Sample records for tce perchloroethylene pce

  1. PCE/TCE DEGRADATION USING MULCH BIOWALLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier (Biowall) was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contamin...

  2. Perchloroethylene (PCE) oxidation by percarbonate in Fe(2+)-catalyzed aqueous solution: PCE performance and its removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhouwei; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Zang, Xuke; Wu, Xiaoliang; Xu, Minhui; Ndong, Landry Biyoghe Bi; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian; Fu, George Yuzhu

    2015-01-01

    The performance of Fe(2+)-catalyzed sodium percarbonate (SPC) stimulating the oxidation of perchloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater remediation was investigated. The experimental results showed that PCE could be completely oxidized in 5 min at 20 °C with a Fe(2+)/SPC/PCE molar ratio of 8/8/1, indicating the effectiveness of Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation for PCE degradation. Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation was suitable for the nearly neutral pH condition, which was superior to the conventional Fenton oxidation in acidic condition. In addition, the investigations by using hydroxyl radical scavengers and free radical probe compounds elucidated that PCE was degraded mainly by hydroxyl radical (HO) oxidation in Fe(2+)/SPC system. In conclusion, Fe(2+)-catalyzed SPC oxidation is a highly promising technique for PCE-contaminated groundwater remediation, but more complex constituents in groundwater should be carefully considered for its practical application. PMID:25460751

  3. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF PCE AND TCE WITHOUT VINYL CHLORIDE AND ETHENE ACCUMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A shallow aquifer at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) was contaminated with tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). Cisdichloroethylene (cis-DCE) is found in ground water at the site, indicating that reductive dehalogenation of PCE and TCE is occurrin...

  4. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR TREATING GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATED WITH TCE (TRICHLOROETHYLENE) AND PCE (TETRACHLOROETHYLENE): LABORATORY STUDIES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with various dosages of ozone or ozone plus hydrogen peroxide was studied in laboratory experiments. The results show that hydrogen peroxide accelerates the oxidation of TCE and PCE by ozone. At peroxide-to-ozone ...

  5. Air purification from TCE and PCE contamination in a hybrid bioreactors and biofilter integrated system.

    PubMed

    Tabernacka, Agnieszka; Zborowska, Ewa; Lebkowska, Maria; Borawski, Maciej

    2014-01-15

    A two-stage waste air treatment system, consisting of hybrid bioreactors (modified bioscrubbers) and a biofilter, was used to treat waste air containing chlorinated ethenes - trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The bioreactor was operated with loadings in the range 0.46-5.50gm(-3)h(-1) for TCE and 2.16-9.02gm(-3)h(-1) for PCE. The biofilter loadings were in the range 0.1-0.97gm(-3)h(-1) for TCE and 0.2-2.12gm(-3)h(-1) for PCE. Under low pollutant loadings, the efficiency of TCE elimination was 23-25% in the bioreactor and 54-70% in the biofilter. The efficiency of PCE elimination was 44-60% in the bioreactor and 50-75% in the biofilter. The best results for the bioreactor were observed one week after the pollutant loading was increased. However, the process did not stabilize. In the next seven days contaminant removal efficiency, enzymatic activity and biomass content were all diminished. PMID:24316808

  6. COMPLETE NATURAL ATTENUATION OF A PCE AND TCE PLUME AFTER SOURCE REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of the chlorinated solvents PCE and TCE at the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) resulted in the contamination of groundwater in a shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer. The resulting plume had moved over 1000 feet from the disposal source area and had impacted p...

  7. Transformation efficiency and formation of transformation products during photochemical degradation of TCE and PCE at micromolar concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene are the most common pollutants in groundwater and two of the priority pollutants listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In previous studies on TCE and PCE photolysis and photochemical degradation, concentration ranges exceeding environmental levels by far with millimolar concentrations of TCE and PCE have been used, and it is not clear if the obtained results can be used to explain the degradation of these contaminants at more realistic environmental concentration levels. Methods Experiments with micromolar concentrations of TCE and PCE in aqueous solution using direct photolysis and UV/H2O2 have been conducted and product formation as well as transformation efficiency have been investigated. SPME/GC/MS, HPLC/UV and ion chromatography with conductivity detection have been used to determine intermediates of degradation. Results The results showed that chloride was a major end product in both TCE and PCE photodegradation. Several intermediates such as formic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetaldehyede, chloroform, formaldehyde and glyoxylic acid were formed during both, UV and UV/H2O2 treatment of TCE. However chloroacetaldehyde and chloroacetic acid were only detected during direct UV photolysis of TCE and oxalic acid was only formed during the UV/H2O2 process. For PCE photodegradation, formic acid, di- and trichloroacetic acids were detected in both UV and UV/H2O2 systems, but formaldehyde and glyoxylic acid were only detected during direct UV photolysis. Conclusions For water treatment UV/H2O2 seems to be favorable over direct UV photolysis because of its higher degradation efficiency and lower risk for the formation of harmful intermediates. PMID:24401763

  8. Identification of TCE and PCE sorption and biodegradation parameters in a sandy aquifer for fate and transport modelling: batch and column studies.

    PubMed

    Kret, E; Kiecak, A; Malina, G; Nijenhuis, I; Postawa, A

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the sorption and biodegradation parameters of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) as input data required for their fate and transport modelling in a Quaternary sandy aquifer. Sorption was determined based on batch and column experiments, while biodegradation was investigated using the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). The aquifer materials medium (soil 1) to fine (soil 2) sands and groundwater samples came from the representative profile of the contaminated site (south-east Poland). The sorption isotherms were approximately linear (TCE, soil 1, K d?=?0.0016; PCE, soil 1, K d?=?0.0051; PCE, soil 2, K d?=?0.0069) except for one case in which the best fitting was for the Langmuir isotherm (TCE, soil 2, K f?=?0.6493 and S max?=?0.0145). The results indicate low retardation coefficients (R) of TCE and PCE; however, somewhat lower values were obtained in batch compared to column experiments. In the column experiments with the presence of both contaminants, TCE influenced sorption of PCE, so that the R values for both compounds were almost two times higher. Non-significant differences in isotope compositions of TCE and PCE measured in the observation points (?(13)C values within the range of -23.6?÷?-24.3?‰ and -26.3?÷-27.7?‰, respectively) indicate that biodegradation apparently is not an important process contributing to the natural attenuation of these contaminants in the studied sandy aquifer. PMID:25647491

  9. Transition Metal Catalyst Assisted Reductive Dechlorination of Perchloroethylene by Anaerobic Aquifer Enrichments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Schaller, Kastli Dianne; Apel, William Arnold; Watwood, Maribeth E.

    2000-04-01

    Bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, such as perchloroethylene (PCE) or carbon tetrachloride, can be accomplished by adding nutrients to stimulate a microbial community capable of reductive dechlorination. However, biotransformation of these solvents, especially PCE, typically occurs very slowly or not at all. Experiments were conducted to evaluate whether the addition of transition metal tetrapyrrole catalysts would increase the reductive transformation of PCE to trichloroethylene (TCE) by sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures. Batch assays were used to test vitamin B12 and two synthetic sulfonatophenyl porphine catalysts for the stimulation of reductive dechlorination of PCE by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) enriched from aquifer sediments from two locations at Dover Air Force Base. Cells from the enrichments were concentrated and added to batch assay vials. Vials containing SRB cells amended with vitamin B12 exhibited enhanced transformation of PCE to TCE compared with reactors amended with either synthetic catalysts or reactors containing cells alone. Methane production was observed in reactors that exhibited maximum levels of dechlorination. Storage of aquifer sediments between enrichments led to decreased levels of PCE dechlorination in subsequent assays.

  10. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Spring, Sarah E; Miles, A Keith; Anderson, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 microl/L of TCE and 0.07 microl/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals. PMID:15378993

  11. Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spring, S.E.; Miles, A.K.; Anderson, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 ??l/L of TCE and 0.07 ??l/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

  12. Optic Neuritis with Residual Tunnel Vision in Perchloroethylene Toxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Onofrj; Astrid Thomas; Cristina Paci; Giordano D’Andreamatteo; Lucia Toma; Domenico Rotilio

    1999-01-01

    Trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene (PCE) are the major constituents of commercially available solutions used in dry cleaning shops. We describe the appearance of severe bilateral optic neuritis (ON) with unexpectedly high levels of PCE metabolites in blood and chloroform in urine in a 57-year-old woman owner of a small dry cleaning shop where she worked for about 20 years using PCE.

  13. Effects of perchloroethylene soil pollution on soil enzyme activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aiqin Shan; Aikuan Wang; Jing Cai; Li Haihua; Honglin Tao

    2011-01-01

    Simulated experiments were conducted to study the eco-toxicology effects of perchloroethylene (PCE) pollutant on three main soil enzyme activities: protease, urease and catalase. The results showed that, increasing the initial PCE concentration resulted in higher inhibition effect on both protease and urease activities. The process was inhibited firstly and then recovered. PCE had a significant inhibition effect on soil protease

  14. Characterization of anaerobic perchloroethylene dehalogenation activity at various substrate and perchloroethylene concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.M.; Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Research was undertaken to characterize anaerobic perchloroethylene (PCE) dehalogenation activity of microorganisms at various substrate and PCE concentrations. The concentrations of substrate, chlorinated ethylenes, and metabolic products such as methane, acetate, propionate, butyrate, hydrogen, and formate were monitored. The apparent relationship between major metabolic activities and dehalogenation was determined.

  15. RESPONSE TO ISSUES AND DATA SUBMISSIONS ON THE CARCINOGENICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The scientific debate over the potential carcinogenicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, perc, PCE) spans several years. his document reviews the issues considered by the EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB) during its review of the Draft Addendum to the Health Assessmen...

  16. Industrial-hygiene report: perchloroethylene at Dubarry Cleaners, Detroit, Michigan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1980-01-01

    An on-site visit was made to Dubarry Cleaners, Detroit, Michigan, as part of an industry-wide mortality and industrial hygiene study of dry cleaning workers exposed to perchloroethylene (PCE). Air samples were taken at the facility and the time weighted average exposure to PCE was calculated to be 23 parts per million (ppm) with 5-minute peak exposures ranging from 33 to

  17. Sonochemical degradation of perchloroethylene: the influence of ultrasonic variables, and the identification of products.

    PubMed

    Sáez, V; Esclapez, M D; Bonete, P; Walton, D J; Rehorek, A; Louisnard, O; González-García, J

    2011-01-01

    Sonochemistry is a technique that offers promise for pollutant degradation, but earlier studies on various chlorinated substrates do not give a definitive view of the effectiveness of this methodology. We now report a thorough study of ultrasonic operational variables upon perchloroethylene (PCE) degradation in water (variables include ultrasonic frequency, power and system geometry as well as substrate concentration) and we attempt to close the mass balance where feasible. We obtained fractional conversions of >97% showing very effective loss of pollutant starting material, and give mechanistic proposals for the reaction pathway based on cavitational phenomena inducing pyrolytic and free radical processes. We note major products of Cl(-) and CO(2)/CO, and also trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloroethylene (DCE) at ppm concentrations as reported earlier. The formation at very low (ppb) concentration of small halocompounds (CHCl(3), CCl(4)) and also of higher-mass species, such as pentachloropropene, hexachloroethane, is noteworthy. But of particular importance in our work is the discovery of significant quantities of chloroacetate derivatives at ppm concentrations. Although these compounds have been described as by-products with other techniques such as radiolysis or photochemistry, this is the first time that these products have been identified in the sonochemical treatment of PCE; this allows a much more effective account of the mass balance and may explain earlier inconsistencies. This reaction system is now better identified, but a corollary is that, because these haloacetates are themselves species of some toxicity, the use of ultrasound here may not sufficiently diminish wastewater toxicity. PMID:20403718

  18. Optimization of Simultaneous Chemical and Biological Mineralization of Perchloroethylene

    PubMed Central

    Büyüksönmez, Fatih; Hess, Thomas F.; Crawford, Ronald L.; Paszczynski, Andrzej; Watts, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    Optimization of the simultaneous chemical and biological mineralization of perchloroethylene (PCE) by modified Fenton’s reagent and Xanthobacter flavus was investigated by using a central composite rotatable experimental design. Concentrations of PCE, hydrogen peroxide, and ferrous iron and the microbial cell number were set as variables. Percent mineralization of PCE to CO2 was investigated as a response. A second-order, quadratic response surface model was generated and fit the data adequately, with a correlation coefficient of 0.72. Analysis of the results showed that the PCE concentration had no significant effect within the tested boundaries of the model, while the other variables, hydrogen peroxide and iron concentrations and cell number, were significant at ? = 0.05 for the mineralization of PCE. The 14C radiotracer studies showed that the simultaneous chemical and biological reactions increased the extent of mineralization of PCE by more than 10% over stand-alone Fenton reactions. PMID:10347081

  19. PHASE BEHAVIOR OF WATER/PERCHLOROETHYLENE/ANIONIC SURFACTANT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Winsor Type I (o/w), Type II (w/o), and Type III (middle phase) microemulsions have been generated for water and perchloroethylene (PCE) in combination with anionic surfactants and the appropriate electrolyte concentration. The surfactant formulation was a combination of sodium d...

  20. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL TO PREDICT SYSTEMIC UPTAKE AND RESPIRATORY ELIMINATION OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The pharmacokinetics of inhaled perchloroethylene (PCE) were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats to characterize pulmonary absorption and elimination. irect measurements of the time-course of PCE in the blood and breath were used to evaluate the ability of a physiologically-based...

  1. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  2. Contamination of ground water by PCE - A national perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, M.J.; Delzer, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) has physical and chemical properties that make it likely to persist in groundwater if released to the environment. The US Geological Survey has collected or compiled data on the occurrence of PCE in groundwater from major aquifers around the US. These data represent the occurrence of PCE in the groundwater resource as a whole and not occurrence at specific release sites. PCE was detected at measurable concentrations in nearly one in 10 wells in major aquifers throughout the country. Trichloroethylene was found most commonly with PCE and its presence may be due, in part, to reductive dechlorination of PCE. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Petroleum Hydrocarbons and Organic Chemicals in Ground Water: Prevention, Assessment, and Remediation Conference (Houston, TX 11/6-7/2006).

  3. Interaction of Perchloroethylene with Cerium Oxide in Three-Way Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Erik C.; Betterton, Eric A.; Arnold, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    The role of cerium oxide on direct oxidation of perchloroethylene (PCE) by a three-way catalyst was explored. In the absence of an external oxidizing agent, PCE was oxidized over an alumina supported Pt/Rh three-way catalyst. We hypothesize that the chlorine atoms in the adsorbed PCE interact with oxygen in CeO2, reducing the cerium to create CeCl3. PMID:21218178

  4. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model useful in prediction of the influence of species, dose, and exposure route on perchloroethylene pharmacokinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cham E. Dallas; Xiao Mei Chen; Srinivasa Muralidhara; Peter Varkonyi; Randall L. Tackett; James V. Bruckner

    1995-01-01

    The ability of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict the uptake and elimination of perchloroethylene (PCE) in venous blood was evaluated by comparison of model simulations with experimental data for two species, two routes of exposure, and three dosage levels. Unanesthetized male Sprague?Dawley rats and beagle dogs were administered 1, 3, or 10 mg PCE\\/kg body weight in

  5. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of perchloroethylene using periodic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hirl, P.J.; Yocum, P.S.; Earley, J.P.; Irvine, R.L. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences

    1995-12-31

    The Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR) was used to select for, enrich, and modify the physiological state of one or more of the many possible microbial consortia that can participate in the reductive dechlorination of perchloroethylene (PCE). The AnSBBR`s used in these studies are periodically operated, up-flow, packed column, biofilm reactors. Initial AnSBBR studies demonstrated that PCE, fed at 8 mg/L, could be reductively dechlorinated to cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (cDCE) using either methanol or acetate as a co-substrate. PCE fed at over 160 mg/L could be completely reductively dechlorinated to ethylene when acetate was used as the co-substrate and methanol as the solvent for PCE addition. These studies support the hypothesis that the extent of reductive dechlorination is determined by environmental parameters which effect the physiological state of the bacterial consortium.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODEL FOR PERCHLOROETHYLENE USING TISSUE CONCENTRATION-TIME DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The tissue disposition of perchloroethylene (PCE) was characterized experimentally in rats in order to: 1) btain input parameters from in vivo data for the development of a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model; and 2) use the PBPK model to predict the deposition of ...

  7. Sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in water: Enhancement of the process by the absence of background electrolyte

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Verónica Sáez; Ignacio Tudela; María Deseada Esclapez; Pedro Bonete; Olivier Louisnard; José González-García

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the presence of a background electrolyte on the efficiency of the sonoelectrochemical (20kHz ultrasound frequency) degradation of perchloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions has been analyzed using sonoelectrolysis in batch mode. A significant enhancement of the efficiency of the sonoelectrochemical process is achieved when the process is carried out in the absence of the background electrolyte. The sonoelectrochemical

  8. Sonochemical degradation of perchloroethylene: The influence of ultrasonic variables, and the identification of products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Sáez; M. D. Esclapez; P. Bonete; D. J. Walton; A. Rehorek; O. Louisnard; J. González-García

    2011-01-01

    Sonochemistry is a technique that offers promise for pollutant degradation, but earlier studies on various chlorinated substrates do not give a definitive view of the effectiveness of this methodology. We now report a thorough study of ultrasonic operational variables upon perchloroethylene (PCE) degradation in water (variables include ultrasonic frequency, power and system geometry as well as substrate concentration) and we

  9. WASHABILITY CURVES FOR PYRITE REMOVAL IN COAL USING PERCHLOROETHYLENE AS HEAVY MEDIUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Padmakar Vishnubhatt; Sunggyu Lee

    1993-01-01

    Pyritic sulfur is removed from raw, high sulfur coal by gravitational separation using a suitable solvent, or heavy medium. This is possible due to the inherent difference in the specific gravity of clean coal and the mineral matter in it. The effectiveness of perchloroethylene (PCE) as a heavy medium was experimentally evaluated. The most important factors governing the efficiency of

  10. Cytotoxicity of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on normal human epidermal keratinocytes and protective role of Vitamin E

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qi-Xing Zhu; Tong Shen; Rui Ding; Zhao-Zhao Liang; Xue-Jun Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PERC), the most common alkenyl halides, have been extensively used in industry, and can cause skin damage. To evaluate their cytotoxic potential on skin, the effects of these agents on the normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) were investigated. Their action on cell viability, membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) was assessed by neutral red uptake (NRU)

  11. Kinetics and Modeling of Reductive Dechlorination at High PCE

    E-print Network

    Semprini, Lewis

    data for PCE concentrations near the solubility limit (1000 AM), and TCE concentrations at half its solubility limit (4000 AM). Based on the modeling analysis of the experimental re- sults, the PM culture (Point Mugu, CA) had very high Hal- dane inhibition constants for cis-1,2-dichlororethylene (c

  12. Catalytic Dechlorination of Gas-phase Perchloroethylene under Mixed Redox Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Özer; Gao, Song; Barbaris, Brian; Rupp, Erik; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    The validity of a new method to destroy gas-phase perchloroethylene (PCE) is demonstrated at bench scale using a fixed-bed reactor that contains a Pt/Rh catalyst. Hydrogen and oxygen were simultaneously fed to the reactor together with PCE. The conversion efficiencies of PCE were sensitive to H2/O2 ratio and reactor temperature. When the temperature was ? 400 °C and H2/O2 was ? 2.15, PCE conversion efficiency was maintained at ? 90%. No catalyst deactivation was observed for over two years, using only mild, convenient regeneration procedures. It is likely that PCE reduction steps precede oxidation reactions and that the importance of oxidation lies in its elimination of intermediates that would otherwise lead to catalyst poisoning. In practice, this catalytic dechlorination method holds potential for low-cost, large-scale field operation. PMID:19234593

  13. Cometabolic degradation of TCE and DCE without intermediate toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bielefeldt, A.R.; Stensel, H.D.; Strand, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) cometabolic degradation by a filamentous, phenol-oxidizing enrichment from a surface-water source were investigated in batch tests. No intermediate toxicity effects were evident during TCE or DCE degradation for loadings up to 0.5 mg TCE/mg VSS or 0.26 mg DCE/mg VSS. Phenol addition up to 40 mg/L did not inhibit TCE or DCE degradation. TCE specific degradation rates ranged from 0.28 to 0.51 g TCE/g VSS-d with phenol present, versus an average endogenous rate of 0.18 g TCE/g VSS-d. DCE specific degradation rates ranged from 0.79 to 2.92 g DCE/g VSS-d with phenol present, versus 0.27 to 1.5 g DCE/g VSS-d for endogenous conditions. There was no inhibition of DCE degradation rates at concentrations as high as 83 mg/L. TCE degradation rates declined between 40 and 130 mg/L TCE. Perchloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chloroform were not degraded.

  14. EMISSIONS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to evaluate the emissions of perchloroethylene (tetrachloroethylene) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (a) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a home affects the indoor concentration of perchloroethylene, and (b) the effectiveness of ?airing...

  15. Influence of Different Electron Donors and Acceptors on Dehalorespiration of Tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    PubMed Central

    Gerritse, Jan; Drzyzga, Oliver; Kloetstra, Geert; Keijmel, Mischa; Wiersum, Luit P.; Hutson, Roger; Collins, Matthew D.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 ?m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35°C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H2, formate, l-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except formate and H2) are oxidized to acetate and CO2. When l-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher (up to 1.4 ?mol of chloride released · min?1 · mg of protein?1). Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumarate or nitrate. PMID:10583967

  16. Industrial-hygiene report: perchloroethylene at Dubarry Cleaners, Detroit, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.

    1980-07-18

    An on-site visit was made to Dubarry Cleaners, Detroit, Michigan, as part of an industry-wide mortality and industrial hygiene study of dry cleaning workers exposed to perchloroethylene (PCE). Air samples were taken at the facility and the time weighted average exposure to PCE was calculated to be 23 parts per million (ppm) with 5-minute peak exposures ranging from 33 to 141 ppm. A 15-minute sample collected indicated a 34-ppm peak of PCE. The author recommends that prospective employees receive preemployment physical examinations, that all dry-cleaning machines and recovery units be equipped with a unit blower capable of providing an indraft velocity through the loading door of 100 feet per minute for each square foot of door opening, that respiratory protection be provided for emergency use, that protective clothing to prevent skin exposure be provided, that all employees be informed as to hazards, symptoms and precautions to take, that storage containers, equipment, piping, and valves be checked for leaks, and that recovered solvent be piped directly to the base tank of the dry cleaning machine and residues containing solvent be disposed of in a manner which would not create a health hazard.

  17. Effects of several electron donors on anaerobic dehalogenation of perchloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Shah, M.M.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Microcosm studies were conducted to evaluate the ability of various electron donors to stimulate efficient microbial dechlorination of perchloroethylene (PCE). The electron donors tested included complex substrates that can be used by fermenters, acetogens, methanogens, and sulfidogens and simple compounds that can be used only be methanogens and a few acetogens. Identical tests were conducted for three aquifers contaminated with chlorinated ethylenes and one uncontaminated river sediment. Temporal changes in substrate, chlorinated ethylenes, and metabolic products such as methane, acetate, hydrogen, and formate were monitored to determine the relationship between major metabolic activities and dehalogenation. Data will be presented on the kinetics of the dehalogenation process as well as the efficiency of the microbes to use electrons from each substrate for dechlorination.

  18. Industrial-hygiene report, perchloroethylene at Key Club Cleaners, Skokie, Illinois, July 18, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.R.

