain T.G-K-S-S exhibited increased fumarate biosynthesis (1.81 g L(-1)). To further improve fumarate production, the oxidative route was optimized. First, three fusion proteins KGD2-SUCLG2, SUCLG2-SDH1 and KGD2-SDH1 were constructed, and KGD2-SUCLG2 led to improved fumarate production (4.24 g L(-1)). In addition, various strengths of KGD2-SUCLG2 and SDH1 expression cassettes were designed by combinations of promoter strengths and copy numbers, resulting in a large increase in fumarate production (from 4.24 g L(-1) to 8.24 g L(-1)). Then, through determining intracellular amino acids and its related gene expression levels, argininosuccinate lyase in the urea cycle was identified as the key factor for restricting higher fumarate production. Correspondingly, after overexpression of it, the fumarate production was further increased to 9.96 g L(-1). Next, two dicarboxylic acids transporters facilitated an improvement of fumarate production, and, as a result, the final strain T.G-KS(H)-S(M)-A-2S reached fumarate titer of 15.76 g L(-1). This strategy described here paves the way to the development of an efficient pathway for microbial production of fumarate. PMID:25708514

  11. Robustness of TCA cycle at steady-state: an LMI-based analysis and synthesis framework.

    PubMed

    Panja, Surajit; Patra, Sourav; Mukherjee, Anirban; Basu, Madhumita; Sengupta, Sanghamitra; Dutta, Pranab K

    2013-06-01

    A novel analysis and synthesis framework is devised for synergism and saturation system, commonly known as S-system, for improving the robustness of the TCA cycle. In order to minimize the perturbation sensitivity, a measure of robustness of the network, a new design framework is proposed. The design constraints are formulated in computationally attractive convex optimization framework. The proposed multi-objective optimization problem, framed as Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI), makes a trade-off between the robustness and the control effort of the synthesized TCA cycle. PMID:23694697

  12. HSulf-1 deficiency dictates a metabolic reprograming of glycolysis and TCA cycle in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Khurana, Ashwani; Chini, Eduardo; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Stilles, Katherine; Padmabandu, Seth; Leung, Sam; Kalloger, Steve; Gilks, Blake; Lowe, Val; Dierks, Thomas; Hammond, Edward; Dredge, Keith; Nagrath, Deepak; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-10-20

    Warburg effect has emerged as a potential hallmark of many cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms that led to this metabolic state of aerobic glycolysis, particularly in ovarian cancer (OVCA) have not been completely elucidated. HSulf-1 predominantly functions by limiting the bioavailability of heparan binding growth factors and hence their downstream signaling. Here we report that HSulf-1, a known putative tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of glycolysis. Silencing of HSulf-1 expression in OV202 cell line increased glucose uptake and lactate production by upregulating glycolytic genes such as Glut1, HKII, LDHA, as well as metabolites. Conversely, HSulf-1 overexpression in TOV21G cells resulted in the down regulation of glycolytic enzymes and reduced glycolytic phenotype, supporting the role of HSulf-1 loss in enhanced aerobic glycolysis. HSulf-1 deficiency mediated glycolytic enhancement also resulted in increased inhibitory phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) thus blocking the entry of glucose flux into TCA cycle. Consistent with this, metabolomic and isotope tracer analysis showed reduced glucose flux into TCA cycle. Moreover, HSulf-1 loss is associated with lower oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and impaired mitochondrial function. Mechanistically, lack of HSulf-1 promotes c-Myc induction through HB-EGF-mediated p-ERK activation. Pharmacological inhibition of c-Myc reduced HB-EGF induced glycolytic enzymes implicating a major role of c-Myc in loss of HSulf-1 mediated altered glycolytic pathway in OVCA. Similarly, PG545 treatment, an agent that binds to heparan binding growth factors and sequesters growth factors away from their ligand also blocked HB-EGF signaling and reduced glucose uptake in vivo in HSulf-1 deficient cells. PMID:26378042

  13. HSulf-1 deficiency dictates a metabolic reprograming of glycolysis and TCA cycle in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Khurana, Ashwani; Chini, Eduardo; Yang, Lifeng; Baddour, Joelle; Stilles, Katherine; Padmabandu, Seth; Leung, Sam; Kalloger, Steve; Gilks, Blake; Lowe, Val; Dierks, Thomas; Hammond, Edward; Dredge, Keith; Nagrath, Deepak; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-01-01

    Warburg effect has emerged as a potential hallmark of many cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms that led to this metabolic state of aerobic glycolysis, particularly in ovarian cancer (OVCA) have not been completely elucidated. HSulf-1 predominantly functions by limiting the bioavailability of heparan binding growth factors and hence their downstream signaling. Here we report that HSulf-1, a known putative tumor suppressor, is a negative regulator of glycolysis. Silencing of HSulf-1 expression in OV202 cell line increased glucose uptake and lactate production by upregulating glycolytic genes such as Glut1, HKII, LDHA, as well as metabolites. Conversely, HSulf-1 overexpression in TOV21G cells resulted in the down regulation of glycolytic enzymes and reduced glycolytic phenotype, supporting the role of HSulf-1 loss in enhanced aerobic glycolysis. HSulf-1 deficiency mediated glycolytic enhancement also resulted in increased inhibitory phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) thus blocking the entry of glucose flux into TCA cycle. Consistent with this, metabolomic and isotope tracer analysis showed reduced glucose flux into TCA cycle. Moreover, HSulf-1 loss is associated with lower oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and impaired mitochondrial function. Mechanistically, lack of HSulf-1 promotes c-Myc induction through HB-EGF-mediated p-ERK activation. Pharmacological inhibition of c-Myc reduced HB-EGF induced glycolytic enzymes implicating a major role of c-Myc in loss of HSulf-1 mediated altered glycolytic pathway in OVCA. Similarly, PG545 treatment, an agent that binds to heparan binding growth factors and sequesters growth factors away from their ligand also blocked HB-EGF signaling and reduced glucose uptake in vivo in HSulf-1 deficient cells. PMID:26378042

  14. Kreb's TCA cycle in Halobacterium salinarum investigated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, M; Sonawat, H M

    1998-11-01

    Kreb's tricarboxylic (TCA) cycle was studied in Halobacterium salinarum cells grown in the presence of glucose or alanine. The cells were incubated with 13C-labeled substrate and the labeling pattern of various carbon positions in glutamate was monitored by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. [2-13C]pyruvate, when used as a substrate, led mainly to signals for C-1 and C-5 glutamate, with some C-3 glutamate. [3-13C]pyruvate as a substrate produced signals, mainly C-2, C-3, and C-4 glutamate, with some C-1 and C-5 glutamate. The multiplicity of the signals and observation of a C-1 signal in this case indicates extensive cycling of the label in the TCA cycle. Isotopomer analysis of glutamate labeling suggested that of the total pyruvate entering the TCA cycle, the flux through pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase was 90% while that through pyruvate carboxylase was 10%. Only 53% of the total acetyl-CoA was produced from the added labeled pyruvate, the rest being generated endogenously. In the presence of nitrogen, mainly transamination reaction products were formed in the case of both these substrates. PMID:9827332

  15. A mitochondrial GABA permease connects the GABA shunt and the TCA cycle, and is essential for normal carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Michaeli, Simon; Fait, Aaron; Lagor, Kelly; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Grillich, Nicole; Yellin, Ayelet; Bar, Dana; Khan, Munziba; Fernie, Alisdair R; Turano, Frank J; Fromm, Hillel

    2011-08-01

    In plants, ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in the cytosol in response to a variety of stresses. GABA is transported into mitochondria, where it is catabolized into TCA cycle or other intermediates. Although there is circumstantial evidence for mitochondrial GABA transporters in eukaryotes, none have yet been identified. Described here is an Arabidopsis protein similar in sequence and topology to unicellular GABA transporters. The expression of this protein complements a GABA-transport-deficient yeast mutant. Thus the protein was termed AtGABP to indicate GABA-permease activity. In vivo localization of GABP fused to GFP and immunobloting of subcellular fractions demonstrate its mitochondrial localization. Direct [(3) H]GABA uptake measurements into isolated mitochondria revealed impaired uptake into mitochondria of a gabp mutant compared with wild-type (WT) mitochondria, implicating AtGABP as a major mitochondrial GABA carrier. Measurements of CO(2) release, derived from radiolabeled substrates in whole seedlings and in isolated mitochondria, demonstrate impaired GABA-derived input into the TCA cycle, and a compensatory increase in TCA cycle activity in gabp mutants. Finally, growth abnormalities of gabp mutants under limited carbon availability on artificial media, and in soil under low light intensity, combined with their metabolite profiles, suggest an important role for AtGABP in primary carbon metabolism and plant growth. Thus, AtGABP-mediated transport of GABA from the cytosol into mitochondria is important to ensure proper GABA-mediated respiration and carbon metabolism. This function is particularly essential for plant growth under conditions of limited carbon. PMID:21501262

  16. TCA cycle inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus alters nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Gangaplara, Arunakumar; Gardner, Donald J; Musser, James M; Steffen, David; Somerville, Greg A; Reddy, Jay

    2011-09-01

    Inactivation of the Staphylococcus aureus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle delays the resolution of cutaneous ulcers in a mouse soft tissue infection model. In this study, it was observed that cutaneous lesions in mice infected with wild-type or isogenic aconitase mutant S. aureus strains contained comparable inflammatory infiltrates, suggesting the delayed resolution was independent of the recruitment of immune cells. These observations led us to hypothesize that staphylococcal metabolism can modulate the host immune response. Using an in vitro model system involving RAW 264.7 cells, the authors observed that cells cultured with S. aureus aconitase mutant strains produced significantly lower amounts of nitric oxide (NO(•)) and an inducible nitric oxide synthase as compared to those cells exposed to wild-type bacteria. Despite the decrease in NO(•) synthesis, the expression of antigen-presentation and costimulatory molecules was similar in cells cultured with wild-type and those cultured with aconitase mutant bacteria. The data suggest that staphylococci can evade innate immune responses and potentially enhance their ability to survive in infected hosts by altering their metabolism. This may also explain the occurrence of TCA cycle mutants in clinical S. aureus isolates. PMID:21519920

  17. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass. PMID:25342454

  18. The Variations of Glycolysis and TCA Cycle Intermediate Levels Grown in Iron and Copper Mediums of Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Tavsan, Zehra; Ayar Kayali, Hulya

    2015-05-01

    The efficiency of optimal metabolic function by microorganism depends on various parameters, especially essential metal supplementation. In the present study, the effects of iron and copper metals on metabolism were investigated by determination of glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites' levels with respect to the metal concentrations and incubation period in Trichoderma harzianum. The pyruvate and citrate levels of T. harzianum increased up to 15 mg/L of copper via redirection of carbon flux though glycolysis by suppression of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). However, the α-ketoglutarate levels decreased at concentration higher than 5 mg/L of copper to overcome damage of oxidative stress. The fumarate levels correlated with the α-ketoglutarate levels because of substrate limitation. Besides, in T. harzianum cells grown in various concentrations of iron-containing medium, the intracellular pyruvate, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate levels showed positive correlation with iron concentration due to modifying of expression of glycolysis and TCA cycle enzymes via a mechanism involving cofactor or allosteric regulation. However, as a result of consuming of prior substrates required for fumarate production, its levels rose up to 10 mg/L. PMID:25805013

  19. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific observations that followed the invention of the microscope. A bacterium can swim through a fluid environment or coordinate motion with a group of bacteria and swarm across a surface. The flagellar motor, which propels the bacterium, is fueled by proton motive force. In contrast to the physiology that governs swimming motility, much less is known about the energy sources required for multicellular swarming on surfaces. In this study, we used Proteus mirabilis as a model organism to study vigorous swarming behavior and genetic and biochemical approaches to define energy pathways and central metabolism that contribute to multicellular motility. We found that swarming bacteria use a complete aerobic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle but do not respire oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, suggesting that multicellular cooperation during swarming reduces the amount of energy required by individual bacteria to achieve rapid motility. PMID:23111869

  20. Exercise with low muscle glycogen augments TCA cycle anaplerosis but impairs oxidative energy provision in humans

    PubMed Central

    Gibala, Martin J; Peirce, Nick; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dimitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2002-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that: (i) exercise with low muscle glycogen would reduce pyruvate flux through the alanine aminotransferase (AAT) reaction and attenuate the increase in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, and (ii) attenuation of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate (TCAI) pool expansion would limit TCA cycle flux, thereby accelerating phosphocreatine (PCr) degradation. Eight men cycled for 10 min at 70% of their VO2,max on two occasions: (i) following their normal diet (CON) and (ii) after cycling to exhaustion and consuming a low carbohydrate diet for ∼2 days (LG). Biopsies (m. vastus lateralis) confirmed that [glycogen] was lower in LG vs. CON at rest (257 ± 18 vs. 611 ± 54 mmol (kg dry mass)−1; P ≤ 0.05); however, net glycogenolysis was not different after 1 or 10 min of exercise. PCr degradation from rest to 1 min was ∼26% higher in LG vs. CON (38 ± 4 vs. 28 ± 4 mmol (kg dry mass)−1; P ≤ 0.05). The sum of five measured TCAIs (∼90 % of total pool) was not different between trials at rest and after 1 min, but was higher after 10 min in LG vs. CON (5.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.45 ± 0.49 mmol (kg dry mass)−1; P ≤ 0.05). Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity was lower during exercise in LG vs. CON (2.2 ± 0.2 vs. 1.4 ± 0.2 mmol min−1 (kg wet weight)−1 after 10 min; P ≤ 0.05), and acetylcarnitine was ∼threefold less, implying increased pyruvate availability for flux through AAT. Resting muscle [glutamate] was higher in LG vs. CON (16.1 ± 0.8 vs. 11.8 ± 0.4 mmol (kg dry mass)−1; P ≤ 0.05) and the net decrease in [glutamate] during exercise was ∼30 % greater in LG vs. CON. These findings suggest that: (i) contrary to our hypotheses, LG increased anaplerosis by decreasing PDC flux and/or increasing the conversion of glutamate carbon to TCAIs, and (ii) accelerating the rate of muscle TCAI expansion did not affect oxidative energy provision during the initial phase of contraction, since changes in [TCAI] were not temporally related to PCr degradation. PMID:11986392

  1. Tracer-based assessments of hepatic anaplerotic and TCA cycle flux: practicality, stoichiometry, and hidden assumptions.

    PubMed

    Previs, Stephen F; Kelley, David E

    2015-10-15

    Two groups recently used different tracer methods to quantify liver-specific flux rates. The studies had a similar goal, i.e., to characterize mitochondrial oxidative function. These efforts could have a direct impact on our ability to understand metabolic abnormalities that affect the pathophysiology of fatty liver and allow us to examine mechanisms surrounding potential therapeutic interventions. Briefly, one method couples the continuous infusion of [(13)C]acetate with direct real-time measurements of [(13)C]glutamate labeling in liver; the other method administers [(13)C]propionate, in combination with other tracers, and subsequently measures the (13)C labeling of plasma glucose and/or acetaminophen-glucuronide. It appears that a controversy has arisen, since the respective methods yielded different estimates of the anaplerotic/TCA flux ratio (VANA:VTCA) in "control" subjects, i.e., the [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]propionate-derived VANA:VTCA flux ratios appear to be ∼1.4 and ∼5, respectively. While the deep expertise in the respective groups makes it somewhat trivial for each to perform the tracer studies, the data interpretation is inherently difficult. The current perspective was undertaken to examine potential factors that could account for or contribute to the apparent differences. Attention was directed toward 1) matters of practicality, 2) issues surrounding stoichiometry, and 3) hidden assumptions. We believe that the [(13)C]acetate method has certain weaknesses that limit its utility; in contrast, the [(13)C]propionate method likely yields a more correct answer. We hope our discussion will help clarify the differences in the recent reports. Presumably this will be of interest to investigators who are considering tracer-based studies of liver metabolism. PMID:26330343

  2. Blocking anaplerotic entry of glutamine into the TCA cycle sensitizes K-Ras mutant cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Saqcena, M; Mukhopadhyay, S; Hosny, C; Alhamed, A; Chatterjee, A; Foster, D A

    2015-05-14

    Cancer cells undergo a metabolic transformation that allows for increased anabolic demands, wherein glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates are shunted away for the synthesis of biological molecules required for cell growth and division. One of the key shunts is the exit of citrate from the mitochondria and the TCA cycle for the generation of cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A that can be used for fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. With the loss of mitochondrial citrate, cancer cells rely on the 'conditionally essential' amino acid glutamine (Q) as an anaplerotic carbon source for TCA cycle intermediates. Although Q deprivation causes G1 cell cycle arrest in non-transformed cells, its impact on the cancer cell cycle is not well characterized. We report here a correlation between bypass of the Q-dependent G1 checkpoint and cancer cells harboring K-Ras mutations. Instead of arresting in G1 in response to Q-deprivation, K-Ras-driven cancer cells arrest in either S- or G2/M-phase. Inhibition of K-Ras effector pathways was able to revert cells to G1 arrest upon Q deprivation. Blocking anaplerotic utilization of Q mimicked Q deprivation--causing S- and G2/M-phase arrest in K-Ras mutant cancer cells. Significantly, Q deprivation or suppression of anaplerotic Q utilization created synthetic lethality to the cell cycle phase-specific cytotoxic drugs, capecitabine and paclitaxel. These data suggest that disabling of the G1 Q checkpoint could represent a novel vulnerability of cancer cells harboring K-Ras and possibly other mutations that disable the Q-dependent checkpoint. PMID:25023699

  3. Comparison of Intact Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Transcript Profiles during Treatment with Inhibitors of Mitochondrial Electron Transport and TCA Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianping; Ruckle, Michael E.; McIntosh, Lee; Hock, Jeffery J.; Bingham, Scott; White, Samuel J.; George, Rajani M.; Subbaiah, Chalivendra C.; Rhoads, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Plant mitochondria signal to the nucleus leading to altered transcription of nuclear genes by a process called mitochondrial retrograde regulation (MRR). MRR is implicated in metabolic homeostasis and responses to stress conditions. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) are a MRR signaling component, but whether all MRR requires ROS is not established. Inhibition of the cytochrome respiratory pathway by antimycin A (AA) or the TCA cycle by monofluoroacetate (MFA), each of which initiates MRR, can increase ROS production in some plant cells. We found that for AA and MFA applied to leaves of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana plants, ROS production increased with AA, but not with MFA, allowing comparison of transcript profiles under different ROS conditions during MRR. Variation in transcript accumulation over time for eight nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein genes suggested operation of both common and distinct signaling pathways between the two treatments. Consequences of mitochondrial perturbations for the whole transcriptome were examined by microarray analyses. Expression of 1316 and 606 genes was altered by AA and MFA, respectively. A subset of genes was similarly affected by both treatments, including genes encoding photosynthesis-related proteins. MFA treatment resulted in more down-regulation. Functional gene category (MapMan) and cluster analyses showed that genes with expression levels affected by perturbation from AA or MFA inhibition were most similarly affected by biotic stresses such as pathogens. Overall, the data provide further evidence for the presence of mtROS-independent MRR signaling, and support the proposed involvement of MRR and mitochondrial function in plant responses to biotic stress. PMID:23028523

  4. Application of citrate as a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate, prevents diabetic-induced heart damages in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Qianqian; Wang, Baoyu; Pang, Lingxia; Wang, Youpei; Zheng, Meiqin; Wang, Qing; Yan, Jingbin; Xu, Jinzhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Higher cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels is important in reducing cellular energy charge (EC) by increasing the levels of key metabolic protein, and nitrosative modifications, and have been shown to damage the cardiac tissue of diabetic mice. However, the relation between energy production and heart function is unclear. Materials and Methods: Streptozotocin (STZ, 150 mg/kg body weight) was injected intraperitoneally once to mice that had been fasted overnight for induction of diabetes. After diabetic induction, mice received citrate (5 µg/kg) through intraperitoneal injection every other day for 5 weeks. The caspase-3, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1), protein kinase B (PKB), commonly known as AKT and phosphorylated-AKT (p-AKT) proteins were examined to elucidate inflammation and apoptosis in the heart. For histological analysis, heart samples were fixed with 10% formalin and stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Sirius red to assess pathological changes and fibrosis. The expression levels[AGA1] of marker proteins, tyrosine nitration, activity of ATP synthase and succinyl-CoA3-ketoacid coenzyme A transferase-1 (SCOT), and EC were measured. Results: Intraperitoneal injection of citrate significantly reduced caspase-3 and PAI-1 protein levels and increased p-AKT level on the 5th week; EC in the heart was found to be increased as well. Further, the expression level, activity, and tyrosine nitration of ATP synthase and SCOT were not affected after induction of diabetes. Conclusion: Results indicate that application of citrate, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate, might alleviate cardiac dysfunction by reducing cardiac inflammation, apoptosis, and increasing cardiac EC. PMID:27096063

  5. Reconstitution of TCA cycle with DAOCS to engineer Escherichia coli into an efficient whole cell catalyst of penicillin G.

    PubMed

    Lin, Baixue; Fan, Keqiang; Zhao, Jian; Ji, Junjie; Wu, Linjun; Yang, Keqian; Tao, Yong

    2015-08-11

    Many medically useful semisynthetic cephalosporins are derived from 7-aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA), which has been traditionally made by the polluting chemical method. Here, a whole-cell biocatalytic process based on an engineered Escherichia coli strain expressing 2-oxoglutarate-dependent deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) for converting penicillin G to G-7-ADCA is developed. The major engineering strategy is to reconstitute the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of E. coli to force the metabolic flux to go through DAOCS catalyzed reaction for 2-oxoglutarate to succinate conversion. Then the glyoxylate bypass was disrupted to eliminate metabolic flux that may circumvent the reconstituted TCA cycle. Additional engineering steps were taken to reduce the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA in the bioconversion process. These steps include engineering strategies to reduce acetate accumulation in the biocatalytic process and to knock out a host β-lactamase involved in the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA. By combining these manipulations in an engineered strain, the yield of G-7-ADCA was increased from 2.50 ± 0.79 mM (0.89 ± 0.28 g/L, 0.07 ± 0.02 g/gDCW) to 29.01 ± 1.27 mM (10.31 ± 0.46 g/L, 0.77 ± 0.03 g/gDCW) with a conversion rate of 29.01 mol%, representing an 11-fold increase compared with the starting strain (2.50 mol%). PMID:26216972

  6. Reconstitution of TCA cycle with DAOCS to engineer Escherichia coli into an efficient whole cell catalyst of penicillin G

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Baixue; Fan, Keqiang; Zhao, Jian; Ji, Junjie; Wu, Linjun; Yang, Keqian; Tao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Many medically useful semisynthetic cephalosporins are derived from 7-aminodeacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA), which has been traditionally made by the polluting chemical method. Here, a whole-cell biocatalytic process based on an engineered Escherichia coli strain expressing 2-oxoglutarate–dependent deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS) for converting penicillin G to G-7-ADCA is developed. The major engineering strategy is to reconstitute the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle of E. coli to force the metabolic flux to go through DAOCS catalyzed reaction for 2-oxoglutarate to succinate conversion. Then the glyoxylate bypass was disrupted to eliminate metabolic flux that may circumvent the reconstituted TCA cycle. Additional engineering steps were taken to reduce the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA in the bioconversion process. These steps include engineering strategies to reduce acetate accumulation in the biocatalytic process and to knock out a host β-lactamase involved in the degradation of penicillin G and G-7-ADCA. By combining these manipulations in an engineered strain, the yield of G-7-ADCA was increased from 2.50 ± 0.79 mM (0.89 ± 0.28 g/L, 0.07 ± 0.02 g/gDCW) to 29.01 ± 1.27 mM (10.31 ± 0.46 g/L, 0.77 ± 0.03 g/gDCW) with a conversion rate of 29.01 mol%, representing an 11-fold increase compared with the starting strain (2.50 mol%). PMID:26216972

  7. The Role of TCA Cycle Anaplerosis in Ketosis and Fatty Liver in Periparturient Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    White, Heather M

    2015-01-01

    The transition to lactation period in dairy cattle is characterized by metabolic challenges, negative energy balance, and adipose tissue mobilization. Metabolism of mobilized adipose tissue is part of the adaptive response to negative energy balance in dairy cattle; however, the capacity of the liver to completely oxidize nonesterified fatty acids may be limited and is reflective of oxaloacetate pool, the carbon carrier of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Alternative metabolic fates of acetyl-CoA from nonesterified fatty acids include esterification to triacylglycerides and ketogenesis, and when excessive, these pathways lead to fatty liver and ketosis. Examination of the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pull of oxaloacetate by the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis may provide insight into the balance of oxidation and esterification of acetyl-CoA within the liver of periparturient dairy cows. PMID:26479386

  8. TCA Cycle Turnover And Serum Glucose Sources By Automated Bayesian Analysis Of NMR Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Burgess, Shawn; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2004-04-01

    Changes in sources of serum glucose are indicative of a variety of pathological metabolic states. It is possible to measure the sources of serum glucose by the administration of deuterated water to a subject followed by analysis of the 2H enrichment levels in glucose extracted from plasma from a single blood draw by 2H NMR. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior probability densities may then be used to evaluate the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and the Kreb's cycle to serum glucose. Experiments with simulated NMR spectra show that in spectra with a S/N of 20 to 1, the resulting metabolic information may be evaluated with an accuracy of about 4 percent.

  9. TCA Cycle Turnover And Serum Glucose Sources By Automated Bayesian Analysis Of NMR Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Merritt, Matthew E.; Burgess, Shawn; Jeffrey, F. Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig; Bretthorst, G. Larry

    2004-04-21

    Changes in sources of serum glucose are indicative of a variety of pathological metabolic states. It is possible to measure the sources of serum glucose by the administration of deuterated water to a subject followed by analysis of the 2H enrichment levels in glucose extracted from plasma from a single blood draw by 2H NMR. Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior probability densities may then be used to evaluate the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and the Kreb's cycle to serum glucose. Experiments with simulated NMR spectra show that in spectra with a S/N of 20 to 1, the resulting metabolic information may be evaluated with an accuracy of about 4 percent.

  10. Integrated, Step-Wise, Mass-Isotopomeric Flux Analysis of the TCA Cycle.

    PubMed

    Alves, Tiago C; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Zhao, Xiaojian; Yarborough, Orlando; Sereda, Sam; Shirihai, Orian; Cline, Gary W; Mason, Graeme; Kibbey, Richard G

    2015-11-01

    Mass isotopomer multi-ordinate spectral analysis (MIMOSA) is a step-wise flux analysis platform to measure discrete glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolic rates. Importantly, direct citrate synthesis rates were obtained by deconvolving the mass spectra generated from [U-(13)C6]-D-glucose labeling for position-specific enrichments of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, oxaloacetate, and citrate. Comprehensive steady-state and dynamic analyses of key metabolic rates (pyruvate dehydrogenase, β-oxidation, pyruvate carboxylase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and PEP/pyruvate cycling) were calculated from the position-specific transfer of (13)C from sequential precursors to their products. Important limitations of previous techniques were identified. In INS-1 cells, citrate synthase rates correlated with both insulin secretion and oxygen consumption. Pyruvate carboxylase rates were substantially lower than previously reported but showed the highest fold change in response to glucose stimulation. In conclusion, MIMOSA measures key metabolic rates from the precursor/product position-specific transfer of (13)C-label between metabolites and has broad applicability to any glucose-oxidizing cell. PMID:26411341

  11. Possible Links Between Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA) Cycle in Francisella Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Dieppedale, Jennifer; Gesbert, Gael; Ramond, Elodie; Chhuon, Cerina; Dubail, Iharilalao; Dupuis, Marion; Guerrera, Ida Chiara; Charbit, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. In vivo, this facultative intracellular bacterium survives and replicates mainly in the cytoplasm of infected cells. We have recently identified a genetic locus, designated moxR that is important for stress resistance and intramacrophage survival of F. tularensis. In the present work, we used tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry to identify in vivo interacting partners of three proteins encoded by this locus: the MoxR-like ATPase (FTL_0200), and two proteins containing motifs predicted to be involved in protein–protein interactions, bearing von Willebrand A (FTL_0201) and tetratricopeptide (FTL_0205) motifs. The three proteins were designated here for simplification, MoxR, VWA1, and TPR1, respectively. MoxR interacted with 31 proteins, including various enzymes. VWA1 interacted with fewer proteins, but these included the E2 component of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and TPR1. The protein TPR1 interacted with one hundred proteins, including the E1 and E2 subunits of both oxoglutarate and pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complexes, and their common E3 subunit. Remarkably, chromosomal deletion of either moxR or tpr1 impaired pyruvate dehydrogenase and oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activities, supporting the hypothesis of a functional role for the interaction of MoxR and TPR1 with these complexes. Altogether, this work highlights possible links between stress resistance and metabolism in F. tularensis virulence. PMID:23669032

  12. An acute decrease in TCA cycle intermediates does not affect aerobic energy delivery in contracting rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Kristen D; Baker, David J; Greenhaff, Paul L; Gibala, Martin J

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an acute decrease in muscle TCA cycle intermediates during contraction would compromise aerobic energy delivery. Male Wistar rats were anaesthetized and the gastrocnemius–plantaris–soleus (GPS) muscle complex from one leg was isolated and perfused with a red cell medium containing either saline (Con) or cycloserine (Cyclo; 0.05 mg g−1), an inhibitor of alanine aminotransferase (AAT). After 1 h of perfusion, the GPS muscle was either snap frozen (Con-Rest, n = 11; Cyclo-Rest, n = 9) or stimulated to contract for 10 min (1 Hz, 0.3 ms, 2 V) with blood flow fixed at 30 ml min−1 (100 g)−1 and then snap frozen (Con-Stim, n = 10; Cyclo-Stim, n = 10). Maximal AAT activity was > 80% lower (P < 0.001) in both Cyclo-treated groups (Rest: 0.61 ± 0.02; Stim: 0.63 ± 0.01 mmol (kg wet wt)−1 min−1; mean ± s.e.m.) compared to Con (Rest: 3.56 ± 0.16; Stim: 3.92 ± 0.29). The sum of five measured TCAI (ΣTCAI) was reduced by 23% in Cyclo-Rest versus Con-Rest but this was not different (P = 0.08). However, after 10 min of contraction, the ΣTCAI was 25% lower (P = 0.006) in Cyclo-Stim compared to Con-Stim (1.88 ± 0.15 versus 2.48 ± 0.11 mmol (kg dry wt)−1). Despite the acute decrease in TCAI after Cyclo treatment, the contraction-induced changes in markers of non-oxidative energy provision (phosphocreatine, ATP and lactate) and the decline in tension after 10 min of stimulation were similar compared to Con. These data do not support the hypothesis that the total muscle concentration of TCAI is causally linked to the rate of mitochondrial respiration during contraction. PMID:15802296

  13. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ghneim, Hazem K.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  14. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  15. TCA cycle-mediated generation of ROS is a key mediator for HeR-MRSA survival under β-lactam antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Roberto R; Fernandez, Regina; Paz, Liliana I; Singh, Christopher R; Rosato, Adriana E

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major multidrug resistant pathogen responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. Clinical Hetero-resistant (HeR) MRSA strains, mostly associated with persistent infections, are composed of mixed cell populations that contain organisms with low levels of resistance (hetero-resistant HeR) and those that display high levels of drug resistance (homo-resistant HoR). However, the full understanding of β-lactam-mediated HeR/HoR selection remains to be completed. In previous studies we demonstrated that acquisition of the HoR phenotype during exposure to β-lactam antibiotics depended on two key elements: (1) activation of the SOS response, a conserved regulatory network in bacteria that is induced in response to DNA damage, resulting in increased mutation rates, and (2) adaptive metabolic changes redirecting HeR-MRSA metabolism to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in order to increase the energy supply for cell-wall synthesis. In the present work, we identified that both main mechanistic components are associated through TCA cycle-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which temporally affects DNA integrity and triggers activation of the SOS response resulting in enhanced mutagenesis. The present work brings new insights into a role of ROS generation on the development of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in a model of natural occurrence, emphasizing the cytoprotective role in HeR-MRSA survival mechanism. PMID:24932751

  16. Contribution of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glyoxylate shunt in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to succinic acid production during dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Aslankoohi, Elham; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-07-01

    Succinic acid produced by yeast during bread dough fermentation can significantly affect the rheological properties of the dough. By introducing mutations in the model S288C yeast strain, we show that the oxidative pathway of the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt contribute significantly to succinic acid production during dough fermentation. More specifically, deletion of ACO1 and double deletion of ACO1 and ICL1 resulted in a 36 and 77% decrease in succinic acid levels in fermented dough, respectively. Similarly, double deletion of IDH1 and IDP1 decreased succinic acid production by 85%, while also affecting the fermentation rate. By contrast, double deletion of SDH1 and SDH2 resulted in a two-fold higher succinic acid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Deletion of fumarate reductase activity (FRD1 and OSM1) in the reductive pathway of the TCA cycle did not affect the fermentation rate and succinic acid production. The changes in the levels of succinic acid produced by mutants Δidh1Δidp1 (low level) and Δsdh1Δsdh2 (high level) in fermented dough only resulted in small pH differences, reflecting the buffering capacity of dough at a pH of around 5.1. Moreover, Rheofermentometer analysis using these mutants revealed no difference in maximum dough height and gas retention capacity with the dough prepared with S288C. The impact of the changed succinic acid profile on the organoleptic or antimicrobial properties of bread remains to be demonstrated. PMID:25828707

  17. Increased anaplerosis, TCA cycling, and oxidative phosphorylation in the liver of dairy cows with intensive body fat mobilization during early lactation.

    PubMed

    Schäff, Christine; Börner, Sabina; Hacke, Sandra; Kautzsch, Ulrike; Albrecht, Dirk; Hammon, Harald M; Röntgen, Monika; Kuhla, Björn

    2012-11-01

    The onset of milk production lets mammals experience an enormous energy and nutrient demand. To meet these requirements, high-yielding dairy cows mobilize body fat resulting in an augmented hepatic oxidative metabolism, which has been suggested to signal for depressing hunger after calving. To examine how the extent of fat mobilization influences hepatic oxidative metabolism and thus potentially feed intake, blood and liver samples of 19 Holstein cows were taken throughout the periparturient period. Retrospectively grouped according to high (H) and low (L) liver fat content, H cows showed higher fatty acid but lower amino acid plasma concentrations and lower feed intake than L cows. The hepatic phospho-AMPK/total AMP ratio was not different between groups but decreased after parturition. A 2-DE coupled MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and qRT-PCR studies revealed H cows having lower expressions of major enzymes involved in mitochondrial β-oxidation, urea cycling, and the pentose phosphate pathway but higher expressions of enzymes participating in peroxisomal and endoplasmic fatty acid degradation, pyruvate and TCA cycling, amino acid catabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and oxidative stress defense. These data indicate that increasing lipolysis leads to augmenting nutrient catabolism for anaplerosis and mitochondrial respiration, providing a molecular link between hepatic oxidative processes and feed intake. PMID:23046364

  18. High night temperature strongly impacts TCA cycle, amino acid and polyamine biosynthetic pathways in rice in a sensitivity-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Glaubitz, Ulrike; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K.; Zuther, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the first committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant cultivars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. PMID:26208642

  19. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment and elevated growth temperatures on metabolites in soybean leaflets: evidence for dynamic changes of TCA cycle intermediates.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Soybean (Glycine max [Merr.] L.) was grown in indoor chambers with ambient (38 Pa) and elevated (70 Pa) CO2 and day/night temperature treatments of 28/20, 32/24 and 36/28 °C. We hypothesized that CO2 enrichment would mitigate the deleterious effects of elevated growth temperatures on metabolites in soybean leaflets. Net CO2 assimilation rates increased incrementally with growth temperature and were enhanced up to 24 % on average by CO2 enrichment. Stomatal conductance about doubled from the lowest to highest temperature but this was partially reversed by CO2 enrichment. Metabolites were measured thrice daily and 19 and 28 of 43 total leaf metabolites were altered by the 32/24 and 36/28 °C temperature treatments, respectively, in both CO2 treatments. Polyols, raffinose and GABA increased and 23 nonstructural carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids decreased when the temperature was increased from 28 to 36 °C under ambient CO2. Citrate, aconitate and 2-oxoglutarate decreased over 90 % in the 36/28 °C compared to the 28/20 °C temperature treatment. Temperature-dependent changes of sugars, organic acids and all but three amino acids were almost completely eliminated by CO2 enrichment. The above findings suggested that specific TCA cycle intermediates were highly depleted by heat stress under ambient CO2. Mitigating effects of CO2 enrichment on soybean leaflet metabolites were attributed to altered rates of photosynthesis, photorespiration, dark respiration, the anaplerotic pathway and to possible changes of gene expression. PMID:23716183

  20. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-TCA by the white-rot fungus Phlebia radiata is initiated by a phase I (O-demethylation)-phase II (O-conjugation) reactions system: implications for the chlorine cycle.

    PubMed

    Campoy, Sonia; Alvarez-Rodríguez, María Luisa; Recio, Eliseo; Rumbero, Angel; Coque, Juan-José R

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen species of white-rot fungi tested have been shown to efficiently biodegrade 1 mM 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in liquid cultures. The maximum biodegradation rate (94.5% in 10-day incubations) was exhibited by a Phlebia radiata strain. The enzymes of the ligninolytic complex, laccase, lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and versatile peroxidase (VP) were not able to transform 2,4,6-TCA in in vitro reactions, indicating that the ligninolytic complex was not involved in the initial attack to 2,4,6-TCA. Instead, the first biodegradative steps were carried out by a phase I and phase II reactions system. Phase I reaction consisted on a O-demethylation catalysed by a microsomal cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase to produce 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). Later, in a phase II reaction catalysed by a microsomal UDP-glucosyltransferase, 2,4,6-TCP was detoxified by O-conjugation with D-glucose to produce 2,4,6-TCP-1-O-d-glucoside (TCPG). This compound accumulated in culture supernatants, reaching its maximum concentration between 48 and 72 h of growth. TCPG levels decreased constantly by the end of fermentation, indicating that it was subsequently metabolized. A catalase activity was able to break in vitro the glycosidic link to produce 2,4,6-TCP, whereas ligninolytic enzymes did not have a significant effect on the biotransformation of that compound. Once formed, 2,4,6-TCP was further degraded as detected by a concomitant release of 2.6 mol of chloride ions by 1 mol of initial 2,4,6-TCA, indicating that this compound underwent almost a complete dehalogenation and biodegradation. It was concluded that P. radiata combines two different degradative mechanisms in order to biodegrade 2,4,6-TCA. The significance of the capability of white-rot fungi to O-demethylate chloroanisoles for the global chlorine cycle is discussed. PMID:18783381

  1. Ames Optimized TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Reuther, James J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Configuration design at Ames was carried out with the SYN87-SB (single block) Euler code using a 193 x 49 x 65 C-H grid. The Euler solver is coupled to the constrained (NPSOL) and the unconstrained (QNMDIF) optimization packages. Since the single block grid is able to model only wing-body configurations, the nacelle/diverter effects were included in the optimization process by SYN87's option to superimpose the nacelle/diverter interference pressures on the wing. These interference pressures were calculated using the AIRPLANE code. AIRPLANE is an Euler solver that uses a unstructured tetrahedral mesh and is capable of computations about arbitrary complete configurations. In addition, the buoyancy effects of the nacelle/diverters were also included in the design process by imposing the pressure field obtained during the design process onto the triangulated surfaces of the nacelle/diverter mesh generated by AIRPLANE. The interference pressures and nacelle buoyancy effects are added to the final forces after each flow field calculation. Full details of the (recently enhanced) ghost nacelle capability are given in a related talk. The pseudo nacelle corrections were greatly improved during this design cycle. During the Ref H and Cycle 1 design activities, the nacelles were only translated and pitched. In the cycle 2 design effort the nacelles can translate vertically, and pitch to accommodate the changes in the lower surface geometry. The diverter heights (between their leading and trailing edges) were modified during design as the shape of the lower wing changed, with the drag of the diverter changing accordingly. Both adjoint and finite difference gradients were used during optimization. The adjoint-based gradients were found to give good direction in the design space for configurations near the starting point, but as the design approached a minimum, the finite difference gradients were found to be more accurate. Use of finite difference gradients was limited by the CPU time limit available on the Cray machines. A typical optimization run using finite difference gradients can use only 30 to 40 design variables and one optimization iteration within the 8 hour queue limit for the chosen grid size and convergence level. The efficiency afforded by the adjoint method allowed for 50-120 design variables and 5-10 optimization iterations in the 8 hour queue. Geometric perturbations to the wing and fuselage were made using the Hicks/Henne (HH) shape functions. The HH functions were distributed uniformly along the chords of the wing defining sections and lofted linearly. During single-surface design, constraints on thickness and volume at selected wing stations were imposed. Both fuselage camber and cross-sectional area distributions were permitted to change during design. The major disadvantage to the use of these functions is the inherent surface waviness produced by repeated use of such functions. Many smoothing operations were required following optimization runs to produce a configuration with reasonable smoothness. Wagner functions were also used on the wing sections but were never used on the fuselage. The Wagner functions are a family of increasingly oscillatory functions that have also been used extensively in airfoil design. The leading and trailing edge regions of the wing were designed by use of polynomial and monomial functions respectively. Twist was attempted but was abandoned because of little performance improvement available from changing the baseline twist.

  2. Viscous Design of TCA Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krist, Steven E.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Campbell, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    The goal in this effort is to redesign the baseline TCA configuration for improved performance at both supersonic and transonic cruise. Viscous analyses are conducted with OVERFLOW, a Navier-Stokes code for overset grids, using PEGSUS to compute the interpolations between overset grids. Viscous designs are conducted with OVERDISC, a script which couples OVERFLOW with the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) inverse design method. The successful execution of any computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based aerodynamic design method for complex configurations requires an efficient method for regenerating the computational grids to account for modifications to the configuration shape. The first section of this presentation deals with the automated regridding procedure used to generate overset grids for the fuselage/wing/diverter/nacelle configurations analysed in this effort. The second section outlines the procedures utilized to conduct OVERDISC inverse designs. The third section briefly covers the work conducted by Dick Campbell, in which a dual-point design at Mach 2.4 and 0.9 was attempted using OVERDISC; the initial configuration from which this design effort was started is an early version of the optimized shape for the TCA configuration developed by the Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG), which eventually evolved into the NCV design. The final section presents results from application of the Natural Flow Wing design philosophy to the TCA configuration.

  3. Genome-wide screen identifies Escherichia coli TCA cycle-related mutants with extended chronological lifespan dependent on acetate metabolism and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E.; Longo, Valter D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Single-gene mutants with extended lifespan have been described in several model organisms. We performed a genome-wide screen for long-lived mutants in Escherichia coli which revealed strains lacking TCA cycle-related genes that exhibit longer stationary phase survival and increased resistance to heat stress compared to wild-type. Extended lifespan in the sdhA mutant, lacking subunit A of succinate dehydrogenase, is associated with reduced production of superoxide and increased stress resistance. On the other hand, the longer lifespan of the lipoic acid synthase mutant (lipA) is associated with reduced oxygen consumption and requires the acetate-producing enzyme pyruvate oxidase, as well as acetyl-CoA synthetase, the enzyme that converts extracellular acetate to acetyl-CoA. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA, acting independently of acetate metabolism, is also required for maximum lifespan extension in the lipA and lpdA mutants, indicating that these mutations promote entry into a mode normally associated with a low-oxygen environment. Since analogous changes from respiration to fermentation have been observed in long-lived Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans strains, such metabolic alterations may represent an evolutionarily conserved strategy to extend lifespan. PMID:20707865

  4. Evolution and Functional Implications of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle as Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A.; Quinhones, Carla G.S.; Pereira-Lima, Italo A.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations. PMID:25274566

  5. MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment evaluation and customization for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Cosmo, M.; Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Mico, S.; Vasey, F.

    2015-01-01

    The MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA industry standards are candidate modular electronics platforms for the upgrade of the current generation of high energy physics experiments at CERN. The PH-ESE group at CERN launched an xTCA evaluation project with the aim of performing technical evaluations and providing support for commercially available components. Over the past years, different equipment from different vendors has been acquired and evaluated. This paper summarizes our evaluation results of commercial MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment. Special emphasis is put on the component requirements to be defined in view of future equipment procurement. Customized prototypes developed according to these generic specifications are presented for the first time.

  6. ATCA/μTCA for physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezynski, Tomasz; Larsen, Raymond; Le Du, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    ATCA/μTCA platforms are attractive because of the modern serial link architecture, high availability features and many packaging options. Less-demanding availability applications can be met economically by scaling back speed and redundancy. The ATCA specification was originally targeted for the Telecom industry but has gained recently a much wider user audience. The purpose of this paper is to report on present hardware and software R&D efforts where ATCA and μTCA are planned, already being used or in development using selected examples for accelerator and detectors in the Physics community. It will present also the status of a proposal for physics extensions to ATCA/μTCA specifications to promote inter-operability of laboratory and industry designs for physics.

  7. ATCA/muTCA for Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Jezynski, Tomasz; Larsen, Raymond; Le Du, Patrick; /Lyon, IPN

    2012-06-14

    ATCA/{mu}TCA platforms are attractive because of the modern serial link architecture, high availability features and many packaging options. Less-demanding availability applications can be met economically by scaling back speed and redundancy. The ATCA specification was originally targeted for the Telecom industry but has gained recently a much wider user audience. The purpose of this paper is to report on present hardware and software R and D efforts where ATCA and {mu}TCA are planned, already being used or in development using selected examples for accelerator and detectors in the Physics community. It will present also the status of a proposal for physics extensions to ATCA/{mu}TCA specifications to promote inter-operability of laboratory and industry designs for physics.

  8. Functional Family Therapy: A Life Cycle Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetchler, Joseph L.

    1985-01-01

    Functional family therapy model assesses family behavior from perspectives of interactional process and functional payoffs for the individual family members. Illustrates that functional needs change as a result of development, and that by including a family life cycle perspective in the assessment process, clinicians will get a clearer picture of…

  9. Development of 2dTCA for the Detection of Irregular, Transient BOLD Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Victoria L.; Li, Yong; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporal clustering algorithm (TCA) has been developed in order to detect irregular, transient functional MRI (fMRI) activation signals when the timings of the stimuli are unknown. Unfortunately, such methods are also sensitive to signal changes caused by motion and physiological noise. We have developed a modified TCA technique, 2dTCA, which can detect multiple different timing patterns within a dataset so that signals of interest can be separated from artifacts and those of no interest. The objective of this work was to further develop the 2dTCA methods and evaluate their performance in simulated functional MRI datasets. Comparisons were made with TCA and a freely-distributed independent component analysis algorithm (ICA). We created two different sets of six computer-generated phantoms with one and two different simulated activation time courses present in 10 regions of interest. The phantoms also contained real subject rigid and nonrigid body motion and noise. Sensitivity of detection, defined as the true-positive activation rate at false-positive activation rates varying between 0.0001 and 0.01, was compared between methods. Additionally, specificity of detection of the irregular, transient signal of interest was assessed by comparing the number of signal time courses detected by each algorithm. The results suggest that the increased sensitivity of 2dTCA over TCA in detecting this particular signal of interest is comparable to the detection with ICA, but with fewer other signals detected. A few examples of the successful application of 2dTCA to the localization of interictal activity in preliminary studies of temporal lobe epilepsy are also described. PMID:17290367

  10. PIE Nacelle Flow Analysis and TCA Inlet Flow Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, C. F.; Arslan, Alan; Sundaran, P.; Kim, Suk; Won, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation includes three topics: (1) Analysis of isolated boattail drag; (2) Computation of Technology Concept Airplane (TCA)-installed nacelle effects on aerodynamic performance; and (3) Assessment of TCA inlet flow quality.

  11. MicroTCA and AdvancedTCA equipment evaluation and developments for LHC experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Mendez, J.; Mico, S.; Vasey, F.

    2016-02-01

    The MicroTCA (MTCA) and AdvancedTCA (ATCA) industry standards have been selected as the platform for many of the current and planned upgrades of the off-detector electronic systems of two of the LHC experiments at CERN. We present a status update from an ongoing project to evaluate commercial MTCA and ATCA components with particular emphasis on infrastructure equipment such as shelves and power-supplies. Shelves customized for use in the existing LHC rack infrastructure have been tested, and electrical and cooling measurements and simulations were performed. In-house developments for hardware platform management will also be shown.

  12. The Tribolium castaneum cell line TcA: a new tool kit for cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Kristopher; Jiang, Hongbo; Fu, Jinping; Phillips, Thomas W.; Beeman, Richard W.; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an agriculturally important insect pest that has been widely used as a model organism. Recently, an adherent cell line (BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 or TcA) was developed from late pupae of the red flour beetle. Next generation transcriptome sequencing of TcA cells demonstrated expression of a wide variety of genes associated with specialized functions in chitin metabolism, immune responses and cellular and systemic RNAi pathways. Accordingly, we evaluated the sensitivity of TcA cells to dsRNA to initiate an RNAi response. TcA cells were highly sensitive to minute amounts of dsRNA, with a minimum effective dose of 100 pg/mL resulting in significant suppression of gene expression. We have also developed a plasmid containing two TcA-specific promoters, the promoter from the 40S ribosomal protein subunit (TC006550) and a bi-directional heat shock promoter (TcHS70) from the intergenic space between heat shock proteins 68a and b. These promoters have been employed to provide high levels of either constitutive (TC006550) or inducible (TcHS70) gene expression of the reporter proteins. Our results show that the TcA cell line, with its sensitivity to RNAi and functional TcA-specific promoters, is an invaluable resource for studying basic molecular and physiological questions. PMID:25354547

  13. The Tribolium castaneum cell line TcA: a new tool kit for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Jiang, Hongbo; Fu, Jinping; Phillips, Thomas W; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong

    2014-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is an agriculturally important insect pest that has been widely used as a model organism. Recently, an adherent cell line (BCIRL-TcA-CLG1 or TcA) was developed from late pupae of the red flour beetle. Next generation transcriptome sequencing of TcA cells demonstrated expression of a wide variety of genes associated with specialized functions in chitin metabolism, immune responses and cellular and systemic RNAi pathways. Accordingly, we evaluated the sensitivity of TcA cells to dsRNA to initiate an RNAi response. TcA cells were highly sensitive to minute amounts of dsRNA, with a minimum effective dose of 100 pg/mL resulting in significant suppression of gene expression. We have also developed a plasmid containing two TcA-specific promoters, the promoter from the 40S ribosomal protein subunit (TC006550) and a bi-directional heat shock promoter (TcHS70) from the intergenic space between heat shock proteins 68a and b. These promoters have been employed to provide high levels of either constitutive (TC006550) or inducible (TcHS70) gene expression of the reporter proteins. Our results show that the TcA cell line, with its sensitivity to RNAi and functional TcA-specific promoters, is an invaluable resource for studying basic molecular and physiological questions. PMID:25354547

  14. The TCA Pathway is an Important Player in the Regulatory Network Governing Vibrio alginolyticus Adhesion Under Adversity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lixing; Huang, Li; Yan, Qingpi; Qin, Yingxue; Ma, Ying; Lin, Mao; Xu, Xiaojin; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion is a critical step in the initial stage of Vibrio alginolyticus infection; therefore, it is important to understand the underlying mechanisms governing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus and determine if environmental factors have any effect. A greater understanding of this process may assist in developing preventive measures for reducing infection. In our previous research, we presented the first RNA-seq data from V. alginolyticus cultured under stress conditions that resulted in reduced adhesion. Based on the RNA-seq data, we found that the Tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA pathway) might be closely related to adhesion. Environmental interactions with the TCA pathway might alter adhesion. To validate this, bioinformatics analysis, quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR), RNAi, and in vitro adhesion assays were performed, while V. alginolyticus was treated with various stresses including temperature, pH, salinity, and starvation. The expression of genes involved in the TCA pathway was confirmed by qPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Silencing of these genes was capable of reducing the adhesion ability of V. alginolyticus. Adhesion of V. alginolyticus is influenced substantially by environmental factors and the TCA pathway is sensitive to some environmental stresses, especially changes in pH and starvation. Our results indicated that (1) the TCA pathway plays a key role in V. alginolyticus adhesion: (2) the TCA pathway is sensitive to environmental stresses. PMID:26870007

  15. Efficacy of Modified Jessner's Peel and 20% TCA Versus 20% TCA Peel Alone for the Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Neerja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is a paucity of studies on the use of chemical peels for acne scars among the Asian population. A trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and Jessner's combination chemical peel, originally described by Monheit, is said to be better than a TCA peel alone. Aims: The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of 20% TCA and Jessner's solution versus 20% TCA alone for the treatment of acne scars. Materials and Methods : The patients were divided into two groups of 25 patients each. Chemical peeling was done in both the groups. In Group I, chemical peeling with Jessner's peel followed by 20% TCA was done and in Group II patients chemical peeling with 20% TCA peel alone was done. Results: In Group I (Jessner's peel and 20% TCA), mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 8% cases, moderate improvement in 32% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 60% patients. In Group II (20% TCA), mild improvement of acne scars was seen in 32% cases, moderate improvement in 40% cases and marked improvement of acne scars was seen in 28% patients. But, the difference in improvement of acne scars was not statistically significant in both the groups (P value > 0.05). PMID:25949022

  16. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-19

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems. PMID:26961352

  17. Functional interplay between the cell cycle and cell phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Chiang; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Phillip, Jude M; Khatau, Shyam B; Choi, Jae Min; Dallas, Matthew R; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Sun, Sean X; Lee, Jerry S H; Hodzic, Didier; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-03-01

    Cell cycle distribution of adherent cells is typically assessed using flow cytometry, which precludes the measurements of many cell properties and their cycle phase in the same environment. Here we develop and validate a microscopy system to quantitatively analyze the cell-cycle phase of thousands of adherent cells and their associated cell properties simultaneously. This assay demonstrates that population-averaged cell phenotypes can be written as a linear combination of cell-cycle fractions and phase-dependent phenotypes. By perturbing the cell cycle through inhibition of cell-cycle regulators or changing nuclear morphology by depletion of structural proteins, our results reveal that cell cycle regulators and structural proteins can significantly interfere with each other's prima facie functions. This study introduces a high-throughput method to simultaneously measure the cell cycle and phenotypes at single-cell resolution, which reveals a complex functional interplay between the cell cycle and cell phenotypes. PMID:23319145

  18. The Jessner's + TCA peel: a medium-depth chemical peel.

    PubMed

    Monheit, G D

    1989-09-01

    The Jessner's + TCA peel, a method of chemexfoliation, is a combination of two acidic compounds. It has been found to be an effective peeling procedure that produces a medium-depth peel for photoaging skin, actinic keratoses, and rhytides. PMID:2778184

  19. Combination medium-depth peeling: the Jessner's + TCA peel.

    PubMed

    Monheit, G D

    1996-04-01

    The Jessner's + TCA peel is an enhanced medium-depth peel that is a combination of two acidic compounds. It has been found to be effective as a peeling procedure for moderately photoaging skin, actinic keratoses, and superficial acne scars. PMID:9220726

  20. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  1. Detection of irregular, transient fMRI activity in normal controls using 2dTCA: comparison to event-related analysis using known timing

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Victoria L.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    When events occur spontaneously during the acquisition of a series of images, traditional modeling methods for detecting functional MRI activation detection cannot be employed. The two-dimensional Temporal Clustering Algorithm, 2dTCA, has been shown to accurately detect random, transient activations in computer simulations without the use of known event timings. In this study we applied the 2dTCA technique to detect the timings and spatial locations of sparse, irregular, transient activations of the visual, auditory and motor cortices in 12 normal controls. Experiments with one and two independent types of stimuli were employed. Event-related activation using known timing was compared to event-related activation using 2dTCA detected timing in individuals and across groups. The 2dTCA algorithm detected the activation from all presented stimuli in every subject. When compared to block-design results using a measure of correlation between activation maps, no significant difference was found between the 2dTCA activation maps and the event-related maps using known timing across all subjects. Therefore, 2dTCA has the potential to be an accurate and more practical method for detection of spontaneous, transient events using fMRI. PMID:19294642

  2. Nitrogen cycling in corals: the key to understanding holobiont functioning?

    PubMed

    Rädecker, Nils; Pogoreutz, Claudia; Voolstra, Christian R; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Wild, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Corals are animals that form close mutualistic associations with endosymbiotic photosynthetic algae of the genus Symbiodinium. Together they provide the calcium carbonate framework of coral reef ecosystems. The importance of the microbiome (i.e., bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses) to holobiont functioning has only recently been recognized. Given that growth and density of Symbiodinium within the coral host is highly dependent on nitrogen availability, nitrogen-cycling microbes may be of fundamental importance to the stability of the coral-algae symbiosis and holobiont functioning, in particular under nutrient-enriched and -depleted scenarios. We summarize what is known about nitrogen cycling in corals and conclude that disturbance of microbial nitrogen cycling may be tightly linked to coral bleaching and disease. PMID:25868684

  3. Intellectual Performance as a Function of Repression and Menstrual Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander-Golden, Paula; And Others

    Performance on complex (Space Relations and Verbal Reasoning) and simple (Digit Symbol) tests was investigated as a function of Byrne's Repression-Sensitization (RS) dimension, phase of menstrual cycle and premenstrual-menstrual (PM) symptomatology in a group of females not taking oral contraceptives. Two control groups, consisting of males and…

  4. Multichannel bolometer for radiation measurements on the TCA tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joye, B.; Marmillod, Ph.; Nowak, S.

    1986-10-01

    A multichannel radiation bolometer has been developed for the Tokamak Chauffage Alfvén (TCA) tokamak. It has 16 equally spaced chords that view the plasma through a narrow horizontal slit. Almost an entire vertical plasma cross section can be observed. The bolometer operates on the basis of a semiconducting element which serves as a temperature-dependent resistance. A new electronic circuit has been developed which takes advantage of the semiconductor characteristics of the detector by using feedback techniques. Measurements made with this instrument are discussed.

  5. Renal function and plasma volume following ultramarathon cycling.

    PubMed

    Neumayr, G; Pfister, R; Hoertnagl, H; Mitterbauer, G; Prokop, W; Joannidis, M

    2005-01-01

    In recreational cyclists marathon cycling influences renal function only on a minimal scale. Respective information on extreme ultramarathon cycling in better trained athletes is not available. The objective was to evaluate the renal and haematological effects of ultraendurance cycling in the world's best ultramarathon cyclists. Creatinine (CR), urea, haemoglobin (Hb), haematocrit (Hct) and plasma volume (PV) were investigated in 16 male ultramarathon cyclists during the 1st Race Across the Alps in 2001 (distance: 525 km; cumulative altitude difference: 12,600 m). All renal functional parameters were normal pre-exercise. During the race serum CR, urea and uric acid rose significantly by 33, 97 % and 18 % (p <0.001 respectively) and nearly normalised again on the following day. The decline in calculated CR clearance was 25 %. There was a negative correlation (r=- 0.575, p=0.02) between the rise in serum CR and the athlete's training kilometers. The serum urea/CR ratio rose above 40 in 12 athletes (75 %). Mean fractional sodium excretion and fractional uric acid excretion fell below 0.5 % (p <0.001) and 7 %, indicating reduced renal perfusion. The deflection of the renal functional parameters was temporary and nearly gone after 24 hours of recovery. Hct declined during the race from 0.44 to 0.42, and continued falling on the next day (0.42 --> 0.40; p <0.001). The corresponding rises in calculated PV were + 8 % and + 22 %. The study affirms that in world class cyclists the enormous strains of ultramarathon cycling influence renal function only on a minimal scale. The impact on the PV, however, is pronounced leading to marked haemodilution post-exercise. This very temporary "impairment of renal function" seems to be the physiological response to ultramarathon cycling and may be attenuated to some extent by preceding high-volume training. PMID:15643528

  6. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction. PMID:26895788

  7. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-03-17

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: "What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?" Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when (13)C-glucose, (13)C-malate, or (13)C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function. PMID:25646482

  8. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Daloso, Danilo M.; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B.; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: “What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?” Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when 13C-glucose, 13C-malate, or 13C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function. PMID:25646482

  9. Development of an isokinetic functional electrical stimulation cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Fornusek, Ché; Davis, Glen M; Sinclair, Peter J; Milthorpe, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    An isokinetic functional electrical stimulation leg cycle ergometer (iFES-LCE) was developed for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The iFES-LCE was designed to allow cycle training over a broad range of pedalling cadences (5-60 rev/min) to promote both muscular strength and cardiorespiratory fitness. A commercially available motorized cycle ergometer was integrated with a custom built FES system, a laptop computer, and a specialized chair that restricted lateral leg movements. Sample biomechanical data were collected from an SCI subject performing FES cycling to demonstrate the iFES-LCE's performance characteristics. Calibration of the iFES-LCE system revealed a linear relationship between torque applied to the axle of the motorized ergometer and the braking motor current generated to maintain velocity. Performance data derived from iFES-LCE motor torque agreed closely with similar data collected using strain-gauge instrumented pedals (cross-correlations = 0.93-0.98). The iFES-LCE was shown to work well across a range of pedaling cadences. We conclude that the new iFES-LCE system may offer improved training potential by allowing cycling over a broad range of pedaling cadences, especially low cadence. This device also improves upon the accuracy of other ergometers by adjusting for the passive load of the legs. PMID:22151127

  10. A personal user's view of functional electrical stimulation cycling.

    PubMed

    Fitzwater, Roger

    2002-03-01

    Two years of functional electrical stimulation cycling (FESC) as a researcher and subject have given me an insight into the direction that future FESC should take as well as providing me with significant health benefits and an enjoyable and functional ability to cycle. If FESC is to benefit spinal cord injured persons (SCIPs), researchers must turn their attention to making the activity convenient and enjoyable. What follows is a personal view and will be less scientifically rigorous than other presentations but hopefully still of value. It calls upon my experience as a general medical practitioner with a special interest in the value of exercise, a human powered vehicle enthusiast, an amateur FES researcher, but most importantly, an SCIP and FES cyclist. PMID:11940034

  11. Urea cycle defects and hyperammonemia: effects on functional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Prust, Morgan; Breeden, Andrew; Fricke, Stanley; VanMeter, John

    2012-01-01

    The urea-cycle disorders (UCDs) are a group of congenital enzyme and carrier deficiencies predisposing to hyperammonemia (HA). HA causes changes in the central nervous system (CNS) including alterations of neurotransmitter function, cell volume, and energy deprivation ultimately leading to cerebral edema. Neuropathological findings of UCDs primarily reflect changes in astrocyte morphology. Neurological features accompanying acute HA include changes in behavior and consciousness in the short term, and potential for impairments in memory and executive function as long-term effects. Plasma measures of ammonia and glutamine, although useful for clinical monitoring, prove poor markers of CNS function. Multimodal neuroimaging has potential to investigate impact on cognitive function by interrogating neural networks, connectivity and biochemistry. As neuroimaging methods become increasingly sophisticated, they will play a critical role in clinical monitoring and treatment of metabolic disease. We describe our findings in UCDs; with focus on Ornithine Transcarbamylase deficiency (OTCD) the only X linked UCD. PMID:23149878

  12. Biological catalysis of the hydrological cycle: life's thermodynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelian, K.

    2011-01-01

    Darwinian theory depicts life as being overwhelmingly consumed by a fight for survival in a hostile environment. However, from a thermodynamic perspective, life is a dynamic out of equilibrium process, stabilizing and coevolving in concert with its abiotic environment. The living component of the biosphere on the surface of the Earth of greatest biomass, the plants and cyanobacteria, are involved in the transpiration of a vast amount of water. Transpiration is part of the global water cycle, and it is this cycle that distinguishes Earth from its apparently life barren neighboring planets, Venus and Mars. The dissipation of sunlight into heat by organic molecules in the biosphere and its coupling to the water cycle (as well as other abiotic processes), is by far the greatest entropy producing process occurring on Earth. Life, from this perspective, can be viewed as performing an important thermodynamic function; acting as a dynamic catalyst by aiding irreversible abiotic process such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents to produce entropy. The role of animals in this view is that of unwitting but dedicated servants of the plants and cyanobacteria, helping them to grow and to spread into initially inhospitable areas.