    1980-08-13

    An on site visit was made to the Key Club Cleaners located in Skokie, Illinois as part of an industrywide mortality and industrial hygiene study of the exposure of dry cleaning workers to perchloroethylene (PCE). Current exposure levels of PCE were determined at the facility using battery operated pumps and charcoal tubes. The company used PCE as a dry cleaning solvent since cleaning began at the site in October of 1978. The facility was housed in a one story building with dimensions of about 40 feet by 100 feet. About 90 gallons of PCE were consumed each month during dry cleaning and about 1800 pounds of clothing were dry cleaned each week. The work force numbered nine persons. The time weighted average exposures to PCE of the dry cleaner/spotter and the presser were 49 and 8.5 parts per million (ppm), respectively. The 5 minute peak exposures to the dry cleaner measured during garment transfer ranged from 316 to 447ppm PCE. While the time weighted average exposures were within recommended guidelines, the peak samples during transfer exceeded all recommended levels. The author recommends measures to lower the exposure level.

  19. Thermocatalytic Destruction of Gas-Phase Perchloroethylene Using Propane as a Hydrogen Source

    PubMed Central

    Willinger, Marty; Rupp, Erik; Barbaris, Brian; Gao, Song; Arnolda, Robert; Betterton, Eric; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The use of propane in combination with oxygen to promote the destruction of perchloroethylene (PCE) over a platinum (Pt)/rhodium (Rh) catalyst on a cerium/zirconium oxide washcoat supported on an alumina monolith was explored. Conversions of PCE were measured in a continuous flow reactor with residence times less than 0.5 s and temperatures ranging from 200 to 600°C. The presence of propane was shown to increase significantly the conversion of PCE over oxygen-only conditions. Conversions close to 100% were observed at temperatures lower than 450°C with 20% oxygen and 2% propane in the feed, which makes this process attractive from a practical standpoint. In the absence of oxygen, PCE conversion is even higher, but the catalyst suffers significant deactivation in less than an hour. Even though results show that oxygen competes with reactants for active sites on the catalyst, the long-term stability that oxygen confers to the catalyst makes the process an efficient alternative to PCE oxidation. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood competitive adsorption model is proposed to quantify PCE conversion. PMID:19217713

  20. Removal of perchloroethylene from a layered soil system by steam flushing

    SciTech Connect

    She, H.Y.; Sleep, B.E.

    1999-10-01

    Steam flushing experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional chamber containing two layers of F75 silica sand separated by a layer of finer F110 silica sand. Perchloroethylene (PCE), which had spilled into the chamber under water-saturated conditions, formed a pool on the F110 sand layer. Steam was injected above the F110 sand layer. Temperatures, moisture content, and PCE concentrations in the chamber were monitored. Samples, taken from the various locations in the sand chamber, indicated that complete removal of PCE from the steam zone was achieved, with an 84% overall recovery. Some downward displacement of PCE-contaminated water through the F110 sand layer was observed and a small amount of gravity override occurred. Channeling of steam was minimal. The experiment indicates that steam flushing may be used successfully for removal of PCE from relatively homogeneous soils. Issues of gravity override and downward mobilization of contaminants must be considered in applying steam flushing at the field scale.

  1. Effect of Chemical Oxidation on Subsurface Microbiology and Trichloroethene (TCE) Biodegradation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Kastner; Miles Denham; Marirosa Molina; Robin Brigmon

    2000-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine the effect of chemical oxidation on subsurface microbiology and cometabolic biodegradation capacity in a trichloroethene (TCE)\\/perchloroethene (PCE)-contaminated aquifer previously treated with Fenton's reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatment, and subsequently rose to a range of 3.4 to 4.0 after 17 months. Limited microbial growth and TCE degradation were detected

  2. Alternatives to perchloroethylene-based garment care: Assessing the viability of professional wet cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, R.; Sinsheimer, P.; Goodheart, J.; Tranby, C.; Bechtel, L.

    1997-12-01

    The report analyzes the viability of Cleaner by Nature, a 100% professional wet cleaner, and whether professional wet cleaning represents a viable pollution prevention approach in eliminating perchloroethylene (PCE), a chemical solvent used in dry cleaning. The analysis includes a comprehensive plant level case study, and comparative performance, financial, and environmental assessments of wet cleaning and PCE-based dry cleaning. The major issues associated with the viability analyses were identified and specific information was collected in relation to how the clothes were cleaned (a customer garment profile, a problem garment analysis, a technical evaluation or repeat clean test, a wearer survey, and customer satisfaction surveys); how wet cleaning did financially (a start-up cost analysis and a profit/loss analysis); what environmental impacts were identified (water, energy, and chemical inputs and outputs); and what contributing factors (technology changes, garment manufacturing and labeling, and regulator or legislative actions) influence the viability of professional wet cleaning.

  3. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic model useful in prediction of the influence of species, dose, and exposure route on perchloroethylene pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Dallas, C E; Chen, X M; Muralidhara, S; Varkonyi, P; Tackett, R L; Bruckner, J V

    1995-03-01

    The ability of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict the uptake and elimination of perchloroethylene (PCE) in venous blood was evaluated by comparison of model simulations with experimental data for two species, two routes of exposure, and three dosage levels. Unanesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats and beagle dogs were administered 1, 3, or 10 mg PCE/kg body weight in polyethylene glycol 400 as a single bolus, either by gavage or by intraarterial (ia) injection. Serial blood samples were obtained from a jugular vein cannula for up to 96 h following dosing. The PCE concentrations were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography. For each dose and route of administration, terminal elimination half-lives in rats were shorter than in dogs, and areas under the blood concentration-time curve were smaller in rats than in dogs. Over a 10-fold range of doses, PCE blood levels in the rat were well predicted by the PBPK model following ia administration, and slightly underpredicted following oral administration. The PCE concentrations in dog blood were generally overpredicted, except for fairly precise predictions for the 3 mg/kg oral dose. These studies provide experimental evidence of the utility of the PBPK model for PCE in interspecies, route-to-route, and dose extrapolations. PMID:7897693

  4. Enhanced solubilization of a metal-organic contaminant mixture (Pb, Sr, Zn, and perchloroethylene) by cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Skold, Magnus E; Thyne, Geoffrey D; Drexler, John W; Macalady, Donald L; McCray, John E

    2008-12-01

    Prior work has suggested that (carboxymethyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) is capable of simultaneously enhancing the solubility of organics and metals, but sparse experimental data and no theoretical models have been published on this process. Preciously, a geochemical model for metal complexation by CMCD was formulated using PHREEQC on the basis of conditional stability constants measured in experiments using single-metal salts. In this study, the model is expanded to simultaneous metal and organic (perchloroethylene, PCE) complexation by CMCD. Experiments to verify the application of the formulation to mixed-waste systems were performed using solutions containing multiple metal ions (Pb, Sr, and Zn) and in a separate experiment introducing PCE with multiple metal ions. These experimental results show simultaneous solubility enhancement of metals and PCE. For solutions up to about 50 g/L CMCD, the model accurately predicted the simultaneous solubility enhancement for PCE, Pb, and Zn, while the difference between the measured and predicted Sr concentrations was accurate to within 15%. At CMCD concentrations greater than 50 g/L, the observed metal solubilities were greater than predicted (10% for Pb and Zn), probably due to the difficulty in accurately representing the activity and the effect on the ionic strength of functional groups on large organic molecules at higher concentrations. PMID:19192820

  5. Evolving TCE Biodegraders

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    A hypothetical scenario is introduced in which the class is asked to apply their understanding of the forces that drive natural selection to prepare a proposal along with an environmental consulting company to help clean up an area near their school that is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). Students use the Avida-ED software application to test hypotheses for evolving (engineering) a strain of bacteria that can biodegrade TCE, resulting in a non-hazardous clean-up solution. Conduct this design challenge activity after completion of the introduction to digital evolution activity, Studying Evolution with Digital Organisms.

  6. TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) ISSUE PAPERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    These issue papers are a part of EPA's effort to develop a trichloroethylene (TCE) human health risk assessment. These issue papers were developed by EPA to provide scientific and technical information to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for use in developing their advice ...

  7. NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE): DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is a background document for a meeting of neurotoxicity experts to discuss the central nervous system effects of exposure to perchloroethylene (perc). The document reviews the literature on neurological testing of people exposed to perc occupationally in dry cleanin...

  8. MEASUREMENT OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (i.e., tetrachloroethylene) is an organic solvent widely used in dry cleaning and industrial metal degreasing operations. Short-term field studies were conducted in each of three major metropolitan areas which were selected on the basis of the number, density an...

  9. The Physiological Opportunism of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Strain TCE1 towards Organohalide Respiration with Tetrachloroethene

    PubMed Central

    Duret, Aurélie; Holliger, Christof

    2012-01-01

    Desulfitobacterium hafniense strain TCE1 is capable of metabolically reducing tetra- and trichloroethenes by organohalide respiration. A previous study revealed that the pce gene cluster responsible for this process is located on an active composite transposon, Tn-Dha1. In the present work, we investigated the effects on the stability of the transposon during successive subcultivations of strain TCE1 in a medium depleted of tetrachloroethene. At the physiological level, an increased fitness of the population was observed after 9 successive transfers and was correlated with a decrease in the level of production of the PceA enzyme. The latter observation was a result of the gradual loss of the pce genes in the population of strain TCE1 and not of a regulation mechanism, as was postulated previously for a similar phenomenon described for Sulfurospirillum multivorans. A detailed molecular analysis of genetic rearrangements occurring around Tn-Dha1 showed two independent but concomitant events, namely, the transposition of the first insertion sequence, ISDha1-a, and homologous recombination across identical copies of ISDha1 flanking the transposon. A new model is proposed for the genetic heterogeneity around Tn-Dha1 in D. hafniense strain TCE1, along with some considerations for the cleavage mechanism mediated by the transposase TnpA1 encoded by ISDha1. PMID:22729540

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa, July 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-21

    The Des Moines TCE site includes the underground infiltration gallery used by the Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) as a source of the public water supply. The site was discovered in 1984 after trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in the city's public water supply. The Dico Company disposed of an unknown quantity of oily waste sludge containing TCE onto their parking lot for dust control and into a drainage ditch on their property. The primary contaminants of concern include: TCE, PCE, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride. The selected remedial action for this site includes: extraction wells to collect the contaminated ground water; isolation of the northern-most section of the north gallery; treatment of the ground water through air stripping to remove 96% of the TCE; discharge of the treated water to the Raccoon River; operation of the west extraction wells until established effluent levels are achieved for four consecutive months.

  11. Schedule-controlled operant behavior of rats following oral administration of perchloroethylene: time course and relationship to blood and brain solvent levels.

    PubMed

    Warren, D A; Reigle, T G; Muralidhara, S; Dallas, C E

    1996-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that human exposure to perchloroethylene (PCE) produces subtle behavioral changes and other neurological effects at concentration at or below the current occupational exposure limit. Since comparable effects in animals may be reflected by changes in schedule-controlled operant behavior, the ability of orally administered PCE to alter fixed-ratio (FR) responding for a food reward was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Furthermore, since behavioral effects of solvents are likely to be more closely related to blood or target tissue (i.e, brain) concentrations than administered dose, the relationship between the pharmacokinetic distribution of PCE and its effects on operant responding was also evaluated. Rats trained to lever-press for evaporated milk on an FR-40 reinforcement schedule were gavaged with 160 or 480 mg/kg PCE and immediately placed in an operant test cage for 90 min. Separate animals gavaged with equivalent doses of PCE were used to determine profiles of blood and brain concentrations versus time. Perchloroethylene produced changes in responding that varied not only with dose but also among animals receiving the same dose. Changes in the response rates of rats receiving 160 mg/kg PCE were either not readily apparent, restricted to the first 5 min of the operant session, or attributable to gavage stress and the dosing vehicle. However, 480 mg/kg produced either an immediate suppression of responding for 15-30 min before a rapid recovery to control rates or a complete elimination of lever-pressing for the majority of the operant session. Although the two doses of PCE produced markedly different effects on operant behavior during the first 30 min of exposure, differences in brain concentrations of PCE were minimal. Furthermore, the majority of animals receiving 480 mg/kg PCE fully recovered from response suppression while blood and brain levels of the solvent continued to rise. Thus, relationships between blood and brain PCE levels and performance impairment were not discernible over the monitored time course. Since the rapid onset of response suppression suggests that the precipitating event occurs within the first few minutes of exposure, it is possible that altered responding is related to the rate of increase in blood or brain concentrations rather than the absolute solvent concentrations themselves. The relationship between the pharmacokinetic distribution of solvents and their effects on the central nervous system is obviously complex and may involve acute neuronal adaptation as well as the dynamics of solvent distribution among the various body compartments. PMID:8600288

  12. A study of the effect of perchloroethylene exposure on semen quality in dry cleaning workers

    SciTech Connect

    Eskenazi, B.; Wyrobek, A.J.; Fenster, L.; Katz, D.F.; Sadler, M.; Lee, J.; Hudes, M.; Rempel, D.M. (Program of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of perchloroethylene (PCE) exposure on human semen quality. We compared the semen quality of 34 dry cleaners with that of 48 laundry workers. We examined the relationships of 17 semen parameters to expired air levels of PCE and to an index of exposure based on job tasks in the last three months. The average sperm concentration was over 80 million for both dry cleaners and laundry workers, but approximately one-quarter of each group was oligospermic. The overall percentage of abnormal forms was similar for the two groups; however, sperm of dry cleaners were significantly more likely to be round (t = -3.29, p = 0.002) and less likely to be narrow (t = 2.35, p = 0.02) than the sperm of laundry workers. These effects were dose-related to expired air levels and to the exposure index after controlling for potential confounders (e.g., heat exposure). The average percent motile sperm for both groups was slightly over 60%; however, sperm of dry cleaners tended to swim with greater amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) than those of laundry workers (t = -1.73, p = 0.09), and level of PCE in expired air was a significant predictor of ALH in the multiple regression model (t = 2.00, p = 0.05). In addition, exposure index was a significant negative predictor of the sperm linearity parameter (t = -2.57, p = 0.01). These results suggest that occupational exposures to PCE can have subtle effects on sperm quality. Additional analyses are required to determine whether these effects are associated with changes in fertility.

  13. PHASE-TRANSFER-CATALYST APPLIED TO THE OXIDATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE BY POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated ethylenes such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) are common contaminants (Plumb 1991; Westrick et al., 1984). They opccur in the subsurface as zones of residual saturation or occasionally as free products. Because of their inherently low solubil...

  14. TCE treatment pasta-bilities.

    PubMed Central

    Holton, W C

    1999-01-01

    Monsanto's "Lasagna" process uses layers of treatment zones spaced between buried electrodes to remove trichloroethylene (TCE) from contaminated soil and groundwater. TCE is used primarily as a metal degreaser as well as in products such as dyes, printing ink, and paint. TCE can eventually make its way into the environment and is prevalent in the water and soil of industrialized nations. Although TCE breaks down in a few days when released into the atmosphere, it degrades much more slowly in soil, taking months or years. Moreover, it is often broken down by microbes into toxic substances such as vinylidene chloride (a suspected human carcinogen) and vinyl chloride (a known human carcinogen). The Lasagna process is based on the principle of electro-osmosis, in which an electric current draws water from low--permeability soils such as clays, silts, and fine sands. To remove TCE from contaminated soils, Monsanto scientists added layers of filtering media, which attack the contaminant as it is pulled from electrode to electrode. The technology has been tested at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky, where it removed over 98% of TCE from contaminated soil. PMID:10464086

  15. Advanced Oxidation Processes for Treating Groundwater Contaminated With TCE and PCE: Pilot-Scale Evaluations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Marco Aieta; Kevin M. Reagan; John S. Lang; Laurent McReynolds; Joon-Wun Kang; William H. Glaze

    1988-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot-scale evaluation of an advanced oxidation process that utilizes hydrogen peroxide and ozone. Treatment efficiency was determined as a function of the hydrogen peroxide-to-ozone dosage ratio, ozone dosage, and contact time. The ozone mass transfer characteristics of the process were also investigated. Comparison with other treatment technologies indicates that advanced oxidation can be

  16. Perchloroethylene exposure assessment among dry cleaning workers

    SciTech Connect

    Solet, D.; Robins, T.G.; Sampaio, C. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Perchloroethylene (Perc), the most widely used solvent in dry cleaning, is toxic to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system and may be a human carcinogen. In the Detroit area, as part of a project investigating the health status of dry cleaning workers, an exposure assessment was carried out in dry cleaning plants using perchloroethylene. Breath samples were obtained from each participant, and time-weighted average (TWA) breathing zone air samples were obtained using passive dosimeters on a subset expected to experience a range of exposures. Perc in breath and Perc in air were highly correlated (r2 = 0.75, p less than 0.0001). On average, operators of dry cleaning equipment experienced significantly more exposure than nonoperators. Also, employees working in shops that use transfer equipment (requiring physical transfer of Perc-saturated clothing from washers to dryers) showed significantly higher exposure than those in shops utilizing dry-to-dry machinery (permitting washing and drying in one machine in a single cycle). One or more air samples in every transfer shop exceeded the recently revised Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 25 ppm, while no air samples in dry-to-dry shops exceeded this limit. The results suggest concern for exposures to operators in transfer shops and that compliance with the PEL is achievable by engineering controls with presently existing technology.

  17. FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Narinder K.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this summer research project was to investigate whether perchloroethylene can be used as a solvent for the quantitative analysis of industrial hydraulic fluids by infrared spectroscopy employing Beer's law. Standard calibration curves using carbon-hydrogen stretching (generic) and ester absorption peaks were prepared for a series of standard dilutions at low ppm levels of concentration of seven hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene. The absorbance spectras were recorded with 1.5-10 mm fixed and variable path length sample cells made of potassium bromide. The results indicate that using ester infrared spectral peak, it is possible to detect about 20 ppm of the hydraulic fluid in perchloroethylene.

  18. TCE gas concentration variation in the unsaturated zone under the influence of fluctuating water table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joun, W.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Common residual DNAPLs (Dense non-Aqueous Phase Liquids) in subsurface are TCE, PCE, and chlorinated solvents. Because DNAPLs were remained or trapped in soil pore while these swept through the subsurface environment. Soil gas sampling is one of the methods to identify the residual source existence in the field contaminated by DNAPLs. However, the concentration of soil gas samples is changeable depending on water table fluctuation. This trend was shown in Woosan Industrial Complex (WIC) site in Korea. To understand this phenomenon in the field laboratory experiments were performed under controllable condition. Continuous soil gas extraction and sampling method was conducted at the laboratory with several different cases. Three cases assume the experimental conditions which were 1) only residual source of TCE exists in vadose zone; 2) only dissolved source of TCE in water exists; 3) not only residuals source but also dissolved source exist in the usual position. A two-dimensional model tank was used for the laboratory scale test. The STOMP-WOA model program was also operated to calculate the TCE gas concentration changes. The concentration represented changes opposite to the water table change as the concentration increased when water table decreased. STOMP simulation results showed the similar trend with laboratory test results.

  19. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE ON HUMAN NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchloroethylene (PERC) is a volatile organic solvent with a variety of industrial uses. PERC exposure has been shown to cause adverse neurological effects including deficits in vision and memory in exposed individuals. Despite knowledge of these effects, the mechanisms by whi...

  20. EVALUATION OF PERCHLOROETHYLENE EMISSIONS FROM DRY CLEANED FABRICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of short-term evaluation of perchloroethylene (perc) from dry cleaned fabrics to determine: (1) how the introduction of fresh dry cleaning into a house affects the indoor concentration of perc, and (2) the effectiveness of 'airing-out' for reducing perc e...

  1. SOURCES, EMISSION AND EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AND RELATED CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the sources, emission, environmental fate and exposures for TCE, some of its metabolites, and some other chemicals known to produce identical metabolites. The major findings for TCE are: The primary sources releasing TCE to the environment ...

  2. REMEDIATION OF SITES CONTAMINATED WITH TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Widespread use of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the U.S. has resulted in its frequent detection in soil and groundwater. TCE can become a health hazard after being processed in the human liver; or reductive dehalogenation in the environment may result in production of vinyl chloride...

  3. Influence of sediment reduction on TCE degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Evans, J. C.; Sklarew, Deborah S.

    2000-12-01

    A field-scale remediation technique for TCE and chromate is currently being implemented which uses a chemical treatment to reduce existing iron(III) in sediments. While reduction of some contaminants is well established, TCE data show that dechlorination is more complex, and the role of iron oxides to catalyze the reaction is not well understood. The purpose of this laboratory-scale study was to investigate the influence of temperature and partial sediment reduction on TCE dechlorination. Fully reduced sediments can degrade TCE at sufficiently fast rates (1.2 to 19 h) during static and transport experiments over 2oC to 25oC that a successful barrier could be made at the field scale. In contrast, partially reduced sediment resulted in up to a 3 order of magnitude decrease in the TCE dechlorination rate. While minimally reduced sediment had nearly no TCE reactivity, > 40% reduced sediment had considerably faster dechlorination rates. The second-order dependence of the TCE dechlorination rate on the fraction of reduced iron demonstrates the significant role of the iron oxide surface (as a catalyst or for surface coordination) for TCE dechlorination. Based on these results, the field-scale reduction was designed with specific reagent concen-trations, temperature, and flow rates to efficiently create a reductive barrier.

  4. PCE oxidation by sodium persulfate in the presence of solids.

    PubMed

    Costanza, Jed; Otaño, Gretell; Callaghan, John; Pennell, Kurt D

    2010-12-15

    Batch reactor experiments were performed to determine the effects of solids on the oxidation of tetracholoroethylene (PCE) by sodium persulfate in aqueous solution. Based on the rates of PCE degradation and chloride formation, PCE oxidation by heat-activated sodium persulfate at 50 °C in the presence of solids ranged from no detectable oxidation of PCE to the levels observed in water-only reactors. Repeated doses of sodium persulfate, undertaken to overcome the inherent solids oxidant demand, improved the rate and extent of PCE oxidation in reactors containing reference solids; however, no improvement was observed in reactors containing field soils. Additionally, no improvements in PCE oxidation were observed after pretreating Great Lakes and Appling soils with ca. 15 g/kg of sodium persulfate or 30% hydrogen peroxide to remove oxidizable fractions, or acetic acid to remove the carbonate fraction. Based on these results, in situ treatment of Great Lakes and Appling soils with heat-activated sodium persulfate is not anticipated to result in substantial PCE oxidation, while in situ treatment of Fort Lewis soils is anticipated to result in PCE oxidation. This work demonstrates the need to perform soil-specific contaminant treatability tests rather than soil oxidant demand tests when determining oxidant dosage requirements. PMID:21070044

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Croyden TCE Spill, PA. (First Remedial Action), December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-28

    The Croyden TCE Spill site is located in Bristol Township, Buck County, Pennsylvania. VOC contamination in the ground water was detected over a 3.5-square mile area, predominantly residential, with an estimated 3,000 residents. The study area is bordered on the south by the Delaware River. Neshaminy Creek, which borders the study area to the west, and Hog Run Creek which flows through the focused area of investigation, both discharge to the river. Although the source of contamination has not been identified, the contaminant plume appears to be flowing south-southeast into the East Branch of Hog Run Creek and probably into the Delaware River. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are TCE and PCE. The selected remedial action for the site includes connecting approximately 13 residences to the public water supply system via the construction of new water services lines, mains, hydrants, and valves; and ground water monitoring to ensure that homes located outside of the TCE-contaminated zone will not be at risk from the migrating plume.

  6. Phytoremediation of trichloroethene (TCE) using cottonwood trees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, S.A.; Lee, R.W.; Kuniansky, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cottonwood trees for phytoremediation was studied on aerobic shallow groundwater containing TCE. Cottonwood trees were planted over a 0.2-ha area at the Naval Air Station at Fort Worth, TX, in April 1996. Two years later, groundwater chemistry in the terrace alluvial aquifer was changing locally. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations declined at the southern end of the whip plantings while total iron concentration increased. Groundwater chemistry near a mature cottonwood tree ~ 60 m from the caliper trees was different from that observed elsewhere. Anaerobic conditions near the mature cottonwood tree were evident. Reductive dechlorination of TCE occurred in the aquifer near the mature tree, as demonstrated by very small concentration of TCE in groundwater, a small median ratio of TCE to the degradation product cis-1,2-DCE and the presence of vinyl chloride.

  7. Monitoring Anaerobic TCE Degradation by Evanite Cultre in Column Packed with TCE-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Han, K.; Ahn, G.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, dehalococcoides spp., but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we examined two different types (i.e., Natural attenuation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation process in anaerobic column packed with TCE-contaminated soil. A TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms was confirmed by monitoring TCE and the metabolites (c-DCE, VC, ETH). However, TCE was transformed and stoichiometry amount of c-DCE was produced, and VC and ETH was not detected. To test bioaugmentation of Evanite culture containing dehalococcoides spp., Evanite culture was injected into the column and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the column by measuring TCE and VC reductases. In the result, the TCE was completely degraded to ETH using hydrogen as electron donor generate by hydrogen-production fermentation from formate.

  8. BIODEGRADATION OF PCE AND TCE IN LANDFILL, LEACHATE PREDICTED FROM CONCENTRATIONS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Refuse Hideaway Landfill (23-acre) was designed as a "natural attenuation" landfill and no provision was made to collect and treat contaminated water. Natural biological degradation through sequential reductive dechlorination had been an important mechanism for natural atten...

  9. Health Assessment Document for Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) is a volatile solvent with important commercial applications. It has been detected in the ambient air of a variety of urban and nonurban areas of the United States. It has less frequently been detected in water but has been monitored generally at levels ...

  10. Monitoring TCE Degradation by In-situ Bioremediation in TCE-Contaminated site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K.; Hong, U.; Ahn, G.; Jiang, H.; Yoo, H.; Park, S.; Kim, N.; Ahn, H.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a long-term common groundwater pollutant because the compound with high density is slowly released into groundwater. Physical and chemical remediation processes have been used to clean-up the contaminant, but novel remediation technology is required to overcome a low efficiency of the traditional treatment process. Many researchers focused on biological process using an anaerobic TCE degrading culture, but it still needs to evaluate whether the process can be applied into field scale under aerobic condition. Therefore, in this work we investigated two different tests (i.e., biostimulation and bioaugmentation) of biological remediation through the Well-to-Well test (injection well to extraction well) in TCE-contaminated site. Also solutions (Electron donor & acceptor, tracer) were injected into the aquifer using a liquid coupled with nitrogen gas sparging. In biostimulation, we use 3 phases to monitoring biological remediation. Phase 1: we inject formate solution to get electron donor hydrogen (hydrogen can be generated from fermentation of formate). We also inject bromide as tracer. Phase 2: we made injection solution by formate, bromide and sulfate. The reason why we inject sulfate is that as a kind of electron accepter, sulfate reduction process is helpful to create anaerobic condition. Phase 3: we inject mixed solution made by formate, sulfate, fumarate, and bromide. The degradation of fumarate has the same mechanism and condition with TCE degradation, so we added fumarate to make sure that if the anaerobic TCE degradation by indigenous microorganisms started up (Because low TCE concentration by gas sparging). In the bioaugmentation test, we inject the Evanite culture (containing dehalococcoides spp) and TCE degradation to c-DCE, VC, ETH was monitored. We are evaluating the transport of the Evanite culture in the field by measuring TCE and VC reductases.

  11. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE PEER REVIEW WORKSHOP ON THE NEUROTOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) DISCUSSION PAPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, Summary Report of the Peer Review Workshop on the Neurotoxicity of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) Discussion , summarizes the discussions at a February 25, 2004, workshop that brought together recognized scientific experts to engage in a public discussi...

  12. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts

    E-print Network

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30

    -order rate constant of PCE degradation rate on Cu(II) concentration .....................81 Figure 5.7 Results of kinetic experiments on PCE degradation by GR-F(Cu) at various initial PCE concentrations..........................................................................47 Table 4.2 Pseudo first-order rate constants and Fe(II) ion normalized rate constants for PCE degradation by five types of GRs with 10 trace metals...

  13. Enhanced dissolution of TCE in NAPL by TCE-degrading bacteria in wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangjin

    2007-06-25

    The influence of trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorinating mixed cultures in dissolution of TCE in nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) via biodegradation was observed. Experiments were conducted in batch reactor system with and without marsh soils under 10 and 20 degrees C for 2 months. The dissolution phenomenon in biotic reactors containing mixed cultures was showed temporal increases compared to abiotic reactors treated with biocide. Effective NAPL-water transfer rate (K(m)) calculated in this study showed more than four times higher in biotic reactors than that in abiotic reactors. The results might be attributed to the biologically enhanced dissolution process via dechlorination in reactors. Temperature would be a factor to determine the dissolution rate by controlling bacterial activity. The TCE dechlorination occurred even in an interface of TCE-NAPL that demonstrated no previous TCE biodegradation, suggesting that microbes may be useful in developing source-zone bioremediation system. In conclusion, dechlorinating mixed culture could enhance dissolution in NAPL that may be useful in the application of source zone bioremediation. PMID:17126487

  14. Status of groundwater pollution in the San Gabriel Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    Contamination of groundwater in the San Gabriel Valley of California has been identified as a potential health hazard from industrial sources. Sampling has revealed the presence of trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC); therefore, water purveyors are using a variety of means to alleviate the contamination and the use of contaminated water.

  15. PCE algorithm for PAPR reduction in OFDM-ROF system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianping Wang; Bosheng Liu; Xianwei Zhou

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a novel constellation extension algorithm, named as peak-restricted constellation extension (PCE), is proposed for peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system. This algorithm actively selects outer constellation points which contribute to the large peak magnitudes, and dynamically alter the amplitudes of these points to reduce PAPR. It does not require transmitting any

  16. Fate and Transport of TCE Solvents Through Saturated Karst Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Carmona, M.; Anaya, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Dense Nonaqueous-Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) are a group of organic compounds that have been a serious problem for groundwater pollution in karst. The industrial production and utilization of these chemicals spread since 1940, and are present at tens of thousands of contaminated sites worldwide. The physic-chemical properties of DNAPLs in conjunction with the hydraulic properties of the karst systems create the perfect condition for DNAPLs to penetrate the epikarst, reach the groundwater, and more within the karst system to zones of potential exposure, such as wells, streams and wetlands. Trichloroethylene (TCE) is the most common DNPAL found in the subsurface environment. This research studies the fate and transport of TCE DNAPL in a karstified limestone physical model (KLPM). Experiments are carried out in KLPM. The KLPM is an enclosed stainless steel tank packed with a rectangular limestone block (15cm x 15cm x 76cm) that simulates a saturated confine karst aquifer. DNAPL experiment involve the injection of 40 ml of pure TCE into steady groundwater flow at the upstream boundary of the KLPM model, while sampling spatially and temporally along the block. Samples are analyzed for TCE on the pure and dissolved phase. Pure TCE is analyzed volumetrically and dissolved phase concentrations are analyze using a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). TCE data is used to construct temporal distributions curves (TDCs) at different spatial locations. Results show that pure TCE volumes are collected at the beginnings of the experiment in sampling ports located near the injection port and along preferential flow paths. TCE concentration TDCs show spatial variations related to the limestone block heterogeneously. Rapid response to TCE concentrations is associated with preferential flow paths. Slow response and long tailing of TCE of TCE concentration are associated with diffusive transport in rock matrix and mass transport rates limitations. Bimodal distributions are associated with multiple flow path connectivity. Overall, results show that karstified limestone has a high capacity to rapidly transport, as well as store and slowly release TCE pure and dissolved phase. Response times to TCE concentrations depend on the mode of transport, and region of flow paths.

  17. PERCHLOROETHYLENE (PERC) INHIBITS FUNCTION OF VOLTAGE-GATED CALCIUM CHANNELS IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The industrial solvent perchloroethylene (PERC) is listed as a hazardous air pollutant in the 1990 Ammendments to Clean Air Act and is a known neurotoxicant. However, the mechanisms by which PERC alters nervous system function are poorly understood. In recent years, it has been d...

  18. EFFECT OF FILTRATION TEMPERATURE ON ORGANIC SULFUR REMOVAL FROM COAL BY PERCHLOROETHYLENE COAL CLEANING PROCESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Padmakar Vishnubhatt; Sunggyu Lee

    1993-01-01

    The perchloroethylene extraction desulfurization process removes the organic sulfur in coal via a hybrid mechanism of solvent extraction and chemical reaction. The nature and extent of the reaction is controlled by the extraction time and temperature of operation. Although the extraction temperature is kept identical for all types of coals (120°C), the organosulfur extraction time still depends upon the type

  19. AMBIENT PERCHLOROETHYLENE LEVELS INSIDE COIN-OPERATED LAUNDRIES WITH DRYCLEANING MACHINES ON THE PREMISES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, ambient perchloroethylene (PERC) levels were measured inside and in the vicinity of six self serve laundries containing coin-type dry cleaning operations. Inside two of the laundries, evaluations of organic vapor monitoring badges were performed in addition to the ...

  20. A PCE\\/GMPLS-based collision-avoiding wavelength assignment scheme for WSONs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiuyu Xie; Min Zhang; Lifang Zhang; Yuefeng Ji; Jie Zhang; Peida Ye

    2010-01-01

    In order to solve the wavelength resource reserve collision problem in distributed wavelength assignment scenario for PCE\\/GMPLS-based WSONs, a half-centralized wavelength assignment scheme has been proposed, which efficiently avoids the collision by adding several functions to PCE and does some extensions to the GMPLS signaling.

  1. EVALUATION OF GEOPHYSICAL METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PCE) IN CONTROLLED SPILL EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), typically used as a dry cleaning solvent, is a predominant contaminant in the subsurface at Superfund Sites. PCE is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) that migrates downward into the earth, leaving behind areas of residual saturation and free prod...

  2. Aqueous oxidation of trichloroethene (TCE): a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K. G., LLNL

    1998-02-28

    An empirical kinetic rate law was determined for the aqueous oxidation of trichloroethene (TCE). By measuring both the rate of disappearance of TCE and the rate of appearance of carbon dioxide and chloride ion, mass balances were monitored to confirm that `mineralization` was the ultimate reaction. Dilute buffer solutions were used to fix pH and stoichiometrically sufficient amounts of dissolved oxygen were used to make the reactions zero-order in oxygen. Using standard chemical kinetic methods, two orders of magnitude were spanned in initial TCE concentration and used in the resulting double-log plot vs. initial rate (regressed using both linear and polynomial fits) to determine the rate constant and `true` reaction order (i.e., with respect to;concentration, not time). By determining rate constants over the temperature interval 343-373K, an Arrhenius activation energy was determined for the reaction. A study was made of the potential effect of buffer ligand concentration and type (phosphate, borate, acetate, carbonate, sulfate), ionic strength, specific electrolytes, and pH on the rate of TCE. The aqueous oxidation reaction rate was found to be pH dependent over the pH range pH 2 to pH 1O and strongly inhibited by high dissolved bromide concentration. The equilibrium aqueous solubilities of TCE was determined by making reversed measurements from 294-390K. Together with the kinetic rate law, the thermodynamic data are required to develop in situ thermal remedial techniques for TCE and to model the reactive transport behavior of TCE in the subsurface.

  3. Degradation of perchloroethylene and dichlorophenol by pulsed?electric discharge and bioremediation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis C. Yee; Sadhana Chauhan; Efim Yankelevich; Vitaly Bystritskii; Thomas K. Wood

    1998-01-01

    Pulsed electric discharge (PED) and bioreme- diation were combined to create a novel two-stage sys- tem which dechlorinates the halogenated pollutants, 2,4- dichlorophenol and perchloroethylene, with repetitive (0.1-1 kHz), short pulse (~100 ns), low voltage (40-80 kV) discharges and then mineralizes the less chlorinated products with aerobic bacteria. A 6.1 mM aqueous di- chlorophenol sample was cycled through the PED

  4. Drip Irrigation Aided Phytoremediation for Removal of TCE from Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.

    2003-04-24

    Groundwater in D-Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and by-products resulting from discharges of this organic solvent during past disposal practices. This contaminated groundwater occurs primarily at depths of 9 meters to 15 meters below ground surface, well below the depths that are typically penetrated by plant roots. The process investigated in this study involved pumping water from the contaminated aquifer and discharging the water into overlying test plots two inches below the surface using drip irrigation. The field treatability study was conducted from 8/31/00 to 4/18/02 using six 0.08 hectare test plots, two each containing pines, cottonwoods, and no vegetation (controls). The primary objective was to determine the overall effectiveness of the process for TCE removal and to determine the principal biotic and abiotic pathways for its removal. Results demonstrated that the process provides a viable method to remove TCE-contaminated groundwater. The data clearly showed that the presence of trees reduced volatilization of TCE from the drip irrigation system to the atmosphere. Influent groundwater TCE concentrations averaging 89 mg/L were reduced to non-detectable levels (less than 5 mg/L) within the upper two feet of soil (rhizosphere).

  5. COMPARISON OF HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN PCE-DEHALOGENATING AND SULFATE-REDUCING ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary transformation pathway for PCE in anoxic environments is through sequential reductive dehalogenation, and information concerning dehalogenation processes that occur in environments containing alternative electron acceptors (sulfate) is limited. Hydrogen is postulated ...

  6. Socioeconomic disparities in indoor air, breath, and blood perchloroethylene level among adult and child residents of buildings with or without a dry cleaner.

    PubMed

    Storm, Jan E; Mazor, Kimberly A; Shost, Stephen J; Serle, Janet; Aldous, Kenneth M; Blount, Benjamin C

    2013-04-01

    In many cities, dry cleaners using perchloroethylene are frequently located in multifamily residential buildings and often cause elevated indoor air levels of perchloroethylene throughout the building. To assess individual perchloroethylene exposures associated with co-located dry cleaners, we measured perchloroethylene in residential indoor air, and in blood and breath of adults and children residing in buildings with a dry cleaner as part of the New York City (NYC) Perc Project. We also measured perchloroethylene in indoor air, and in blood and breath of residents of buildings without a dry cleaner for comparison. Here, we evaluate whether an environmental disparity in perchloroethylene exposures is present. Study participants are stratified by residential building type (dry cleaner or reference) and socioeconomic characteristics (race/ethnicity and income); measures of perchloroethylene exposure are examined; and, the influence of stratified variables and other factors on perchloroethylene exposure is assessed using multivariate regression. All measures of perchloroethylene exposure for residents of buildings with a dry cleaner indicated a socioeconomic disparity. Mean indoor air perchloroethylene levels were about five times higher in minority (82.5 ug/m(3)) than in non-minority (16.5 ug/m(3)) households, and about six times higher in low-income (105.5 ug/m(3)) than in high income (17.8 ug/m(3)) households. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in minority children (0.27 ng/mL) and adults (0.46 ng/mL) were about two and three times higher than in non-minority children (0.12 ng/mL) and adults (0.15 ng/mL), respectively. Mean blood perchloroethylene levels in low income children (0.34 ng/mL) and adults (0.62 ng/mL) were about three and four times higher than in high income children (0.11 ng/mL) and adults (0.14 ng/mL), respectively. A less marked socioeconomic disparity was observed in perchloroethylene breath levels with minority and low income residents having slightly higher levels than non-minority and high income residents. Multivariate regression affirmed that indoor air perchloroethylene level in dry cleaner buildings was the single most important factor determining perchloroethylene in blood and breath. Neither age, gender, nor socioeconomic status significantly influenced perchloroethylene levels in breath or blood. We previously reported that increased indoor air, breath, and blood perchloroethylene levels among NYC Perc Project child participants were associated with an increased risk for slightly altered vision. Thus, the disproportionately elevated perchloroethylene exposures of minority and low-income child residents of buildings with a dry cleaner shown here constitutes an environmental exposure disparity with potential public health consequences. Among residents of buildings without a dry cleaner, we observed some small increases in perchloroethylene breath and blood levels among non-minority or high income residents compared to minority or low income residents. These differences were not attributable to differences in indoor air levels of perchloroethylene which did not differ across socioeconomic categories, but appear to be associated with more frequent exposures dry cleaned garments. PMID:23453848

  7. Coupling Surfactants with Permanganate for PCE DNAPL Removal: Coinjection or Sequential Application as Delivery Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, P. J.; Siegrist, R. L.; Crimi, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Batch experiments and two-dimensional (2-D) flow-through cell experiments were conducted to investigate coupling surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) for PCE mass destruction. Previous batch screening tests were performed on surfactants and cosolvents in the presence of the oxidant potassium permanganate, to assess compatibility for coupling with permanganate. The anionic surfactants sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (Aerosol OT), and sodium hexadecyl diphenyl oxide disulfonate (Dowfax 8390) were compatible and selected for use. Two delivery methods were investigated: (1) coinjection of 0.66 pore volumes (PVs) of 1.0-wt% Aerosol-OT, 0.5-wt% Dowfax 8390, 0.35-wt% CaBr2, and 0.75-wt% NaBr, (for enhanced PCE solubilization) with 0.5-wt% permanganate(for DNAPL mass destruction), and (2) sequential application of 0.66 PVs of the same surfactant solution followed by 0.66 PVs of 0.5-wt% permanganate flush. The 2-D cell packing configuration consisted of a fine-grained silica sand matrix with an embedded medium- grained sand lens, which allowed for the development of a high saturation PCE DNAPL source zone (~9-11% v/v) within the lens of each cell. For both experiments the flushing solutions were delivered at a linear velocity of 52 cm/day. Water quality samples were collected from eight point sampling ports, as well as the cell effluent. Samples were analyzed for PCE, chloride, and permanganate. At the conclusion of the experiments, the mass of PCE removed was quantified by destructively analyzing the cell. Results indicate complete mass removal using sequential application as a delivery method. In the coinjection experiment, cores extracted at the conclusion revealed that 99.8% of PCE DNAPL mass was removed. However, it was not possible to close a mass balance between the initial PCE added and the PCE removed. It is hypothesized this result was due to incomplete oxidation whereby destruction of PCE occurs without mineralization. Results indicate that coupling surfactants with permanganate holds promise as a viable method for in situ mass depletion of PCE DNAPL using sequential application as a delivery method. Although experimental results were encouraging with respect to the coinjection of surfactants and permanganate for DNAPL mass removal, further bench-scale research is warranted prior to implementation in the field.

  8. A PCE\\/GMPLS-based collision-avoiding wavelength assignment scheme for WSONs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiuyu Xie; Min Zhang; Lifang Zhang; Yuefeng Ji; Jie Zhang; Peida Ye

    2010-01-01

    In order to solve the wavelength resource reserve collision problem in distributed wavelength assignment senario for PCE\\/GMPLS-based WSONs, a half-centralized wavelength assignment scheme has been proposed, which efficiently avoids the collision by adding several functions to PCE and doing some extensions to the GMPLS signaling. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme performs much better in decreasing total blocking probability

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroethylene (TCE) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroethylene (TCE) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Please refer to ...

  10. The Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  11. FRACTIONATION OF STABLE CARBON ISOTOPES DURING ABIOTIC TRANSFORMATION OF TCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a Superfund Site in Minnesota, ground water is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) with the contaminant plume stretching over five miles long. The ground water is iron and manganese reducing, and the complete absence of dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and ethene in th...

  12. Impact of FeS Mineralogy on TCE Degradation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (Fe...

  13. Cometabolic Degradation of TCE Vapors in a Foamed Emulsion

    E-print Network

    including biological trickling filters, stirred tank reactors, airlift reactors, membrane bioreactors for Burkholderia cepacia G4 which cometabolically biodegraded TCE. Batch operation of the reactor with respect contaminated wastes, biological treatment is potentially a cost-effective and safe technique as it leads

  14. 75 FR 25319 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...a correction to a notice of the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...application packages for the 2011 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program....

  15. 76 FR 30243 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ...TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...Application Packages for the 2012 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program. DATES...package to the IRS for the 2012 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is...

  16. 75 FR 22437 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ...TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...Application Packages for the 2011 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program. DATES...package to the IRS for the 2011 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is...

  17. 78 FR 17777 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ...TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...Application Packages for the 2014 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program. DATES...application package to the IRS for the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is...

  18. 77 FR 20695 - Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability of Application Packages

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ...TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program Availability...Application Packages for the 2013 Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program. DATES...application package to the IRS for the Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program is...

  19. Characterization of Microbial Communities in TCE-Contaminated Seep Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    ROBIN, BRIGMON

    2005-03-07

    Hundreds of sites across the United States contain trichloroethene (TCE) contamination, including the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. Previous studies have indicated that microorganisms are capable of efficiently degrading TCE to nonhazardous end products. In this project, molecular and growth based methods were used for microbial characterization of a TCE impacted seepzone where TCE degradation is naturally occurring. The results from this work provide clear evidence that the SRB may play a significant role in TCE degradation along the Twin Lakes seepline.

  20. Surface-plasmon-resonance-enhanced cavity ring-down detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew C. R. Pipino; John T. Woodward; Curtis W. Meuse; Vitalii Silin

    2004-01-01

    The cavity ring-down technique is used to probe the absolute optical response of the localized surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a gold nanoparticle distribution to adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) from the gas phase. Extended Mie theory for a coated sphere with a particle-size-dependent dielectric function is used to elucidate size-dispersion effects, the size-dependence of the SPR sensitivity

  1. Physiological changes associated with aging result in lower internal doses of toluene and perchloroethylene in simulations using pharmacokinetic modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Yokley; M. V. Evans

    2008-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models were developed in order to translate external concentrations into internal dose estimates, but most PBPK models were developed for younger adults. A set of physiological parameters for ages 65, 75, and 85 of both genders were developed and were used with previously established human PBPK models of exposure to toluene and perchloroethylene (PERC) in order

  2. Reaction products and mass balances from irradiated TCE vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, S.M.; Wang, F.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mill, T. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor, at a concentration of 3000 ppmv in synthetic air, was sealed in Tedlar bags and irradiated with a 3.7 MeV electron beam. Bags of dry vapor and vapor at 90% relative humidity were irradiated. Doses up to 11 megarads (11 MR) were applied. Each bag was chemically analyzed for reaction products and a mass balance of the chlorine and carbon was obtained within the 11 MR dose range. The results of these radiolysis experiments and chemical analysis show that, given the proper treatment, the TCE concentration is reduced to below detection limit and the reaction products of the organic carbon and chlorine are carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), chlorine gas (Cl{sub 2}) and hydrochloric acid (140). No detectable amounts of dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC) or phosgene (PG) remained in the sample after proper treatment. DCAC and PG were found only as intermediary oxidation products of the TCE. High energy ionizing radiation, as electron beams and bremsstrahlung, is a new treatment technology for destroying toxic compounds and hazardous Wastes. A demonstration of complete destruction of organic products, using this treatment at standard temperature and pressure, is expected to help implement the use of this technology.

  3. Non-steady state partitioning of dry cleaning surfactants between tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and water in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggan, James L.; Bae, Keonbeom; Kibbey, Tohren C. G.

    2007-08-01

    Trapped organic solvents, in both the vadose zone and below the water table, are frequent sources of environmental contamination. A common source of organic solvent contamination is spills, leaks, and improper solvent disposal associated with dry cleaning processes. Dry cleaning solvents, such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are typically enhanced with the addition of surfactants to improve cleaning performance. The objective of this work was to examine the partitioning behavior of surfactants from PCE in contact with water. The relative rates of surfactants partitioning and PCE dissolution are important for modeling the behavior of waste PCE in the subsurface, in that they influence the interfacial tension of the PCE, and how (or if) interfacial tension changes over time in the subsurface. The work described here uses a flow-through system to examine simultaneous partitioning and PCE dissolution in a porous medium. Results indicate that both nonylphenol ethoxylate nonionic surfactants and a sulfosuccinate anionic surfactant partition out of residual PCE much more rapidly than the PCE dissolves, suggesting that in many cases interfacial tension changes caused by partitioning may influence infiltration and distribution of PCE in the subsurface. Non-steady-state partitioning is found to be well-described by a linear driving force model incorporating measured surfactant partition coefficients.