  13. Cell Cycle Regulatory Functions of the KSHV Oncoprotein LANA

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fang; Gan, Jin; Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Cai, Qiliang

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment during infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the primary etiological agent of several human malignancies including Kaposi’s sarcoma, and primary effusion lymphoma, encodes several oncoproteins that deregulate normal physiology of cell cycle machinery to persist with endothelial cells and B cells and subsequently establish a latent infection. During latency, only a small subset of viral proteins is expressed. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is one of the latent antigens shown to be essential for transformation of endothelial cells in vitro. It has been well demonstrated that LANA is critical for the maintenance of latency, episome DNA replication, segregation and gene transcription. In this review, we summarize recent studies and address how LANA functions as an oncoprotein to steer host cell cycle-related events including proliferation and apoptosis by interacting with various cellular and viral factors, and highlight the potential therapeutic strategy of disrupting LANA-dependent signaling as targets in KSHV-associated cancers. PMID:27065950

  14. Corpus luteum function in successful in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Shamma, F N; Penzias, A S; Thatcher, S; DeCherney, A H; Lavy, G

    1992-05-01

    The function of the corpus luteum in early pregnancy has been subject to some controversy. The purpose of our study was to determine the life span of the corpus luteum in early pregnancy after successful GnRH-a/hMG stimulation in IVF-ET. The study consisted of a retrospective analysis of patients after 12 successful singleton intrauterine IVF-ET cycles. Serum samples were obtained during early pregnancy beginning 14 days after hCG administration. The levels of 17 alpha-OHP, hCG, P, and E2 were measured in each sample. A significant negative correlation was noted between 17 alpha-OHP and date from hCG. The x-intercept of the regression line allowed estimation of the life span of the corpus luteum to be 72 +/- 25 days. In conclusion, in GnRH-a/hMG-stimulated IVF-ET cycles that result in a singleton pregnancy, the functional life span of the corpus luteum averages 72 days. PMID:1572481

  15. Vx-770 potentiates CFTR function by promoting decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Jih, Kang-Yang; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2013-03-12

    Vx-770 (Ivacaftor), a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug for clinical application to patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), shifts the paradigm from conventional symptomatic treatments to therapeutics directly tackling the root of the disease: functional defects of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel caused by pathogenic mutations. The underlying mechanism for the action of Vx-770 remains elusive partly because this compound not only increases the activity of wild-type (WT) channels whose gating is primarily controlled by ATP binding/hydrolysis, but also improves the function of G551D-CFTR, a disease-associated mutation that abolishes CFTR's responsiveness to ATP. Here we provide a unified theory to account for this dual effect of Vx-770. We found that Vx-770 enhances spontaneous, ATP-independent activity of WT-CFTR to a similar magnitude as its effects on G551D channels, a result essentially explaining Vx-770's effect on G551D-CFTR. Furthermore, Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR in an [ATP]-dependent manner. This distinct kinetic effect is accountable with a newly proposed CFTR gating model depicting an [ATP]-dependent "reentry" mechanism that allows CFTR shuffling among different open states by undergoing multiple rounds of ATP hydrolysis. We further examined the effect of Vx-770 on R352C-CFTR, a unique mutant that allows direct observation of hydrolysis-triggered gating events. Our data corroborate that Vx-770 increases the open time of WT-CFTR by stabilizing a posthydrolytic open state and thereby fosters decoupling between the gating cycle and ATP hydrolysis cycle. The current study also suggests that this unique mechanism of drug action can be further exploited to develop strategies that enhance the function of CFTR. PMID:23440202

  16. Alteration in auditory function during the ovarian cycle.

    PubMed

    Al-Mana, Deena; Ceranic, Borka; Djahanbakhch, Ovrang; Luxon, Linda M

    2010-09-01

    This study investigates whether physiological variations in ovarian hormones during the ovarian cycle (OC) are associated with changes in auditory function. Sixteen women with normal hearing underwent auditory tests and simultaneous measurements of the hormone levels four times during OC. The auditory tests included recording of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), the medial olivocochlear (MOC) suppression and auditory brainstem responses (ABRs). The OC was defined by oestradiol and progesterone serum levels and menstrual cycle dating. A significant spontaneous OAE frequency shift [F(3,114.6)=15.8, p<0.001], with the greatest shift in the late follicular phase (highest oestrogen levels), was observed. Transient evoked OAE levels showed a consistent tendency in an increase in all frequency bands in the late follicular/early luteal stage and a decrease in the late follicular stage; TEOAE inter-session comparison indicated very small statistical differences. The MOC suppression changed significantly during OC [F(3,33.8)=3.2, p=0.036], with significant inter-session difference, lower in session 2 than in session 1 (p=0.019) and lower in session 4 than in session 1 (p=0.007). The ABR wave V absolute latency changed significantly during OC [F(3,33)=3.3, p=0.03], longer in the late follicular phase. There was also a significant positive correlation of TEOAEs and ABR (wave V latency and III-V interval) and significant negative correlation of MOC suppression with oestradiol levels in the follicular phase. The results of this study reflect very small changes in auditory function during OC, and they are suggestive of an increased hearing sensitivity around the time of ovulation. PMID:20685243

  17. ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF RECYCLE SO2-LIME SLURRY IN TCA (TURBULENT CONTACT ABSORBER) SCRUBBER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of flue gas desulfurization by a turbulent contact absorber (TCA) employing lime slurry, including the development of performance equations for the scrubber-hold tank recycle system. Performance characteristics investigated include pressure...

  18. Development of a cellular biosensor for the detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA).

    PubMed

    Varelas, Vassileios; Sanvicens, Nuria; M-Pilar-Marco; Kintzios, Spiridon

    2011-05-15

    2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) is a microbial metabolite formed from chlorophenols through the activity of several natural fungal strains present on the cork oak bark. TCA is the primary compound responsible for the mousty/mould off-odour known as "cork taint" present in cork stoppers, wine, water and alcoholic beverages. Chromatographic and electrochemical methods are currently used for the determination of TCA, however its detection at low concentrations remains a technical challenge. The aim of this study was the development of a rapid novel biosensor system based on the Bioelectric Recognition Assay (BERA). The sensor measured the electric response of cultured membrane-engineered fibroblast cells suspended in an alginate gel matrix due to the change of their membrane potential in the presence of the analyte. Membrane-engineered cells were prepared by osmotic insertion of 0.5 μg/l of specific TCA antibodies into the membrane of the cells. The BERA-based sensor was able to detect TCA in a few minutes (3-5 min) at extremely low concentrations (10(-1)ppt), thus demonstrating higher sensitivity than the human sensory threshold. In addition, the assay was quite selective against other haloanisoles and halophenols structurally related to or co-occurring with TCA. Finally the sensor was tested against real white wine samples from cork soaks. At this real test, the BERA sensor was able to detect TCA from cork soaks rapidly (3-5 min) at very low concentrations (1.02-12 ng/l), covering the whole range for the detection threshold for wines (1.4-10 ng/l). Therefore, this novel biosensor offers new perspectives for ultra-rapid, ultra-sensitive and low-cost monitoring of TCA presence in cork and wine and possibly also other food commodities. PMID:21482306

  19. Control of gag-pol gene expression in the Candida albicans retrotransposon Tca2

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Elaine M; Nieduszynska, Siân R; Brunton, Fiona K; Gibson, Joanne; Glover, L Anne; Stansfield, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background In the C. albicans retrotransposon Tca2, the gag and pol ORFs are separated by a UGA stop codon, 3' of which is a potential RNA pseudoknot. It is unclear how the Tca2 gag UGA codon is bypassed to allow pol expression. However, in other retroelements, translational readthrough of the gag stop codon can be directed by its flanking sequence, including a 3' pseudoknot. Results The hypothesis was tested that in Tca2, gag stop codon flanking sequences direct translational readthrough and synthesis of a gag-pol fusion protein. Sequence from the Tca2 gag-UGA-pol junction (300 nt) was inserted between fused lacZ and luciferase (luc) genes in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae dual reporter construct. Although downstream of UGA, luc was expressed, but its expression was unaffected by inserting additional stop codons at the 3' end of lacZ. Luc expression was instead being driven by a previously unknown minor promoter activity within the gag-pol junction region. Evidence together indicated that junction sequence alone cannot direct UGA readthrough. Using reporter genes in C. albicans, the activities of this gag-pol junction promoter and the Tca2 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter were compared. Of the two promoters, only the LTR promoter was induced by heat-shock, which also triggers retrotransposition. Tca2 pol protein, epitope-tagged in C. albicans to allow detection, was also heat-shock induced, indicating that pol proteins were expressed from a gag-UGA-pol RNA. Conclusion This is the first demonstration that the LTR promoter directs Tca2 pol protein expression, and that pol proteins are translated from a gag-pol RNA, which thus requires a mechanism for stop codon bypass. However, in contrast to most other retroelement and viral readthrough signals, immediate gag UGA-flanking sequences were insufficient to direct stop readthrough in S. cerevisiae, indicating non-canonical mechanisms direct gag UGA bypass in Tca2. PMID:17961216

  20. High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facilty

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Park

    2006-12-01

    High-Level Functional & Operational Requirements for the AFCF -This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy.

  1. Quantum chemical study, spectroscopic investigations, NBO and HOMO-LUMO analyses of 3-aminoquinoline (3AQ) and [Ag(3AQ)2(TCA)] complex (TCA = Trichloroacetate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Saied M.; Kassem, Taher S.; Badr, Ahmed M. A.; Abu Youssef, Morsy A.; Assem, Rania

    2014-09-01

    The new [Ag(3AQ)2(TCA)]; (3AQ = 3-aminoquinoline and TCA = Trichloroacetate) complex is synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, FTIR, NMR and mass spectroscopy. The molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) 1H chemical shift values of the free and coordinated 3AQ in the ground state have been calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method. The TD-DFT results of the [Ag(3AQ)2(TCA)] complex showed a π-π* transition band at 240.3-242.6 nm (f = 0.1334-0.1348) which has longer wavelength and lower absorption intensity than that for the free 3AQ (233.2 nm, f = 0.3958). Dipole moment, polarizability and HOMO-LUMO gap values predicted better nonlinear optical properties (NLO) for the [Ag(3AQ)2(TCA)] than the 3AQ ligand. NBO analysis has been used to predict the most accurate Lewis structure of the studied molecules. The energies of the different intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) interactions within the studied molecules were estimated using second order perturbation theory.

  2. Cell-cycle-dependent regulation of androgen receptor function.

    PubMed

    Koryakina, Yulia; Knudsen, Karen E; Gioeli, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a critical oncogene in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. In this study, we demonstrate cell-cycle-dependent regulation of AR activity, localization, and phosphorylation. We show that for three AR-target genes, androgen-stimulated AR transactivation is highest during the G1 phase, decreased during S-phase, and abrogated during G2/M. This change in AR transactivation parallels changes in AR localization and phosphorylation. A combination of imaging techniques and quantitative analysis reveals nuclear AR localization during interphase and the exclusion of the majority, but not all, AR from chromatin during mitosis. Flow cytometry analyses using a phospho-S308 AR-specific antibody in asynchronous and chemically enriched G2/M PCa cells revealed ligand-independent induction of S308 phosphorylation in mitosis when CDK1 is activated. Consistent with our flow cytometry data, IP-western blotting revealed an increase in S308 phosphorylation in G2/M, and the results of an in vitro kinase assay indicated that CDK1 was able to phosphorylate the AR on S308. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1 activity resulted in decreased S308 phosphorylation in PCa cells. Importantly, using a combination of anti-total AR and phospho-S308-specific antibodies in immunofluorescence experiments, we showed that the AR is excluded from condensed chromatin in mitotic cells when it was phosphorylated on S308. In summary, we show that the phosphorylation of the AR on S308 by CDK1 during mitosis regulates AR localization and correlates with changes in AR transcriptional activity. These findings have important implications for understanding the function of AR as an oncogene. PMID:25691442

  3. SWATCH: common control SW for the uTCA-based upgraded CMS L1 Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, Jim; Bunkowski, Karol; Cali, Ivan; Ghabrous Larrea, Carlos; Lazaridis, Christos; Thea, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The CMS L1 Trigger electronics are composed of a large number of different cards based on the VMEBus standard. The majority of the system is being replaced to adapt the trigger to the higher collision rates the LHC will deliver after the LS1, the first phase on the CMS upgrade program. As a consequence, the software that controls, monitors and tests the hardware will need to be re-written. The upgraded trigger will consist of a set of general purpose boards of similar technology that follow the TCA specification, thus resulting in a more homogeneous system. A great effort has been made to identify the common firmware blocks and components shared across different cards, regardless of the role they play within the trigger data path. A similar line of work has been followed in order to identify all possible common functionalities in the control software, as well as in the database where the hardware initialisation and configuration data are stored. This will not only increase the homogeneity on the software and database sides, but it will also reduce the manpower needed to accommodate the online SW to the changes on hardware. Due to the fact that the upgrade will take place in different stages, it has been taken into consideration that these new components had to be integrated in the current SW framework. This paper presents the design of the control SW and configuration database for the upgraded L1 Trigger.

  4. Crystal structure and functional analysis of isocitrate lyases from Magnaporthe oryzae and Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Park, Yangshin; Cho, Yerim; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Yin-Won; Rhee, Sangkee

    2016-06-01

    The glyoxylate cycle bypasses a CO2-generating step in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and efficiently assimilates C2 compounds into intermediates that can be used in later steps of the TCA cycle. It plays an essential role in pathogen survival during host infection such that the enzymes involved in this cycle have been suggested as potential drug targets against human pathogens. Isocitrate lyase (ICL) catalyzes the first-step reaction of the glyoxylate cycle, using isocitrate from the TCA cycle as the substrate to produce succinate and glyoxylate. In this study we report the crystal structure of Magnaporthe oryzae ICL in both the ligand-free form and as a complex with Mg(2+), glyoxylate, and glycerol, as well as the structure of the Fusarium graminearum ICL complexed with Mn(2+) and malonate. We also describe the ligand-induced conformational changes in the catalytic loop and C-terminal region, both of which are essential for catalysis. Using various mutant ICLs in an activity assay, we gained insight into the function of residues within the active site. These structural and functional analyses provide detailed information with regard to fungal ICLs. PMID:27016285

  5. Comparative study of 15% TCA peel versus 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Neerja

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chemical peels are the mainstay of a cosmetic practitioner's armamentarium because they can be used to treat some skin disorders and can provide aesthetic benefit. Objectives: To compare 15% TCA peel and 35% glycolic acid peel for the treatment of melasma. Material and Methods: We selected 30 participants of melasma aged between 20 and 50 years from the dermatology outpatient department and treated equal numbers with 15% TCA and 35% glycolic acid. Results: Subjective response as graded by the patient showed good or very good response in 70% participants in the glycolic acid group and 64% in the TCA group. Conclusions: There was statistically insignificant difference in the efficacy between the two groups for the treatment of melasma. PMID:23130283

  6. Metrological characterization of a cycle-ergometer to optimize the cycling induced by functional electrical stimulation on patients with stroke.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Lorenzo; Ferrante, Simona; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Bocciolone, Marco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Molteni, Franco

    2010-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a well established method in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Indeed, a bilateral movement such as cycling induced by FES would be crucial for these patients who had an unilateral motor impairment and had to recover an equivalent use of limbs. The aim of this study was to develop a low-cost meteorologically qualified cycle-ergometer, optimized for patients with stroke. A commercial ergometer was instrumented with resistive strain gauges and was able to provide the torque produced at the right and left crank, independently. The developed system was integrated with a stimulator, obtaining a novel FES cycling device able to control in real-time the movement unbalance. A dynamic calibration of the sensors was performed and a total torque uncertainty was computed. The system was tested on a healthy subject and on a stroke patient. Results demonstrated that the proposed sensors could be successfully used during FES cycling sessions where the maximum torque produced is about 9Nm, an order of magnitude less than the torque produced during voluntary cycling. This FES cycling system will assist in future investigations on stroke rehabilitation by means of FES and in new exercise regimes designed specifically for patients with unilateral impairments. PMID:20171923

  7. Evaluation of a commercial AdvancedTCA board management controller solution (IPMC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J.; Bobillier, V.; Haas, S.; Joos, M.; Vasey, F.

    2016-02-01

    The MicroTCA (MTCA) and AdvancedTCA (ATCA) industry standards have been selected as the hardware platform for the upgrade of the electronic systems of some of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . In this context, the electronics support group for experiments at CERN is running a project to perform technical evaluations of MTCA and ATCA equipment. As part of this activity, a commercial solution for an Intelligent Platform Management Controller (IPMC), an essential component of any ATCA blade design, is being evaluated. We validated the supported IPMC features, checked the interoperability and adapted the reference design for use on an existing ATCA carrier board.

  8. Short term hypothyroidism affects ovarian function in the cycling rat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Rats made hypothyroid with propilthyouracil start showing abnormal cycling on the second cycle after the start of the treatment, with a high proportion of spontaneous pseudopregnancies and reduced fertility. Methods To investigate some of the mechanisms involved in these reproductive abnormalities, hypothyroidism was induced in virgin rats by propilthyouracil (0.1 g/L in the drinking water) and we determined circulating hormones by radioimmunoassay and whole ovary expression of ovarian hormone receptors, growth factors and steroidogenic enzymes using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The study was performed on days 6 to 9 of treatment, corresponding to diestrus I (at 20.00-22.00 h), diestrus II (at 20.00-22.00 h), proestrus and estrus (both at 8.00-10.00 h and 20.00-22.00 h) of the second estrous cycle after beginning propilthyouracil treatment. Another group of rats was mated on day 8 and the treatment continued through the entire pregnancy to evaluate reproductive performance. Results Hypothyroidism increased circulating prolactin and estradiol on estrus 5 to 7-fold and 1.2 to 1.4-fold respectively. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 diminished 60 and 20% respectively on proestrus morning. Hypothyroidism doubled the ovarian mRNA contents of estrogen receptor-beta on proestrus and estrus evenings, cyp19A1 aromatase mRNA on estrus evening and of growth hormone receptor on proestrus evening. Hypothyroidism did not influence ovulation rate or the number of corpora lutea at term, but a diminished number of implantation sites and pups per litter were observed (Hypothyroid: 11.7 +/- 0.8 vs. Control: 13.9 +/- 0.7). Conclusions Short term hypothyroidism alters normal hormone profile in the cycling rat increasing the expression of estrogen receptor-beta and cyp19A1 aromatase on estrus, which in turn may stimulate estradiol and prolactin secretion, favouring corpus luteum survival and the subsequent instauration of pseudopregnancy. PMID:20149258

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development ...

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 24, 2009, the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies an...

  11. PICMG xTCA Standards Extensions for Physics: New Developments & Future Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    After several years of planning and workshop meetings, a decision was reached in late 2008 to organize PICMG xTCA for Physics Technical Subcommittees to extend the ATCA and MTCA telecom standards for enhanced system performance, availability and interoperability for physics controls and applications hardware and software. Since formation in May-June 2009, the Hardware Technical Subcommittee has developed a number of ATCA, ARTM, AMC, MTCA and RTM extensions to be completed in mid-to-late 2010. The Software Technical Subcommittee is developing guidelines to promote interoperability of modules designed by industry and laboratories, in particular focusing on middleware and generic application interfaces such as Standard Process Model, Standard Device Model and Standard Hardware API. The paper describes the prototype design work completed by the lab-industry partners to date, the timeline for hardware releases to PICMG for approval, and the status of the software guidelines roadmap. The paper also briefly summarizes the program of the 4th xTCA for Physics Workshop immediately preceding the RT2010 Conference. he case for developing ATCA and MicroTCA (xTCA) specification extensions for physics has been covered in several previous papers. Briefly, ATCA and MicroTCA is the first all-serial communication platform available to the physics community to support both massively complex accelerator controls and massively large, high bandwidth and throughput experimental data acquisition systems. The major strength of xTCA is its multi-layer highly scalable managed platform architecture designed to achieve the highest possible system availability. Physics research imaging technologies have driven industrial applications in a wide range of medical scanners, for example, and in turn continue to evolve to exponentially higher speeds and resolution through new computer, communications industry and analog-to-digital conversion chip developments. The high availability managed platform is an important new tool for the instrumentation and control systems of these most complex scientific machines and instruments ever invented. Adaptation of the xTCA platforms to physics was undertaken by a collaboration starting in May-June 2009 with the PICMG open specifications industry consortium. The remainder of this paper discusses the results of lab-industry committee work as well as important concomitant prototype developments among participating laboratories and industries.

  12. Evaluation of Functional Electrical Stimulation to Assist Cycling in Four Adolescents with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Ann Tokay; McRae, Calum G. A.; Lee, Samuel C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP) often have difficulty participating in exercise at intensities necessary to improve cardiovascular fitness. Functional electrical stimulation- (FES-) assisted cycling is proposed as a form of exercise for adolescents with CP. The aims of this paper were to adapt methods and assess the feasibility of applying FES cycling technology in adolescents with CP, determine methods of performing cycling tests in adolescents with CP, and evaluate the immediate effects of FES assistance on cycling performance. Materials/Methods. Four participants (12–14 years old; GMFCS levels III-IV) participated in a case-based pilot study of FES-assisted cycling in which bilateral quadriceps muscles were activated using surface electrodes. Cycling cadence, power output, and heart rate were collected. Results. FES-assisted cycling was well tolerated (n = 4) and cases are presented demonstrating increased cadence (2–43 rpm), power output (19–70%), and heart rates (4-5%) and decreased variability (8–13%) in cycling performance when FES was applied, compared to volitional cycling without FES assistance. Some participants (n = 2) required the use of an auxiliary hub motor for assistance. Conclusions. FES-assisted cycling is feasible for individuals with CP and may lead to immediate improvements in cycling performance. Future work will examine the potential for long-term fitness gains using this intervention. PMID:22685479

  13. The functional cycle of visual arrestins in photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Hanson, Susan M.; Song, Xiufeng; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; Gurevich, Eugenia V.

    2011-01-01

    Visual arrestin-1 plays a key role in the rapid and reproducible shutoff of rhodopsin signaling. Its highly selective binding to light-activated phosphorylated rhodopsin is an integral part of the functional perfection of rod photoreceptors. Structure-function studies revealed key elements of the sophisticated molecular mechanism ensuring arrestin-1 selectivity and paved the way to the targeted manipulation of the arrestin-1 molecule to design mutants that can compensate for congenital defects in rhodopsin phosphorylation. Arrestin-1 self-association and light-dependent translocation in photoreceptor cells work together to keep a constant supply of active rhodopsin-binding arrestin-1 monomer in the outer segment. Recent discoveries of arrestin-1 interaction with other signaling proteins suggest that it is a much more versatile signaling regulator than previously thought, affecting the function of the synaptic terminals and rod survival. Elucidation of the fine molecular mechanisms of arrestin-1 interactions with rhodopsin and other binding partners is necessary for the comprehensive understanding of rod function and for devising novel molecular tools and therapeutic approaches to the treatment of visual disorders. PMID:21824527

  14. Impact of Polyphenol Antioxidants on Cycling Performance and Cardiovascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Trinity, Joel D.; Pahnke, Matthew D.; Trombold, Justin R.; Coyle, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    This investigation sought to determine if supplementation with polyphenol antioxidant (PA) improves exercise performance in the heat (31.5 °C, 55% RH) by altering the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to exercise. Twelve endurance trained athletes ingested PA or placebo (PLAC) for 7 days. Consecutive days of exercise testing were performed at the end of the supplementation periods. Cardiovascular and thermoregulatory measures were made during exercise. Performance, as measured by a 10 min time trial (TT) following 50 min of moderate intensity cycling, was not different between treatments (PLAC: 292 ± 33 W and PA: 279 ± 38 W, p = 0.12). Gross efficiency, blood lactate, maximal neuromuscular power, and ratings of perceived exertion were also not different between treatments. Similarly, performance on the second day of testing, as assessed by time to fatigue at maximal oxygen consumption, was not different between treatments (PLAC; 377 ± 117 s vs. PA; 364 ± 128 s, p = 0.61). Cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to exercise were not different between treatments on either day of exercise testing. Polyphenol antioxidant supplementation had no impact on exercise performance and did not alter the cardiovascular or thermoregulatory responses to exercise in the heat. PMID:24667134

  15. FOC Point-Spread Function Monitoring - Cycle 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrzejewski, Robert

    1994-01-01

    This proposal will image a UV standard star in the F/96 mode in order to monitor the point-spread function of the HST-COSTAR-FOC channel. Data will be taken every 5-7 weeks, following a planned COSTAR DOB move to ensure that the FOC keeps pace with desorption. The COSTAR DOB and COSTAR FOC lines can be used as generic SUs to plug in whenever such adjustments are needed (e.g. to compensate for secondary mirror moves).

  16. IPbus: a flexible Ethernet-based control system for xTCA hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabrous Larrea, C.; Harder, K.; Newbold, D.; Sankey, D.; Rose, A.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.

    2015-02-01

    The ATCA and μTCA standards include industry-standard data pathway technologies such as Gigabit Ethernet which can be used for control communication, but no specific hardware control protocol is defined. The IPbus suite of software and firmware implements a reliable high-performance control link for particle physics electronics, and has successfully replaced VME control in several large projects. In this paper, we outline the IPbus control system architecture, and describe recent developments in the reliability, scalability and performance of IPbus systems, carried out in preparation for deployment of μTCA-based CMS upgrades before the LHC 2015 run. We also discuss plans for future development of the IPbus suite.

  17. Uncertainty of Prebiotic Scenarios: The Case of the Non-Enzymatic Reverse Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-01-01

    We consider the hypothesis of the primordial nature of the non-enzymatic reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and describe a modeling approach to quantify the uncertainty of this hypothesis due to the combinatorial aspect of the constituent chemical transformations. Our results suggest that a) rTCA cycle belongs to a degenerate optimum of auto-catalytic cycles, and b) the set of targets for investigations of the origin of the common metabolic core should be significantly extended. PMID:25620471

  18. Non-canonical functions of cell cycle cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Hydbring, Per; Malumbres, Marcos; Sicinski, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    The roles of cyclins and their catalytic partners, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), as core components of the machinery that drives cell cycle progression are well established. Increasing evidence indicates that mammalian cyclins and CDKs also carry out important functions in other cellular processes, such as transcription, DNA damage repair, control of cell death, differentiation, the immune response and metabolism. Some of these non-canonical functions are performed by cyclins or CDKs, independently of their respective cell cycle partners, suggesting that there was a substantial divergence in the functions of these proteins during evolution. PMID:27033256

  19. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral

  20. Menstrual Cycle-Related Changes of Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Fine Motor Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuating sex hormone levels during the menstrual cycle have been shown to affect functional cerebral asymmetries in cognitive domains. These effects seem to result from the neuromodulatory properties of sex hormones and their metabolites on interhemispheric processing. The present study was carried out to investigate whether functional cerebral…

  1. [Paraplegic cycling using functional electrical stimulation. Experimental and model-based study of power output].

    PubMed

    Szecsi, J; Krafczyk, S; Quintern, J; Fiegel, M; Straube, A; Brandt, T

    2004-12-01

    Cycling using functional electrical stimulation offers paraplegics the possibility of muscle and cardiovascular training as well as the chance for independent locomotion. To investigate whether this method might be suitable for a large group of paraplegics, the first German feasibility study of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling with seven paraplegic patients was started at the beginning of 2003. Even at the beginning of the study, and without training, these patients were able to drive distances of 0.5-1.6 km. To stimulate cardiovascular adaptation processes in the case of FES ergometer training or to cover useful distances in the case of FES cycling, a minimum amount of generated mechanical output power is required, which as a rule cannot be achieved yet. In this study, we point out two particular aspects of FES cycling, which impair power output: prolonged fatigue mode and viscous joint friction of the paraplegic FES cyclist. We discuss current possibilities for increasing output power and endurance. PMID:15368054

  2. Effects of Swimming and Cycling Exercise Intervention on Vascular Function in Patients With Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Baker, Jeffrey R; Akkari, Amanda S; Park, Wonil; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Swimming exercise is an ideal and excellent form of exercise for patients with osteoarthritis (OA). However, there is no scientific evidence that regular swimming reduces vascular dysfunction and inflammation and elicits similar benefits compared with land-based exercises such as cycling in terms of reducing vascular dysfunction and inflammation in patients with OA. Forty-eight middle-aged and older patients with OA were randomly assigned to swimming or cycling training groups. Cycling training was included as a non-weight-bearing land-based comparison group. After 12 weeks of supervised exercise training, central arterial stiffness, as determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid artery stiffness, through simultaneous ultrasound and applanation tonometry, decreased significantly after both swimming and cycling training. Vascular endothelial function, as determined by brachial flow-mediated dilation, increased significantly after swimming but not after cycling training. Both swimming and cycling interventions reduced interleukin-6 levels, whereas no changes were observed in other inflammatory markers. In conclusion, these results indicate that regular swimming exercise can exert similar or even superior effects on vascular function and inflammatory markers compared with land-based cycling exercise in patients with OA who often has an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. PMID:26541906

  3. Dwell Time and Surface Parameter Effects on Removal of Silicone Oil From D6ac Steel Using TCA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boothe, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the impact of dwell time, surface roughness, and the surface activation state on 1,1,1-trichloroethane's (TCA's) effectiveness for removing silicone oil from D6ac steel. Silicone-contaminated test articles were washed with TCA solvent, and then the surfaces were analyzed for residue, using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predominant factor affecting the ability to remove the silicone oil was surface roughness.

  4. Animal Models for Studying the In Vivo Functions of Cell Cycle CDKs.

    PubMed

    Risal, Sanjiv; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Cdks (Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdk2) and a mitotic Cdk (Cdk1) are involved in cell cycle progression in mammals. Cyclins, Cdk inhibitors, and phosphorylations (both activating and inhibitory) at different cellular levels tightly modulate the activities of these kinases. Based on the results of biochemical studies, it was long believed that different Cdks functioned at specific stages during cell cycle progression. However, deletion of all three interphase Cdks in mice affected cell cycle entry and progression only in certain specialized cells such as hematopoietic cells, beta cells of the pancreas, pituitary lactotrophs, and cardiomyocytes. These genetic experiments challenged the prevailing biochemical model and established that Cdks function in a cell-specific, but not a stage-specific, manner during cell cycle entry and the progression of mitosis. Recent in vivo studies have further established that Cdk1 is the only Cdk that is both essential and sufficient for driving the resumption of meiosis during mouse oocyte maturation. These genetic studies suggest a minimal-essential cell cycle model in which Cdk1 is the central regulator of cell cycle progression. Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of the interphase Cdks by forming active complexes with A-, B-, E-, and D-type Cyclins in a stepwise manner. Thus, Cdk1 plays an essential role in both mitosis and meiosis in mammals, whereas interphase Cdks are dispensable. PMID:26231715

  5. The Cell-Cycle Arrest and Apoptotic Functions of p53 in Tumor Initiation and Progression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    P53 is a transcription factor highly inducible by many stress signals such as DNA damage, oncogene activation, and nutrient deprivation. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are the most prominent outcomes of p53 activation. Many studies showed that p53 cell-cycle and apoptosis functions are important for preventing tumor development. p53 also regulates many cellular processes including metabolism, antioxidant response, and DNA repair. Emerging evidence suggests that these noncanonical p53 activities may also have potent antitumor effects within certain context. This review focuses on the cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis functions of p53, their roles in tumor suppression, and the regulation of cell fate decision after p53 activation. PMID:26931810

  6. Functional microarray analysis of nitrogen and carbon cycling genes across an Antarctic latitudinal transect.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Kang, Sanghoon; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong; Kowalchuk, George A

    2007-06-01

    Soil-borne microbial communities were examined via a functional gene microarray approach across a southern polar latitudinal gradient to gain insight into the environmental factors steering soil N- and C-cycling in terrestrial Antarctic ecosystems. The abundance and diversity of functional gene families were studied for soil-borne microbial communities inhabiting a range of environments from 51 degrees S (cool temperate-Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (cold rock desert-Coal Nunatak). The recently designed functional gene array used contains 24,243 oligonucleotide probes and covers >10,000 genes in >150 functional groups involved in nitrogen, carbon, sulfur and phosphorus cycling, metal reduction and resistance and organic contaminant degradation (He et al. 2007). The detected N- and C-cycle genes were significantly different across different sampling locations and vegetation types. A number of significant trends were observed regarding the distribution of key gene families across the environments examined. For example, the relative detection of cellulose degradation genes was correlated with temperature, and microbial C-fixation genes were more present in plots principally lacking vegetation. With respect to the N-cycle, denitrification genes were linked to higher soil temperatures, and N2-fixation genes were linked to plots mainly vegetated by lichens. These microarray-based results were confirmed for a number of gene families using specific real-time PCR, enzymatic assays and process rate measurements. The results presented demonstrate the utility of an integrated functional gene microarray approach in detecting shifts in functional community properties in environmental samples and provide insight into the forces driving important processes of terrestrial Antarctic nutrient cycling. PMID:18043626

  7. Menstrual cycle influence on cognitive function and emotion processing—from a reproductive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Gingnell, Malin

    2014-01-01

    The menstrual cycle has attracted research interest ever since the 1930s. For many researchers the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. Over the past years methodological improvements in menstrual cycle studies have been noted, and this review summarizes the findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies in healthy women. Whereas the predominant hypotheses of the cognitive field state that sexually dimorphic cognitive skills that favor men are improved during menstrual cycle phases with low estrogen and that cognitive skills that favor women are improved during cycle phases with increased estrogen and/or progesterone, this review has not found sufficient evidence to support any of these hypotheses. Mental rotation has gained specific interest in this aspect, but a meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference in error rate of 1.61 (95% CI −0.35 to 3.57), suggesting, at present, no favor of an early follicular phase improvement in mental rotation performance. Besides the sexually dimorphic cognitive skills, studies exploring menstrual cycle effects on tasks that probe prefrontal cortex function, for instance verbal or spatial working memory, have also been reviewed. While studies thus far are few, results at hand suggest improved performance at times of high estradiol levels. Menstrual cycle studies on emotional processing, on the other hand, tap into the emotional disorders of the luteal phase, and may be of relevance for women with premenstrual disorders. Although evidence at present is limited, it is suggested that emotion recognition, consolidation of emotional memories, and fear extinction is modulated by the menstrual cycle in women. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, several studies report changes in brain reactivity across the menstrual cycle, most notably increased amygdala reactivity in the luteal phase. Thus, to the extent that behavioral changes have been demonstrated over the course of the menstrual cycle, the best evidence suggests that differences in sexually dimorphic tasks are small and difficult to replicate. However, emotion-related changes are more consistently found, and are better associated with progesterone than with estradiol such that high progesterone levels are associated with increased amygdala reactivity and increased emotional memory. PMID:25505380

  8. Functional cellular analyses reveal energy metabolism defect and mitochondrial DNA depletion in a case of mitochondrial aconitase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Roa; Barca, Emanuele; Masand, Ruchi; Donti, Taraka R; Naini, Ali; De Vivo, Darryl C; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hanchard, Neil A; Graham, Brett H

    2016-05-01

    Defects in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) are associated with a spectrum of neurological phenotypes that are often difficult to diagnose and manage. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) led to a rapid expansion of diagnostic capabilities in such disorders and facilitated a better understanding of disease pathogenesis, although functional characterization remains a bottleneck to the interpretation of potential pathological variants. We report a 2-year-old boy of Afro-Caribbean ancestry, who presented with neuromuscular symptoms without significant abnormalities on routine diagnostic evaluation. WES revealed compound heterozygous missense variants of uncertain significance in mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2), which encodes the TCA enzyme ACO2. Pathogenic variants in ACO2 have been described in a handful of families as the cause of infantile cerebellar-retinal degeneration syndrome. Using biochemical and cellular assays in patient fibroblasts, we found that ACO2 expression was quantitatively normal, but ACO2 enzyme activity was <20% of that observed in control cells. We also observed a deficiency in cellular respiration and, for the first time, demonstrate evidence of mitochondrial DNA depletion and altered expression of some TCA components and electron transport chain subunits. The observed cellular defects were completely restored with ACO2 gene rescue. Our findings demonstrate the pathogenicity of two VUS in ACO2, provide novel mechanistic insights to TCA disturbances in ACO2 deficiency, and implicate mitochondrial DNA depletion in the pathogenesis of this recently described disorder. PMID:26992325

  9. CHLORINATION BY-PRODUCTS IN DRINKING WATER AND MENSTRUAL CYCLE FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination by-Products in Drinking Water and Menstrual Cycle Function

    Gayle C. Windham1, Kirsten Waller2, Meredith Anderson2, Laura Fenster1, Pauline Mendola3, Shanna Swan4

    1California Department of Health Services, Division of Environmental and Occupational Disea...

  10. Simultaneous determination of tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Cooper, Arthur J L; Isakova, Elena P; Deryabina, Yulia I; Beal, M Flint; Krasnikov, Boris F

    2016-06-15

    Here we describe a simple high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure for the simultaneous detection and quantitation in standard solutions of 13 important metabolites of cellular energy metabolism, including 9 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle components and 4 additional metabolites. The metabolites are detected by their absorbance at 210 nm. The procedure does not require prior derivatization, and an analysis can be carried out at ambient temperature within 15 min. The significance of the current work is that the current HPLC procedure should motivate the development of simplified TCA cycle enzyme assays, isotopomer analysis, and determination of selected TCA metabolite levels in plasma/tissues. PMID:27001310

  11. The effect of physical activity across the menstrual cycle on reproductive function

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Katherine A.; Vladutiu, Catherine J.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Schliep, Karen C.; Perkins, Neil J.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between physical activity (PA) across the menstrual cycle and reproductive function. Methods The BioCycle Study (2005–2007) followed 259, healthy premenopausal women not using hormonal contraceptives for up to two menstrual cycles (N=509 cycles). Serum leptin, estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and testosterone were measured five to eight times per cycle. Linear mixed models were used to estimate the effect of past-week PA (measured four times during each cycle) on hormone levels. Past-week PA was categorized into tertiles based on metabolic equivalent [MET]-h/week (cut-points were 15.3 and 35.7). Risk ratios for sporadic anovulation were estimated using generalized linear models. Analyses adjusted for habitual PA (assessed at baseline), body mass index, race, age, and perceived stress. Linear mixed models used inverse probability weights to control for concurrent reproductive hormones and caloric intake. Results High past-week PA was inversely associated with leptin (−6.6%, 95% confidence interval [−10.6, −2.5]) and luteal phase progesterone (−22.1% [−36.2, −4.7]) as compared with low past-week PA. High past-week PA was not significantly associated with sporadic anovulation (adjusted risk ratio=1.5 [0.6, 3.4]). Conclusions High levels of PA were modestly associated with changes in select hormones, but not sporadic anovulation among moderate to highly active premenopausal women. PMID:24345590

  12. Po2 cycling protects diaphragm function during reoxygenation via ROS, Akt, ERK, and mitochondrial channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Pannell, Benjamin K; Re, Anthony T; Best, Thomas M; Wagner, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    Po2 cycling, often referred to as intermittent hypoxia, involves exposing tissues to brief cycles of low oxygen environments immediately followed by hyperoxic conditions. After experiencing long-term hypoxia, muscle can be damaged during the subsequent reintroduction of oxygen, which leads to muscle dysfunction via reperfusion injury. The protective effect and mechanism behind Po2 cycling in skeletal muscle during reoxygenation have yet to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that Po2 cycling effectively increases muscle fatigue resistance through reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and certain mitochondrial channels during reoxygenation. Using a dihydrofluorescein fluorescent probe, we detected the production of ROS in mouse diaphragmatic skeletal muscle in real time under confocal microscopy. Muscles treated with Po2 cycling displayed significantly attenuated ROS levels (n = 5; P < 0.001) as well as enhanced force generation compared with controls during reperfusion (n = 7; P < 0.05). We also used inhibitors for signaling molecules or membrane channels such as ROS, Akt, ERK, as well as chemical stimulators to close mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) or open mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). All these blockers or stimulators abolished improved muscle function with Po2 cycling treatment. This current investigation has discovered a correlation between KATP and mPTP and the Po2 cycling pathway in diaphragmatic skeletal muscle. Thus we have identified a unique signaling pathway that may involve ROS, Akt, ERK, and mitochondrial channels responsible for Po2 cycling protection during reoxygenation conditions in the diaphragm. PMID:26423578

  13. Multiple functions of p21 in cell cycle, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Karimian, Ansar; Ahmadi, Yasin; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-06-01

    An appropriate control over cell cycle progression depends on many factors. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 (also known as p21(WAF1/Cip1)) is one of these factors that promote cell cycle arrest in response to a variety of stimuli. The inhibitory effect of P21 on cell cycle progression correlates with its nuclear localization. P21 can be induced by both p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. Some other important functions attributed to p21 include transcriptional regulation, modulation or inhibition of apoptosis. These functions are largely dependent on direct p21/protein interactions and also on p21 subcellular localizations. In addition, p21 can play a role in DNA repair by interacting with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In this review, we will focus on the multiple functions of p21 in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and gene transcription after DNA damage and briefly discuss the pathways and factors that have critical roles in p21 expression and activity. PMID:27156098

  14. Structural rearrangement of ebola virus VP40 begets multiple functions in the virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Noda, Takeshi; Abelson, Dafna M; Halfmann, Peter; Wood, Malcolm R; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2013-08-15

    Proteins, particularly viral proteins, can be multifunctional, but the mechanisms behind multifunctionality are not fully understood. Here, we illustrate through multiple crystal structures, biochemistry, and cellular microscopy that VP40 rearranges into different structures, each with a distinct function required for the ebolavirus life cycle. A butterfly-shaped VP40 dimer traffics to the cellular membrane. Once there, electrostatic interactions trigger rearrangement of the polypeptide into a linear hexamer. These hexamers construct a multilayered, filamentous matrix structure that is critical for budding and resembles tomograms of authentic virions. A third structure of VP40, formed by a different rearrangement, is not involved in virus assembly but instead uniquely binds RNA to regulate viral transcription inside infected cells. These results provide a functional model for ebolavirus matrix assembly and the other roles of VP40 in the virus life cycle and demonstrate how a single wild-type, unmodified polypeptide can assemble into different structures for different functions. PMID:23953110

  15. Regulation of Id3 cell cycle function by Cdk-2-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Deed, R W; Hara, E; Atherton, G T; Peters, G; Norton, J D

    1997-01-01

    The functions of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors in activating differentiation-linked gene expression and in inducing G1 cell cycle arrest are negatively regulated by members of the Id family of HLH proteins. These bHLH antagonists are induced during a mitogenic signalling response, and they function by sequestering their bHLH targets in inactive heterodimers that are unable to bind to specific gene regulatory (E box) sequences. Recently, cyclin E-Cdk2- and cyclin A-Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation of a single conserved serine residue (Ser5) in Id2 has been shown to occur during late G1-to-S phase transition of the cell cycle, and this neutralizes the function of Id2 in abrogating E-box-dependent bHLH homo- or heterodimer complex formation in vitro (E. Hara, M. Hall, and G. Peters, EMBO J. 16:332-342, 1997). We now show that an analogous cell-cycle-regulated phosphorylation of Id3 alters the specificity of Id3 for abrogating both E-box-dependent bHLH homo- or heterodimer complex formation in vitro and E-box-dependent reporter gene function in vivo. Furthermore, compared with wild-type Id3, an Id3 Asp5 mutant (mimicking phosphorylation) is unable to promote cell cycle S phase entry in transfected fibroblasts, whereas an Id3 Ala5 mutant (ablating phosphorylation) displays an activity significantly greater than that of wild-type Id3 protein. Cdk2-dependent phosphorylation therefore provides a switch during late G1-to-S phase that both nullifies an early G1 cell cycle regulatory function of Id3 and modulates its target bHLH specificity. These data also demonstrate that the ability of Id3 to promote cell cycle S phase entry is not simply a function of its ability to modulate bHLH heterodimer-dependent gene expression and establish a biologically important mechanism through which Cdk2 and Id-bHLH functions are integrated in the coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:9372912

  16. Structural and functional insights into enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

    PubMed

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins require carboxylation of certain glutamates for their biological functions. The enzymes involved in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation include: gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) and an as-yet-unidentified vitamin K reductase (VKR). Due to the hydrophobicity of vitamin K, these enzymes are likely to be integral membrane proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, structure-function studies on these enzymes have been challenging, and some of the results are notably controversial. Patients with naturally occurring mutations in these enzymes, who mainly exhibit bleeding disorders or are resistant to oral anticoagulant treatment, provide valuable information for the functional study of the vitamin K cycle enzymes. In this review, we discuss: (i) the discovery of the enzymatic activities and gene identifications of the vitamin K cycle enzymes; (ii) the identification of their functionally important regions and their active site residues; (iii) the membrane topology studies of GGCX and VKOR; and (iv) the controversial issues regarding the structure and function studies of these enzymes, particularly, the membrane topology, the role of the conserved cysteines and the mechanism of active site regeneration of VKOR. We also discuss the possibility that a paralogous protein of VKOR, VKOR-like 1 (VKORL1), is involved in the vitamin K cycle, and the importance of and possible approaches for identifying the unknown VKR. Overall, we describe the accomplishments and the remaining questions in regard to the structure and function studies of the enzymes in the vitamin K cycle. PMID:26663892

  17. Spur gears: Optimal geometry, methods for generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this report include the following: (1) development of optimal geometry for crowned spur gears; (2) methods for their generation; and (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact on the crowned spur gears. The method developed for synthesis is used for the determination of the optimal geometry for crowned pinion surface and is directed to reduce the sensitivity of the gears to misalignment, localize the bearing contact, and guarantee the favorable shape and low level of the transmission errors. A new method for the generation of the crowned pinion surface has been proposed. This method is based on application of the tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The crowned pinion surface can also be generated by a generating plane whose motion is provided by an automatic grinding machine controlled by a computer. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined.

  18. Topology of modified helical gears and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1989-01-01

    The contents of this report covers: (1) development of optimal geometries for crowned helical gears; (2) a method for their generation; (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact of the crowned helical gears; and (4) modelling and simulation of gear shaft deflection. The developed method for synthesis was used to determine the optimal geometry for a crowned helical pinion surface and was directed to localize the bearing contact and guarantee favorable shape and a low level of transmission errors. Two new methods for generation of the crowned helical pinion surface are proposed. One is based on the application of a tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The other is based on a crowning pinion tooth surface with predesigned transmission errors. The pinion tooth surface can be generated by a computer-controlled automatic grinding machine. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined. The gear shaft deformation was modelled and investigated. It was found that the deflection of gear shafts has the same effect as gear misalignment.

  19. Cycling exercise with functional electrical stimulation improves postural control in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Chang; Hsu, Yung-Chun; Hsueh, Ya-Hsin; Yeh, Chun-Yu

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether short term functional electrical stimulation (FES)-assisted cycling training can affect the postural control of stroke patients, and whether the application of FES can enhance the effect of cycling training. 20 stroke patients were randomly assigned to the FES-cycling group (FES-CG) or the cycling group (CG). Measurements were completed before and immediately after each 20 min training sessions. The measurements included a balance test (to quantify the postural control ability), a Hoffmann's reflex/motor response ratio (H/M ratio) test and a pendulum test (to quantify the muscle tone). In the balance test, some parameters in all directions exhibited significant intervention effects between the FES-CG group and the CG group. The H/M ratios (p=.014; .005, FES-CG and CG respectively) and relaxation index (p=.005; .047, FES-CG and CG respectively) revealed significant difference between FES-CG and CG group. The change ratios of directional control in the forward direction and H/M ratio revealed significant difference (p=.022; .015) between FES-CG and CG among subjects with higher muscle tone. The stroke subjects' postural control was improved while their muscle tone was reduced after the 20 min cycling training program both with and without FES. We conclude that cycling training, with or without FES may reduce spasticity in stroke patients. The application of FES in cycling exercise was shown to be more effective in stroke patients with higher muscle tone. PMID:22153770

  20. Gene expression signatures but not cell cycle checkpoint functions distinguish AT carriers from normal individuals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liwen; Simpson, Dennis A.; Innes, Cynthia L.; Chou, Jeff; Bushel, Pierre R.; Paules, Richard S.; Kaufmann, William K.

    2013-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene (ATM). AT carriers with one mutant ATM allele are usually not severely affected although they carry an increased risk of developing cancer. There has not been an easy and reliable diagnostic method to identify AT carriers. Cell cycle checkpoint functions upon ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA damage and gene expression signatures were analyzed in the current study to test for differential responses in human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different ATM genotypes. While both dose- and time-dependent G1 and G2 checkpoint functions were highly attenuated in ATM?/? cell lines, these functions were preserved in ATM+/? cell lines equivalent to ATM+/+ cell lines. However, gene expression signatures at both baseline (consisting of 203 probes) and post-IR treatment (consisting of 126 probes) were able to distinguish ATM+/? cell lines from ATM+/+ and ATM?/? cell lines. Gene ontology (GO) and pathway analysis of the genes in the baseline signature indicate that ATM function-related categories, DNA metabolism, cell cycle, cell death control, and the p53 signaling pathway, were overrepresented. The same analyses of the genes in the IR-responsive signature revealed that biological categories including response to DNA damage stimulus, p53 signaling, and cell cycle pathways were overrepresented, which again confirmed involvement of ATM functions. The results indicate that AT carriers who have unaffected G1 and G2 checkpoint functions can be distinguished from normal individuals and AT patients by expression signatures of genes related to ATM functions. PMID:23943852

  1. Canard cycles for predator-prey systems with Holling types of functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengzhi; Zhu, Huaiping

    By using the singular perturbation theory developed by Dumortier and Roussarie and recent work of De Maesschalck and Dumortier, we study the canard phenomenon for predator-prey systems with response functions of Holling types. We first develop a formula for computing the slow divergence integrals. By using the formula we prove that for the systems with the response function of Holling types III and IV the cyclicity of any limit periodic set is at most two, that is at most two families of hyperbolic limit cycles or at most one family of limit cycles with multiplicity two can bifurcate from the limit periodic set by small perturbations. We also indicate the regions in parameter space where the corresponding limit periodic set has cyclicity at most one or at most two.

  2. A kinase-independent function of CDK6 links the cell cycle to tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Karoline; Heller, Gerwin; Schneckenleithner, Christine; Warsch, Wolfgang; Scheicher, Ruth; Ott, Rene G; Schäfer, Markus; Fajmann, Sabine; Schlederer, Michaela; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Reichart, Ursula; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Hoeller, Christoph; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Bock, Christoph; Kenner, Lukas; Hoefler, Gerald; Freissmuth, Michael; Green, Anthony R; Moriggl, Richard; Busslinger, Meinrad; Malumbres, Marcos; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-08-12

    In contrast to its close homolog CDK4, the cell cycle kinase CDK6 is expressed at high levels in lymphoid malignancies. In a model for p185BCR-ABL+ B-acute lymphoid leukemia, we show that CDK6 is part of a transcription complex that induces the expression of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a and the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF-A. This function is independent of CDK6's kinase activity. High CDK6 expression thus suppresses proliferation by upregulating p16INK4a, providing an internal safeguard. However, in the absence of p16INK4a, CDK6 can exert its full tumor-promoting function by enhancing proliferation and stimulating angiogenesis. The finding that CDK6 connects cell-cycle progression to angiogenesis confirms CDK6's central role in hematopoietic malignancies and could underlie the selection pressure to upregulate CDK6 and silence p16INK4a. PMID:23948297

  3. Functional profiles of orphan membrane transporters in the life cycle of the malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Kenthirapalan, Sanketha; Waters, Andrew P.; Matuschewski, Kai; Kooij, Taco W. A.

    2016-01-01

    Assigning function to orphan membrane transport proteins and prioritizing candidates for detailed biochemical characterization remain fundamental challenges and are particularly important for medically relevant pathogens, such as malaria parasites. Here we present a comprehensive genetic analysis of 35 orphan transport proteins of Plasmodium berghei during its life cycle in mice and Anopheles mosquitoes. Six genes, including four candidate aminophospholipid transporters, are refractory to gene deletion, indicative of essential functions. We generate and phenotypically characterize 29 mutant strains with deletions of individual transporter genes. Whereas seven genes appear to be dispensable under the experimental conditions tested, deletion of any of the 22 other genes leads to specific defects in life cycle progression in vivo and/or host transition. Our study provides growing support for a potential link between heavy metal homeostasis and host switching and reveals potential targets for rational design of new intervention strategies against malaria. PMID:26796412

  4. Fresh insight to functioning of selected enzymes of the nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Eady, Robert R; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Hasnain, S Samar

    2016-04-01

    The global nitrogen cycle is the process in which different forms of environmental N are interconverted by microorganisms either for assimilation into biomass or in respiratory energy-generating pathways. This short review highlights developments over the last 5 years in our understanding of functionality of nitrogenase, Cu-nitrite reductase, NO reductase and N2O reductase, complex metalloenzymes that catalyze electron/proton-coupled substrate reduction reactions. PMID:26963700

  5. Integrative Functional Genomics of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Identifies Host Dependencies in Complete Viral Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qisheng; Zhang, Yong-Yuan; Chiu, Stephan; Hu, Zongyi; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Cha, Helen; Sodroski, Catherine; Zhang, Fang; Hsu, Ching-Sheng; Thomas, Emmanuel; Liang, T. Jake

    2014-01-01

    Recent functional genomics studies including genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) exploits an extensive network of host factors for productive infection and propagation. How these co-opted host functions interact with various steps of HCV replication cycle and exert pro- or antiviral effects on HCV infection remains largely undefined. Here we present an unbiased and systematic strategy to functionally interrogate HCV host dependencies uncovered from our previous infectious HCV (HCVcc) siRNA screen. Applying functional genomics approaches and various in vitro HCV model systems, including HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp), single-cycle infectious particles (HCVsc), subgenomic replicons, and HCV cell culture systems (HCVcc), we identified and characterized novel host factors or pathways required for each individual step of the HCV replication cycle. Particularly, we uncovered multiple HCV entry factors, including E-cadherin, choline kinase α, NADPH oxidase CYBA, Rho GTPase RAC1 and SMAD family member 6. We also demonstrated that guanine nucleotide binding protein GNB2L1, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2J1, and 39 other host factors are required for HCV RNA replication, while the deubiquitinating enzyme USP11 and multiple other cellular genes are specifically involved in HCV IRES-mediated translation. Families of antiviral factors that target HCV replication or translation were also identified. In addition, various virologic assays validated that 66 host factors are involved in HCV assembly or secretion. These genes included insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a proviral factor, and N-Myc down regulated Gene 1 (NDRG1), an antiviral factor. Bioinformatics meta-analyses of our results integrated with literature mining of previously published HCV host factors allows the construction of an extensive roadmap of cellular networks and pathways involved in the complete HCV replication cycle. This comprehensive study of HCV host dependencies yields novel insights into viral infection, pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24852294

  6. Differential Editosome Protein Function between Life Cycle Stages of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Guo, Xuemin; Carnes, Jason; Stuart, Kenneth

    2015-10-01

    Uridine insertion and deletion RNA editing generates functional mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei. The mRNAs are differentially edited in bloodstream form (BF) and procyclic form (PF) life cycle stages, and this correlates with the differential utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation between the stages. The mechanism that controls this differential editing is unknown. Editing is catalyzed by multiprotein ∼20S editosomes that contain endonuclease, 3'-terminal uridylyltransferase, exonuclease, and ligase activities. These editosomes also contain KREPB5 and KREPA3 proteins, which have no functional catalytic motifs, but they are essential for parasite viability, editing, and editosome integrity in BF cells. We show here that repression of KREPB5 or KREPA3 is also lethal in PF, but the effects on editosome structure differ from those in BF. In addition, we found that point mutations in KREPB5 or KREPA3 differentially affect cell growth, editosome integrity, and RNA editing between BF and PF stages. These results indicate that the functions of KREPB5 and KREPA3 editosome proteins are adjusted between the life cycle stages. This implies that these proteins are involved in the processes that control differential editing and that the 20S editosomes differ between the life cycle stages. PMID:26304125

  7. Functional unit, technological dynamics, and scaling properties for the life cycle energy of residences.

    PubMed

    Frijia, Stephane; Guhathakurta, Subhrajit; Williams, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Prior LCA studies take the operational phase to include all energy use within a residence, implying a functional unit of all household activities, but then exclude related supply chains such as production of food, appliances, and household chemicals. We argue that bounding the functional unit to provision of a climate controlled space better focuses the LCA on the building, rather than activities that occur within a building. The second issue explored in this article is how technological change in the operational phase affects life cycle energy. Heating and cooling equipment is replaced at least several times over the lifetime of a residence; improved efficiency of newer equipment affects life cycle energy use. The third objective is to construct parametric models to describe LCA results for a family of related products. We explore these three issues through a case study of energy use of residences: one-story and two-story detached homes, 1,500-3,500 square feet in area, located in Phoenix, Arizona, built in 2002 and retired in 2051. With a restricted functional unit and accounting for technological progress, approximately 30% of a building's life cycle energy can be attributed to materials and construction, compared to 0.4-11% in previous studies. PMID:22192002

  8. Influence of menstrual cycle phase on pulmonary function in asthmatic athletes.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kristin I; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Ray, Shahla; Lindley, Martin R; Koceja, David M; Stager, Joel M

    2006-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between menstrual cycle phase and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in female athletes with mild atopic asthma. Seven eumenorrheic subjects with regular 28-day menstrual cycles were exercised to volitional exhaustion on day 5 [mid-follicular (FOL)] and day 21 [mid-luteal (LUT)] of their menstrual cycle. Pulmonary function tests were conducted pre- and post-exercise. The maximal percentage decline in post-exercise forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and forced expiratory flow from 25 to 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75%)) was significantly greater (P<0.05) on day 21 (mid-LUT phase) (-17.35+/-2.32 and -26.28+/-6.04%, respectively), when salivary progesterone concentration was highest, compared to day 5 (mid-FOL phase) (-12.81+/-3.35 and -17.23+/-8.20%, respectively), when salivary progesterone concentration was lowest. The deterioration in the severity of EIB during the mid-LUT phase was accompanied by worsening asthma symptoms and increased bronchodilator use. There was a negative correlation between the percent change in pre- to post-exercise FEV(1) and salivary progesterone concentration. However, no such correlation was found between salivary estradiol and the percentage change in pre- to post-exercise FEV(1). This study has shown for the first time that menstrual cycle phase is an important determinant of the severity of EIB in female athletes with mild atopic asthma. Female asthmatic athletes may need to adjust their training and competition schedules to their menstrual cycle and to consider the potential negative effects of the LUT phase of the menstrual cycle on exercise performance. PMID:16450167

  9. Seat Pressure Changes after Eight Weeks of Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pressure ulcers (PUs) are a common secondary condition associated with spinal cord injury (SCI). PUs can potentially interfere with activities of daily living, occupational duties, and rehabilitation programs, and in severe cases they may threaten life. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling has been proposed as an activity that may decrease the risk of PUs through the promotion of increased blood flow and thickening of the gluteus maximus. The purpose of this pilot study was to measure the effects of home-based FES cycling on the average and maximal seat pressure of wheelchair-reliant individuals with SCI. Method: Eight male veterans with C5-T6 SCI participated in FES cycling 3 times per week. Cycling parameters were individualized depending on the comfort of the participants and the amount of current needed to perform the cycling activity. Pressure mapping was completed immediately before and after the 8 weeks of FES cycling with the measurement performed by a force sensitive application (FSA) 4 pressure mapping system. Results: The mean average seat pressure decreased by 3.69 ± 4.46 mm Hg (35.57 ± 11.99 to 31.88 ± 13.02), while the mean maximum seat pressure decreased by 14.56 ±18.45 mm Hg (112 ± 34.73 to 98.36 ± 25.89). Although neither measurement was statistically significant, there was a strong trend toward a reduction in average and maximal seat pressure (P = .052 and P = .061, respectively). Conclusion: The positive trend of decreased seat pressure in our study creates incentive for further investigation of the effects of electrical stimulation activities on seat pressure and the prevention of PUs. PMID:23960706

  10. Four weeks of functional electrical stimulated cycling after spinal cord injury: a clinical cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Daniel; Leichtfried, Veronika; Schobersberger, Wolfgang

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and the effects of functional electrical stimulated cycling (FES cycling) in patients with spinal cord injury during their rehabilitation in a special acute care unit. Thirty patients [10 with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) grade A, three with AIS grade B, 15 with AIS grade C, two with AIS grade D] aged 44±15.5 years and 2 (median) (interquartile range, 1.0-4.25) months after spinal cord injury were included in the study. The patients participated in a 20-min FES-cycling program 2 days per week for 4 weeks during their acute inpatient rehabilitation. The influence on muscle cross-section, muscle and leg circumference, spasticity, and the walking ability parameter (distance, time, aids) was measured. Muscle stimulation intensity and output parameters (pedalling time and distance) were also recorded. Spasticity decreased during hip abduction and adduction (70 and 98.1%, respectively). Spasticity during knee flexion and knee extension decreased by 66.8 and 76.6%, and a decrease was found during dorsal foot extension (67.8%; for all, P<0.05). Presession-postsession comparisons showed that after 4 weeks of FES cycling, an increase in the circumference of the cross-sectional area of 15.3% on the left and of 17% on the right m. rectus femoris could be observed in group AIS A+B. In the AIS C+D group, the circumference of the left m. rectus femoris increased by 25% and that of the right m. rectus femoris by 21% (for all, P<0.05). The results of the study show that FES cycling in combination with function-oriented physiotherapy and occupational therapy can have a positive influence on spasticity, walking ability, and muscular reactivation. It seems to support circulatory processes within the rehabilitation of paraplegics already after a 4-week intervention. PMID:24802976

  11. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) mixture toxicity to the macrophytes Myriophyllum spicatum and Myriophyllum sibiricum in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Sibley, Paul K; Mabury, Scott A; Solomon, Keith R; Muir, Derek C G

    2002-02-21

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) have been detected together in environmental water samples throughout the world. TCA may enter into aquatic systems via rainout as the degradation product of chlorinated solvents, herbicide use, as a by-product of water disinfection and from emissions of spent bleach liquor of kraft pulp mills. Sources of TFA include degradation of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) refrigerants and pesticides. These substances are phytotoxic and widely distributed in aquatic environments. A study to assess the risk of a binary mixture of TCA and TFA to macrophytes in aquatic microcosms was conducted as part of a larger study on haloacetic acids. M. spicatum and M. sibiricum were exposed to 0.1, 1, 3 and 10 mg/l of both TCA and TFA (neutralized with sodium hydroxide) in replicate (n = 3) 12000 l aquatic microcosms for 49 days in an one-way analysis of variance design. Each microcosm was stocked with 14 individual apical shoots per species. The plants were sampled at regular intervals and assessed for the somatic endpoints of plant length, root growth, number of nodes and wet and dry mass and the biochemical endpoints of chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, carotenoid content and citric acid levels. Results indicate that there were statistically significant effects of the TCA/TFA mixture on certain pigment concentrations immediately after the start of exposure (2-7 days), but the plants showed no signs of stress thereafter. These data suggest that TCA/TFA mixtures at environmentally relevant concentrations do not pose a significant risk to these aquatic macrophytes. PMID:11878273

  12. Suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and TCA enzymes in discrete brain regions of mice exposed to high fluoride: amelioration by Panax ginseng (Ginseng) and Lagerstroemia speciosa (Banaba) extracts.

    PubMed

    Mahaboob Basha, P; Saumya, S M

    2013-04-01

    Chronic fluoride intoxication results in pathophysiological complications pertaining to soft tissues, called non-skeletal fluorosis. This study examined whether fluoride-induced alterations in selected parameters that are indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction accompany the toxic effects of fluoride in discrete brain regions in vivo and also explored the possibility of treatment with Ginseng (GE) and Banaba (BLE) either alone or with their co-exposure which is capable of reversing parameters indicative of fluoride-induced impairments in mitochondrial function. Swiss mice, Mus musculus, were given 270 ppm fluoride (600 ppm NaF) in their drinking water for 30 days, while continuing the fluoride exposure, toxicated animals were given differential doses (50-250 mg/kg body wt) of phytoextracts through oral gavage for 2 weeks. Discrete brain regions separated from dissected animals to perform biochemical assessments. Disturbances in mitochondrial enzyme complexes (I-IV) and decrements in TCA enzymes (ICDH, SDH, and aconitase) were noted in discrete brain regions upon F exposure, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, a significant reduction in oxidative stress indices with increased MDA content as well as decrease in reduced glutathione content and increases in catalase and SOD enzyme activity suggests the involvement of severe oxidative stress affecting the mitochondrial function(s). Treatment with either GE or BLE reversed F-induced alterations in augmenting the suppressed complex enzymes followed by TCA enzymes and oxidative stress indices in a dose independent manner. However, the co-exposure of GE and BLE at a dose of 150 mg/kgbw appeared to restore mitochondrial functioning. These results provide in vivo evidence supporting the hypothesis that fluoride induces impairments in mitochondrial function, which can be reversed by treatment with GE and BLE as well their co-exposure at 150 mg/kgbw. PMID:23392579

  13. Citral exerts its antifungal activity against Penicillium digitatum by affecting the mitochondrial morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shiju; Jing, Guoxing; Wang, Xiao; Ouyang, Qiuli; Jia, Lei; Tao, Nengguo

    2015-07-01

    This work investigated the effect of citral on the mitochondrial morphology and function of Penicillium digitatum. Citral at concentrations of 2.0 or 4.0 μL/mL strongly damaged mitochondria of test pathogen by causing the loss of matrix and increase of irregular mitochondria. The deformation extent of the mitochondria of P. digitatum enhanced with increasing concentrations of citral, as evidenced by a decrease in intracellular ATP content and an increase in extracellular ATP content of P. digitatum cells. Oxygen consumption showed that citral resulted in an inhibition in the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) pathway of P. digitatum cells, induced a decrease in activities of citrate synthetase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinodehydrogenase and the content of citric acid, while enhancing the activity of malic dehydrogenase in P. digitatum cells. Our present results indicated that citral could damage the mitochondrial membrane permeability and disrupt the TCA pathway of P. digitatum. PMID:25704686

  14. HESS Opinions "Biological catalysis of the hydrological cycle: life's thermodynamic function"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelian, K.

    2012-08-01

    Darwinian theory depicts life as being overwhelmingly consumed by a fight for survival in a hostile environment. However, from a thermodynamic perspective, life is a dynamic, out of equilibrium process, stabilizing and coevolving in concert with its abiotic environment. The living components of the biosphere on the Earth's surface of greatest biomass, the plants and cyanobacteria, are involved in the transpiration of a vast amount of water. Transpiration is part of the global water cycle, and it is this cycle that distinguishes Earth from its apparently life-barren neighboring planets, Venus and Mars. The dissipation of sunlight into heat by organic molecules in the biosphere, and its coupling to the water cycle (as well as other abiotic processes), is by far the greatest entropy-producing process occurring on Earth. Life, from this perspective, can be viewed as performing an important thermodynamic function, acting as a dynamic catalyst by aiding irreversible abiotic processes such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents to produce entropy. The role of animals in this view is that of unwitting but dedicated servants of the plants and cyanobacteria, helping them to grow, and to spread into initially inhospitable areas.