  4. Bacteria associated with oak and ash on a TCE-contaminated site: Characterization of isolates with potential to avoid evapotranspiration of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Taghavi, S.; Barac, T.; Boulet, J.; Artois, T.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2009-11-01

    Along transects under a mixed woodland of English Oak (Quercus robur) and Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) growing on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater plume, sharp decreases in TCE concentrations were observed, while transects outside the planted area did not show this remarkable decrease. This suggested a possibly active role of the trees and their associated bacteria in the remediation process. Therefore, the cultivable bacterial communities associated with both tree species growing on this TCE-contaminated groundwater plume were investigated in order to assess the possibilities and practical aspects of using these common native tree species and their associated bacteria for phytoremediation. In this study, only the cultivable bacteria were characterized because the final aim was to isolate TCE-degrading, heavy metal resistant bacteria that might be used as traceable inocula to enhance bioremediation. Cultivable bacteria isolated from bulk soil, rhizosphere, root, stem, and leaf were genotypically characterized by amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) of their 16S rRNA gene and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria that displayed distinct ARDRA patterns were screened for heavy metal resistance, as well as TCE tolerance and degradation, as preparation for possible future in situ inoculation experiments. Furthermore, in situ evapotranspiration measurements were performed to investigate if the degradation capacity of the associated bacteria is enough to prevent TCE evapotranspiration to the air. Between both tree species, the associated populations of cultivable bacteria clearly differed in composition. In English Oak, more species-specific, most likely obligate endophytes were found. The majority of the isolated bacteria showed increased tolerance to TCE, and TCE degradation capacity was observed in some of the strains. However, in situ evapotranspiration measurements revealed that a significant amount of TCE and its metabolites was evaporating through the leaves to the atmosphere. The characterization of the isolates obtained in this study shows that the bacterial community associated with Oak and Ash on a TCE-contaminated site, was strongly enriched with TCE-tolerant strains. However, this was not sufficient to degrade all TCE before it reaches the leaves. A possible strategy to overcome this evapotranspiration to the atmosphere is to enrich the plant-associated TCE-degrading bacteria by in situ inoculation with endophytic strains capable of degrading TCE.

  5. Trichloroethene Reductive Dehalogenase from Dehalococcoides ethenogenes: Sequence of tceA and Substrate Range Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Jon K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Burris, David R.; Kingsley, Mark T.

    2000-01-01

    The anaerobic bacterium Dehalococcoides ethenogenes is the only known organism that can completely dechlorinate tetrachloroethene or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene via dehalorespiration. One of two corrinoid-containing enzymes responsible for this pathway, TCE reductive dehalogenase (TCE-RDase) catalyzes the dechlorination of TCE to ethene. TCE-RDase dehalogenated 1,2-dichloroethane and 1,2-dibromoethane to ethene at rates of 7.5 and 30 ?mol/min/mg, respectively, similar to the rates for TCE, cis-dichloroethene (DCE), and 1,1-DCE. A variety of other haloalkanes and haloalkenes containing three to five carbon atoms were dehalogenated at lower rates. The gene encoding TCE-RDase, tceA, was cloned and sequenced via an inverse PCR approach. Sequence comparisons of tceA to proteins in the public databases revealed weak sequence similarity confined to the C-terminal region, which contains the eight-iron ferredoxin cluster binding motif, (CXXCXXCXXXCP)2. Direct N-terminal sequencing of the mature enzyme indicated that the first 42 amino acids constitute a signal sequence containing the twin-arginine motif, RRXFXK, associated with the Sec-independent membrane translocation system. This information coupled with membrane localization studies indicated that TCE-RDase is located on the exterior of the cytoplasmic membrane. Like the case for the two other RDases that have been cloned and sequenced, a small open reading frame, tceB, is proposed to be involved with membrane association of TCE-RDase and is predicted to be cotranscribed with tceA. PMID:11097881

  6. Dechlorination of PCE by mixtures of green rust and zero-valent iron

    E-print Network

    Marchal, Fabienne

    2002-01-01

    electron flow in the system with zero-valent iron and green rust . . . . 3 Reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE by GRso4 at pH 8, 9, and 10 Some error bars are smaller than the symbols. 18 Corrected rate constant as a function of p.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Reductive dechlorination of 0. 246 mM PCE by treated ZVI at pH 8, 9 and 10. Some errors bars are smaller than the symbols. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Influence of pH and of the pretreatment of ZVI on first-order rate constants...

  7. Biodegradation of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene in a continuous flow column system

    SciTech Connect

    Isalou, M; Sleep, B.E. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Liss, S.N. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Applied Chemical and Biological Sciences] [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Applied Chemical and Biological Sciences

    1998-11-15

    A long-term (2.5 years) study of the anaerobic biodegradation of high concentrations of perchloroethylene (PCE) was carried out in a continuously operated laboratory column filled with sand which was inoculated with biomass from an anaerobic digester. Concentrations of PCE fed to the column were increased from 12 {micro}M to over 600 {micro}M over 21 months, with methanol added as electron donor. Vinyl chloride (VC) was the terminal product of PCE dechlorination for the first 21 months at which point significant conversion of VC to ethylene (ETH) was detected. The onset of ETH production coincided with acetogenesis becoming the primary pathway for methanol metabolism. ETH production occurred in the column in the presence of PCE and TCE. Varying methanol:PCE molar ratios from 1.4 to 7.5 had little effect on the transformation of PCE and TCE to VC. The degradation of VC to ETH was much more sensitive, and VC accumulated when the methanol:PCE molar ratio dropped below 5.0. Withdrawal of PCE from the system for a 5 month period and maintenance of the column on methanol alone did not result in the loss of PCE degradation capability of the consortium.

  8. Removal of gaseous trichloroethylene (TCE) in a composite membrane biofilm reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Kumar; Aline Vercruyssen; Jo Dewulf; Piet Lens; Herman Van Langenhove

    2012-01-01

    A membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) was investigated for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapors inoculated by Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4. Toluene (TOL) was used as the primary substrate. The MBfR was loaded sequentially with TOL, TCE (or both) during 110 days. In this study, a maximum steady-state TCE removal efficiency of 23% and a maximum volumetric elimination capacity (EC) of 2.1

  9. Steam and air co-injection in removing residual TCE in unsaturated layered sandy porous media.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sheng; Wang, Ning; Chen, Jiajun

    2013-10-01

    Steam and air co-injection is a promising technique for volatile and semi-volatile organic contaminant remediation in heterogeneous porous media. In this study, removal of trichloroethene (TCE) with steam-air co-injection was investigated through a series of 2D sandbox experiments with different layered sand structures, and through numerical simulations. The results show that a layered structure with coarse sand, in which steam and air convection are relatively rapid, resulted in a higher removal rate and a larger removal ratio than those observed in an experiment using finer sand; however, the difference was not significant, and the removal ratios from three experiments ranged from 85% to 94%. Slight downward movement of TCE was observed for Experiment 1 (TCE initially in a fine sand zone encased in a coarse sand), while no such movement was observed for Experiment 2 (TCE initially in two fine sand layers encased in a coarse sand) or 3 (TCE initially in a silty sand zone encased in a coarse sand). Simulations show accumulation of TCE at the interface of the layered sands, which indicates a capillary barrier effect in restraining the downward movement of TCE. This effect is illustrated further by a numerical experiment with homogeneous coarse sand, in which continuous downward TCE movement to the bottom of the sandbox was simulated. Another numerical experiment with higher water saturation was also conducted. The results illustrate a complicated influence of water saturation on TCE removal in a layered sand structure. PMID:23962760

  10. DEPENDENCE OF A HIGH-RATE, PCE-DECHLORINATING ENRICHMENT CULTURE ON METHANOGENIC ACTIVITY. (R825549C053)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role served by the presence of methanogenic activity within a tetrachloroethene (PCE)-dechlorinating culture was investigated through a series of supplementation experiments. An acclimated lactate-enrichment culture (LEC 1) capable of rapidly converting PCE to ethene was s...

  11. Sewer Gas: An Indoor Air Source of PCE to Consider During Vapor Intrusion Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kelly G.; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; McClean, Michael D.; Ames, Jennifer; Weldon, Brittany; Friguglietti, Leigh; Suuberg, Eric M.; Shen, Rui; Indeglia, Paul A.; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J.

    2013-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) is finalizing its vapor intrusion guidelines. One of the important issues related to vapor intrusion is background concentrations of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in indoor air, typically attributed to consumer products and building materials. Background concentrations can exist even in the absence of vapor intrusion and are an important consideration when conducting site assessments. In addition, the development of accurate conceptual models that depict pathways for vapor entry into buildings is important during vapor intrusion site assessments. Sewer gas, either as a contributor to background concentrations or as part of the site conceptual model, is not routinely evaluated during vapor intrusion site assessments. The research described herein identifies an instance where vapors emanating directly from a sanitary sewer pipe within a residence were determined to be a source of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) detected in indoor air. Concentrations of PCE in the bathroom range from 2.1 to 190 ug/m3 and exceed typical indoor air concentrations by orders of magnitude resulting in human health risk classified as an “Imminent Hazard” condition. The results suggest that infiltration of sewer gas resulted in PCE concentrations in indoor air that were nearly two-orders of magnitude higher as compared to when infiltration of sewer gas was not known to be occurring. This previously understudied pathway whereby sewers serve as sources of PCE (and potentially other VOC) vapors is highlighted. Implications for vapor intrusion investigations are also discussed. PMID:23950637

  12. Au Nanocluster assisted PCE improvement in PEDOT: PSS - Si Hybrid Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ayon, Arturo A.

    2015-03-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS), a P-type organic polymer is frequently employed in the fabrication of heterojunction p-n solar cell devices due to its proper HOMO-LUMO band gap as well as its tunable conductivity. In this report we describe the incorporation of gold (Au) nanoclusters in the PEDOT:PSS blend and its influence on the power-conversion-efficiency (PCE) on planar silicon (Si) hybrid heterojunction solar cell devices. Specifically, the reference samples without the aforementioned nanoclusters, were measured to exhibit a 6.10% PCE, value that increased to 7.55% upon the addition of the Au nanoclusters. The observed increase in the PCE is attributed to the enhanced electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS films due to the incorporation of the nanoclusters, which is directly reflected in their improved fill factor. It is further theorized that the presence of Au nanoclusters in the insulating PSS layer in the PEDOT:PSS blend have a positive influence in the charge collection effectiveness of the devices produced. Considering that the Au nanoparticles involved in this research exercise had an average size of only 4 nm, it is considered that plasmonic effects did not play a relevant role in the observed PCE improvement.

  13. Adult Neuropsychological Performance Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Vieira, Veronica; Aschengrau, Ann

    2012-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined adult performance on a battery of neuropsychological tests in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and a Geographic Information System (GIS). Results of crude and multivariate analyses among 35 exposed and 28 unexposed subjects showed no association between prenatal and early postnatal exposure and decrements on tests that assess abilities in the domains of omnibus intelligence, academic achievement or language. The results were suggestive of an association between prenatal and early postnatal PCE exposure and diminished performance on tests that assessed abilities in the domains of visuospatial functioning, learning and memory, motor, attention and mood. Because the sample size was small, most findings were not statistically significant. Future studies with larger sample sizes should be conducted to further define the neuropsychological consequences of early developmental PCE exposure. PMID:22522125

  14. Bacteria associated with oak and ash on a TCE-contaminated site: characterization of isolates with potential to avoid evapotranspiration of TCE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nele Weyens; Safiyh Taghavi; Tanja Barac; Daniel van der Lelie; Jana Boulet; Tom Artois; Robert Carleer; Jaco Vangronsveld

    2009-01-01

    Background, aim, and scope  Along transects under a mixed woodland of English Oak (Quercus robur) and Common Ash (Fraxinus excelsior) growing on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater plume, sharp decreases in TCE concentrations were observed,\\u000a while transects outside the planted area did not show this remarkable decrease. This suggested a possibly active role of the\\u000a trees and their associated bacteria in the

  15. RATE OF TCE DEGRADATION IN PASSIVE REACTIVE BARRIERS CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALLS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews a case study at Altus AFB on the extent of treatment of TCE in a passive reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch. It presents data from a tracer test to estimate the rate of ground water flow at the site, and the residence time of water and TCE in...

  16. Characterization of a TCE-Contaminated Aquifer Using Tritium-Helium Ages and Geochemical Tracers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. E. Murphy; I. D. Clark

    2009-01-01

    A deltaic sand aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). A numerical groundwater model is being developed to better define dissolved TCE transport and guide the implementation of remediation strategies. A geochemical characterization was carried out to further contrain the model with independent data. Tritium- helium (3H-3He) dating is a reliable method of determining groundwater residence times in shallow groundwater systems,

  17. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kirit D. Chapatwala; G. R. V. Babu; Larry Baresi; Richard M. Trunzo

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in

  18. MICROFRACTURE SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY AND ADHERENT MICROBIAL POPULATION METABOLISM IN TCE-CONTAMINATED COMPETENT BEDROCK

    EPA Science Inventory

    A TCE-contaminated competent bedrock site in Portsmouth, NH was used to determine if a relation existed between microfracture (MF) surface geochemistry and the ecology and metabolic activity of attached microbes relative to terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and TCE bi...

  19. Global Gene Expression of Dehalococcoides Within a Robust Dynamic TCE-Dechlorinating

    E-print Network

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    ARTICLE Global Gene Expression of Dehalococcoides Within a Robust Dynamic TCE was used to analyze gene expression in a robust long-term trichloroethene (TCE)- degrading microbial dehalogenase genes (DET0173 and DET1545) were most highly expressed at T2, likely in response to the presence

  20. Characterization of a TCE-Contaminated Aquifer Using Tritium-Helium Ages and Geochemical Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. E.; Clark, I. D.

    2009-05-01

    A deltaic sand aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). A numerical groundwater model is being developed to better define dissolved TCE transport and guide the implementation of remediation strategies. A geochemical characterization was carried out to further contrain the model with independent data. Tritium- helium (3H-3He) dating is a reliable method of determining groundwater residence times in shallow groundwater systems, which can be directly compared with simulated model ages [1, 2]. Changes in groundwater chemistry provide a way to trace dissolved TCE to its origin and identify groundwater flow paths [3]. In the studied aquifer, groundwater samples were obtained along flowlines originating from two distinct TCE source zones, which converge to form a single plume. Isotopic ages were compared to simulated ages using a range of values for porosity to determine the best match. In certain locations, anomalously old 3H-3He ages with high concentrations of terrigenic helium indicate areas where groundwater from the underlying proglacial unit flows upward into the deltaic sand aquifer through aquitard windows. The upflow locations correspond with increased TCE concentrations, suggesting significant TCE provenance from the proglacial unit and a potential third source of TCE contributing to the plume. Geochemical signatures associated with each TCE source zone were identified by examining spatial patterns in groundwater chemistry. Geochemical tracers such as dissolved ions, stable isotopes and other parameters were used to distinguish the relative TCE contribution from each source zone, and support the possibility of a third TCE source. This original approach of characterizing groundwater flow and contaminant history can lead to more reprensentative numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. [1] Solomon et al. (1992) Wat. Resour. Res. 28, 741-755. [2] Dunkle-Shapiro et al. (1998) Wat. Resour. Res. 34, 1165-1180. [3] Glynn & Plummer (2005) Hydrogeol. J. 13, 263-287.

  1. Effectiveness of stimulating PCE reductive dechlorination: A step-wise approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Zhuobiao; Smit, Martijn; Grotenhuis, Tim; van Gaans, Pauline; Rijnaarts, Huub

    2014-08-01

    Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products in aquifers is often hampered by Fe(III) reducing conditions. Rigorous treatment to adjust the redox potential and stimulate dechlorination may be costly and potentially have negative effects on other aquifer functions. A step-wise experimental strategy was applied to investigate the effectiveness of various adjustment scenarios. Batch experiments with ascorbic acid (AA) and sodium lactate (SL) showed that 75 ?mol electron equivalents per gram dry mass of aquifer material was required to reach a sufficiently low redox potential for the onset of PCE dechlorination. Similar effects of either AA or SL on the measured redox potential suggest electron donors are not specific. However, the relative rates of Fe(III) and sulphate reduction appeared to be specific to the electron donor applied. While redox potential stabilised around - 450 mV after titration and sulphate was reduced to zero in both treatments, in the AA treatment a faster production of Fe2 + was observed with a final concentration of 0.46 mM compared to only 0.07 mM in the SL treatment. In subsequent batch experiments with aquifer material that was pre-treated with AA or SL, PCE reductive dechlorination occurred within 30 days. Further stimulation tests with extra electron donor or inoculum revealed that adding electron donor can accelerate the initiation of PCE biodegradation. However, bioaugmentation with dechlorinating bacteria is required to achieve complete reductive dechlorination to ethene. The findings from step-wise approaches are relevant for improving the cost-effectiveness of the design and operation of in-situ bioremediation at initially unfavourable environmental conditions.

  2. A service plane over the PCE architecture for automatic multidomain connection-oriented services

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Douville; J.-L. Le Roux; J.-L. Rougier; S. Secci

    2008-01-01

    In this article we concentrate on the automated provisioning of inter-AS services based on GMPLS-TE technology. We consider a provider alliance where TE connections are established between the members of the alliance. We propose an efficient and economically feasible architecture for the automatic provisioning of inter-AS GMPLS-TE, based on the introduction of a multidomain service plane coupled with the PCE-based

  3. A risk-based cleanup criterion for PCE in soil. [Tetrachloroethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, J.I.; McKone, T.E.; Hall, L.C.

    1990-09-26

    The most important attribute of a chemical contaminant at a hazardous-wastes site for decision makers to consider with regard to its cleanup is the potential risk associated with human exposure. For this reason we have developed a strategy for establishing a risk-based cleanup criterion for chemicals in soil. We describe this strategy by presenting a cleanup criterion for tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in soil associated with a representative California landscape. We being by discussing the environmental fate and transport model, developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), that we used to predict the equilibrium concentration of PCE in five environmental media from a steady-state source in soil. Next, we explain the concept and application of pathway-exposure factors (PEFs), the hazard index, and cancer-potency factors (CPFs) for translating the predicted concentrations of PCE into estimated potential hazard or risk for hypothetically exposed individuals. Finally, the relationship between concentration and an allowable level of risk is defined and the societal and financial implications are discussed. 22 refs., 6 tabs.

  4. Use of emulsified vegetable oil to support bioremediation of TCE DNAPL in soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Mark; Fisher, Angela

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and trichloroethylene (TCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) was observed using two soil columns and subsequent reductive dechlorination of TCE was monitored over a three year period. Dyed TCE DNAPL (~ 75 g) was emplaced in one column (DNAPL column), while the second was DNAPL-free (plume column). EVO was added to both columns and partitioning of the EVO into the TCE DNAPL was measured and quantified. TCE (1.9 mM) was added to the influent of the plume column to simulate conditions down gradient of a DNAPL source area and the columns were operated independently for more than one year, after which they were connected in series. Initially limited dechlorination of TCE to cDCE was observed in the DNAPL column, while the plume column supported complete reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. Upon connection and reamendment of the plume column with EVO, near saturation levels of TCE from the effluent of the DNAPL column were rapidly dechlorinated to c-DCE and VC in the plume column; however, this high rate dechlorination produced hydrochloric acid which overwhelmed the buffering capacity of the system and caused the pH to drop below 6.0. Dechlorination efficiency in the columns subsequently deteriorated, as measured by the chloride production and Dehalococcoides counts, but was restored by adding sodium bicarbonate buffer to the influent groundwater. Robust dechlorination was eventually observed in the DNAPL column, such that the TCE DNAPL was largely removed by the end of the study. Partitioning of the EVO into the DNAPL provided significant operational benefits to the remediation system both in terms of electron donor placement and longevity.

  5. Removal of trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated soil using a two-stage anaerobic-aerobic composting technique.

    PubMed

    Ponza, Supat; Parkpian, Preeda; Polprasert, Chongrak; Shrestha, Rajendra P; Jugsujinda, Aroon

    2010-01-01

    The effect of organic carbon addition on remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated clay soil was investigated using a two stage anaerobic-aerobic composting system. TCE removal rate and processes involved were determined. Uncontaminated clay soil was treated with composting materials (dried cow manure, rice husk and cane molasses) to represent carbon based treatments (5%, 10% and 20% OC). All treatments were spiked with TCE at 1,000 mg TCE/kg DW and incubated under anaerobic and mesophillic condition (35 degrees C) for 8 weeks followed by continuous aerobic condition for another 6 weeks. TCE dissipation, its metabolites and biogas composition were measured throughout the experimental period. Results show that TCE degradation depended upon the amount of organic carbon (OC) contained within the composting treatments/matrices. The highest TCE removal percentage (97%) and rate (75.06 micro Mole/kg DW/day) were obtained from a treatment of 10% OC composting matrices as compared to 87% and 27.75 micro Mole/kg DW/day for 20% OC, and 83% and 38.08 micro Mole/kg DW/day for soil control treatment. TCE removal rate was first order reaction kinetics. Highest degradation rate constant (k(1) = 0.035 day(- 1)) was also obtained from the 10% OC treatment, followed by 20% OC (k(1) = 0.026 day(- 1)) and 5% OC or soil control treatment (k(1) = 0.023 day(- 1)). The half-life was 20, 27 and 30 days, respectively. The overall results suggest that sequential two stages anaerobic-aerobic composting technique has potential for remediation of TCE in heavy texture soil, providing that easily biodegradable source of organic carbon is present. PMID:20390902

  6. Sorption model of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benezene in municipal landfill materials 

    E-print Network

    Chuang, Yuh-Lin

    1995-01-01

    This research is intended to establish a mathematical model describing the mass transfer of trace gas in landfill. Experimental data used for calibration were reported by Stiegler et al. [ 1989]. Transfer mechanisms of TCE and benzene (trace gases...

  7. Remediation of TCE contaminated soils by in situ EK-Fenton process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gordon C. C. Yang; Chyi-Yech Liu

    2001-01-01

    The treatment performance and cost analysis of in situ electrokinetic (EK)-Fenton process for oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in soils were evaluated in this work. In all experiments, an electric gradient of 1V\\/cm, de-ionized water as the cathode reservoir fluid and a treatment time of 10 days were employed. Treatment efficiencies of TCE were evaluated in terms of the electrode material,

  8. Pneumococcal phosphorylcholine esterase, Pce, contains a metal binuclear center that is essential for substrate binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Lagartera, Laura; González, Ana; Hermoso, Juan A.; Saíz, José L.; García, Pedro; García, José L.; Menéndez, Margarita

    2005-01-01

    The phosphorylcholine esterase from Streptococcus pneumoniae, Pce, catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine residues from teichoic and lipoteichoic acids attached to the bacterial envelope and comprises a globular N-terminal catalytic module containing a zinc binuclear center and an elongated C-terminal choline-binding module. The dependence of Pce activity on the metal/enzyme stoichiometry shows that the two equivalents of zinc are essential for the catalysis, and stabilize the catalytic module through a complex metal-ligand coordination network. The pH dependence of Pce activity toward the alternative substrate p-nitrophenylphosphorylcholine (NPPC) shows that kcat and kcat/Km depend on the protonation state of two protein residues that can be tentatively assigned to the ionization of the metal-bound water (hydrogen bonded to D89) and to H228. Maximum activity requires deprotonation of both groups, although the catalytic efficiency is optimum for the single deprotonated form. The drastic reduction of activity in the H90A mutant, which still binds two Zn2+ ions at neutral pH, indicates that Pce activity also depends on the geometry of the metallic cluster. The denaturation heat capacity profile of Pce exhibits two peaks with Tm values of 39.6°C (choline-binding module) and 60.8°C (catalytic module). The H90A mutation reduces the high-temperature peak by about 10°C. Pce is inhibited in the presence of 1 mM zinc, but this inhibition depends on pH, buffer, and substrate species. A reaction mechanism is proposed on the basis of kinetic data, the structural model of the Pce:NPPC complex, and the currently accepted mechanism for other Zn-metallophosphoesterases. PMID:16260756

  9. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-03-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  10. Endophytic bacteria improve phytoremediation of Ni and TCE co-contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Croes, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate if engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of co-contaminations by organic pollutants and toxic metals. As a model system, yellow lupine was inoculated with the endophyte Burkholderia cepacia VM1468 possessing (a) the pTOM-Bu61 plasmid, coding for constitutive trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation, and (b) the ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system. Plants were exposed to Ni and TCE and (a) Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, (b) TCE degradation and evapotranspiration, and (c) Ni concentrations in the roots and shoots were determined. Inoculation with B. cepacia VM1468 resulted in decreased Ni and TCE phytotoxicity, as measured by 30% increased root biomass and up to 50% decreased activities of enzymes involved in anti-oxidative defence in the roots. In addition, TCE evapotranspiration showed a decreasing trend and a 5 times higher Ni uptake was observed after inoculation. Engineered endophytes can improve phytoremediation of mixed contaminations via enhanced degradation of organic contaminants and improved metal uptake and translocation.

  11. Effects of a nutrient-surfactant compound on solubilization rates of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, M.T.; Strong-Gunderson, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    BioTreat{trademark}, a commercially available nutrient-surfactant compound, was investigated for its ability to solubilize TCE. Potential mechanisms for enhancing biodegradation rates by the use of nutrient-surfactant mixtures are: increased solubilization of TCE into the aqueous phase, and increased nutrients for the bacteria and greater numbers of colony forming units (CFUs). In aqueous systems, no measured solubilization of 0.1 and 1.0 ppm TCE from the headspace into the liquid phase was observed with BioTreat added at concentrations <0.5%. However, at BioTreat concentrations in excess of the CMC (>0.5%), increased solubilization of TCE was measured. A second question was the nutrient effect of BioTreat on the growth of the TCE-degrading bacterium, Burkholderia cepacia G4 PR1{sub 301}. The added nutrients provided by BioTreat was evident and lead to increased cell numbers. The effect of BioTreat on the expression of ortho-monooxgenase, the enzyme necessary for TCE degradation by B. cepacia was also investigated. Enzyme expression as detected by a calorimetric assay was inhibited for BioTreat concentrations >0.05%. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. No radioadaptive response to micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction in murine peripheral blood in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Morales-Ramirez, P.; Vallarino-Kelly, T.; Rodriguez-Reyes, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    1997-10-01

    The effect of conditioning pretreatment with 0.025 Gy of gamma rays on micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MN-PCE) induction by 1.0 or 0.1 Gy of gamma rays was determined in murine peripheral blood. The adaptive and challenge doses as well as the timing of their administration were taken from a previously reported experiment. The response was determined by the strategy of measuring the area below the curve (ABC) of MN-PCE induction vs. time. This strategy permits one to determine an index of total damage and to establish if conditioning exposure affects the timing of MN-PCE appearance in the blood stream, which in turn could cause an apparent difference in response between the conditioned and the unconditioned groups at specific times. The results indicate that low dose gamma ray pretreatment does not protect against MN-PCE induction by the challenge gamma ray dose, and that there was no change on the kinetics of MN-PCE appearance in peripheral blood. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Bioremediation of TCE contaminated groundwater using aerobic bioaugmentation: Field demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Bourquin, A.W.; Mosteller, D.C.; Olsen, R.L.; Smith, M.J. [Camp Dresser and McKee Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Reardon, K.F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Groundwater throughout the central district of Wichita, Kansas, is contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE) and dichloroethene (DCE). A field study demonstrated the feasibility of aerobic bioremediation using bioaugmentation with Burkholderia cepacia PR1{sub 301} to degrade the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs). The CAH biodegradative capabilities of the strain are unique because it is constitutive for toluene ortho-monooxygenase (TOM). Field trials were conducted with PR1 grown to high cell densities and high TOM activity and continuously added to the groundwater with oxygen through an injection well. Monitoring points were installed 5 days hydraulic flow upgradient and 2, 5, 10, and 15 days downgradient from the injection well. A bromide groundwater tracer study was used to determine hydraulic flow, flowpath and retardation of oxygen, contaminants and microorganisms. Oxygen was retarded in the soil formation by 60 days but this could not be attributed to reduced constituents or microbial activity. The field test was amended to determine the feasibility of a biological barrier which would effectively remove all contaminants from the groundwater flowing through it. The injection well simulated the trench with an average 250 ppb total CAHs moving through the system. The microorganisms degraded to non-detect all contaminants in the aerobic system within 24 hours following injection and maintained that level for 4 days. Total mass of contaminants degraded during the test period is estimated at 10.23 mg, or 94.5 {micro}g/L/h. The test system formed an effective removal barrier for contamination allowing clean groundwater to flow downgradient of the injection well. This was the first demonstration that bioaugmentation could effectively degrade CAHs using a laboratory developed strain. CDM is designing an in-ground trench for maintaining a biological barrier to prevent further migration of groundwater contaminates at the Gilbert-Mosley site.

  14. The Effect of FeS Mineral Transformation on TCE Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. T.; Wilson, J. T.; Wilkin, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Iron- and sulfate-reducing conditions are often encountered in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems that are constructed to remove TCE from groundwater, which usually leads to the accumulation of FeS mineral phases in the matrix of the PRB. Poorly crystalline mackinawite (FeS) has been shown to play an important role in the removal of TCE in these engineered systems. In a column experiment simulating conditions in a PRB at Altus AFB in Oklahoma, USA, abiotic reaction of TCE with FeS could account for up to 50% of TCE removal in the PRB. However, the rate constant obtained in the column experiment with biogenic FeS was an order of magnitude higher than rates reported in the literature for TCE reaction with chemically synthesized FeS. The experiments reported in the literature used freeze drying as part of its preparation for synthesized FeS. To resolve the discrepancy between our results from biogenic FeS and the reports in the literature, we conducted batch experiments with FeS that was chemically synthesized under conditions that corresponded to the geochemical conditions in the column experiment (final free sulfide concentrations ~5 mg/L). All operations were carried out in an oxygen free glove box. One set of experiments were conducted with chemically synthesized FeS kept in suspension throughout the experiment, and a second set of experiments were conducted using FeS that had been freeze dried, then resuspended in water. The pH and free sulfide concentrations were adjusted to equal the conditions in the first set of experiments. The results show that 13C labeled TCE is readily degraded by FeS to acetylene and CO2. TCE degradation rate by FeS kept in suspension is 20-40 times faster than the freeze dried FeS. The effect of pH on TCE degradation is also investigated in this study. Mineralogical characterization by XRD and XAS show FeS in suspension remains as mackinawite (FeS) through out the experiment duration (56d), while freeze dried FeS changes over time from mackinawite (FeS) to a mixture of mackinawite, greigite, pyrite, a transient phase lepidocrocite and goethite. This study show that freeze drying process could significantly change FeS mineralogy, and the mineralogy characteristics of FeS has important impact on its reactivity over TCE degradation. This is an abstract of a proposed presentation and does not necessarily reflect EPA policy.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of vibrational spectra of coordination polymers based on TCE-TTF.

    PubMed

    Olejniczak, Iwona; Lapi?ski, Andrzej; Swietlik, Roman; Olivier, Jean; Golhen, Stéphane; Ouahab, Lahcène

    2011-08-01

    The room-temperature infrared and Raman spectra of a series of four isostructural polymeric salts of 2,3,6,7-tetrakis(2-cyanoethylthio)-tetrathiafulvalene (TCE-TTF) with paramagnetic (Co(II), Mn(II)) and diamagnetic (Zn(II), Cd(II)) ions, together with BF(4)(-) or ClO(4)(-) anions are reported. Infrared and Raman-active modes are identified and assigned based on theoretical calculations for neutral and ionized TCE-TTF using density functional theory (DFT) methods. It is confirmed that the TCE-TTF molecules in all the materials investigated are fully ionized and interact in the crystal structure through cyanoethylthio groups. The vibrational modes related to the C=C stretching vibrations of TCE-TTF are analyzed assuming the occurrence of electron-molecular vibration coupling (EMV). The presence of the antisymmetric C=C dimeric mode provides evidence that charge transfer takes place between TCE-TTF molecules belonging to neighboring polymeric networks. PMID:21648046

  16. TCE degradation by toluene/benzene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 and Escherichia coli recombinant

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Junichi [National Univ. of Yokohama (Japan). Div. of Bioengineering; Kitayama, Atsushi [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biotechnology

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 incorporates more than three degradation pathways for aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylene. A dioxygenase and two monooxygenases were cloned in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue. The dioxygenase yielding cis-toluene dihydrodiol and one of the monooxygenases producing o-cresol from toluene did not exhibit conspicuous activity in trichloroethylene (TCE) oxygenation, although DNA sequencing proved that the former enzyme was an isozyme of toluene dioxygenase of the known TCE decomposer P.putida F1. The other toluene/benzene monooxygenase that could generate o-, m-, and p-cresol simultaneously from toluene showed TCE oxygenation activity resulting in TCE decomposition in E. coli. The activity was inhibited competitively by toluene, ethylbenzene, and o- and m-xylene: their inhibition constants were greater than those of propylbenzene and p-xylene. When the E. coli recombinant harboring the monooxygenase was induced by isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and incubated in the absence of toluene, TCE degradation activity decreased during incubation, compared to that with toluene. Toluene probably controlled the lifetime of the enzyme.

  17. TCE Transport to Woburn Wells G and H

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Bair

    To prepare to view the TCE animation, students could view the 'A Civil Action' movie and the instructor could read to them excerpts from the trial testimony and images from Woburn, wells G and H, geologic materials, geologic cross sections, the trial participants, and the federal courtroom in Boston (available as a attachment to this activity and at a website listed below). The discussion in Bair (2001) about scientists in the courtroom, the specific (excerpted) testimony presented by the three expert witnesses in the 'A Civil Action' trial, a chart summarizing the differences in their testimony, and the views of a federal judge on the goal of science versus the goal of a civil trial may also be worthwhile reading by the class prior to the assignment. The instructor could also show students the large plates included in the USGS report by Myette and others (1987) that display potentiometric data and contours before and after the famous aquifer test performed in December 1985 and January 1986, just before the trial, and discuss the ramifications of having only two sets of water-level measurements to characterize all the changes in the flow system between 1964 and 1979, when wells G and H periodically operated. This makes students consider the substantial differences in making predictions based on a steady-state conceptualization of the flow system or a transient conceptualization. The instructor could also show the animation of induced infiltration from the Aberjona River to wells G and H that also was created by Martin van Oort (M.S., 2005) and based on the research of Maura Metheny (M.S., 1998; Ph.D., 2004) at Ohio State University. Viewing both animations enables students to see that the water produced by wells G and H is a highly transient mixture derived from many different source areas within the valley. The article by Bair and Metheny (2002) concerning the remediation activities at the Wells G & H Superfund Site could be used to show how groundwater contamination is cleaned up, why different remediation schemes needed to be used in different hydrogeologic settings, and why cleanup to U.S. EPA standards can take decades.

  18. PCE-based scalable dynamic path control for large-scale photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Soichiro; Shimada, Kohei; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken-ichi; Iizawa, Yohei; Ishida, Shinya; Nishioka, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an inter-domain path control system based on PCE (Path Computation Element) for large-scale photonic networks, especially for a photonic network across over multiple carrier domains. We discuss the overall architecture of multi-domain optical network control system. The system utilizes maximum flow information in path computation and Path Key scheme in signaling, which improve the load-balancing and the confidentiality of the inside information for the route computation and the path provisioning among different carriers. We also provide measured performance results for inter-domain path computation and path setups using global optimization scheme, estimating the path provisioning time at the network scale dependency with the route computation time and the signaling time. As a result, we show its applicability to a 1000-node scale photonic network.

  19. The Observation of the Change of TCE Caused by Different Acupuncture Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Cheng, Xinnong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To observe the change of transcutaneous CO2 emission on meridian points or nonacupoints when the different needle sensations were gotten and study the associativity between Deqi acupuncture and periphery constitution energy metabolism effect. Method. 20 healthy volunteers were punctured on Neiguan (P6) in different ways including sham, shallow, Deqi acupuncture, and Deqi plus pressed P5, and measured TCE of different points before, during, and after acupuncture. Result. Needle sensations of sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture were less than those of Deqi acupuncture. TCE of meridian points increased significantly and showed the specificity of meridian/channels. Conclusion. Verum acupuncture could cause the stronger needling sensations including distention, aching, numbness, and tingling than sham and shallow acupuncture. The strength of needling sensation caused by Deqi acupuncture is moderate and brought the best curative effects in TCE measurement. Deqi acupuncture could improve the energy metabolism of the points on the corresponding meridian/channel. PMID:24069059

  20. Visualization of TCE recovery mechanisms using surfactant polymer solutions in a two-dimensional heterogeneous sand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Thomas; Martel, Richard; Conrad, Stephen H.; Lefebvre, René; Gabriel, Uta

    2006-06-01

    This research focused on the optimization of TCE dissolution in a physical two-dimensional model providing a realistic representation of a heterogeneous granular aquifer. TCE was infiltrated in the sand pack where it resided both in pools and in zones of residual saturation. Surfactant was initially injected at low concentration to minimize TCE remobilization at first contact but was incrementally increased later during the experiment. Xanthan gum was added to the injected surfactant solution to optimize the sweep efficiency through the heterogeneous medium. Photographs and digital image analysis illustrated the interactions between TCE and the injected fluids. During the polymer flood, the effects of heterogeneities inside the sand pack were greatly reduced by the increased fluid viscosity and the shear-thinning effects of the polymer. The polymer also improved the contact between the TCE ganglia and the surfactant-polymer solution, thereby promoting dissolution. Surfactants interacted with the polymer reducing the overall viscosity of the solution. At first contact with a 0.5% mass surfactant solution, the TCE pools drained and some remobilization occurred. However, no TCE bank was formed and TCE did not penetrate into any previously uncontaminated areas. As a result, TCE surface area was increased. Subsequent surfactant floods at higher surfactant concentrations did not trigger more remobilization. TCE was mainly dissolved by the solution with the highest surfactant concentration. Plugging from bacterial growth or microgel formation associated to the polymer at the inflow screen prevented the full completion of the experiment. However, more than 90% of TCE was recovered with the circulation of less than 6 pore volumes of surfactant-polymer solution.

  1. INFLUENCE OF HYDRAULIC RETENTION TIME ON EXTENT OF PCE DECHLORINATION AND PRELIMINARY CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ENRICHMENT CULTURE. (R826694C703)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dechlorination in two chemostats was evaluated as a function of hydraulic retention time (HRT). The inoculum of these chemostats was from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor that rapidly converts PCE to vinyl chloride (VC) an...

  2. Age-associated T-cell Clonal Expansions (TCE) in vivo—Implications for Pathogen Resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janko Nikolich-Žugich; Anna Lang

    Age-related T-cell clonal expansions (TCE) are an incompletely understood disturbance in T-cell homeostasis found frequently\\u000a in old humans and experimental animals. These accumulations of CD8 T-cells have the potential to distort T-cell population\\u000a balance and reduce T-cell repertoire diversity above and beyond the changes seen in the aging of T-cell pool in the absence\\u000a of TCE. This chapter discusses our

  3. The 3rd Annual International TCE Conference Machine Learning & Big Data

    E-print Network

    Schuster, Assaf

    The 3rd Annual International TCE Conference Machine Learning & Big Data Call for Presentations and Big Data. Topics include learning from huge datasets, compressing, streaming, inferring, utilizing to submit a presentation on all facets related to Machine Learning and Big Data. A limited number

  4. Lossy-to-Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery Using Three-Dimensional TCE and an

    E-print Network

    Fowler, James E.

    imaging devices, compression of hyperspectral datasets is becoming of critical interest in many application areas. There have been a number of compression techniques proposed for hyperspectral imagesLossy-to-Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery Using Three-Dimensional TCE and an Integer

  5. Diversity of Pristine Methanotrophic Communities in a Basalt Aquifer: Implications for Natural Attenuation of TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, D. W.; Newby, D. T.; Delwiche, M. E.; Igoe, A.; McKinley, J. P.; Roberto, F. F.; Colwell, F. S.

    2001-12-01

    Natural attenuation of a large trichloroethylene (TCE) plume within the oxic Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) appears to be occurring by aerobic co-metabolism. Methanotrophs are some of the key TCE degraders known to inhabit the aquifer. To better understand the role methanotrophs may have in TCE degradation and the relationship of methanotrophs to dissolved methane concentrations, groundwater collected from wells in the SRPA was analyzed for geochemical properties and methanotroph diversity. Microorganisms removed from groundwater by filtration were used as inocula for enrichments or were frozen and subsequently extracted for DNA. Primers that target Type I and Type II methanotroph 16S rDNA or genes that code for soluble (mmoX) and particulate (pmoA) methane monooxygenase subunits were used to characterize the indigenous methanotrophs via PCR, cloning, and sequencing. Groundwater had dissolved methane concentrations that ranged from 1 to >1000 nM. Analysis of sequencing results suggest that the group Methylocystaceae is a predominant Type II methanotroph in each sample. Methanotrophs can be detected and enriched from groundwater containing even low methane concentrations. Analysis of gene sequences provides assessments of methanotroph abundance and diversity with respect to the aquifer methane concentrations, imparting greater insight into the genetic potential of the microbial community capable of degrading TCE. This research will continue to focus on the evaluation of natural attenuation by methanotrophs.

  6. A SEARCH FOR RESIDUAL BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) IN RATS EXPOSED AS YOUNG ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a solvent of concern to the EPA due to its extensive use in industry, its prevalence in urban air, and its appearance in water supplies. Human clinical studies have associated short and long-termsolvent exposures with cognitive dysfunction including att...

  7. Abiotic and Biotic Transformation of TCE under Sulfate Reducing Conditions: the Role of Spatial Heterogeneity

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a number of sites in the USA, passive reactive barriers built with shredded plant mulch have been constructed to treat ground water contaminated with TCE. These barriers are called biowalls because anaerobic biodegradation of the plant mulch is expected to provide substrates...

  8. Decision Tree based Prediction and Rule Induction for Groundwater Trichloroethene (TCE) Pollution Vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Yoo, K.

    2013-12-01

    For groundwater resource conservation, it is important to accurately assess groundwater pollution sensitivity or vulnerability. In this work, we attempted to use data mining approach to assess groundwater pollution vulnerability in a TCE (trichloroethylene) contaminated Korean industrial site. The conventional DRASTIC method failed to describe TCE sensitivity data with a poor correlation with hydrogeological properties. Among the different data mining methods such as Artificial Neural Network (ANN), Multiple Logistic Regression (MLR), Case Base Reasoning (CBR), and Decision Tree (DT), the accuracy and consistency of Decision Tree (DT) was the best. According to the following tree analyses with the optimal DT model, the failure of the conventional DRASTIC method in fitting with TCE sensitivity data may be due to the use of inaccurate weight values of hydrogeological parameters for the study site. These findings provide a proof of concept that DT based data mining approach can be used in predicting and rule induction of groundwater TCE sensitivity without pre-existing information on weights of hydrogeological properties.

  9. Dechlorination after thermal treatment of a TCE-contaminated aquifer: laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Friis, A K; Edwards, E A; Albrechtsen, H-J; Udell, K S; Duhamel, M; Bjerg, P L

    2007-03-01

    A microcosm study was conducted to evaluate dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene and survival of dechlorinating bacteria after a thermal treatment in order to explore the potential for post-thermal bioremediation. Unamended microcosms containing groundwater and aquifer material from a contaminated site dechlorinated TCE to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), while lactate-amended microcosms dechlorinated TCE to cDCE or ethene. A thermal treatment was simulated by heating a sub-set of microcosms to 100 degrees C for 10d followed by cooling to 10 degrees C over 150 d. The heated microcosms demonstrated no dechlorination when unamended. However, when amended with lactate, cDCE was produced in 2 out of 6 microcosms within 300 d after heating. Dechlorination of TCE to cDCE thus occurred in fewer heated (2 out of 12) than unheated (10 out of 12) microcosms. In unheated microcosms, the presence of dechlorinating microorganisms, including Dehalococcoides, was confirmed using nested PCR of 16S rRNA genes. Dechlorinating microorganisms were detected in fewer microcosms after heating, and Dehalococcoides were not detected in any microcosms after heating. Dechlorination may therefore be limited after a thermal treatment in areas that have been heated to 100 degrees C. Thus, inflow of groundwater containing dechlorinating microorganisms and/or bioaugmention may be needed for anaerobic dechlorination to occur after a thermal treatment. PMID:17174379

  10. REMEDIATION OF TCE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER BY A PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER FILLED WITH PLANT MULCH (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier filled with plant mulch was installed at Altus Air Force Base (in Oklahoma, USA) to treat trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in ground water emanating from a landfill. The barrier was constructed in June 2002. It was 139 meters long, 7 ...

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Davis Park Road TCE, Gastonia, NC, September 29, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Davis Park Road TCE Site in Gastonia, Gaston County, North Carolina. This remedy addressees the principle threat posed by the Site. The major threat is the contaminated groundwater emanating from beneath the Site.

  12. Monitoring Performance of a Dual Wall Permeable Reactive Barrier for Treating Perchlorate and TCE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. E. Dowman; Y. Hashimoto; S. Warner; P. Bennett; D. Gandhi; F. Szerdy; S. Neville; C. Fennessy; K. M. Scow

    2008-01-01

    AMEC Geomatrix, through collaboration with Aerojet General Corporation and the University of California, Davis (UCD), has performed work leading to the installation of a dual wall permeable reactive barrier (PRB) system capable of treating perchlorate and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbon compounds (CAHs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), at Aerojet's Area 40 site in Sacramento, California. This unique system consisted of an upgradient zero-valent

  13. FIELD SCALE EVALUATION OF TREATMENT OF TCE IN A BIOWALL AT THE OU-1 SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier (Biowall) was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contamin...

  14. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ground water contaminated with TCE is commonly treated with a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) constructed with zero-valence iron. The cost of iron as the reactive matrix has driven a search for less costly alternatives, and composted plant mulch has been used as an alternative ...

  15. RATE OF TCE DEGRADATION IN A PLANT MULCH PASSIVE REACTIVE BARRIER (BIOWALL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A passive reactive barrier was installed at the OU-1 site at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma to treat TCE contamination in ground water from a landfill. Depth to ground water varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters below land surface. To intercept and treat the plume of contaminated groun...

  16. Betula pendula: A Promising Candidate for Phytoremediation of TCE in Northern Climates.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jeffrey; Qvarfort, Ulf; Sjöström, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Betula pendula (Silver birch) trees growing on two contaminated sites were evaluated to assess their capacity to phytoscreen and phytoremediate chlorinated aliphatic compounds and heavy metals. Both locations are industrially-contaminated properties in central Sweden. The first was the site of a trichloroethylene (TCE) spill in the 1980s while the second was polluted with heavy metals by burning industrial wastes. In both cases, sap and sapwood from Silver birch trees were collected and analyzed for either chlorinated aliphatic compounds or heavy metals. These results were compared to analyses of the surface soil, vadose zone pore air and groundwater. Silver birch demonstrated the potential to phytoscreen and possibly phytoremediate TCE and related compounds, but it did not demonstrate the ability to effectively phytoextract heavy metals when compared with hyperaccumulator plants. The capacity of Silver birch to phytoremediate TCE appears comparable to tree species that have been employed in field-scale TCE phytoremediation efforts, such as Populus spp. and Eucalyptus sideroxylon rosea. PMID:25174420

  17. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy. PMID:24096200

  18. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  19. 20 kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in sodium sulfate aqueous media: Influence of the operational variables in batch mode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Verónica Sáez; María Deseada Esclapez; Ignacio Tudela; Pedro Bonete; Olivier Louisnard; José González-García

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study of the 20kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in aqueous sodium sulfate has been carried out using controlled current density degradation sonoelectrolyses in batch mode. An important improvement in the viability of the sonochemical process is achieved when the electrochemistry is implemented, but the improvement of the electrochemical treatment is lower when the 20kHz ultrasound field is simultaneously

  20. Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing of surfactants for environmental restoration of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.E. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Fountain, J.C. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    This project is composed of two phases and has the objective of demonstrating surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) as a practical remediation technology at DOE sites with ground water contaminated by dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), in particular, chlorinated solvents. The first phase of this project, Laboratory and Pilot Field Scale Testing, which is the subject of the work so far, involves (1) laboratory experiments to examine the solubilization of multiple component DNAPLs, e.g., solvents such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), by dilute surfactant solutions, and (2) a field test to demonstrate SEAR technology on a small scale and in an existing well.