  15. C4-dicarboxylic acid production by overexpressing the reductive TCA pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Ge, Chengyu; Deng, Li; Tan, Tianwei; Wang, Fang

    2015-05-01

    As C4-dicarboxylic acids could replace C4-petrochemicals, the reductive tricarboxylic acid (TCA) pathway was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris for production of the C4-dicarboxylic acids. Three expression cassettes which carried the pyruvate carboxylase gene (pc), the cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase gene (mdh1) and the retargeted fumarase gene (Tfum) were integrated into the chromosomal DNA of P. pastoris GS115 alone or jointly. Multicopy integrations were screened using quantitative PCR for C4-dicarboxylic acid overaccumulation. The results showed that the highest titer in 96 h of fumaric, malic and succinic acid (0.76, 42.28 and 9.42 g l(-1)) was obtained by co-expression of pc and mdh1 in P. pastoris. This is the first report about multiple genes engineered in P. pastoris for C4-dicarboxylic acid production. The strain Pp-PC-MDH1, moreover, has a significant potential to produce malic acid in aerobic conditions. PMID:25862576

  16. Functional electrical stimulation cycling in youth with spinal cord injury: A review of intervention studies

    PubMed Central

    Mayson, Tanja A.; Harris, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Preliminary research suggests that functional electrical stimulation cycling (FESC) might be a promising intervention for youth with spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective To review the evidence on FESC intervention in youth with SCI. Methods Systematic literature searches were conducted during December 2012. Two reviewers independently selected titles, abstracts, and full-text articles. Of 40 titles retrieved, six intervention studies met inclusion criteria and were assessed using American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Levels of Evidence and Conduct Questions for Group Design. Results The study results were tabulated based on levels of evidence, with outcomes categorized according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health framework. Evidence from the six included studies suggests that FESC is safe for youth with SCI, with no increase in knee/hip injury or hip displacement. Results from one level II randomized controlled trial suggest that a thrice weekly, 6-month FESC program can positively influence VO2 levels when compared with passive cycling, as well as quadriceps strength when compared with electrical stimulation and passive cycling. Conclusions FESC demonstrates limited yet encouraging results as a safe modality to mitigate effects of inactivity in youth with SCI. More rigorous research involving a greater number of participants is needed before clinicians can be confident of its effectiveness. PMID:24621033

  17. Modeling the High Speed Research Cycle 2B Longitudinal Aerodynamic Database Using Multivariate Orthogonal Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, E. A.; Proffitt, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    The data for longitudinal non-dimensional, aerodynamic coefficients in the High Speed Research Cycle 2B aerodynamic database were modeled using polynomial expressions identified with an orthogonal function modeling technique. The discrepancy between the tabular aerodynamic data and the polynomial models was tested and shown to be less than 15 percent for drag, lift, and pitching moment coefficients over the entire flight envelope. Most of this discrepancy was traced to smoothing local measurement noise and to the omission of mass case 5 data in the modeling process. A simulation check case showed that the polynomial models provided a compact and accurate representation of the nonlinear aerodynamic dependencies contained in the HSR Cycle 2B tabular aerodynamic database.

  18. Computational estimation of tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes using noisy NMR data from cardiac biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aerobic energy metabolism of cardiac muscle cells is of major importance for the contractile function of the heart. Because energy metabolism is very heterogeneously distributed in heart tissue, especially during coronary disease, a method to quantify metabolic fluxes in small tissue samples is desirable. Taking tissue biopsies after infusion of substrates labeled with stable carbon isotopes makes this possible in animal experiments. However, the appreciable noise level in NMR spectra of extracted tissue samples makes computational estimation of metabolic fluxes challenging and a good method to define confidence regions was not yet available. Results Here we present a computational analysis method for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites. The method was validated using measurements on extracts of single tissue biopsies taken from porcine heart in vivo. Isotopic enrichment of glutamate was measured by NMR spectroscopy in tissue samples taken at a single time point after the timed infusion of 13C labeled substrates for the TCA cycle. The NMR intensities for glutamate were analyzed with a computational model describing carbon transitions in the TCA cycle and carbon exchange with amino acids. The model dynamics depended on five flux parameters, which were optimized to fit the NMR measurements. To determine confidence regions for the estimated fluxes, we used the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling to generate extensive ensembles of feasible flux combinations that describe the data within measurement precision limits. To validate our method, we compared myocardial oxygen consumption calculated from the TCA cycle flux with in vivo blood gas measurements for 38 hearts under several experimental conditions, e.g. during coronary artery narrowing. Conclusions Despite the appreciable NMR noise level, the oxygen consumption in the tissue samples, estimated from the NMR spectra, correlates with blood-gas oxygen uptake measurements for the whole heart. The MCMC method provides confidence regions for the estimated metabolic fluxes in single cardiac biopsies, taking the quantified measurement noise level and the nonlinear dependencies between parameters fully into account. PMID:23965343

  19. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based extracellular metabolomic analysis of multidrug resistant Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUI; CHEN, JIAO; FENG, YUN; ZHOU, WENJIE; ZHANG, JIHUA; YU, YU; WANG, XIAOQIAN; ZHANG, PING

    2015-01-01

    A major obstacle of successful chemotherapy is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in the cancer cells, which is difficult to reverse. Metabolomic analysis, an emerging approach that has been increasingly applied in various fields, is able to reflect the unique chemical fingerprints of specific cellular processes in an organism. The assessment of such metabolite changes can be used to identify novel therapeutic biomarkers. In the present study, 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyze the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of the Tca8113 oral squamous carcinoma cell line, in which MDR was induced using the carboplatin (CBP) and pingyangmycin (PYM) chemotherapy drugs in vitro. The data were analyzed using the principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) methods. The results demonstrated that the extracellular metabolomic spectrum of metabolites such as glutamate, glycerophosphoethanol amine, α-Glucose and β-Glucose for the drug-induced Tca8113 cells was significantly different from the parental Tca8113 cell line. A number of biochemicals were also significantly different between the groups based on their NMR spectra, with drug-resistant cells presenting relatively higher levels of acetate and lower levels of lactate. In addition, a significantly higher peak was observed at δ 3.35 ppm in the spectrum of the PYM-induced Tca8113 cells. Therefore, 1H NMR-based metabolomic analysis has a high potential for monitoring the formation of MDR during clinical tumor chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26137105

  20. Extraction-less, rapid assay for the direct detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) in cork samples.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, Theofylaktos; Pascual, Nuria; Marco, M-Pilar; Moschos, Anastassios; Petropoulos, Anastassios; Kaltsas, Grigoris; Kintzios, Spyridon

    2014-07-01

    2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA), the cork taint molecule, has been the target of several analytical approaches over the few past years. In spite of the development of highly efficient and sensitive tools for its detection, ranging from advanced chromatography to biosensor-based techniques, a practical breakthrough for routine cork screening purposes has not yet been realized, in part due to the requirement of a lengthy extraction of TCA in organic solvents, mostly 12% ethanol and the high detectability required. In the present report, we present a modification of a previously reported biosensor system based on the measurement of the electric response of cultured fibroblast cells membrane-engineered with the pAb78 TCA-specific antibody. Samples were prepared by macerating cork tissue and mixing it directly with the cellular biorecognition elements, without any intervening extraction process. By using this novel approach, we were able to detect TCA in just five minutes at extremely low concentrations (down to 0.2 ppt). The novel biosensor offers a number of practical benefits, including a very considerable reduction in the total assay time by one day, and a full portability, enabling its direct employment for on-site, high throughput screening of cork in the field and production facilities, without requiring any type of supporting infrastructure. PMID:24840453

  1. Adenosine Kinase Deficiency Disrupts the Methionine Cycle and Causes Hypermethioninemia, Encephalopathy, and Abnormal Liver Function

    PubMed Central

    Bjursell, Magnus K.; Blom, Henk J.; Cayuela, Jordi Asin; Engvall, Martin L.; Lesko, Nicole; Balasubramaniam, Shanti; Brandberg, Göran; Halldin, Maria; Falkenberg, Maria; Jakobs, Cornelis; Smith, Desiree; Struys, Eduard; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Lundeberg, Joakim; Wedell, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Four inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are known to cause hypermethioninemia by directly interfering with the methionine cycle. Hypermethioninemia is occasionally discovered incidentally, but it is often disregarded as an unspecific finding, particularly if liver disease is involved. In many individuals the hypermethioninemia resolves without further deterioration, but it can also represent an early sign of a severe, progressive neurodevelopmental disorder. Further investigation of unclear hypermethioninemia is therefore important. We studied two siblings affected by severe developmental delay and liver dysfunction. Biochemical analysis revealed increased plasma levels of methionine, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) but normal or mildly elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels, indicating a block in the methionine cycle. We excluded S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) deficiency, which causes a similar biochemical phenotype, by using genetic and biochemical techniques and hypothesized that there was a functional block in the SAHH enzyme as a result of a recessive mutation in a different gene. Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous c.902C>A (p.Ala301Glu) missense mutation in the adenosine kinase gene (ADK), the function of which fits perfectly with this hypothesis. Increased urinary adenosine excretion confirmed ADK deficiency in the siblings. Four additional individuals from two unrelated families with a similar presentation were identified and shown to have a homozygous c.653A>C (p.Asp218Ala) and c.38G>A (p.Gly13Glu) mutation, respectively, in the same gene. All three missense mutations were deleterious, as shown by activity measurements on recombinant enzymes. ADK deficiency is a previously undescribed, severe IEM shedding light on a functional link between the methionine cycle and adenosine metabolism. PMID:21963049

  2. Genetic investigation of tricarboxylic acid metabolism during the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hangjun; Lewis, Ian A; Morrisey, Joanne M; McLean, Kyle J; Ganesan, Suresh M; Painter, Heather J; Mather, Michael W; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Llinás, Manuel; Vaidya, Akhil B

    2015-04-01

    New antimalarial drugs are urgently needed to control drug-resistant forms of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Mitochondrial electron transport is the target of both existing and new antimalarials. Herein, we describe 11 genetic knockout (KO) lines that delete six of the eight mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Although all TCA KOs grew normally in asexual blood stages, these metabolic deficiencies halted life-cycle progression in later stages. Specifically, aconitase KO parasites arrested as late gametocytes, whereas α-ketoglutarate-dehydrogenase-deficient parasites failed to develop oocysts in the mosquitoes. Mass spectrometry analysis of (13)C-isotope-labeled TCA mutant parasites showed that P. falciparum has significant flexibility in TCA metabolism. This flexibility manifested itself through changes in pathway fluxes and through altered exchange of substrates between cytosolic and mitochondrial pools. Our findings suggest that mitochondrial metabolic plasticity is essential for parasite development. PMID:25843709

  3. Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Rainey E; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Williams, Caroline M; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T; Martinez, Janie; Reinhard, Mary K; McDougall, Danielle J; Rocca, James R; Yost, Richard A; Cusi, Kenneth; Garrett, Timothy J; Sunny, Nishanth E

    2016-04-01

    The hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is central to integrating macronutrient metabolism and is closely coupled to cellular respiration, free radical generation, and inflammation. Oxidative flux through the TCA cycle is induced during hepatic insulin resistance, in mice and humans with simple steatosis, reflecting early compensatory remodeling of mitochondrial energetics. We hypothesized that progressive severity of hepatic insulin resistance and the onset of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) would impair oxidative flux through the hepatic TCA cycle. Mice (C57/BL6) were fed a high-trans-fat high-fructose diet (TFD) for 8 wk to induce simple steatosis and NASH by 24 wk. In vivo fasting hepatic mitochondrial fluxes were determined by(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopomer analysis. Hepatic metabolic intermediates were quantified using mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance preceded alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, since TCA cycle fluxes remained normal during simple steatosis. However, mice with NASH had a twofold induction (P< 0.05) of mitochondrial fluxes (μmol/min) through the TCA cycle (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6), anaplerosis (9.1 ± 1.2 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2), and pyruvate cycling (4.9 ± 1.0 vs. 11.1 ± 1.9) compared with their age-matched controls. Induction of the TCA cycle activity during NASH was concurrent with blunted ketogenesis and accumulation of hepatic diacylglycerols (DAGs), ceramides (Cer), and long-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting inefficient oxidation and disposal of excess free fatty acids (FFA). Sustained induction of mitochondrial TCA cycle failed to prevent accretion of "lipotoxic" metabolites in the liver and could hasten inflammation and the metabolic transition to NASH. PMID:26814015

  4. Tricarboxylic acid cycle-sustained oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Calzia, Daniela; Aluigi, Maria Grazia; Ramoino, Paola; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2013-11-01

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) function was shown to be fueled exclusively by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). This is in line with the sensitivity of brain to hypoxia, but less with the scarcity of the mitochondria in CNS. Consistently with the ectopic expression of FoF1-ATP synthase and the electron transfer chain in myelin, we have reported data demonstrating that isolated myelin vesicles (IMV) conduct OXPHOS. It may suggest that myelin sheath could be a site for the whole aerobic degradation of glucose. In this paper, we assayed the functionality of glycolysis and of TCA cycle enzymes in IMV purified from bovine forebrain. We found the presence and activity of all of the glycolytic and TCA cycle enzymes, comparable to those in mitochondria-enriched fractions, in the same experimental conditions. IMV also contain consistent carbonic anhydrase activity. These data suggest that myelin may be a contributor in energy supply for the axon, performing an extra-mitochondrial aerobic OXPHOS. The vision of myelin as the site of aerobic metabolism may shed a new light on many demyelinating pathologies, that cause an a yet unresolved axonal degeneration and whose clinical onset coincides with myelin development completion. PMID:23851157

  5. Nitrogen cycling in Yellowstone National Park thermal features: using gene expression to reveal ecological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafree, S. T.; Burton, M. S.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of biodiversity, metabolic strategies, and functional ecology in modern hydrothermal systems have the potential to provide insight into the metabolism and evolution of life. The geochemical and microbial diversity present at Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, makes it an ideal place for studying the functional ecology and metabolic processes of prokaryotic organisms. While much work in terrestrial hydrothermal features is focused on phylogenetic and geochemical analyses, a few recent investigations in YNP and other hydrothermal areas have focused on “gene hunting”: screening thermal sediment and biofilm samples for the presence of genes utilized in specific metabolic processes [2, 3, 6, 7, 8]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of many of these genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use, and few researchers have done work to confirm the utilization (expression) of the genes discovered in thermal samples [1, 6, 7, 8]. Disequilibrium between reduced hydrothermal fluid of YNP thermal features and the atmosphere provides a copious source of potential energy to be harnessed through microbial metabolic processes, with NO3- and NO2- serving as the preferred electron acceptors and top energy sources after O2 [4, 5]. Consequentially, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes, as well as nutrient availability. This study explores the presence and utilization of functional genes that are key in steps of the nitrogen cycle, such as nitrogen fixation (NifH), denitrification (nirKS), and ammonia oxidation (amoA). Both DNA and RNA were extracted from thermal sediment and streamer biofilm communities collected in the chemosynthetic zone of various thermal features of the Sentinel Meadows Group in Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Extracted DNA and reverse transcribed RNA (cDNA) were amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and products were analyzed through gel electrophoresis to identify the presence and expression of the target functional nitrogen cycle genes. Results allow comparison of nitrogen cycling processes between different chemotrophic microbial communities both within and among the thermal features investigated in this study. [1] Botero et al., 2005. AEM 71: 1267-1275. [2] Hall et al., 2008. AEM 74: 4910-4922. [3] Meyer-Dombard et al., 2009. EOS Trans AGU 90. Abstract B23C-0390. [4] Reysenbach & Shock, 2002. Science 296: 1077-1082. [5] Shock et al., 2005. Geochim Cosmochim Acta 74: 4005-4043. [6] Steunou et al., 2006. PNAS 103:2398-2403. [7] Steunou et al., 2008. The ISME Journal 2: 364-378. [8] Zhang et al., 2008. AEM 74: 6417-6426.

  6. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  7. Experimental Approaches to Study Mitochondrial Localization and Function of a Nuclear Cell Cycle Kinase, Cdk1.

    PubMed

    Candas, Demet; Qin, Lili; Fan, Ming; Li, Jian-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondria possess their own transcriptional machinery, merely 1% of mitochondrial proteins are synthesized inside the organelle. The nuclear-encoded proteins are transported into mitochondria guided by their mitochondria targeting sequences (MTS); however, a majority of mitochondrial localized proteins lack an identifiable MTS. Nevertheless, the fact that MTS can instruct proteins to go into the mitochondria provides a valuable tool for studying mitochondrial functions of normally nuclear and/or cytoplasmic proteins. We have recently identified the cell cycle kinase CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex in the mitochondria. To specifically study the mitochondrial functions of this complex, mitochondrial overexpression and knock-down of this complex without interfering with its nuclear or cytoplasmic functions were essential. By tagging CyclinB1/Cdk1 with MTS, we were able to achieve mitochondrial overexpression of this complex to study its mitochondrial targets as well as functions. Via tagging dominant-negative Cdk1 with MTS, inhibition of Cdk1 activity was accomplished particularly in the mitochondria. Potential mitochondrial targets of CyclinB1/Cdk1 complex were identified using a gel-based proteomics approach. Unlike traditional 2D gel analysis, we employed 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) technology followed by phosphoprotein staining to fluorescently label differentially phosphorylated proteins in mitochondrial Cdk1 expressing cells. Identification of phosphoprotein spots that were altered in wild type versus dominant negative Cdk1 bearing mitochondria revealed the identity of mitochondrial targets of Cdk1. Finally, to determine the effect of CyclinB1/Cdk1 mitochondrial localization in cell cycle progression, a cell proliferation assay using a synthetic thymidine analogue EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) was used to monitor the cells as they go through the cell cycle and replicate their DNA. Altogether, we demonstrated a variety of approaches available to study mitochondrial localization and activity of a cell cycle kinase. These are advanced, yet easy to follow methods that will be beneficial to many cell biology researchers. PMID:26967001

  8. Functional near infrared spectroscopy study of age-related difference in cortical activation patterns during cycling with speed feedback.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Yi; Lin, Sang-I; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2012-01-01

    Functional decline of lower-limb affects the ability of locomotion and the age-related brain differences have been elucidated among the elderly. Cycling exercise is a common training program for restoring motor function in the deconditioned elderly or stroke patients. The provision of speed feedback has been commonly suggested to clinical therapists for facilitating learning of controlled cycling performance and maintaining motivation in training programs with elderly participants. However, the cortical control of pedaling movements and the effect of external feedback remain poorly understanding. This study investigated the regional cortical activities detected by functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) in 12 healthy young and 13 healthy elderly subjects under conditions of cycling without-(free cycling) and with feedback (target cycling). The elderly exhibited predominant activation of the sensorimotor cortex during free cycling similar to young subjects but with poorer cycling performance. The cycling performance improved in both groups, and the elderly showed increased brain activities of the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex under target cycling condition. These findings demonstrated age-related changes in the cortical control in processing external feedback and pedaling movements. Use of fNIRS to evaluate brain activation patterns after training may facilitate brain-based design of tailored therapeutic rehabilitation strategies. PMID:21984524

  9. Variable Sun-Earth energy coupling function: dependence on solar cycle strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi

    2014-05-01

    Correlation between monthly geomagnetic activity and monthly sunspot numbers for more than 50 years revealed that the geomagnetic activity during the current solar maximum is lower than what can be expected from the sunspot numbers. This is valid for both one station (Kiruna K index, since 1962) and world-wide average (Kp index, since 1932). The Kp data with more than 80 years record also revealed that monthly Kp for given sunspot numbers are lower during solar cycles with small amplitude than those with large amplitude when we define the cycle from the end of solar maximum to the end of next solar maximum. The result suggests that the Sun-Earth coupling function itself (including the multiplication constant) might be different between different solar cycles when the amplitude is different, and therefore that there might be unknown solar parameter that should contribute to the Sun-Earth coupling. Such a hidden parameter might bridge missing physical link between the solar effect and the terrestrial environment such as the global temperature. Acknowledgement: Kp is an official IAGA endorsed index that is provided by GFZ, Adolf-Schmidt-Observatory Niemegk, Germany. The sunspot numbers are provided by Royal Observatory of Belgium, Brussels.

  10. PLZF mutation alters mouse hematopoietic stem cell function and cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Platet, Nadine; Vandevelde, Amelle; Poplineau, Mathilde; Koubi, Myriam; Finetti, Pascal; Tiberi, Guillaume; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Bertucci, François; Duprez, Estelle

    2016-04-14

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood populations due to their long-term self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capacities. Because they have to persist throughout an organism's life span, HSCs tightly regulate the balance between proliferation and quiescence. Here, we investigated the role of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (plzf) in HSC fate using the Zbtb16(lu/lu)mouse model, which harbors a natural spontaneous mutation that inactivates plzf. Regenerative stress revealed that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs had a lineage-skewing potential from lymphopoiesis toward myelopoiesis, an increase in the long-term-HSC pool, and a decreased repopulation potential. Furthermore, oldplzf-mutant HSCs present an amplified aging phenotype, suggesting that plzf controls age-related pathway. We found that Zbtb16(lu/lu)HSCs harbor a transcriptional signature associated with a loss of stemness and cell cycle deregulation. Lastly, cell cycle analyses revealed an important role for plzf in the regulation of the G1-S transition of HSCs. Our study reveals a new role for plzf in regulating HSC function that is linked to cell cycle regulation, and positions plzf as a key player in controlling HSC homeostasis. PMID:26941402

  11. Acute Bouts of Assisted Cycling Improves Cognitive and Upper Extremity Movement Functions in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringenbach, Shannon D. R; Albert, Andrew R.; Chen, Chih-Chia; Alberts, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 2 modes of exercise on cognitive and upper extremity movement functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Nine participants randomly completed 3 interventions over 3 consecutive weeks. The interventions were: (a) voluntary cycling (VC), in which participants cycled at their…

  12. Sparstolonin B Inhibits Pro-Angiogenic Functions and Blocks Cell Cycle Progression in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Henry R.; Liang, Qiaoli; Fan, Daping; Rodriguez, Vanessa; Lessner, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Sparstolonin B (SsnB) is a novel bioactive compound isolated from Sparganium stoloniferum, an herb historically used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as an anti-tumor agent. Angiogenesis, the process of new capillary formation from existing blood vessels, is dysregulated in many pathological disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, tumor growth, and atherosclerosis. In functional assays, SsnB inhibited endothelial cell tube formation (Matrigel method) and cell migration (Transwell method) in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray experiments with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) demonstrated differential expression of several hundred genes in response to SsnB exposure (916 and 356 genes, respectively, with fold change ≥2, p<0.05, unpaired t-test). Microarray data from both cell types showed significant overlap, including genes associated with cell proliferation and cell cycle. Flow cytometric cell cycle analysis of HUVECs treated with SsnB showed an increase of cells in the G1 phase and a decrease of cells in the S phase. Cyclin E2 (CCNE2) and Cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) are regulatory proteins that control cell cycle progression through the G1/S checkpoint. Both CCNE2 and CDC6 were downregulated in the microarray data. Real Time quantitative PCR confirmed that gene expression of CCNE2 and CDC6 in HUVECs was downregulated after SsnB exposure, to 64% and 35% of controls, respectively. The data suggest that SsnB may exert its anti-angiogenic properties in part by downregulating CCNE2 and CDC6, halting progression through the G1/S checkpoint. In the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay, SsnB caused significant reduction in capillary length and branching number relative to the vehicle control group. Overall, SsnB caused a significant reduction in angiogenesis (ANOVA, p<0.05), demonstrating its ex vivo efficacy. PMID:23940584

  13. Modifications in activation of lower limb muscles as a function of initial foot position in cycling.

    PubMed

    Padulo, Johnny; Powell, Douglas W; Ardigò, Luca P; Viggiano, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Cyclic movements, such as walking/cycling, require the activity of spinal-circuits, the central-pattern-generators (CPG). To our knowledge little work has been done to investigate the activation of these circuits, e.g., the muscular and kinematic activity during cycling initiation. This study aims to detail the muscle output properties as a function of the initial lower limb-position using a simple cycling paradigm. Therefore, subjects were required to pedal on a cycle-ergometer in seated position starting at different-crank-angles (0-150°). Surface-electromyography was recorded from the gluteus major (GL), vastus lateralis (VL), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM), while crank position was recorded using a linear-encoder. Gluteus major peak-activity (PA) occurred at 65.0±12.4° when starting with 0° initial crank position (ICP), while occurred maximally at 110.5±2.9 when starting with 70° ICP. Vastus lateralis PA occurred at 40.7±8.8° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 103.4±4.0°. Similarly, GM PA occurred at 112.0±10.7° with 0° ICP, whereas with 70° ICP PA occurred at 142.5±4.2° PA. Gluteus major and gastrocnemius medialis showed similar PA phase shifts, which may suggest they are controlled by same local circuitry, in agreement with their common spinal origin, i.e., motoneurons pool in S1-S2. PMID:25921852

  14. National exposure registry volatile organic compounds registry 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) subregistry baseline and followup 1 technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, J.R.; Gist, G.L.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the baseline activities and results of the statistical analyses of the baseline and first follow-up data for the TCA Subregistry of the Volatile Organic Compounds Registry of the National Exposure Registry. The TCA Subregistry baseline data contains information on 3,665 persons who had documented exposure to TCA in their drinking water and were exposed for at least 30 days; the follow-up files contain information on 3,469 persons. The individuals included in the TCA Subregistry resided at a site in Vestal, New York. The findings in this report cannot be used to identify a causal relationship between the health outcomes and TCA exposure. In addition, there are some methodological differences in data collection that might have biased the reporting rates, resulting in false positive findings. The findings of this report do, however, reinforce the need to continue regular followup of this population.

  15. The Functional Breakdown Structure (FBS) and Its Relationship to Life Cycle Cost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHoff, Bryan; Levack, Danie J. H.; Rhodes, Russell E.

    2009-01-01

    The Functional Breakdown Structure (FBS) is a structured, modular breakdown of every function that must be addressed to perform a generic mission. It is also usable for any subset of the mission. Unlike a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), the FBS is a function-oriented tree, not a product-oriented tree. The FBS details not products, but operations or activities that should be performed. The FBS is not tied to any particular architectural implementation because it is a listing of the needed functions, not the elements, of the architecture. The FBS for Space Transportation Systems provides a universal hierarchy of required functions, which include ground and space operations as well as infrastructure - it provides total visibility of the entire mission. By approaching the systems engineering problem from the functional view, instead of the element or hardware view, the SPST has created an exhaustive list of potential requirements which the architecture designers can use to evaluate the completeness of their designs. This is a new approach that will provide full accountability of all functions required to perform the planned mission. It serves as a giant check list to be sure that no functions are omitted, especially in the early architectural design phase. A significant characteristic of a FBS is that if architecture options are compared using this approach, then any missing or redundant elements of each option will be ' identified. Consequently, valid Life Cycle Costs (LCC) comparisons can be made. For example, one architecture option might not need a particular function while another option does. One option may have individual elements to perform each of three functions while another option needs only one element to perform the three functions. Once an architecture has been selected, the FBS will serve as a guide in development of the work breakdown structure, provide visibility of those technologies that need to be further developed to perform required functions, and help identify the personnel skills required to develop and operate the architecture. It also wifi allow the systems engineering activities to totally integrate each discipline to the maximum extent possible and optimize at the total system level, thus avoiding optimizing at the element level (stove-piping). In addition, it furnishes a framework that wifi help prevent over or under specifying requirements because all functions are identified and all elements are aligned to functions.

  16. Evidence for autotrophy via the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle in the marine magnetotactic coccus strain MC-1.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Scott, James H; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2006-02-01

    Strain MC-1 is a marine, microaerophilic, magnetite-producing, magnetotactic coccus phylogenetically affiliated with the alpha-Proteobacteria. Strain MC-1 grew chemolithotrophically with sulfide and thiosulfate as electron donors with HCO3-/CO2 as the sole carbon source. Experiments with cells grown microaerobically in liquid with thiosulfate and H14CO3-/14CO2 showed that all cell carbon was derived from H14CO3-/14CO2 and therefore that MC-1 is capable of chemolithoautotrophy. Cell extracts did not exhibit ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (RubisCO) activity, nor were RubisCO genes found in the draft genome of MC-1. Thus, unlike other chemolithoautotrophic, magnetotactic bacteria, strain MC-1 does not appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy. Cell extracts did not exhibit carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity, indicating that the acetyl-coenzyme A pathway also does not function in strain MC-1. The 13C content of whole cells of MC-1 relative to the 13C content of the inorganic carbon source (Deltadelta13C) was -11.4 per thousand. Cellular fatty acids showed enrichment of 13C relative to whole cells. Strain MC-1 cell extracts showed activities for several key enzymes of the reverse (reductive) tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle including fumarate reductase, pyruvate:acceptor oxidoreductase and 2-oxoglutarate:acceptor oxidoreductase. Although ATP citrate lyase (another key enzyme of the rTCA cycle) activity was not detected in strain MC-1 using commonly used assays, cell extracts did cleave citrate, and the reaction was dependent upon the presence of ATP and coenzyme A. Thus, we infer the presence of an ATP-dependent citrate-cleaving mechanism. These results are consistent with the operation of the rTCA cycle in MC-1. Strain MC-1 appears to be the first known representative of the alpha-Proteobacteria to use the rTCA cycle for autotrophy. PMID:16461683

  17. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Weippert, Matthias; Wassermann, Franziska; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC) and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after 8 weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0–100, 100–200 ms) and iMVC of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave), peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that cycling endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue resistance. PMID:26029114

  18. Neuromuscular function and fatigue resistance of the plantar flexors following short-term cycling endurance training.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Weippert, Matthias; Wassermann, Franziska; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies on the effect of short-term endurance training on neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors have shown that the H-reflex elicited at rest and during weak voluntary contractions was increased following the training regime. However, these studies did not test H-reflex modulation during isometric maximum voluntary contraction (iMVC) and did not incorporate a control group in their study design to compare the results of the endurance training group to individuals without the endurance training stimulus. Therefore, this randomized controlled study was directed to investigate the neuromuscular function of the plantar flexors at rest and during iMVC before and after 8 weeks of cycling endurance training. Twenty-two young adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group and a control group. During neuromuscular testing, rate of torque development, isometric maximum voluntary torque and muscle activation were measured. Triceps surae muscle activation and tibialis anterior muscle co-activation were assessed by normalized root mean square of the EMG signal during the initial phase of contraction (0-100, 100-200 ms) and iMVC of the plantar flexors. Furthermore, evoked spinal reflex responses of the soleus muscle (H-reflex evoked at rest and during iMVC, V-wave), peak twitch torques induced by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve at rest and fatigue resistance were evaluated. The results indicate that cycling endurance training did not lead to a significant change in any variable of interest. Data of the present study conflict with the outcome of previously published studies that have found an increase in H-reflex excitability after endurance training. However, these studies had not included a control group in their study design as was the case here. It is concluded that short-term cycling endurance training does not necessarily enhance H-reflex responses and fatigue resistance. PMID:26029114

  19. A Kinase-Independent Function of CDK6 Links the Cell Cycle to Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, Karoline; Heller, Gerwin; Schneckenleithner, Christine; Warsch, Wolfgang; Scheicher, Ruth; Ott, Rene G.; Schäfer, Markus; Fajmann, Sabine; Schlederer, Michaela; Schiefer, Ana-Iris; Reichart, Ursula; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Hoeller, Christoph; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Bock, Christoph; Kenner, Lukas; Hoefler, Gerald; Freissmuth, Michael; Green, Anthony R.; Moriggl, Richard; Busslinger, Meinrad; Malumbres, Marcos; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Summary In contrast to its close homolog CDK4, the cell cycle kinase CDK6 is expressed at high levels in lymphoid malignancies. In a model for p185BCR-ABL+ B-acute lymphoid leukemia, we show that CDK6 is part of a transcription complex that induces the expression of the tumor suppressor p16INK4a and the pro-angiogenic factor VEGF-A. This function is independent of CDK6’s kinase activity. High CDK6 expression thus suppresses proliferation by upregulating p16INK4a, providing an internal safeguard. However, in the absence of p16INK4a, CDK6 can exert its full tumor-promoting function by enhancing proliferation and stimulating angiogenesis. The finding that CDK6 connects cell-cycle progression to angiogenesis confirms CDK6’s central role in hematopoietic malignancies and could underlie the selection pressure to upregulate CDK6 and silence p16INK4a. PMID:23948297

  20. An Estimate of the Size and Shape of Sunspot Cycle 24 Based on its Early Cycle Behavior using the Hathaway-Wilson-Reichmann Shape-Fitting Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of 12-month moving averages (12-mma) of monthly mean sunspot number (R), sunspot cycle 24 had its minimum amplitude (Rm = 1.7) in December 2008. At 12 mo past minimum, R measured 8.3, and at 18 mo past minimum, it measured 16.4. Thus far, the maximum month-to-month rate of rise in 12-mma values of monthly mean sunspot number (AR(t) max) has been 1.7, having occurred at elapsed times past minimum amplitude (t) of 14 and 15 mo. Compared to other sunspot cycles of the modern era, cycle 24?s Rm and AR(t) max (as observed so far) are the smallest on record, suggesting that it likely will be a slow-rising, long-period sunspot cycle of below average maximum amplitude (RM). Supporting this view is the now observed relative strength of cycle 24?s geomagnetic minimum amplitude as measured using the 12-mma value of the aa-geomagnetic index (aam = 8.4), which also is the smallest on record, having occurred at t equals 8 and 9 mo. From the method of Ohl (the inferred preferential association between RM and aam), one predicts RM = 55 +/- 17 (the ?1 se prediction interval) for cycle 24. Furthermore, from the Waldmeier effect (the inferred preferential association between the ascent duration (ASC) and RM) one predicts an ASC longer than 48 mo for cycle 24; hence, maximum amplitude occurrence should be after December 2012. Application of the Hathaway-Wilson-Reichmann shape-fitting function, using an RM = 70 and ASC = 56 mo, is found to adequately fit the early sunspot number growth of cycle 24.

  1. A "footprint" of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution. PMID:26263551

  2. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Kim M; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Williams, Kenneth H; Sharon, Itai; Miller, Christopher S; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian C; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Philip E; Hettich, Robert L; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates complex community functioning and syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer and recovered during microbial sulfate reduction. De novo reconstruction of community sequences yielded near-complete genomes of Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria), Sulfurovum- and Sulfurimonas-like Epsilonproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen fixation and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results indicate less abundant Desulfuromonadales, and possibly Bacteroidetes, also actively contributed to CO2 production via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. We infer that high acetate concentrations, aimed at stimulating anaerobic heterotrophy, led to the co-enrichment of, and carbon fixation in Epsilonproteobacteria. Results give an insight into ecosystem behavior following addition of simple organic carbon to the subsurface, and demonstrate a range of biological processes and community interactions were stimulated. PMID:23190730

  3. Loss of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 Function Affects "Siesta" Behavior but Not Synchronization to Temperature Cycles.

    PubMed

    Roessingh, Sanne; Wolfgang, Werner; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    To maintain synchrony with the environment, circadian clocks use a wide range of cycling sensory cues that provide input to the clock (zeitgebers), including environmental temperature cycles (TCs). There is some knowledge about which clock neuronal groups are important for temperature synchronization, but we currently lack knowledge on the temperature receptors and their signaling pathways that feed temperature information to the (neuronal) clock. Since TRPA1 is a well-known thermosensor that functions in a range of temperature-related behaviors, and it is potentially expressed in clock neurons, we set out to test the putative role of TRPA1 in temperature synchronization of the circadian clock. We found that flies lacking TRPA1 are still able to synchronize their behavioral activity to TCs comparable to wild-type flies, both in 16°C : 25°C and 20°C : 29°C TCs. In addition, we found that flies lacking TRPA1 show higher activity levels during the middle of the warm phase of 20°C : 29°C TCs, and we show that this TRPA1-mediated repression of locomotor activity during the "siesta" is caused by a lack of sleep. Based on these data, we conclude that the TRPA1 channel is not required for temperature synchronization in this broad temperature range but instead is required to repress activity during the warm part of the day. PMID:26459465

  4. Life-cycle cost analysis 200-West Weather Enclosure: Multi-function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Umphrey, M.R.

    1995-01-16

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF)will provide environmentally safe and acceptable storage capacity for handling wastes resulting from the remediation of existing single-shell and double-shell tanks on the Hanford Site. The MWTF will construct two tank farm facilities at two separate locations. A four-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site; a two-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-West Area. This report documents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH) for the Weather Enclosure proposed to be constructed over the 200-West tanks. Currently, all tank farm operations on the Hanford Site are conducted in an open environment, with weather often affecting tank farm maintenance activities. The Weather Enclosure is being proposed to allow year-round tank farm operation and maintenance activities unconstrained by weather conditions. Elimination of weather-related delays at the MWTF and associated facilities will reduce operational costs. The life-cycle cost analysis contained in this report analyzes potential cost savings based on historical weather information, operational and maintenance costs, construction cost estimates, and other various assumptions.

  5. Analysis of limit cycles sustained by two modes in the flame describing function framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudy, Frédéric; Durox, Daniel; Schuller, Thierry; Candel, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Describing Function (FDF) framework, developed for the nonlinear instability analysis of combustors, has been validated more recently in a generic configuration comprising an upstream manifold, an injection unit and a flame tube. This system featuring a wide variety of dynamical phenomena, is used here to explore a new range of self-sustained flame oscillations. Depending on the geometry, the system exhibits stable or variable amplitude limit cycles. In the first case, oscillations have an essentially constant amplitude and are well retrieved with the FDF framework, whereas in the second case, limit cycles feature different types of amplitude unsteadiness and require some further consideration. The present article is concerned with one type of unstable oscillation in which a regular period modification occurs in the presence of two modes, leading to frequency heterodyning. It is found from the FDF analysis that such oscillations sustained by two modes may occur when there is an overlap between modes corresponding to super and subcritical bifurcations. An additional condition which has to be fulfilled to obtain this behavior is inferred from experiments.

  6. Loss of gene function through rapid mitotic cycles in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Rothe, M; Pehl, M; Taubert, H; Jckle, H

    1992-09-10

    The early developmental period in Drosophila is characterized by rapid mitotic divisions, when the body pattern becomes organized by a cascade of segmentation gene activity. During this process localized expression of the gap gene knirps (kni) is required to establish abdomen segmentation. The knirps-related gene (knrl) encodes a kni-homologous nuclear hormone receptor-like protein and shares the spatial patterns of kni expression. The two genes differ with respect to the size of their transcription units; kni contains 1 kilobase and knrl 19 kilobases of intron sequences. The consequence of this difference in intron size is that knrl cannot substitute for kni segmentation function, although it gains this ability when expressed from an intronless transgene. Here we show that the length of mitotic cycles provides a physiological barrier to transcript size, and is therefore a significant factor in controlling developmental gene activity during short 'phenocritical' periods. The required coordination of cycle length and gene size provides severe constraints towards the evolution of rapid development. PMID:1522901

  7. Power Effects on High Lift, Stability and Control Characteristics of the TCA Model Tested in the LaRC 14 x 22 Ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glessner, Paul T.

    1999-01-01

    The TCA-2 wind-tunnel test was the second in a series of planned tests utilizing the 5% Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) model. Each of the tests was planned to utilize the unique capabilities of the NASA Langley 14'x22' and the NASA Ames 12' test facilities, in order to assess specific aspects of the high lift and stability and control characteristics of the TCA configuration. However, shortly after the completion of the TCA-1 test, an early projection of the Technology Configuration (TC) identified the need for several significant changes to the baseline TCA configuration. These changes were necessary in order to meet more stringent noise certification levels, as well as, to provide a means to control dynamic structural modes. The projected changes included a change to the outboard wing (increased aspect ratio and lower sweep) and a reconfiguration of the longitudinal control surfaces to include a medium size canard and a reduced horizontal tail. The impact of these proposed changes did not affect the TCA-2 test, because it was specifically planned to address power effects on the empennage and a smaller horizontal tail was in the plan to be tested. However, the focus of future tests was reevaluated and the emphasis was shifted away from assessment of TCA specific configurations to a more general assessment of configurations that encompass the projected design space for the TC.

  8. Viral Membrane Channels: Role and Function in the Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sze, Ching Wooen; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Viroporins are small, hydrophobic trans-membrane viral proteins that oligomerize to form hydrophilic pores in the host cell membranes. These proteins are crucial for the pathogenicity and replication of viruses as they aid in various stages of the viral life cycle, from genome uncoating to viral release. In addition, the ion channel activity of viroporin causes disruption in the cellular ion homeostasis, in particular the calcium ion. Fluctuation in the calcium level triggers the activation of the host defensive programmed cell death pathways as well as the inflammasome, which in turn are being subverted for the viruses’ replication benefits. This review article summarizes recent developments in the functional investigation of viroporins from various viruses and their contributions to viral replication and virulence. PMID:26110585

  9. Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Hernández, Carlos; Link, Andres; López-Uribe, Margarita M

    2015-01-01

    Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of declining bee populations. Male euglossine bees collect, store, and accumulate odoriferous compounds (perfumes) to subsequently use during courtship display. Thus, synthetic chemical baits can be used to attract and monitor euglossine bee populations. We conducted monthly censuses of orchid bees in three sites in the Magdalena valley of Colombia – a region where Central and South American biotas converge – to investigate the structure, diversity, and assembly of euglossine bee communities through time in relation to seasonal climatic cycles. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that phylogenetic community structure and functional trait diversity changed in response to seasonal rainfall fluctuations. All communities exhibited strong to moderate phylogenetic clustering throughout the year, with few pronounced bursts of phylogenetic overdispersion that coincided with the transition from wet-to-dry seasons. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of functional traits (e.g., body size, body mass, and proboscis length) and the observed seasonal fluctuations in phylogenetic diversity, we found that functional trait diversity, evenness, and divergence remained constant during all seasons in all communities. However, similar to the pattern observed with phylogenetic diversity, functional trait richness fluctuated markedly with rainfall in all sites. These results emphasize the importance of considering seasonal fluctuations in community assembly and provide a glimpse to the potential effects that climatic alterations may have on both pollinator communities and the ecosystem services they provide. PMID:26140205

  10. Seasonal cycles, phylogenetic assembly, and functional diversity of orchid bee communities.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Santiago R; Hernández, Carlos; Link, Andres; López-Uribe, Margarita M

    2015-05-01

    Neotropical rainforests sustain some of the most diverse terrestrial communities on Earth. Euglossine (or orchid) bees are a diverse lineage of insect pollinators distributed throughout the American tropics, where they provide pollination services to a staggering diversity of flowering plant taxa. Elucidating the seasonal patterns of phylogenetic assembly and functional trait diversity of bee communities can shed new light into the mechanisms that govern the assembly of bee pollinator communities and the potential effects of declining bee populations. Male euglossine bees collect, store, and accumulate odoriferous compounds (perfumes) to subsequently use during courtship display. Thus, synthetic chemical baits can be used to attract and monitor euglossine bee populations. We conducted monthly censuses of orchid bees in three sites in the Magdalena valley of Colombia - a region where Central and South American biotas converge - to investigate the structure, diversity, and assembly of euglossine bee communities through time in relation to seasonal climatic cycles. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that phylogenetic community structure and functional trait diversity changed in response to seasonal rainfall fluctuations. All communities exhibited strong to moderate phylogenetic clustering throughout the year, with few pronounced bursts of phylogenetic overdispersion that coincided with the transition from wet-to-dry seasons. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of functional traits (e.g., body size, body mass, and proboscis length) and the observed seasonal fluctuations in phylogenetic diversity, we found that functional trait diversity, evenness, and divergence remained constant during all seasons in all communities. However, similar to the pattern observed with phylogenetic diversity, functional trait richness fluctuated markedly with rainfall in all sites. These results emphasize the importance of considering seasonal fluctuations in community assembly and provide a glimpse to the potential effects that climatic alterations may have on both pollinator communities and the ecosystem services they provide. PMID:26140205

  11. DNA Damage Response and Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Function throughout the Cell Cycle to Ensure Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Katherine S.; Chau, Thinh; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR), which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved. PMID:25898113

  12. DNA damage response and spindle assembly checkpoint function throughout the cell cycle to ensure genomic integrity.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Katherine S; Chau, Thinh; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2015-04-01

    Errors in replication or segregation lead to DNA damage, mutations, and aneuploidies. Consequently, cells monitor these events and delay progression through the cell cycle so repair precedes division. The DNA damage response (DDR), which monitors DNA integrity, and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which responds to defects in spindle attachment/tension during metaphase of mitosis and meiosis, are critical for preventing genome instability. Here we show that the DDR and SAC function together throughout the cell cycle to ensure genome integrity in C. elegans germ cells. Metaphase defects result in enrichment of SAC and DDR components to chromatin, and both SAC and DDR are required for metaphase delays. During persistent metaphase arrest following establishment of bi-oriented chromosomes, stability of the metaphase plate is compromised in the absence of DDR kinases ATR or CHK1 or SAC components, MAD1/MAD2, suggesting SAC functions in metaphase beyond its interactions with APC activator CDC20. In response to DNA damage, MAD2 and the histone variant CENPA become enriched at the nuclear periphery in a DDR-dependent manner. Further, depletion of either MAD1 or CENPA results in loss of peripherally associated damaged DNA. In contrast to a SAC-insensitive CDC20 mutant, germ cells deficient for SAC or CENPA cannot efficiently repair DNA damage, suggesting that SAC mediates DNA repair through CENPA interactions with the nuclear periphery. We also show that replication perturbations result in relocalization of MAD1/MAD2 in human cells, suggesting that the role of SAC in DNA repair is conserved. PMID:25898113

  13. 4-Quinolone drugs affect cell cycle progression and function of human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, A; Schlossman, S F; Tedder, T F

    1987-01-01

    Most antibacterial agents do not affect human lymphocyte function, but a few are inhibitory. In contrast, a pronounced increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in the presence of 4-quinolones was observed in these studies. The uptake of [3H]thymidine into DNA (trichloroacetic acid precipitable) was significantly increased in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes when they were exposed to eight new 4-quinolone derivatives, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, A-56619, A-56620, amifloxacin, enoxacin, and pefloxacin, at 1.6 to 6.25 micrograms/ml for 5 days. Four less antibacterially active 4-quinolones (nalidixic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, and pipemidic acid) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation only at higher concentrations or not at all. Kinetic studies showed that incorporation of [3H]thymidine was not affected or slightly inhibited by ciprofloxacin 2 days after phytohemagglutinin stimulation but was increased on days 3 to 6. The total incorporation of [3H]thymidine from day 1 to day 6 after phytohemagglutinin stimulation was increased by 42 to 45% at 5 to 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. Increased [3H]thymidine incorporation was also seen when human lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens other than phytohemagglutinin. Ciprofloxacin added at the start of the culture had a more pronounced effect on [3H]thymidine incorporation than when added later. In spite of the apparent increase in DNA synthesis, lymphocyte growth was inhibited by 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and cell cycle analysis showed that ciprofloxacin inhibited progression through the cell cycle. In addition, immunoglobulin secretion by human lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen for Epstein-Barr virus was inhibited by approximately 50% at 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. These results suggest that the 4-quinolone drugs may also affect eucaryotic cell function in vitro, but additional studies are needed to establish an in vivo relevance. PMID:3606076

  14. The N cycle in Earth subsurface. Reactivity of functional genes to anthropogenic CO2 injections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trias, Rosalia; Gérard, Emmanuelle; Le Campion, Paul; Gíslason, Sigurður R.; Aradóttir, Edda S.; Alfreðsson, Helgui A.; Mesfin, Kiflom G.; Snæbjörnsdóttir, Sandra Ó.; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2014-05-01

    The Nitrogen cycle has been widely studied in surface ecosystems, due to the importance of this nutrient for the organisms' development, and to the impact in the environment of most of the N forms, many of them being considered pollutants. However, little is known about the importance of the N-related metabolisms in subsurface systems now recognized to host diverse and active microbial life. In this study, we have periodically sampled the subsurface aquifers of the Icelandic pilot site for CO2 storage associated with the geothermal plant of Hellisheidi (operated by Reykjavik Energy; http://www.or.is/en/projects/carbfix). With the aim of understanding the dynamics of N-cycle in the subsurface, and its reactivity to CO2 injections, we quantified through qPCR the functional genes amoA (archaea), amoA (bacteria), nirK, nirS, nosZ, nifH, and the 16SrRNA genes of the anammox, total archaea and total bacteria. The 16SrRNA gene quantification provided values of around 107 gene copies/l at non injection periods. CO2 injection caused first a slight decrease probably due to pH decrease or toxicity by oxygen contamination during the injections. Two months after injection, the copy numbers increased up to 109 gene copies/l, and slowly returned to pre-injection values. The archaeal 16S rDNA copy numbers showed a similar reaction, with higher toxicity effects, and a lower increase afterwards. Due to the high reactivity of the microbial populations to CO2 injections, all the N cycle quantifications were related to the total 16S rDNA copies for normalization. Nitrifying genes (amoA) were mainly represented by the ammonia oxidizing archaea, and were apparently not affected by CO2 injections. Anammox bacteria were present in a very low percentage, and the obtained copy numbers tended to decrease after the injection. These results were surprising due to the autotrophic character of ammonia oxidizers, but could be explained by a competitive exclusion. On the contrary, N-fixation (nifH) was stimulated by the injections, doubling their relative abundance in relation to bacteria 16S rDNA copy numbers, supplying the N requirements of new biomass formed by autotrophic CO2 fixation. Finally, denitrifying bacteria (nirK, nirS and nosZ) showed a higher seasonal variation, but were positively stimulated by the CO2 injections. This process can be autotrophic in some species, using directly the injected CO2 as C source. Altogether the results suggest a high response of the N cycle to the CO2 injections, and its potential contribution to the formation of new biomass and C fixation. We provide evidences for the importance of the N cycle on the subsurface and its reactivity to CO2 injections, being therefore important the consideration of this cycle in CO2 storage modelling.

  15. Potential Abiotic Functions of Root Exudates in Rhizosphere Cycling of Soil Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J.; Keiluweit, M.; Bougoure, J.; Kleber, M.; Nico, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon cycling in the rhizosphere is a nexus of biophysical interactions between plant roots, microorganisms and the soil organo-mineral matrix. Plant roots are the primary source of C in mineral horizons and can significantly accelerate the rate of soil organic matter mineralization in rhizosphere soils. While a portion of this acceleration results from stimulation of microbial enzymatic capacities (the 'priming effect') - abiotic responses also play a significant role in rhizosphere cycling of soil organic matter (SOM). For example, exudate-stimulated mobilization and dissolution of metal species may release previously complexed SOM, or could affect Fe mobility via redox changes associated with microbially-driven O2 depletion. We have investigated the abiotic response of rhizosphere microenvironments, using additions of several 13C-enriched low molecular weight (LMW) root exudates and 13C-plant detritus to controlled microcosms. We hypothesized that certain abiotic effects are triggered by specific exudate compounds and that the magnitude of the effect depends on the soil physiochemical properties. Using a combination of microsensor measurements, solid-phase extractions, X-ray and IR spectroscopy, we measured how root exudates differ in their potential to create reducing microenvironments, alter metal chemisty and mineralogy, and influence the availability of SOM in the rhizosphere. High resolution X-ray microscopy (STXM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) analyses illustrate the physical fate of the added isotope tracers in both pore water and on mineral surfaces. Our results suggest that certain root exudates facilitate abiotic reactions that increase the pool of bioavailable SOM and stimulate its microbial decomposition in the rhizosphere. In particular, the contrasting ecological functions of LMW organic acids and simple sugars in facilitating SOM breakdown in the rhizosphere will be discussed.

  16. Linking N Cycling to Microbial Function Within Soil Microenvironments in Cover Crop Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. Y.; Scow, K. M.; Hristova, K.; Six, J.

    2007-12-01

    Cover crops have emerged as a crop management strategy to achieve agricultural sustainability and maintain environmental quality. Thus, fundamental knowledge of microbial-mediated C and N cycling is vital to understanding soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics in cover cropped agroecosystems. We investigated the effects of short-term cover crop-C input on N processing by microbial communities within SOM microenvironments and in bulk soil, across a gradient of organic to conventional crop management. We hypothesized that cover crop C and N inputs promote soil aggregation, which increases the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and stimulates greater microbial cycling of N within soil microenvironments, thereby leading to potential increases in N stabilization coupled with decreases in N loss. Our hypothesis was tested on the long-term organic, low-input, and conventional maize-tomato rotations at the Center for Integrated Farming Systems experiment (Davis, CA). We collected soil samples (0-15cm) across the cover crop and subsequent maize growing seasons and then isolated three SOM fractions soil: coarse particulate organic matter (cPOM; >250um), microaggregates (53-250um), and silt-and-clay (<53um). Total C and N were measured on both bulk soil and SOM fractions. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers for the functional genes, amoA and nosZ, were employed to quantify AOB and denitrifier population sizes, respectively. We also measured gross ammonification and nitrification rates in short-term 15N-incubations of the bulk soil to link cover crop induced N cycling to N-transforming bacteria. Total soil C and N concentrations and soil aggregation were higher in the organic than conventional and low-input systems. The amoA and no Z copy numbers g-1 dry soil were highest in the microaggregate fraction and similar between the cPOM and silt-and-clay fractions, among all cropping treatments. Abundances of AOB and denitrifiers were lower in bulk soil from the conventional and low- input than organic system. Our study indicates that long-term, annual cover crop inputs to the organic system lead to greater aggregation and development of microaggregate structures. Consequently, the abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers as well as the rates of ammonification and nitrification are augmented in the organic system compared to the conventional, which does not receive a cover crop, and the low-input system, which receives cover crops only in alternate years. These results shed light on the specific mechanisms governing short-term N stabilization versus losses under long-term crop management.

  17. A systematic analysis of TCA Escherichia coli mutants reveals suitable genetic backgrounds for enhanced hydrogen and ethanol production using glycerol as main carbon source.

    PubMed

    Valle, Antonio; Cabrera, Gema; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Trivedi, Drupad K; Ratray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston; Cantero, Domingo; Bolivar, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Biodiesel has emerged as an environmentally friendly alternative to fossil fuels; however, the low price of glycerol feed-stocks generated from the biodiesel industry has become a burden to this industry. A feasible alternative is the microbial biotransformation of waste glycerol to hydrogen and ethanol. Escherichia coli, a microorganism commonly used for metabolic engineering, is able to biotransform glycerol into these products. Nevertheless, the wild type strain yields can be improved by rewiring the carbon flux to the desired products by genetic engineering. Due to the importance of the central carbon metabolism in hydrogen and ethanol synthesis, E. coli single null mutant strains for enzymes of the TCA cycle and other related reactions were studied in this work. These strains were grown anaerobically in a glycerol-based medium and the concentrations of ethanol, glycerol, succinate and hydrogen were analysed by HPLC and GC. It was found that the reductive branch is the more relevant pathway for the aim of this work, with malate playing a central role. It was also found that the putative C4-transporter dcuD mutant improved the target product yields. These results will contribute to reveal novel metabolic engineering strategies for improving hydrogen and ethanol production by E. coli. PMID:26058953

  18. Insulin signalling and glucose transport in the ovary and ovarian function during the ovarian cycle.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Joëlle; Scaramuzzi, Rex J

    2016-06-01

    Data derived principally from peripheral tissues (fat, muscle and liver) show that insulin signals via diverse interconnecting intracellular pathways and that some of the major intersecting points (known as critical nodes) are the IRSs (insulin receptor substrates), PI3K (phosphoinositide kinase)/Akt and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Most of these insulin pathways are probably also active in the ovary and their ability to interact with each other and also with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) signalling pathways enables insulin to exert direct modulating influences on ovarian function. The present paper reviews the intracellular actions of insulin and the uptake of glucose by ovarian tissues (granulosa, theca and oocyte) during the oestrous/menstrual cycle of some rodent, primate and ruminant species. Insulin signals through diverse pathways and these are discussed with specific reference to follicular cell types (granulosa, theca and oocyte). The signalling pathways for FSH in granulosa cells and LH in granulosa and theca cells are summarized. The roles of glucose and of insulin-mediated uptake of glucose in folliculogenesis are discussed. It is suggested that glucose in addition to its well-established role of providing energy for cellular function may also have insulin-mediated signalling functions in ovarian cells, involving AMPK (AMP-dependent protein kinase) and/or hexosamine. Potential interactions of insulin signalling with FSH or LH signalling at critical nodes are identified and the available evidence for such interactions in ovarian cells is discussed. Finally the action of the insulin-sensitizing drugs metformin and the thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone on follicular cells is reviewed. PMID:27234585

  19. Oligonucleotide microarray for the study of functional gene diversity in the nitrogen cycle in the environment.

    PubMed

    Taroncher-Oldenburg, Gaspar; Griner, Erin M; Francis, Chris A; Ward, Bess B

    2003-02-01

    The analysis of functional diversity and its dynamics in the environment is essential for understanding the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of aquatic systems. Here we describe the development and optimization of a DNA microarray method for the detection and quantification of functional genes in the environment and report on their preliminary application to the study of the denitrification gene nirS in the Choptank River-Chesapeake Bay system. Intergenic and intragenic resolution constraints were determined by an oligonucleotide (70-mer) microarray approach. Complete signal separation was achieved when comparing unrelated genes within the nitrogen cycle (amoA, nifH, nirK, and nirS) and detecting different variants of the same gene, nirK, corresponding to organisms with two different physiological modes, ammonia oxidizers and denitrifying halobenzoate degraders. The limits of intragenic resolution were investigated with a microarray containing 64 nirS sequences comprising 14 cultured organisms and 50 clones obtained from the Choptank River in Maryland. The nirS oligonucleotides covered a range of sequence identities from approximately 40 to 100%. The threshold values for specificity were determined to be 87% sequence identity and a target-to-probe perfect match-to-mismatch binding free-energy ratio of 0.56. The lower detection limit was 10 pg of DNA (equivalent to approximately 10(7) copies) per target per microarray. Hybridization patterns on the microarray differed between sediment samples from two stations in the Choptank River, implying important differences in the composition of the denitirifer community along an environmental gradient of salinity, inorganic nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon. This work establishes a useful set of design constraints (independent of the target gene) for the implementation of functional gene microarrays for environmental applications. PMID:12571043

  20. The effect of previous weight training and concurrent weight training on endurance for functional electrical stimulation cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold Scott; Laymon, Mike

    2004-04-01

    Forty-five paraplegic subjects participated in three series of experiments to examine the interrelationships between previous weight training, concurrent weight training and muscle strength and endurance during cycle ergometry elicited by functional electrical stimulation (FES). When subjects only underwent isokinetic weight training (series 1) three times per week on the quadriceps, hamstring and gluteus maximus groups for 12 weeks, strength increased linearly with time for all three muscle groups from an initial average of 17 N to 269 N at the end of training, a 15-fold increase. In the second series of experiments, different groups of subjects either underwent no strength training prior to cycle ergometry or underwent strength training of these same three muscle groups for 2 weeks, four weeks, or 6 weeks prior to cycle ergometry. Any strength training was effective in increasing endurance for cycle ergometry. However, the rate of increase in endurance during cycle ergometry with no prior strength training was only 5 min per week, whereas the rate of increase in cycle endurance during ergometry was 14.6, 25.0, and 33.3 min per week increase in endurance after strength training for 2.4 and 6 weeks, respectively. When weight training was accomplished during FES cycle ergometry (concurrently) in a third series of experiments, there was an additional increase in endurance during cycling if strength training was concurrently accomplished. With no weight training, endurance increased 23 min per week, whereas with concurrent weight training at three times per week, endurance increased during cycling by 41.6 min per week. The results of these experiments seem to show a clear advantage of weight training concurrently and before FES cycle ergometry. Results are given as mean (SD). PMID:14618331

  1. Parametric Flutter Analysis of the TCA Configuration and Recommendation for FFM Design and Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Myles; Lenkey, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The current HSR Aeroelasticity plan to design, build, and test a full span, free flying transonic flutter model in the TDT has many technical obstacles that must be overcome for a successful program. One technical obstacle is the determination of a suitable configuration and point in the sky to use in setting the scaling point for the ASE models program. Determining this configuration and point in the sky requires balancing several conflicting requirements, including model buildability, tunnel test safety, and the ability of the model to represent the flutter mechanisms of interest. As will be discussed in detail in subsequent sections, the current TCA design exhibits several flutter mechanisms of interest. It has been decided that the ASE models program will focus on the low frequency symmetric flutter mechanism, and will make no attempt to investigate high frequency flutter mechanisms. There are several reasons for this choice. First, it is believed that the high frequency flutter mechanisms are similar in nature to classical wing bending/torsion flutter, and therefore there is more confidence that this mechanism can be predicted using current techniques. The low frequency mode, on the other hand, is a highly coupled mechanism involving wing, body, tail, and engine motion which may be very difficult to predict. Second, the high frequency flutter modes result in very small weight penalties (several hundred pounds), while suppression of the low frequency mechanism inside the flight envelope causes thousands of pounds to be added to the structure. In order to successfully test the low frequency flutter mode of interest, a suitable starting configuration and point in the sky must be identified. The configuration and point in the sky must result in a wind tunnel model that (1) represents the low-frequency wing/body/engine/empennage flutter mechanisms that are unique to HSCT configurations, (2) flutters at an acceptably low frequency in the tunnel, (3) flutters at an acceptably low dynamic pressure in the tunnel, (4) allows sufficient weight for model buildability without inordinately high cost, and (5) has significant separation between the target flutter mechanism and other, potentially catastrophic, flutter mechanisms.

  2. Effect of adjusting pulse durations of functional electrical stimulation cycling on energy expenditure and fatigue after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Poarch, Hunter J; Dolbow, David D; Castillo, Teodoro; Gater, David R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of three different pulse durations (200, 350, and 500 microseconds [P200, P350, and P500, respectively]) on oxygen uptake (VO2), cycling performance, and energy expenditure (EE) percentage of fatigue of the knee extensor muscle group immediately and 48 to 72 h after cycling in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). A convenience sample of 10 individuals with motor complete SCI participated in a repeated-measures design using a functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycle ergometer over a 3 wk period. There was no difference among the three FES protocols on relative VO2 or cycling EE. Delta EE between exercise and rest was 42% greater in both P500 and P350 compared with P200 (p = 0.07), whereas recovery VO2 was 23% greater in P350 compared with P200 (p = 0.03). There was no difference in the outcomes of the three pulse durations on muscle fatigue. Knee extensor torque significantly decreased immediately after (p < 0.001) and 48 to 72 h after (p < 0.001) FES leg cycling. Lengthening pulse duration did not affect submaximal or relative VO2 or EE, total EE, and time to fatigue. Greater recovery VO2 and delta EE were noted in P350 and P500 compared with P200. An acute bout of FES leg cycling resulted in torque reduction that did not fully recover 48 to 72 h after cycling. PMID:25803753

  3. The Fate and Function of Therapeutic Antiaddiction Monoclonal Antibodies across the Reproductive Cycle of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Jonathan J.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Williams, D. Keith; Gentry, W. Brooks

    2011-01-01

    During preclinical development of neuroprotective antiaddiction therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against phencyclidine (PCP) and (+)-methamphetamine, we discovered novel, gestation stage-specific changes in mAb disposition spanning the entire reproductive cycle of female rats. Each pharmacological change was independent of mAb dose and antigen target but was precisely coincident with transitions between the gestational trimesters, parturition, and lactation periods of the female reproductive cycle. Whereas anti-PCP mAb6B5 terminal elimination half-life (t1/2λz) in nonpregnant females was 6.6 ± 1.6 days, the mAb6B5 t1/2λz significantly changed to 3.7 ± 0.4 days, then 1.4 ± 0.1 days, then 3.0 ± 0.4 days in the second trimester, third trimester, and postpartum periods, respectively (p < 0.05 for each change). Initially, these evolving changes in mAb6B5 clearance (3.3-fold), distribution volume (1.8-fold), and elimination half-life (4.7-fold) affected our ability to sustain sufficient mAb6B5 levels to sequester PCP in the bloodstream. However, understanding the mechanisms underlying each transition allowed development of an adaptive mAb-dosing paradigm, which substantially reduced PCP levels in dam brains and fetuses throughout pregnancy. These mAb functional studies also revealed that antidrug mAbs readily cross the placenta before syncytiotrophoblast barrier maturation, demonstrating the dynamic nature of mAb pharmacokinetics in pregnancy and the importance of maintaining maternal mAb levels. These studies provide the first preclinical pregnancy model in any species for chronic mAb dosing and could have important implications for the use of antibody therapies involving blood organ barriers (such as addiction) or other chronic diseases in women of childbearing age (e.g., irritable bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis). PMID:20962030

  4. Existence of limit cycles and homoclinic bifurcation in a plant-herbivore model with toxin-determined functional response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yulin; Feng, Zhilan; Zheng, Yiqiang; Cen, Xiuli

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we study a two-dimensional toxin-determined functional response model (TDFRM). The toxin-determined functional response explicitly takes into consideration the reduction in the consumption of plants by herbivore due to chemical defense, which generates more complex dynamics of the plant-herbivore interactions. The purpose of the present paper is to analyze the existence of limit cycles and bifurcations of the model. By applying the theories of rotated vector fields and the extended planar termination principle, we establish the conditions for the existence of limit cycles and homoclinic loop. It is shown that a limit cycle is generated in a supercritical Hopf bifurcation and terminated in a homoclinic bifurcation, as the parameters vary. Analytic proofs are provided for all results, which generalize the results presented in [11].

  5. Advanced oxidation degradation kinetics as a function of ultraviolet LED duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Kelsey; Spencer, Michael; Bates, Christopher; Miller, Michael E; Almquist, Catherine; Grimaila, Michael; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Racz, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) may be a viable option as a UV light source for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) utilizing photocatalysts or oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. The effect of UV-LED duty cycle, expressed as the percentage of time the LED is powered, was investigated in an AOP with hydrogen peroxide, using methylene blue (MB) to assess contaminant degradation. The UV-LED AOP degraded the MB at all duty cycles. However, adsorption of MB onto the LED emitting surface caused a linear decline in reactor performance over time. With regard to the effect of duty cycle, the observed rate constant of MB degradation, after being adjusted to account for the duty cycle, was greater for 5 and 10% duty cycles than higher duty cycles, providing a value approximately 160% higher at 5% duty cycle than continuous operation. This increase in adjusted rate constant at low duty cycles, as well as contaminant fouling of the LED surface, may impact design and operational considerations for pulsed UV-LED AOP systems. PMID:25945855

  6. Functional genes to assess nitrogen cycling and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation: primers and processing matter

    PubMed Central

    Penton, C. Ryan; Johnson, Timothy A.; Quensen, John F.; Iwai, Shoko; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting sequencing to genes involved in key environmental processes, i.e., ecofunctional genes, provides an opportunity to sample nature's gene guilds to greater depth and help link community structure to process-level outcomes. Vastly different approaches have been implemented for sequence processing and, ultimately, for taxonomic placement of these gene reads. The overall quality of next generation sequence analysis of functional genes is dependent on multiple steps and assumptions of unknown diversity. To illustrate current issues surrounding amplicon read processing we provide examples for three ecofunctional gene groups. A combination of in silico, environmental and cultured strain sequences was used to test new primers targeting the dioxin and dibenzofuran degrading genes dxnA1, dbfA1, and carAa. The majority of obtained environmental sequences were classified into novel sequence clusters, illustrating the discovery value of the approach. For the nitrite reductase step in denitrification, the well-known nirK primers exhibited deficiencies in reference database coverage, illustrating the need to refine primer-binding sites and/or to design multiple primers, while nirS primers exhibited bias against five phyla. Amino acid-based OTU clustering of these two N-cycle genes from soil samples yielded only 114 unique nirK and 45 unique nirS genus-level groupings, likely a reflection of constricted primer coverage. Finally, supervised and non-supervised OTU analysis methods were compared using the nifH gene of nitrogen fixation, with generally similar outcomes, but the clustering (non-supervised) method yielded higher diversity estimates and stronger site-based differences. High throughput amplicon sequencing can provide inexpensive and rapid access to nature's related sequences by circumventing the culturing barrier, but each unique gene requires individual considerations in terms of primer design and sequence processing and classification. PMID:24062736

  7. Stable isotope approaches for tracking C cycling and function in microbial communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pett-Ridge, J.