  1. Radiation induced dechlorination of some chlorinated hydrocarbons in aqueous suspensions of various solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mú?ka, V.; Bu?ata, M.; ?uba, V.; Silber, R.; Juha, L.

    2015-07-01

    Radiation induced dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in aqueous solutions containing the active carbon (AC) or cupric oxide (CuO) as the modifiers was studied. The obtained results were compared to the previously studied dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both modifiers were found to decrease the efficiency of dechlorination. The AC modifier acts mainly via adsorption of the aliphatic (unlike the aromatic) hydrocarbons and the CuO oxide mainly inhibits the mineralization of the perchloroethylene. The results presented in this paper will be also helpful for the studies of the impact of chlorinated hydrocarbons on the membrane permeability of living cells.

  2. Superfund explanation of signifcant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 3): Bendix Flight Systems Division, Bridgewater Township, South Montrose, Susquehanna County, PA, January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The Bendix Superfund Site is an active aircraft instrument manufacturing plant. This disposal practices resulted in contamination of the soil and groundwater, with chemicals including trichloroethylene (`TCE`), perchloroethylene (`PCE`), 1,1,1-trichloroethylene (`TCA`), vinyl chloride, benzene, and xylene. The responsible party requested that the remedy be changed to provide for soil excavation and aeration on the west side of the plant instead of vacuum extraction. This ESD allows for the same remedial action (i.e mechanical soils aeration) to occur for soils on the west side of the plant as was specified in the Record of Decision for the east side of the plant.

  3. Change of pH and Iron Ion Concentration During Photodegradation of TCE with Ferrioxalate/UVvis Process

    SciTech Connect

    Hareyama, Wataru; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Nakazawa, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Iwate University, Morioka (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Recently, some studies show various organic compounds such as pesticides and dyes degraded with the irradiation of ultraviolet light and visible light in the presence of oxalic acid and ferric ion (ferrioxalate/UVvis process). The process has much advance than other technologies because it can utilize the wavelength of 300{approx}450nm and also under the condition of neutral pH. Chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE), which have caused ground water pollution on a lot of sites, have never been applied by photodegradation with this process. In this study, we showed the degradation of TCE in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion and the change of pH, ferric and ferrous ion concentration during the photodegradation of TCE with ferrioxalate/UV-vis process. TCE was degraded in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion. In the reactions, the equilibrium of oxalate ion and iron ion is important since it determines the amount of ferrioxalate complex which absorbs light and induces the reactions of the degradation of TCE. Thus, the pH value and iron ion concentration are the important factors which determine the amount of ferrioxalate complex. The pH is nearly constant during the photodegradation of TCE. The ferrous ion concentration was decreased as soon as beginning photodegradation of TCE, and then the ferrous ion concentration and ferric ion concentration became constant.

  4. PCE dissolution and simultaneous dechlorination by nanoscale zero-valent iron particles in a DNAPL source zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerlund, F.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Phenrat, T.; Kim, H.-J.; Lowry, G. V.

    2012-04-01

    While the capability of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) to dechlorinate organic compounds in aqueous solutions has been demonstrated, the ability of NZVI to remove dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) from source zones under flow-through conditions similar to a field scale application has not yet been thoroughly investigated. To gain insight on simultaneous DNAPL dissolution and NZVI-mediated dechlorination reactions after direct placement of NZVI into a DNAPL source zone, a combined experimental and modeling study was performed. First, a DNAPL tetrachloroethene (PCE) source zone with emplaced NZVI was built inside a small custom-made flow cell and the effluent PCE and dechlorination byproducts were monitored over time. Second, a model for rate-limited DNAPL dissolution and NZVI-mediated dechlorination of PCE to its three main reaction byproducts with a possibility for partitioning of these byproducts back into the DNAPL was formulated. The coupled processes occurring in the flow cell were simulated and analyzed using a detailed three-dimensional numerical model. It was found that subsurface emplacement of NZVI did not markedly accelerate DNAPL dissolution or the DNAPL mass-depletion rate, when NZVI at a particle concentration of 10 g/L was directly emplaced in the DNAPL source zone. To react with NZVI the DNAPL PCE must first dissolve into the groundwater and the rate of dissolution controls the longevity of the DNAPL source. The modeling study further indicated that faster reacting particles would decrease aqueous contaminant concentrations but there is a limit to how much the mass removal rate can be increased by increasing the dechlorination reaction rate. To ensure reduction of aqueous contaminant concentrations, remediation of DNAPL contaminants with NZVI should include emplacement in a capture zone down-gradient of the DNAPL source.

  5. CIS-DCE AND VC MICROBIAL COMMUNITY CHANGES ASSOCIATED WITH A SHIFT FROM REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF PCE TO REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Subcultures that reductively dechlorinate cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) or vinyl chloride (VC) were derived from three independent enrichments that completely dechlorinated tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene in order to study the reductive dechlorination of the lesser chlorinated e...

  6. In Situ Redox Manipulation of Subsurface Sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron Reduction and TCE Dechlorination Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Evans, John C.

    2000-03-17

    The feasibility of chemically treating sediments from the Ft. Lewis, Washington, Logistics Center to develop a permeable barrier for dechlorination of TCE was investigated in a series of laboratory experiments.

  7. On Logical Difficulties, Philosophy, and the T.C.E. Explanation of the Firm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Nash; Liza Rybak

    2010-01-01

    By exploring the implications of the linkage between Knight and Pragmatism, some non-trivial implications can be argued to exist. Specifically, section 2 outlines the T.C.E. literature, and how it exists in an atmosphere mixed with Marshallian competition and Knightian uncertainty. Section 3 then considers the disparate philosophical positions behind the work of Knight and Marshall. Knight's critique of Marshall is

  8. Application of fluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for TCE and PAH degrading bacteria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Brigmon; M. Franck; J. Brey; D. Scott; K. Lanclos; C. Fliermans

    1996-01-01

    Historically, methods used to identify methanotrophic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon-degrading (PAH) bacteria in environmental samples have been inadequate because isolation and identification procedures are time-consuming and often fail to separate specific bacteria from other environmental microorganisms. Methanotrophic bacteria have been isolated and characterized from TCE-contaminated soils (Bowman et al. 1993; Fliermans et al., 1988). Fliermans et al., (1988) and others demonstrated

  9. Surfactant foam\\/bioaugmentation technology for in situ treatment of TCE-DNAPLs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randi K. Rothmel; Robert W. Peters; Edward St. Martin; Mary F. DeFlaun

    1998-01-01

    Chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) are prevalent aquifer contaminants. Depending on the degree of contamination, their physical properties may cause them to occur as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) making them difficult to remediate by pump-and-treat methods. Successful in situ bioremediation requires mobilization and dispersion of DNAPLs in order to reduce sediment concentrations to levels nontoxic to degradative bacteria. A

  10. Influence of pH on persulfate oxidation of TCE at ambient temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenju Liang; Zih-Sin Wang; Clifford J. Bruell

    2007-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a technology used for groundwater remediation. This laboratory study investigated the use of the oxidant sodium persulfate for the chemical oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) at near ambient temperatures (10, 20 and 30°C) to determine the influence of pH (pH=4, 7 and 9) on the reaction rate (i.e., pseudo-first-order rate constants) over the range of

  11. The role of microbial reductive dechlorination of TCE at a phytoremediation site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E.M.; Warren, E.; Paganelli, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    In April 1996, a phytoremediation field demonstration site at the Naval Air Station, Fort Worth, Texas, was developed to remediate shallow oxic ground water (< 3.7 m deep) contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. Microbial populations were sampled in February and June 1998. The populations under the newly planted cottonwood trees had not yet matured to an anaerobic community that could dechlorinate trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (DCE); however, the microbial population under a mature (???22-year-old) cottonwood tree about 30 m southwest of the plantings had a mature anaerobic population capable of dechlorinating TCE to DCE, and DCE to vinyl chloride (VC). Oxygen-free sediment incubations with contaminated groundwater also demonstrated that resident microorganisms were capable of the dechlorination of TCE to DCE. This suggests that a sufficient amount of organic material is present for microbial dechlorination in aquifer microniches where dissolved O2 concentrations are low. Phenol, benzoic acid, acetic acid, and a cyclic hydrocarbon, compounds consistent with the degradation of root exudates and complex aromatic compounds, were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in sediment samples under the mature cottonwood tree. Elsewhere at the site, transpiration and degradation by the cottonwood trees appears to be responsible for loss of chlorinated ethenes.

  12. The transfer of trichloroethylene (TCE) from a shower to indoor air: experimental measurements and their implications.

    PubMed

    McKone, T E; Knezovich, J P

    1991-03-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the transfer of trichloroethylene (TCE), a volatile organic compound (VOC), from tap water in showers to indoor air. In these experiments, the loss of TCE from tap water in the shower is based on the difference between influent and effluent concentrations. We have developed and previously published a three-compartment model, which we use to simulate the 24-h concentration history of VOCs in the shower, bathroom, and remaining household volumes resulting from the use of contaminated tap water. An important input to this model is the transfer efficiency of the VOC from water to air. The experiments reveal that the transfer efficiency of TCE from shower water to air has an arithmetic mean value of 61 percent and an arithmetic standard deviation of 9 percent. Analysis of the results shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the transfer efficiency measured with hot (37 degrees C) or cold (22 degrees C) shower water and that there is no statistically significant change in transfer efficiency with time during a 20-min shower. The implications for exposure assessment are considered. PMID:2059420

  13. The transfer of trichloroethylene (TCE) from a shower to indoor air: experimental measurements and their implications.

    PubMed

    McKone, T E; Knezovich, J P

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the transfer of trichloroethylene (TCE), a volatile organic compound (VOC), from tap water in showers to indoor air. In these experiments, the loss of TCE from tap water in the shower is based on the difference between influent and effluent concentrations. We have developed and previously published a three-compartment model, which we use to simulate the 24-h concentration history of VOCs in the shower, bathroom, and remaining household volumes resulting from the use of contaminated tap water. An important input to this model is the transfer efficiency of the VOC from water to air. The experiments reveal that the transfer efficiency of TCE from shower water to air has an arithmetic mean value of 61 percent and an arithmetic standard deviation of 9 percent. Analysis of the results shows that there is no statistically significant difference between the transfer efficiency measured with hot (37 degrees C) or cold (22 degrees C) shower water and that there is no statistically significant change in transfer efficiency with time during a 20-min shower. The implications for exposure assessment are considered. PMID:1910750

  14. Analysis of TCE Fate and Transport in Karst Groundwater Systems Using Statistical Mixed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems are highly productive and provide an important fresh water resource for human development and ecological integrity. Their high productivity is often associated with conduit flow and high matrix permeability. The same characteristics that make these aquifers productive also make them highly vulnerable to contamination and a likely for contaminant exposure. Of particular interest are trichloroethylene, (TCE) and Di-(2-Ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). These chemicals have been identified as potential precursors of pre-term birth, a leading cause of neonatal complications with a significant health and societal cost. Both of these contaminants have been found in the karst groundwater formations in this area of the island. The general objectives of this work are to: (1) develop fundamental knowledge and determine the processes controlling the release, mobility, persistence, and possible pathways of contaminants in karst groundwater systems, and (2) characterize transport processes in conduit and diffusion-dominated flow under base flow and storm flow conditions. The work presented herein focuses on the use of geo-hydro statistical tools to characterize flow and transport processes under different flow regimes, and their application in the analysis of fate and transport of TCE. Multidimensional, laboratory-scale Geo-Hydrobed models (GHM) were used for this purpose. The models consist of stainless-steel tanks containing karstified limestone blocks collected from the karst aquifer formation of northern Puerto Rico. The models integrates a network of sampling wells to monitor flow, pressure, and solute concentrations temporally and spatially. Experimental work entails injecting dissolved CaCl2 tracers and TCE in the upstream boundary of the GHM while monitoring TCE and tracer concentrations spatially and temporally in the limestone under different groundwater flow regimes. Analysis of the temporal and spatial concentration distributions of solutes indicates a highly heterogeneous system resulting in large preferential flow components. The distributions are highly correlated with statistically-developed spatial flow models. High degree of tailing in breakthrough curves indicate significant amount of mass limitations, particularly in diffuse flow regions. Higher flow rates in the system result in increasing preferential flow region volumes, but lower mass transfer limitations. Future work will involve experiments with non-aqueous phase liquid TCE, DEHP, and a mixture of these, and geo-temporal statistical modeling. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River (Grant Award No. DE-FG09-07SR22571), and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS, Grant Award No. P42ES017198).

  15. Survey of hazardous organic compounds in the groundwater, air and wastewater effluents near the Tehran automobile industry.

    PubMed

    Kargar, Mahdi; Nadafi, Kazem; Nabizadeh, Ramin; Nasseri, Simin; Mesdaghinia, Alireza; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Alimohammadi, Mahmood; Nazmara, Shahrokh; Rastkari, Noushin

    2013-02-01

    Potential of wastewater treatment in car industry and groundwater contamination by volatile organic compounds include perchloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE) and dichloromethane (DCM) near car industry was conducted in this study. Samples were collected in September through December 2011 from automobile industry. Head-space Gas chromatography with FID detector is used for analysis. Mean PCE levels in groundwater ranged from 0 to 63.56 ?g L(-1) with maximum level of 89.1 ?g L(-1). Mean TCE from 0 to 76.63 ?g L(-1) with maximum level of 112 ?g L(-1). Due to the data obtained from pre treatment of car staining site and conventional wastewater treatment in car factory, the most of TCE, PCE and DCM removed by pre aeration. Therefor this materials entry from liquid phase to air phase and by precipitation leak out to the groundwater. As a consequence these pollutants have a many negative health effect on the workers by air and groundwater. PMID:23160750

  16. Potential for Methanotroph-Mediated Natural Attenuation of TCE in a Basalt Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, F. S.; Newby, D. T.; Reed, D. W.; Igoe, A.; Petzke, L.; Delwiche, M. E.; McKinley, J. P.; Roberto, F. F.; Whiticar, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria are one of the microbial communities believed to be responsible for natural attenuation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) plume in the Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA). To better understand the role that indigenous methanotrophs may have in TCE degradation in the aquifer, groundwater was collected from four SRPA wells and analyzed for geochemical properties and methanotroph diversity. Dissolved methane concentrations in the aquifer ranged from 1 to >1000 nM. Stable carbon isotope ratios for dissolved methane suggest a microbial source for the methane (del 13C values of ca. -61 per mil in three wells). The combination of 13C enriched methane and 13C depleted-dissolved inorganic carbon in one of the wells suggests that microbial oxidation of methane occurs. Filtered groundwater yielded microorganisms that were used as inocula for enrichments or were frozen and subsequently extracted for DNA. Primers that target taxonomic (type I and type II 16S rDNA) or functional (mmoX and pmoA methane monooxygenase subunits) genes were used to characterize the indigenous methanotrophs via PCR, cloning, and sequencing. DNA sequencing and alignment results suggest that clones with sequences most similar to Methylocystis sp. (a type II methanotroph) and Methylobacter sp. (a type I methanotroph) are frequently present in filtered groundwater with the former often represented in enrichment cultures as well. Methanotroph genes are detected in the aquifer even in wells having methane concentrations as low as 1 nM. Methanotroph presence and a microbial origin for the dissolved methane indicate that microbial cycling of this key gas may play a role in the destruction of TCE in the aquifer.

  17. The influence of different geotechnically relevant amendments on the reductive degradation of TCE by nZVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Peter; Schöftner, Philipp; Waldner, Georg; Reichenauer, Thomas G.; Nickel, Claudia; Spitz, Marcus; Dietzel, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was widely used as a cleaning and degreasing agent. Companies needing these agents were often situated in or close to built up areas, so spillage led to contaminated sites which now can only be remediated using in situ techniques. The situation is compounded by the fact that TCE tends to seep through ground water bodies forming pools at the bottom of the aquifer. When reacting with TCE, nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI) is known to reduce it into non-toxic substances. The difficulty is to bring it in contact with the pollutant. Attempts using passive insertion into the groundwater via wells yielded mixed results. Reasons for this are that ZVI tends to coagulate, to sediment and to adsorb on the matrix of the aquifer. Also, in inhomogeneous aquifers a passive application of nZVI can be difficult and might not bring the desired results, due to existence of preferential flow paths. A possible solution to this problem is the physical in situ mixing of ZVI into the contaminant source. This can, in principle, be done by adapting jet grouting - a method that uses a high pressure slurry jet, consisting of water and geotechnical additives ("binders"), to mix and compact zones ("columns") in soil. These columns are commonly used to solve foundation problems but can also be used to solve the problem of delivering nZVI to TCE source zones. This paper examines the influence binders have on the degradation reaction between TCE and nZVI. The necessity of these binders is explained by the fact that the subsoil structure is rearranged during the jetting process leading to subsidence on the surface. These subsidences could result in damage to neighbouring structures. A series of batch experiments was conducted in this study. Contaminated groundwater was brought into contact with samples of slurries commonly used in geotechnical applications. We tested the effects of concresole, bentonite, zeolithe, fly ash, slag sand and cement on the kinetics of TCE degradation by nZVI. The degradation of TCE was measured using GC Headspace samples. Furthermore, additional experiments were conducted to investigate the interaction between binders and TCE as well as binders and nZVI. The results of these experiments led to the conclusion that jet grouting could be well suited for the delivery of nZVI to TCE contaminated source zones. Currently, soil column experiments and large-scale experiments in test facilities are performed to confirm the batch testing results.

  18. Uncertainty Analysis for the Southern TCE Plume in the C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.E.

    2002-04-16

    This report documents an uncertainty analysis on a local groundwater flow and transport model for the C-Area Reactor Groundwater Operable Unit. The work is a continuation of the recently completed regional groundwater flow model for C Area (Bills et al. 2000) and the local flow and transport model for the southern C-Area plumes (Fogle and Brewer, 2001). The local flow and transport model is a representation of groundwater flow and contaminant migration through the Upper Three Runs aquifer, southwest to Fourmile Branch and Castor Creek. The uncertainty analysis is focused on total TCE flux to the streams, as well as maximum concentration discharge locations.

  19. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons: Ugly duckling to beautiful swan

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, G.F.

    1999-10-01

    For many years anaerobic biological processes were reputed to be more sensitive than aerobic processes to toxic substances such as chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) and thus a poor choice for treating water containing these compounds. This was especially true for water containing perchloroethylene (PCE) or trichloroethylene (TCE) because vinyl chloride, a human carcinogen, is produced when these two compounds are degraded anaerobically. Aerobic treatment with organisms containing oxygenase enzyme systems, which could fortuitously degrade a wide variety of chlorinated aliphatics (but not PCE), was favored. Recently, however, several enrichments and organisms have been isolated that will convert PCE and TCE into ethene and ethane, as shown by field data. Because of this evidence, anaerobic processes are now considered a significant alternative treatment for CAH contamination. Recent work at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, has focused on the effect of mixtures of CAHs on biotransformation of individual organic compounds and the potential for a combined methanogen-iron (Fe(0)) system to improve CAH bioremediation. At the concentration ranges tested, the presence of a mixture of CAHs seems to decrease rate of transformation of individual organics. However, there are important exceptions; in some cases a mixture of CAHs seems to facilitate transformation of an individual organic compound. Combination of an active methanogenic population with Fe(0) increases the rate and extent of transformation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. Results with PCE and 1,1,1-trichloroethane are less clear.

  20. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-10-24

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  1. Phylogenetic Microarray Analysis of a Microbial Community Performing Reductive Dechlorination at a TCE-contaminated Site

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patrick K. H.; Warnecke, F.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Macbeth, Tamzen W.; Conrad, Mark E.; Andersen, Gary L.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A high-density phylogenetic microarray (PhyloChip) was applied to track bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of remediation at Ft. Lewis, WA, a trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater site. Biostimulation with whey, and bioaugmentation with a Dehalococcoides-containing enrichment culture were strategies implemented to enhance dechlorination. As a measure of species richness, over 1300 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected in DNA from groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment and in the bioaugmentation culture. In order to determine active members within the community, 16S rRNA from samples were analyzed by microarray and ~600 OTUs identified. A cDNA clone library of the expressed 16S rRNA corroborated the observed diversity and activity of some of the phyla. Principle component analysis of the treatment plot samples revealed that the microbial populations were constantly changing during the course of the study. Dynamic analysis of the archaeal population showed significant increases in methanogens at the later stages of treatment that correlated with increases in methane concentrations of over two orders of magnitude. Overall, the PhyloChip analyses in this study have provided insights into the microbial ecology and population dynamics at the TCE-contaminated field site useful for understanding the in situ reductive dechlorination processes. PMID:22091783

  2. Changes in concentrations of a TCE plume in near- stream zones of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Hyun, Y.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    A field investigation of a trichloroethylene (TCE) groundwater plume originating at an industrial complex and its discharges to a stream nearby showed that apparent plume attenuation occurred in the near-stream zone of a DNAPL contaminated area adjacent to a stream prior to discharging to the stream. The concentrations of TCE and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) in groundwater, hyporheic water, stream water and streambed, and hydrogeology were characterized using mini-piezometers, monitoring wells, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys, and soil coring. In the near stream zones temporal and spatial TCE plume concentration changes and mass fluxes were investigated along the flowpath of groundwater discharging to the stream. It is evident that observed concentrations of contaminants (TCE and cis-DCE) were reduced in the near-stream zone, resulting that TCE and cis-DCE were not detected in the streambed and stream water. Ground GPR surveys done in the near stream zone found that wire and water treatment pipe conduits were buried under the ground next to the stream, which could lead groundwater flow field distortion in this zone. At streambed, the GPR survey and soil coring indicated the presence of low permeable zones consisting of rotten material deposits at the top of 0.3 m ~ 0.8 m underlain by silty sands. These hydrogeological features can also attribute to no detection of contaminants in the streambed and stream water because low permeable zone is an obstacle to effective interactions between groundwater and stream water. More investigations will be carried out for comprehensive understanding of hydrological and biogeochemical processes associated with TCE plume attenuation in near stream zones and streambed in the site.

  3. Development of KMnO(4)-releasing composites for in situ chemical oxidation of TCE-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liang, S H; Chen, K F; Wu, C S; Lin, Y H; Kao, C M

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a controlled-oxidant-release technology combining in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and permeable reactive barrier (PRB) concepts to remediate trichloroethene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater. In this study, a potassium permanganate (KMnO4)-releasing composite (PRC) was designed for KMnO4 release. The components of this PRC included polycaprolactone (PCL), KMnO4, and starch with a weight ratio of 1.14:2:0.96. Approximately 64% (w/w) of the KMnO4 was released from the PRC after 76 days of operation in a batch system. The results indicate that the released KMnO4 could oxidize TCE effectively. The results from a column study show that the KMnO4 released from 200 g of PRC could effectively remediate 101 pore volumes (PV) of TCE-contaminated groundwater (initial TCE concentration = 0.5 mg/L) and achieve up to 95% TCE removal. The effectiveness of the PRC system was verified by the following characteristics of the effluents collected after the PRC columns (barrier): (1) decreased TCE concentrations, (2) increased ORP and pH values, and (3) increased MnO2 and KMnO4 concentrations. The results of environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) analysis show that the PCL and starch completely filled up the pore spaces of the PRC, creating a composite with low porosity. Secondary micro-scale capillary permeability causes the KMnO4 release, mainly through a reaction-diffusion mechanism. The PRC developed could be used as an ISCO-based passive barrier system for plume control, and it has the potential to become a cost-effective alternative for the remediation of chlorinated solvent-contaminated groundwater. PMID:24568784

  4. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic In situ bioremediation of TCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-01

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested consisted of a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses using a horizontal injection well. Sediment core samples (n=367) taken from 0 (surface)-43m depth were probed for genes coding for soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to cometabolize TCE. The same samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) to access changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations. Hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent 4% methane:air (v/v) injection resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since subsequent addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process becoming non-detectable by the final treatment. These patterns indicate methanotrophs displaced heterotrophs containing TOD genes. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with studies showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in methanotroph viable counts, increased mineralization rates of TCE, and increases in chloride inventories provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. This work suggests that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the biodegradation of TCE observed. This study demonstrated that the use of nucleic acid analytical methods provided a gene specific assessment of the effects of in situ treatment technologies.

  5. Use of gene probes to assess the impact and effectiveness of aerobic in situ bioremediation of TCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.; Chakraborty, Romy; Fleming, James M.; Gregory, Ingrid R.; Bowman, John P.; Jimenez, Luis; Zhang, Dai; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Brockman, Fred J.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-03-15

    Gene probe hybridization was used to determine distribution and expression of co-metabolic genes at a contaminated site as it underwent in situ methanotrophic bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The bioremediation strategies tested included a series of air, air:methane, and air:methane:nutrient pulses of the test plot using horizontal injection wells. During the test period, the levels of TCE reduced drastically in almost all test samples. Sediment core samples (n = 367) taken from 0 m (surface)-43 m depth were probed for gene coding for methanotrophic soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and heterotrophic toluene dioxygenase (TOD), which are known to co-metabolize TCE. The same sediment samples were also probed for genes coding for methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) (catalyzing the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde) to assess specifically changes in methylotrophic bacterial populations in the site. Gene hybridization results showed that the frequency of detection of sMMO genes were stimulated approximately 250% following 1% methane:air (v/v) injection. Subsequent injection of 4% methane:air (v/v) resulted in an 85% decline probably due to nutrient limitations, since addition of nutrients (gaseous nitrogen and phosphorus) thereafter caused an increase in the frequency of detection of sMMO genes. Detection of TOD genes declined during the process, and eventually they were non-detectable by the final treatment, suggesting that methanotrophs displaced the TOD gene containing heterotrophs. Active transcription of sMMO and TOD was evidenced by hybridization to mRNA. These analyses combined with results showing the concomitant decline in TCE concentrations, increases in chloride concentration and increases in methanotroph viable counts, provide multiple lines of evidence that TCE remediation was caused specifically by methanotrophs. Our results suggest that sMMO genes are responsible for most, if not all, of the observed biodegradation of TCE. This study demonstrates that the use of nucleic acid analytical methods provided a gene specific assessment of the effects of in situ treatment technologies.

  6. Preliminary study of propyl bromide exposure among New Jersey dry cleaners as a result of a pending ban on perchloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Blando, James D; Schill, Donald P; De La Cruz, Mary Pauline; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Junfeng

    2010-09-01

    Many states are considering, and some states have actively pursued, banning the use of perchloroethylene (PERC) in dry cleaning establishments. Proposed legislation has led many dry cleaners to consider the use of products that contain greater than 90% n-propyl bromide (n-PB; also called 1-bromopropane or 1-BP). Very little information is known about toxicity and exposure to n-PB. Some n-PB-containing products are marketed as nonhazardous and "green" or "organic." This has resulted in some users perceiving the solvent as nontoxic and has resulted in at least one significant poisoning incident in New Jersey. In addition, many dry cleaning operators may not realize that the machine components and settings must be changed when converting from PERC to n-PB containing products. Not performing these modifications may result in overheating and significant leaks in the dry cleaning equipment. A preliminary investigation was conducted of the potential exposures to n-PB and isopropyl bromide (iso-PB; also called 2-bromopropane or 2-BP) among dry cleaners in New Jersey who have converted their machines from PERC to these new solvent products. Personal breathing zone and area samples were collected using the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Sampling and Analytical Method 1025, with a slight modification to gas chromatography conditions to facilitate better separation of n-PB from iso-PB. During the preliminary investigation, exposures to n-PB among some workers in two of three shops were measured that were greater than the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) for n-PB. The highest exposure measured among a dry cleaning machine operator was 54 parts per million (ppm) as an 8-hr time-weighted average, which is more than 5 times the ACGIH TLV of 10 ppm. The preliminary investigation also found that the work tasks most likely to result in the highest short-term exposures included the introduction of solvent to the machine, maintenance of the machine, unloading and handling of recently cleaned clothes, and interrupting the wash cycle of the machine. In addition, this assessment suggested that leaks may have contributed to exposure and may have resulted from normal machine wear over time, ineffective maintenance, and from the incompatibility of n-PB with gasket materials. PMID:20863050

  7. Electrochemical deposition of green rust on zero-valent iron 

    E-print Network

    Kulkarni, Dhananjay Vijay

    2006-08-16

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a toxic contaminant that has been introduced into the environment over many years through industrial and agricultural wastes. Research has been done in the past to investigate PCE degradation by zero-valent iron (ZVI...

  8. Abiotic Removal of TCE and cis-DCE by Magnetite under Aerobic Conditions in Ground Water (Maryland)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The former Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant (TCAAP) is located just north of St. Paul, Minnesota. Disposal of chlorinated solvents at the Building102 site on the TCAAP contaminated groundwater in the shallow, unconsolidated sand aquifer with TCE and cis-DCE. Concentrations of ...

  9. Content Instruction through a Foreign Language. A Report on the 1992-1993 TCE Programme. Research and Fieldwork No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasanen, Anne, Ed.; Marsh, David, Ed.

    This volume of articles is a report from the national teacher in-service development program in teaching content through a foreign language at the Continuing Education Centre of the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland. This publication is mainly in English, because of the basic rationale of the Teaching Content through English (TCE) programme, and…

  10. Abiotic and Biotic Transformation of TCE under Sulfate Reducing Conditions: the Role of Spatial Heterogeneity (Monterey, CA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a number of sites in the USA, passive reactive barriers built with shredded plant mulch have been constructed to treat ground water contaminated with TCE. These barriers are called biowalls because anaerobic biodegradation of the plant mulch is expected to provide substrates ...

  11. Hydraulic Containment of TCE Contaminated Groundwater at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.C.; Rieske, D.P.G.; Baird, D.R.P.E. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper will describe the progress of a groundwater remedial action at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility that enriched uranium from the early 1950's until 2000. The X-749 southern boundary hydraulic containment system, combining a four-well extraction system with a previously constructed subsurface barrier wall, has been employed at PORTS. The hydraulic containment project has been implemented as part of containment and remediation of the X-749/X-120 area trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant. The X-749/X-120 groundwater contaminant plume is located in the south central section (Quadrant I) of the PORTS facility. The plume is associated with the former X-120 Goodyear Training Facility and a landfill known as the X-749 Contaminated Materials Disposal Facility. The principal contaminants of concern are chlorinated solvents (primarily TCE) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). A subsurface barrier wall (X-749 South Barrier Wall) was completed in 1994 at the PORTS southern reservation boundary as an interim remedial measure to slow the advancement of the leading edge of the contaminated groundwater plume or to prevent the plume from migrating off DOE property. Remedial measures identified by Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) included installation of a barrier wall around the eastern and southern portions of the X-749 landfill to provide source control and installation of a phyto-remediation system to help contain groundwater flow and remove volatile organic compounds. Previous remedial measures that were implemented as elements of 'closures' on the X-749 landfill included a multimedia cap, barrier walls, and a groundwater collection system. Despite these measures, the X-749/X-120 groundwater plume has migrated beyond the southern DOE property boundary. Current TCE concentrations in off-site groundwater monitoring wells are below the preliminary remediation goal and drinking water maximum contaminant level for TCE of 5 {mu}g/kg, but continue to increase. Hydraulic containment was selected as the method for controlling the plume at the southern DOE property boundary. Recent borings and pumping tests indicate that approximately a 400-foot section of the existing subsurface barrier wall near the DOE property boundary may been improperly keyed into the Sunbury Shale bedrock which underlies the unconsolidated uppermost Gallia sand and gravel aquifer (Gallia). This gap is reported to be as much as 4 vertical feet. In addition, the X-749 groundwater plume is migrating around the western end of the X-749 South Barrier Wall. Four groundwater extraction wells were installed at the DOE property boundary to provide hydraulic control of the plume currently flowing under and around the existing subsurface barrier wall. Placement of the new extraction wells was based on groundwater modeling and data collected from pumping tests in the area. The extracted groundwater is being sent to the on-site X-622 Groundwater Treatment Facility via subsurface piping. The hydraulic containment system began operation in June 2007. The preliminary water elevations from monitoring wells in the vicinity of two of the four extraction wells demonstrate a significant decrease in groundwater potentiometric head in the southern boundary area. The current extraction rates should be adequate to contain the leading edge of the contaminant plume. Monitoring wells in the area will continue to be sampled on a quarterly basis. (authors)

  12. National exposure registry: Tichloroethylene (TCE) subregistry (on CD-ROM). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 National Exposure Registry: Trichloroethylene (TCE) Subregistry' contains data on approximately 4,000 persons and is the first CD-ROM product released in the National Exposure Registry Series. This CD-ROM is composed of three files: Demographics and Health, Mortality, and Environmental. The CD-ROM includes access software, the Statistical Export and Tabulation System (SETS). The TCE subregistry is one of three (dioxin and benzene subregistries are the other two). The National Exposure Registry was created in response to a mandate given in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to create a registry of persons exposed to hazardous substances. This mandate was reiterated in the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The National Exposure Registry is a database composed of names of persons, along with additional information on these persons, with documented exposure to specific chemicals. The purpose of the Registry is to aid in assessing the long-term health consequences of low-level, long-term exposure to environmental contaminants. One of the goals is to establish a database that will furnish the information needed to generate appropriate and valid hypotheses for future activities such as epidemiological studies. When supplemented with additional data, the combined file can then be used to carry out hypothesis-testing epidemiological investigations. The data collected for each member of the Registry include environmental levels, demographic information, smoking and occupational history, and self-reported responses to 25 general health status questions. The files for each chemical-specific subregistry are established at the time baseline data are collected and are updated and maintained by ATSDR on an ongoing basis (annually the first year, biennially thereafter).

  13. 20 kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in sodium sulfate aqueous media: influence of the operational variables in batch mode.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Verónica; Esclapez, María Deseada; Tudela, Ignacio; Bonete, Pedro; Louisnard, Olivier; González-García, José

    2010-11-15

    A preliminary study of the 20 kHz sonoelectrochemical degradation of perchloroethylene in aqueous sodium sulfate has been carried out using controlled current density degradation sonoelectrolyses in batch mode. An important improvement in the viability of the sonochemical process is achieved when the electrochemistry is implemented, but the improvement of the electrochemical treatment is lower when the 20 kHz ultrasound field is simultaneously used. A fractional conversion of 100% and degradation efficiency around 55% are obtained independently of the ultrasound power used. The current efficiency is also enhanced compared to the electrochemical treatment and a higher speciation is also detected; the main volatile compounds produced in the electrochemical and sonochemical treatment, trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene, are not only totally degraded, but also at shorter times than in the sonochemical or electrochemical treatments. PMID:20705391

  14. Studies in applying Pseudomonas cepacia PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}) to a TCE bioreactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R.; Jones, W. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Center for Biofilm Engineering; Shields, M.; Moody, T. [Univ. of West Florida, Pensacola, FL (United States). Center for Diagnostics and Bioremediation

    1994-12-31

    The pTOM{sub 31C} plasmid was derived from the large plasmid of Pseudomonas cepacia G4. Strain G4 is an environmental isolate that is capable of cometabolic mineralization of trichloroethylene (TCE). The degradation of TCE by strain G4 is a result of the induction of enzymes in a non-constitutive aromatic degradative pathway that is present on the large plasmid of G4. A Tn5 insertion into the large plasmid of G4 resulted in a TCE constitutive plasmid designated as pTOM{sub 31C}. A number of laboratory and field studies have been performed to determine the feasibility of applying pTOM{sub 31C}, via a host microbe designated Ps. cepacia PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}), into vapor phase TCE bioreactors. Results from degradation studies show a linear degradation rate of TCE by PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}). The growth kinetics of PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}) on phthalate followed the Monod kinetics model. However, bench scale studies showed that PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}) growing on phthalate was incapable of developing a substantial biofilm. The results from a number of bench scale and field scale reactor studies showed that PR1-(pTOM{sub 31}) could not compete with invading microorganisms, even when selective pressures for PR1 were applied to the systems. In the field scale reactors, PR1-(pTOM{sub 31C}) was able to colonize only the top fraction of the oyster shell support media.

  15. Degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by Fe and Fe-Pd bimetals in the presence of surfactants and cosolvents

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, B.; Liang, L.; West, O.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cameron, P. [Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States); Davenport, D. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Surfactants and cosolvents are being used to enhance the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) from contaminated soils. However, the waste surfactant solution containing TCE and PCBs must be treated before it can be disposed. This study evaluated the use of zero-valence iron and palladized iron fillings on the dechlorination of TCE and a PCB congener in a dihexylsulfosuccinate surfactant solution. Batch experimental results indicated that TCE can be rapidly degraded by palladized iron filings with a half-life of 27.4 min. PCB was degraded at a slower rate than TCE with a half-life ranging from 100 min to 500 min as the concentration of surfactant increased. In column flow-through experiments, both TCE and PCBs degrade at an enhanced rate with a half-life about 1.5 and 6 min because of an increased solid to solution ratio in the column than in the batch experiments. Results of this work suggest that Fe-Pd filings may be potentially applicable for ex-situ treatment of TCE and PCBs in the surfactant solutions that are generated during surfactant washing of the contaminated soils.

  16. CuSCN-Based Inverted Planar Perovskite Solar Cell with an Average PCE of 15.6.

    PubMed

    Ye, Senyun; Sun, Weihai; Li, Yunlong; Yan, Weibo; Peng, Haitao; Bian, Zuqiang; Liu, Zhiwei; Huang, Chunhui

    2015-06-10

    Although inorganic hole-transport materials usually possess high chemical stability, hole mobility, and low cost, the efficiency of most of inorganic hole conductor-based perovskite solar cells is still much lower than that of the traditional organic hole conductor-based cells. Here, we have successfully fabricated high quality CH3NH3PbI3 films on top of a CuSCN layer by utilizing a one-step fast deposition-crystallization method, which have lower surface roughness and smaller interface contact resistance between the perovskite layer and the selective contacts in comparison with the films prepared by a conventional two-step sequential deposition process. The average efficiency of the CuSCN-based inverted planar CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells has been improved to 15.6% with a highest PCE of 16.6%, which is comparable to that of the traditional organic hole conductor-based cells, and may promote wider application of the inexpensive inorganic materials in perovskite solar cells. PMID:25938881

  17. Lossy-to-Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Imagery Using Three-Dimensional TCE and an Integer KLT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Zhang; James E. Fowler; Guizhong Liu

    2008-01-01

    An embedded lossy-to-lossless coder for hyperspectral images is presented. The proposed coder couples a reversible integer-valued Karhunen-Loeve transform with an extension into 3-D of the tarp-based coding with classification for embedding (TCE) algorithm that was originally developed for lossy coding of 2-D images. The resulting coder obtains lossy-to-lossless operation while closely matching the lossy performance of JPEG2000. Additionally, for lossless

  18. Thermally Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,1Trichloroethane (TCA) in Aqueous Systems and Soil Slurries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen Ju Liang; Clifford J. Bruell; Michael C. Marley; Kenneth L. Sperry

    2003-01-01

    Under thermally activated conditions (i.e., temperature of 40?99°C), there is considerable evidence that the persulfate anion () can be converted to a powerful oxidant known as the sulfate free radical (), which could be used in situ to destroy groundwater contaminants. In this laboratory study only limited trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation and no 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) degradation was observed at 20°C. However,

  19. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging in an Adult Cohort Following Prenatal and Early Postnatal Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Janulewicz, Patricia A; Killiany, Ronald J; White, Roberta F; Martin, Brett M; Winter, Michael R; Weinberg, Janice M; Aschengrau, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This population-based retrospective cohort study examined Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain in relation to prenatal and early postnatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE)-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Subjects were identified through birth records from 1969 through 1983. Exposure was modeled using pipe network information from town water departments, a PCE leaching and transport algorithm, EPANet water flow modeling software, and Geographic Information System (GIS) methodology. Brain imaging was performed on 26 exposed and 16 unexposed subjects. Scans were acquired on a Philips 3T whole body scanner using the ADNI T1-weighted MP-RAGE scan. The scans were processed by FreeSurfer version 4.3.1 software to obtain measurements of specific brain regions. There were no statistically significant differences between exposed and unexposed subjects on measures of white matter hypointensities (?: 127.5 mm3, 95% CI: ?259.1, 1514.0), white matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral white matter: ?: 21230.0 mm3, 95% CI: ?4512.6, 46971.7) or gray matter volumes (e.g. total cerebral gray matter: ?: 11976.0 mm3, 95% CI: ?13657.2, 37609.3). The results of this study suggest that exposure to PCE during gestation and early childhood, at the levels observed in this population, is not associated with alterations in the brain structures studied. PMID:23571160

  20. Spectroscopic fingerprints for charge localization in the organic semiconductor (DOEO)4[HgBr4]·TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koplak, Oksana V.; Chernenkaya, Alisa; Medjanik, Katerina; Brambilla, Alberto; Gloskovskii, Andrei; Calloni, Alberto; Elmers, Hans-Joachim; Schönhense, Gerd; Ciccacci, Franco; Morgunov, Roman B.

    2015-05-01

    Changes of the electronic structure accompanied by charge localization and a transition to an antiferromagnetic ground state were observed in the organic semiconductor (DOEO)4[HgBr4]·TCE. Localization starts in the temperature region of about 150 K and the antiferromagnetic state occurs below 60 K. The magnetic moment of the crystal contains contributions of inclusions (droplets), and individual paramagnetic centers formed by localized holes and free charge carriers at 2 K. Two types of inclusions of 100-400 nm and 2-5 nm sizes were revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Studying the temperature- and angular dependence of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra revealed fingerprints of antiferromagnetic contributions as well as paramagnetic resonance spectra of individual localized charge carriers. The results point on coexistence of antiferromagnetic long and short range order as evident from a second ESR line. Photoelectron spectroscopy in the VUV, soft and hard X-ray range shows temperature-dependent effects upon crossing the critical temperatures around 60 K and 150 K. The substantially different probing depths of soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy yield information on the surface termination. The combined investigation using complementary methods at the same sample reveals the close relation of changes in the transport properties and in the energy distribution of electronic states.

  1. Simulating an exclusion zone for vapour intrusion of TCE from groundwater into indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomin; Unger, Andre J. A.; Parker, Beth L.

    2012-10-01

    This paper is an extension of the work by Yu et al. (2009) to examine exposure pathways of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) originating from a NAPL source zone located below the water table, and their potential impact on multiple residential dwellings down-gradient of the source zone. The three-dimensional problem geometry is based on the Rivett (1995) field experiment in the Borden aquifer, and contains houses located both above and adjacent to the groundwater plume in order to define an exclusion zone. Simulation results using the numerical model CompFlow Bio indicate that houses which are laterally offset from the groundwater plume are less affected by vapour intrusion than those located directly above the plume due to limited transverse horizontal flux of TCE within the groundwater plume, in agreement with the ASTM (2008) guidance. Uncertainty in the simulated indoor air concentration is sensitive to heterogeneity in the permeability structure of a stratigraphically continuous aquifer, with uncertainty defined as the probability of simulated indoor air concentrations exceeding the NYSDOH (2005) regulatory limit. Within this uncertainty framework, this work shows that the Johnson and Ettinger (1991), ASTM (2008) and CompFlow Bio models all delineate an identical exclusion zone at a 99.9% confidence interval of indoor air concentrations based on the probability of exceedence.

  2. Effects of Reduced Sulfur Compounds on Pd-catalytic Hydrodechlorination of TCE in Groundwater by Cathodic H2 under Electrochemically-induced Oxidizing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Mingjie; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) poison Pd catalysts for catalytic hydrodechlorination of contaminants in anoxic groundwater. This study investigates the effects of RSCs on Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in oxic groundwater. Water electrolysis in an undivided electrolytic cell is used to produce H2 for TCE hydrodechlorination under oxidizing conditions. TCE is efficiently hydrodechlorinated to ethane, with significant accumulation of H2O2 under acidic conditions. Presence of sulfide at concentrations less than 93.8 ?M moderately inhibits TCE hydrodechlorination and H2O2 production. Presence of sulfite at low concentrations (? 1 mM) significantly enhances TCE decay, while at high concentration (3 mM) inhibits initially and enhances afterwards when sulfite concentration declines to less than 1 mM. Using radical scavenging experiments and electron spin resonance assay, SO3•? which is generated from sulfite under oxidizing conditions is validated as the new reactive species contributing to the enhancement. This study reveals a distinct mechanism of effect of sulfite on TCE hydrodechlorination by Pd and H2 in oxic groundwater and presents an alternative approach to increasing resistance of Pd to RSCs poisoning. PMID:23962132

  3. Heterogeneous hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharging to an urban river reach.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Juliana G; Rivett, Michael O; Roche, Rachel S; Durrant Neé Cleverly, Megan; Walker, Caroline; Tellam, John H

    2015-02-01

    The typically elevated natural attenuation capacity of riverbed-hyporheic zones is expected to decrease chlorinated hydrocarbon (CHC) groundwater plume discharges to river receptors through dechlorination reactions. The aim of this study was to assess physico-chemical processes controlling field-scale variation in riverbed-hyporheic zone dechlorination of a TCE groundwater plume discharge to an urban river reach. The 50-m long pool-riffle-glide reach of the River Tame in Birmingham (UK) studied is a heterogeneous high energy river environment. The shallow riverbed was instrumented with a detailed network of multilevel samplers. Freeze coring revealed a geologically heterogeneous and poorly sorted riverbed. A chlorine number reduction approach provided a quantitative indicator of CHC dechlorination. Three sub-reaches of contrasting behaviour were identified. Greatest dechlorination occurred in the riffle sub-reach that was characterised by hyporheic zone flows, moderate sulphate concentrations and pH, anaerobic conditions, low iron, but elevated manganese concentrations with evidence of sulphate reduction. Transient hyporheic zone flows allowing input to varying riverbed depths of organic matter are anticipated to be a key control. The glide sub-reach displayed negligible dechlorination attributed to the predominant groundwater baseflow discharge condition, absence of hyporheic zone, transition to more oxic conditions and elevated sulphate concentrations expected to locally inhibit dechlorination. The tail-of-pool-riffle sub-reach exhibited patchy dechlorination that was attributed to sub-reach complexities including significant flow bypass of a low permeability, high organic matter, silty unit of high dechlorination potential. A process-based conceptual model of reach-scale dechlorination variability was developed. Key findings of practitioner relevance were: riverbed-hyporheic zone CHC dechlorination may provide only a partial, somewhat patchy barrier to CHC groundwater plume discharges to a surface water receptor; and, monitoring requirements to assess the variability in CHC attenuation within a reach are expected to be onerous. Further research on transient hyporheic zone dechlorination is recommended. PMID:25461025

  4. Comparison Of A Laboratory Consortium That Dechlorinates TCE To Ethene To The Field Community From Which It Was Derived

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wood; K. S. Sorenson; D. E. Cummings

    2004-12-01

    Sodium lactate additions to a trichloroethene (TCE) residual source area in deep, fractured basalt at a U.S. Department of Energy site have resulted in the enrichment of the indigenous microbial community, the complete dechlorination of nearly all aqueous-phase TCE to ethene, and the continued depletion of the residual source since 1999. The bacterial and archaeal consortia in groundwater obtained from the residual source were assessed by using PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A clone library of bacterial amplicons was predominated by those from members of the class Clostridia (57 of 93 clones), of which a phylotype most similar to that of the homoacetogen Acetobacterium sp. strain HAAP-1 was most abundant (32 of 93 clones). The remaining Bacteria consisted of phylotypes affiliated with Sphingobacteria, Bacteroides, Spirochaetes, Mollicutes, and Proteobacteria and candidate divisions OP11 and OP3. The two proteobacterial phylotypes were most similar to those of the known dechlorinators Trichlorobacter thiogenes and Sulfurospirillum multivorans. Although not represented by the bacterial clones generated with broad-specificity bacterial primers, a Dehalococcoides-like phylotype was identified with genus-specific primers. Only four distinct phylotypes were detected in the groundwater archaeal library, including predominantly a clone affiliated with the strictly acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii (24 of 43 clones). A mixed culture that completely dechlorinates TCE to ethene was enriched from this groundwater, and both communities were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). According to T-RFLP, the laboratory enrichment community was less diverse overall than the groundwater community, with 22 unique phylotypes as opposed to 43 and a higher percentage of Clostridia, including the Acetobacterium population. Bioreactor archaeal structure was very similar to that of the groundwater community, suggesting that methane is generated primarily via the acetoclastic pathway, using acetate generated by lactate fermentation and acetogenesis in both systems.