    2008-12-01

    Identifying the microorganisms responsible for specific processes in C cycling remains a major challenge in environmental microbiology, one that requires integration of multiple techniques. Stable isotope probing, or SIP, has come to represent a variety of powerful approaches that allow simultaneous identification of identity and function in microbial communities. Bulk methods such as DNA/RNA-SIP and PLFA-SIP are well developed and allow tracking of a multitude of C substrates (acetate, cellulose, CH4, CO2, and plant litter) into specific microbial consumers. However, to understand the spatio-temporal context of may key C transformations and microbial interactions, new imaging technologies are needed to analyze processes and properties of macromolecule complexes, microbes, plant root cells, soil (micro)aggregates, phytoplankton and marine snow as they undergoes formation and decomposition. New and sensitive in situ approaches include NanoSIMS single cell analysis, isotope arrays, and combinations of immuno- or FISH labeling with high resolution isotope imaging. Recent work illustrates how these powerful new techniques use targeted stable isotope probing to measure biological, physical and chemical processes and can be used in soil systems to study microbial mats or rhizosphere interactions. In both terrestrial and aquatic systems, they allow us to directly link C and other nutrient metabolism at the organismal level. Lastly, these new aproaches may be of great use in the study of trophic cascades and metabolic networks. While cross-feeding is often thought of as a confounding effect in SIP-type studies, with fine scale temporal sampling and FISH-SIMS analysis, we have the opportunity trace C flows through microbial foodwebs and to their eventual fate in stabilized organic-mineral complexes.

  8. Sexual functioning and commitment to their current relationship among breastfeeding and regularly cycling women in Manila, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Escasa-Dorne, Michelle J

    2015-03-01

    This project investigates the relationship between lactation and female sexual functioning and relationship commitment among partnered women in urban Manila. Previous literature suggests that the time after giving birth is often rife with lower sexual functioning and relationship dissatisfaction. Given the important role of caregiving by multiple individuals in humans, the current cross-sectional study suggests that female sexuality may decline immediately after giving birth but then may increase afterwards. Non-cycling, breastfeeding (n = 86); cycling, breastfeeding (n = 48); and nulliparous, regularly cycling (n = 105) women were recruited from neighborhood health centers in Manila to complete questionnaires that assessed sexual functioning and relationship satisfaction, along with demographic variables. Cycling, breastfeeding women report the highest sexual functioning scores and commitment scores. Females undergoing life history trade-offs between mating effort and parenting effort during the postpartum phase may employ a strategy in which they continue investment both in their offspring and in a romantic relationship. Variations in self-reported sexual functioning, level of commitment in a relationship, and love toward her current partner may indicate that breastfeeding women engage in sexual activities as part of a relationship maintenance strategy. Cultural and life history factors will serve as a framework for the findings. The current findings suggest women in Manila may experience a post-birth increase in sexual functioning that may be higher than pre-pregnancy levels. Future studies should incorporate a longitudinal component or a memory recall on pre-pregnancy and post-birth sexual functioning levels. PMID:25847056

  9. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: The Functional Unit in the Life Cycle Inventory Analysis of Degreasing Processes in the Metal-Processing Industry

    PubMed

    Finkbeiner; Hoffmann; Kreisel

    1997-07-01

    / In 1986 degreasing processes in the German metal-processing industry contributed about 70,000 t to the emission of chlorinated C1 and C2 hydrocarbons (trichloroethane, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, dichloromethane). Measures aiming at the reduction of toxic emissions and ozone depletion potential (ODP) may possibly lead to a shift of environmental impacts towards higher energy consumption, emission of waste water, and volatile organic compounds (VOC) with photochemical oxidant creation potential (POCP). The present article concerns itself with a life cycle assessment of the three main degreasing processes in order to compare their integral environmental impacts with one another. This is supplemented by presenting the methodology of the life cycle inventory life cycle inventory analysis (LCI). Generally, the applicability of the established LCI method can be shown quite clearly. However, some difficulties arise, especially at the stage of the goal definition, as the use of the process and the functional unit cannot be pinned down as easily and neatly as for most other products. The definition of the use of the process and the functional unit is not as straightforward as for most products. Among the potential functional units identified are the mass of removed impurities, cleaning time, cleaning work, percentage of purity, throughput of parts, loads, mass or surface and virtual coefficients. The mass of removed impurities turned out to be the most suitable parameter for measuring the technical performance of degreasing processes. The article discusses background, purpose, scope, system boundaries, target group, process tree and representativeness of the present study.KEY WORDS: Functional unit; Life cycle assessment; Life cycle inventory analysis; Degreasing processes; Metal processing PMID:9175550

  11. Study of the damage evolution function of tin silver copper in cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasaimeh, Awni

    The present research focused on the assessment of solder joint fatigue life in microelectronics assemblies. A general concern of any reliability engineer is whether accelerated tests are relevant to field conditions. The risk of this was minimized by developing an approach to reduce the duration of an accelerated thermal cycling test, thus allowing for the use of less accelerated test conditions. For this purpose the conventional dye and pry technique was improved and used together with artificial neural networks to measure and characterize very early stages of crack growth. The same work also demonstrated a quantitative link between thermal cycling induced recrystallization and a strong acceleration of the subsequent fatigue crack growth and failure. A new study was conducted in which different combinations of annealing and isothermal cycling provided a systematic characterization of the effects of a range of individual parameters on the recrystallization. Experiments showed the ongoing coarsening of secondary precipitates to have a clear effect on recrystallization. The rate of recrystallization was also shown not to scale with the inelastic energy deposition. This means that the most popular current thermal cycling model cannot apply to SnAgCu solder joints. Recrystallization of the Sn grains is usually not the rate limiting mechanism in isothermal cycling. The crack initiation stage often takes up a much greater fraction of the overall life, and the eventual failure of BGA joints tends to involve transgranular crack growth instead. Cycling of individual solder joints allowed for monitoring of the evolution of the solder properties and the rate of inelastic energy deposition. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation and the subsequent number of cycles to failure were shown to be determined by the inelastic energy deposition. This provides for a simple model for the extrapolation of accelerated test results to the much milder cycling amplitudes characteristic of long term service conditions based on conventional Finite Element Modeling. It also offers a critical basis for the ongoing development of a practical model to account for the often dramatic break-down of Miner's rule of linear damage accumulation under variable cycling amplitudes as expected in realistic applications.

  12. Icotinib inhibits the invasion of Tca8113 cells via downregulation of nuclear factor κB-mediated matrix metalloproteinase expression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CAILING; YAN, JIANGUO; YUAN, GUOYAN; ZHANG, YINGHUA; LU, DERONG; REN, MINGXIN; CUI, WEIGANG

    2014-01-01

    Icotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which has been revealed to inhibit proliferation in tumor cells. However, the effect of icotinib on cancer cell metastasis remains to be explained. This study examines the effect of icotinib on the migration and invasion of squamous cells of tongue carcinoma (Tca8113 cells) in vitro. The results of the Boyden chamber invasion assay demonstrated that icotinib reduced cell invasion, suppressed the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. In addition, icotinib was found to significantly decrease the protein levels of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, which suggested that icotinib inhibits NF-κB activity. Furthermore, treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, suppressed cell invasion and MMP-2 expression. These results suggested that icotinib inhibits the invasion of Tca8113 cells by downregulating MMP via the inactivation of the NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25120710

  13. Non-target effects of repeated chlorothalonil application on soil nitrogen cycling: The key functional gene study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manyun; Xu, Zhihong; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Wang, Jun; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Li, Zhengao

    2016-02-01

    The widespread and increasing application of chlorothalonil (CTN) raises concerns about its non-target impacts, but little information is available on the effect of CTN on the key functional genes related to soil nitrogen (N) cycling, especially in the case of repeated applications. In the present study, a microcosm incubation was conducted to determine CTN residues and the impacts on the abundances of key functional genes related to N cycling after repeated CTN applications. The results demonstrated that repeated CTN applications at the recommended application rate and five times the recommended rate led to the accumulation of CTN residue in soil at concentrations of 5.59 and 78.79 mg kg(-1), respectively, by the end of incubation. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) revealed that repeated CTN applications had negative effects on the chiA and aprA gene abundances. There were significantly negative correlations between CTN residues and abundances of AOA and AOB genes. In addition, the abundances of key functional genes involved in soil denitrification were declined by repeated CTN applications with the sole exception of the nosZ gene. This study suggests that repeated CTN applications could lead to the accumulation of CTN residue and generate somewhat inconsistent and erratic effects on the abundances of key functional genes related to soil N cycling. PMID:26613517

  14. Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life

    SciTech Connect

    Maleki, Hossein; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Hallmark, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The impact of elevated temperature chargeedischarge cycling on thermal conductivity (K-value) of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) cells of various chemistries from three different manufacturers was investigated. These included high voltage (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.35 V), wide voltage (Si:C/LiCoO2:2.7e4.35 V) and conventional (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.2 V) chemistries. Investigation results show limited variability within the in-plane and through-plane K-values for the fresh cells with graphite-based anodes from all three suppliers. After 500 cycles at 45 C, in-plane and through-plane K-values of the high voltage cells reduced less vs. those for the wide voltage cells. Such results suggest that high temperature cycling could have a greater impact on thermal properties of Si:C cells than on the LIP cells with graphite (Gr) anode cells we tested. This difference is due to the excess swelling of Si:C-anode based cells vs. Gr-anode cells during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Thermal modeling is used to evaluate the impact of K-value changes, due to cycles at 45 C, on the cells internal heat propagation under internal short circuit condition that leads to localized meltdown of the separator.

  15. Glycerolipid/free fatty acid cycle and islet β-cell function in health, obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Prentki, Marc; Madiraju, S R Murthy

    2012-04-28

    Pancreatic β-cells secrete insulin in response to fluctuations in blood fuel concentrations, in particular glucose and fatty acids. However, chronic fuel surfeit can overwhelm the metabolic, signaling and secretory capacity of the β-cell leading to its dysfunction and death - often referred to as glucolipotoxicity. In β-cells and many other cells, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways converge into a glycerolipid/free fatty acid (GL/FFA) cycle, which is driven by the substrates, glycerol-3-phosphate and fatty acyl-CoA, derived from glucose and fatty acids, respectively. Although the overall operation of GL/FFA cycle, consisting of lipolysis and lipogenesis, is "futile" in terms of energy expenditure, this metabolic cycle likely plays an indispensable role for various β-cell functions, in particular insulin secretion and excess fuel detoxification. In this review, we discuss the significance of GL/FFA cycle in the β-cell, its regulation and role in generating essential metabolic signals that participate in the lipid amplification arm of glucose stimulated insulin secretion and in β-cell growth. We propose the novel concept that the lipolytic segment of GL/FFA cycle is instrumental in producing signals for insulin secretion, whereas, the lipogenic segment generates signals relevant for β-cell survival/death and growth/proliferation. PMID:22108437

  16. Alternating stimulation of synergistic muscles during functional electrical stimulation cycling improves endurance in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Decker, M J; Griffin, L; Abraham, L D; Brandt, L

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycling for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) are limited by high rates of muscular fatigue. FES-cycling performance limits and surface mechanomyography (MMG) of 12 persons with SCI were compared under two different stimulation protocols of the quadriceps muscles. One strategy used the standard "co-activation" protocol from the manufacturer of the FES cycle which involved intermittent simultaneous activation of the entire quadriceps muscle group for 400 ms. The other strategy was an "alternation" stimulation protocol which involved alternately stimulating the rectus femoris (RF) muscle for 100 ms and the vastus medialis (VM) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles for 100 ms, with two sets with a 400 ms burst. Thus, during the alternation protocol, each of the muscle groups rested for two 100 ms "off" periods in each 400 ms burst. There was no difference in average cycling cadence (28 RPM) between the two protocols. The alternation stimulation protocol produced longer ride times and longer virtual distances traveled and used lower stimulation intensity levels with no differences in average MMG amplitudes compared to the co-activation protocol. These results demonstrate that FES-cycling performance can be enhanced by a synergistic muscle alternation stimulation strategy. PMID:20708950

  17. Biochar affects soil organic matter cycling and microbial functions but does not alter microbial community structure in a paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Wang, Jingyuan; Dippold, Michaela; Gao, Yang; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-06-15

    The application of biochar (BC) in conjunction with mineral fertilizers is one of the most promising management practices recommended to improve soil quality. However, the interactive mechanisms of BC and mineral fertilizer addition affecting microbial communities and functions associated with soil organic matter (SOM) cycling are poorly understood. We investigated the SOM in physical and chemical fractions, microbial community structure (using phospholipid fatty acid analysis, PLFA) and functions (by analyzing enzymes involved in C and N cycling and Biolog) in a 6-year field experiment with BC and NPK amendment. BC application increased total soil C and particulate organic C for 47.4-50.4% and 63.7-74.6%, respectively. The effects of BC on the microbial community and C-cycling enzymes were dependent on fertilization. Addition of BC alone did not change the microbial community compared with the control, but altered the microbial community structure in conjunction with NPK fertilization. SOM fractions accounted for 55% of the variance in the PLFA-related microbial community structure. The particulate organic N explained the largest variation in the microbial community structure. Microbial metabolic activity strongly increased after BC addition, particularly the utilization of amino acids and amines due to an increase in the activity of proteolytic (l-leucine aminopeptidase) enzymes. These results indicate that microorganisms start to mine N from the SOM to compensate for high C:N ratios after BC application, which consequently accelerate cycling of stable N. Concluding, BC in combination with NPK fertilizer application strongly affected microbial community composition and functions, which consequently influenced SOM cycling. PMID:26974565

  18. Cuckoo Search Algorithm Based on Repeat-Cycle Asymptotic Self-Learning and Self-Evolving Disturbance for Function Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie-sheng; Li, Shu-xia; Song, Jiang-di

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve convergence velocity and optimization accuracy of the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm for solving the function optimization problems, a new improved cuckoo search algorithm based on the repeat-cycle asymptotic self-learning and self-evolving disturbance (RC-SSCS) is proposed. A disturbance operation is added into the algorithm by constructing a disturbance factor to make a more careful and thorough search near the bird's nests location. In order to select a reasonable repeat-cycled disturbance number, a further study on the choice of disturbance times is made. Finally, six typical test functions are adopted to carry out simulation experiments, meanwhile, compare algorithms of this paper with two typical swarm intelligence algorithms particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm and artificial bee colony (ABC) algorithm. The results show that the improved cuckoo search algorithm has better convergence velocity and optimization accuracy. PMID:26366164

  19. Spatial Distribution of Cellular Function: The Partitioning of Proteins between Mitochondria and the Nucleus in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qattan, Amal T.; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent proteomics analysis of the nuclei and mitochondria of MCF7 breast cancer cells identified 985 proteins (40% of all detected proteins) present in both organelles. Numerous proteins from all five complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., NDUFA5, NDUFB10, NDUFS1, NDUF2, SDHA, UQRB, UQRC2, UQCRH, COX5A, COX5B, MT-CO2, ATP5A1, ATP5B, ATP5H, etc.), from the TCA-cycle (DLST, IDH2, IDH3A, OGDH, SUCLAG2, etc.), and from glycolysis (ALDOA, ENO1, FBP1, GPI, PGK1, TALDO1, etc.) were distributed to both the nucleus and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins involved in nuclear/mitochondrial RNA processing/translation and Ras/Rab signaling showed different partitioning patterns. The identity of the OxPhos, TCA-cycle, and glycolysis proteins distributed to both the nucleus and mitochondria provides evidence for spatio-functional integration of these processes over the two different subcellular organelles. We suggest that there are unrecognized aspects of functional coordination between the nucleus and mitochondria, that integration of core functional processes via wide subcellular distribution of constituent proteins is a common characteristic of cells, and that subcellular spatial integration of function may be a vital aspect of cancer. PMID:23051583

  20. Patterns of matrix metalloproteinase expression in cycling endometrium imply differential functions and regulation by steroid hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, W H; Matrisian, L M; Giudice, L C; Dsupin, B; Cannon, P; Svitek, C; Gorstein, F; Osteen, K G

    1994-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases are a highly regulated family of enzymes, that together can degrade most components of the extracellular matrix. These proteins are active in normal and pathological processes involving tissue remodeling; however, their sites of synthesis and specific roles are poorly understood. Using in situ hybridization, we determined cellular distributions of matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, in endometrium during the reproductive cycle. The mRNAs for all the metalloproteinases were detected in menstrual endometrium, but with different tissue distributions. The mRNA for matrilysin was localized to epithelium, while the others were detected in stromal cells. Only the transcripts for the 72-kD gelatinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 were detected throughout the cycle. Transcripts for stromelysin-2 and the 92-kD gelatinase were only detected in late secretory and menstrual endometrium, while those for matrilysin, the 72-kD gelatinase, and stromelysin-3 were also consistently detected in proliferative endometrium. These data indicate that matrix metalloproteinases are expressed in cell-type, tissue, and reproductive cycle-specific patterns, consistent with regulation by steroid hormones, and with specific roles in the complex tissue growth and remodeling processes occurring in the endometrium during the reproductive cycle. Images PMID:8083380

  1. Computational functions in biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed Central

    Arkin, A; Ross, J

    1994-01-01

    In prior work we demonstrated the implementation of logic gates, sequential computers (universal Turing machines), and parallel computers by means of the kinetics of chemical reaction mechanisms. In the present article we develop this subject further by first investigating the computational properties of several enzymatic (single and multiple) reaction mechanisms: we show their steady states are analogous to either Boolean or fuzzy logic gates. Nearly perfect digital function is obtained only in the regime in which the enzymes are saturated with their substrates. With these enzymatic gates, we construct combinational chemical networks that execute a given truth-table. The dynamic range of a network's output is strongly affected by "input/output matching" conditions among the internal gate elements. We find a simple mechanism, similar to the interconversion of fructose-6-phosphate between its two bisphosphate forms (fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and fructose-2,6-bisphosphate), that functions analogously to an AND gate. When the simple model is supplanted with one in which the enzyme rate laws are derived from experimental data, the steady state of the mechanism functions as an asymmetric fuzzy aggregation operator with properties akin to a fuzzy AND gate. The qualitative behavior of the mechanism does not change when situated within a large model of glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. The mechanism, in this case, switches the pathway's mode from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis in response to chemical signals of low blood glucose (cAMP) and abundant fuel for the TCA cycle (acetyl coenzyme A). Images FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 10 FIGURE 12 FIGURE 13 FIGURE 14 FIGURE 15 FIGURE 16 PMID:7948674

  2. Decoupling of soil nutrient cycles as a function of aridity in global drylands.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Maestre, Fernando T; Gallardo, Antonio; Bowker, Matthew A; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Quero, Jose Luis; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; García-Gómez, Miguel; Soliveres, Santiago; García-Palacios, Pablo; Berdugo, Miguel; Valencia, Enrique; Escolar, Cristina; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Carreira, José Antonio; Chaieb, Mohamed; Conceição, Abel A; Derak, Mchich; Eldridge, David J; Escudero, Adrián; Espinosa, Carlos I; Gaitán, Juan; Gatica, M Gabriel; Gómez-González, Susana; Guzman, Elizabeth; Gutiérrez, Julio R; Florentino, Adriana; Hepper, Estela; Hernández, Rosa M; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Liu, Jushan; Mau, Rebecca L; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Naseri, Kamal; Noumi, Zouhaier; Polo, Vicente; Prina, Aníbal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramírez, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Collantes, David A; Romão, Roberto; Tighe, Matthew; Torres, Duilio; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Ungar, Eugene D; Val, James; Wamiti, Wanyoike; Wang, Deli; Zaady, Eli

    2013-10-31

    The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are interlinked by primary production, respiration and decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. It has been suggested that the C, N and P cycles could become uncoupled under rapid climate change because of the different degrees of control exerted on the supply of these elements by biological and geochemical processes. Climatic controls on biogeochemical cycles are particularly relevant in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid ecosystems (drylands) because their biological activity is mainly driven by water availability. The increase in aridity predicted for the twenty-first century in many drylands worldwide may therefore threaten the balance between these cycles, differentially affecting the availability of essential nutrients. Here we evaluate how aridity affects the balance between C, N and P in soils collected from 224 dryland sites from all continents except Antarctica. We find a negative effect of aridity on the concentration of soil organic C and total N, but a positive effect on the concentration of inorganic P. Aridity is negatively related to plant cover, which may favour the dominance of physical processes such as rock weathering, a major source of P to ecosystems, over biological processes that provide more C and N, such as litter decomposition. Our findings suggest that any predicted increase in aridity with climate change will probably reduce the concentrations of N and C in global drylands, but increase that of P. These changes would uncouple the C, N and P cycles in drylands and could negatively affect the provision of key services provided by these ecosystems. PMID:24172979

  3. Decoupling of soil nutrient cycles as a function of aridity in global drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel; Maestre, Fernando T.; Gallardo, Antonio; Bowker, Matthew A.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Quero, Jose Luis; Ochoa, Victoria; Gozalo, Beatriz; García-Gómez, Miguel; Soliveres, Santiago; García-Palacios, Pablo; Berdugo, Miguel; Valencia, Enrique; Escolar, Cristina; Arredondo, Tulio; Barraza-Zepeda, Claudia; Bran, Donaldo; Carreira, José Antonio; Chaieb, Mohamed; Conceição, Abel A.; Derak, Mchich; Eldridge, David J.; Escudero, Adrián; Espinosa, Carlos I.; Gaitán, Juan; Gatica, M. Gabriel; Gómez-González, Susana; Guzman, Elizabeth; Gutiérrez, Julio R.; Florentino, Adriana; Hepper, Estela; Hernández, Rosa M.; Huber-Sannwald, Elisabeth; Jankju, Mohammad; Liu, Jushan; Mau, Rebecca L.; Miriti, Maria; Monerris, Jorge; Naseri, Kamal; Noumi, Zouhaier; Polo, Vicente; Prina, Aníbal; Pucheta, Eduardo; Ramírez, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Collantes, David A.; Romão, Roberto; Tighe, Matthew; Torres, Duilio; Torres-Díaz, Cristian; Ungar, Eugene D.; Val, James; Wamiti, Wanyoike; Wang, Deli; Zaady, Eli

    2013-10-01

    The biogeochemical cycles of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) are interlinked by primary production, respiration and decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems. It has been suggested that the C, N and P cycles could become uncoupled under rapid climate change because of the different degrees of control exerted on the supply of these elements by biological and geochemical processes. Climatic controls on biogeochemical cycles are particularly relevant in arid, semi-arid and dry sub-humid ecosystems (drylands) because their biological activity is mainly driven by water availability. The increase in aridity predicted for the twenty-first century in many drylands worldwide may therefore threaten the balance between these cycles, differentially affecting the availability of essential nutrients. Here we evaluate how aridity affects the balance between C, N and P in soils collected from 224 dryland sites from all continents except Antarctica. We find a negative effect of aridity on the concentration of soil organic C and total N, but a positive effect on the concentration of inorganic P. Aridity is negatively related to plant cover, which may favour the dominance of physical processes such as rock weathering, a major source of P to ecosystems, over biological processes that provide more C and N, such as litter decomposition. Our findings suggest that any predicted increase in aridity with climate change will probably reduce the concentrations of N and C in global drylands, but increase that of P. These changes would uncouple the C, N and P cycles in drylands and could negatively affect the provision of key services provided by these ecosystems.

  4. Fish TRIM39 regulates cell cycle progression and exerts its antiviral function against iridovirus and nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Youhua; Yu, Yepin; Yang, Ying; Xu, Meng; Chen, Xiuli; Ni, Songwei; Qin, Qiwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing proteins exert important immune regulatory roles through regulating different signaling pathways in response to different stimuli. TRIM39, a member of the TRIM family, is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase which could regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. However, the antiviral activity of TRIM39 is not explored. Here, a TRIM39 homolog from grouper, Epinephelus coioides (EcTRIM39) was cloned, and its effects on cell cycle progression and fish virus replication were investigated. The full-length EcTRIM39 cDNA was composed of 2535 bp and encoded a polypeptide of 543 amino acids with 70% identity with TRIM39 homologs from bicolor damselfish. Amino acid alignment analysis indicated that EcTRIM39 contained a RING finger, B-box and SPRY domain. Expression profile analysis revealed that EcTRIM39 was abundant in intestine, spleen and skin. Upon different stimuli in vivo, the EcTRIM39 transcript was obviously up-regulated after challenging with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). Using fluorescence microscopy, we found that EcTRIM39 localized in the cytoplasm and formed aggregates in grouper spleen (GS) cells. The ectopic expression of EcTRIM39 in vitro affected the cell cycle progression via mediating G1/S transition. Moreover, the RING domain was essential for its accurate localization and effect on cell cycle. In addition, overexpression of EcTRIM39 significantly inhibited viral gene transcription of SGIV and red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) in vitro, and the mutant of RING exerted the opposite effect. Together, our results demonstrated that fish TRIM39 not only regulated the cell cycle progression, but also acted as an important regulator of fish innate immune response against viruses. PMID:26784918

  5. Metabolomic analyses reveal profound differences in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism in glucose-responsive and -unresponsive clonal β-cell lines.

    PubMed

    Spégel, Peter; Malmgren, Siri; Sharoyko, Vladimir V; Newsholme, Philip; Koeck, Thomas; Mulder, Hindrik

    2011-04-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells is controlled by complex metabolic and energetic changes provoked by exposure to metabolic fuels. Perturbations in these processes lead to impaired insulin secretion, the ultimate cause of T2D (Type 2 diabetes). To increase our understanding of stimulus-secretion coupling and metabolic processes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of T2D, a comprehensive investigation of the metabolic response in the glucose-responsive INS-1 832/13 and glucose-unresponsive INS-1 832/2 β-cell lines was performed. For this metabolomics analysis, we used GC/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) combined with multivariate statistics. We found that perturbed secretion in the 832/2 line was characterized by disturbed coupling of glycolytic and TCA (tricarboxylic acid)-cycle metabolism. The importance of this metabolic coupling was reinforced by our observation that insulin secretion partially could be reinstated by stimulation of the cells with mitochondrial fuels which bypass glycolytic metabolism. Furthermore, metabolic and functional profiling of additional β-cell lines (INS-1, INS-1 832/1) confirmed the important role of coupled glycolytic and TCA-cycle metabolism in stimulus-secretion coupling. Dependence of the unresponsive clones on glycolytic metabolism was paralleled by increased stabilization of HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α). The relevance of a similar perturbation for human T2D was suggested by increased expression of HIF-1α target genes in islets from T2D patients. PMID:21208194

  6. Test bed with force-measuring crank for static and dynamic investigations on cycling by means of functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gföhler, M; Angeli, T; Eberharter, T; Lugner, P; Mayr, W; Hofer, C

    2001-06-01

    Cycling by means of functional electrical stimulation (FES) is an attractive training method for individuals with paraplegia. The physiological benefits of FES are combined with the psychological incentive of independent locomotion. In addition, cycling has the advantage in that the generated muscle forces are converted into drive power with relatively high efficiency compared to other means of locomotion, e.g., walking. For the design of an appropriate cycling device and the development of optimal stimulation patterns, it has to be investigated how the geometry for FES cycling, influenced by individual parameters of the FES-generated drive torques and the magnitude of variations among subjects with paraplegia, can be optimized. This study shows the design of a freely adjustable test bed with additional motor drive which allows static and dynamic measurements of force components and drive torque at the crank. Furthermore, the influence of geometry and various individual parameters on FES pedaling can be tested for each subject individually. A pedal path realized by a three-bar linkage that was optimized according to preliminary simulations further increases leg cycling efficiency. Safety precautions avoid injuries in case of excessive forces, e.g., spasms. Test results illustrate the application of the test bed and measurement routines. A test series with four paraplegic test persons showed that the presented static and dynamic measurement routines allow to provide optimal stimulation patterns for individual paraplegic subjects. While pedaling with these optimal stimulation patterns only negligible negative active drive torques, due to active muscle forces, were applied to the crank and sufficient drive power was generated to power a cycle independently. PMID:11474970

  7. ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 inhibits the growth, migration, and invasion of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong-Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu-Fei

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 on the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). The methods of the study are as follows: After being routinely cultured for 24 h, Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells were treated with Y-27632 solution. The morphological change of Y-27632-treated cells was observed under an optical microscope and an inverted microscope; MTT assay was performed to measure the optical density (OD) of cells and calculate cell growth inhibition rate; the change of apoptosis was detected by AnnexinV-FITC/PI assay; cell invasion and migration were measured by Transwell assay. The results were as follows: (1) With increasing concentration of Y-27632, cell morphology changed and cell apoptosis appeared; (2) MTT assay showed that inhibition effect of Y-27632 on Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells was enhanced with increasing concentrations and time (all P < 0.01); (3) Apoptosis showed that, compared with controls, the number of apoptosis cells in experimental groups was significantly increased (all P < 0.01). Apoptosis rate was elevated with increasing concentrations of Y-27632; (4) Transwell assay showed, after a treatment with Y-27632, the number of migrated and invaded Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in each group was statistically different (all P < 0.01); compared with controls, the number of migrated cell in groups treated with Y-27632 was decreased and less Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in experimental groups passed through polycarbonate membrane (all P < 0.05). The study concludes that Y-27632 can inhibit the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells, suggesting that Y-27632 may be therapeutically useful in TSCC. PMID:26468018

  8. Conserved CDC20 Cell Cycle Functions Are Carried out by Two of the Five Isoforms in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Da Ines, Olivier; Tiricz, Hilda; Kroll, Alexandra; Regulski, Krzysztof; Mergaert, Peter; Kondorosi, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Background The CDC20 and Cdh1/CCS52 proteins are substrate determinants and activators of the Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) E3 ubiquitin ligase and as such they control the mitotic cell cycle by targeting the degradation of various cell cycle regulators. In yeasts and animals the main CDC20 function is the destruction of securin and mitotic cyclins. Plants have multiple CDC20 gene copies whose functions have not been explored yet. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are five CDC20 isoforms and here we aimed at defining their contribution to cell cycle regulation, substrate selectivity and plant development. Methodology/Principal Findings Studying the gene structure and phylogeny of plant CDC20s, the expression of the five AtCDC20 gene copies and their interactions with the APC/C subunit APC10, the CCS52 proteins, components of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) and mitotic cyclin substrates, conserved CDC20 functions could be assigned for AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2. The other three intron-less genes were silent and specific for Arabidopsis. We show that AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are components of the MCC and interact with mitotic cyclins with unexpected specificity. AtCDC20.1 and AtCDC20.2 are expressed in meristems, organ primordia and AtCDC20.1 also in pollen grains and developing seeds. Knocking down both genes simultaneously by RNAi resulted in severe delay in plant development and male sterility. In these lines, the meristem size was reduced while the cell size and ploidy levels were unaffected indicating that the lower cell number and likely slowdown of the cell cycle are the cause of reduced plant growth. Conclusions/Significance The intron-containing CDC20 gene copies provide conserved and redundant functions for cell cycle progression in plants and are required for meristem maintenance, plant growth and male gametophyte formation. The Arabidopsis-specific intron-less genes are possibly retrogenes and have hitherto undefined functions or are pseudogenes. PMID:21687678

  9. Muscle Synergies in Cycling after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Correlation with Clinical Measures of Motor Function and Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Filipe O.; Torricelli, Diego; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Taylor, Julian; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Santos, Cristina; Moreno, Juan C.; Pons, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: After incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI), patients suffer important sensorimotor impairments, such as abnormal locomotion patterns and spasticity. Complementary to current clinical diagnostic procedures, the analysis of muscle synergies has emerged as a promising tool to study muscle coordination, which plays a major role in the control of multi-limb functional movements. Objective: Based on recent findings suggesting that walking and cycling share similar synergistic control, the analysis of muscle synergies during cycling might be explored as an early descriptor of gait-related impaired control. This idea was split into the following two hypotheses: (a) iSCI patients present a synergistic control of muscles during cycling; (b) muscle synergies outcomes extracted during cycling correlate with clinical measurements of gait performance and/or spasticity. Methods: Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 13 unilateral lower limb muscles was recorded in a group of 10 healthy individuals and 10 iSCI subjects during cycling at four different cadences. A non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF) algorithm was applied to identify synergistic components (i.e., activation coefficients and muscle synergy vectors). Reconstruction goodness scores (VAF and r2) were used to evaluate the ability of a given number of synergies to reconstruct the EMG signals. A set of metrics based on the similarity between pathologic and healthy synergies were correlated with clinical scales of gait performance and spasticity. Results: iSCI patients preserved a synergistic control of muscles during cycling. The similarity with the healthy reference was consistent with the degree of the impairment, i.e., less impaired patients showed higher similarities with the healthy reference. There was a strong correlation between reconstruction goodness scores at 42 rpm and motor performance scales (TUG, 10-m test and WISCI II). On the other hand, the similarity between the healthy and affected synergies presented correlation with some spasticity symptoms measured by Penn, Modified Ashworth and SCATS scales. Conclusion: Overall, the results of this study support the hypothesis that the analysis of muscle synergies during cycling can provide detailed quantitative assessment of functional motor impairments and symptoms of spasticity caused by abnormal spatiotemporal muscle co-activation following iSCI. PMID:26793088

  10. Versatility of global transcriptional regulators in alpha-Proteobacteria: from essential cell cycle control to ancillary functions.

    PubMed

    Panis, Gaël; Murray, Sean R; Viollier, Patrick H

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that cell cycle transcription in many alpha-Proteobacteria is executed by at least three conserved functional modules in which pairs of antagonistic regulators act jointly, rather than in isolation, to control transcription in S-, G2- or G1-phase. Inactivation of module components often results in pleiotropic defects, ranging from cell death and impaired cell division to fairly benign deficiencies in motility. Expression of module components can follow systemic (cell cycle) or external (nutritional/cell density) cues and may be implemented by auto-regulation, ancillary regulators or other (unknown) mechanisms. Here, we highlight the recent progress in understanding the molecular events and the genetic relationships of the module components in environmental, pathogenic and/or symbiotic alpha-proteobacterial genera. Additionally, we take advantage of the recent genome-wide transcriptional analyses performed in the model alpha-Proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus to illustrate the complexity of the interactions of the global regulators at selected cell cycle-regulated promoters and we detail the consequences of (mis-)expression when the regulators are absent. This review thus provides the first detailed mechanistic framework for understanding orthologous operational principles acting on cell cycle-regulated promoters in other alpha-Proteobacteria. PMID:25793963

  11. Converting chemical energy into electricity through a functionally cooperating device with diving-surfacing cycles.

    PubMed

    Song, Mengmeng; Cheng, Mengjiao; Ju, Guannan; Zhang, Yajun; Shi, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A smart device that can dive or surface in aqueous medium has been developed by combining a pH-responsive surface with acid-responsive magnesium. The diving-surfacing cycles can be used to convert chemical energy into electricity. During the diving-surfacing motion, the smart device cuts magnetic flux lines and produces a current, demonstrating that motional energy can be realized by consuming chemical energy of magnesium, thus producing electricity. PMID:25146589

  12. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina; Marshall, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility. PMID:26765561

  13. [Sonographic presentation of the physiologic ovarian function in the anovulatory and pseudopregnant cycle of the cat].

    PubMed

    Gnzel-Apel, A R; Kawauchi, R; Nautrup, C P; Hedrich, H J

    1998-07-01

    Continuous sonographic examinations of the physiological ovarian structures were performed in four anovulatory and 14 pseudopregnant cycles. The animals were examined in standing position from the right and left flank using a mechanical 13 MHz sector scanner with integrated stand off pad. The intervals were two or three days during anoestrous and luteal phases and one day during follicular phases. The follicles could be identified from a minimum size of 1.0 mm and reached maximum mean diameters of 3.3 mm within at most eight days. The period of follicular regression was eight days in the anovulatory cycles. In the pseudopregnant cycles ovulation could be sonographically verified by the disappearance of follicles of 3 or more mm in diameter within 24 hours. Immediately thereafter the ovary had a more or less homogeneous appearance. Luteal development gave different sonographic findings. In general anechoic structures of 1 mm in diameter were recognizable within three days after ovulation, coming up to 5.3 mm within five days. Compact corpora lutea were easily identified as nearly homogeneous structures, that bulged over the ovarian surface. Corpora lutea, that were embedded in the ovary could not be detected without doubt. PMID:9710936

  14. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) function is essential for cell cycle progression, senescence and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kümper, Sandra; Mardakheh, Faraz K; McCarthy, Afshan; Yeo, Maggie; Stamp, Gordon W; Paul, Angela; Worboys, Jonathan; Sadok, Amine; Jørgensen, Claus; Guichard, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases 1 and 2 (ROCK1/2) are Rho-GTPase effectors that control key aspects of the actin cytoskeleton, but their role in proliferation and cancer initiation or progression is not known. Here, we provide evidence that ROCK1 and ROCK2 act redundantly to maintain actomyosin contractility and cell proliferation and that their loss leads to cell-cycle arrest and cellular senescence. This phenotype arises from down-regulation of the essential cell-cycle proteins CyclinA, CKS1 and CDK1. Accordingly, while the loss of either Rock1 or Rock2 had no negative impact on tumorigenesis in mouse models of non-small cell lung cancer and melanoma, loss of both blocked tumor formation, as no tumors arise in which both Rock1 and Rock2 have been genetically deleted. Our results reveal an indispensable role for ROCK, yet redundant role for isoforms 1 and 2, in cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis, possibly through the maintenance of cellular contractility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12203.001 PMID:26765561

  15. Functional morphology of thyrotropic and corticotropic cells during reproductive cycle in ewe.

    PubMed

    Hifny, A; Hassan, A H; Kamel, G; Abo-Elmagd, A

    1982-01-01

    A histological examination has been carried on the pars distalis of the pituitaries of twelve, healthy sexually mature balady ewes which were classified into three groups Resting, follicular and luteal phases according to the different phases of reproduction. The histological features of the TSH- ACTH-cells during resting phase has been used to establish a standard with which the subsequent changes during the follicular and luteal phases were compared. Using PAS/OG, AB/OG and PFA/AB/PAS/OG stains the TSH- and ACTH-cells were differentiated and identified from the other forms of the pars distalis cells. The topographical study of the TSH- and ACTH-cells in various regions and levels in the pars distalis of balady ewe as well as their frequencies during the different phase of reproductive cycle were discussed. Statistical analysis of the different cell count during the different phases of reproductive cycle was conducted. TSH- and ACTH-cells exhibited signs of increased cellular activities and significantly increased in number during follicular phase and in the other phases of the reproductive cycle. PMID:6287752

  16. Aircraft Emission Scenarios Projected in Year 2015 for the NASA Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baughcum, Steven L.; Henderson, Stephen C.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the development of a three-dimensional database of aircraft fuel burn and emissions (fuel burned, NOx, CO, and hydrocarbons) from projected fleets of high speed civil transports (HSCTs) on a universal airline network. Inventories for 500 and 1000 HSCT fleets, as well as the concurrent subsonic fleets, were calculated. The HSCT scenarios are calculated using the NASA technology concept airplane (TCA) and update an earlier report. These emissions inventories are available for use by atmospheric scientists conducting the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) modeling studies. Fuel burned and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx as NO2), carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons have been calculated on a 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude x 1 kilometer pressure altitude grid and delivered to NASA as electronic files.

  17. Regulation of leukocyte tricarboxylic acid cycle in drug-naïve Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Streck, Emilio L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Brunoni, Andre R; Zanetti, Marcus V; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Diniz, Breno S; Portela, Luis V; Carvalho, André F; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-09-25

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is fundamental for mitochondrial energy production and produces substrates used in oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The activity of the key TCA cycle enzymes citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase has never been evaluated in BD. In the present study, these enzymes were assayed from leukocytes of drug-naïve BD patients in a major depressive episode (n=18) and compared to 24 age-matched healthy controls. Drug-naïve BD patients did not show differences in activities of citrate synthase (p=0.79), malate dehydrogenase (p=0.17), and succinate dehydrogenase (p=0.35) compared with healthy controls. No correlation between any TCA cycle enzyme activity and severity of depressive symptoms was observed. Overall, these data suggest that the activities of the TCA cycle enzymes are not altered in major depressive episodes of recent-onset BD, which may support the concept of illness staging and neuroprogression in BD. PMID:26297865

  18. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  19. A pseudouridylation switch in rRNA is implicated in ribosome function during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Chikne, Vaibhav; Doniger, Tirza; Rajan, K. Shanmugha; Bartok, Osnat; Eliaz, Dror; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Tschudi, Christian; Unger, Ron; Hashem, Yaser; Kadener, Sebastian; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes devastating diseases in humans and animals in sub-Saharan Africa, undergoes a complex life cycle between the mammalian host and the blood-feeding tsetse fly vector. However, little is known about how the parasite performs most molecular functions in such different environments. Here, we provide evidence for the intriguing possibility that pseudouridylation of rRNA plays an important role in the capacity of the parasite to transit between the insect midgut and the mammalian bloodstream. Briefly, we mapped pseudouridines (Ψ) on rRNA by Ψ-seq in procyclic form (PCF) and bloodstream form (BSF) trypanosomes. We detected 68 Ψs on rRNA, which are guided by H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNA). The small RNome of both life cycle stages was determined by HiSeq and 83 H/ACAs were identified. We observed an elevation of 21 Ψs modifications in BSF as a result of increased levels of the guiding snoRNAs. Overexpression of snoRNAs guiding modification on H69 provided a slight growth advantage to PCF parasites at 30 °C. Interestingly, these modifications are predicted to significantly alter the secondary structure of the large subunit (LSU) rRNA suggesting that hypermodified positions may contribute to the adaption of ribosome function during cycling between the two hosts. PMID:27142987

  20. JMJD5 interacts with p53 and negatively regulates p53 function in control of cell cycle and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Shuilian; Qi, Hongyan; Wang, Zhengyang; Chen, Hong-Wu; Shao, Jimin; Shen, Jing

    2015-10-01

    JMJD5 is a Jumonji C domain-containing demethylase/hydroxylase shown to be essential in embryological development, osteoclastic maturation, circadian rhythm regulation and cancer metabolism. However, its role and underlying mechanisms in oncogenesis remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that JMJD5 forms complex with the tumor suppressor p53 by interacting with p53 DNA-binding domain (DBD), and negatively regulates its activity. Downregulation of JMJD5 resulted in increased expression of multiple p53 downstream genes, such as the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1A and DNA repair effector P53R2, only in p53-proficient lung cancer cells. Upon DNA damage, the JMJD5-p53 association decreased, and thereby, promoted p53 recruitment to the target genes and stimulated its transcriptional activity. Furthermore, JMJD5 facilitated the cell cycle progression in a p53-dependent manner under both normal and DNA damage conditions. Depletion of JMJD5 inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced adriamycin-induced cell growth suppression in the presence of p53. Collectively, our results reveal that JMJD5 is a novel binding partner of p53 and it functions as a positive modulator of cell cycle and cell proliferation mainly through the repression of p53 pathway. Our study extends the mechanistic understanding of JMJD5 function in cancer development and implicates JMJD5 as a potential therapeutic target for cancer. PMID:26025680

  1. Immune function in a free-living bird varies over the annual cycle, but seasonal patterns differ between years.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Arne; Matson, Kevin D; Both, Christiaan; Tieleman, B Irene

    2012-11-01

    A central hypothesis of eco-immunology proposes trade-offs between immune defences and competing physiological and behavioural processes, leading to immunological variation within and among annual-cycle stages, as has been revealed for some species. However, few studies have simultaneously investigated patterns of multiple immune indices over the entire annual cycle in free-living birds, and none has investigated the consistency of seasonal patterns across multiple years. We quantified lysis, agglutination, haptoglobin, leukocyte profiles, and body mass in free-living skylarks (Alauda arvensis) through two complete annual cycles and within and between four breeding seasons. The skylarks' annual cycle is characterised by annually repeated changes in energy and time budgets, social structure and diet. If trade-offs relating to these cyclic changes shape evolution, predictable intra-annual immune patterns may result. Alternatively, intra-annual immune patterns may vary among years if fluctuating environmental changes affect the cost-benefit balances of immune function. We found significant variation in immune indices and body mass across the annual cycle, and these patterns differed between years. Immune parameters differed between four breeding seasons, and in all years, lysis and agglutination increased as the season progressed independent of average levels. Population-level patterns (intra-annual, inter-annual, within breeding season) were consistent with within-individual patterns based on repeated measurements. We found little evidence for sex differences, and only haptoglobin was correlated (negatively) with body mass. We conclude that immune modulation is not simply a pre-programmed phenomenon that reflects predictable ecological changes. Instead, fluctuating environmental conditions that vary among years likely contribute to the immunological variation that we observed. PMID:22562421

  2. The sensitivity of fast muscle contractile function to the major components of the sarcomere Ca(2+)-cycling system.

    PubMed

    Golding, C; Kelly, K; Kinsey, S T; Locke, B R

    2016-04-01

    A reaction-diffusion model of a muscle sarcomere was developed to evaluate the sensitivity of force characteristics to diffusion and Ca(2+)-cycling components. The model compared well to experimental force measurements. Diffusion led to Ca(2+) gradients that enhanced maximal force and accelerated relaxation compared to when diffusion was infinitely fast. However, a modest increase in sarcomere length or radius led to a decrease in maximal force. Lowering the Ca(2+) release rate caused a lower maximal force, but increasing the rate led to only modest gains in maximal force while incurring much greater ATP costs associated with reuptake. Greater parvalbumin binding rates decreased maximal force but enhanced relaxation, and this effect was magnified when Ca(2+) uptake rates were lowered as may occur during fatigue. These results show a physiological set of parameters that lead to a functional sarcomere of known dimensions and contractile function, and the effects of parameter variation on muscle function. PMID:26774860

  3. Dynamics and function of the tear film in relation to the blink cycle

    PubMed Central

    Braun, R.J.; King-Smith, P.E.; Begley, C.G.; Li, Longfei; Gewecke, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    Great strides have recently been made in quantitative measurements of tear film thickness and thinning, mathematical modeling thereof and linking these to sensory perception. This paper summarizes recent progress in these areas and reports on new results. The complete blink cycle is used as a framework that attempts to unify the results that are currently available. Understanding of tear film dynamics is aided by combining information from different imaging methods, including fluorescence, retroillumination and a new high-speed stroboscopic imaging system developed for studying the tear film during the blink cycle. During the downstroke of the blink, lipid is compressed as a thick layer just under the upper lid which is often released as a narrow thick band of lipid at the beginning of the upstroke. “Rippling” of the tear film/air interface due to motion of the tear film over the corneal surface, somewhat like the flow of water in a shallow stream over a rocky streambed, was observed during lid motion and treated theoretically here. New mathematical predictions of tear film osmolarity over the exposed ocular surface and in tear breakup are presented; the latter is closely linked to new in vivo observations. Models include the effects of evaporation, osmotic flow through the cornea and conjunctiva, quenching of fluorescence, tangential flow of aqueous tears and diffusion of tear solutes and fluorescein. These and other combinations of experiment and theory increase our understanding of the fluid dynamics of the tear film and its potential impact on the ocular surface. PMID:25479602

  4. Environmental impacts on the diversity of methane-cycling microbes and their resultant function

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Emma L.; Allison, Steven D.; Helliker, Brent R.

    2013-01-01

    Methane is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas that is produced and consumed in soils by microorganisms responding to micro-environmental conditions. Current estimates show that soil consumption accounts for 5–15% of methane removed from the atmosphere on an annual basis. Recent variability in atmospheric methane concentrations has called into question the reliability of estimates of methane consumption and calls for novel approaches in order to predict future atmospheric methane trends. This review synthesizes the environmental and climatic factors influencing the consumption of methane from the atmosphere by non-wetland, terrestrial soil microorganisms. In particular, we focus on published efforts to connect community composition and diversity of methane-cycling microbial communities to observed rates of methane flux. We find abundant evidence for direct connections between shifts in the methane-cycling microbial community, due to climate and environmental changes, and observed methane flux levels. These responses vary by ecosystem and associated vegetation type. This information will be useful in process-based models of ecosystem methane flux responses to shifts in environmental and climatic parameters. PMID:23966984

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Calcium-Dependent Paenibacillus sp. Strain TCA20, Isolated from a Hot Spring Containing a High Concentration of Calcium Ions.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Shun; Takeda-Yano, Kiyoko; Onodera, Takefumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Motohiko; Takahashi, Yuka; Narumi, Issay; Ito, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent Paenibacillus sp. strain TCA20 was isolated from a water sample of a hot spring containing a high concentration of calcium ions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, which may be the basis for the research of calcium ion homeostasis. PMID:25189580

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Calcium-Dependent Paenibacillus sp. Strain TCA20, Isolated from a Hot Spring Containing a High Concentration of Calcium Ions

    PubMed Central

    Fujinami, Shun; Takeda-Yano, Kiyoko; Onodera, Takefumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Sano, Motohiko; Takahashi, Yuka; Narumi, Issay

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent Paenibacillus sp. strain TCA20 was isolated from a water sample of a hot spring containing a high concentration of calcium ions. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, which may be the basis for the research of calcium ion homeostasis. PMID:25189580

  7. Modeling forest carbon cycle response to tree mortality: Effects of plant functional type and disturbance intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasson, Renato Prata de Moraes; Bohrer, Gil; Medvigy, David; Matheny, Ashley M.; Morin, Timothy H.; Vogel, Christoph S.; Gough, Christopher M.; Maurer, Kyle D.; Curtis, Peter S.

    2015-11-01

    Natural and anthropogenic disturbances influence ecological succession and impact the carbon cycle. Understanding disturbance effects and ecosystem recovery is essential to carbon modeling. We hypothesized that (1) species-specific disturbances impact the carbon cycle differently from nonspecific disturbances. In particular, disturbances that target early-successional species will lead to higher carbon uptake by the postrecovery, middle- and late-successional community and (2) disturbances that affect the midsuccessional deciduous species have more intense and long-lasting impacts on carbon uptake than disturbances of similar intensity that only affect the early-successional species. To test these hypotheses, we employed a series of simulations conducted with the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 to evaluate the sensitivity of a temperate mixed-deciduous forest to disturbance intensity and type. Our simulation scenarios included a control (undisturbed) case, a uniform disturbance case where we removed 30% of all trees regardless of their successional status, five cases where only early-successional deciduous trees were removed with increasing disturbance intensity (30%, 70%, 85%, and 100%), and four cases of midsuccessional disturbances with increasing intensity (70%, 85%, and 100%). Our results indicate that disturbances affecting the midsuccessional deciduous trees led to larger decreases in carbon uptake as well as longer recovery times when compared to disturbances that exclusively targeted the early-successional deciduous trees at comparable intensities. Moreover, disturbances affecting 30% to 100% of early-successional deciduous trees resulted in an increased carbon uptake, beginning 6 years after the disturbance and sustained through the end of the 100 year simulation.

  8. Endogenous and exogenous control of ecosystem function: N cycling in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Valett, H M; Thomas, S A; Mulholland, P J; Webster, J R; Dahm, C N; Fellows, C S; Crenshaw, C L; Peterson, C G

    2008-12-01

    Allochthonous inputs act as resource subsidies to many ecosystems, where they exert strong influences on metabolism and material cycling. At the same time, metabolic theory proposes endogenous thermal control independent of resource supply. To address the relative importance of exogenous and endogenous influences, we quantified spatial and temporal variation in ecosystem metabolism and nitrogen (N) uptake using seasonal releases of 15N as nitrate in six streams differing in riparian-stream interaction and metabolic character. Nitrate removal was quantified using a nutrient spiraling approach based on measurements of downstream decline in 15N flux. Respiration (R) and gross primary production (GPP) were measured with whole-stream diel oxygen budgets. Uptake and metabolism metrics were addressed as z scores relative to site means to assess temporal variation. In open-canopied streams, areal uptake (U; microg N x m(-2) x s(-1)) was closely related to GPP, metabolic rates increased with temperature, and R was accurately predicted by metabolic scaling relationships. In forested streams, N spiraling was not related to GPP; instead, uptake velocity (v(f); mm/s) was closely related to R. In contrast to open-canopied streams, N uptake and metabolic activity were negatively correlated to temperature and poorly described by scaling laws. We contend that streams differ along a gradient of exogenous and endogenous control that relates to the relative influences of resource subsidies and in-stream energetics as determinants of seasonal patterns of metabolism and N cycling. Our research suggests that temporal variation in the propagation of ecological influence between adjacent systems generates phases when ecosystems are alternatively characterized as endogenously and exogenously controlled. PMID:19137956

  9. Phylogeny and phylogeography of functional genes shared among seven terrestrial subsurface metagenomes reveal N-cycling and microbial evolutionary relationships

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Maggie C. Y.; Cameron, Connor; Magnabosco, Cara; Brown, C. Titus; Schilkey, Faye; Grim, Sharon; Hendrickson, Sarah; Pullin, Michael; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara; van Heerden, Esta; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on community phylogenetics and phylogeography of microorganisms living in extreme environments are rare. Terrestrial subsurface habitats are valuable for studying microbial biogeographical patterns due to their isolation and the restricted dispersal mechanisms. Since the taxonomic identity of a microorganism does not always correspond well with its functional role in a particular community, the use of taxonomic assignments or patterns may give limited inference on how microbial functions are affected by historical, geographical and environmental factors. With seven metagenomic libraries generated from fracture water samples collected from five South African mines, this study was carried out to (1) screen for ubiquitous functions or pathways of biogeochemical cycling of CH4, S, and N; (2) to characterize the biodiversity represented by the common functional genes; (3) to investigate the subsurface biogeography as revealed by this subset of genes; and (4) to explore the possibility of using metagenomic data for evolutionary study. The ubiquitous functional genes are NarV, NPD, PAPS reductase, NifH, NifD, NifK, NifE, and NifN genes. Although these eight common functional genes were taxonomically and phylogenetically diverse and distinct from each other, the dissimilarity between samples did not correlate strongly with geographical or environmental parameters or residence time of the water. Por genes homologous to those of Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii detected in all metagenomes were deep lineages of Nitrospirae, suggesting that subsurface habitats have preserved ancestral genetic signatures that inform the study of the origin and evolution of prokaryotes. PMID:25400621

  10. c-Myb Regulates Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Erbin: An Implication for a Novel Function of Erbin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Qian, Lu; Yu, Ming; Hu, Meiru; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Tianyou; Han, Caili; Duan, Huijun; Guo, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we demonstrated the cell cycle periodicity of Erbin expression with the maximal expression of Erbin in G2/M phase. A significant increase in Erbin promoter activity was observed in G2/M phase-synchronized cells. Sequence analysis revealed a c-Myb site in the core promoter region of Erbin. Mutagenesis of c-Myb consensus sequences abrogated the increased Erbin promoter activity in G2/M phase. ChIP and oligonucleotide pull-down assays validated that the recruitment of c-Myb to the consensus sequences was specific. The interaction of c-Myb with c-Myb site in the Erbin promoter was significantly enhanced in G2/M phase. Ectopic overexpression of c-Myb led to the up-regulation of Erbin promoter activity and c-Myb silencing by small interfering RNA significantly decreased Erbin protein level. Transfection of c-Myb rescued Erbin expression that was impaired by c-Myb knockdown. It proves that c-Myb and the c-Myb response element mediate the cell cycle-dependent expression of Erbin. Inactivation of Erbin causes an acceleration of the G1/S transition, the formation of multipolar spindles and abnormal chromosome congression. These results unravel a critical role of c-Myb in promoting Erbin transcription in G2/M phase and also predict an unappreciated function of Erbin in cell cycle progression. PMID:22880131

  11. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes. PMID:20622067

  12. Metabolic Bypass of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle during Lipid Mobilization in Germinating Oilseeds1

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Kimberly L.; Behal, Robert H.; Xiang, Chengbin; Oliver, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Biosynthesis of sucrose from triacylglycerol requires the bypass of the CO2-evolving reactions of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The regulation of the TCA cycle bypass during lipid mobilization was examined. Lipid mobilization in Brassica napus was initiated shortly after imbibition of the seed and proceeded until 2 d postimbibition, as measured by in vivo [1-14C]acetate feeding to whole seedlings. The activity of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (a decarboxylative enzyme) was not detected until 2 d postimbibition. RNA-blot analysis of B. napus seedlings demonstrated that the mRNA for NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase was present in dry seeds and that its level increased through the 4 d of the experiment. This suggested that NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity was regulated by posttranscriptional mechanisms during early seedling development but was controlled by mRNA level after the 2nd or 3rd d. The activity of fumarase (a component of the nonbypassed section of the TCA cycle) was low but detectable in B. napus seedlings at 12 h postimbibition, coincident with germination, and increased for the next 4 d. RNA-blot analysis suggested that fumarase activity was regulated primarily by the level of its mRNA during germination and early seedling development. It is concluded that posttranscriptional regulation of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity is one mechanism of restricting carbon flux through the decarboxylative section of the TCA cycle during lipid mobilization in germinating oilseeds. PMID:9625700

  13. EFFECTS OF LAND USE CHANGES ON THE FUNCTIONING OF SOILS AND WATERSHEDS OF CENTRAL BRAZIL SAVANNAS: PHASE 2, IMPACTS ON NUTRIENT AND CARBON CYCLES AND TRACE GAS EXCHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is funded through an interagency agreement with NASA. The research in this project is contributing to assessments of the effects of land use in central Brazil on: 1) the stocks and cycling rates of carbon and nutrient cycling; 2) the function and structure of soil ...

  14. Anaplerotic triheptanoin diet enhances mitochondrial substrate use to remodel the metabolome and improve lifespan, motor function, and sociability in MeCP2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Degano, Alicia L; Penati, Judith; Zhuo, Justin; Roe, Charles R; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Symptoms range in severity and include psychomotor disabilities, seizures, ataxia, and intellectual disability. Symptom onset is between 6-18 months of age, a critical period of brain development that is highly energy-dependent. Notably, patients with RTT have evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as abnormal levels of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin, suggesting overall metabolic imbalance. We hypothesized that one contributor to RTT symptoms is energy deficiency due to defective nutrient substrate utilization by the TCA cycle. This energy deficit would lead to a metabolic imbalance, but would be treatable by providing anaplerotic substrates to the TCA cycle to enhance energy production. We show that dietary therapy with triheptanoin significantly increased longevity and improved motor function and social interaction in male mice hemizygous for Mecp2 knockout. Anaplerotic therapy in Mecp2 knockout mice also improved indicators of impaired substrate utilization, decreased adiposity, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, decreased serum leptin and insulin, and improved mitochondrial morphology in skeletal muscle. Untargeted metabolomics of liver and skeletal muscle revealed increases in levels of TCA cycle intermediates with triheptanoin diet, as well as normalizations of glucose and fatty acid biochemical pathways consistent with the improved metabolic phenotype in Mecp2 knockout mice on triheptanoin. These results suggest that an approach using dietary supplementation with anaplerotic substrate is effective in improving symptoms and metabolic health in RTT. PMID:25299635

  15. Anaplerotic Triheptanoin Diet Enhances Mitochondrial Substrate Use to Remodel the Metabolome and Improve Lifespan, Motor Function, and Sociability in MeCP2-Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qun; Degano, Alicia L.; Penati, Judith; Zhuo, Justin; Roe, Charles R.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene that encodes methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Symptoms range in severity and include psychomotor disabilities, seizures, ataxia, and intellectual disability. Symptom onset is between 6-18 months of age, a critical period of brain development that is highly energy-dependent. Notably, patients with RTT have evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction, as well as abnormal levels of the adipokines leptin and adiponectin, suggesting overall metabolic imbalance. We hypothesized that one contributor to RTT symptoms is energy deficiency due to defective nutrient substrate utilization by the TCA cycle. This energy deficit would lead to a metabolic imbalance, but would be treatable by providing anaplerotic substrates to the TCA cycle to enhance energy production. We show that dietary therapy with triheptanoin significantly increased longevity and improved motor function and social interaction in male mice hemizygous for Mecp2 knockout. Anaplerotic therapy in Mecp2 knockout mice also improved indicators of impaired substrate utilization, decreased adiposity, increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, decreased serum leptin and insulin, and improved mitochondrial morphology in skeletal muscle. Untargeted metabolomics of liver and skeletal muscle revealed increases in levels of TCA cycle intermediates with triheptanoin diet, as well as normalizations of glucose and fatty acid biochemical pathways consistent with the improved metabolic phenotype in Mecp2 knockout mice on triheptanoin. These results suggest that an approach using dietary supplementation with anaplerotic substrate is effective in improving symptoms and metabolic health in RTT. PMID:25299635

  16. Biostimulation induces syntrophic interactions that impact C, S and N cycling in a sediment microbial community

    SciTech Connect

    Handley, KM; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Steefel, Carl I; Sharon, I; Williams, Ken; Miller, CS; Frischkorn, Kyle C; Chourey, Karuna; Thomas, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Long, Phil; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of subsurface microorganisms to induce reductive immobilization of metals is a promising approach for bioremediation, yet the overall microbial community response is typically poorly understood. Here we used community proteogenomics to test the hypothesis that excess input of acetate activates syntrophic interactions among autotrophs and heterotrophs. A flow-through sediment column was incubated in a groundwater well of an acetate-amended aquifer. Genomic sequences from the community recovered during microbial sulfate reduction were used to econstruct, de novo, near-complete genomes for Desulfobacter (Deltaproteobacteria) and relatives of Sulfurovum and Sulfurimonas (Epsilonproteobacteria), and Bacteroidetes. Partial genomes were obtained for Clostridiales (Firmicutes) and Desulfuromonadales-like Deltaproteobacteria. The majority of proteins identified by mass spectrometry corresponded to Desulfobacter-like species, and demonstrate the role of this organism in sulfate reduction (Dsr and APS), nitrogen-fixation (Nif) and acetate oxidation to CO2 during amendment. Results suggest less abundant Desulfuromonadales and Bacteroidetes also actively contributed to CO2 production via the TCA cycle. Proteomic data indicate that sulfide was partially re-oxidized by Epsilonproteobacteria through nitrate-dependent sulfide oxidation (using Nap, Nir, Nos, SQR and Sox), with CO2 fixed using the reverse TCA cycle. Modeling shows that this reaction was thermodynamically possible, and kinetically favorable relative to acetate-dependent denitrification. We conclude that high-levels of carbon amendment aimed to stimulate anaerobic heterotrophy led to carbon fixation in co-dependent chemoautotrophs. These results have implications for understanding complex ecosystem behavior, and show that high levels of organic carbon supplementation can expand the range of microbial functionalities accessible for ecosystem manipulation.

  17. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A functions to repress FoxO transcription factors to allow cell cycle progression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huanjie; Mohamed, Esraa M; Xu, Guoyan G; Waters, Michael; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Zhang, Yan; Spiegel, Sarah; Idowu, Michael O; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-26

    Cancer cells rely on hyperactive de novo lipid synthesis for maintaining malignancy. Recent studies suggest involvement in cancer of fatty acid oxidation, a process functionally opposite to lipogenesis. A mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to oncogenic processes is yet to be established. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) that catalyzes the transfer of long-chain acyl group of the acyl-CoA ester to carnitine, thereby shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPT1A was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian serous carcinomas. Overexpression of CPT1A correlated with a poor overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. Inactivation of CPT1A decreased cellular ATP levels and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, suggesting that ovarian cancer cells depend on or are addicted to CPT1A-mediated FAO for cell cycle progression. CPT1A deficiency also suppressed anchorage-independent growth and formation of xenografts from ovarian cancer cell lines. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 (p21) was identified as most consistently and robustly induced cell cycle regulator upon inactivation of CPT1A. Furthermore, p21 was transcriptionally upregulated by the FoxO transcription factors, which were in turn phosphorylated and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK and p38. Our results established the oncogenic relevance of CPT1A and a mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to cell cycle regulation, suggesting that CPT1A could be a prognostic biomarker and rational target for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:26716645

  18. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A functions to repress FoxO transcription factors to allow cell cycle progression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huanjie; Mohamed, Esraa M.; Xu, Guoyan G.; Waters, Michael; Jing, Kai; Ma, Yibao; Zhang, Yan; Spiegel, Sarah; Idowu, Michael O.; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells rely on hyperactive de novo lipid synthesis for maintaining malignancy. Recent studies suggest involvement in cancer of fatty acid oxidation, a process functionally opposite to lipogenesis. A mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to oncogenic processes is yet to be established. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) that catalyzes the transfer of long-chain acyl group of the acyl-CoA ester to carnitine, thereby shuttling fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix for β-oxidation. In the present study, we demonstrated that CPT1A was highly expressed in most ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian serous carcinomas. Overexpression of CPT1A correlated with a poor overall survival of ovarian cancer patients. Inactivation of CPT1A decreased cellular ATP levels and induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1, suggesting that ovarian cancer cells depend on or are addicted to CPT1A-mediated FAO for cell cycle progression. CPT1A deficiency also suppressed anchorage-independent growth and formation of xenografts from ovarian cancer cell lines. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 (p21) was identified as most consistently and robustly induced cell cycle regulator upon inactivation of CPT1A. Furthermore, p21 was transcriptionally upregulated by the FoxO transcription factors, which were in turn phosphorylated and activated by AMP-activated protein kinase and the mitogen-activated protein kinases JNK and p38. Our results established the oncogenic relevance of CPT1A and a mechanistic link from lipid catabolism to cell cycle regulation, suggesting that CPT1A could be a prognostic biomarker and rational target for therapeutic intervention of cancer. PMID:26716645

  19. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  20. Targeting and functional mechanisms of the cytokinesis‑related F‑BAR protein Hof1 during the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Younghoon; Schreiter, Jennifer; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Wloka, Carsten; Bi, Erfei

    2013-01-01

    F-BAR proteins are membrane‑associated proteins believed to link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton in cellular processes such as cytokinesis and endocytosis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the F‑BAR protein Hof1 localizes to the division site in a complex pattern during the cell cycle and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, the mechanisms underlying its localization and function are poorly understood. Here we show that Hof1 contains three distinct targeting domains that contribute to cytokinesis differentially. The N‑terminal half of Hof1 localizes to the bud neck and the sites of polarized growth during the cell cycle. The neck localization is mediated mainly by an interaction between the second coiled‑coil region in the N‑terminus and the septin Cdc10, whereas the localization to the sites of polarized growth is mediated entirely by the F‑BAR domain. In contrast, the C‑terminal half of Hof1 interacts with Myo1, the sole myosin‑II heavy chain in budding yeast, and localizes to the bud neck in a Myo1‑dependent manner from the onset to the completion of cytokinesis. We also show that the SH3 domain in the C‑terminus plays an important role in maintaining the symmetry of Myo1 ring constriction during cytokinesis and that Hof1 interacts with Chs2, a chitin synthase that is required for primary septum formation. Together these data define a mechanism that accounts for the localization of Hof1 during the cell cycle and suggest that Hof1 may function in cytokinesis by coupling actomyosin ring constriction to primary septum formation through interactions with Myo1 and Chs2. PMID:23468521

  1. Genetic analysis of punt, a type II Dpp receptor that functions throughout the Drosophila melanogaster life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Simin, K; Bates, E A; Horner, M A; Letsou, A

    1998-01-01

    TGF-beta (transforming growth factor-beta-) mediated signal transduction affects growth and patterning in a variety of organisms. Here we report a genetic characterization of the Drosophila punt gene that encodes a type II serine/threonine kinase TGF-beta/Dpp (Decapentaplegic) receptor. Although the punt gene was originally identified based on its requirement for embryonic dorsal closure, we have documented multiple periods of punt activity throughout the Drosophila life cycle. We demonstrate that potentially related embryonic punt phenotypes, defects in dorsoventral patterning and dorsal closure, correspond to distinct maternal and zygotic requirements for punt. In addition, we document postembryonic requirements for punt activity. The tight correspondence between both embryonic and postembryonic loss-of-function punt and dpp phenotypes implicates a role for Punt in mediating virtually all Dpp signaling events in Drosophila. Finally, our comparison of punt homoallelic and heteroallelic phenotypes provides direct evidence for interallelic complementation. Taken together, these results suggest that the Punt protein functions as a dimer or higher order multimer throughout the Drosophila life cycle. PMID:9504926

  2. Study of nickel electrode oxidation as a function of 80% depth of discharge cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, D.F. Jr.; Scoles, D.L.; Johnson, Z.W.; Hayden, J.W.; Pennington, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    Oxidation of nickel sinter used in nickel oxide electrodes in aerospace nickel cadmium cells leads to hydrogen gassing and the potential for cell rupture. The oxidation is directly related to loss of overcharge protection built into the cell during manufacturing. In nickel hydrogen cells, excessive oxidation of the nickel sinter can eventually lead to a burst before leak situation and is a potential source of failure. It is well known that nickel cadmium cells having nylon separators contribute to loss of overcharge via a hydrolysis reaction of the nylon in the potassium hydroxide electrolyte environment in the cell. The hydrolysis reaction produces lower chain organics which are oxidized by the positive electrode and oxygen. Oxidation of the organics diminishes the overcharge protection. With introduction of the Super NiCd{trademark} and the Magnum{trademark} nickel cadmium cells the nylon hydrolysis reaction is eliminated, but any reducing agent in the cell such as nickel or an organic additive can contribute to loss of overcharge protection. The present effort describes chemical analyses made to evaluate the extent of overcharge protection loss in nickel cadmium cells which do not have nylon hydrolysis, and quantifies the amount of hydrogen buildup in nickel hydrogen cells which are subjected to 80% depth of discharge cycling with and without the presence of cadmium in the positive electrode.

  3. Some evidence on determinants of fuel economy as a function of driving cycle and test type

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01

    Statistical methods are used with 107 vehicles whose fuel economy was presented and reported for five test types in a single publication by Consumers Union (CU) for 1986--1988 vehicles. Standard loglinear statistical formulations (i.e., multiplicative models of interactions) are used with data from this and supplementary sources to develop coefficients estimating the percent fuel economy gain per percent change in engine/vehicle design characteristic. The coefficients are developed for the five different test conditions evaluated by CU and are compared with each other on the basis of attributes of the tests. The insights of engineering models are used to develop expectations regarding the shift in size of coefficients as driving cycles change. In both the engineering models and the statistical model, the effect of weight is estimated to be higher in urban driving than in highway driving. For two test categories -- field tests and dynamometer tests -- the benefits of weight reduction are statistically estimated to be greatest in urban driving conditions. The effect on idle fuel flow rate of designing vehicles to hold performance roughly constant by maintaining power per kilogram and/or displacement per kilogram is examined, and its implication for the size of the weight effect is simply approximated from Sovran`s 1983 engineering model results. The fuel-economy-decreasing effect of the desire for performance is estimated to be somewhat larger in the statistical analysis than in the NAS study, when engine technology is held constant.

  4. The Closure of the Cycle: Enzymatic Synthesis and Functionalization of Bio-Based Polyesters.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Herrero Acero, Enrique; Ferrario, Valerio; Ribitsch, Doris; Guebitz, Georg M; Gardossi, Lucia

    2016-04-01

    The polymer industry is under pressure to mitigate the environmental cost of petrol-based plastics. Biotechnologies contribute to the gradual replacement of petrol-based chemistry and the development of new renewable products, leading to the closure of carbon circle. An array of bio-based building blocks is already available on an industrial scale and is boosting the development of new generations of sustainable and functionally competitive polymers, such as polylactic acid (PLA). Biocatalysts add higher value to bio-based polymers by catalyzing not only their selective modification, but also their synthesis under mild and controlled conditions. The ultimate aim is the introduction of chemical functionalities on the surface of the polymer while retaining its bulk properties, thus enlarging the spectrum of advanced applications. PMID:26806112

  5. An N-Myristoylated Globin with a Redox-Sensing Function That Regulates the Defecation Cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tilleman, Lesley; De Henau, Sasha; Pauwels, Martje; Nagy, Nora; Pintelon, Isabel; Braeckman, Bart P.; De Wael, Karolien; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Globins occur in all kingdoms of life where they fulfill a wide variety of functions. In the past they used to be primarily characterized as oxygen transport/storage proteins, but since the discovery of new members of the globin family like neuroglobin and cytoglobin, more diverse and complex functions have been assigned to this heterogeneous family. Here we propose a function for a membrane-bound globin of C. elegans, GLB-26. This globin was predicted to be myristoylated at its N-terminus, a post-translational modification only recently described in the globin family. In vivo, this globin is found in the membrane of the head mesodermal cell and in the tail stomato-intestinal and anal depressor muscle cells. Since GLB-26 is almost directly oxidized when exposed to oxygen, we postulate a possible function as electron transfer protein. Phenotypical studies show that GLB-26 takes part in regulating the length of the defecation cycle in C. elegans under oxidative stress conditions. PMID:23251335

  6. A “footprint” of plant carbon fixation cycle functions during the development of a heterotrophic fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Xueliang; Shen, Cuicui; Xie, Jiatao; Fu, Yanping; Jiang, Daohong; Hu, Zijin; Tang, Lihua; Tang, Liguang; Ding, Feng; Li, Kunfei; Wu, Song; Hu, Yanping; Luo, Lilian; Li, Yuanhao; Wang, Qihua; Li, Guoqing; Cheng, Jiasen

    2015-01-01

    Carbon fixation pathway of plants (CFPP) in photosynthesis converts solar energy to biomass, bio-products and biofuel. Intriguingly, a large number of heterotrophic fungi also possess enzymes functionally associated with CFPP, raising the questions about their roles in fungal development and in evolution. Here, we report on the presence of 17 CFPP associated enzymes (ten in Calvin-Benson-Basham reductive pentose phosphate pathway and seven in C4-dicarboxylic acid cycle) in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, a heterotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, and only two unique enzymes: ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) were absent. This data suggested an incomplete CFPP-like pathway (CLP) in fungi. Functional profile analysis demonstrated that the activity of the incomplete CLP was dramatically regulated during different developmental stages of S. sclerotiorum. Subsequent experiments confirmed that many of them were essential to the virulence and/or sclerotial formation. Most of the CLP associated genes are conserved in fungi. Phylogenetic analysis showed that many of them have undergone gene duplication, gene acquisition or loss and functional diversification in evolutionary history. These findings showed an evolutionary links in the carbon fixation processes of autotrophs and heterotrophs and implicated the functions of related genes were in course of continuous change in different organisms in evolution. PMID:26263551

  7. The role of surface chemical analysis in a study to select replacement processes for TCA vapor degreasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesley, Michael W.; Davis, Lawrence E.; Moulder, John F.; Carlson, Brad A.

    1995-01-01

    The role of surface-sensitive chemical analysis (ESCA, AES, and SIMS) in a study to select a process to replace 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) vapor degreasing as a steel and aluminum bonding surface preparation method is described. The effort was primarily concerned with spray-in-air cleaning processes involving aqueous alkaline and semi-aqueous cleaners and a contamination sensitive epoxy-to-metal bondline. While all five cleaners tested produced bonding strength results equal to or better than those produced by vapor degreasing, the aqueous alkaline cleaners yielded results which were superior to those produced by the semi-aqueous cleaners. The main reason for the enhanced performance appears to be a silicate layer left behind by the aqueous alkaline cleaners. The silicate layer increases the polarity of the surface and enhances epoxy-to-metal bonding. On the other hand, one of the semi-aqueous cleaners left a nonpolar carbonaceous residue which appeared to have a negative effect on epoxy-to-metal bonding. Differences in cleaning efficiency between cleaners/processes were also identified. These differences in surface chemistry, which were sufficient to affect bonding, were not detected by conventional chemical analysis techniques.

  8. The CMS fast beams condition monitor back-end electronics based on MicroTCA technology: status and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka A.; Dabrowski, Anne E.; Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2015-09-01

    The Fast Beams Condition Monitor (BCM1F), upgraded for LHC Run II, is used to measure the online luminosity and machine induced background for the CMS experiment. The detector consists of 24 single-crystal CVD diamond sensors that are read out with a custom fast front-end chip fabricated in 130 nm CMOS technology. Since the signals from the sensors are used for real time monitoring of the LHC conditions they are processed by dedicated back-end electronics to measure separately rates corresponding to LHC collision products, machine induced background and residual activation exploiting different arrival times. The system is built in MicroTCA technology and uses high speed analog-to-digital converters. In operational modes of high rates, consecutive events, spaced in time by less than 12.5 ns, may cause partially overlapping events. Hence, novel signal processing techniques are deployed to resolve overlapping peaks. The high accuracy qualification of the signals is crucial to determine the luminosity and the machine induced background rates for the CMS experiment and the LHC.

  9. The role of biodiversity for the carbon cycle: Implementation of functional diversity in a dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakschewski, Boris; Boit, Alice; von Bloh, Werner; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2013-04-01

    Most dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) condense natural plant diversity to plant functional types (PFTs). A single PFT usually represents a whole biome, e.g. the PFT "tropical broadleaved evergreen tree" and its constant set of functional trait parameters covers entire regions in the model. This approach minimizes functional diversity and neglects the effects of functional diversity on the modeled vegetation and carbon dynamics. Our work aims to overcome this limitation and extend functional diversity in the vegetation model LPJmL to explore the role of biodiversity in climate change mitigation. Our approach improves the representation of biodiversity in the model by incorporating the natural ranges and eco-physiological interrelations of relevant plant traits. Empirical data on plant traits is provided by the TRY data base (www.try-db.org) and the ROBIN project (www.robinproject.info). A first sensitivity analysis revealed that simulated carbon stocks are very stable under a large range of trait combinations. However, several model output variables appeared highly sensitive to small changes of plant trait parameters and thus the introduction of trait ranges requires several improvements of the PFT concept of LPJmL. One possible way of improvement is to implement missing plant-trait tradeoffs, which will be used to simulate the growth of individual plants with flexible parameter combinations at the landscape scale. Our improved model will enable for the simulation of local competition and complementarity of individual plants which, according to their trait values and ranges, can then be categorized into a much broader variety of PFTs. This modeling approach will allow for investigating the role of bio- and functional diversity in the global carbon cycle as well as in regional vegetation dynamics.

  10. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the ?-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other ?-proteobacteria.

  11. The Relationship between Sleep-Wake Cycle and Cognitive Functioning in Young People with Affective Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Joanne S.; Robillard, Rébecca; Lee, Rico S. C.; Hermens, Daniel F.; Naismith, Sharon L.; White, Django; Whitwell, Bradley; Scott, Elizabeth M.; Hickie, Ian B.

    2015-01-01

    Although early-stage affective disorders are associated with both cognitive dysfunction and sleep-wake disruptions, relationships between these factors have not been specifically examined in young adults. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in those with affective disorders are considerably heterogeneous, and may not relate to cognitive dysfunction in a simple linear fashion. This study aimed to characterise profiles of sleep and circadian disturbance in young people with affective disorders and examine associations between these profiles and cognitive performance. Actigraphy monitoring was completed in 152 young people (16–30 years; 66% female) with primary diagnoses of affective disorders, and 69 healthy controls (18–30 years; 57% female). Patients also underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment. Actigraphy data were processed to estimate both sleep and circadian parameters. Overall neuropsychological performance in patients was poor on tasks relating to mental flexibility and visual memory. Two hierarchical cluster analyses identified three distinct patient groups based on sleep variables and three based on circadian variables. Sleep clusters included a ‘long sleep’ cluster, a ‘disrupted sleep’ cluster, and a ‘delayed and disrupted sleep’ cluster. Circadian clusters included a ‘strong circadian’ cluster, a ‘weak circadian’ cluster, and a ‘delayed circadian’ cluster. Medication use differed between clusters. The ‘long sleep’ cluster displayed significantly worse visual memory performance compared to the ‘disrupted sleep’ cluster. No other cognitive functions differed between clusters. These results highlight the heterogeneity of sleep and circadian profiles in young people with affective disorders, and provide preliminary evidence in support of a relationship between sleep and visual memory, which may be mediated by use of antipsychotic medication. These findings have implications for the personalisation of treatments and improvement of functioning in young adults early in the course of affective illness. PMID:25898321

  12. In situ Expression of Functional Genes Reveals Nitrogen Cycling at High Temperatures in Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiacono, S. T.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    An essential element for life, nitrogen occurs in all living organisms and is critical for the synthesis of amino acids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other forms of biomass. Thus, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes as well as nutrient availability. For microorganisms in "extreme" environments, this means developing adaptations that allow them to survive in harsh conditions and still perform the metabolisms essential to sustain life. Recent studies have screened biofilms and thermal sediments of Yellowstone National Park (YNP) thermal features for the presence of nifH genes, which code for a key enzyme in the nitrogen fixation process [1-4]. Furthermore, analysis of nitrogen isotopes in biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient revealed that nitrogen fixation likely varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [5]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of nifH genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use. Instead, other methods, such as culturing, isotope tracer assays, and gene expression studies are required to provide direct evidence of biological nitrogen fixation. Culturing and isotope tracer approaches have successfully revealed high-temperature biological nitrogen fixation in both marine hydrothermal vent microbial communities [6] and in acidic, terrestrial hydrothermal sediment [3]. Transcriptomics-based techniques (using mRNA extracted from samples to confirm in situ expression of targeted genes) have been much more limited in number, and only a few studies have, to date, investigated in situ expression of the nifH gene in thermophilic microbial communities [2, 7]. This study explores the presence and expression of nifH genes in several features of the Lower Geyser Basin (LGB) of YNP. Nucleic acids from chemosynthetic and photosynthetic microbial communities were extracted and then amplified using (reverse-transcription) polymerase chain reaction to identify the presence and expression of nifH genes, and resultant (RT-)PCR product was cloned and sequenced. Results reveal high-temperature in situ expression of nifH in select LGB features [7] which is, to the authors' knowledge, the first direct evidence of nifH transcription in the chemosynthetic zones of terrestrial hydrothermal systems. Results also indicate the presence of novel nifH sequences and allow phylogenetic comparison of nifH genes along geochemical gradients within individual hot spring features and between various thermal features in the LGB. Collectively, these results provide evidence for microbial adaptations that have led to the ability to support basic metabolic processes under "extreme" conditions. [1] Hall et al., 2008. AEM 74: 4910-4922. [2] Steunou et al., 2008. The ISME Journal 2: 364-378. [3] Hamilton et al., 2011. Microb Ecol DOI 10.1007/s00248-011-9824-9. [4] Raymond et al., 2008. EOS Trans AGU. Abstract B14A-03. [5] Havig et al., 2010. J Geophys Res-Biogeo 116: G01005. [6] Mehta & Baross, 2006. Science 314: 1783-1786. [7] Loiacono et al., 2011. Submitted FEMS Microbiol Ecol.

  13. Normal Proliferation and Tumorigenesis but Impaired Pancreatic Function in Mice Lacking the Cell Cycle Regulator Sei1

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Pantoja, Cristina; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Agueda; Martin, Nicholas; Flores, Juana M.; Valverde, Angela M.; Hara, Eiji; Serrano, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Sei1 is a positive regulator of proliferation that promotes the assembly of Cdk4-cyclin D complexes and enhances the transcriptional activity of E2f1. The potential oncogenic role of Sei1 is further suggested by its overexpression in various types of human cancers. To study the role of Sei1, we have generated a mouse line deficient for this gene. Sei1-null fibroblasts did not show abnormalities regarding proliferation or susceptibility to neoplastic transformation, nor did we observe defects on Cdk4 complexes or E2f activity. Sei1-null mice were viable, did not present overt pathologies, had a normal lifespan, and had a normal susceptibility to spontaneous and chemically-induced cancer. Pancreatic insulin-producing cells are known to be particularly sensitive to Cdk4-cyclin D and E2f activities, and we have observed that Sei1 is highly expressed in pancreatic islets compared to other tissues. Interestingly, Sei1-null mice present lower number of islets, decreased β-cell area, impaired insulin secretion, and glucose intolerance. These defects were associated to nuclear accumulation of the cell-cycle inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 in islet cells. We conclude that Sei1 plays an important role in pancreatic β-cells, which supports a functional link between Sei1 and the core cell cycle regulators specifically in the context of the pancreas. PMID:20090907

  14. Chloroplastic thioredoxin m functions as a major regulator of Calvin cycle enzymes during photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of various chloroplastic proteins in a light-dependent manner. Five types of Trxs function in different physiological processes in the chloroplast of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous in vitro experiments have suggested that the f-type Trx (Trx f) is the main redox regulator of chloroplast enzymes, including Calvin cycle enzymes. To investigate the in vivo contribution of each Trx isoform to the redox regulatory system, we first quantified the protein concentration of each Trx isoform in the chloroplast stroma. The m-type Trx (Trx m), which consists of four isoforms, was the most abundant type. Next, we analyzed several Arabidopsis Trx-m-deficient mutants to elucidate the physiological role of Trx m in vivo. Deficiency of Trx m impaired plant growth and decreased the CO2 assimilation rate. We also determined the redox state of Trx target enzymes to examine their photo-reduction, which is essential for enzyme activation. In the Trx-m-deficient mutants, the reduction level of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase was lower than that in the wild type. Inconsistently with the historical view, our in vivo study suggested that Trx m plays a more important role than Trx f in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes. PMID:26468055

  15. Extramitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle in retinal rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Panfoli, Isabella; Calzia, Daniela; Ravera, Silvia; Bruschi, Maurizio; Tacchetti, Carlo; Candiani, Simona; Morelli, Alessandro; Candiano, Giovanni

    2011-09-01

    Vertebrate retinal rod Outer Segments (OS) are the site of visual transduction, an energy demanding process for which mechanisms of ATP supply are still poorly known. Glycolysis or diffusion of either ATP or phosphocreatine from the Inner Segment (IS) does not seem to display adequate timing to supply ATP for phototransduction. We have previously reported data suggesting an aerobic metabolism in OS, which would largely account for the light-stimulated ATP need of the photoreceptor. Here, by oxymetry and biochemical analyses we show that: (i) disks isolated by Ficoll flotation consume O(2) in the presence of physiological respiring substrates either in coupled or uncoupled conditions; (ii) OS homogenates contain the whole biochemical machinery for the degradation of glucose, i.e. glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), consistently with the results of our previous proteomic study. Activities of the 8 TCA cycle enzymes in OS were comparable to those in retinal mitochondria-enriched fractions. Disk and OS preparations were subjected to TEM analysis, and while they can be considered free of inner segment contaminants, immunogold with specific antibodies demonstrate the expression therein of both the visual pigment rhodopsin and F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase. Finally, double immunofluorescence on mouse retina sections demonstrated a colocalization of some respiratory complex mitochondrial proteins with rhodopsin in rod OS. Data, suggestive of the exportability of the mitochondrial machinery for aerobic metabolism, may shed light on those retinal pathologies related to energy supply impairment in OS and to mutations in TCA enzymes. PMID:21683117

  16. Structure and diversity of functional guilds in the microbial nitrogen cycle of estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.; Francis, C. A.; Taroncher-Oldenburg, G.; Cornwell, J.

    2002-12-01

    Denitrification is a major flux of nitrogen in Chesapeake Bay, an estuary with a long residence time and high organic and inorganic nutrient inputs from the large surrounding watershed. The estuarine system spans a complex gradient of salinity and many correlated chemical constituents, from its upper bay and river freshwater end members to its nearly full strength seawater lower Bay. Denitrification rates in sediments, computed from net nitrogen fluxes in simulated in situ core incubations, show distinct reproducible patterns along the Bay. Highest rates are observed in sediments from the low salinity, high nitrate upper stations in the Bay and Choptank River. Lower rates occur in the low nitrate, oxygen depleted mid bay sediments and in the metabolically less active south Bay sediments. Gene sequences for nitrite reductase, the key enzyme in denitrification, show very high diversity in Bay and River sediments. On the basis of clone library sequences alone, however, there are distinct clades and patterns indicating highest diversity in the upper Bay and River sediments and lower diversity in the lower Bay sediments. Using a DNA microarray containing many individual nitrite reductase sequences, we investigated the population structure of denitrification genes along the estuarine gradient. Evaluation of gene expression patterns, in addition to presence/absence or abundance of individual genes, will allow a direct assessment of the links between diversity and biogeochemical transformation rates for particular functional guilds. The rate of denitrification and its regulation by environmental variables may be reflected in patterns of guild composition and activity.

  17. Rho proteins of plants--functional cycle and regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Elena; Fricke, Inka; Schaefer, Antje; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Berken, Antje

    2011-11-01

    Rho-related ROP proteins are molecular switches that essentially regulate a wide variety of processes. Of central interest is their influence on the plant cytoskeleton by which they affect vital processes like cell division, growth, morphogenesis, and pathogen defense. ROPs switch between GTP- and GDP-bound conformations by strictly regulated nucleotide exchange and GTP-hydrolysis, and only the active GTP-form interacts with downstream effectors to ultimately provoke a biological response. However, the mode of action of the engaged regulators and effectors as well as their upstream and downstream interaction partners have long been largely unknown. As opposed to analogous systems in animals and fungi, plants use specific GTPase activating proteins (RopGAPs) with a unique domain composition and novel guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RopGEFs) with a probable link to cell surface receptors. Moreover, plants comprise novel effector molecules and adapters connecting ROPs to mostly unknown downstream targets on the route to the cytoskeleton. This review aims to summarize recent knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and reaction cascades involved in ROP dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements, addressing the structure and function of the unusual RopGAPs, RopGEFs and effectors, and the upstream and downstream pathways linking ROPs to cell receptor-like kinases, actin filaments, and microtubules. PMID:21277045

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Calcium Cycling in Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte: Macroscopic Consequences of Microscopic Dyadic Function

    PubMed Central

    Gaur, Namit; Rudy, Yoram

    2011-01-01

    In cardiac ventricular myocytes, calcium (Ca) release occurs at distinct structures (dyads) along t-tubules, where L-type Ca channels (LCCs) appose sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca release channels (RyR2s). We developed a model of the cardiac ventricular myocyte that simulates local stochastic Ca release processes. At the local Ca release level, the model reproduces Ca spark properties. At the whole-cell level, the model reproduces the action potential, Ca currents, and Ca transients. Changes in microscopic dyadic properties (e.g., during detubulation in heart failure) affect whole-cell behavior in complex ways, which we investigated by simulating changes in the dyadic volume and number of LCCs/RyR2s in the dyad, and effects of calsequestrin (CSQN) as a Ca buffer (CSQN buffer) or a luminal Ca sensor (CSQN regulator). We obtained the following results: 1), Increased dyadic volume and reduced LCCs/RyR2s decrease excitation-contraction coupling gain and cause asynchrony of SR Ca release, and interdyad coupling partially compensates for the reduced synchrony. 2), Impaired CSQN buffer depresses Ca transients without affecting the synchrony of SR Ca release. 3), When CSQN regulator function is impaired, interdyad coupling augments diastolic Ca release activity to form Ca waves and long-lasting Ca release events. PMID:21689523

  19. How useful are plant functional types in global simulations of the carbon, water, and energy cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Paul B.

    2011-03-01

    Land-surface and vegetation models divide the globe into discrete vegetation classes or plant functional types (PFTs). The current study quantifies some of the limitations of this simplification on global predictions of carbon, water, and energy fluxes. First, a state-of-the-art land-surface model, JULES-SF, is optimized against a diversity of calibration data sets (eddy covariance fluxes, field measurements of net primary production (NPP), and remotely sensed surface albedo) in order to retrieve a range of values for four key plant parameters within each PFT. This is done for 112 sites and 1200 1° land points. Second, global simulations are compared in which the parameter values per PFT are either fixed (standard method) or vary according to either the retrieved parameter range or the satellite-observed range (new methods). Retrieved key plant parameters exhibit a broad range, and the range overlap between PFTs is significant. The impact on the global simulation depends on the surface flux/state in question. Thus, the difference between the new and old method is small for albedo, net shortwave radiation, and continental runoff (0.005, 0.7%, and 2%, respectively) compared to current model-observation differences (0.05, 7%, and 20%, respectively). In contrast, carbon fluxes are more sensitive to the categorization of plant properties, with predicted global NPP varying by ≤15% (6.2 Gt yr-1) according to whether the standard or one of the new methods is implemented.

  20. Establishment and consolidation of the sleep-wake cycle as a function of attachment pattern.

    PubMed

    Pennestri, Marie-Hélène; Moss, Ellen; O'Donnell, Katherine; Lecompte, Vanessa; Bouvette-Turcot, Andrée-Anne; Atkinson, Leslie; Minde, Klaus; Gruber, Reut; Fleming, Alison S; Meaney, Michael J; Gaudreau, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The development of sleep-wake regulation in infants depends upon brain maturation as well as various environmental factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate sleep duration and quality as a function of child attachment to the mother. One hundred and thirty-four mother-child dyads enrolled in the Maternal Adversity, Vulnerability and Neurodevelopment (MAVAN) project were included in this study. Attachment was assessed with the Strange Situation procedure at 36 months and maternal sleep reports were collected at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. Differences in sleep characteristics were assessed with mixed models with one factor (attachment group) and one repeated measure (age). Children classified as disorganized had a significantly lower duration of nocturnal sleep, went to bed later, signaled more awakenings, had shorter periods of uninterrupted sleep (only at 12 months) and had shorter periods of time in bed (only at 6 months) than children classified as secure and/or ambivalent (p < 0.05). This is the first study to show that children with insecure disorganized attachment present a distinct sleep pattern in comparison with those with secure or ambivalent attachment between 6 and 36 months of age. Sleep disturbances could exacerbate difficulties in these families that are already considered vulnerable. PMID:25231054

  1. Usual dietary isoflavone intake and reproductive function across the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Filiberto, Amanda C.; Mumford, Sunni L.; Pollack, Anna Z.; Zhang, Cuilin; Yeung, Edwina H.; Schliep, Karen C.; Perkins, Neil J.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of total isoflavone intake with ovulatory function, including sporadic anovulation in healthy premenopausal women. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting University. Patient(s) Participants included 259 healthy regularly menstruating women aged 18–44 years. Intervention(s) None. Main Outcome Measure(s) Serum concentrations of E2, free E2, P, LH, FSH, and SHBG and sporadic anovulation in healthy premenopausal women. Result(s) Isoflavone intake was not associated with E2, free E2, P, LH, and FSH concentrations. Consumption in the highest quartile (Q4: 1.6–78.8 mg/d) was significantly associated with greater SHBG concentrations (β = 0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02–0.16), compared with the first quartile (Q1: 0.0–0.3 mg/d). Conclusion(s) Isoflavone intake was not associated with sporadic anovulation (Q4 vs. Q1: odds ratio 0.87, 95% CI 0.32–1.66). Dietary isoflavone intake among young premenopausal women was not related to sex hormone concentrations or anovulation, but was associated with minimally increased SHBG concentrations. These results suggest potential endocrine effects with no subsequent effects on ovulation, easing concerns regarding their impacts on fertility. PMID:23998910

  2. Genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in epithelial ovarian cancer and functional contribution to cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Barger, Carter J; Zhang, Wa; Hillman, Joanna; Stablewski, Aimee B; Higgins, Michael J; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R

    2015-09-29

    The FOXM1 transcription factor network is frequently activated in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most common and lethal subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We used primary human EOC tissues, HGSOC cell lines, mouse and human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells, and a murine transgenic ovarian cancer model to investigate genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in EOC, and to begin to define its functional contribution to disease pathology. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data indicated that the FOXM1 locus is amplified in ~12% of HGSOC, greater than any other tumor type examined, and that FOXM1 amplification correlates with increased expression and poor survival. In an independent set of primary EOC tissues, FOXM1 expression correlated with advanced stage and grade. Of the three known FOXM1 isoforms, FOXM1c showed highest expression in EOC. In murine OSE cells, combined knockout of Rb1 and Trp53 synergistically induced FOXM1. Consistently, human OSE cells immortalized with SV40 Large T antigen (IOSE-SV) had significantly higher FOXM1 expression than OSE immortalized with hTERT (IOSE-T). FOXM1 was overexpressed in murine ovarian tumors driven by combined Rb1/Trp53 disruption. FOXM1 induction in IOSE-SV cells was partially dependent on E2F1, and FOXM1 expression correlated with E2F1 expression in human EOC tissues. Finally, FOXM1 functionally contributed to cell cycle progression and relevant target gene expression in human OSE and HGSOC cell models. In summary, gene amplification, p53 and Rb disruption, and E2F1 activation drive FOXM1 expression in EOC, and FOXM1 promotes cell cycle progression in EOC cell models. PMID:26243836

  3. Genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in epithelial ovarian cancer and functional contribution to cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Carter J.; Zhang, Wa; Hillman, Joanna; Stablewski, Aimee B.; Higgins, Michael J.; Vanderhyden, Barbara C.; Odunsi, Kunle; Karpf, Adam R.

    2015-01-01

    The FOXM1 transcription factor network is frequently activated in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), the most common and lethal subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We used primary human EOC tissues, HGSOC cell lines, mouse and human ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells, and a murine transgenic ovarian cancer model to investigate genetic determinants of FOXM1 overexpression in EOC, and to begin to define its functional contribution to disease pathology. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data indicated that the FOXM1 locus is amplified in ~12% of HGSOC, greater than any other tumor type examined, and that FOXM1 amplification correlates with increased expression and poor survival. In an independent set of primary EOC tissues, FOXM1 expression correlated with advanced stage and grade. Of the three known FOXM1 isoforms, FOXM1c showed highest expression in EOC. In murine OSE cells, combined knockout of Rb1 and Trp53 synergistically induced FOXM1. Consistently, human OSE cells immortalized with SV40 Large T antigen (IOSE-SV) had significantly higher FOXM1 expression than OSE immortalized with hTERT (IOSE-T). FOXM1 was overexpressed in murine ovarian tumors driven by combined Rb1/Trp53 disruption. FOXM1 induction in IOSE-SV cells was partially dependent on E2F1, and FOXM1 expression correlated with E2F1 expression in human EOC tissues. Finally, FOXM1 functionally contributed to cell cycle progression and relevant target gene expression in human OSE and HGSOC cell models. In summary, gene amplification, p53 and Rb disruption, and E2F1 activation drive FOXM1 expression in EOC, and FOXM1 promotes cell cycle progression in EOC cell models. PMID:26243836

  4. ZYG-9, TAC-1 and ZYG-8 together ensure correct microtubule function throughout the cell cycle of C. elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Jean-Michel; Carter, J Clayton; Phillips, Jennifer B; Canard, Coralie; Bowerman, Bruce; Gönczy, Pierre

    2007-08-15

    The early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is well suited for investigating microtubule-dependent cell division processes. In the one-cell stage, the XMAP215 homologue ZYG-9, associated with the TACC protein TAC-1, promotes microtubule growth during interphase and mitosis, whereas the doublecortin domain protein ZYG-8 is required for anaphase spindle positioning. How ZYG-9, TAC-1 and ZYG-8 together ensure correct microtubule-dependent processes throughout the cell cycle is not fully understood. Here, we identify new temperature-sensitive alleles of zyg-9 and tac-1. Analysis of ZYG-9 and TAC-1 distribution in these mutants identifies amino acids important for centrosomal targeting and for stability of the two proteins. This analysis also reveals that TAC-1 is needed for correct ZYG-9 centrosomal enrichment. Moreover, we find that ZYG-9, but not TAC-1, is limiting for microtubule-dependent processes in one-cell-stage embryos. Using two of these alleles to rapidly inactivate ZYG-9-TAC-1 function, we establish that this complex is required for correct anaphase spindle positioning. Furthermore, we uncover that ZYG-9-TAC-1 and ZYG-8 function together during meiosis, interphase and mitosis. We also find that TAC-1 physically interacts with ZYG-8 through its doublecortin domain, and that in vivo TAC-1 and ZYG-8 are part of a complex that does not contain ZYG-9. Taken together, these findings indicate that ZYG-9-TAC-1 and ZYG-8 act in a partially redundant manner to ensure correct microtubule assembly throughout the cell cycle of early C. elegans embryos. PMID:17666432

  5. Human Liver Methionine Cycle: MAT1A and GNMT Gene Resequencing, Functional Genomics, and Hepatic Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yuan; Nordgren, Kendra K. S.; Chai, Yubo; Hebbring, Scott J.; Jenkins, Gregory D.; Abo, Ryan P.; Peng, Yi; Pelleymounter, Linda L.; Moon, Irene; Eckloff, Bruce W.; Chai, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Jianping; Fridley, Brooke L.; Yee, Vivien C.; Wieben, Eric D.

    2012-01-01

    The “methionine cycle” plays a critical role in the regulation of concentrations of (S)-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet), the major biological methyl donor. We set out to study sequence variation in genes encoding the enzyme that synthesizes AdoMet in liver, methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A) and the major hepatic AdoMet using enzyme, glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), as well as functional implications of that variation. We resequenced MAT1A and GNMT using DNA from 288 subjects of three ethnicities, followed by functional genomic and genotype-phenotype correlation studies performed with 268 hepatic biopsy samples. We identified 44 and 42 polymorphisms in MAT1A and GNMT, respectively. Quantitative Western blot analyses for the human liver samples showed large individual variation in MAT1A and GNMT protein expression. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified two genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), reference SNP (rs) 9471976 (corrected p = 3.9 × 10−10) and rs11752813 (corrected p = 1.8 × 10−5), and 42 imputed SNPs surrounding GNMT that were significantly associated with hepatic GNMT protein levels (corrected p values < 0.01). Reporter gene studies showed that variant alleles for both genotyped SNPs resulted in decreased transcriptional activity. Correlation analyses among hepatic protein levels for methionine cycle enzymes showed significant correlations between GNMT and MAT1A (p = 1.5 × 10−3) and between GNMT and betaine homocysteine methyltransferase (p = 1.6 × 10−7). Our discovery of SNPs that are highly associated with hepatic GNMT protein expression as well as the “coordinate regulation” of methionine cycle enzyme protein levels provide novel insight into the regulation of this important human liver biochemical pathway. PMID:22807109

  6. Rates of insulin secretion in INS-1 cells are enhanced by coupling to anaplerosis and Kreb's cycle flux independent of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied media effects on mechanisms of insulin secretion of INS-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was higher in DMEM than KRB despite identical ATP synthesis rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion rates correlated with rates of anaplerosis and TCA cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondria metabolism and substrate cycles augment secretion signal of ATP. -- Abstract: Mechanistic models of glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) established in minimal media in vitro, may not accurately describe the complexity of coupling metabolism with insulin secretion that occurs in vivo. As a first approximation, we have evaluated metabolic pathways in a typical growth media, DMEM as a surrogate in vivo medium, for comparison to metabolic fluxes observed under the typical experimental conditions using the simple salt-buffer of KRB. Changes in metabolism in response to glucose and amino acids and coupling to insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 832/13 cells. Media effects on mitochondrial function and the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were determined by fluorometrically measured oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) combined with {sup 31}P NMR measured rates of ATP synthesis. Substrate preferences and pathways into the TCA cycle, and the synthesis of mitochondrial 2nd messengers by anaplerosis were determined by {sup 13}C NMR isotopomer analysis of the fate of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose metabolism. Despite similar incremental increases in insulin secretion, the changes of OCR in response to increasing glucose from 2.5 to 15 mM were blunted in DMEM relative to KRB. Basal and stimulated rates of insulin secretion rates were consistently higher in DMEM, while ATP synthesis rates were identical in both DMEM and KRB, suggesting greater mitochondrial uncoupling in DMEM. The relative rates of anaplerosis, and hence synthesis and export of 2nd messengers from the mitochondria were found to be similar in DMEM to those in KRB. And, the correlation of total PC flux with insulin secretion rates in DMEM was found to be congruous with the correlation in KRB. Together, these results suggest that signaling mechanisms associated with both TCA cycle flux and with anaplerotic flux, but not ATP production, may be responsible for the enhanced rates of insulin secretion in more complex, and physiologically-relevant media.

  7. A functional analysis of the influence of β3-adrenoceptors on the rat micturition cycle.

    PubMed

    Sadananda, Prajni; Drake, Marcus J; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2013-11-01

    Dysfunctions of the lower urinary tract, such as overactive bladder syndrome and incontinence, are the product of storage failure. Spontaneous regional bladder wall movements [nonmicturition contractions (NMCs)] are proposed to generate afferent activity that signals volume status to the central nervous system. The sympathetic nervous system, via activation of β-adrenoceptors (β-ARs), causes bladder relaxation and promotes urine storage. We hypothesized that β-AR regulation of micturition is mediated by suppression of NMCs. We used an unanesthetized, decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation that allows simultaneous cystometry with external urethral sphincter and pelvic afferent nerve recordings. Systemic isoprenaline (10 nM to 1 µM) increased intervoid interval and bladder compliance accompanied by a decrease in NMC amplitude, voiding pressure, and voiding threshold. Isoprenaline also reduced arterial pressure and increased heart rate. The β3-AR agonist mirabegron (10-100 nM) increased intervoid interval and bladder compliance and reduced NMC amplitude, yet preserved active voiding function and had no effect on arterial pressure or heart rate. All of these effects of mirabegron were blocked by the selective β3-AR antagonist N-[[3-[(2S)-2-hydroxy-3-[[2-[4-[(phenylsulfonyl)amino] phenyl]ethyl]amino]propoxy]phenyl]methyl]-acetamide (L748,337), which alone shortened intervoid interval and decreased bladder compliance-suggesting the presence of a basal β3-AR-mediated sympathetic tone. Similar effects of mirabegron were seen in an acetic acid-sensitized bladder preparation and in preparations after loss of spinobulbar reflex bladder control. The β3-AR-mediated increase in intervoid interval correlated with increased bladder compliance but not with the decrease in NMC amplitude. These findings indicate that β3-adrenoceptors have a selective effect that improves urine storage by increasing compliance without affecting the active components of voiding. PMID:24008334

  8. New model fit functions of the plasmapause location determined using THEMIS observations during the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Junghee; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Jin-Hee; Shin, Dae-Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Chan; Turner, Drew

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that the plasmapause is influenced by the solar wind and magnetospheric conditions. Empirical models of its location have been previously developed such as those by O'Brien and Moldwin (2003) and Larsen et al. (2006). In this study, we identified the locations of the plasmapause using the plasma density data obtained from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) satellites. We used the data for the period (2008-2012) corresponding to the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24. Our database includes data from over a year of unusually weak solar wind conditions, correspondingly covering the plasmapause locations in a wider L range than those in previous studies. It also contains many coronal hole stream intervals during which the plasmasphere is eroded and recovers over a timescale of several days. The plasmapause was rigorously determined by requiring a density gradient by a factor of 15 within a radial distance of 0.5 L. We first determined the statistical correlation of the plasmapause locations with several solar wind parameters as well as geomagnetic indices. We found that the plasmapause locations are well correlated with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field Bz, therefore the y component of the convective electric field, and some energy coupling functions such as the well-known Akasofu's epsilon parameter. The plasmapause locations are also highly correlated with the geomagnetic indices, Dst, AE, and Kp, as recognized previously. Finally, we suggest new model fit functions for the plasmapause locations in terms of the solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. When applied to a new data interval outside the model training interval, our model fit functions work better than existing ones. The new model fit functions developed here extend the range of conditions from those used in previous works.

  9. Phagocytic efficacy of macrophage-like cells as a function of cell cycle and Fc? receptors (Fc?R) and complement receptor (CR)3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Y; Cook, E; Fries, B C; Casadevall, A

    2006-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have shown that the efficiency of phagocytosis is a function of cell cycle and that phagocytosis promotes cell cycle progression. Because phagocytosis is dependent on cellular receptors we hypothesized that Fc? receptors (Fc?R) and complement receptors (CR) expression varied with cell cycle. Consequently, we used centrifugal elutriation of macrophage-like cells, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and receptor staining to investigate expression of Fc?R and CR as a function of cell cycle. We confirmed that Fc?R expression on macrophage-like cells increased as the cells progressed from G1 to G2 phases. Moreover, CR3 expression varied as a function of cell cycle in a manner similar to Fc?R. Correlation of receptor expression with cell size showed that Fc?R and CR3 expression on macrophages was determined largely by cell size enlargement during the cell cycle. The efficacy of both Fc- and complement-mediated phagocytosis of live Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) showed a biphasic pattern with the efficacy of phagocytosis decreasing when the cells approached the G1S interface, which paralleled the changes in receptor surface expression when cells exited G1 phase. Live Cn cells were significantly more resistant to phagocytosis than dead cells at all stages of macrophage-like cell cycle. In contrast to live cells, the efficacy of phagocytosis of dead Cn decreased as surface receptor expression increased. Hence, the efficacy of phagocytosis in this system as function of cell cycle is not related to phagocytic receptor expression. PMID:16879260

  10. rre37 Overexpression Alters Gene Expression Related to the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and Pyruvate Metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Hiroko; Watanabe, Atsuko; Takanobu, Junko; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Osanai, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and pyruvate metabolism of cyanobacteria are unique and important from the perspectives of biology and biotechnology research. Rre37, a response regulator induced by nitrogen depletion, activates gene expression related to sugar catabolism. Our previous microarray analysis has suggested that Rre37 controls the transcription of genes involved in sugar catabolism, pyruvate metabolism, and the TCA cycle. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the transcript levels of 12 TCA cycle genes and 13 pyruvate metabolism genes. The transcripts of 6 genes (acnB, icd, ppc, pyk1, me, and pta) increased after 4 h of nitrogen depletion in the wild-type GT strain but the induction was abolished by rre37 overexpression. The repression of gene expression of fumC, ddh, and ackA caused by nitrogen depletion was abolished by rre37 overexpression. The expression of me was differently affected by rre37 overexpression, compared to the other 24 genes. These results indicate that Rre37 differently controls the genes of the TCA cycle and pyruvate metabolism, implying the key reaction of the primary in this unicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:25614900

  11. Effect of Multiple Freezing/Thawing Cycles on the Structural and Functional Properties of Waxy Rice Starch

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Han; Yan, Juan; Zhao, Jianwei; Tian, Yaoqi; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    The structural and functional properties of non-gelatinized waxy rice starch were investigated after 1, 3, 7, and 10 freezing/thawing cycles. Freezing caused an increasing damaged starch from 1.36% in native waxy rice starch to 5.77% in 10 freezing/thawing-treated starch (FTS), as evidenced by the cracking surface on starch granules. More dry matter concentration was leached, which was characterized by high amylopectin concentration (4.34 mg/mL). The leaching was accompanied by a decrease in relative crystallinity from 35.19% in native starch to 31.34% in 10 FTS. Freezing treatment also led to significant deviations in the functional characteristics, for instance decreased gelatinization temperature range, enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. The resistant starch content of 10FTS significantly decreased from 58.9% to 19%, whereas the slowly digested starch content greatly increased from 23.8% in native starch to 50.3%. The increase in susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis may be attributed to porous granular surface, amylopectin leaching, and the decrease in the relative crystallinity caused by freezing water. PMID:26018506

  12. Interconnection between tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy generation in microbial fuel cell performed by desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Maslovska, Olga D.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2015-05-01

    Desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384 is exoelectrogenic obligate anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium. Its one of the first described electrogenic bacterium that performs complete oxidation of an organic substrate with electron transfer directly to the electrode in microbial fuel cell (MFC). This bacterium is very promising for MFC development because of inexpensive cultivation medium, high survival rate and selective resistance to various heavy metal ions. The size of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 cells is comparatively small (0.4-0.8×1-2 μm) that is highly beneficial while application of porous anode material because of complete bacterial cover of an electrode area with further significant improvement of the effectiveness of its usage. The interconnection between functioning of reductive stage of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under anaerobic conditions, and MFC performance was established. Malic, pyruvic, fumaric and succinic acids in concentration 42 mM were separately added into the anode chamber of MFC as the redox agents. Application of malic acid caused the most stabile and the highest power generation in comparison with other investigated organic acids. Its maximum equaled 10.07±0.17mW/m2 on 136 hour of bacterial cultivation. Under addition of pyruvic, succinic and fumaric acids into the anode chamber of MFC the maximal power values equaled 5.80±0.25 mW/m2; 3.2±0.11 mW/m2, and 2.14±0.19 mW/m2 respectively on 40, 56 and 32 hour of bacterial cultivation. Hence the malic acid conversion via reductive stage of TCA cycle is shown to be the most efficient process in terms of electricity generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 in MFC under anaerobic conditions.

  13. Outcomes of a Home Cycling Program Using Functional Electrical Stimulation or Passive Motion for Children With Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Therese E; Smith, Brian T; Oladeji, Oluwabunmi; Betz, Randal R; Lauer, Richard T

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: Children with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at risk for musculoskeletal and cardiovascular complications. Stationary cycling using functional electrical stimulation (FES) or passive motion has been suggested to address these complications. The purpose of this case series is to report the outcomes of a 6-month at-home cycling program for 4 children with SCI. Methods: Two children cycled with FES and 2 cycled passively at home for 1 hour, 3 times per week. Outcome Measures: Data collected included bone mineral density of the left femoral neck, distal femur, and proximal tibia; quadriceps and hamstring muscle volume; stimulated quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength; a fasting lipid profile; and heart rate and oxygen consumption during incremental upper extremity ergometry testing. Results: The 2 children cycling with FES and 1 child cycling passively exhibited improved bone mineral density, muscle volume, stimulated quadriceps strength, and lower resting heart rate. For the second child cycling passively, few changes were realized. Overall, the lipid results were inconsistent, with some positive and some negative changes seen. Conclusions: This case series suggests that cycling with or without FES may have positive health benefits and was a practical home exercise option for these children with SCI. PMID:18581671

  14. Biological weathering and the long-term carbon cycle: integrating mycorrhizal evolution and function into the current paradigm.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L L; Leake, J R; Quirk, J; Hardy, K; Banwart, S A; Beerling, D J

    2009-03-01

    The dramatic decline in atmospheric CO2 evidenced by proxy data during the Devonian (416.0-359.2 Ma) and the gradual decline from the Cretaceous (145.5-65.5 Ma) onwards have been linked to the spread of deeply rooted trees and the rise of angiosperms, respectively. But this paradigm overlooks the coevolution of roots with the major groups of symbiotic fungal partners that have dominated terrestrial ecosystems throughout Earth history. The colonization of land by plants was coincident with the rise of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF),while the Cenozoic (c. 65.5-0 Ma) witnessed the rise of ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) that associate with both gymnosperm and angiosperm tree roots. Here, we critically review evidence for the influence of AMF and EMF on mineral weathering processes. We show that the key weathering processes underpinning the current paradigm and ascribed to plants are actually driven by the combined activities of roots and mycorrhizal fungi. Fuelled by substantial amounts of recent photosynthate transported from shoots to roots, these fungi form extensive mycelial networks which extend into soil actively foraging for nutrients by altering minerals through the acidification of the immediate root environment. EMF aggressively weather minerals through the additional mechanism of releasing low molecular weight organic chelators. Rates of biotic weathering might therefore be more usefully conceptualized as being fundamentally controlled by the biomass, surface area of contact, and capacity of roots and their mycorrhizal fungal partners to interact physically and chemically with minerals. All of these activities are ultimately controlled by rates of carbon-energy supply from photosynthetic organisms. The weathering functions in leading carbon cycle models require experiments and field studies of evolutionary grades of plants with appropriate mycorrhizal associations. Representation of the coevolution of roots and fungi in geochemical carbon cycle models is required to further our understanding of the role of the biota in Earth's CO2 and climate history. PMID:19323695

  15. Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling Enhances Quality of Life in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: With advances in medicine and increased survival rates, the focus of health care after spinal cord injury (SCI) has evolved from extending life to increasing independence and quality of life (QOL). Because enhancing QOL is an ultimate goal of the rehabilitation process, research involving the improvement of QOL is of great importance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a home-based functional electrical stimulation lower extremity cycling (FES-LEC) program on the QOL of persons with SCI. Design: Eleven veterans with posttraumatic C4-T11 AIS A-C SCI participated in 8 weeks of 3 times weekly home-based FES-LEC. QOL was assessed using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. Tests were completed by all participants prior to and after the 8-week FES-LEC program. Results: There were significant increases in the physical and environmental domain QOL scores. There were nominal nonsignificant increases in the psychological and social domain QOL scores. Conclusions: The results of this study provide evidence that home-based FES-LEC 3 times per week for 8 weeks has the potential to result in QOL improvements. PMID:24244097

  16. The multimerization of human immunodeficiency virus type I Vif protein: a requirement for Vif function in the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Yang, S; Sun, Y; Zhang, H

    2001-02-16

    The Vif (virion infectivity factor protein of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) is essential for viral replication in vivo and productive infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and H9 T-cells. However, the molecular mechanism(s) of Vif remains unknown and needs to be further determined. In this report, we show that, like many other proteins encoded by HIV-1, Vif proteins possess a strong tendency toward self-association. In relatively native conditions, Vif proteins formed multimers in vitro, including dimers, trimers, or tetramers. Through in vivo binding assays such as coimmunoprecipitation and the mammalian two-hybrid system, we also demonstrated that Vif proteins could interact with each other within a cell, indicating that the multimerization of Vif proteins is not simply due to fortuitous aggregation. Further studies indicated that the domain affecting Vif self-association is located at the C terminus of this protein, especially the proline-enriched 151-164 region. Moreover, we found that a Vif mutant with deletion at amino acid 151-164 was unable to rescue the infectivity of vif-defective viruses generated from H9 T-cells, suggesting that the multimerization of Vif proteins could be important for Vif function in the viral life cycle. Our studies identified a new feature of Vif and should accelerate our understanding of its role in HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:11071884

  17. The Cdk1-APC/C cell cycle oscillator circuit functions as a time-delayed, ultrasensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiong; Ferrell, James E

    2013-05-01

    Despite the complexity and variety of biological oscillators, their core design invariably includes an essential negative feedback loop. In the Xenopus laevis embryonic cell cycle oscillator, this loop consists of the kinase cyclin B-Cdk1 and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C(Cdc20); active Cdk1 activates APC/C(Cdc20), which then brings about cyclin B degradation and inactivates Cdk1. Here we ask how this negative feedback loop functions quantitatively, with the aim of understanding what mechanisms keep the Cdk1-APC/C(Cdc20) system from settling into a stable steady state with intermediate levels of Cdk1 and APC/C(Cdc20) activity. We found that the system operates as a time-delayed, digital switch, with a time lag of ∼ 15 min between Cdk1 and APC/C(Cdc20) activation and a tremendously high degree of ultrasensitivity (n(H)≈17). Computational modelling shows how these attributes contribute to the generation of robust, clock-like oscillations. Principles uncovered here may also apply to other activator-repressor oscillators and help in designing robust synthetic clocks. PMID:23624406

  18. Assessing Cell Cycle Independent Function of the CDK Inhibitor p21(CDKN¹A) in DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Dutto, Ilaria; Tillhon, Micol; Prosperi, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(CDKN1A) is a small protein that is able to regulate many important cell functions, often independently of its activity of CDK inhibitor. In addition to cell cycle, this protein regulates cell transcription, apoptosis, cell motility, and DNA repair. In particular, p21 may participate in different DNA repair processes, like the nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), and double-strand breaks (DSB) repair, because of its ability to interact with DNA repair proteins, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a master regulator of many DNA transactions. Although this role has been debated for a long time, the influence of p21 in DNA repair has been now established. However, it remain to be clarified how this role is coupled to proteasomal degradation that has been shown to occur after DNA damage. This chapter describes procedures to study p21 protein recruitment to localized DNA damage sites in the cell nucleus. In particular, we describe a technique based on local irrradiation with UV light through a polycarbonate filter with micropores; an in situ lysis procedure to detect chromatin-bound proteins by immunofluorescence; a cell fractionation procedure to study chromatin association of p21 by Western blot analysis, and p21 protein-protein interactions by an immunoprecipitation assay. PMID:26231713

  19. The Cdk1-APC/C cell cycle oscillator circuit functions as a time-delayed, ultrasensitive switch

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiong; Ferrell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the complexity and variety of biological oscillators, their core design invariably includes an essential negative feedback loop. In the Xenopus laevis embryonic cell cycle oscillator, this loop consists of the kinase cyclin B-Cdk1 and the ubiquitin ligase APC/CCdc20; active Cdk1 activates APC/CCdc20, which then brings about cyclin B degradation and inactivates Cdk1. Here we ask how this negative feedback loop functions quantitatively, with the aim of understanding what mechanisms keep the Cdk1-APC/CCdc20 system from settling into a stable steady state with intermediate levels of Cdk1 and APC/CCdc20 activity. We found that the system operates as a time-delayed, digital switch, with a time lag of ~15 min between Cdk1 and APC/CCdc20 activation and a tremendously high degree of ultrasensitivity (nH ≈ 17). Computational modeling shows how these attributes contribute to the generation of robust, clock-like oscillations. Principles uncovered here may also apply to other activator-repressor oscillators and help in designing robust synthetic clocks. PMID:23624406

  20. Rescue in vitro maturation (IVM) of immature oocytes in stimulated cycles in women with low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Joon; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Shohat-Tal, Aya; Lazzaroni-Tealdi, Emanuela; Wu, Yan-Guang; Gleicher, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    Rescue in vitro maturation (IVM) is currently not a routine procedure in association with in vitro fertilization (IVF). We compared in a prospectively cohort study of 10 patients with normal functional ovarian reserve (NFOR) and of 25 with low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR), defined by abnormally high FSH and/or abnormally low AMH levels), IVM dynamics of immature oocytes. Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in IVF cycles, only immature oocytes underwent rescue IVM (for up to 48 h). Oocyte maturation dynamics, fertilization rates, embryo development, and pregnancy rates were then compared between NFOR and LFOR patients. Though proportion of MI and GV oocytes reaching MII stages within 48 h and rate of maturation of MI oocytes did not differ, in women with LFOR significantly more GV oocytes reached MII stage within 24 h (30.4 vs. 66.9 %; P = 0.013), while fertilization rates and embryo generation numbers were similar between both groups. Rescue IVM, thus, produced 1.5 additional embryos for transfer in women with LFOR and 1.6 in patients with NFOR, a highly significant difference in relative improvement in available embryo numbers for LFOR (+60.0 %) and NFOR women (+16.5 %). Rescue IVM, thus, not only demonstrates different time dynamics between women with LFOR and NFOR but also disproportionate efficacy in improving available embryo numbers for transfer in favor of LFOR patients. 1/7 patients, who reached embryo transfer with only embryos produced via rescue IVF conceived and delivered, proving that rescue IVF in women with LFOR also improves pregnancy and delivery chances. Because of the small number of embryos LFOR patients produce, every additional embryo is of considerable potential clinical significance for them, suggesting that rescue IVM in women with LFOR should become routine practice. PMID:26419849

  1. Solar Wind Helium Abundance as a Function of Speed and Heliographic Latitude: Variation through a Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, J. C.; Stenens, M. L.; Stevens, M. L.; Lazarus, A. J.; Steinberg, J. T.; Ogilvie, Keith W.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of the variation of the relative abundance of helium to hydrogen in the solar wind as a function of solar wind speed and heliographic latitude over the previous solar cycle. The average values of A(sub He), the ratio of helium to hydrogen number densities, are calculated in 25 speed intervals over 27-day Carrington rotations using Faraday Cup observations from the Wind spacecraft between 1995 and 2005. The higher speed and time resolution of this study compared to an earlier work with the Wind observations has led to the discovery of three new aspects of A(sub He), modulation during solar minimum from mid-1995 to mid-1997. First, we find that for solar wind speeds between 350 and 415 km/s, A(sub He), varies with a clear six-month periodicity, with a minimum value at the heliographic equatorial plane and a typical gradient of 0.01 per degree in latitude. For the slow wind this is a 30% effect. We suggest that the latitudinal gradient may be due to an additional dependence of coronal proton flux on coronal field strength or the stability of coronal loops. Second, once the gradient is subtracted, we find that A(sub He), is a remarkably linear function of solar wind speed. Finally, we identify a vanishing speed, at which A(sub He), is zero, is 259 km/s and note that this speed corresponds to the minimum solar wind speed observed at one AU. The vanishing speed may be related to previous theoretical work in which enhancements of coronal helium lead to stagnation of the escaping proton flux. During solar maximum the A(sub He), dependences on speed and latitude disappear, and we interpret this as evidence of two source regions for slow solar wind in the ecliptic plane, one being the solar minimum streamer belt and the other likely being active regions.

  2. Cognitive functions of regularly cycling women may differ throughout the month, depending on sex hormone status; a possible explanation to conflicting results of studies of ADHD in females

    PubMed Central

    Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Berger, Itai

    2014-01-01

    Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is considered as a model of neuro-developmental cognitive function. ADHD research previously studied mainly males. A major biological distinction between the genders is the presence of a menstrual cycle, which is associated with variations in sex steroid hormone levels. There is a growing body of literature showing that sex hormones have the ability to regulate intracellular signaling systems that are thought to be abnormal in ADHD. Thus, it is conceivable to believe that this functional interaction between sex hormones and molecules involved with synaptic plasticity and neurotransmitter systems may be associated with some of the clinical characteristics of women with ADHD. In spite of the impact of sex hormones on major neurotransmitter systems of the brain in a variety of clinical settings, the menstrual cycle is usually entered to statistical analyses as a nuisance or controlled for by only testing male samples. Evaluation of brain structure, function and chemistry over the course of the menstrual cycle as well as across the lifespan of women (premenarche, puberty, cycling period, premenopause, postmenopause) is critical to understanding sex differences in both normal and aberrant mental function and behavior. The studies of ADHD in females suggest confusing and non-consistent conclusions. None of these studies examined the possible relationship between phase of the menstrual cycle, sex hormones levels and ADHD symptoms. The menstrual cycle should therefore be taken into consideration in future studies in the neurocognitive field since it offers a unique opportunity to understand whether and how subtle fluctuations of sex hormones and specific combinations of sex hormones influence neuronal circuits implicated in the cognitive regulation of emotional processing. The investigation of biological models involving the role of estrogen, progesterone, and other sex steroids has the potential to generate new and improved diagnostic and treatment strategies that could change the course of cognitive-behavioral disorders such as ADHD. PMID:24744721

  3. Combined effects of CO2 enrichment and elevated growth temperatures on metabolites in soybean leaflets; evidence for dynamic changes of TCA cycle intermediates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean (Glycine max [Merr.]L.) was grown in indoor chambers with ambient (38 Pa) and elevated (70 Pa) CO2 and day/night temperature treatments of 28/20, 32/24, and 36/28 °C. Net rates of CO2 assimilation increased with growth temperature and were enhanced an additional 25% on average by CO2 enrich...

  4. The Pyruvate-Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Node

    PubMed Central

    Bücker, René; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Becker, Judith; Dersch, Petra; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the specific pathogenicity factors in bacteria, the contribution of metabolic processes to virulence is largely unknown. Here, we elucidate a tight connection between pathogenicity and core metabolism in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by integrated transcriptome and [13C]fluxome analysis of the wild type and virulence-regulator mutants. During aerobic growth on glucose, Y. pseudotuberculosis reveals an unusual flux distribution with a high level of secreted pyruvate. The absence of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators RovA, CsrA, and Crp strongly perturbs the fluxes of carbon core metabolism at the level of pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and these perturbations are accompanied by transcriptional changes in the corresponding enzymes. Knock-outs of regulators of this metabolic branch point and of its central enzyme, pyruvate kinase (ΔpykF), result in mutants with significantly reduced virulence in an oral mouse infection model. In summary, our work identifies the pyruvate-TCA cycle node as a focal point for controlling the host colonization and virulence of Yersinia. PMID:25164818

  5. Short-Term Mechanical Unloading With Left Ventricular Assist Devices After Acute Myocardial Infarction Conserves Calcium Cycling and Improves Heart Function

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xufeng; Li, Tieluo; Hagen, Brian; Zhang, Pei; Sanchez, Pablo G.; Williams, Katrina; Li, Shuying; Bianchi, Giacomo; Son, Ho Sung; Wu, Changfu; DeFilippi, Christopher; Xu, Kai; Lederer, William J.; Wu, Zhongjun J.; Griffith, Bartley P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to demonstrate that short-term cardiac unloading with a left ventricular (LV) assist device (LVAD) after acute myocardial infarction (MI) can conserve calcium cycling and improve heart function. Background Heart failure secondary to MI remains a major source of morbidity and mortality. Alterations in calcium cycling are linked to cardiac dysfunction in the failing heart. Methods Adult Dorsett hybrid sheep underwent acute MI and were mechanically unloaded with an axial-flow LVAD (Impella 5.0) for 2 weeks (n = 6). Six sheep with MI only and 4 sham sheep were used as controls. All animals were followed for 12 weeks post-MI. Regional strains in the LV were measured by sonomicrometry. Major calcium-handling proteins (CHPs), including sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase-2α (SERCA-2α), Na+-Ca2+ exchanger-1, and phospholamban, and Ca2+-ATPase activity were investigated. The electrophysiological calcium cycling in single isolated cardiomyocytes was measured with the patch-clamp technique. The related ultrastructures were studied with electron microscopy. Results LVAD unloading alleviated LV dilation and improved global cardiac function and regional contractility compared with the MI group. The regional myocardial strain (stretch) was minimized during the unloading period and even attenuated compared with the MI group at 12 weeks. Impaired calcium cycling was evident in the adjacent noninfarcted zone in the MI group, whereas CHP expression was normalized and Ca2+-ATPase activity was preserved in the LVAD unloading group. The electrophysiological calcium cycling was also conserved, and the ultrastructural damage was ameliorated in the unloaded animals. Conclusions Short-term LVAD unloading may conserve calcium cycling and improve heart function during the post-infarct period. PMID:23523452

  6. Glutamate is the major anaplerotic substrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of isolated rumen epithelial and duodenal mucosal cells from beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine the contribution of substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle fluxes in rumen epithelial (REC) and duodenal mucosal (DMC) cells isolated from bulls (n = 6) fed either a 75% forage (HF) or 75% concentrate (HC) diet. In separate incubations, [13C6]glucose, [13C5]glutam...

  7. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  8. Differences in Retinal Structure and Function between Aging Male and Female Sprague-Dawley Rats are Strongly Influenced by the Estrus Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chaychi, Samaneh; Polosa, Anna; Lachapelle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Biological sex and age are considered as two important factors that may influence the function and structure of the retina, an effect that might be governed by sexual hormones such as estrogen. The purpose of this study was to delineate the influence that biological sex and age exert on the retinal function and structure of rodents and also clarify the effect that the estrus cycle might exert on the retinal function of female rats. Method The retinal function of 50 normal male and female albino Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats was investigated with the electroretinogram (ERG) at postnatal day (P) 30, 60, 100, 200, and 300 (n = 56 male and female rats/age). Following the ERG recording sessions, retinal histology was performed in both sexes. In parallel, the retinal function of premenopausal and menopausal female rats aged P540 were also compared. Results Sex and age-related changes in retinal structure and function were observed in our animal model. However, irrespective of age, no significant difference was observed in ERG and retinal histology obtained from male and female rats. Notwithstanding the above we did however notice that between P60 and P200 there was a gradual increase in ERG amplitudes of female rats compared to males. Furthermore, the ERG of premenopausal female rats aged 18 months old (P540) was larger compared to age-matched menopausal female rats as well as that of male rats. Conclusion Our results showed that biological sex and age can influence the retinal function and structure of albino SD rats. Furthermore, we showed that cycled female rats have better retinal function compared to the menopausal female rats suggesting a beneficial effect of the estrus cycle on the retinal function. PMID:26317201

  9. Catabolite control protein E (CcpE) is a LysR-type transcriptional regulator of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Torsten; Zhang, Bo; Baronian, Grégory; Schulthess, Bettina; Homerova, Dagmar; Grubmüller, Stephanie; Kutzner, Erika; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Bertram, Ralph; Powers, Robert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Kormanec, Jan; Herrmann, Mathias; Molle, Virginie; Somerville, Greg A; Bischoff, Markus

    2013-12-13

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is a central metabolic pathway that provides energy, reducing potential, and biosynthetic intermediates. In Staphylococcus aureus, TCA cycle activity is controlled by several regulators (e.g. CcpA, CodY, and RpiRc) in response to the availability of sugars, amino acids, and environmental stress. Developing a bioinformatic search for additional carbon catabolite-responsive regulators in S. aureus, we identified a LysR-type regulator, catabolite control protein E (CcpE), with homology to the Bacillus subtilis CcpC regulator. Inactivation of ccpE in S. aureus strain Newman revealed that CcpE is a positive transcriptional effector of the first two enzymes of the TCA cycle, aconitase (citB) and to a lesser extent citrate synthase (citZ). Consistent with the transcriptional data, aconitase activity dramatically decreased in the ccpE mutant relative to the wild-type strain. The effect of ccpE inactivation on citB transcription and the lesser effect on citZ transcription were also reflected in electrophoretic mobility shift assays where CcpE bound to the citB promoter but not the citZ promoter. Metabolomic studies showed that inactivation of ccpE resulted in increased intracellular concentrations of acetate, citrate, lactate, and alanine, consistent with a redirection of carbon away from the TCA cycle. Taken together, our data suggest that CcpE is a major direct positive regulator of the TCA cycle gene citB. PMID:24194525

  10. Rates of insulin secretion in INS-1 cells are enhanced by coupling to anaplerosis and Kreb's cycle flux independent of ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cline, Gary W; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Zhao, Xiaojian; Papas, Klearchos K

    2011-11-11

    Mechanistic models of glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) established in minimal media in vitro, may not accurately describe the complexity of coupling metabolism with insulin secretion that occurs in vivo. As a first approximation, we have evaluated metabolic pathways in a typical growth media, DMEM as a surrogate in vivo medium, for comparison to metabolic fluxes observed under the typical experimental conditions using the simple salt-buffer of KRB. Changes in metabolism in response to glucose and amino acids and coupling to insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 832/13 cells. Media effects on mitochondrial function and the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were determined by fluorometrically measured oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) combined with (31)P NMR measured rates of ATP synthesis. Substrate preferences and pathways into the TCA cycle, and the synthesis of mitochondrial 2nd messengers by anaplerosis were determined by (13)C NMR isotopomer analysis of the fate of [U-(13)C] glucose metabolism. Despite similar incremental increases in insulin secretion, the changes of OCR in response to increasing glucose from 2.5 to 15mM were blunted in DMEM relative to KRB. Basal and stimulated rates of insulin secretion rates were consistently higher in DMEM, while ATP synthesis rates were identical in both DMEM and KRB, suggesting greater mitochondrial uncoupling in DMEM. The relative rates of anaplerosis, and hence synthesis and export of 2nd messengers from the mitochondria were found to be similar in DMEM to those in KRB. And, the correlation of total PC flux with insulin secretion rates in DMEM was found to be congruous with the correlation in KRB. Together, these results suggest that signaling mechanisms associated with both TCA cycle flux and with anaplerotic flux, but not ATP production, may be responsible for the enhanced rates of insulin secretion in more complex, and physiologically-relevant media. PMID:22008547

  11. The role of the endometrial oxytocin receptor in determining the length of the sterile oestrous cycle and ensuring maintenance of luteal function in early pregnancy in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Flint, A P; Lamming, G E; Stewart, H J; Abayasekara, D R

    1994-05-28

    The oxytocin receptor, a seven transmembrane domain, G protein-linked receptor molecule, plays a central role in determining the endocrine function of the ruminant uterine endometrium. During nonpregnant cycles the control of this molecule by circulating steroid hormones leads to regression of the corpora lutea. The kinetics of the mechanisms involved determine the time at which luteolysis occurs, and therefore the length of the oestrous cycle. In pregnancy, secretions of the trophoblast block endometrial oxytocin receptor gene expression and lead to luteal maintenance. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the steroidal control of oxytocin receptor gene expression will provide an explanation for the relative constancy of oestrous cycle lengths in non-pregnant animals. Unravelling the way in which trophoblast products block expression of the oxytocin receptor gene will lead to a better understanding of the reasons for the high rate of embryonic loss in domestic ruminants. PMID:7938200

  12. Linking sediment structure, hydrological functioning and biogeochemical cycling in disturbed coastal saltmarshes and implications for vegetation development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kate; Harvey, Gemma; James, Tempest; Simon, Carr; Michelle, Morris

    2014-05-01

    Saltmarsh restoration undoubtedly provides environmental enhancement, with vegetation quickly re-establishing following the breach of sea walls and subsequent tidal inundation of previously defended areas. Yet evidence increasingly suggests that the restored saltmarshes do not have the same biological characteristics as their natural counterparts (Mossman et al. 2012) and this may be in part be due to physicochemical parameters at the site including anoxia and poor drainage. Hence, restored saltmarshes may not offer the range and quality of ecosystem services anticipated. These environments will have been 'disturbed' by previous land use and there is little understanding of the impacts of this disturbance on the wider hydrogeomorphic and biogeochemical functioning in restored saltmarshes and the implications for saltmarsh vegetation development. This study examines linkages between physical sediment characteristics, sediment structure (using X-ray microtomography), sub-surface hydrology (using pressure transducers and time series analysis), and sediment and porewater geochemistry (major and trace elements, major anions) in sediment cores collected from undisturbed saltmarshes and those restored by de-embankment. Sub-surface sediments in restored saltmarshes have lower organic matter content, lower moisture content and higher bulk density than undisturbed sites. Using X-ray tomography a clear horizon can be observed which separates relict agricultural soils at depth with less dense and structureless sediments deposited since de-embankment. Ratios of open to closed pore space suggest that while undisturbed saltmarshes have the highest porosity, restored saltmarshes have larger void spaces, but limited pore connectivity. Sub-surface hydrological response to tidal flooding was subdued in the restored compared to the undisturbed site, suggesting that porewater flow may be impeded. Time series analysis indicated that flow pathways differ in restored saltmarsh sediments with preferential horizontal flows. The undisturbed saltmarsh displayed typical vertical geochemical sediment profiles. However, in the restored sites total Fe and Mn are elevated at depth indicating an absence of diagenetic cycling, whilst porewater sulphate and nitrate increased at depth suggesting that vertical solute transport is impeded in restored sites. In surface sediments, though total Hg concentrations are similar, Hg methylation rates are significantly higher than in the undisturbed saltmarsh suggesting that surface anoxia and poor drainage may result in increased mobilization and bioavailability of Hg. These findings have implications for the wider biogeochemical ecosystem services offered by saltmarsh restoration and the water-logged, anoxic conditions produced are unsuitable for seedling germination and plant growth. This highlights the need for integrated understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes.

  13. Cisplatin-induced alterations in the functional spermatogonial stem cell pool and niche in C57/BL/6J mice following a clinically relevant multi-cycle exposure

    PubMed Central

    Harman, James G.; Richburg, John H.

    2014-01-01

    A typical clinical cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) dosing regimen consists of repeated treatment cycles followed by a recovery period. While effective, this dosing structure results in a prolonged, often permanent, infertility in men. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are theoretically capable of repopulating the seminiferous tubules after exposure has ceased. We propose that an altered spermatogonial environment during recovery from the initial treatment cycle drives an increase in SSC mitotic cell activity, rendering the SSC pool increasingly susceptible to cisplatin-induced injury from subsequent cycles. To test this hypothesis, the undifferentiated spermatogonia population and niche of the adult mouse (C57/BL/6J) were examined during the recovery periods of a clinically-relevant cisplatin exposure paradigm. Histological examination revealed a disorganization of spermatogenesis correlating with the number of exposure cycles. Quantification of Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase-Mediated Digoxigenin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) staining indicated an increase in apoptotic frequency following exposure. Immunohistochemical examination of Foxo1 and incorporated BrdU showed an increase in the undifferentiated spermatogonial population and mitotic activity in the recovery period in mice exposed to one cycle, but not two cycles of cisplatin. Immunohistochemical investigation of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) revealed an increase in production along the basal Sertoli cell membrane throughout the recovery period in all treatment groups. Taken together, these data establish that the impact of cisplatin exposure on the functional stem cell pool and niche correlates with: (1) the number of dosing cycles; (2) mitotic activity of early germ cells; and (3) alterations in the basal Sertoli cell GDNF expression levels after cisplatin-induced testicular injury. PMID:24704392

  14. Nuclear import and cell cycle arrest functions of the HIV-1 Vpr protein are encoded by two separate genes in HIV-2/SIV(SM).

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, T M; Brichacek, B; Sharova, N; Newman, M A; Stivahtis, G; Sharp, P M; Emerman, M; Hahn, B H; Stevenson, M

    1996-01-01

    The vpr genes of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV/SIV) encode proteins which are packaged in the virus particle. HIV-1 Vpr has been shown to mediate the nuclear import of viral reverse transcription complexes in non-dividing target cells (e.g. terminally differentiated macrophages), and to alter the cell cycle and proliferation status of the infected host cell. Members of the HIV-2/SIV(SM) group encode, in addition to Vpr, a related protein called Vpx. Because these two proteins share considerable sequence similarity, it has been assumed that they also exhibit similar functions. Here, we report that the functions of Vpr and Vpx are distinct and non-redundant, although both proteins are components of the HIV-2/SIV(SM) virion and reverse transcription complex. Characterizing SIV(SM) proviruses defective in one or both genes, we found that Vpx is both necessary and sufficient for the nuclear import of the viral reverse transcription complex. In contrast, Vpr, but not Vpx, inhibited the progression of infected host cells from the G2 to the M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, two independent functions of the HIV-1 Vpr protein are encoded by separate genes in HIV-2/SIV(SM). This segregation is consistent with the conservation of these genes in HIV-2/SIV(SM) evolution, and underscores the importance of both nuclear transport and cell cycle arrest functions in primate lentivirus biology. Images PMID:8947037

  15. Structural and functional characteristics of virgin and fouled Protein A MabSelect resin cycled in a monoclonal antibody purification process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaojie; Xu, Kerui; Daniels, William; Salm, Jeffrey; Glynn, Judy; Martin, Joseph; Gallo, Christopher; Godavarti, Ranga; Carta, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    The structural and functional characteristics of the Protein A MabSelect resin are determined for a virgin sample and for samples removed from a column that had been operated in an antibody capture process which had shown losses in product recovery over fewer than 20 cycles. Compared to the virgin resin, the cycled samples show reduced porosity and apparent pore size based on inverse size exclusion chromatography while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows accumulation of foulants on the cycled resin. Adsorption isotherms, batch adsorption kinetics, and batch desorption kinetics, obtained using the antibody in purified form, show that the cycled samples have about 10% lower binding capacity and slower mass transfer. Confocal scanning laser microscopy shows, however, that different degrees of fouling exist for different beads in the cycled samples, which may correspond to the existence of areas exposed to minimal or no flow in the process column. Replacing the standard cleaning procedure with an improved multi-step cleaning protocol prevented the accumulation of foulants in the resin beads, as evident from TEM, and resulted in a stable operation with high recovery. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 367-375. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26175184

  16. Stability of IRA-45 solid amine resin as a function of carbon dioxide absorption and steam desorption cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter C.; Wydeven, Theodore

    1987-01-01

    The removal of CO2 from the NASA Space Station's cabin atmosphere, which may be undertaken by a solid-amine water (steam)-desorbed system, is presently evaluated with a view to long-term amine resin stability and adsorption/desorption cycling by means of an automated laboratory flow-testing facility. While the CO2-adsorption capacity of the IRA-45 amine resin used gradually decreased over time, the rate of degradation significantly decreased after the first 10 cycles. Attention is given to the presence (and possible need for removal) of trimethylamine in the process air downstream of the resin bed.

  17. Predicting VO[subscript 2max] in College-Aged Participants Using Cycle Ergometry and Perceived Functional Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielson, David E.; George, James D.; Vehrs, Pat R.; Hager, Ron L.; Webb, Carrie V.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a multiple linear regression model to predict treadmill VO[subscript 2max] scores using both exercise and non-exercise data. One hundred five college-aged participants (53 male, 52 female) successfully completed a submaximal cycle ergometer test and a maximal graded exercise test on a motorized treadmill.…

  18. In Situ Activity and Functional Diversity of Microbes Linking Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles in Marine Ecosystems: BI-OMP Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, Robert E.

    2004-05-01

    We developed methods to simultaneously detect genes or gene expression involved with carbon and nitrogen cycling in individual marine bacterial cells in their natural matrices. The technique focuses on in situ polymerase chain reaction which we were the first lab to successfully obtain with intact prokaryotic cells. We listed the papers published to date from this project and summarize highlights of our results.

  19. Pre–B cell receptor–mediated cell cycle arrest in Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia requires IKAROS function

    PubMed Central

    Trageser, Daniel; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Nahar, Rahul; Duy, Cihangir; von Levetzow, Gregor; Klemm, Lars; Park, Eugene; Schuh, Wolfgang; Gruber, Tanja; Herzog, Sebastian; Kim, Yong-mi; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Li, Aihong; Storlazzi, Clelia Tiziana; Jäck, Hans-Martin; Groffen, John; Martinelli, Giovanni; Heisterkamp, Nora; Jumaa, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    B cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arises in virtually all cases from B cell precursors that are arrested at pre–B cell receptor–dependent stages. The Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) subtype of ALL accounts for 25–30% of cases of adult ALL, has the most unfavorable clinical outcome among all ALL subtypes and is defined by the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 kinase and deletions of the IKAROS gene in >80% of cases. Here, we demonstrate that the pre–B cell receptor functions as a tumor suppressor upstream of IKAROS through induction of cell cycle arrest in Ph+ ALL cells. Pre–B cell receptor–mediated cell cycle arrest in Ph+ ALL cells critically depends on IKAROS function, and is reversed by coexpression of the dominant-negative IKAROS splice variant IK6. IKAROS also promotes tumor suppression through cooperation with downstream molecules of the pre–B cell receptor signaling pathway, even if expression of the pre–B cell receptor itself is compromised. In this case, IKAROS redirects oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase signaling from SRC kinase-activation to SLP65, which functions as a critical tumor suppressor downstream of the pre–B cell receptor. These findings provide a rationale for the surprisingly high frequency of IKAROS deletions in Ph+ ALL and identify IKAROS-mediated cell cycle exit as the endpoint of an emerging pathway of pre–B cell receptor–mediated tumor suppression. PMID:19620627

  20. Response to Functional Electrical Stimulation Cycling in Women With Spinal Cord Injuries Using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry and Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Maureen C; Eng, Janice J; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Warburton, Darren E.R; Hung, Chihya; Tawashy, Amira

    2010-01-01

    Background: Loss of bone mass is common after spinal cord injury (SCI). One rehabilitation modality that has shown some promise for maintaining bone health is the functional electrical stimulation (FES) cycle ergometer. Although there has been some research investigating bone health and FES cycle ergometry, few have provided a detailed description of the changes that can occur in bone mass and soft-tissue mass. Objective: To use 2 types of bone imaging, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), to provide a detailed description of bone and soft-tissue response to FES cycle ergometry training in women with SCI. Study Design: Case series; a 6-month program of FES cycle ergometry for women with chronic motor complete (n  =  2) and incomplete (n  =  1) SCI. Setting: Outpatient rehabilitation center in Canada. Methods: Three women participated in a thrice weekly 6-month exercise program of FES cycle ergometry. We used DXA (lower extremity) and pQCT at the midshaft (50%) and distal (5%) sites of the tibia to assess bone density and soft-tissue mass before and after the exercise program. Results: There was an increase or maintenance in bone mineral density by DXA and pQCT in the lower extremity for all 3 participants. Muscle mass by DXA increased in the lower extremity in 2 participants. Conclusion: In this case series, we note a positive response in bone mass and soft-tissue mass in the lower extremity after a 6-month FES cycle ergometry program. PMID:20397446

  1. Triheptanoin partially restores levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates in the mouse pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hadera, Mussie G; Smeland, Olav B; McDonald, Tanya S; Tan, Kah Ni; Sonnewald, Ursula; Borges, Karin

    2014-04-01

    Triheptanoin, the triglyceride of heptanoate, is anticonvulsant in various epilepsy models. It is thought to improve energy metabolism in the epileptic brain by re-filling the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle with C4-intermediates (anaplerosis). Here, we injected mice with [1,2-(13) C]glucose 3.5-4 weeks after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) fed either a control or triheptanoin diet. Amounts of metabolites and incorporations of (13) C were determined in extracts of cerebral cortices and hippocampal formation and enzyme activity and mRNA expression were quantified. The percentage enrichment with two (13) C atoms in malate, citrate, succinate, and GABA was reduced in hippocampal formation of control-fed SE compared with control mice. Except for succinate, these reductions were not found in triheptanoin-fed SE mice, indicating that triheptanoin prevented a decrease of TCA cycle capacity. Compared to those on control diet, triheptanoin-fed SE mice showed few changes in most other metabolite levels and their (13) C labeling. Reduced pyruvate carboxylase mRNA and enzyme activity in forebrains and decreased [2,3-(13) C]aspartate amounts in cortex suggest a pyruvate carboxylation independent source of C-4 TCA cycle intermediates. Most likely anaplerosis was kept unchanged by carboxylation of propionyl-CoA derived from heptanoate. Further studies are proposed to fully understand triheptanoin's effects on neuroglial metabolism and interaction. PMID:24236946

  2. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients. PMID:25978848

  3. Changes in Sleep Time and Sleep Quality across the Ovulatory Cycle as a Function of Fertility and Partner Attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that near ovulation women tend to consume fewer calories and engage in more physical activity; they are judged to be more attractive, express greater preferences for masculine and symmetrical men, and experience increases in sexual desire for men other than their primary partners. Some of these cycle phase shifts are moderated by partner attractiveness and interpreted as strategic responses to women's current reproductive context. The present study investigated changes in sleep across the ovulatory cycle, based on the hypothesis that changes in sleep may reflect ancestral strategic shifts of time and energy toward reproductive activities. Participants completed a 32-day daily diary in which they recorded their sleep time and quality for each day, yielding over 1,000 observations of sleep time and quality. Results indicated that, when the probability of conception was high, women partnered with less attractive men slept more, while women with more attractive partners slept less. PMID:24710508

  4. Cell cycle regulation of VCIP135 deubiquitinase activity and function in p97/p47-mediated Golgi reassembly

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the inheritance of the Golgi apparatus into the daughter cells during each cycle of cell division is mediated by a disassembly and reassembly process, and this process is precisely controlled by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. VCIP135 (valosin-containing protein p97/p47 complex–interacting protein, p135), a deubiquitinating enzyme required for p97/p47-mediated postmitotic Golgi membrane fusion, is phosphorylated at multiple sites during mitosis. However, whether phosphorylation directly regulates VCIP135 deubiquitinase activity and Golgi membrane fusion in the cell cycle remains unknown. We show that, in early mitosis, phosphorylation of VCIP135 by Cdk1 at a single residue, S130, is sufficient to inactivate the enzyme and inhibit p97/p47-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. At the end of mitosis, VCIP135 S130 is dephosphorylated, which is accompanied by the recovery of its deubiquitinase activity and Golgi reassembly. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation and ubiquitination are coordinated via VCIP135 to control Golgi membrane dynamics in the cell cycle. PMID:25904330

  5. Diurnal Changes in Mitochondrial Function Reveal Daily Optimization of Light and Dark Respiratory Metabolism in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun Pong; Eubel, Holger; Millar, A. Harvey

    2010-01-01

    Biomass production by plants is often negatively correlated with respiratory rate, but the value of this rate changes dramatically during diurnal cycles, and hence, biomass is the cumulative result of complex environment-dependent metabolic processes. Mitochondria in photosynthetic plant tissues undertake substantially different metabolic roles during light and dark periods that are dictated by substrate availability and the functional capacity of mitochondria defined by their protein composition. We surveyed the heterogeneity of the mitochondrial proteome and its function during a typical night and day cycle in Arabidopsis shoots. This used a staged, quantitative analysis of the proteome across 10 time points covering 24 h of the life of 3-week-old Arabidopsis shoots grown under 12-h dark and 12-h light conditions. Detailed analysis of enzyme capacities and substrate-dependent respiratory processes of isolated mitochondria were also undertaken during the same time course. Together these data reveal a range of dynamic changes in mitochondrial capacity and uncover day- and night-enhanced protein components. Clear diurnal changes were evident in mitochondrial capacities to drive the TCA cycle and to undertake functions associated with nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, redox poise, and mitochondrial antioxidant defense. These data quantify the nature and nuances of a daily rhythm in Arabidopsis mitochondrial respiratory capacity. PMID:20601493

  6. Functional Classification of Uncultured Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum Using the Maple System

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Hideto; Arai, Wataru; Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Taniguchi, Takeaki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the metabolic and physiological potential evaluator system based on Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) functional modules was employed to establish a functional classification of archaeal species and to determine the comprehensive functions (functionome) of the previously uncultivated thermophile Candidatus Caldiarchaeum subterraneum (Ca. C. subterraneum). A phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated sequences of proteins common among 142 archaea and 2 bacteria, and among 137 archaea and 13 unicellular eukaryotes suggested that Ca. C. subterraneum is closely related to thaumarchaeotic species. Consistent with the results of the phylogenetic analysis, clustering and principal component analyses based on the completion ratio patterns for all KEGG modules in 79 archaeal species suggested that the overall metabolic and physiological potential of Ca. C. subterraneum is similar to that of thaumarchaeotic species. However, Ca. C. subterraneum possessed almost no genes in the modules required for nitrification and the hydroxypropionatehydroxybutyrate cycle for carbon fixation, unlike thaumarchaeotic species. However, it possessed all genes in the modules required for central carbohydrate metabolism, such as glycolysis, pyruvate oxidation, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the glyoxylate cycle, as well as multiple sets of sugar and branched chain amino acid ABC transporters. These metabolic and physiological features appear to support the predominantly aerobic character of Ca. C. subterraneum, which lives in a subsurface thermophilic microbial mat community with a heterotrophic lifestyle. PMID:26196861

  7. Stereometric parameters change vs. Topographic Change Analysis (TCA) agreement in Heidelberg Retina Tomography III (HRT-3) early detection of clinical significant glaucoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Dascalu, AM; Cherecheanu, AP; Stana, D; Voinea, L; Ciuluvica, R; Savlovschi, C; Serban, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of the stereometric parameters change analysis vs. Topographic Change Analysis in early detection of glaucoma progression. Methods: 81 patients with POAG were monitored for 4 years (GAT monthly, SAP at every 6 months, optic disc photographs and HRT3 yearly). The exclusion criteria were other optic disc or retinal pathology; topographic standard deviation (TSD >30; inter-test variation of reference height > 25 μm. The criterion for structural progression was the following: at least 20 adjacent super-pixels with a clinically significant decrease in height (>5%). Results: 16 patients of the total 81 presented structural progression on TCA. The most useful stereometric parameters for the early detection of glaucoma progression were the following: Rim Area change (sensitivity 100%, specificity 74.2% for a “cut-off ” value of -0.05), C/D Area change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a “cut off ” value of 0.02), C/D linear change (sensitivity 85.7%, specificity 71.5% for a “cut-off ” value of 0.02), Rim Volume change (sensitivity 71.4%, specificity 88.8% for a “cut-off ” value of -0.04). RNFL Thickness change (<0) was highly sensitive (82%), but less specific for glaucoma progression (45,2%). Changes of the other stereometric parameters have a limited diagnostic value for the early detection of glaucoma progression. Conclusion: TCA is a valuable tool for the assessment of the structural progression in glaucoma patients and its inter-test variability is low. On long-term, the quantitative analysis according to stereometric parameters change is also very important. The most relevant parameters to detect progression are RA, C/D Area, Linear C/D and RV. PMID:25713621

  8. ISG15 Functions as an Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Effector Early in the Murine Norovirus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marisela R.; Monte, Kristen; Thackray, Larissa B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (HuNoV) are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Similar to HuNoV, murine noroviruses (MNV) are enteric pathogens spread via the fecal-oral route and have been isolated from numerous mouse facilities worldwide. Type I and type II interferons (IFN) restrict MNV-1 replication; however, the antiviral effectors impacting MNV-1 downstream of IFN signaling are largely unknown. Studies using dendritic cells, macrophages, and mice deficient in free and conjugated forms of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) revealed that ISG15 conjugation contributes to protection against MNV-1 both in vitro and in vivo. ISG15 inhibited a step early in the viral life cycle upstream of viral genome transcription. Directly transfecting MNV-1 RNA into IFN-stimulated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) lacking ISG15 conjugates bypassed the antiviral activity of ISG15, further suggesting that ISG15 conjugates restrict the MNV-1 life cycle at the viral entry/uncoating step. These results identify ISG15 as the first type I IFN effector regulating MNV-1 infection both in vitro and in vivo and for the first time implicate the ISG15 pathway in the regulation of early stages of MNV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Type I IFNs are important in controlling murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) infections; however, the proteins induced by IFNs that restrict viral growth are largely unknown. This report reveals that interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) mitigates MNV-1 replication both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, it shows that ISG15 inhibits MNV-1 replication by targeting an early step in the viral life cycle, MNV-1 entry and/or uncoating. These results identify ISG15 as the first type I IFN effector regulating MNV-1 infection both in vitro and in vivo and for the first time implicate the ISG15 pathway in the regulation of viral entry/uncoating. PMID:24899198

  9. Germ-line-derived hinge domain p53 mutants have lost apoptotic but not cell cycle arrest functions.

    PubMed

    Aurelio, O N; Cajot, J F; Hua, M L; Khwaja, Z; Stanbridge, E J

    1998-05-15

    The protein p53 is a critical tumor suppressor, as demonstrated by its frequent mutation in human cancers. Overexpression of the wild-type form of the p53 tumor suppressor gene in human cancer cell lines has been shown to lead to either cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A study of two Li-Fraumeni syndrome-derived p53 hinge domain mutants shows that both mutants retain the ability to arrest cell growth but are significantly impaired for the induction of apoptosis in human p53-null cell lines. This indicates that the hinge domain may be important in the regulation of p53-dependent apoptosis. PMID:9605765

  10. Developmental regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mouse mammary gland during a prolonged lactation cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the lactating mammary cell is poorly understood. The goal of this study was to use proteomics to relate temporal changes in mammary cell mitochondrial function during lactation to changes in the proteins that make up this organelle. The hypo...

  11. RNA versatility governs tRNA function: Why tRNA flexibility is essential beyond the translation cycle.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Claus-D

    2016-05-01

    tRNAs undergo multiple conformational changes during the translation cycle that are required for tRNA translocation and proper communication between the ribosome and translation factors. Recent structural data on how destabilized tRNAs utilize the CCA-adding enzyme to proofread themselves put a spotlight on tRNA flexibility beyond the translation cycle. In analogy to tRNA surveillance, this review finds that other processes also exploit versatile tRNA folding to achieve, amongst others, specific aminoacylation, translational regulation by riboswitches or a block of bacterial translation. tRNA flexibility is thereby not restricted to the hinges utilized during translation. In contrast, the flexibility of tRNA is distributed all over its L-shape and is actively exploited by the tRNA-interacting partners to discriminate one tRNA from another. Since the majority of tRNA modifications also modulate tRNA flexibility it seems that cells devote enormous resources to tightly sense and regulate tRNA structure. This is likely required for error-free protein synthesis. PMID:26990636

  12. Inhibition of akt phosphorylation diminishes mitochondrial biogenesis regulators, tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and exacerbates recognition memory deficit in rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Khodagholi, Fariba

    2014-11-01

    3-Methyladenine (3-MA), as a PI3K inhibitor, is widely used for inhibition of autophagy. Inhibition of PI3K class I leads to inhibition of Akt phosphorylation, a central molecule involved in diverse arrays of intracellular cascades in nervous system. Accordingly, in the present study, we aimed to determine the alterations of specific mitochondrial biogenesis markers and mitochondrial function in 3-MA-injected rats following amyloid beta (A?) insult. Our data revealed that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation downregulates master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1?). Our data also showed that decrease in PGC-1? level presumably is due to decrease in the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding and AMP-activated kinase, two upstream activators of PGC-1?. As a consequence, the level of some mitochondrial biogenesis factors including nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, and Cytochrome c decreased significantly. Also, activities of tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) enzymes such as Aconitase, a-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase reduced in the presence of 3-MA with or without A? insult. Decrease in mitochondrial biogenesis factors and TCA enzyme activity in the rats receiving 3-MA and A? were more compared to the rats that received either alone; indicating the additive destructive effects of these two agents. In agreement with our molecular results, data obtained from behavioral test (using novel objective recognition test) indicated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation with or without A? injection impaired novel recognition (non-spatial) memory. Our results suggest that 3-MA amplified deleterious effects of A? by targeting central molecule Akt. PMID:25135709

  13. Succession of microbial functional communities in response to a pilot-scale ethanol-blended fuel release throughout the plume life cycle.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Deng, Ye; Yuan, Tong; Zhou, Jizhong; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-03-01

    GeoChip, a comprehensive gene microarray, was used to examine changes in microbial functional gene structure throughout the 4-year life cycle of a pilot-scale ethanol blend plume, including 2-year continuous released followed by plume disappearance after source removal. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and Mantel tests showed that dissolved O2 (which was depleted within 5 days of initiating the release and rebounded 194 days after source removal) was the most influential environmental factor on community structure. Initially, the abundance of anaerobic BTEX degradation genes increased significantly while that of aerobic BTEX degradation genes decreased. Gene abundance for N fixation, nitrification, P utilization, sulfate reduction and S oxidation also increased, potentially changing associated biogeochemical cycle dynamics. After plume disappearance, most genes returned to pre-release abundance levels, but the final functional structure significantly differed from pre-release conditions. Overall, observed successions of functional structure reflected adaptive responses that were conducive to biodegradation of ethanol-blend releases. PMID:25603154

  14. Sensory screening for large-format natural corks by "dry soak" testing and its correlation to headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) releasable trichloroanisole (TCA) analysis.

    PubMed

    Macku, Carlos; Gonzalez, Lesa; Schleussner, Christiane; Mesquita, Ana Cristina; Herwatt, James W; Kirch, Leonard C; Schwartz, Rob J

    2009-09-01

    Large-format natural corks were individually screened for trichloroanisole (TCA) taint and other non-characteristic cork odors by smelling the high relative humidity headspace of the jarred closure during expert panel sensory sessions. The method was coined "dry soak sensory screening". Out of a population of 2296 corks, 138 specimens [6% of the total population (TP)] were retained because of unusual odors, ranging from mild to severe. All retained corks were analyzed for releasable TCA (RTCA) by the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique. Results indicated that 30 corks (1.3% TP) had concentrations between 1.0 and 5.0 ppt. Most of these corks had non-typical TCA odors described as ashtray, musty, moldy, dirty, and wet cardboard. A total of 13 retained corks (0.57% TP) had RTCA values higher than 5.0 ppt, mostly displaying the typical TCA odor. Dry soak screening has been determined to be a clean, fast, and most importantly, a nondestructive method ideal for screening large-format natural corks with off odors. PMID:19722710

  15. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon – Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning. PMID:26396042

  16. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon - Simpson’s indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning.

  17. Planting increases the abundance and structure complexity of soil core functional genes relevant to carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Liang, Yuting; Jiang, Yuji; Yang, Yunfeng; Xue, Kai; Xiong, Jinbo; Zhou, Jizhong; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Plants have an important impact on soil microbial communities and their functions. However, how plants determine the microbial composition and network interactions is still poorly understood. During a four-year field experiment, we investigated the functional gene composition of three types of soils (Phaeozem, Cambisols and Acrisol) under maize planting and bare fallow regimes located in cold temperate, warm temperate and subtropical regions, respectively. The core genes were identified using high-throughput functional gene microarray (GeoChip 3.0), and functional molecular ecological networks (fMENs) were subsequently developed with the random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework. Our results demonstrated that planting significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gene alpha-diversity in terms of richness and Shannon - Simpson's indexes for all three types of soils and 83.5% of microbial alpha-diversity can be explained by the plant factor. Moreover, planting had significant impacts on the microbial community structure and the network interactions of the microbial communities. The calculated network complexity was higher under maize planting than under bare fallow regimes. The increase of the functional genes led to an increase in both soil respiration and nitrification potential with maize planting, indicating that changes in the soil microbial communities and network interactions influenced ecological functioning. PMID:26396042

  18. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies. PMID:25902192

  19. Carbon and nitrogen cycling in thermally heated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Burton, M.; Vennelakanti, S.; Havig, J. R.; Shock, E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrothermally heated sediment environments, such as are found in abundance throughout Yellowstone National Park, host fully functional microbial ecosystems. As with any ecosystem, both sources and sinks of carbon, nitrogen, and a myriad of other nutrients and energy-driving factors must be supplied. While we know microbial communities in hydrothermal environments can be surprisingly diverse, we know little about basic ecological functions such as carbon and nitrogen cycling. Previous work has shown that carbon cycling in one hot spring in Yellowstone National Park [“Bison Pool”] and its associated runoff channel functions as a complex system. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in sediments and biofilms across a temperature and chemical gradient at this location revealed that the four best studied carbon fixation pathways [Calvin, reverse tricarboxylic acid, acetyl-CoA, 3-hydroxypropionate cycles] may all be functioning in this system, and nitrogen fixation varies across the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone [1]. Microcosm experiments using biofilms from this hot spring as inoculae with 13C labeled carbon substrates indicate heterotrophic growth [2]. In addition, metagenomic analysis of environmental DNA has indicated the presence of genes involved in carbon fixation [both phototrophic and autotrophic], and heterotrophy, as well as nitrogen fixation [3]. Studies from other Yellowstone locations have also found genetic evidence for carbon and nitrogen fixation [4, 5]. Of particular interest is the role of individuals in carbon and nitrogen cycling as environmental conditions suitable for chemosynthetic and photosynthetic growth vary. This study explores the diversity of cbbM/cbbL [Calvin cycle], aclB/oor/porA [rTCA cycle], nifH [nitrogen fixation], nirK [nitrite reduction] and amoA [ammonia oxidation] genes across a variety of Yellowstone environments. The transition of genetic diversity within sediments and biofilms is focused on the chemosynthetic/photosynthetic ecotone from a variety of hot springs spanning a range of pH and geochemical conditions. By sampling across this ecotone, changes in carbon and nitrogen fixation as a function of changing community structure become apparent. Environmental DNA was extracted from these samples, and the presence/absence of Bacteria and Archaea determined by PCR. In addition, PCR-directed screens reveal the presence or absence of the aforementioned functional genes. Further, comparison across a broad spectrum of environmental conditions supplies context for phylogenetic analysis of diversity. [1] Havig, J.R., 2009. Geochemistry of Hydrothermal Biofilms: Composition of Biofilms in Siliceous Sinter-Deposting Hot Springs. Doctoral Dissertation, Arizona State University. [2] Meyer-Dombard et al., 2007. Microbial Diversity and SIP Investigations of Streamer Biofilm Communities in Yellowstone. Goldschmidt Geochemical Conference. [3] Raymond et al., 2008. EOS Trans AGU. Abstract B14A-03. [4] Hall et al., 2008. AEM 74:4910-4922. [5] Steunou et al., 2006. PNAS 103:2398-2403.

  20. [The function of mitochondrion, carnitine, coenzyme-A, fat acids, glucose, the Randle cycle and insulin: a lecture].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2012-02-01

    In the function of feeding as biologic function of trophology, occurs the interchange of biologic reactions of exotrophy (postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia) and periods of food absence (biologic reaction of endotrophy). The action of insulin is realized in the biologic reaction of exotrophy only. The phylogenetic late insulin manages the function of phylogenetic early mitochondrion in the biologic reaction of exotrophy. In the biologic reaction of exotrophy, the cells activatedly absorb glucose under effect of insulin through glucose carriers-4 and actively absorb fat acids in the form of nonpolar triglycerides in olein lipoproteins of very low density by force of receptor endocytosis. These mechanisms formed on late stages of phylogenesis in the becoming of biologic function of locomotion--the function of movement. In the biologic reaction of endotrophy the cells absorb passively glucose under effect of glycaemia in intercellular medium through glucose carriers and passively (on gradient of concentration) absorb the fat acids in polar form under passive diffusion through plasmatic membrane. These reactions are worked out on the early stages of phylogenesis in the becoming of biologic function of homeostasis. The syndrome of resistance to insulin is formed only in biologic reaction of exotrophy but the disorders can persist and during realization of biologic reaction of endotrophy. In the biologic reaction of exotrophy insulin "decides": a) glucose can be deposited only in a limited way and can be consumed (oxidized in mitochondrion) in the first instance: b) fat acids can be stored and kept to be used in biologic function of locomotion. In the biologic reaction of exotrophy insulin "endeavors" as fast and full as possible use glucose and preserve in vivo as much as possible of fat acids as a substratum for further realization of biologic function of locomotion. Insulin minimizes in cytosol the content of a) ketone bodies - metabolites of C4 butyric fat acid and b) short chained C6-C10 fat acids and C16 palmitic acid for which in mitochondrion exists specific carrier - carnitin-palmitoilacyltransferase and "forces" mitochondrion to oxidize glucose. The main biologic role of insulin is to provide the biologic function of locomotion with substratum of energy PMID:22624461

  1. Proteome-Based Comparative Analyses of Growth Stages Reveal New Cell Cycle-Dependent Functions in the Predatory Bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Dori-Bachash, Mally; Dassa, Bareket; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2008-01-01

    Bdellovibrio and like organisms are obligate predators of bacteria that are ubiquitously found in the environment. Most exhibit a peculiar dimorphic life cycle during which free-swimming attack-phase (AP) cells search for and invade bacterial prey cells. The invader develops in the prey as a filamentous polynucleoid-containing cell that finally splits into progeny cells. Therapeutic and biocontrol applications of Bdellovibrio in human and animal health and plant health, respectively, have been proposed, but more knowledge of this peculiar cell cycle is needed to develop such applications. A proteomic approach was applied to study cell cycle-dependent expression of the Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus proteome in synchronous cultures of a facultative host-independent (HI) strain able to grow in the absence of prey. Results from two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, and temporal expression of selected genes in predicted operons were analyzed. In total, about 21% of the in silico predicted proteome was covered. One hundred ninety-six proteins were identified, including 63 hitherto unknown proteins and 140 life stage-dependent spots. Of those, 47 were differentially expressed, including chemotaxis, attachment, growth- and replication-related, cell wall, and regulatory proteins. Novel cell cycle-dependent adhesion, gliding, mechanosensing, signaling, and hydrolytic functions were assigned. The HI model was further studied by comparing HI and wild-type AP cells, revealing that proteins involved in DNA replication and signaling were deregulated in the former. A complementary analysis of the secreted proteome identified 59 polypeptides, including cell contact proteins and hydrolytic enzymes specific to predatory bacteria. PMID:18836011

  2. Mediation of nerve growth factor-driven cell cycle arrest in PC12 cells by p53. Simultaneous differentiation and proliferation subsequent to p53 functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A L; Gollapudi, L; Sladek, T L; Neet, K E

    2000-12-01

    Upon stimulation with nerve growth factor (NGF), PC12 cells extend neurites and cease to proliferate by influencing cell cycle proteins. Previous studies have shown that neuritogenesis and a block at the G(1)/S checkpoint correlate with the nuclear translocation of and an increase in the p53 tumor suppressor protein. This study was designed to determine if p53 plays a direct role in mediating NGF-driven G(1) arrest. A retroviral vector that overexpresses a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant protein (p53ts) was used to extinguish the function of endogenous p53 in PC12 cells in a dominant-negative manner at the nonpermissive temperature. NGF treatment led to transactivation of a p53 response element in a luciferase reporter construct in PC12 cells, whereas this response to NGF was absent in PC12(p53ts) cells at the nonpermissive temperature. With p53 functionally inactivated, NGF failed to activate growth arrest, as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and also failed to induce p21/WAF1 expression, as measured by Western blotting. Since neurite outgrowth proceeded unharmed, 50% of the cells simultaneously demonstrated neurite morphology and were in S phase. Both PC12 cells expressing SV40 T antigen and PC12 cells treated with p53 antisense oligonucleotides continued through the cell cycle, confirming the dependence of the NGF growth arrest signal on a p53 pathway. Activation of Ras in a dexamethasone-inducible PC12 cell line (GSRas1) also caused p53 nuclear translocation and growth arrest. Therefore, wild-type p53 is indispensable in mediating the NGF antiproliferative signal through the Ras/MAPK pathway that regulates the cell cycle of PC12 cells. PMID:10978315

  3. Cytological cycles and fates in Psidium myrtoides are altered towards new cell metabolism and functionalities by the galling activity of Nothotrioza myrtoidis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, R G S; Isaias, R M S

    2015-03-01

    The morphogenesis of galls occurs by the redifferentiation of cells that assume new functions in the modified host plant organs. The redifferentiated cells in the galls of Nothotrioza myrtoidis on Psidium myrtoides have low complexity metabolism and are photosynthesis-deficient. These galls were studied in search for evidences of the establishment of new cell cycles and fates and cytological gradients that corroborate their metabolic profile. Young and mature leaves of P. myrtoides and leaf galls induced by N. myrtoidis at different developmental stages were collected along 24 months and analyzed under light and transmission electron microscopy. The leaves of P. myrtoides are long-lasting and did not senesce within the analyzed period, while the galls have a shorter cycle, and senesce within 1 year. A homogenous parenchyma is established by a "standby-redifferentiation" of the chlorophyllous tissues, and sclerenchyma cells redifferentiate from parenchyma cells in the outer cortex of the mature galls. The lack of organelles, the underdeveloped lamellation of chloroplasts, and the occurrence of few plastoglobules are related to the photosynthetic deficiency of the galls. No cytological gradients were observed, but the organelle-rich cells of the vascular and perivascular parenchymas are similar to those of the nutritive tissues of galls induced by other insect taxa. These cells nearest to the feeding sites of N. myrtoidis present higher metabolism and well-developed apparatus for the prevention of oxidative stress. The features herein described corroborate the low metabolic profile of the galls as the cell cycles and fates of P. myrtoides are manipulated for completely new functionalities. PMID:25272990

  4. Performance improvement of GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal photodiodes grown on Si(111) substrate by thermal cycle annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyun-Hao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2014-01-01

    A simple thermal cycle annealing (TCA) process was used to improve the quality of GaN grown on a Si substrate. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) and etch pit density (EPD) results revealed that using more process cycles, the defect density cannot be further reduced. However, the performance of GaN-based metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes (PDs) prepared on Si substrates showed significant improvement. With a two-cycle TCA process, it is found that the dark current of the device was only 1.46 × 10-11 A, and the photo-to-dark-current contrast ratio was about 1.33 × 105 at 5 V. Also, the UV/visible rejection ratios can reach as high as 1077.

  5. Hydrologic controls on nitrogen cycling processes and functional gene abundance in sediments of a groundwater flow-through lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Repert, Deborah A.; Smith, Richard L.; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R.; McCobb, Timothy D.; Conaway, Christopher; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient.

  6. Nucleotide sequence and functional analysis of cbbR, a positive regulator of the Calvin cycle operons of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, J L; Tabita, F R

    1993-01-01

    Structural genes encoding Calvin cycle enzymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides are duplicated and organized within two physically distinct transcriptional units, the form I and form II cbb operons. Nucleotide sequence determination of the region upstream of the form I operon revealed a divergently transcribed open reading frame, cbbR, that showed significant similarity to the LysR family of transcriptional regulatory proteins. Mutants containing an insertionally inactivated cbbR gene were impaired in photoheterotrophic growth and completely unable to grow photolithoautotrophically with CO2 as the sole carbon source. In the cbbR strain, expression of genes within the form I operon was completely abolished and that of the form II operon was reduced to about 30% of the wild-type level. The cloned cbbR gene complemented the mutant for wild-type growth characteristics, and normal levels of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) were observed. However, rocket immunoelectrophoresis revealed that the wild-type level of RubisCO was due to overexpression of the form II enzyme, whereas expression of the form I RubisCO was 10% of that of the wild-type strain. The cbbR insertional inactivation did not appear to affect aerobic expression of either CO2 fixation operon, but preliminary evidence suggests that the constitutive expression of the form II operon observed in the cbbR strain may be subject to repression during aerobic growth. PMID:8376325

  7. Hydrologic Controls on Nitrogen Cycling Processes and Functional Gene Abundance in Sediments of a Groundwater Flow-Through Lake.

    PubMed

    Stoliker, Deborah L; Repert, Deborah A; Smith, Richard L; Song, Bongkeun; LeBlanc, Denis R; McCobb, Timothy D; Conaway, Christopher H; Hyun, Sung Pil; Koh, Dong-Chan; Moon, Hee Sun; Kent, Douglas B

    2016-04-01

    The fate and transport of inorganic nitrogen (N) is a critically important issue for human and aquatic ecosystem health because discharging N-contaminated groundwater can foul drinking water and cause algal blooms. Factors controlling N-processing were examined in sediments at three sites with contrasting hydrologic regimes at a lake on Cape Cod, MA. These factors included water chemistry, seepage rates and direction of groundwater flow, and the abundance and potential rates of activity of N-cycling microbial communities. Genes coding for denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and nitrification were identified at all sites regardless of flow direction or groundwater dissolved oxygen concentrations. Flow direction was, however, a controlling factor in the potential for N-attenuation via denitrification in the sediments. Potential rates of denitrification varied from 6 to 4500 pmol N/g/h from the inflow to the outflow side of the lake, owing to fundamental differences in the supply of labile organic matter. The results of laboratory incubations suggested that when anoxia and limiting labile organic matter prevailed, the potential existed for concomitant anammox and denitrification. Where oxic lake water was downwelling, potential rates of nitrification at shallow depths were substantial (1640 pmol N/g/h). Rates of anammox, denitrification, and nitrification may be linked to rates of organic N-mineralization, serving to increase N-mobility and transport downgradient. PMID:26967929

  8. Postsynthetic acetylation of histones during the cell cycle: a general function for the displacement of histones during chromatin rearrangements.

    PubMed Central

    Loidl, P; Gröbner, P

    1987-01-01

    Postsynthetic acetylation of core histones exhibits a peak during S-phase of the Physarum cell cycle. The maximum 3H-acetate incorporation precedes the maximum of histone synthesis. Acetate is incorporated into all core histones during S-phase, but only into H2A and H2B during G2-period. Resolution of acetylated H4-subspecies reveals acetate incorporation into preexisting H4, but not into newly synthesized molecules during mitosis and early S-phase. In a protamine competition assay histones from S-phase chromatin are released at lower protamine concentrations as compared to the lower acetylated G2-chromatin. We demonstrate a preferential release of highly acetylated H4-subspecies at low protamine concentrations. Our results fit into a general model of the relationship between histone acetylation and chromatin assembly. According to this model acetylation of core histones would serve as a signal for displacement of histones from nucleosomes by modulating histone-protein or histone-DNA interactions. We propose that this mechanism operates during DNA-replication and transcription, as well as during other chromatin rearrangements. Images PMID:3118335

  9. Recovery of Olfactory Function in Postviral Olfactory Dysfunction Patients after Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Pang, Zhihui; Yu, Hongmeng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA) in postviral olfactory dysfunction (PVOD) patients who were refractory to standardized treatment and to compare the results with the impact observed in an observation group. Methods. Fifty patients who presented to the outpatient clinic with PVOD and were refractory to standardized treatment were included: 25 were treated with TCA and 25 patients were simply observed. A subjective olfactory test was performed using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). The effects of TCA were compared with the results obtained in the observation group. Results. Improved olfactory function was observed in eleven patients treated with TCA compared with four patients in the observation group. This study revealed significantly improved olfactory function outcomes in patients who underwent acupuncture compared with the observation group. No significant differences in olfaction recovery were found according to age, gender, or duration of disease between the two groups; however, hyposmic patients recovered at a higher rate than anosmic patients. Conclusion. TCA may aid the treatment of PVOD patients who are refractory to drugs or other therapies. PMID:27034689

  10. Solar activity secular cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramynin, A. P.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term variations in solar activity secular cycles have been studied using a method for the expansion of reconstructed sunspot number series Sn( t) for 11400 years in terms of natural orthogonal functions. It has been established that three expansion components describe more than 98% of all Sn( t) variations. In this case, the contribution of the first expansion component is about 92%. The averaged form of the 88year secular cycle has been determined based on the form of the first expansion coordinate function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle have been revealed based on the time function conjugate to the first function. The quasi-periodicities modulating the secular cycle coincide with those observed in the Sn( t) series spectrum. A change in the secular cycle form and the time variations in this form are described by the second and third expansion components, the contributions of which are about 4 and 2%, respectively. The variations in the steepness of the secular cycle branches are more pronounced in the 200-year cycle, and the secular cycle amplitude varies more evidently in the 2300-year cycle.

  11. The onset of the new solar modulation cycle in 1987-1988 as a function of heliocentric radius and latitude

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, W.R.; Lockwood, J.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Observations of the onset of the new modulation cycle in 1987 using the counting rates of E > 60 MeV particles at the IMP, Voyager and Pioneer spacecraft indicate that the decrease at Earth was rapid after the intensity maximum in early 1987 and was closely correlated with the increase in the average tilt of the heliospheric current sheet. Several small Forbush decreases were seen at Earth in 1987-1988 superimposed on a relatively smooth overall decrease. Simular episodic decreases were seen at Voyager 2 (V2) and Pioneer 10 (P10) following these decreases at Earth by an appropriate time delay corresponding to a propagation speed of about 400 km/s. The relative effects of these transient decreases as compared with the overall decrease was more pronounced at large radii. By the end of 1988 the intensity had decreased by about 40% at Earth, 30% at V2 and 18% at P10. This overall decrease was accompanied by an increase in the average integral radial gradient as well as a decrease in the radial dependence of the gradient out to about 40 AU so that by the end of 1988 the gradient was {approximately}2.0%/AU, essentially independent of radius. V1, about 30{degree}N of the heliographic equatorial plane, observed none of the decrease seen in the equatorial plane. However, a prominent 27-day variation of peak-to-peak amplitude of {approximately}5% was observed. As a result, the intensity at V2 in 1988 decreased below that of V1. Consequently, the latitudinal gradient present since 1985 almost completely disappeared by the end of 1988.

  12. Contribution of metabolic reprogramming to macrophage plasticity and function.

    PubMed

    El Kasmi, Karim C; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages display a spectrum of functional activation phenotypes depending on the composition of the microenvironment they reside in, including type of tissue/organ and character of injurious challenge they are exposed to. Our understanding of how macrophage plasticity is regulated by the local microenvironment is still limited. Here we review and discuss the recent literature regarding the contribution of cellular metabolic pathways to the ability of the macrophage to sense the microenvironment and to alter its function. We propose that distinct alterations in the microenvironment induce a spectrum of inducible and reversible metabolic programs that might form the basis of the inducible and reversible spectrum of functional macrophage activation/polarization phenotypes. We highlight that metabolic pathways in the bidirectional communication between macrophages and stromals cells are an important component of chronic inflammatory conditions. Recent work demonstrates that inflammatory macrophage activation is tightly associated with metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis, an altered TCA cycle, and reduced mitochondrial respiration. We review cytosolic and mitochondrial mechanisms that promote initiation and maintenance of macrophage activation as they relate to increased aerobic glycolysis and highlight potential pathways through which anti-inflammatory IL-10 could promote macrophage deactivation. Finally, we propose that in addition to their role in energy generation and regulation of apoptosis, mitochondria reprogram their metabolism to also participate in regulating macrophage activation and plasticity. PMID:26454572

  13. Fragile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Ch.; Díaz, L. J.

    We study diffeomorphisms f with heterodimensional cycles, that is, heteroclinic cycles associated to saddles p and q with different indices. Such a cycle is called fragile if there is no diffeomorphism close to f with a robust cycle associated to hyperbolic sets containing the continuations of p and q. We construct a codimension one submanifold of Diff(S×S) that consists of diffeomorphisms with fragile heterodimensional cycles. Our construction holds for any manifold of dimension ⩾4.

  14. Cell cycle independent role of Cyclin E during neural cell fate specification in Drosophila is mediated by its regulation of Prospero function.

    PubMed

    Berger, Christian; Kannan, Ramakrishnan; Myneni, Sudharani; Renner, Simone; Shashidhara, L S; Technau, Gerhard M

    2010-01-15

    During development, neural progenitor cells or neuroblasts generate a great intra- and inter-segmental diversity of neuronal and glial cell types in the nervous system. In thoracic segments of the embryonic central nervous system of Drosophila, the neuroblast NB6-4t undergoes an asymmetric first division to generate a neuronal and a glial sublineage, while abdominal NB6-4a divides once symmetrically to generate only 2 glial cells. We had earlier reported a critical function for the G1 cyclin, CyclinE (CycE) in regulating asymmetric cell division in NB6-4t. Here we show that (i) this function of CycE is independent of its role in cell cycle regulation and (ii) the two functions are mediated by distinct domains at the protein level. Results presented here also suggest that CycE inhibits the function of Prospero and facilitates its cortical localization, which is critical for inducing stem cell behaviour, i.e. asymmetric cell division of NB6-4t. Furthermore our data imply that CycE is required for the maintenance of stem cell identity of most other neuroblasts. PMID:19914234

  15. Sometimes "Newton's Method" Always "Cycles"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latulippe, Joe; Switkes, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Are there functions for which Newton's method cycles for all non-trivial initial guesses? We construct and solve a differential equation whose solution is a real-valued function that two-cycles under Newton iteration. Higher-order cycles of Newton's method iterates are explored in the complex plane using complex powers of "x." We find a class of

  16. Sometimes "Newton's Method" Always "Cycles"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latulippe, Joe; Switkes, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Are there functions for which Newton's method cycles for all non-trivial initial guesses? We construct and solve a differential equation whose solution is a real-valued function that two-cycles under Newton iteration. Higher-order cycles of Newton's method iterates are explored in the complex plane using complex powers of "x." We find a class of…

  17. Impacts of the triggering function of cumulus parameterization on warm-season diurnal rainfall cycles at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Chi; Pan, Hua-Lu; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impacts of the triggering function of the deep convection scheme on diurnal rainfall variation in the middle latitudes by using the single-column version of the Community Atmospheric Model (SCAM). Using the climate statistics of a long-term ensemble analysis of SCAM simulations, we quantified and validated the diurnal rainfall climatological regimes at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The results showed that the averaged diurnal rainfall cycle simulated using the default Zhang-Mcfarlane (ZM) scheme of the SCAM peaks near noon, which is far earlier than the observed nighttime peak phase. This bias was due to the ZM scheme, which produced spurious daytime rainfall, even during days in which only light rainfall was observed. By contrast, using a weather-focused scheme, the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS) scheme, we successfully simulated the nocturnal peak of the diurnal cycle. Experiments conducted on the ZM and SAS schemes featuring different triggering functions revealed that the relaxation of launching parcels above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and the inclusion of convective inhibition (CIN) were crucial designs for the model to capture the nocturnal rainfall events of the SGP. The inclusion of CIN reduces spurious weak convective events, and the allowance of launching parcels being above the PBL better captures convective cloud base. The results of this study highlight the modulatory effect of low-level inhomogeneity on the diurnal variation of convection over midlatitudes and the importance of the triggering function of the deep convection scheme in capturing those variations.

  18. Code Calibration Applied to the TCA High-Lift Model in the 14 x 22 Wind Tunnel (Simulation With and Without Model Post-Mount)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to calibrate a Navier-Stokes code for the TCA (30/10) baseline configuration (partial span leading edge flaps were deflected at 30 degs. and all the trailing edge flaps were deflected at 10 degs). The computational results for several angles of attack are compared with experimental force, moments, and surface pressures. The code used in this study is CFL3D; mesh sequencing and multi-grid were used to full advantage to accelerate convergence. A multi-grid approach was used similar to that used for the Reference H configuration allowing point-to-point matching across all the trailingedge block interfaces. From past experiences with the Reference H (ie, good force, moment, and pressure comparisons were obtained), it was assumed that the mounting system would produce small effects; hence, it was not initially modeled. However, comparisons of lower surface pressures indicated the post mount significantly influenced the lower surface pressures, so the post geometry was inserted into the existing grid using Chimera (overset grids).

  19. SYN2 is an autism predisposing gene: loss-of-function mutations alter synaptic vesicle cycling and axon outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Piton, Amélie; Patry, Lysanne; Marte, Antonella; Rossi, Pia; Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Gauthier, Julie; Lapointe, Line; Mottron, Laurent; Valtorta, Flavia; Rouleau, Guy A; Fassio, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes predisposing to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has been identified, many of which are implicated in synaptic function. This 'synaptic autism pathway' notably includes disruption of SYN1 that is associated with epilepsy, autism and abnormal behavior in both human and mice models. Synapsins constitute a multigene family of neuron-specific phosphoproteins (SYN1-3) present in the majority of synapses where they are implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. Synapsins I and II, the major Syn isoforms in the adult brain, display partially overlapping functions and defects in both isoforms are associated with epilepsy and autistic-like behavior in mice. In this study, we show that nonsense (A94fs199X) and missense (Y236S and G464R) mutations in SYN2 are associated with ASD in humans. The phenotype is apparent in males. Female carriers of SYN2 mutations are unaffected, suggesting that SYN2 is another example of autosomal sex-limited expression in ASD. When expressed in SYN2  knockout neurons, wild-type human Syn II fully rescues the SYN2 knockout phenotype, whereas the nonsense mutant is not expressed and the missense mutants are virtually unable to modify the SYN2 knockout phenotype. These results identify for the first time SYN2  as a novel predisposing gene for ASD and strengthen the hypothesis that a disturbance of synaptic homeostasis underlies ASD. PMID:23956174

  20. SYN2 is an autism predisposing gene: loss-of-function mutations alter synaptic vesicle cycling and axon outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Piton, Amélie; Patry, Lysanne; Marte, Antonella; Rossi, Pia; Cadieux-Dion, Maxime; Gauthier, Julie; Lapointe, Line; Mottron, Laurent; Valtorta, Flavia; Rouleau, Guy A.; Fassio, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes predisposing to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has been identified, many of which are implicated in synaptic function. This ‘synaptic autism pathway’ notably includes disruption of SYN1 that is associated with epilepsy, autism and abnormal behavior in both human and mice models. Synapsins constitute a multigene family of neuron-specific phosphoproteins (SYN1-3) present in the majority of synapses where they are implicated in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. Synapsins I and II, the major Syn isoforms in the adult brain, display partially overlapping functions and defects in both isoforms are associated with epilepsy and autistic-like behavior in mice. In this study, we show that nonsense (A94fs199X) and missense (Y236S and G464R) mutations in SYN2 are associated with ASD in humans. The phenotype is apparent in males. Female carriers of SYN2 mutations are unaffected, suggesting that SYN2 is another example of autosomal sex-limited expression in ASD. When expressed in SYN2  knockout neurons, wild-type human Syn II fully rescues the SYN2 knockout phenotype, whereas the nonsense mutant is not expressed and the missense mutants are virtually unable to modify the SYN2 knockout phenotype. These results identify for the first time SYN2  as a novel predisposing gene for ASD and strengthen the hypothesis that a disturbance of synaptic homeostasis underlies ASD. PMID:23956174

  1. Role of the N-terminal forkhead-associated domain in the cell cycle checkpoint function of the Rad53 kinase.

    PubMed

    Pike, B L; Hammet, A; Heierhorst, J

    2001-04-27

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are multifunctional phosphopeptide-binding modules and are the hallmark of the conserved family of Rad53-like checkpoint protein kinases. Rad53-like kinases, including the human tumor suppressor protein Chk2, play crucial roles in cell cycle arrest and activation of repair processes following DNA damage and replication blocks. Here we show that ectopic expression of the N-terminal FHA domain (FHA1) of the yeast Rad53 kinase causes a growth defect by arresting the cell cycle in G(1). This phenotype was highly specific for the Rad53-FHA1 domain and not observed with the similar Rad53-FHA2, Dun1-FHA, and Chk2-FHA domains, and it was abrogated by mutations that abolished binding to a phosphothreonine-containing peptide in vitro. Furthermore, replacement of the RAD53 gene with alleles containing amino acid substitutions in the FHA1 domain resulted in an increased DNA damage sensitivity in vivo. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the FHA1 domain contributes to the checkpoint function of Rad53, possibly by associating with a phosphorylated target protein in response to DNA damage in G(1). PMID:11278522

  2. Functional impact of Aurora A-mediated phosphorylation of HP1γ at serine 83 during cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous elegant studies performed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have identified a requirement for heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) for spindle pole formation and appropriate cell division. In mammalian cells, HP1γ has been implicated in both somatic and germ cell proliferation. High levels of HP1γ protein associate with enhanced cell proliferation and oncogenesis, while its genetic inactivation results in meiotic and mitotic failure. However, the regulation of HP1γ by kinases, critical for supporting mitotic progression, remains to be fully characterized. Results We report for the first time that during mitotic cell division, HP1γ colocalizes and is phosphorylated at serine 83 (Ser83) in G2/M phase by Aurora A. Since Aurora A regulates both cell proliferation and mitotic aberrations, we evaluated the role of HP1γ in the regulation of these phenomena using siRNA-mediated knockdown, as well as phosphomimetic and nonphosphorylatable site-directed mutants. We found that genetic downregulation of HP1γ, which decreases the levels of phosphorylation of HP1γ at Ser83 (P-Ser83-HP1γ), results in mitotic aberrations that can be rescued by reintroducing wild type HP1γ, but not the nonphosphorylatable S83A-HP1γ mutant. In addition, proliferation assays showed that the phosphomimetic S83D-HP1γ increases 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation, whereas the nonphosphorylatable S83A-HP1γ mutant abrogates this effect. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that the effects of these mutants on mitotic functions are congruently reflected in G2/M gene expression networks in a manner that mimics the on and off states for P-Ser83-HP1γ. Conclusions This is the first description of a mitotic Aurora A-HP1γ pathway, whose integrity is necessary for the execution of proper somatic cell division, providing insight into specific types of posttranslational modifications that associate to distinct functional outcomes of this important chromatin protein. PMID:23829974

  3. Expression patterns of cysteine peptidase genes across the Tribolium castaneum life cycle provide clues to biological function

    PubMed Central

    Elpidina, Elena N.; Oppert, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major agricultural pest responsible for considerable loss of stored grain and cereal products worldwide. T. castaneum larvae have a highly compartmentalized gut, with cysteine peptidases mostly in the acidic anterior part of the midgut that are critical to the early stages of food digestion. In previous studies, we described 26 putative cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum (types B, L, O, F, and K) located mostly on chromosomes 3, 7, 8, and 10. In the present study, we hypothesized that specific cysteine peptidase genes could be associated with digestive functions for food processing based on comparison of gene expression profiles in different developmental stages, feeding and non-feeding. RNA-Seq was used to determine the relative expression of cysteine peptidase genes among four major developmental stages (egg, larvae, pupae, and adult) of T. castaneum. We also compared cysteine peptidase genes in T. castaneum to those in other model insects and coleopteran pests. By combining transcriptome expression, phylogenetic comparisons, response to dietary inhibitors, and other existing data, we identified key cysteine peptidases that T. castaneum larvae and adults use for food digestion, and thus new potential targets for biologically-based control products. PMID:26819843

  4. Ant-mediated ecosystem functions on a warmer planet: effects on soil movement, decomposition and nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Israel; Ribbons, Relena R; Ellison, Aaron M

    2015-09-01

    1. Direct and indirect consequences of global warming on ecosystem functions and processes mediated by invertebrates remain understudied but are likely to have major impacts on ecosystems in the future. Among animals, invertebrates are taxonomically diverse, responsive to temperature changes, and play major ecological roles which also respond to temperature changes. 2. We used a mesocosm experiment to evaluate impacts of two warming treatments (+3·5 and +5 °C, set-points) and the presence and absence of the ant Formica subsericea (a major mediator of processes in north temperate ecosystems) on decomposition rate, soil movement, soil respiration and nitrogen availability. 3, Replicate 19-L mesocosms were placed outdoors in lathe houses and continuously warmed for 30 days in 2011 and 85 days in 2012. Warming treatments mimicked expected temperature increases for future climates in eastern North America. 4. In both years, the amount of soil displaced and soil respiration increased in the warming and ant presence treatments (soil movement: 73-119%; soil respiration: 37-48% relative to the control treatments without ants). 5. Decomposition rate and nitrogen availability tended to decrease in the warmest treatments (decomposition rate: -26 to -30%; nitrate availability: -11 to -42%). 6. Path analyses indicated that ants had significant short-term direct and indirect effects on the studied ecosystem processes. These results suggest that ants may be moving more soil and building deeper nests to escape increasing temperatures, but warming may also influence their direct and indirect effects on soil ecosystem processes. PMID:25773283

  5. Effects of local growth factors on the secretory function of bovine corpus luteum during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, J; Schams, D; Miyamoto, A

    1996-01-01

    The impact of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the release of progesterone (P4) and oxytocin (OT) from individual bovine corpora lutea at different stages of the oestrous cycle and pregnancy was evaluated with a microdialysis system (MDS) in vitro. IGF-I (1 microgram mL-1) induced significantly the acute effects on P4 release at the late luteal stage (Days 15-18) and early pregnancy (Days 60-120), whereas bFGF (100 ng mL-1) was extremely effective in stimulating P4 release particularly during the mid-luteal stage (Days 8-12). Both peptides stimulated (P < 0.05) the release of OT throughout the three luteal stages and during early and late pregnancy (Days 30-60 and Days 150-210). ET-1 (100 ng mL-1) clearly inhibited P4 release during the early (Days 5-7) and mid-luteal phase and stimulated OT release only during the mid-luteal stage (P < 0.001). TNF-alpha (100 ng mL-1) stimulated the release of P4 exclusively at the early luteal phase (P < 0.05), whereas OT secretion was increased by TNF-alpha during all stages of the oestrous cycle (P < 0.001). TGF-alpha and PDGF (100 ng mL-1) were effective in stimulating P4 release particularly during late pregnancy (P < 0.05). In contrast, stimulation of OT secretion by TGF-alpha was maximal during the late-luteal stage (P < 0.001), whereas PDGF significantly increased OT secretion during the oestrous cycle (except the early luteal stage) and pregnancy (P < 0.001). The data demonstrate distinct and stage-specific effects of growth factors on P4 and OT secretion in vitro. IGF-I, bFGF and TGF-alpha may play an important role in corpus luteum (CL) function during the oestrous cycle and pregnancy since they are locally expressed and synthesized, there are receptors for these growth factors, and they have been demonstrated to exert biological effects on the CL. PMID:8896036

  6. Functional and structural responses of soil N-cycling microbial communities to the herbicide mesotrione: a dose-effect microcosm approach.

    PubMed

    Crouzet, Olivier; Poly, Franck; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Bru, David; Batisson, Isabelle; Bohatier, Jacques; Philippot, Laurent; Mallet, Clarisse

    2016-03-01

    Microbial communities driving the nitrogen cycle contribute to ecosystem services such as crop production and air, soil, and water quality. The responses to herbicide stress of ammonia-oxidizing and ammonia-denitrifying microbial communities were investigated by an analysis of changes in structure-function relationships. Their potential activities, abundances (quantitative PCR), and genetic structure (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) were assessed in a microcosm experiment. The application rate (1 × FR, 0.45 μg g(-1) soil) of the mesotrione herbicide did not strongly affect soil N-nutrient dynamics or microbial community structure and abundances. Doses of the commercial product Callisto® (10 × FR and 100 × FR) or pure mesotrione (100 × FR) exceeding field rates induced short-term inhibition of nitrification and a lasting stimulation of denitrification. These effects could play a part in the increase in soil ammonium content and decrease in nitrate contents observed in treated soils. These functional impacts were mainly correlated with abundance shifts of ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and Archaea (AOA) or denitrifying bacteria. The sustained restoration of nitrification activity, from day 42 in the 100 × FR-treated soils, was likely promoted by changes in the community size and composition of AOB, which suggests a leading role, rather than AOA, for soil nitrification restoration after herbicide stress. This ecotoxicological community approach provides a nonesuch multiparameter assessment of responses of N-cycling microbial guilds to pesticide stress. PMID:26122568

  7. Menstrual Cycle: Basic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    The basic biology of the menstrual cycle is a complex, coordinated sequence of events involving the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, and endometrium. The menstrual cycle with all its complexities can be easily perturbed by environmental factors such as stress, extreme exercise, eating disorders, and obesity. Furthermore, genetic influences such as fragile X premutations (Chapter X), X chromosome abnormalities (Chapter X), and galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) point mutations (galactosemia) also contribute to perturbations of the menstrual cycle. Although not perfect, mouse model have helped to identify and confirm additional components and pathways in menstrual cycle function and dysfunction in humans. PMID:18574203

  8. The Function of the Superficial Root Mat in the Biogeochemical Cycles of Nutrients in Congolese Eucalyptus Plantations

    PubMed Central

    LACLAU, JEAN‐PAUL; TOUTAIN, FRANÇOIS; M’BOU, ARMEL THONGO; ARNAUD, MICHEL; JOFFRE, RICHARD; RANGER, JACQUES

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The importance of superficial root mats inside the forest floor for the nutrition of Amazonian rain forests has been extensively investigated. The present study was aimed at assessing the function of a root mat adherent to decomposing organic material observed in Eucalyptus plantations. • Methods The development of the root mat was studied through micromorphological observations of thin litter sections, and the influence of soil microtopography and soil water repellency on root mat biomass was assessed in situ on an area of 5 m2. In addition, input–output budgets of nutrients within the forest floor were established from measurements of litterfall, dissolved nutrients in gravitational solutions, and forest floor nutrient contents. • Key Findings The amounts of nutrients released during litter decay in this ecosystem during the period of study were, on average, 46, 3, 4, 19 and 17 kg ha–1 year–1 for N, P, K, Ca and Mg, respectively. The simultaneous measurements of the chemical composition of throughfall solutions and leachates beneath the forest floor showed a very quick uptake of nutrients by the root mat during the decomposition processes. Indeed, the solutions did not become noticeably enriched in nutrients during their passage through the holorganic layer, despite large amounts of elements being released during litter decay. The root mat biomass decreased significantly during the dry season, and a preferential development in microdepressions at the soil surface was observed. A strong water repellency observed in these depressions might enhance the ability of the roots to take up water and nutrients during the dry periods. • Conclusions The root mat was active throughout the year to catch the flux of nutrients from the biodegradation of the forest floor, preventing the transfer of dissolved nutrients toward deeper soil horizons. This mechanism is involved in the successful adaptation of this Eucalyptus hybrid in areas covered by ‘climacic’ savannas in Congo. PMID:14749252

  9. Biogeochemical Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  10. Elevated cytokine responses to Vibrio harveyi infection in the Japanese pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes) treated with Lactobacillus paracasei spp. paracasei (06TCa22) isolated from the Mongolian dairy product.

    PubMed

    Biswas, G; Korenaga, H; Nagamine, R; Kawahara, S; Takeda, S; Kikuchi, Y; Dashnyam, B; Yoshida, T; Kono, T; Sakai, M

    2013-09-01

    With the aim of evaluating the effect of a Mongolian dairy product derived Lactobacillus paracasei spp. paracasei (strain 06TCa22) (Lpp) on the cytokine-mediated immune responses to Vibrio harveyi infection, we examined 16 cytokine expressions in the Japanese pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes. Fish were orally treated with the heat-killed Lpp at 1 mg g(-1) body weight d(-1) for 3 days. At 24 h posttreatment, fish were infected by an intramuscular injection of 0.1 mL V. harveyi bacterial suspension (10(8) cfu mL(-1)). Additionally, superoxide anion production (SAP) and phagocytic activity (PA) of head kidney cells were assessed during 120 h postinfection period. Significant up-regulation of pro-inflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A/F-3, TNF-α and TNF-N), cell-mediated immune inducing (IL-12p35, IL-12p40 and IL-18), antiviral/intra-cellular pathogen killing (I-IFN-1 and IFN-γ), anti-inflammatory (IL-10) and lymphocyte agonistic (IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, IL-21 and TGF-β1) cytokines was observed in the treated fish compared to control ones during the pathogen infection. Furthermore, significantly increased SAP and PA (P < 0.01; 0.05) were recorded in the treated fish compared to untreated fish. These results suggest the beneficial role of Lpp in enhancement of cytokine-mediated immunity in the Japanese pufferfish against V. harveyi infection and application of this product as a potential fish immunostimulant. PMID:23769874

  11. Distribution patterns of nitrogen micro-cycle functional genes and their quantitative coupling relationships with nitrogen transformation rates in a biotrickling filter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honglei; Ji, Guodong; Bai, Xueyuan

    2016-06-01

    The present study explored the distribution patterns of nitrogen micro-cycle genes and the underlying mechanisms responsible for nitrogen transformation at the molecular level (genes) in a biotrickling filter (biofilter). The biofilter achieved high removal efficiencies for ammonium (NH4(+)-N) (80-94%), whereas nitrate accumulated at different levels under a progressive NH4(+)-N load. Combined analyses revealed the anammox, nas, napA, narG, nirS, and nxrA genes were the dominant enriched genes in different treatment layers. The presence of simultaneous nitrification, ammonium oxidation (anammox), and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were the primary factors accounted for the robust NH4(+)-N treatment performance. The presence of DNRA, nitrification, and denitrification was determined to be a pivotal pathway that contributed to the nitrate accumulation in the biofilter. The enrichment of functional genes at different depth gradients and the multi-path coupled cooperation at the functional gene level are conducive to achieving complete nitrogen removal. PMID:26954310

  12. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community.

    PubMed

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil. PMID:24067258

  13. In vitro mimicking of estrous cycle stages in porcine oviduct epithelium cells: estradiol and progesterone regulate differentiation, gene expression, and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Einspanier, Ralf; Schoen, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    Throughout the estrous cycle the oviduct epithelium undergoes dramatic morphological and functional changes. To elucidate cyclic cellular events and associated regulation mechanisms of 17beta estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), we mimicked estrous cycle stages in vitro using a culture system of primary porcine oviduct epithelium cells (POEC). Cells were polarized in an air/liquid interface and then treated with E2 and P4 for physiological time periods: In experiment 1, high concentration of P4 with low concentration of E2 for 10 days resembled diestrus; in experiment 2, following the previous diestrus, sequential high E2 with low P4 for 2.5 days represented estrus. Histomorphometry and electron microscopy showed cyclic changes in cellular height, cell population, and cilia density under the influence of hormone stimulation. Transepithelial electrical resistance was high in simulated diestrus but reduced in estrus. Thus, E2 and P4 affect cellular polarity, transformation of ciliated and secretory cells, as well as electrical conductivity of oviduct epithelium. Simulation of diestrus led to significant decrease in expression of hormone receptors (PGR and ESR1) and other epithelial markers (MUC16, OVGP1, and HSP90B1), while sequential simulated estrus caused an increase in these markers. The hormonal regulation of some marker genes was clearly time-dependent. Furthermore, POEC showed increased sperm-binding capacity in simulated estrus. In this study, we also present a novel approach based on the AndroVision software, which can be routinely utilized as a parameter for ciliary activity, and for the first time, we showed fluid movement patterns along the epithelium lining in vitro. PMID:23904510

  14. Modulation and Functional Role of the Orientations of the N- and P-Domains of Cu+ -Transporting ATPase along the Ion Transport Cycle.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dan; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Zhang, Fengli; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-08-18

    Ion transport of different P-type ATPases is regulated similarly through the interplay of multiple protein domains. In the presence of ATP, binding of a cation to the ion binding site in the transmembrane helices leads to the phosphorylation of the P-domain, allowing ion transfer across the membrane. The details of the mechanism, however, are not clear. Here, we report the modulation of the orientation between the N- and P-domains of Cu(+)-transporting ATPase along the ion transport cycle using high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in solution. On the basis of residual dipolar coupling measurements, it is found that the interdomain orientation (relative openness) of the N- and P-domains is distinctly modulated depending on the specific state of the N- and P-domains along the ion translocation cycle. The two domains' relative position in the apo state is semiopen, whereas it becomes closed upon binding of ATP to the N-domain. After phosphorylation of the P-domain and the release of ADP, the opening, however, becomes the widest among all the states. We reason such wide opening resulting from the departure of ADP prepares the N- and P-domains to accommodate the A-domain for interaction and, hence, promote ion transport and allow dephosphorylation of the P-domain. Such wide interdomain opening is abolished when an Asn to Asp mutation is introduced into the conserved DXXK motif located in the hinge region of the N- and P-domains of Cu(+)-ATPase, suggesting the indispensible role of the N- and P-interdomain orientation during ion transportation. Our results shed new light on the structural and mechanistic details of P-type ATPase function at large. PMID:26196187

  15. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbiological processes (that is, nitrification and denitrification). Soil amended with biochar (charcoal created by pyrolysis of biomass) has been demonstrated to increase crop yield, improve soil quality and affect greenhouse gas emissions, for example, reduce N2O emissions. Despite several studies on variations in the general microbial community structure due to soil biochar amendment, hitherto the specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in mitigating soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. We performed a microcosm study with a water-saturated soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil. PMID:24067258

  16. Centrosome structure and function is altered by chloral hydrate and diazepam during the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, H.; Chakrabarti, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the mode of action of the tranquillizers chloral hydrate and diazepam during fertilization and mitosis of the first reproductive cell cycles in sea urchin eggs. Most striking effects of these drugs are the alteration of centrosomal material and the abnormal microtubule configurations during exposure and after recovery from the drugs. This finding is utilized to study the mechanisms of centrosome compaction and decompaction and the dynamic configurational changes of centrosomal material and its interactions with microtubules. When 0.1% chloral hydrate or 350-750 microM diazepam is applied at specific phases during the first cell cycle of sea urchin eggs, expanded centrosomal material compacts at distinct regions and super-compacts into dense spheres while microtubules disassemble. When eggs are treated before pronuclear fusion, centrosomal material aggregates around each of the two pronuclei while microtubules disappear. Upon recovery, atypical asters oftentimes with multiple foci are formed from centrosomal material surrounding the pronuclei which indicates that the drugs have affected centrosomal material and prevent it from functioning normally. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies with antibodies that routinely stain centrosomes in sea urchin eggs (4D2; and Ah-6) depict centrosomal material that is altered when compared to control cells. This centrosomal material is not able to reform normal microtubule patterns upon recovery but will form multiple asters around the two pronuclei. When cells are treated with 0.1% chloral hydrate or 350-750 microM diazepam during mitosis, the bipolar centrosomal material becomes compacted and aggregates into multiple dense spheres while spindle and polar microtubules disassemble. With increased incubation time, the smaller dense centrosome particles aggregate into bigger and fewer spheres. Upon recovery, unusual irregular microtubule configurations are formed from centrosomes that have lost their ability to reform normal mitotic figures. These results indicate that chloral hydrate and diazepam affect centrosome structure which results in the inability to reform normal microtubule formations and causes abnormal fertilization and mitosis.

  17. Linking N2O emissions from biochar-amended soil to the structure and function of the N-cycling microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, Johannes; Krause, Hans-Martin; Schuettler, Stefanie; Ruser, Reiner; Fromme, Markus; Scholten, Thomas; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Agricultural sources represent about 60% of anthropogenic N2O emissions. Most agricultural N2O emissions are due to increased fertilizer application. A considerable fraction of nitrogen fertilizers are converted to N2O by microbially-mediated processes. Soil amended with biochar has been demonstrated to reduce N2O emissions in the field and in laboratory experiments. Although N2O emission mitigation following soil biochar amendment has been reported frequently the underlying processes and specific role of the nitrogen cycling microbial community in decreasing soil N2O emissions has not been subject of systematic investigation. To investigate the impact of biochar on the microbial community of nitrogen-transforming microorganisms we performed a microcosm study with arable soil amended with different amounts (0%, 2% and 10% (w/w)) of high-temperature wood derived biochar. By quantifying the abundance and activity of functional marker genes of microbial nitrogen fixation (nifH), nitrification (amoA) and denitrification (nirK, nirS and nosZ) using quantitative real-time PCR we found that biochar addition enhanced microbial nitrous oxide reduction and increased the abundance of microorganisms capable of N2-fixation. Soil biochar amendment increased the relative gene and transcript copy numbers of the nosZ-encoded bacterial N2O reductase, suggesting a mechanistic link to the observed reduction in N2O emissions. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of the impact of biochar on the nitrogen cycling microbial community and the consequences of soil biochar amendment for microbial nitrogen transformation processes and N2O emissions from soil.

  18. Elevated autophagy gene expression in adipose tissue of obese humans: A potential non-cell-cycle-dependent function of E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Haim, Yulia; Blüher, Matthias; Slutsky, Noa; Goldstein, Nir; Klöting, Nora; Harman-Boehm, Ilana; Kirshtein, Boris; Ginsberg, Doron; Gericke, Martin; Guiu Jurado, Esther; Kovsan, Julia; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kachko, Leonid; Bashan, Nava; Gepner, Yiftach; Shai, Iris; Rudich, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy genes' expression is upregulated in visceral fat in human obesity, associating with obesity-related cardio-metabolic risk. E2F1 (E2F transcription factor 1) was shown in cancer cells to transcriptionally regulate autophagy. We hypothesize that E2F1 regulates adipocyte autophagy in obesity, associating with endocrine/metabolic dysfunction, thereby, representing non-cell-cycle function of this transcription factor. E2F1 protein (N=69) and mRNA (N=437) were elevated in visceral fat of obese humans, correlating with increased expression of ATG5 (autophagy-related 5), MAP1LC3B/LC3B (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 β), but not with proliferation/cell-cycle markers. Elevated E2F1 mainly characterized the adipocyte fraction, whereas MKI67 (marker of proliferation Ki-67) was elevated in the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue. In human visceral fat explants, chromatin-immunoprecipitation revealed body mass index (BMI)-correlated increase in E2F1 binding to the promoter of MAP1LC3B, but not to the classical cell cycle E2F1 target, CCND1 (cyclin D1). Clinically, omental fat E2F1 expression correlated with insulin resistance, circulating free-fatty-acids (FFA), and with decreased circulating ADIPOQ/adiponectin, associations attenuated by adjustment for autophagy genes. Overexpression of E2F1 in HEK293 cells enhanced promoter activity of several autophagy genes and autophagic flux, and sensitized to further activation of autophagy by TNF. Conversely, mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived adipocytes from e2f1 knockout mice (e2f1−/−) exhibited lower autophagy gene expression and flux, were more insulin sensitive, and secreted more ADIPOQ. Furthermore, e2f1−/− MEF-derived adipocytes, and autophagy-deficient (by Atg7 siRNA) adipocytes were resistant to cytokines-induced decrease in ADIPOQ secretion. Jointly, upregulated E2F1 sensitizes adipose tissue autophagy to inflammatory stimuli, linking visceral obesity to adipose and systemic metabolic-endocrine dysfunction. PMID:26391754

  19. Protease Inhibitors Block Multiple Functions of the NS3/4A Protease-Helicase during the Hepatitis C Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Takahiro; Lovell, William; Hamlett, Chris; Saalau-Bethell, Susanne; Graham, Brent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 is a multifunctional protein composed of a protease domain and a helicase domain linked by a flexible linker. Protease activity is required to generate viral nonstructural (NS) proteins involved in RNA replication. Helicase activity is required for RNA replication, and genetic evidence implicates the helicase domain in virus assembly. Binding of protease inhibitors (PIs) to the protease active site blocks NS3-dependent polyprotein processing but might impact other steps of the virus life cycle. Kinetic analyses of antiviral suppression of cell culture-infectious genotype 1a strain H77S.3 were performed using assays that measure different readouts of the viral life cycle. In addition to the active-site PI telaprevir, we examined an allosteric protease-helicase inhibitor (APHI) that binds a site in the interdomain interface. By measuring nucleotide incorporation into HCV genomes, we found that telaprevir inhibits RNA synthesis as early as 12 h at high but clinically relevant concentrations. Immunoblot analyses showed that NS5B abundance was not reduced until after 12 h, suggesting that telaprevir exerts a direct effect on RNA synthesis. In contrast, the APHI could partially inhibit RNA synthesis, suggesting that the allosteric site is not always available during RNA synthesis. The APHI and active-site PI were both able to block virus assembly soon (<12 h) after drug treatment, suggesting that they rapidly engage with and block a pool of NS3 involved in assembly. In conclusion, PIs and APHIs can block NS3 functions in RNA synthesis and virus assembly, in addition to inhibiting polyprotein processing. IMPORTANCE The NS3/4A protease of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important antiviral target. Currently, three PIs have been approved for therapy of chronic hepatitis C, and several others are in development. NS3-dependent cleavage of the HCV polyprotein is required to generate the mature nonstructural proteins that form the viral replicase. Inhibition of protease activity can block RNA replication by preventing expression of mature replicase components. Like many viral proteins, NS3 is multifunctional, but how PIs affect stages of the HCV life cycle beyond polyprotein processing has not been well studied. Using cell-based assays, we show here that PIs can directly inhibit viral RNA synthesis and also block a late stage in virus assembly/maturation at clinically relevant concentrations. PMID:25740995

  20. Merging the managed care cycle and revenue cycle to meet strategic goals.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul; Messinger, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    By integrating the functions of the managed care cycle and the revenue cycle, providers can more readily obtain appropriate payment. The managed care cycle emphasizes strategy, while the revenue cycle emphasizes day-to-day business functions. The four phases of the managed care cycle are interlinked. Management requires information obtained from the revenue cycle to decide upon action needed in the managed care cycle. PMID:12747052

  1. Decreased glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates coincide with peripheral nervous system oxidative stress in a murine model of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hinder, Lucy M.; Vivekanandan-Giri, Anuradha; McLean, Lisa L.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Feldman, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common complication of diabetes and is characterized by distal-to-proximal loss of peripheral nerve axons. The idea of tissue-specific pathological alterations in energy metabolism in diabetic complications-prone tissues is emerging. Altered nerve metabolism in type 1 diabetes models is observed; however, therapeutic strategies based on these models offer limited efficacy to type 2 diabetic patients with DN. Therefore, understanding how peripheral nerves metabolically adapt to the unique type 2 diabetic environment is critical to develop disease-modifying treatments. In the current study, we utilized targeted LC/MS/MS to characterize the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolomes in sural nerve, sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from male type 2 diabetic mice (BKS.Cg-m+/+Leprdb; db/db) and controls (db/+). We report depletion of glycolytic intermediates in diabetic sural nerve and sciatic nerve (glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-6-phosphate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (sural nerve only), 3-phosphoglycerate, 2-phosphoglycerate, phosphoenolpyruvate, lactate), with no significant changes in DRG. Citrate and isocitrate TCA cycle intermediates were decreased in sural nerve, sciatic nerve and DRG from diabetic mice. Utilizing LC/ESI/MS/MS and HPLC methods, we also observed increased protein and lipid oxidation (nitrotyrosine; hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids, HODEs) in db/db tissue, with a proximal-to-distal increase in oxidative stress, with associated decreased aconitase enzyme activity. We propose a preliminary model, whereby the greater change in metabolomic profile, increase in oxidative stress, and decrease in TCA cycle enzyme activity may cause distal peripheral nerve to rely on truncated TCA cycle metabolism in the type 2 diabetes environment. PMID:23086140

  2. TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASES MYOCARDIAL FUNCTION AND PYRUVATE ENTRY INTO THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE AFTER REPERFUSION IN A MODEL OF INFANT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    We utilized a translational model of infant CPB to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. Methods and Results: Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]-pyruvate for 40 minutes (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (Cont) or immediately after reperfusion (IR) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (IR-Tr) received T3 (1.2 ug/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels (aCAC) and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC ) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC; ) using 13C-labeled pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C NMR. Neither IR nor IR-Tr modified aCAC. However, compared to IR, T3 (group IR-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after CPB while elevating both PDC and PC (~ four-fold). T3 inhibited IR induced reductions in CAC intermediate molar percent enrichment (MPE) and oxaloacetate(citrate)/malate MPE ratio; an index of aspartate entry into the CAC. Conclusions: T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC thereby providing substrate for elevated cardiac function and work after reperfusion. The increases in pyruvate flux occur with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Additionally, T3 inhibition of reductions in CAC intermediate MPEs indicates that T3 reduces the reliance on amino acids (AA) for anaplerosis after reperfusion. Thus, AA should be more available for other functions such as protein synthesis.

  3. Effect of post-exercise protein-leucine feeding on neutrophil function, immunomodulatory plasma metabolites and cortisol during a 6-day block of intense cycling.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andre R; Jackson, Lara; Clarke, Jim; Stellingwerff, Trent; Broadbent, Suzanne; Rowlands, David S

    2013-09-01

    Whey protein and leucine ingestion following exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and could influence neutrophil function during recovery from prolonged intense exercise. We examined the effects of whey protein and leucine ingestion post-exercise on neutrophil function and immunomodulators during a period of intense cycling. In a randomized double-blind crossover, 12 male cyclists ingested protein/leucine/carbohydrate/fat (LEUPRO 20/7.5/89/22 g h(-1), respectively) or isocaloric carbohydrate/fat control (CON 119/22 g h(-1)) beverages for 1-3 h post-exercise during 6 days of high-intensity training. Blood was taken pre- and post-exercise on days 1, 2, 4 and 6 for phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophil superoxide (O2 (-)) production, immune cell counts, amino acid and lipid metabolism via metabolomics, hormones (cortisol, testosterone) and cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-10). During recovery on day 1, LEUPRO ingestion increased mean concentrations of plasma amino acids (glycine, arginine, glutamine, leucine) and myristic acid metabolites (acylcarnitines C14, myristoylcarnitine; and C14:1-OH, hydroxymyristoleylcarnitine) with neutrophil priming capacity, and reduced neutrophil O2 production (15-17 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1) ± 90 % confidence limits 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)). On day 2, LEUPRO increased pre-exercise plasma volume (6.6 ± 3.8 %) but haematological effects were trivial. LEUPRO supplementation did not substantially alter neutrophil elastase, testosterone, or cytokine concentrations. By day 6, however, LEUPRO reduced pre-exercise cortisol 21 % (±15 %) and acylcarnitine C16 (palmitoylcarnitine) during exercise, and increased post-exercise neutrophil O2 (-) (33 ± 20 mmol O2 (-) cell(-1)), relative to control. Altered plasma amino acid and acylcarnitine concentrations with protein-leucine feeding might partly explain the acute post-exercise reduction in neutrophil function and increased exercise-stimulated neutrophil oxidative burst on day 6, which could impact neutrophil-dependent processes during recovery from intense training. PMID:23624785

  4. Regulation of steroid hormone receptors and coregulators during the cell cycle highlights potential novel function in addition to roles as transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingfeng; Murphy, Leigh C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is tightly controlled by several kinase families including Cyclin-Dependent Kinases, Polo-Like Kinases, and Aurora Kinases. A large amount of data show that steroid hormone receptors and various components of the cell cycle, including cell cycle regulated kinases, interact, and this often results in altered transcriptional activity of the receptor. Furthermore, steroid hormones, through their receptors, can also regulate the transcriptional expression of genes that are required for cell cycle regulation. However, emerging data suggest that steroid hormone receptors may have roles in cell cycle progression independent of their transcriptional activity. The following is a review of how steroid receptors and their coregulators can regulate or be regulated by the cell cycle machinery, with a particular focus on roles independent of transcription in G2/M. PMID:26778927

  5. Improvement of Cycling Performance of Lithium-Sulfur Batteries by Using Magnesium Oxide as a Functional Additive for Trapping Lithium Polysulfide.

    PubMed

    Ponraj, Rubha; Kannan, Aravindaraj G; Ahn, Jun Hwan; Kim, Dong-Won

    2016-02-17

    Trapping lithium polysulfides formed in the sulfur positive electrode of lithium-sulfur batteries is one of the promising approaches to overcome the issues related to polysulfide dissolution. In this work, we demonstrate that intrinsically hydrophilic magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles having surface hydroxyl groups can be used as effective additives to trap lithium polysulfides in the positive electrode. MgO nanoparticles were uniformly distributed on the surface of the active sulfur, and the addition of MgO into the sulfur electrode resulted in an increase in capacity retention of the lithium-sulfur cell compared to a cell with pristine sulfur electrode. The improvement in cycling stability was attributed to the strong chemical interactions between MgO and lithium polysulfide species, which suppressed the shuttling effect of lithium polysulfides and enhanced the utilization of the sulfur active material. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first demonstration of MgO as an effective functional additive to trap lithium polysulfides in lithium-sulfur cells. PMID:26808673

  6. Aggregation of Ribosomal Protein S6 at Nucleolus Is Cell Cycle-Controlled and Its Function in Pre-rRNA Processing Is Phosphorylation Dependent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Duo; Chen, Hui-Peng; Duan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Li-Hua; Shao, Yong; Chen, Ke-Yan; Wang, You-Liang; Lan, Feng-Hua; Hu, Xian-Wen

    2016-07-01

    Ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) has long been regarded as one of the primary r-proteins that functions in the early stage of 40S subunit assembly, but its actual role is still obscure. The correct forming of 18S rRNA is a key step in the nuclear synthesis of 40S subunit. In this study, we demonstrate that rpS6 participates in the processing of 30S pre-rRNA to 18S rRNA only when its C-terminal five serines are phosphorylated, however, the process of entering the nucleus and then targeting the nucleolus does not dependent its phosphorylation. Remarkably, we also find that the aggregation of rpS6 at the nucleolus correlates to the phasing of cell cycle, beginning to concentrate in the nucleolus at later S phase and disaggregate at M phase. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1649-1657, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26639987

  7. Role for a region of helically unstable DNA within the Epstein-Barr virus latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP in origin function

    SciTech Connect

    Polonskaya, Zhanna; Benham, Craig J.; Hearing, Janet . E-mail: jhearing@ms.cc.sunysb.edu

    2004-10-25

    The minimal replicator of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent cycle origin of DNA replication oriP is composed of two binding sites for the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and flanking inverted repeats that bind the telomere repeat binding factor TRF2. Although not required for minimal replicator activity, additional binding sites for EBNA-1 and TRF2 and one or more auxiliary elements located to the right of the EBNA-1/TRF2 sites are required for the efficient replication of oriP plasmids. Another region of oriP that is predicted to be destabilized by DNA supercoiling is shown here to be an important functional component of oriP. The ability of DNA fragments of unrelated sequence and possessing supercoiled-induced DNA duplex destabilized (SIDD) structures, but not fragments characterized by helically stable DNA, to substitute for this component of oriP demonstrates a role for the SIDD region in the initiation of oriP-plasmid DNA replication.

  8. Complementation of the Function of Glycoprotein H of Human Herpesvirus 6 Variant A by Glycoprotein H of Variant B in the Virus Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Oyaizu, Hiroko; Tang, Huamin; Ota, Megumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ozono, Keiichi; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a T-cell-tropic betaherpesvirus. HHV-6 can be classified into two variants, HHV-6 variant A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B, based on genetic, antigenic, and cell tropisms, although the homology of their entire genomic sequences is nearly 90%. The HHV-6A glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 is a viral ligand that binds to the cellular receptor human CD46. Because gH has 94.3% amino acid identity between the variants, here we examined whether gH from one variant could complement its loss in the other. Recently, we successfully reconstituted HHV-6A from its cloned genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) (rHHV-6ABAC). Using this system, we constructed HHV-6ABAC DNA containing the HHV-6B gH (BgH) gene instead of the HHV-6A gH (AgH) gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant HHV-6ABAC expressing BgH (rHHV-6ABAC-BgH) was successfully reconstituted. In addition, a monoclonal antibody that blocks HHV-6B but not HHV-6A infection neutralized rHHV-6ABAC-BgH but not rHHV-6ABAC. These results indicate that HHV-6B gH can complement the function of HHV-6A gH in the viral infectious cycle. PMID:22647694

  9. Triiodothyronine increases myocardial function and pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle after reperfusion in a model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Aaron K.; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy; Rosiers, Christine Des

    2012-01-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation improves clinical outcomes in infants after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass by unknown mechanisms. We utilized a translational model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC), thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]pyruvate for 40 min (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (control) or immediately after reperfusion (I/R) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (I/R-Tr) received T3 (1.2 μg/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC) using [2-13C]pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When compared with I/R, T3 (group I/R-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after I/R while elevating flux of both PDC and PC (∼4-fold). Although neither I/R nor I/R-Tr modified absolute CAC levels, T3 inhibited I/R-induced reductions in their molar percent enrichment. Furthermore, 13C-labeling of CAC intermediates suggests that T3 may decrease entry of unlabeled carbons at the level of oxaloacetate through anaplerosis or exchange reaction with asparate. T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC fluxes, thereby providing potential substrate for elevated cardiac function after reperfusion. This T3-induced increase in pyruvate fluxes occurs with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Our labeling data raise the possibility that T3 reduces reliance on amino acids for anaplerosis after reperfusion. PMID:22180654

  10. Triiodothyronine increases myocardial function and pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle after reperfusion in a model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation improves clinical outcomes in infants after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass by unknown mechanisms. We utilized a translational model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC), thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-(13)Carbon((13)C)]pyruvate for 40 min (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (control) or immediately after reperfusion (I/R) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (I/R-Tr) received T3 (1.2 μg/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC) using [2-(13)C]pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When compared with I/R, T3 (group I/R-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after I/R while elevating flux of both PDC and PC (∼4-fold). Although neither I/R nor I/R-Tr modified absolute CAC levels, T3 inhibited I/R-induced reductions in their molar percent enrichment. Furthermore, (13)C-labeling of CAC intermediates suggests that T3 may decrease entry of unlabeled carbons at the level of oxaloacetate through anaplerosis or exchange reaction with asparate. T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC fluxes, thereby providing potential substrate for elevated cardiac function after reperfusion. This T3-induced increase in pyruvate fluxes occurs with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Our labeling data raise the possibility that T3 reduces reliance on amino acids for anaplerosis after reperfusion. PMID:22180654

  11. Functional interaction of the Ras effector RASSF5 with the tyrosine kinase Lck: critical role in nucleocytoplasmic transport and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Gita; Singhal, P K; Suryaraja, R; Mahalingam, S

    2010-03-19

    RASSF5 is a member of the Ras association domain family, which is known to be involved in cell growth regulation. Expression of RASSF5 is extinguished selectively by epigenetic mechanism(s) in different cancers and cell lines, and reexpression usually suppresses cell proliferation and tumorigenicity. To date, the mechanism regulating RASSF5 nuclear transport and its role in cell growth regulation remains unclear. Using heterokaryon assay, we have demonstrated that RASSF5 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B, suggesting that RASSF5 is exported from the nucleus by a CRM-1-dependent export pathway. We further demonstrate that RASSF5 contains a hydrophobic-rich nuclear export signal (NES) towards the C-terminus and two nuclear localization signals-one each at the N-terminus and the C-terminus. Combination of mutational and immunofluorescence analyses suggests that the functional NES residing between amino acids 260 and 300 in the C-terminus is necessary for the efficient export of RASSF5 from the nucleus. In addition, substitution of conserved hydrophobic residues within the minimal NES impaired RASSF5 export from the nucleus. Furthermore, exchange of proline residues within the putative Src homology 3 binding motifs altered the export of RASSF5 from the nucleus despite the presence of functional NES, suggesting that multiple domains independently modulate the nucleocytoplasmic transport of RASSF5. Interestingly, the present investigation provided evidence that RASSF5 interacts with the tyrosine kinase Lck through its C-terminal Src homology 2 binding motif and showed that Lck-mediated phosphorylation is critical for the efficient translocation of RASSF5 into the nuclear compartment. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that wild type and nuclear export defective (DeltaNES) mutant of RASSF5 but not the import defective mutant of accumulate the cells at G1/S phase and induce apoptosis. Furthermore, the Lck-interaction-defective mutant of RASSF5 induces apoptosis without altering cell cycle progression, suggesting that RASSF5 induces apoptosis independent of cell cycle arrest. Together, our data demonstrate that interaction with Lck is critical for RASSF5 phosphorylation, which in turn regulates the cell growth control activity of RASSF5. Finally, we have shown that RASSF5 encodes four splice variants and is translocated to the nucleus by the classical nuclear import pathway. One of the splice variants, RASSF5C, was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and translocated into the nucleus upon leptomycin B treatment despite the absence of N-terminal nuclear localization signal, suggesting that distribution of RASSF5 variants in different cellular compartments may be critical for Ras-dependent cell growth regulation. Collectively, the present investigation provided evidence that Lck-mediated phosphorylation regulates the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control activities of RASSF5. PMID:20064523

  12. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the lining of the uterus. If the egg is not fertilized, hormone levels will drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and be shed with the ...

  13. Escherichia coli enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) supports efficient operation of a functional reversal of β-oxidation cycle.

    PubMed

    Vick, Jacob E; Clomburg, James M; Blankschien, Matthew D; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-02-01

    We recently used a synthetic/bottom-up approach to establish the identity of the four enzymes composing an engineered functional reversal of the -oxidation cycle for fuel and chemical production in Escherichia coli (J. M. Clomburg, J. E. Vick, M. D. Blankschien, M. Rodriguez-Moya, and R. Gonzalez, ACS Synth Biol 1:541–554, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sb3000782).While native enzymes that catalyze the first three steps of the pathway were identified, the identity of the native enzyme(s) acting as the trans-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase(s) remained unknown, limiting the amount of product that could be synthesized (e.g., 0.34 g/liter butyrate) and requiring the overexpression of a foreign enzyme (the Euglena gracilis trans-enoyl-CoA reductase [EgTER]) to achieve high titers (e.g., 3.4 g/liter butyrate). Here, we examine several native E. coli enzymes hypothesized to catalyze the reduction of enoyl-CoAs to acyl-CoAs. Our results indicate that FabI, the native enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase (ENR) from type II fatty acid biosynthesis, possesses sufficient NADH-dependent TER activity to support the efficient operation of a -oxidation reversal. Overexpression of FabI proved as effective as EgTER for the production of butyrate and longer-chain carboxylic acids. Given the essential nature of fabI, we investigated whether bacterial ENRs from other families were able to complement a fabI deletion without promiscuous reduction of crotonyl-CoA. These characteristics from Bacillus subtilis FabL enabled deltaffabI complementation experiments that conclusively established that FabI encodes a native enoyl-CoA reductase activity that supports the β-oxidation reversal in E. coli. PMID:25527535

  14. Escherichia coli Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase (FabI) Supports Efficient Operation of a Functional Reversal of the β-Oxidation Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Jacob E.; Clomburg, James M.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung

    2014-01-01

    We recently used a synthetic/bottom-up approach to establish the identity of the four enzymes composing an engineered functional reversal of the β-oxidation cycle for fuel and chemical production in Escherichia coli (J. M. Clomburg, J. E. Vick, M. D. Blankschien, M. Rodriguez-Moya, and R. Gonzalez, ACS Synth Biol 1:541–554, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/sb3000782). While native enzymes that catalyze the first three steps of the pathway were identified, the identity of the native enzyme(s) acting as the trans-enoyl coenzyme A (CoA) reductase(s) remained unknown, limiting the amount of product that could be synthesized (e.g., 0.34 g/liter butyrate) and requiring the overexpression of a foreign enzyme (the Euglena gracilis trans-enoyl-CoA reductase [EgTER]) to achieve high titers (e.g., 3.4 g/liter butyrate). Here, we examine several native E. coli enzymes hypothesized to catalyze the reduction of enoyl-CoAs to acyl-CoAs. Our results indicate that FabI, the native enoyl-acyl carrier protein (enoyl-ACP) reductase (ENR) from type II fatty acid biosynthesis, possesses sufficient NADH-dependent TER activity to support the efficient operation of a β-oxidation reversal. Overexpression of FabI proved as effective as EgTER for the production of butyrate and longer-chain carboxylic acids. Given the essential nature of fabI, we investigated whether bacterial ENRs from other families were able to complement a fabI deletion without promiscuous reduction of crotonyl-CoA. These characteristics from Bacillus subtilis FabL enabled ΔfabI complementation experiments that conclusively established that FabI encodes a native enoyl-CoA reductase activity that supports the β-oxidation reversal in E. coli. PMID:25527535

  15. Functional expression of chloride channels and their roles in the cell cycle and cell proliferation in highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weiyuan; Liu, Mei; Zhu, Linyan; Liu, Shanwen; Luo, Hai; Ma, Lianshun; Wang, Haibo; Lu, Ruiling; Sun, Xiaoxue; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei

    2014-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that the growth of the poorly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-2Z) was more dependent on the activities of volume-activated chloride channels than that of the normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69-SV40T). However, the activities and roles of such volume-activated chloride channels in highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE-1) are not clarified. In this study, it was found that a volume-activated chloride current and a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) were induced by 47% hypotonic challenges. The current density and the capacity of RVD in the highly differentiated CNE-1 cells were lower than those in the poorly differentiated CNE-2Z cells, and higher than those in the normal cells (NP69-SV40T). The chloride channel blockers, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen inhibited the current and RVD. Depletion of intracellular Cl(-) abolished the RVD. The chloride channel blockers reversibly inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phases, but did not change cell viability. The sensitivity of the three cell lines to the chloride channel blockers was different, with the highest in poorly differentiated cells (CNE-2Z) and the lowest in the normal cells (NP69-SV40T). ClC-3 proteins were expressed in the three cells and distributed inside the cells as well as on the cell membrane. In conclusion, the highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-1 cells functionally expressed the volume-activated chloride channels, which may play important roles in controlling cell proliferation through modulating the cell cycle, and may be associated with cell differentiation. Chloride channels may be a potential target of anticancer therapy. PMID:25214521

  16. Functional expression of chloride channels and their roles in the cell cycle and cell proliferation in highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weiyuan; Liu, Mei; Zhu, Linyan; Liu, Shanwen; Luo, Hai; Ma, Lianshun; Wang, Haibo; Lu, Ruiling; Sun, Xiaoxue; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We previously demonstrated that the growth of the poorly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE‐2Z) was more dependent on the activities of volume‐activated chloride channels than that of the normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69‐SV40T). However, the activities and roles of such volume‐activated chloride channels in highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells (CNE‐1) are not clarified. In this study, it was found that a volume‐activated chloride current and a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) were induced by 47% hypotonic challenges. The current density and the capacity of RVD in the highly differentiated CNE‐1 cells were lower than those in the poorly differentiated CNE‐2Z cells, and higher than those in the normal cells (NP69‐SV40T). The chloride channel blockers, 5‐nitro‐2‐(3‐phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen inhibited the current and RVD. Depletion of intracellular Cl− abolished the RVD. The chloride channel blockers reversibly inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration‐ and time‐dependent manner, and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phases, but did not change cell viability. The sensitivity of the three cell lines to the chloride channel blockers was different, with the highest in poorly differentiated cells (CNE‐2Z) and the lowest in the normal cells (NP69‐SV40T). ClC‐3 proteins were expressed in the three cells and distributed inside the cells as well as on the cell membrane. In conclusion, the highly differentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE‐1 cells functionally expressed the volume‐activated chloride channels, which may play important roles in controlling cell proliferation through modulating the cell cycle, and may be associated with cell differentiation. Chloride channels may be a potential target of anticancer therapy. PMID:25214521

  17. High levels of fatty acids increase contractile function of neonatal rabbit hearts during reperfusion following ischemia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masayoshi; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Lam, Victoria H; Oka, Tatsujiro; Zhang, Liyan; Beker, Donna L; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Rebeyka, Ivan M

    2010-05-01

    In the neonatal heart the transition from using carbohydrates to using fatty acids has not fully matured and oxidative metabolism/ATP generation may be limiting contractile function after ischemia. This study tested the hypothesis that increasing fatty acid availability increases recovery of left ventricular (LV) work by increasing palmitate oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, and ATP generation. Isolated working hearts from 7-day-old rabbits were perfused with Krebs solution containing low (0.4 mM) or high (2.4 mM) palmitate and 5.5 mM glucose. Hearts were subjected to 35-min global ischemia before 40-min reperfusion, and rates of glycolysis, glucose oxidation, and palmitate oxidation were assessed. LV work was similar before ischemia but was greater during reperfusion in hearts perfused with 2.4 mM palmitate compared with hearts perfused with 0.4 mM palmitate [6.98 +/- 0.14 (n = 15) vs. 3.01 +/- 0.23 (n = 16) mJ.beat(-1).g dry wt(-1); P < 0.05]. This was accompanied by increased LV energy expenditure during reperfusion [35.98 +/- 0.16 (n = 8) vs. 19.92 +/- 0.18 (n = 6) mJ.beat(-1).g dry wt(-1); P < 0.05]. During reperfusion the rates of palmitate oxidation [237.5 +/- 28.10 (n = 7) vs. 86.0 +/- 9.7 (n = 6) nmol.g dry wt(-1).min(-1); P < 0.05], total TCA cycle activity [2.65 +/- 0.39 (n = 7) vs. 1.36 +/- 0.14 (n = 6) micromol acetyl-CoA.g dry wt(-1).min(-1); P < 0.05], and ATP generation attributable to palmitate oxidation [26.6 +/- 3.1 (n = 7) vs. 12.6 +/- 1.7 (n = 6) micromol.g dry wt(-1).min(-1); P < 0.05] were greater in hearts perfused with 2.4 mM palmitate. These data indicate that the neonatal heart has decreased energy reserve, and, in contrast to the mature heart, increasing availability of fatty acid substrate increases energy production and improves recovery of function after ischemia. PMID:20154256

  18. Studying Microbial Mat Functioning Amidst "Unexpected Diversity": Methodological Approaches and Initial Results from Metatranscriptomes of Mats Over Diel cycles, iTags from Long Term Manipulations, and Biogeochemical Cycling in Simplified Microbial Mats Constructed from Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bebout, B.; Bebout, L. E.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Lee, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Weber, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial mats are famously amongst the most diverse microbial ecosystems on Earth, inhabiting some of the most inclement environments known, including hypersaline, dry, hot, cold, nutrient poor, and high UV environments. The high microbial diversity of microbial mats makes studies of microbial ecology notably difficult. To address this challenge, we have been using a combination of metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, iTags and culture-based simplified microbial mats to study biogeochemical cycling (H2 production, N2 fixation, and fermentation) in microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California. Metatranscriptomes of microbial mats incubated over a diel cycle have revealed that a number of gene systems activate only during the day in Cyanobacteria, while the remaining appear to be constitutive. The dominant cyanobacterium in the mat (Microcoleus chthonoplastes) expresses several pathways for nitrogen scavenging undocumented in cultured strains, as well as the expression of two starch storage and utilization cycles. Community composition shifts in response to long term manipulations of mats were assessed using iTags. Changes in community diversity were observed as hydrogen fluxes increased in response to a lowering of sulfate concentrations. To produce simplified microbial mats, we have isolated members of 13 of the 15 top taxa from our iTag libraries into culture. Simplified microbial mats and simple co-cultures and consortia constructed from these isolates reproduce many of the natural patterns of biogeochemical cycling in the parent natural microbial mats, but against a background of far lower overall diversity, simplifying studies of changes in gene expression (over the short term), interactions between community members, and community composition changes (over the longer term), in response to environmental forcing.

  19. Hydrological cycle.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, H C; Mercante, M A; Santos, E T

    2011-04-01

    The Pantanal hydrological cycle holds an important meaning in the Alto Paraguay Basin, comprising two areas with considerably diverse conditions regarding natural and water resources: the Plateau and the Plains. From the perspective of the ecosystem function, the hydrological flow in the relationship between plateau and plains is important for the creation of reproductive and feeding niches for the regional biodiversity. In general, river declivity in the plateau is 0.6 m/km while declivity on the plains varies from 0.1 to 0.3 m/km. The environment in the plains is characteristically seasonal and is home to an exuberant and abundant diversity of species, including some animals threatened with extinction. When the flat surface meets the plains there is a diminished water flow on the riverbeds and, during the rainy season the rivers overflow their banks, flooding the lowlands. Average annual precipitation in the Basin is 1,396 mm, ranging from 800 mm to 1,600 mm, and the heaviest rainfall occurs in the plateau region. The low drainage capacity of the rivers and lakes that shape the Pantanal, coupled with the climate in the region, produce very high evaporation: approximately 60% of all the waters coming from the plateau are lost through evaporation. The Alto Paraguay Basin, including the Pantanal, while boasting an abundant availability of water resources, also has some spots with water scarcity in some sub-basins, at different times of the year. Climate conditions alone are not enough to explain the differences observed in the Paraguay River regime and some of its tributaries. The complexity of the hydrologic regime of the Paraguay River is due to the low declivity of the lands that comprise the Mato Grosso plains and plateau (50 to 30 cm/km from east to west and 3 to 1.5 cm/km from north to south) as well as the area's dimension, which remains periodically flooded with a large volume of water. PMID:21537597

  20. Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 49 NIST Vapor Compression Cycle Design Program (CYCLE_D) (PC database for purchase)   The CYCLE_D database package simulates the vapor compression refrigeration cycles. It is fully compatible with REFPROP 9.0 and covers the 62 single-compound refrigerants . Fluids can be used in mixtures comprising up to five components.

  1. Determining novel functions of Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins in central metabolic processes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 14-3-3 proteins are considered master regulators of many signal transduction cascades in eukaryotes. In plants, 14-3-3 proteins have major roles as regulators of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, conclusions based on the studies of a few specific 14-3-3 targets. Results In this study, extensive novel roles of 14-3-3 proteins in plant metabolism were determined through combining the parallel analyses of metabolites and enzyme activities in 14-3-3 overexpression and knockout plants with studies of protein-protein interactions. Decreases in the levels of sugars and nitrogen-containing-compounds and in the activities of known 14-3-3-interacting-enzymes were observed in 14-3-3 overexpression plants. Plants overexpressing 14-3-3 proteins also contained decreased levels of malate and citrate, which are intermediate compounds of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. These modifications were related to the reduced activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase, which are key enzymes of TCA cycle. In addition, we demonstrated that 14-3-3 proteins interacted with one isocitrate dehydrogenase and two malate dehydrogenases. There were also changes in the levels of aromatic compounds and the activities of shikimate dehydrogenase, which participates in the biosynthesis of aromatic compounds. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that 14-3-3 proteins play roles as crucial tuners of multiple primary metabolic processes including TCA cycle and the shikimate pathway. PMID:22104211

  2. Methylcitrate cycle defines the bactericidal essentiality of isocitrate lyase for survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Eoh, Hyungjin; Rhee, Kyu Y.

    2014-01-01

    Few mutations attenuate Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) more profoundly than deletion of its isocitrate lyases (ICLs). However, the basis for this attenuation remains incompletely defined. Mtb’s ICLs are catalytically bifunctional isocitrate and methylisocitrate lyases required for growth on even and odd chain fatty acids. Here, we report that Mtb’s ICLs are essential for survival on both acetate and propionate because of its methylisocitrate lyase (MCL) activity. Lack of MCL activity converts Mtb’s methylcitrate cycle into a “dead end” pathway that sequesters tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates into methylcitrate cycle intermediates, depletes gluconeogenic precursors, and results in defects of membrane potential and intrabacterial pH. Activation of an alternative vitamin B12-dependent pathway of propionate metabolism led to selective corrections of TCA cycle activity, membrane potential, and intrabacterial pH that specifically restored survival, but not growth, of ICL-deficient Mtb metabolizing acetate or propionate. These results thus resolve the biochemical basis of essentiality for Mtb’s ICLs and survival on fatty acids. PMID:24639517

  3. Menu Cycles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Alfred; Almony, John

    The curriculum guide for commercial foods instruction is designed to aid the teacher in communicating the importance of menu cycles in commercial food production. It also provides information about the necessary steps in getting food from the raw form to the finished product, and then to the consumer. In addition to providing information on how to…

  4. Learning Cycles in the General Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whisnant, David M.

    1983-01-01

    Three-phased learning cycles (exploration, invention, application) were introduced into general chemistry laboratories at Northland College (Wisconsin). Discusses each phase and its use in a learning cycle on the functional groups of organic compounds. (JN)

  5. Acclimation to Chronic O3 in Field-grown Soybean is Characterized by Increased Levels of TCA Cycle Transcripts and ROS Scavenging Compounds in Addition to Decreased Photosynthetic Capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a pollutant that is generated by volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides and sunlight. When plants take in O3 through stomata, harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced that induce the production of ROS scavenging antioxidants. Climate change predictions indic...

  6. The menstrual cycle: basic biology.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Shannon M; Matzuk, Martin M

    2008-01-01

    The basic biology of the menstrual cycle is a complex, coordinated sequence of events involving the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, ovary, and endometrium. The menstrual cycle with all its complexities can be easily perturbed by environmental factors such as stress, extreme exercise, eating disorders, and obesity. Furthermore, genetic influences such as fragile X premutations, X chromosome abnormalities, and galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) point mutations (galactosemia) also contribute to perturbations of the menstrual cycle. Although not perfect, mouse models have helped to identify and confirm additional components and pathways in menstrual cycle function and dysfunction in humans. PMID:18574203

  7. A comparative look at sunspot cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of cycles 8 through 20, spanning about 143 years, observations of sunspot number, smoothed sunspot number, and their temporal properties were used to compute means, standard deviations, ranges, and frequency of occurrence histograms for a number of sunspot cycle parameters. The resultant schematic sunspot cycle was contrasted with the mean sunspot cycle, obtained by averaging smoothed sunspot number as a function of time, tying all cycles (8 through 20) to their minimum occurence date. A relatively good approximation of the time variation of smoothed sunspot number for a given cycle is possible if sunspot cycles are regarded in terms of being either HIGH- or LOW-R(MAX) cycles or LONG- or SHORT-PERIOD cycles, especially the latter. Linear regression analyses were performed comparing late cycle parameters with early cycle parameters and solar cycle number. The early occurring cycle parameters can be used to estimate later occurring cycle parameters with relatively good success, based on cycle 21 as an example. The sunspot cycle record clearly shows that the trend for both R(MIN) and R(MAX) was toward decreasing value between cycles 8 through 14 and toward increasing value between cycles 14 through 20. Linear regression equations were also obtained for several measures of solar activity.

  8. Comparison of oxygen uptake during cycle ergometry with and without functional electrical stimulation in patients with COPD: protocol for a randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    Medrinal, Clément; Prieur, Guillaume; Debeaumont, David; Robledo Quesada, Aurora; Combret, Yann; Quieffin, Jean; Contal, Olivier; Lamia, Bouchra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has systemic repercussions that can lead to peripheral muscle dysfunction. Muscle atrophy reduces aerobic capacity, greatly limiting activities of daily living and quality of life. Pulmonary rehabilitation is the gold standard treatment for these patients, however, patients may not be able to reach sufficient training intensities for benefits to occur. Technologies such as functional electrical stimulation (FES) are currently being adapted and tested to enhance exercise training. We hypothesise that FES coupled with cycling (FES-cycling) will improve maximal uptake of oxygen (VO2) and aerobic capacity more than endurance training with placebo stimulation. Methods A randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial will be carried out to evaluate the effects of FES-cycling on VO2 during endurance exercise on a cycle ergometer in patients with COPD. 25 patients with COPD will carry out two 30 min sessions at a constant load; one session with active and one with placebo FES. The primary outcome is oxygen uptake recorded with a metabolic measurement system. Secondary outcomes include ventilation equivalent for oxygen, ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide, cardiac output, lactate values, perceived dyspnoea and perceived muscle fatigue. Results and conclusions Approval has been granted by our Institutional Review Board (Comité de Protection des Personnes Nord-Ouest 3). The results of the trial will be presented at national and international meetings and published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number NCT02594722. PMID:27110364

  9. Alcohol consumption as a function of dietary restraint and the menstrual cycle in moderate/heavy ("at-risk") female drinkers.

    PubMed

    DiMatteo, Julie; Reed, Stephanie Collins; Evans, Suzette M

    2012-08-01

    Previous research suggests that women who report dietary restraint tend to consume alcohol in greater quantities, however most studies use retrospective data collection, which is often unreliable, and no studies have accounted for this relationship with respect to potential changes in alcohol consumption across the menstrual cycle. Therefore, the present study investigated the relationship between prospectively monitored drinking patterns and dietary restraint across the menstrual cycle among females from the general population whose drinking level (7-20 drinks/week) places them at-risk for developing alcohol use disorders. Restrained eaters (RES; N=51) and unrestrained eaters (UN-RES; N=55), per the cognitive restraint scale scores from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire, provided prospective ratings measuring mood, alcohol consumption, and consequences of alcohol use across one full menstrual cycle. Dysphoric mood increased during the late luteal and menstrual phases in both groups. Although overall the RES group did not drink more than the UN-RES group, the RES group drank less than the UN-RES group during the follicular phase, suggesting that among RES women alcohol consumption may be modulated by hormonal fluctuations across the menstrual cycle. The differences between the present findings and previous research may be due to the cohorts sampled; the majority of previous studies sampled college students, where binge drinking and dietary restraint are more common, whereas this study sampled the general population. Future research should replicate prior studies in a college-aged population using the current design of prospective data collection for greater accuracy of self-reported alcohol consumption. PMID:22664414

  10. The nucleotide exchange factor MGE exerts a key function in the ATP-dependent cycle of mt-Hsp70-Tim44 interaction driving mitochondrial protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, H C; Westermann, B; Neupert, W; Brunner, M

    1996-01-01

    Import of preproteins into the mitochondrial matrix is driven by the ATP-dependent interaction of mt-Hsp70 with the peripheral inner membrane import protein Tim44 and the preprotein in transit. We show that Mge1p, a co-chaperone of mt-Hsp70, plays a key role in the ATP-dependent import reaction cycle in yeast. Our data suggest a cycle in which the mt-Hsp70-Tim44 complex forms with ATP: Mge1p promotes assembly of the complex in the presence of ATP. Hydrolysis of ATP by mt-Hsp70 occurs in complex with Tim44. Mge1p is then required for the dissociation of the ADP form of mt-Hsp70 from Tim44 after release of inorganic phosphate but before release of ADP. ATP hydrolysis and complex dissociation are accompanied by tight binding of mt-Hsp70 to the preprotein in transit. Subsequently, the release of mt-Hsp70 from the polypeptide chain is triggered by Mge1p which promotes release of ADP from mt-Hsp70. Rebinding of ATP to mt-Hsp70 completes the reaction cycle. Images PMID:8918457

  11. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastian; Baxter, Douglas J; Cannon, William R

    2014-12-26

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, material flux, and thermodynamic profiles of the oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on modeling states using statistical thermodynamics and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals. PMID:25495377

  12. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  13. Characterization of a Functional Role of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum Isocitrate Lyase in Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jeong-Min; Lee, Hae-In; Sadowsky, Michael J; Sugawara, Masayuki; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of soybean. In previous studies, transcriptomic profiling of B. japonicum USDA110, grown under various environmental conditions, revealed the highly induced gene aceA, encoding isocitrate lyase (ICL). The ICL catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to succinate and glyoxylate in the glyoxylate bypass of the TCA cycle. Here, we evaluated the functional role of B. japonicum ICL under desiccation-induced stress conditions. We purified AceA (molecular mass = 65 kDa) from B. japonicum USDA110, using a His-tag and Ni-NTA column approach, and confirmed its ICL enzyme activity. The aceA mutant showed higher sensitivity to desiccation stress (27% relative humidity (RH)), compared to the wild type. ICL activity of the wild type strain increased approximately 2.5-fold upon exposure to 27% RH for 24 h. The aceA mutant also showed an increased susceptibility to salt stress. Gene expression analysis of aceA using qRT-PCR revealed a 148-fold induction by desiccation, while other genes involved in the glyoxylate pathway were not differentially expressed in this condition. Transcriptome analyses revealed that stress-related genes, such as chaperones, were upregulated in the wild-type under desiccating conditions, even though fold induction was not dramatic (ca. 1.5-2.5-fold). PMID:26204840

  14. Characterization of a Functional Role of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum Isocitrate Lyase in Desiccation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jeong-Min; Lee, Hae-In; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Sugawara, Masayuki; Chang, Woo-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a nitrogen-fixing symbiont of soybean. In previous studies, transcriptomic profiling of B. japonicum USDA110, grown under various environmental conditions, revealed the highly induced gene aceA, encoding isocitrate lyase (ICL). The ICL catalyzes the conversion of isocitrate to succinate and glyoxylate in the glyoxylate bypass of the TCA cycle. Here, we evaluated the functional role of B. japonicum ICL under desiccation-induced stress conditions. We purified AceA (molecular mass = 65 kDa) from B. japonicum USDA110, using a His-tag and Ni-NTA column approach, and confirmed its ICL enzyme activity. The aceA mutant showed higher sensitivity to desiccation stress (27% relative humidity (RH)), compared to the wild type. ICL activity of the wild type strain increased approximately 2.5-fold upon exposure to 27% RH for 24 h. The aceA mutant also showed an increased susceptibility to salt stress. Gene expression analysis of aceA using qRT-PCR revealed a 148-fold induction by desiccation, while other genes involved in the glyoxylate pathway were not differentially expressed in this condition. Transcriptome analyses revealed that stress-related genes, such as chaperones, were upregulated in the wild-type under desiccating conditions, even though fold induction was not dramatic (ca. 1.5–2.5-fold). PMID:26204840

  15. Oxaloacetate-to-malate conversion by mineral photoelectrochemistry: implications for the viability of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Martin, Scot T.

    2008-10-01

    The carboxylic acids produced by the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle are possibly a biosynthetic core of initial life, although several steps such as the reductive kinetics of oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate (MA) are problematic by conventional chemical routes. In this context, we studied the kinetics of this reaction as promoted by ZnS mineral photoelectrochemistry. The quantum efficiency φMA of MA production from the photoelectrochemical reduction of OAA followed φMA=0.13 [OAA] (2.1×10-3+[OAA])-1 and was independent of temperature (5 to 50°C). To evaluate the importance of this forward rate under a prebiotic scenario, we also studied the temperature-dependent rate of the backward thermal decarboxylation of OAA to pyruvate (PA), which followed an Arrhenius behavior as log (k-2)=11.74 4956/T, where k-2 is in units of s-1. These measured rates were employed in conjunction with the indirectly estimated carboxylation rate of PA to OAA to assess the possible importance of mineral photoelectrochemistry in the conversion of OAA to MA under several scenarios of prebiotic conditions on early Earth. As an example, our analysis shows that there is 90% efficiency with a forward velocity of 3 yr/cycle for the OAA→MA step of the rTCA cycle at 280 K. Efficiency and velocity both decrease for increasing temperature. These results suggest high viability for mineral photoelectrochemistry as an enzyme-free engine to drive the rTCA cycle through the early aeons of early Earth, at least for the investigated OAA→MA step.

  16. The multi-functional sorting protein PACS-2 regulates SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of p53 to modulate p21-dependent cell cycle arrest

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Katelyn M.; Thomas, Laura L.; Barroso-González, Jonathan; Thomas, Laurel; Auclair, Sylvain; Yin, Jun; Kang, Hyeog; Chung, Jay H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Thomas, Gary

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY SIRT1 regulates the DNA damage response by deacetylating p53, thereby repressing p53 transcriptional output. Here we demonstrate that the sorting protein PACS-2 regulates SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of p53 to modulate the DNA damage response. PACS-2 knockdown cells failed to efficiently undergo p53-induced cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Accordingly, p53 acetylation was reduced both in PACS-2 knockdown cells and thymocytes from Pacs-2−/− mice, thereby blunting induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 (CDKN1A). The SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 or SIRT1 knockdown restored p53 acetylation and p21 induction as well as p21-dependent cell cycle arrest in PACS-2 knockdown cells. Trafficking studies revealed cytoplasmic PACS-2 shuttled to the nucleus where it interacted with SIRT1 and repressed SIRT1-mediated p53 deacetylation. Correspondingly, in vitro assays demonstrated PACS-2 directly inhibited SIRT1-catalyzed p53 deacetylation. Together, these findings identify PACS-2 as an in vivo mediator of the SIRT1—p53—p21 axis that modulates the DNA damage response. PMID:25159152

  17. The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle: function, regional differences in glutamate and GABA production and effects of interference with GABA metabolism.

    PubMed

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2015-02-01

    The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide information about glutamine transfer. The present review will give information about glutamine trafficking and the tools used to map it as exemplified by discussions of published work employing brain cell cultures as well as intact animals. It will be documented that considerably more glutamine is transferred from astrocytes to glutamatergic than to GABAergic neurons. However, glutamine does have an important role in GABAergic neurons despite their capability of re-utilizing their neurotransmitter by re-uptake. PMID:25380696

  18. Verbal and music dichotic listening tasks reveal variations in functional cerebral asymmetry across the menstrual cycle that are phase and task dependent.

    PubMed

    Sanders, G; Wenmoth, D

    1998-09-01

    Two dichotic listening tests, one a verbal consonant-vowel identification task, the other a musical chord recognition task, were administered to 32 women at two points during the menstrual cycle, menses (when oestrogen is low) and the midluteal phase (when oestrogen is high), in a counterbalanced repeated measures design. The degree of asymmetry changed across the cycle for both syllables and music. The right ear advantage recorded for the verbal task was greater during the midluteal phase than during menses. The left ear advantage recorded for the music task was greater during menses than during the midluteal phase. These reciprocal changes in asymmetry were the result of consistent changes in ear performance. From menses to the midluteal phase, left ear (right hemisphere) performance fell significantly for both tasks whereas right ear (left hemisphere) performance showed a small, but non-significant, increase. The findings are discussed in the light of evidence for phasic activational effects of gonadal steroids on both asymmetry and cognition which provide an explanation for the sometimes elusive nature and small effect size of sex differences in these characteristics. The relationships between sex differences in asymmetry and cognition are re-examined. PMID:9740360

  19. FOXO1-mediated Upregulation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase-4 (PDK4) Decreases Glucose Oxidation and Impairs Right Ventricular Function in Pulmonary Hypertension: Therapeutic Benefits of Dichloroacetate

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Lin; Sidhu, Vaninder K.; Fang, Yong-Hu; Ryan, John J.; Parikh, Kishan S.; Hong, Zhigang; Toth, Peter T.; Morrow, Erik; Kutty, Shelby; Lopaschuk, Gary D.; Archer, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is activated in right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), causing an increase in glycolysis relative to glucose oxidation that impairs RV function. The stimulus for PDK upregulation, its isoform specificity and the long-term effects of PDK inhibition are unknown. We hypothesize that FOXO1-mediated PDK4 upregulation causes bioenergetic impairment and RV dysfunction, which can be reversed by dichloroacetate. Methods Adult male Fawn-Hooded rats (FHR) with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and RVH (age 612 months) were compared to age-matched controls. Cardiac glucose and fatty acid oxidation (GO, FAO) were measured at baseline and after acute dichloroacetate (1mM40-minutes) in isolated working-hearts and in freshly dispersed RV myocytes. The effects of chronic dichloroacetate (0.75 g/L drinking water for 6 months) on cardiac output (CO) and exercise capacity were measured in vivo. Expression of PDK4 and its regulatory transcription factor, FOXO1, were also measured in FHR and RV specimens from PAH patients (n=10). Results Microarray analysis of 168 genes related to glucose or FA metabolism showed >4-fold upregulation of PDK4, aldolase B and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase. FOXO1 was increased, in FHR RV whereas HIF-1? was unaltered. PDK4 expression was increased and the inactivated form of FOXO1 decreased in human PAH RV (P<0.01). PDH inhibition in RVH increased proton production and reduced GOs contribution to the TCA cycle. Acutely, dichloroacetate reduced RV proton production and increased GOs contribution (relative to FAO) to the TCA cycle and ATP production in FHR (P<0.01). Chronically dichloroacetate decreased PDK4 and FOXO1, thereby activating PDH and increasing GO in FHR. These metabolic changes increased CO (8414 vs. 6914 ml/min, P<0.05) and treadmill-walking distance (23920 vs. 17122 m, P<0.05). Conclusion Chronic dichloroacetate inhibits FOXO1-induced PDK4 upregulation and restores GO, leading to improved bioenergetics and RV function in RVH. PMID:23247844

  20. FOXO1-mediated upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK4) decreases glucose oxidation and impairs right ventricular function in pulmonary hypertension: therapeutic benefits of dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lin; Sidhu, Vaninder K; Fang, Yong-Hu; Ryan, John J; Parikh, Kishan S; Hong, Zhigang; Toth, Peter T; Morrow, Erik; Kutty, Shelby; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Archer, Stephen L

    2013-03-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) is activated in right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), causing an increase in glycolysis relative to glucose oxidation that impairs right ventricular function. The stimulus for PDK upregulation, its isoform specificity, and the long-term effects of PDK inhibition are unknown. We hypothesize that FOXO1-mediated PDK4 upregulation causes bioenergetic impairment and RV dysfunction, which can be reversed by dichloroacetate. Adult male Fawn-Hooded rats (FHR) with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH; age 6-12 months) were compared to age-matched controls. Glucose oxidation (GO) and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) were measured at baseline and after acute dichloroacetate (1 mM × 40 min) in isolated working hearts and in freshly dispersed RV myocytes. The effects of chronic dichloroacetate (0.75 g/L drinking water for 6 months) on cardiac output (CO) and exercise capacity were measured in vivo. Expression of PDK4 and its regulatory transcription factor, FOXO1, were also measured in FHR and RV specimens from PAH patients (n = 10). Microarray analysis of 168 genes related to glucose or FA metabolism showed >4-fold upregulation of PDK4, aldolase B, and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase. FOXO1 was increased in FHR RV, whereas HIF-1 α was unaltered. PDK4 expression was increased, and the inactivated form of FOXO1 decreased in human PAH RV (P < 0.01). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) inhibition in RVH increased proton production and reduced GO's contribution to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Acutely, dichloroacetate reduced RV proton production and increased GO's contribution (relative to FAO) to the TCA cycle and ATP production in FHR (P < 0.01). Chronically dichloroacetate decreased PDK4 and FOXO1, thereby activating PDH and increasing GO in FHR. These metabolic changes increased CO (84 ± 14 vs. 69 ± 14 ml/min, P < 0.05) and treadmill-walking distance (239 ± 20 vs. 171 ± 22 m, P < 0.05). Chronic dichloroacetate inhibits FOXO1-induced PDK4 upregulation and restores GO, leading to improved bioenergetics and RV function in RVH. PMID:23247844

  1. A Comparison of Possible Physical, Chemical, and Microbial Functional Gene Controls on Methane Cycling at Two Distinct Sites on the Alaskan North Slope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.

    2014-12-01

    Greater thaw depth in the Arctic permafrost regions will increase soil liquid-water content and enrich for the microbial production of methane (CH4). Carbon cycling in Arctic soils is poorly understood with regard to biological controls on observed CH4 fluxes. In the analysis presented here I have measured and compared chemical and physical properties and conducted an anaerobic incubation experiment on soil core samples obtained from Atqasuk and Ivotuk, two sites on the North Slope of Alaska. Additionally, metagenomes have been sequenced across a soil depth profile at both sites. There are significant differences between the two sites with regard to soil bulk density, pH, volumetric water content, total carbon, total phosphate, Iron III and methanogenesis potential. The sites are not significantly different in total organic matter, total nitrogen, Iron II and anaerobic respiration potential. Volumetric water content is highly correlated at both sites with soil bulk density, with higher water content measured at Ivotuk with finer, siltier soil, and lower water content measured at Atqasuk with coarser, sandier soil. The water retention in these soils may influence carbon dioxide and methane flux at these two sites. Incubations produced similar levels of carbon dioxide at both sites, and much higher levels of methane at Atqasuk than Ivotuk. Multiple regression analysis shows a strong correlation between volumetric water content and pH as predictor variables for methanogenesis in Ivotuk, though not in Atqasuk. Additionally, carbon dioxide production is significantly correlated with methane production in all samples and all depths, though there is a much stronger relationship in Atqasuk. This may indicate a relationship between methane oxidation and carbon dioxide production in Atqasuk, though further investigation is needed. Preliminary metagenomic data for Ivotuk indicates a possible relationship between iron reducing bacteria and soil iron concentrations. Further analysis of metagenomic data is ongoing and will ideally provide greater insights into methane cycling at these two sites.

  2. Nuclear cathepsin D enhances TRPS1 transcriptional repressor function to regulate cell cycle progression and transformation in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Derocq, Danielle; Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Montcourrier, Philippe; Salwa Sebti, Salwa; Orsetti, Béatrice; Theillet, Charles; Gongora, Céline; Pattingre, Sophie; Ibing, Eva; Roger, Pascal; Linares, Laetitia K.; Reinheckel, Thomas; Meurice, Guillaume; Kaiser, Frank J.; Gespach, Christian; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (Cath-D) is overproduced in breast cancer cells (BCC) and supports tumor growth and metastasis formation. Here, we describe the mechanism whereby Cath-D is accumulated in the nucleus of ERα-positive (ER+) BCC. We identified TRPS1 (tricho-rhino-phalangeal-syndrome 1), a repressor of GATA-mediated transcription, and BAT3 (Scythe/BAG6), a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling chaperone protein, as new Cath-D-interacting nuclear proteins. Cath-D binds to BAT3 in ER+ BCC and they partially co-localize at the surface of lysosomes and in the nucleus. BAT3 silencing inhibits Cath-D accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that Cath-D nuclear targeting is controlled by BAT3. Fully mature Cath-D also binds to full-length TRPS1 and they co-localize in the nucleus of ER+ BCC where they are associated with chromatin. Using the LexA-VP16 fusion co-activator reporter assay, we then show that Cath-D acts as a transcriptional repressor, independently of its catalytic activity. Moreover, microarray analysis of BCC in which Cath-D and/or TRPS1 expression were silenced indicated that Cath-D enhances TRPS1-mediated repression of several TRPS1-regulated genes implicated in carcinogenesis, including PTHrP, a canonical TRPS1 gene target. In addition, co-silencing of TRPS1 and Cath-D in BCC affects the transcription of cell cycle, proliferation and transformation genes, and impairs cell cycle progression and soft agar colony formation. These findings indicate that Cath-D acts as a nuclear transcriptional cofactor of TRPS1 to regulate ER+ BCC proliferation and transformation in a non-proteolytic manner. PMID:26183398

  3. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes. PMID:27212081

  4. Your Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... during your menstrual cycle What happens during your menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle includes not just your period, but the rise ... tool is based on a sample 28-day menstrual cycle, but every woman is different in how long ...

  5. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  6. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with water-insoluble porphyrin in ionic liquid: direct electrochemistry and highly sensitive amperometric biosensing for trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2009-01-01

    A functional composite of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with hematin, a water-insoluble porphyrin, was first prepared in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]) ionic liquid. The novel composite in ionic liquid was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and showed a pair of direct redox peaks of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple. The composite-[BMIM][PF(6)]-modified glassy carbon electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in neutral media due to the synergic effect among SWNTs, [BMIM][PF(6)], and porphyrin, which led to a highly sensitive and stable amperometric biosensor for TCA with a linear range from 9.0x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-4) M. The detection limit was 3.8x10(-7) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The TCA biosensor had good analytical performance, such as rapid response, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy, and could be successfully used for the detection of residual TCA in polluted water. The functional composite in ionic liquid provides a facile way to not only obtain the direct electrochemistry of water-insoluble porphyrin, but also construct novel biosensors for monitoring analytes in real environmental samples. PMID:19058268

  7. The photochemical cycle of bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lozier, R. H.; Niederberger, W.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction cycle of bacteriorhodopsin in the purple membrane isolated from Halobacterium halobium has been studied by optical absorption spectroscopy using low-temperature and flash kinetic techniques. After absorption of light, bacteriorhodopsin passes through at least five distinct intermediates. The temperature and pH dependence of the absorbance changes suggests that branch points and/or reversible steps exist in this cycle. Flash spectroscopy in the presence of a pH-indicating dye shows that the transient release of a proton accompanies the photoreaction cycle. The proton release occurs from the exterior and the uptake is on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane, as required by the function of bacteriorhodopsin as a light-driven proton pump. Proton translocating steps connecting release and uptake are indicated by deuterium isotope effects on the kinetics of the cycle. The rapid decay of a light-induced linear dichroism shows that a chromophore orientation change occurs during the reaction cycle.

  8. Comamonas testosteroni uses a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates to trigger chemotactic responses towards aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bin; Huang, Zhou; Fan, Zheng; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds has been frequently observed; however, knowledge of how bacteria sense aromatic compounds is limited. Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 is able to grow on a range of aromatic compounds. This study investigated the chemotactic responses of CNB-1 to 10 aromatic compounds. We constructed a chemoreceptor-free, non-chemotactic mutant, CNB-1Δ20, by disruption of all 19 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) and the atypical chemoreceptor in strain CNB-1. Individual complementation revealed that a putative MCP (tagged MCP2201) was involved in triggering chemotaxis towards all 10 aromatic compounds. The recombinant sensory domain of MCP2201 did not bind to 3- or 4-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate, catechol, benzoate, vanillate and gentisate, but bound oxaloacetate, citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate and malate. The mutant CNB-1ΔpmdF that lost the ability to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate and protocatechuate also lost its chemotactic response to these compounds, suggesting that taxis towards aromatic compounds is metabolism-dependent. Based on the ligand profile, we proposed that MCP2201 triggers taxis towards aromatic compounds by sensing TCA cycle intermediates. Our hypothesis was further supported by the finding that introduction of the previously characterized pseudomonad chemoreceptor (McpS) for TCA cycle intermediates into CNB-1Δ20 likewise triggered chemotaxis towards aromatic compounds. PMID:24102855

  9. ANTI-SILENCING FUNCTION1 Proteins Are Involved in Ultraviolet-Induced DNA Damage Repair and Are Cell Cycle Regulated by E2F Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lario, Luciana D.; Ramirez-Parra, Elena; Gutierrez, Crisanto; Spampinato, Claudia P.; Casati, Paula

    2013-01-01

    ANTI-SILENCING FUNCTION1 (ASF1) is a key histone H3/H4 chaperone that participates in a variety of DNA- and chromatin-related processes, including DNA repair, where chromatin assembly and disassembly are of primary relevance. Information concerning the role of ASF1 proteins in the post-ultraviolet (UV) response in higher plants is currently limited. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), an initial analysis of in vivo localization of ASF1A and ASF1B indicates that both proteins are mainly expressed in proliferative tissues. In silico promoter analysis identified ASF1A and ASF1B as potential targets of Elongation Factor2 (E2F) transcription factors. These observations were experimentally validated, both in vitro, by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and in vivo, by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays and expression analysis using transgenic plants with altered levels of different E2F transcription factors. These data suggest that ASF1A and ASF1B are regulated during cell cycle progression through E2F transcription factors. In addition, we found that ASF1A and ASF1B are associated with the UV-B-induced DNA damage response in Arabidopsis. Transcript levels of ASF1A and ASF1B were increased following UV-B treatment. Consistent with a potential role in UV-B response, RNA interference-silenced plants of both genes showed increased sensitivity to UV-B compared with wild-type plants. Finally, by coimmunoprecipitation analysis, we found that ASF1 physically interacts with amino-terminal acetylated histones H3 and H4 and with acetyltransferases of the Histone Acetyl Transferase subfamily, which are known to be involved in cell cycle control and DNA repair, among other functions. Together, we provide evidence that ASF1A and ASF1B are regulated by cell cycle progression and are involved in DNA repair after UV-B irradiation. PMID:23596192

  10. INCUBATION TEMPERATURE AND EGGSHELL CONDUCTANCE EFFECTS ON THE INTESTINAL MATURATION AND THYROID FUNCTION IN COMMERCIAL TURKEY POULTS HATCHING FROM THE FIRST CYCLE FLOCK

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggshell conductance (G) and egg white (EW) affect poult viability. Poor livability may be related intestinal maturation and thyroid function of the neonate. The objectives of this study were to test if incubator temperature and G determine poult maturity among egg from a young turkey flock. Matu...

  11. Forced cell cycle exit and modulation of GABAA, CREB, and GSK3β signaling promote functional maturation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.

    PubMed

    Telezhkin, Vsevolod; Schnell, Christian; Yarova, Polina; Yung, Sun; Cope, Emma; Hughes, Alis; Thompson, Belinda A; Sanders, Philip; Geater, Charlene; Hancock, Jane M; Joy, Shona; Badder, Luned; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Comella, Andrea; Straccia, Marco; Bombau, Georgina; Brown, Jon T; Canals, Josep M; Randall, Andrew D; Allen, Nicholas D; Kemp, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    Although numerous protocols have been developed for differentiation of neurons from a variety of pluripotent stem cells, most have concentrated on being able to specify effectively appropriate neuronal subtypes and few have been designed to enhance or accelerate functional maturity. Of those that have, most employ time courses of functional maturation that are rather protracted, and none have fully characterized all aspects of neuronal function, from spontaneous action potential generation through to postsynaptic receptor maturation. Here, we describe a simple protocol that employs the sequential addition of just two supplemented media that have been formulated to separate the two key phases of neural differentiation, the neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, each characterized by different signaling requirements. Employing these media, this new protocol synchronized neurogenesis and enhanced the rate of maturation of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors. Neurons differentiated using this protocol exhibited large cell capacitance with relatively hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials; moreover, they exhibited augmented:1) spontaneous electrical activity;2) regenerative induced action potential train activity;3) Na(+)current availability, and4) synaptic currents. This was accomplished by rapid and uniform development of a mature, inhibitory GABAAreceptor phenotype that was demonstrated by Ca(2+)imaging and the ability of GABAAreceptor blockers to evoke seizurogenic network activity in multielectrode array recordings. Furthermore, since this protocol can exploit expanded and frozen prepatterned neural progenitors to deliver mature neurons within 21 days, it is both scalable and transferable to high-throughput platforms for the use in functional screens. PMID:26718628

  12. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes in iron-rich microbial mats at an active hydrothermal vent system (Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i).

    PubMed

    Jesser, Kelsey J; Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W; Moyer, Craig L

    2015-05-01

    The chemolithotrophic Zetaproteobacteria represent a novel class of Proteobacteria which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and are the dominant bacterial population in iron-rich microbial mats. Zetaproteobacteria were first discovered at Lō'ihi Seamount, located 35 km southeast off the big island of Hawai'i, which is characterized by low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal venting. Novel nondegenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genes associated with microbial nitrogen fixation, denitrification, arsenic detoxification, Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB), and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles were developed using selected microbial mat community-derived metagenomes. Nitrogen fixation genes were not detected, but all other functional genes were present. This suggests that arsenic detoxification and denitrification processes are likely cooccurring in addition to two modes of carbon fixation. Two groups of microbial mat community types were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and were further described based on qPCR data for zetaproteobacterial abundance and carbon fixation mode preference. qPCR variance was associated with mat morphology but not with temperature or sample site. Geochemistry data were significantly associated with sample site and mat morphology. Together, these qPCR assays constitute a functional gene signature for iron microbial mat communities across a broad array of temperatures, mat types, chemistries, and sampling sites at Lō'ihi Seamount. PMID:25681182

  13. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Functional Genes in Iron-Rich Microbial Mats at an Active Hydrothermal Vent System (Lō'ihi Seamount, Hawai'i)

    PubMed Central

    Jesser, Kelsey J.; Fullerton, Heather; Hager, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    The chemolithotrophic Zetaproteobacteria represent a novel class of Proteobacteria which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and are the dominant bacterial population in iron-rich microbial mats. Zetaproteobacteria were first discovered at Lō'ihi Seamount, located 35 km southeast off the big island of Hawai'i, which is characterized by low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal venting. Novel nondegenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for genes associated with microbial nitrogen fixation, denitrification, arsenic detoxification, Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB), and reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycles were developed using selected microbial mat community-derived metagenomes. Nitrogen fixation genes were not detected, but all other functional genes were present. This suggests that arsenic detoxification and denitrification processes are likely cooccurring in addition to two modes of carbon fixation. Two groups of microbial mat community types were identified by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and were further described based on qPCR data for zetaproteobacterial abundance and carbon fixation mode preference. qPCR variance was associated with mat morphology but not with temperature or sample site. Geochemistry data were significantly associated with sample site and mat morphology. Together, these qPCR assays constitute a functional gene signature for iron microbial mat communities across a broad array of temperatures, mat types, chemistries, and sampling sites at Lō'ihi Seamount. PMID:25681182

  14. Effects of Melatonin on Morphological and Functional Parameters of the Pineal Gland and Organs of Immune System in Rats During Natural Light Cycle and Constant Illumination.

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, G I; Shurlygina, A V; Gritsyk, O B; Mel'nikova, E V; Tenditnik, M V; Avrorov, P A; Trufakin, V A

    2015-10-01

    We studied the response of the pineal gland and organs of the immune system to melatonin treatment in Wistar rats kept under conditions of abnormal illumination regimen. The animals were kept under natural light regimen or continuous illumination for 14 days and then received daily injections of melatonin (once a day in the evening) for 7 days. Administration of melatonin to rats kept at natural light cycle was followed by a decrease in percent ratio of CD4+8+ splenocytes and CD4-8+ thymocytes. In 24-h light with the following melatonin injections were accompanied by an increase in percent rate and absolute amount of CD4+8+ cells in the spleen, and a decrease in percent rate of CD11b/c and CD4-8+ splenocytes. In the thymus amount of CD4-8+ cells increased, and absolute number of CD4+25+ cells reduced. Melatonin significantly decreased lipofuscin concentration in the pineal gland during continuous light. Direction and intensity of effects of melatonin on parameters of cell immunity and state of the pineal gland were different under normal and continuous light conditions. It should be taken into account during using of this hormone for correction of immune and endocrine impairments developing during change in light/dark rhythm. PMID:26515173

  15. Radiolabeled acetate as a tracer of myocardial tricarboxylic acid cycle flux

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, D.B.; Schwaiger, M.; Nguyen, A.; Phelps, M.E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1988-09-01

    The kinetics of (1-14C)acetate oxidation in isolated perfused rat hearts have been determined over a range of perfusion conditions. Effluent measurements demonstrated that 14CO2 cleared biexponentially over 50 minutes after bolus injection of (1-14C)acetate into normoxic hearts perfused with 5 mM glucose and 10 mU/ml insulin. The clearance half-time (t1/2) for the predominant initial clearance phase was 3.1 +/- 0.5 minutes (n = 4). MVO2 was varied over a fourfold range by hypoxia and phenylephrine stimulation (t1/2, 7.2 +/- 1.2 and 2.2 +/- 0.2 minutes, respectively) and in the presence of alternate substrates (lactate, 2 mM; DL-3-hydroxybutyrate, 20 mM; and palmitate, 0.1 mM), which did not modify either tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux or acetate kinetics. A good correlation (r = 0.93) was observed between k, the rate constant for the initial phase of 14CO2 clearance, and TCA cycle flux, estimated from oxygen consumption. In contrast to results with (1-14C)acetate, lactate (2 mM) increased t1/2 for 14CO2 clearance from a bolus injection of (1-14C)palmitate from 3.0 +/- 0.4 minutes (n = 3) at control to 4.3 +/- 0.2 minutes (n = 3, p less than 0.01). Addition of acetate in nontracer amounts (0.5 or 5 mM) caused significant underestimation of TCA cycle flux when estimated with (1-14C)acetate. 14CO2 clearance accounted for 88-98% of total effluent 14C between 10 and 20 minutes after (1-14C)acetate bolus injection; rate constants for clearance of 14CO2 and total 14C clearance were very similar during this period, and these two rate constants did not differ significantly from each other under any conditions tested.

  16. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus): Changes in baseline activity, reactivity, and fecal excretion of glucocorticoids across the diurnal cycle

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Breanna N.; Saltzman, Wendy; de Jong, Trynke R.; Milnes, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    The California mouse, Peromyscus californicus, is an increasingly popular animal model in behavioral, neural, and endocrine studies, but little is known about its baseline hypothalamicpituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity or HPA responses to stressors. We characterized plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations in P. californicus under baseline conditions across the diurnal cycle, in response to pharmacological manipulation of the HPA axis, and in response to a variety of stressors at different times of day. In addition, we explored the use of fecal samples to monitor adrenocortical activity non-invasively. California mice have very high baseline levels of circulating CORT that change markedly over 24 hours, but that do not differ between the sexes. This species may be somewhat glucocorticoid-resistant in comparison to other rodents as a relatively high dose of dexamethasone (5 mg/kg, s.c.) was required to suppress plasma CORT for 8 h post-injection. CORT responses to stressors and ACTH injection differed with time of day, as CORT concentrations were elevated more readily during the morning (inactive period) than in the evening (active period) when compared to time-matched control. Data from 3H-CORT injection studies show that the time course for excretion of fecal CORT, or glucocorticoid metabolites, differs with time of injection. Mice injected in the evening excreted the majority of fecal radioactivity 2–4 h post-injection whereas mice injected during the morning did so at 14–16 h post-injection. Unfortunately, the antibody we used does not adequately bind the most prevalent fecal glucocorticoid metabolites and therefore we could not validate its use for fecal assays. PMID:23026495

  17. Cyclin E-CDK2 protein phosphorylates plant homeodomain finger protein 8 (PHF8) and regulates its function in the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Huang, Yan; Wei, Qian; Tong, Xiaomei; Cai, Rong; Nalepa, Grzegorz; Ye, Xin

    2015-02-13

    Cyclin E-CDK2 is a key regulator in G1/S transition. Previously, we identified a number of CDK2-interacting proteins, including PHF8 (plant homeodomain finger protein 8). In this report, we confirmed that PHF8 is a novel cyclin E-CDK2 substrate. By taking the approach of mass spectrometry, we identified that PHF8 Ser-844 is phosphorylated by cyclin E-CDK2. Immunoblotting analysis indicated that WT PHF8 demethylates histone H3K9me2 more efficiently than the cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation-deficient PHF8-S844A mutant. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis showed that WT PHF8 promotes S phase progression more robustly than PHF8-S844A. Real-time PCR results demonstrated that PHF8 increases transcription of cyclin E, E2F3, and E2F7 to significantly higher levels compared with PHF8-S844A. Further analysis by ChIP assay indicated that PHF8 binds to the cyclin E promoter stronger than PHF8-S844A and reduces the H3K9me2 level at the cyclin E promoter more efficiently than PHF8-S844A. In addition, we found that cyclin E-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of PHF8 Ser-844 promotes PHF8-dependent rRNA transcription in luciferase reporter assays and real-time PCR. Taken together, these results indicate that cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylates PHF8 to stimulate its demethylase activity to promote rRNA transcription and cell cycle progression. PMID:25548279

  18. Carbon cycling and carbon metabolism by soil fungi in a boreal forest: impacts of wildfire and permafrost on functional genes, isotope signatures, and ectomycorrhizae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Harden, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon within boreal forest ecosystems is of great importance to the global carbon budget. Much is currently known about boreal soil carbon dynamics in relation to biophysical and landscape variables such as temperature, moisture, wildfire intensity, and stand age. We have less information regarding the controls on decomposition at the molecular scale, where interactions between microbial communities, their genetic `potential' for decomposition, functional genes, enzyme synthesis, and organic matter transformations occur. We have entered an age in which these connections can be made at the molecular scale, but what form do they take, and can they scale up to affect carbon dynamics at the level of the ecosystem? We examined these molecular scale processes in mature boreal forest soils and soils that had been impacted by wildfire near Delta Junction, Alaska. We also examined the interactive effect of permafrost presence, which reduces soil drainage, with wildfire. We focused on three themes: linking microbial communities and laccase functional genes to soil laccase enzyme activity and lignin decomposition, assessing substrate availability using the natural abundance δ13C isotope ratios of microbial biomass, and the influence of ectomycorrhizal mats on decomposition. Wildfire reduced fungal biomass, laccase functional gene abundance, laccase activity, and δ13C-lignin decomposition. Relationships between gene abundance and microbial activity were significant and logarithmic in form. Soil drainage, which is mediated by the presence of permafrost, had little effect on the abundance of fungi, functional genes, or potential process rates. Microbial biomass δ13C was always enriched relative to soil organic matter, and this difference was greater in control soils compared to wildfire-affected soils, indicating that ÄΔδ13C MB-SOIL may indicate the level of bioavailability of soil carbon for microbial metabolism. Ectomycorrhizal mats occurred only in control soils and increased fungal biomass, functional gene abundance, enzyme activities and process rates compared to non-mat soils. Taken together these results indicate that linkages can be made between the distribution of soil microbial communities, molecular scale information, and soil carbon dynamics.

  19. Classification of a frameshift/extended and a stop mutation in WT1 as gain-of-function mutations that activate cell cycle genes and promote Wilms tumour cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Maike; Schwindt, Heinrich; Brandt, Artur; Beier, Manfred; Görldt, Nicole; Romaniuk, Paul; Toska, Eneda; Roberts, Stefan; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The WT1 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor important for normal kidney development. WT1 is a suppressor for Wilms tumour development and an oncogene for diverse malignant tumours. We recently established cell lines from primary Wilms tumours with different WT1 mutations. To investigate the function of mutant WT1 proteins, we performed WT1 knockdown experiments in cell lines with a frameshift/extension (p.V432fsX87 = Wilms3) and a stop mutation (p.P362X = Wilms2) of WT1, followed by genome-wide gene expression analysis. We also expressed wild-type and mutant WT1 proteins in human mesenchymal stem cells and established gene expression profiles. A detailed analysis of gene expression data enabled us to classify the WT1 mutations as gain-of-function mutations. The mutant WT1Wilms2 and WT1Wilms3 proteins acquired an ability to modulate the expression of a highly significant number of genes from the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, and WT1 knockdown experiments showed that they are required for Wilms tumour cell proliferation. p53 negatively regulates the activity of a large number of these genes that are also part of a core proliferation cluster in diverse human cancers. Our data strongly suggest that mutant WT1 proteins facilitate expression of these cell cycle genes by antagonizing transcriptional repression mediated by p53. We show that mutant WT1 can physically interact with p53. Together the findings show for the first time that mutant WT1 proteins have a gain-of-function and act as oncogenes for Wilms tumour development by regulating Wilms tumour cell proliferation. PMID:24619359

  20. The Q-cycle reviewed: how well does a monomeric mechanism of the bc1 complex account for the function of a dimeric complex?

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, Antony R.; Holland, J. Todd; Victoria, Doreen; Kolling, Derrick R.J.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Gilbreth, Ryan; Lhee, Sangmoon; Kuras, Richard; Kuras, Mariana Guergova

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the Q-cycle mechanism of the bc1 complex is reviewed. The data strongly support a mechanism in which the Qo-site operates through a reaction in which the first electron transfer from ubiquinol to the oxidized iron-sulfur protein is the rate determining step for the overall process. The reaction involves a proton-coupled electron transfer down a hydrogen bond between the ubiquinol and a histidine ligand of the [2Fe-2S] cluster, in which the unfavorable protonic configuration contributes a substantial part of the activation barrier. The reaction is endergonic, and the products are an unstable ubisemiquinone at the Qo-site, and the reduced iron-sulfur protein, the extrinsic mobile domain of which is now free to dissociate and move away from the site to deliver an electron to cyt c1 and liberate the H+. When oxidation of the semiquinone is prevented, it participates in bypass reactions, including superoxide generation if O2 is available. When the b-heme chain is available as acceptor, the semiquinone is oxidized in a process in which the proton is passed to the glutamate of the conserved –PEWY- sequence, and the semiquinone anion passes its electron to heme bL to form the product ubiquinone. The rate is rapid compared to the limiting reaction, and would require movement of the semiquinone closer to heme bL to enhance the rate constant. The acceptor reactions at the Qi-site are still controversial, but likely involve a “two-electron gate” in which a stable semiquinone stores an electron. Possible mechanisms to explain the cytb150 phenomenon are discussed, and the information from pulsed EPR studies about the structure of the intermediate state is reviewed. The mechanism discussed is applicable to a monomeric bc1 complex. We discuss evidence in the literature that has been interpreted as shown that the dimeric structure participates in a more complicated mechanism involving electron transfer across the dimer interface. We show from myxothiazol titrations and mutational analysis of Tyr-199, which is at the interface between monomers, that no such inter-monomer electron transfer is detected at the level of the bL hemes. We show from analysis of strains with mutations at Asn-221 that there are coulombic interactions between the b-hemes in a monomer. The data can also be interpreted as showing similar coulombic interaction across the dimer interface, and we discuss mechanistic implications. PMID:18501698

  1. Comparing the Antibacterial and Functional Properties of Cameroonian and Manuka Honeys for Potential Wound Healing-Have We Come Full Cycle in Dealing with Antibiotic Resistance?

    PubMed

    Boateng, Joshua; Diunase, Keshu Nso

    2015-01-01

    The increased incidence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has generated renewed interest in "traditional" antimicrobials, such as honey. This paper reports on a study comparing physico-chemical, antioxidant and antibacterial characteristics (that potentially contribute in part, to the functional wound healing activity) of Cameroonian honeys with those of Manuka honey. Agar well diffusion was used to generate zones of inhibition against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus while broth dilutions were used to study the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Non-peroxide activity was investigated by catalase for hydrogen peroxide reduction. The Cameroonian honeys demonstrated functional properties similar to Manuka honey, with strong correlations between the antioxidant activity and total phenol content of each honey. They were also as effective as Manuka honey in reducing bacteria load with an MIC of 10% w/v against all three bacteria and exhibited non-peroxide antimicrobial activity. These Cameroon honeys have potential therapeutic activity and may contain compounds with activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Antibacterial agents from such natural sources present a potential affordable treatment of wound infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are a leading cause of amputations and deaths in many African countries. PMID:26364634

  2. Algae displaying the diadinoxanthin cycle also possess the violaxanthin cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Martin; Wilhelm, Christian

    1999-01-01

    According to general agreement, all photosynthetic organisms using xanthophyll cycling for photoprotection contain either the violaxanthin (Vx) cycle or the diadinoxanthin (Ddx) cycle instead. Here, we report the temporal accumulation of substantial amounts of pigments of the Vx cycle under prolonged high-light stress in several microalgae thought to possess only the Ddx cycle. In the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, used as a model organism, these pigments also participate in xanthophyll cycling, and their accumulation depends on de novo synthesis of carotenoids and on deepoxidase activity. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest a biosynthetic sequence from Vx via Ddx to fucoxanthin in P. tricornutum. This gives experimental support to the long-stated hypothesis that Vx is a common precursor of all carotenoids with an allenic or acetylenic group, including the main light-harvesting carotenoids in most chlorophyll a/c-containing algae. Thus, another important function for xanthophyll cycling may be to optimize the biosynthesis of light-harvesting xanthophylls under fluctuating light conditions. PMID:10411953

  3. Structural and functional characterization of a cell cycle associated HDAC1/2 complex reveals the structural basis for complex assembly and nucleosome targeting

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshimasa; Fairall, Louise; Muskett, Frederick W.; Milano, Charles P.; Watson, Peter J.; Arnaudo, Nadia; Saleh, Almutasem; Millard, Christopher J.; El-Mezgueldi, Mohammed; Martino, Fabrizio; Schwabe, John W.R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies have identified a novel histone deacetylase complex that is upregulated during mitosis and is associated with cyclin A. This complex is conserved from nematodes to man and contains histone deacetylases 1 and 2, the MIDEAS corepressor protein and a protein called DNTTIP1 whose function was hitherto poorly understood. Here, we report the structures of two domains from DNTTIP1. The amino-terminal region forms a tight dimerization domain with a novel structural fold that interacts with and mediates assembly of the HDAC1:MIDEAS complex. The carboxy-terminal domain of DNTTIP1 has a structure related to the SKI/SNO/DAC domain, despite lacking obvious sequence homology. We show that this domain in DNTTIP1 mediates interaction with both DNA and nucleosomes. Thus, DNTTIP1 acts as a dimeric chromatin binding module in the HDAC1:MIDEAS corepressor complex. PMID:25653165

  4. All-Trans-Retinoic Acid Enhances Mitochondrial Function in Models of Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Sasmita; Chapman, John D; Han, Chang Y; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel L M; Onken, Jennifer; Kent, Travis; Goodlett, David R; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-05-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. The liver is the main storage organ of vitamin A, but activation of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in mouse liver and in human liver cell lines has also been shown. AlthoughatRA treatment improves mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle in rodents, its role in modulating mitochondrial function in the liver is controversial, and little data are available regarding the human liver. The aim of this study was to determine whetheratRA regulates hepatic mitochondrial activity.atRA treatment increased the mRNA and protein expression of multiple components of mitochondrialβ-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and respiratory chain. Additionally,atRA increased mitochondrial biogenesis in human hepatocytes and in HepG2 cells with and without lipid loading based on peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1αand 1βand nuclear respiratory factor 1 mRNA and mitochondrial DNA quantification.atRA also increasedβ-oxidation and ATP production in HepG2 cells and in human hepatocytes. Knockdown studies of RARα, RARβ, and PPARδrevealed that the enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis andβ-oxidation byatRA requires peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta. In vivo in mice,atRA treatment increased mitochondrial biogenesis markers after an overnight fast. Inhibition ofatRA metabolism by talarozole, a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 26 specific inhibitor, increased the effects ofatRA on mitochondrial biogenesis markers in HepG2 cells and in vivo in mice. These studies show thatatRA regulates mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism and that increasingatRA concentrations in human liver via CYP26 inhibition may increase mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acidβ-oxidation and provide therapeutic benefit in diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26921399

  5. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Lia R.; Sharma, Lokendra; Wang, Huabo; Kang, Audry; d’Souza, Sonia; Lu, Jie; McLaughlin, Michael; Dolezal, James M.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T.; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos) although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT) and ampk-/- (KO) murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER) fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS)-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions. PMID:26230505

  6. A Synthesis of Solar Cycle Prediction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Wilson, Robert M.; Reichmann, Edwin J.

    1999-01-01

    A number of techniques currently in use for predicting solar activity on a solar cycle timescale are tested with historical data. Some techniques, e.g., regression and curve fitting, work well as solar activity approaches maximum and provide a month-by-month description of future activity, while others, e.g., geomagnetic precursors, work well near solar minimum but only provide an estimate of the amplitude of the cycle. A synthesis of different techniques is shown to provide a more accurate and useful forecast of solar cycle activity levels. A combination of two uncorrelated geomagnetic precursor techniques provides a more accurate prediction for the amplitude of a solar activity cycle at a time well before activity minimum. This combined precursor method gives a smoothed sunspot number maximum of 154 plus or minus 21 at the 95% level of confidence for the next cycle maximum. A mathematical function dependent on the time of cycle initiation and the cycle amplitude is used to describe the level of solar activity month by month for the next cycle. As the time of cycle maximum approaches a better estimate of the cycle activity is obtained by including the fit between previous activity levels and this function. This Combined Solar Cycle Activity Forecast gives, as of January 1999, a smoothed sunspot maximum of 146 plus or minus 20 at the 95% level of confidence for the next cycle maximum.

  7. Novel Tools to Analyze the Function of Salmonella Effectors Show That SvpB Ectopic Expression Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    In order to further characterize its role in pathogenesis and to establish whether its overproduction can lead to eukaryotic tumor cell death, Salmonella strains able to express its virulence factor SpvB (an ADP-ribosyl transferase enzyme) in a salicylate-inducible way have been constructed and analyzed in different eukaryotic tumor cell lines. To do so, the bacterial strains bearing the expression system have been constructed in a ∆purD background, which allows control of bacterial proliferation inside the eukaryotic cell. In the absence of bacterial proliferation, salicylate-induced SpvB production resulted in activation of caspases 3 and 7 and apoptotic cell death. The results clearly indicated that controlled SpvB production leads to F-actin depolimerization and either G1/S or G2/M phase arrest in all cell lines tested, thus shedding light on the function of SpvB in Salmonella pathogenesis. In the first place, the combined control of protein production by salicylate regulated vectors and bacterial growth by adenine concentration offers the possibility to study the role of Salmonella effectors during eukaryotic cells infection. In the second place, the salicylate-controlled expression of SpvB by the bacterium provides a way to evaluate the potential of other homologous or heterologous proteins as antitumor agents, and, eventually to construct novel potential tools for cancer therapy, given that Salmonella preferentially proliferates in tumors. PMID:24205236

  8. Inferring deep biosphere function and diversity through (near) surface biosphere portals (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Cardace, D.; Woycheese, K. M.; Swingley, W.; Schubotz, F.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    The consideration of surface expressions of the deep subsurface- such as springs- remains one of the most economically viable means to query the deep biosphere's diversity and function. Hot spring source pools are ideal portals for accessing and inferring the taxonomic and functional diversity of related deep subsurface microbial communities. Consideration of the geochemical composition of deep vs. surface fluids provides context for interpretation of community function. Further, parallel assessment of 16S rRNA data, metagenomic sequencing, and isotopic compositions of biomass in surface springs allows inference of the functional capacities of subsurface ecosystems. Springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), the Philippines, and Turkey are considered here, incorporating near-surface, transition, and surface ecosystems to identify 'legacy' taxa and functions of the deep biosphere. We find that source pools often support functional capacity suited to subsurface ecosystems. For example, in hot ecosystems, source pools are strictly chemosynthetic, and surface environments with measureable dissolved oxygen may contain evidence of community functions more favorable under anaerobic conditions. Metagenomic reads from a YNP ecosystem indicate the genetic capacity for sulfate reduction at high temperature. However, inorganic sulfate reduction is only minimally energy-yielding in these surface environments suggesting the potential that sulfate reduction is a 'legacy' function of deeper biosphere ecosystems. Carbon fixation tactics shift with increased surface exposure of the thermal fluids. Genes related to the rTCA cycle and the acetyl co-A pathway are most prevalent in highest temperature, anaerobic sites. At lower temperature sites, fewer total carbon fixation genes were observed, perhaps indicating an increase in heterotrophic metabolism with increased surface exposure. In hydrogen and methane rich springs in the Philippines and Turkey, methanogenic taxa dominate source spring archaeal communities, however methanogenesis is predicted to not be a viable metabolic function. Bacterial communities dominated by heterotrophic taxa suggest that the inorganic carbon-poor deeper subsurface fluids do not support autotrophic metabolic functions. Transitions in community functional and taxonomic diversity as a result of transitions in environment, for example as a result of fluid cooling/mixing or in response to climate-related stimulus, drive community plasticity and redundancy. Together, these surface-related datasets allow informed reconstruction of biogeochemical processes and microbial community diversity relevant to deep subsurface communities, and along with other recent work broaden our view of community function in deep subsurface hydrothermal ecosystems and the transition to surface environments.

  9. Genetic Evidence for Bacterial Chemolithoautotrophy Based on the Reductive Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Groundwater Systems

    PubMed Central

    Alfreider, Albin; Vogt, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Geologically and chemically distinct aquifers were screened for the presence of two genes coding for key enzymes of the reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle in autotrophic bacteria, 2-oxoglutarate : ferredoxin oxidoreductase (oorA) and the beta subunit of ATP citrate lyase enzymes (aclB). From 42 samples investigated, aclB genes were detected in two and oorA genes in six samples retrieved from polluted and sulfidic aquifers. aclB genes were represented by a single phylotype of almost identical sequences closely affiliated with chemolithoautotrophic Sulfurimonas species. In contrast, sequences analysis of oorA genes revealed diverse phylotypes mainly related to sequences from cultivation-independent studies. PMID:22791056

  10. Final Report - The Xanthophyll Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Yamamato

    2005-04-21

    The xanthophyll cycle is a ubiquitous activity in higher plants. A major function of the cycle is to protect the photosynthetic system from the potentially damaging effects of high light by dissipating excess energy that might otherwise damage the photosynthetic apparatus harmlessly as heat by a process termed non-photochemical quenching (NFQ). This research focused on investigating the dynamics of the relationship between PsbS, subunit PSII protein required for NPQ, and zeaxanthin by perturbing the natural relationship of these components by overexpression of PsbS, violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE), and PsbS-VDE in tobacco. The effects of these treatments showed that the relationship between NPQ and zeaxanthin formation is more complex than previously indicated from studies carried out under high light. It is postulated that the xanthophyll cycle functions as a type of signal-transduction system within the thylakoid membrane. Recent studies in model lipid systems demonstrated that zeaxanthin exerts feedback inhibition on violaxanthin de-epoxidase. This feedback inhibition is consistent with the lipid phase functioning as a modulating factor in the dynamics of the cycle's operation. While this research and those in other laboratories have defined both the biochemistry and molecular mechanism of the cycle's operation, especially for violaxanthin de-epoxidase, there is yet insufficient knowledge that explains the ubiquitous presence of the cycle in all higher plants and a related cycle in diatoms. Antisense VDE tobacco plants (work carried out under another grant) withstood the high-light environment in Hawaii over one generation. Thus, it is speculated that the protective system was essential for survival in earth's high-light earth environment over multiple generations. The proposed signal transduction protective system, however, may explain the ability of the protective system to modulate or adapt to a range of environments.

  11. Systems Approaches to Predict the Functions of Glycoside Hydrolases during the Life Cycle of Aspergillus niger Using Developmental Mutants ∆brlA and ∆flbA

    PubMed Central

    van Munster, Jolanda M.; Nitsche, Benjamin M.; Akeroyd, Michiel; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; van der Maarel, Marc J. E. C.; Ram, Arthur F. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger encounters carbon starvation in nature as well as during industrial fermentations. In response, regulatory networks initiate and control autolysis and sporulation. Carbohydrate-active enzymes play an important role in these processes, for example by modifying cell walls during spore cell wall biogenesis or in cell wall degradation connected to autolysis. Results In this study, we used developmental mutants (ΔflbA and ΔbrlA) which are characterized by an aconidial phenotype when grown on a plate, but also in bioreactor-controlled submerged cultivations during carbon starvation. By comparing the transcriptomes, proteomes, enzyme activities and the fungal cell wall compositions of a wild type A. niger strain and these developmental mutants during carbon starvation, a global overview of the function of carbohydrate-active enzymes is provided. Seven genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes, including cfcA, were expressed during starvation in all strains; they may encode enzymes involved in cell wall recycling. Genes expressed in the wild-type during starvation, but not in the developmental mutants are likely involved in conidiogenesis. Eighteen of such genes were identified, including characterized sporulation-specific chitinases and An15g02350, member of the recently identified carbohydrate-active enzyme family AA11. Eight of the eighteen genes were also expressed, independent of FlbA or BrlA, in vegetative mycelium, indicating that they also have a role during vegetative growth. The ΔflbA strain had a reduced specific growth rate, an increased chitin content of the cell wall and specific expression of genes that are induced in response to cell wall stress, indicating that integrity of the cell wall of strain ΔflbA is reduced. Conclusion The combination of the developmental mutants ΔflbA and ΔbrlA resulted in the identification of enzymes involved in cell wall recycling and sporulation-specific cell wall modification, which contributes to understanding cell wall remodeling mechanisms during development. PMID:25629352

  12. Seasonal Nitrogen Cycles on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. J.; Paige, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    A thermal model, developed to predict seasonal nitrogen cycles on Triton, has been modified and applied to Pluto. The model is used to calculate the partitioning of nitrogen between surface frost deposits and the atmosphere, as a function of time for various sets of input parameters.

  13. Inhibition of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex alters mitochondrial function and cellular calcium regulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsueh-Meei; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Hui; Gibson, Gary E

    2003-01-20

    Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases. The alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) catalyzes a key and arguably rate-limiting step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA). A reduction in the activity of the KGDHC occurs in brains and cells of patients with many of these disorders and may underlie the abnormal mitochondrial function. Abnormalities in calcium homeostasis also occur in fibroblasts from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in cells bearing mutations that lead to AD. Thus, the present studies test whether the reduction of KGDHC activity can lead to the alterations in mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis. alpha-Keto-beta-methyl-n-valeric acid (KMV) inhibits KGDHC activity in living N2a cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, concentration of KMV that inhibit in situ KGDHC by 80% does not alter the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). However, similar concentrations of KMV induce the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, reduce basal [Ca(2+)](i) by 23% (P<0.005), and diminish the bradykinin (BK)-induced calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by 46% (P<0.005). This result suggests that diminished KGDHC activities do not lead to the Ca(2+) abnormalities in fibroblasts from AD patients or cells bearing PS-1 mutations. The increased release of cytochrome c with diminished KGDHC activities will be expected to activate other pathways including cell death cascades. Reductions in this key mitochondrial enzyme will likely make the cells more vulnerable to metabolic insults that promote cell death. PMID:12527416

  14. Annual Cycle of Surface Longwave Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Pamela E.; Smith, G. Louis; Wilber, Anne C.; Stackhouse, Paul W.

    2011-01-01

    The annual cycles of upward and downward longwave fluxes at the Earth s surface are investigated by use of the NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget Data Set. Because of the immense difference between the heat capacity of land and ocean, the surface of Earth is partitioned into these two categories. Principal component analysis is used to quantify the annual cycles. Over land, the first principal component describes over 95% of the variance of the annual cycle of the upward and downward longwave fluxes. Over ocean the first term describes more than 87% of these annual cycles. Empirical orthogonal functions show the corresponding geographical distributions of these cycles. Phase plane diagrams of the annual cycles of upward longwave fluxes as a function of net shortwave flux show the thermal inertia of land and ocean.

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 may be expressed as multiple proteins and have functions that are independent of binding to CCND and RB and occur at the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuan; Lou, Xiaomin; Yang, Min; Yuan, Chengfu; Ma, Ling; Xie, Bing-Kun; Wu, Jian-min; Yang, Wei; Shen, Steven XJ; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) is known to be a 33 kD protein that drives G1 phase progression of the cell cycle by binding to a CCND protein to phosphorylate RB proteins. Using different CDK4 antibodies in western blot, we detected 2 groups of proteins around 40 and 33 kD, respectively, in human and mouse cells; each group often appeared as a duplet or triplet of bands. Some CDK4 shRNAs could decrease the 33 kD wild-type (wt) CDK4 but increase some 40 kD proteins, whereas some other shRNAs had the opposite effects. Liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the existence of CDK4 isoforms smaller than 33 kD but failed to identify CDK4 at 40 kD. We cloned one CDK4 mRNA variant that lacks exon 2 and encodes a 26 kD protein without the first 74 amino acids of the wt CDK4, thus lacking the ATP binding sequence and the PISTVRE domain required for binding to CCND. Co-IP assay confirmed that this ΔE2 protein lost CCND1- and RB1-binding ability. Moreover, we found, surprisingly, that the wt CDK4 and the ΔE2 could inhibit G1–S progression, accelerate S–G2/M progression, and enhance or delay apoptosis in a cell line-specific manner in a situation where the cells were treated with a CDK4 inhibitor or the cells were serum-starved and then replenished. Hence, CDK4 seems to be expressed as multiple proteins that react differently to different CDK4 antibodies, respond differently to different shRNAs, and, in some situations, have previously unrecognized functions at the S–G2/M phases of the cell cycle via mechanisms independent of binding to CCND and RB. PMID:24091631

  16. Urinary Loss of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates As Revealed by Metabolomics Studies: An Underlying Mechanism to Reduce Lipid Accretion by Whey Protein Ingestion?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Whey protein intake is associated with the modulation of energy metabolism and altered body composition both in human subjects and in animals, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet elucidated. We fed obesity-prone C57BL/6J mice high-fat diets with either casein (HF casein) or whey (HF whey) for 6 weeks. At equal energy intake and apparent fat and nitrogen digestibility, mice fed HF whey stored less energy as lipids, evident both as lower white adipose tissue mass and as reduced liver lipids, compared with HF-casein-fed mice. Explorative analyses of 48 h urine, both by 1H NMR and LC–MS metabolomic platforms, demonstrated higher urinary excretion of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citric acid and succinic acid (identified by both platforms), and cis-aconitic acid and isocitric acid (identified by LC–MS platform) in the HF whey, relative to in the HF-casein-fed mice. Targeted LC–MS analyses revealed higher citric acid and cis-aconitic acid concentrations in fed state plasma, but not in liver of HF-whey-fed mice. We propose that enhanced urinary loss of TCA cycle metabolites drain available substrates for anabolic processes, such as lipogenesis, thereby leading to reduced lipid accretion in HF-whey-fed compared to HF-casein-fed mice. PMID:24702026

  17. The centriole duplication cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fırat-Karalar, Elif Nur; Stearns, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes are the main microtubule-organizing centre of animal cells and are important for many critical cellular and developmental processes from cell polarization to cell division. At the core of the centrosome are centrioles, which recruit pericentriolar material to form the centrosome and act as basal bodies to nucleate formation of cilia and flagella. Defects in centriole structure, function and number are associated with a variety of human diseases, including cancer, brain diseases and ciliopathies. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how new centrioles are assembled and how centriole number is controlled. We propose a general model for centriole duplication control in which cooperative binding of duplication factors defines a centriole ‘origin of duplication’ that initiates duplication, and passage through mitosis effects changes that license the centriole for a new round of duplication in the next cell cycle. We also focus on variations on the general theme in which many centrioles are created in a single cell cycle, including the specialized structures associated with these variations, the deuterosome in animal cells and the blepharoplast in lower plant cells. PMID:25047614

  18. Marine biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and carbon cycles

    PubMed Central

    Beaugrand, Grégory; Edwards, Martin; Legendre, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Although recent studies suggest that climate change may substantially accelerate the rate of species loss in the biosphere, only a few studies have focused on the potential consequences of a spatial reorganization of biodiversity with global warming. Here, we show a pronounced latitudinal increase in phytoplanktonic and zooplanktonic biodiversity in the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean in recent decades. We also show that this rise in biodiversity paralleled a decrease in the mean size of zooplanktonic copepods and that the reorganization of the planktonic ecosystem toward dominance by smaller organisms may influence the networks in which carbon flows, with negative effects on the downward biological carbon pump and demersal Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Our study suggests that, contrary to the usual interpretation of increasing biodiversity being a positive emergent property promoting the stability/resilience of ecosystems, the parallel decrease in sizes of planktonic organisms could be viewed in the North Atlantic as reducing some of the services provided by marine ecosystems to humans. PMID:20479247

  19. Solar Cycle 25: Another Moderate Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Jiang, J.; Schüssler, M.

    2016-06-01

    Surface flux transport simulations for the descending phase of Cycle 24 using random sources (emerging bipolar magnetic regions) with empirically determined scatter of their properties provide a prediction of the axial dipole moment during the upcoming activity minimum together with a realistic uncertainty range. The expectation value for the dipole moment around 2020 (2.5 ± 1.1 G) is comparable to that observed at the end of Cycle 23 (about 2 G). The empirical correlation between the dipole moment during solar minimum and the strength of the subsequent cycle thus suggests that Cycle 25 will be of moderate amplitude, not much higher than that of the current cycle. However, the intrinsic uncertainty of such predictions resulting from the random scatter of the source properties is considerable and fundamentally limits the reliability with which such predictions can be made before activity minimum is reached.

  20. Functional laser speckle imaging of cerebral blood flow under hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minheng; Miao, Peng; Zhu, Yisheng; Tong, Shanbao

    2011-08-01

    Hypothermia can unintentionally occur in daily life, e.g., in cardiovascular surgery or applied as therapeutics in the neurosciences critical care unit. So far, the temperature-induced spatiotemporal responses of the neural function have not been fully understood. In this study, we investigated the functional change in cerebral blood flow (CBF), accompanied with neuronal activation, by laser speckle imaging (LSI) during hypothermia. Laser speckle images from Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8, male) were acquired under normothermia (37°C) and moderate hypothermia (32°C). For each animal, 10 trials of electrical hindpaw stimulation were delivered under both temperatures. Using registered laser speckle contrast analysis and temporal clustering analysis (TCA), we found a delayed response peak and a prolonged response window under hypothermia. Hypothermia also decreased the activation area and the amplitude of the peak CBF. The combination of LSI and TCA is a high-resolution functional imaging method to investigate the spatiotemporal neurovascular coupling in both normal and pathological brain functions.

  1. Cycling To Awareness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Stan

    1999-01-01

    Encourages environmental and outdoor educators to promote bicycling. In the community and the curriculum, cycling connects environmental issues, health and fitness, law and citizenship, appropriate technology, and the joy of being outdoors. Describes the Ontario Cycling Association's cycling strategy and its four components: school cycling…

  2. HIV Life Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Overview The HIV Life Cycle (Last updated 9/22/2015; last reviewed 9/22/2015) Key Points HIV gradually destroys the immune ... life cycle. What is the connection between the HIV life cycle and HIV medicines? Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ...

  3. Introduction to combined cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. J.

    Ideas and concepts underlying the technology of combined cycles including the scientific principles involved and the reasons these cycles are in fashion at the present time, are presented. A cycle is a steady flow process for conversion of heat energy into work, in which a working medium passes through a range of states, returning to its original state. Cycles for power production are the steam cycle, which is a closed cycle, and the gas turbine, which represents an open cycle. Combined cycle thermodynamic parameters, are discussed. The general arrangement of the plant is outlined and important features of their component parts described. The scope for future development is discussed. It is concluded that for the next few years the natural gas fired combined cycle will be the main type of plant installed for electricity generation and cogeneration. Whilst gas turbines may not increase substantially in unit size, there remains scope for further increase in firing temperature with consequent increase in cycle performance. However the larger global reserves of coal are providing an incentive to the development of plant for clean coal combustion using the inherent advantage of the combined cycle to attain high efficiencies.

  4. Effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā w.r. to lunar cycles

    PubMed Central

    Tavhare, Swagata Dilip; Nishteswar, Karra; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Suśruta, Caraka and other ācāryas advocate the collection of medicinal plants keeping in view the part used, season, soil in which the herb grows and the desired pharmacological actions or therapeutic benefits. The logic behind such recommendations is being validated by modern scientific research. Aim: To assess the effect of seasonal variations on the phytoconstituents of Aśvagandhā (Withania somnifera L. Dunal) w.s.r. to lunar cycles. Material and Methods: The plant specimens were collected from Jamnagar identified pharmacognostically and cultivated under a defined habitat in a herbal garden of IPGT and RA on 7 Oct 2013. The root samples were collected on every paurṇimā (full moon) and amāvāsyā (new moon) days in śiśira and grīṣṃa ṛtu (as per classics) of the year 2013-14. The physicochemical parameters such as pH, ash values, extractive value, total alkaloid content, total flavonoids content (UV spectrometer with AlCl3 reagent), total phenolic content (Singleton and Rossi method), total carbohydrate content (UV spectroscopy with glucose as standard), UV-VIS-NIR and HPTLC were determined. Result: The results of the analytical studies clearly validate the logic of the recommendations of Suśruta and Cakrapāṇi. According to these recommendations, uṣṇa vīrya drugs must be collected during āgneya ṛtu i.e. grīṣṃa ṛtu. In present study, total phenolic, flavonide and carbohydrate content were found more in pournima samples. GAP samples showed maximum differentiation from rest of the samples with regards to TCA, TCW, TFW, MEx, WEX, pH etc. parameters. The Grīṣṃa Jyeṣṭha Paurṇimā (GJP) and Āṣāḍha Paurṇimā (GAP) samples were found to be superior than amāvāsyā samples w.r.t. functional groups and withanoloid content respectively on HPTLC. Conclusion: The observations of experimental studies validate the concept of seasonal as well as lunar collection of herb Ashwagandha to yield a drug of superior quality of active principles. PMID:27143799

  5. Synaptic function.

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Janet

    2005-01-01

    C. elegans has emerged as a powerful genetic model organism in which to study synaptic function. Most synaptic proteins in the C. elegans genome are highly conserved and mutants can be readily generated by forward and reverse genetics. Most C. elegans synaptic protein mutants are viable affording an opportunity to study the functional consequences in vivo. Recent advances in electrophysiological approaches permit functional analysis of mutant synapses in situ. This has contributed to an already powerful arsenal of techniques available to study synaptic function in C. elegans. This review highlights C. elegans mutants affecting specific stages of the synaptic vesicle cycle, with emphasis on studies conducted at the neuromuscular junction. PMID:18050398

  6. Limit cycles and conformal invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-François; Grinstein, Benjamín; Stergiou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    There is a widely held belief that conformal field theories (CFTs) require zero beta functions. Nevertheless, the work of Jack and Osborn implies that the beta functions are not actually the quantites that decide conformality, but until recently no such behavior had been exhibited. Our recent work has led to the discovery of CFTs with nonzero beta functions, more precisely CFTs that live on recurrent trajectories, e.g., limit cycles, of the beta-function vector field. To demonstrate this we study the S function of Jack and Osborn. We use Weyl consistency conditions to show that it vanishes at fixed points and agrees with the generator Q of limit cycles on them. Moreover, we compute S to third order in perturbation theory, and explicitly verify that it agrees with our previous determinations of Q. A byproduct of our analysis is that, in perturbation theory, unitarity and scale invariance imply conformal invariance in four-dimensional quantum field theories. Finally, we study some properties of these new, "cyclic" CFTs, and point out that the a-theorem still governs the asymptotic behavior of renormalization-group flows.

  7. Nucleosome architecture throughout the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Deniz, Özgen; Flores, Oscar; Aldea, Martí; Soler-López, Montserrat; Orozco, Modesto

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes provide additional regulatory mechanisms to transcription and DNA replication by mediating the access of proteins to DNA. During the cell cycle chromatin undergoes several conformational changes, however the functional significance of these changes to cellular processes are largely unexplored. Here, we present the first comprehensive genome-wide study of nucleosome plasticity at single base-pair resolution along the cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We determined nucleosome organization with a specific focus on two regulatory regions: transcription start sites (TSSs) and replication origins (ORIs). During the cell cycle, nucleosomes around TSSs display rearrangements in a cyclic manner. In contrast to gap (G1 and G2) phases, nucleosomes have a fuzzier organization during S and M phases, Moreover, the choreography of nucleosome rearrangements correlate with changes in gene expression during the cell cycle, indicating a strong association between nucleosomes and cell cycle-dependent gene functionality. On the other hand, nucleosomes are more dynamic around ORIs along the cell cycle, albeit with tighter regulation in early firing origins, implying the functional role of nucleosomes on replication origins. Our study provides a dynamic picture of nucleosome organization throughout the cell cycle and highlights the subsequent impact on transcription and replication activity. PMID:26818620

  8. VISION - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; A. M. Yacout; J. J. Jacobson; C. Laws; G. E. Matthern; D. E. Shropshire

    2006-02-01

    The U.S. DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) fundamental objective is to provide technology options that - if implemented - would enable long-term growth of nuclear power while improving sustainability and energy security. The AFCI organization structure consists of four areas; Systems Analysis, Fuels, Separations and Transmutations. The Systems Analysis Working Group is tasked with bridging the program technical areas and providing the models, tools, and analyses required to assess the feasibility of design and deployment options and inform key decision makers. An integral part of the Systems Analysis tool set is the development of a system level model that can be used to examine the implications of the different mixes of reactors, implications of fuel reprocessing, impact of deployment technologies, as well as potential "exit" or "off ramp" approaches to phase out technologies, waste management issues and long-term repository needs. The Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) is a computer-based simulation model that allows performing dynamic simulations of fuel cycles to quantify infrastructure requirements and identify key trade-offs between alternatives. It is based on the current AFCI system analysis tool "DYMOND-US" functionalities in addition to economics, isotopic decay, and other new functionalities. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI and Generation IV reactor development studies.

  9. Low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, H. D. (Editor); Kaisand, L. R. (Editor); Halford, G. R. (Editor); Leis, B. N. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on various aspects of low cycle fatigue, including cyclic deformation, crack propagation, high-temperature low cycle fatigue, microstructural defects, multiaxial and variable amplitude loading, and life prediction. Papers are presented on the low cycle fatigue of some aluminum alloys, prediction of crack growth under creep-fatigue loading conditions, high-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior and lifetime prediction of a nickel-base ODS alloy, and an integrated approach to creep-fatigue life prediction. Other topics discussed include thermal fatigue testing of coated monocrystalline superalloys, low cycle fatigue of Al-Mg-Si alloys, and the effect of superimposed stresses at high frequency on low cycle fatigue.

  10. Cogwheel Phase Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.; Madhu, P. K.; Hughes, Colan E.

    2002-04-01

    A new method for constructing phase cycles is described. The new schemes apply to experiments involving several consecutive coherence transfer steps. The radiofrequency phases of two or more irradiation blocks are incremented simultaneously, as opposed to the traditional "nested" scheme, in which the block phases are incremented independently. In many cases, the "cogwheel" phase cycles achieve the same selectivity as traditional phase cycles, using fewer steps. Significant time savings are achievable in a wide range of NMR experiments.

  11. [Cycling in Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Matos, Stipan; Krapac, Ladislav; Krapac, Josip

    2007-01-01

    Cycling in Zagreb, as means of urban transport inside and outside the city, has a bright past, hazy presence but a promising future. Every day, aggressive citizens who lack urban traffic culture mistreat many cyclists but also many pedestrians. Sedentary way of living, unhealthy eating habits and inadequate recreation would surely be reduced if Zagreb had a network of cycling tracks (190 cm) or lanes (80 cm). Main city roads were constructed at the beginning of the 20th century. Today, the lack of cycling tracks is particularly evident in terms of missing connections between northern and southern parts of the city. Transportation of bikes in public vehicles, parking of bikes as well as cycling along the foot of the mountains Medvednica and Zumberacko gorje is not adequately organized. Better organization is necessary not only because of the present young generation but also because of the young who will shortly become citizens of the EU, where cycling is enormously popular. Cycling tourism is not known in Zagreb, partly due to inadequate roads. The surroundings of Zagreb are more suitable for cycling tourism and attractive brochures and tourist guides offer information to tourists on bikes. Professional, acrobatic and sports cycling do not have a tradition in Zagreb and in Croatia. The same holds true for recreational cycling and indoor exercise cycling. The authors discuss the impact of popularization of cycling using print and electronic media. The role of district and local self-government in the construction and improvement of traffic roads in Zagreb is very important. It is also significant for the implementation of legal regulations that must be obeyed by all traffic participants in order to protect cyclists, the most vulnerable group of traffic participants besides passengers. Multidisciplinary action of all benevolent experts would surely increase safety and pleasure of cycling in the city and its surroundings. This would also help reduce daily stress and improve the quality of living in the capital of Croatia. PMID:18949922

  12. Product development cycle time reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farran, Robin

    1992-05-01

    We are facing here today the key issues that face us in the competitive environment. North American companies are struggling to compete in the global marketplace. Gone are the days when presence ensured success. Then, sales and earnings were guaranteed. Today the competition is intense. Many manufacturing and service companies are no longer competitive. Traditionally, manufacturing companies have created the most wealth for the community and economy. Losing this ability to create wealth is tragic and unnecessary. A company can only be successful by focusing on customer satisfaction at competitive costs. Revenue growth and earnings growth require a continuous stream of products that anticipate the customers' needs, result from shorter and shorter innovation cycles, continually improve in quality, and are produced at improved costs on each cycle. The best opportunities for increased quality and decreased costs are with new products. Sure, work on quality and costs everyday. The biggest changes, however, will come through the new product development cycle. We must improve our development processes to provide leadership products which result in high levels of customer satisfaction. This is a prerequisite for business success. When presence in the marketplace was a virtual guarantee of success for a North American company, technology tended to drive the products, and the customers bought virtually everything that was produced. Functional excellence was stressed within companies ... and that was enough. Effective planning processes were not a prerequisite for success. Today success demands highly developed business research and planning processes, and functional excellence combined with organizational capabilities that ensure commercialization excellence.

  13. NiH2 Cycle Life Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollandsworth, Roger P.; Armantrout, Jon D.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.

    2002-01-01

    Cycle life studies have been performed at Eagle Picher Technologies (EPT), on HST Mantech design cells with various pedigrees of slurry and dry sinter processed electrodes, to evaluate peak load voltage performance during generic load profile testing. These tests provide information for determining voltage and capacity fade (degradation) mechanisms, and their impact on nickel hydrogen cell cycle life. Comparison of peak load voltage fade, as a function of State of Charge and cycle life, with capacity data from HST indicates that the cycle life limiting mechanism is due to impedance growth, and formation of a second discharge plateau. With a second plateau on discharge, capacity from the cell is still available, but at an unacceptable low voltage of 0.8 V per cell (17.6 V battery). Data shows that cell impedance increases with cycle number and depth of discharge, as expected.

  14. Cell cycle: proteomics gives it a spin.

    PubMed

    Archambault, Vincent

    2005-08-01

    The eukaryotic cell division cycle has been studied at the molecular level for over 30 years, most fruitfully in model organisms. In the past 5 years, developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have been applied to the study of protein interactions and post-translational modifications involving key cell cycle regulators such as cyclin-dependent kinases and the anaphase-promoting complex, as well as effectors such as centrosomes, the kinetochore and DNA replication forks. In addition, innovations in chemical biology, functional proteomics and bioinformatics have been employed to study the cell cycle at the proteome level. This review surveys the contributions of proteomics to cell cycle research. The near future should see the application of more quantitative proteomic approaches to probe the dynamic aspects of the molecular system that underlie the cell cycle in model organisms and in human cells. PMID:16097893

  15. Budding yeast protein extraction and purification for the study of function, interactions, and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Eva Paige; Kerscher, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Homogenization by bead beating is a fast and efficient way to release DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites from budding yeast cells, which are notoriously hard to disrupt. Here we describe the use of a bead mill homogenizer for the extraction of proteins into buffers optimized to maintain the functions, interactions and post-translational modifications of proteins. Logarithmically growing cells expressing the protein of interest are grown in a liquid growth media of choice. The growth media may be supplemented with reagents to induce protein expression from inducible promoters (e.g. galactose), synchronize cell cycle stage (e.g. nocodazole), or inhibit proteasome function (e.g. MG132). Cells are then pelleted and resuspended in a suitable buffer containing protease and/or phosphatase inhibitors and are either processed immediately or frozen in liquid nitrogen for later use. Homogenization is accomplished by six cycles of 20 sec bead-beating (5.5 m/sec), each followed by one minute incubation on ice. The resulting homogenate is cleared by centrifugation and small particulates can