  5. A Dechlorinating Community Resulting From In Situ Biostimulation of a TCE-contaminated Deep Fracture Basalt Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wood; D. E. Cummings

    2004-12-01

    Sodium lactate additions to a trichloroethene (TCE) residual source area in deep, fractured basalt at a U.S. Department of Energy site have resulted in the enrichment of the indigenous microbial community, the complete dechlorination of nearly all aqueous-phase TCE to ethene, and the continued depletion of the residual source since 1999. The bacterial and archaeal consortia in groundwater obtained from the residual source were assessed by using PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. A clone library of bacterial amplicons was predominated by those from members of the class Clostridia (57 of 93 clones), of which a phylotype most similar to that of the homoacetogen Acetobacterium sp. strain HAAP-1 was most abundant (32 of 93 clones). The remaining Bacteria consisted of phylotypes affiliated with Sphingobacteria, Bacteroides, Spirochaetes, Mollicutes, and Proteobacteria and candidate divisions OP11 and OP3. The two proteobacterial phylotypes were most similar to those of the known dechlorinators Trichlorobacter thiogenes and Sulfurospirillum multivorans. Although not represented by the bacterial clones generated with broad-specificity bacterial primers, a Dehalococcoides-like phylotype was identified with genus-specific primers. Only four distinct phylotypes were detected in the groundwater archaeal library, including predominantly a clone affiliated with the strictly acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta concilii (24 of 43 clones). A mixed culture that completely dechlorinates TCE to ethene was enriched from this groundwater, and both communities were characterized by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). According to T-RFLP, the laboratory enrichment community was less diverse overall than the groundwater community, with 22 unique phylotypes as opposed to 43 and a higher percentage of Clostridia, including the Acetobacterium population. Bioreactor archaeal structure was very similar to that of the groundwater community, suggesting that methane is generated primarily via the acetoclastic pathway, using acetate generated by lactate fermentation and acetogenesis in both systems.

  6. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios. PMID:25827100

  7. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  8. The impact of additives found in industrial formulations of TCE on the wettability of sandstone.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Gavin; Lerner, David N; Leharne, Stephen A

    2005-11-01

    The wettability of aquifer rocks is a key physical parameter which exerts an important control on the transport, residual trapping, distribution and eventual fate of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (CHSs) released into the subsurface. Typically chlorinated solvents are assumed to be non-wetting in water saturated rocks and unconsolidated sediments. However industrially formulated solvent products are often combined with basic additives such as alkylamines to improve their performance; and the mineral surfaces of aquifer rocks and sediments usually possess a range of acid and hydrogen-bonding adsorption sites. The presence of these sites provides a mechanism whereby the basic additives in CHSs can be adsorbed at the solvent phase/solid phase interface. Given the amphiphilic molecular structure of these additives, this may result in changes in the wetting conditions of the solid phase. The aim of this study was therefore to test this conjecture for two classes of additives (alkylamines and quaternary ammonium salts) that are often encountered in industrial solvent formulations. Wettability assessments were made on sandstone cores by means of measurements of spontaneous and forced water drainage and spontaneous and forced water imbibition and through contact angle measurements on a smooth quartz surface. No solvent/additive combination produced solvent wetting conditions, though dodecylamine and octadecylamine significantly reduced the water wetting preference of sandstone which frequently resulted in neutral wetting conditions. The large volume of spontaneous water drainage observed in wettability experiments involving cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, suggested that the sandstone cores in these tests remained strongly water wetting. However equilibrium static contact angles of around 60 degrees were measured on quartz suggesting that the sandstone surfaces should be close to neutral wetting conditions. This paradox was finally resolved by noting that contact between the solvent mixture and water in the sandstone core resulted in a final solvent phase which had an extremely low interfacial tension. It is therefore suspected that the observed spontaneous drainage of solvent from the core was driven by gravitational and buoyancy forces rather than strong water wetting conditions. Finally it was noted that the mobilisation of iron oxide coatings from the sandstone surface had a considerable influence in reducing the interfacial tension and in the formation and stabilisation of TCE/water emulsions. PMID:16099534

  9. Perchloroethylene dry cleaning facilities. General recommended operating and maintenance practices for dry cleaning equipment. (Only for use when manufacturers' information is unavailable). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of the manual is to outline general recommended operating and maintenance practices for owners or operators of dry cleaning machines and emission control devices, only where efforts to obtain manufacturers' manuals are unsuccessful. Section 2.0 of this manual presents general recommended operation and maintenance practices for dry cleaning machines and auxiliary equipment. This section includes a brief description of the basic components in dry-to-dry and transfer machine systems, along with recommended operation and maintenance practices derived from sources with expert knowledge of the dry cleaning industry. Section 3.0 provides similar information for control devices. Section 4.0 presents a brief discussion of some of the most common causes of PCE vapor loss from dry cleaners.

  10. In situ redox manipulation of subsurface sediments from Fort Lewis, Washington: Iron reduction and TCE dechlorination mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    JE Szecsody; JS Fruchter; DS Sklarew; JC Evans

    2000-03-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a bench-scale study to determine how effective chemically treated Ft. Lewis sediments can degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The objectives of this experimental study were to quantify: (1) sediment reduction and oxidation reactions, (2) TCE degradation reactions, and (3) other significant geochemical changes that occurred. Sediment reduction and oxidation were investigated to determine the mass of reducible iron in the Ft. Lewis sediments and the rate of this reduction and subsequent oxidation at different temperatures. The temperature dependence was needed to be able to predict field-scale reduction in the relatively cold ({approximately}11 C) Ft. Lewis aquifer. Results of these experiments were used in conjunction with other geochemical and hydraulic characterization to design the field-scale injection experiment and predict barrier longevity. For example, the sediment reduction rate controls the amount of time required for the dithionite solution to fully react with sediments. Sediment oxidation experiments were additionally conducted to determine the oxidation rate and provide a separate measure of the mass of reduced iron. Laboratory experiments that were used to meet these objectives included: (1) sediment reduction in batch (static) systems, (2) sediment reduction in 1-D columns, and (3) sediment oxidation in 1-D columns. Multiple reaction modeling was conducted to quantify the reactant masses and reaction rates.

  11. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.; Smith, Thor E.; Williams, John H.; Degnan, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Des Moines TCE Site, Operable Unit 3, Des Moines, IA. (Second remedial action), September 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-18

    The Des Moines TCE site is located southwest of downtown Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa. Land use in the area is predominantly industrial and commercial, and part of the site lies within the floodplain of the Raccoon River. Water from the Des Moines Water Works north infiltration gallery was found to be contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE), dichloroethylene (DCE), and vinyl chloride at levels above accepted drinking water standards. The ROD addresses OU3, which encompasses potential sources of ground water contamination in an area north of the Raccoon River. The selected remedial action for OU3 includes no action with periodic groundwater monitoring.

  13. Scaling of silent electrical discharge reactors for hazardous organics destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, J.J.; Rosocha, L.A.; Brower, M.J.; Kang, M.; Schmidt, C.A.

    1993-07-01

    Silent electrical discharges are used to produce highly reactive free radicals that destroy hazardous compounds entrained in gaseous effluents at ambient gas temperatures and pressures. We have carried out destruction experiments at Los Alamos on a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride, perchloroethylene (PCE), and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). We have measured a ``nine-factor``, the amount of energy required to reduce the VOC concentration by a factor of ten. For practical reactor power densities, the ``nine-factor`` can be used to predict the destruction an removal efficiency (DRE) in terms of gas flow rate and the number of reactor modules. This report proposes a modular, stackable architecture for scaling up the reactor throughput.

  14. Final Report on Testing of Off-Gas Treatment Technologies for Abatement of Atmospheric Emissions of Chlorinated Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jarosch, T.R.; Haselow, J.S.; Rossabi, J.; Burdick, S.A.; Raymond, R.; Young, J.E.; Lombard, K.H.

    1995-01-23

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the program for off-gas treatment of atmospheric emissions of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), in particular trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE). This program was funded through the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s VOC`s in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (VNID). The off-gas treatment program was initiated after testing of in-situ air stripping with horizontal wells was completed (Looney et al., 1991). That successful test expectedly produced atmospheric emissions of CVOCs that were unabated. It was decided after that test that an off-gas treatment is an integral portion of remediation of CVOC contamination in groundwater and soil but also because several technologies were being developed across the United States to mitigate CVOC emissions. A single platform for testing off-gas treatment technologies would facilitate cost effective evaluation of the emerging technologies. Another motivation for the program is that many CVOCs will be regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and are already regulated by many state regulatory programs. Additionally, compounds such as TCE and PCE are pervasive subsurface environmental contaminants, and, as a result, a small improvement in terms of abatement efficiency or cost will significantly reduce CVOC discharges to the environment as well as costs to United States government and industry.

  15. Biological reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethylenes: Implications for natural attenuation and biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, T.D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Harrisburg, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated organic compounds are the most frequently found contaminants at many hazardous waste sites and industrial facilities. Numerous industries use chlorinated organics such as tetrachloroethylene also known as perchloroethylene (PCE) -- and trichloroethylene (TCE), as degreasing agents, paint strippers, and in textile processing. These solvents are often detected as soil and ground water contaminants due to improper storage and disposal practices. Laboratory and full-scale investigations have proven that complete biological transformation of PCE and TCE is possible under anaerobic conditions. Biological treatment of chlorinated ethenes has received much interest due to the prevalence of these contaminants and the need to develop technologies that destroy contaminants rather than transfer them to other media. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the biological process by which anaerobic bacteria biodegrade chlorinated ethylenes. The benefits of this process are discussed along with key findings that may be employed to determine if dechlorination is occurring under natural conditions. Requirements of these bacteria are described and an assessment of future research needs is provided.

  16. Kinetics of chlorinated ethylene dehalogenation under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Gao, J.; Hooker, B.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-20

    Kinetics were determined for methanogenic activity and chlorinated ethylene dehalogenation by a methanol-enriched, anaerobic sediment consortium. The culture reductively dechlorinated perchloroethylene (PCE) to trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), vinylchloride (VC), and ethylene and ethane. The absence of methanol or the addition of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid in the presence of methanol suppressed both methanogenic activity and dechlorination. In contrast, acetate production continued in the presence of 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid. These results suggest that dechlorination was strongly linked to methane formation and not to acetate production. A kinetic model, developed to describe both methanogenesis and dechlorination, successfully predicted experimentally measured concentrations of biomass, methane, substrate, and chlorinated ethylenes. The average maximum specific dehalogenation rates for PCE, TCE, 1,1-DCE, and VC were 0.9 {+-} 0.6, 0.4 {+-} 0.1, 12 {+-} 0.1, and 2.5 {+-} 1.7 {micro}mol contaminant/g {center_dot} DW/day, respectively. This pattern for dechlorination rates is distinctly different than that reported for transition metal cofactors, where rates drop by approximately one order of magnitude as each successive chlorine is removed. The experimental results and kinetic analysis suggest that it will be impractical to targeting methanol consuming methanogenic organisms for in-situ groundwater restoration.

  17. Demonstration of low latency Intra/Inter Data-Centre heterogeneous optical sub-wavelength network using extended GMPLS-PCE control-plane.

    PubMed

    Rofoee, Bijan Rahimzadeh; Zervas, Georgios; Yan, Yan; Simeonidou, Dimitra; Bernini, Giacomo; Carrozzo, Gino; Ciulli, Nicola; Levins, John; Basham, Mark; Dunne, John; Georgiades, Michael; Belovidov, Alexander; Andreou, Lenos; Sanchez, David; Aracil, Javier; Lopez, Victor; Fernández-Palacios, Juan P

    2013-03-11

    This paper reports on the first user/application-driven multi-technology optical sub-wavelength network for intra/inter Data-Centre (DC) communications. Two DCs each with distinct sub-wavelength switching technologies, frame based synchronous TSON and packet based asynchronous OPST are interconnected by a WSON inter-DC communication. The intra/inter DC testbed demonstrates ultra-low latency (packet-delay <270 µs and packet-delay-variation (PDV)<10 µs) flexible data-rate traffic transfer by point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, and multipoint-to-(multi)point connectivity, highly suitable for cloud based applications and high performance computing (HPC). The extended GMPLS-PCE-SLAE based control-plane enables innovative application-driven end-to-end sub-wavelength path setup and resource reservation across the multi technology data-plane, which has been assessed for as many as 25 concurrent requests. PMID:23482117

  18. Degradation of TCE, Cr(VI), sulfate, and nitrate mixtures by granular iron in flow-through columns under different microbial conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sumeet Gandhi; Byung-Taek Oh; Jerald L. Schnoor; Pedro J. J. Alvarez

    2002-01-01

    Flow-through aquifer columns packed with a middle layer of granular iron (Fe0) were used to study the applicability and limitations of bio-enhanced Fe0 barriers for the treatment of contaminant mixtures in groundwater. Concentration profiles along the columns showed extensive degradation of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI), nitrate, sulfate, and trichloroethene (TCE), mainly in the Fe0 layer. One column was bioaugmented with Shewanella

  19. Persulfate oxidation for in situ remediation of TCE. I. Activated by ferrous ion with and without a persulfate–thiosulfate redox couple

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenju Liang; Clifford J. Bruell; Michael C. Marley; Kenneth L. Sperry

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the laboratory study is to examine the conditions under which transition metal ions (e.g., ferrous ion, Fe2+) could activate the persulfate anion (S2O82?) to produce a powerful oxidant known as the sulfate free radical (SO4?) with a standard redox potential of 2.6 V. The SO4? is capable of destroying groundwater contaminants in situ such as trichloroethylene (TCE).

  20. Development of an integrated, in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 9. Part I. TCE degradation using nonbiological methods, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.P.; Sivavec, T.M.; Baghel, S.S. [General Electric Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low-permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge for in situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low-permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is used to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Draft Topical Report for Task No. 9 summarizes laboratory investigations into TCE degradation using nonbiological methods. These studies were conducted by the General Electric Company. The report concentrates on zero valent iron as the reducing agent and presents data on TCE and daughter product degradation rates in batch experiments, column studies, and electroosmotic cells. It is shown that zero valent iron effectively degrades TCE in electroosmotic experiments. Daughter product degradation and gas generation are shown to be important factors in designing field scale treatment zones for the Lasagna{trademark} process.

  1. 1992 toxic hazards research unit annual report. Annual report, 1 October 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, H.G.; Dodd, D.E.; Vinegar, A.; Schneider, M.G.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period 1 October 1991 through 30 September 1992. The THRU conducts descriptive, mechanistic, and predictive toxicology research and toxicological risk assessments to provide data to predict health hazards and to assess health risks associated with human exposure to chemicals and materials associated with military systems and operational environments. The report includes summaries of ongoing or completed research activities for the individual toxicology research requirements of the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy; highlights of the research support elements and conference activities of the THRU; and appendices that describe the THRU organization and its publications and presentations. 1,3,3-Trinitroazetidine (TNAZ), 1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene (TNB), Carboxylic acid metabolite, Chlorofluorocarbon, Chloroform, Delayed neurotoxicity, Halon replacement, Hydraulic fluid, Hydrazine, Inhalation, Jet engine oil, Lactational transfer, Methylene chloride, MIL-H-19457C, Neurotoxic Esterase (NTE), OTTO Fuel II, Perchloroethylene (PCE), Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling, Polychlorotrifluoroethylene (pCTFE), Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR), Reproductive, Risk assessment, Smoke, Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), Toxic dust, Vinyl Chloride (VC) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) mixture.

  2. Impedimetric microbial biosensor based on single wall carbon nanotube modified microelectrodes for trichloroethylene detection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Hnaien; S. Bourigua; F. Bessueille; J. Bausells; A. Errachid; F. Lagarde; N. Jaffrezic-Renault

    Contamination of soils and groundwaters with persistent organic pollutants is a matter of increasing concern. The most common organic pollutants are chlorinated hydrocarbons such as perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene (TCE). In this study, we developed a bacterial impedimetric biosensor for TCE detection, based on the immobilization of Pseudomonas putida F1 strain on gold microelectrodes functionalized with single wall carbon nanotubes covalently

  3. Ground water remediation modular approach using multiple technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mizerany

    2008-01-01

    Shallow ground water at a manufacturing facility in Sarasota, Florida, was impacted by historical practices that caused releases of sodium, sulfate, PCE, and TCE to the ground water. A risk assessment was used successfully to limit remediation to PCE, TCE, and daughter compounds. Due to closure time frames for the RCRA units and the need to remediate a large portion

  4. CROWTM PROCESS APPLICATION FOR SITES CONTAMINATED WITH LIGHT NON-AQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS AND CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Johnson, Jr.

    2003-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has successfully applied the CROWTM (Contained Recovery of Oily Wastes) process at two former manufactured gas plants (MGPs), and a large wood treatment site. The three CROW process applications have all occurred at sites contaminated with coal tars or fuel oil and pentachlorophenol (PCP) mixtures, which are generally denser than water and are classified as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). While these types of sites are abundant, there are also many sites contaminated with gasoline, diesel fuel, or fuel oil, which are lighter than water and lie on top of an aquifer. A third site type occurs where chlorinated hydrocarbons have contaminated the aquifer. Unlike the DNAPLs found at MGP and wood treatment sites, chlorinated hydrocarbons are approximately one and a half times more dense than water and have fairly low viscosities. These contaminants tend to accumulate very rapidly at the bottom of an aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene, or tetrachloroethylene (PCE), are the major industrial chlorinated solvents that have been found contaminating soils and aquifers. The objective of this program was to demonstrate the effectiveness of applying the CROW process to sites contaminated with light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Individual objectives were to determine a range of operating conditions necessary to optimize LNAPL and chlorinated hydrocarbon recovery, to conduct numerical simulations to match the laboratory experiments and determine field-scale recoveries, and determine if chemical addition will increase the process efficiency for LNAPLs. The testing consisted of twelve TCE tests; eight tests with PCE, diesel, and wood treatment waste; and four tests with a fuel oil-diesel blend. Testing was conducted with both vertical and horizontal orientations and with ambient to 211 F (99 C) water or steam. Residual saturations for the horizontal tests ranged from 23.6% PV to 0.3% PV. Also conducted was screening of 13 chemicals to determine their relative effectiveness and the selection of three chemicals for further testing.

  5. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  6. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 11 entitled: Evaluation of TCE contamination before and after the field experiment, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B.M.; Athmer, C.J.; Sheridan, P.W. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. The technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to install degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electro-osmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. The present Topical Report for Task No. 11 summarizes the results of TCE analysis in soil and carbon before and after conducting the field experiment. In addition, a discussion of the TCE material balance demonstrates that the Lasagna{trademark} process is effective in moving TCE from the contaminated soil into carbon treatment zones in the field experiment at DOE`s Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky.

  7. Behavioral components of tolerance to repeated inhalation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in rats 1 1 This manuscript has been reviewed by the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and approved for publication. Approval does not signify that the contents necessarily reflect the policies of the Agency nor does mention of trade names or commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation for use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip J Bushnell; Wendy M Oshiro

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that the acute neurotoxic effects of organic solvents change with repeated exposure will affect risk assessment of these pollutants. We observed previously that rats inhaling trichloroethylene (TCE) showed a progressive attenuation of impairment of signal detection behavior across several weeks of intermittent exposure, suggesting the development of tolerance. Here, we explored the development of tolerance to TCE during

  8. Desorption Behavior of Trichloroethene and Tetrachloroethene in U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site Unconfined Aquifer Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert G.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2006-06-21

    The DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating the potential applicability of the monitored natural attenuation (MNA) process as a contributor to the understanding of the restoration of its unconfined groundwater aquifer known to be contaminated with the chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE). This report discusses the results from aqueous desorption experiments on SRS aquifer sediments from two different locations at the SRS (A/M Area; P-Area) with the objective of providing technically defensible TCE/PCE distribution coefficient (Kd) data and data on TCE/PCE reversible and irreversible sorption behavior needed for further MNA evaluation.

  9. Initial field test of High-Energy Corona process for treating a contaminated soil-offgas stream

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, R R; Garcia, R E; Jeffs, J T; Virden, J W; Heath, W O

    1995-04-01

    The High-Energy Corona (HEC) technology for treating process offgases has been under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) since 1991. The HEC process uses high-voltage electrical discharges in air to ionize the air, forming a low-temperature plasma that would be expected to destroy a wide variety of organic compounds in air. The plasma contains strong oxidants, possibly including hydroxyl radicals, hydroperoxy radicals, superoxide radicals, various excited as well as ionized forms of oxygen, high-energy electrons, and ultraviolet (UV) light. Because the high-voltage plasma is produced near ambient temperatures and pressures, yet exhibits extremely rapid destruction kinetics with relatively low power requirements, the HEC technique appears promising as a low-cost treatment technique (Virden et al. 1992). As part of the Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Nonarid Integrated Demonstration (ID) at the DOE Savannah River Site, research activities were initiated in December 1991 to develop a prototype HEC process for a small-scale field demonstration to treat a soil-offgas stream contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) at varying concentrations. Over an 18-month period, the HEC technology was developed on a fast track, through bench and pilot scales into a trailer-mounted system that was tested at the Nonarid ID. Other national laboratories, universities, and private companies have also participated at the Nonarid ID to demonstrate a number of conventional, emerging and innovative approaches for treating the same soil-offgas stream.

  10. Sensitive and Specific In-Situ Sensor for Monitoring Contaminated Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai [ORNL] [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitten, William B [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Haiyang [ORNL] [ORNL; Nazarov, Erkinjun [Sionex Corp] [Sionex Corp; Xu, Jun [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of a high-sensitivity and high-specificity sensor, combining membrane extraction, pre-concentration, and gas-chromatographic differential mobility spectrometry (GC/DMS), for in situ detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. Direct in-situ detection was achieved by membrane conversion of aqueous analyte to vapor, followed by vapor spectroscopy using GC/DMS analyzer. The limit of detection (LOD) reaches 0.37 parts per billion in volume (ppbv), or 0.54 ug/L, for aqueous trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1.6 ug/L for perchloroethylene (PCE) by incorporating a preconcentrator between the membrane extraction and GC/DMS detection systems. The high specificity was achieved using two-dimensional separation parameters of GC retention time and DMS compensation voltage. The presence of co-contaminants and foreign contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, CCl4, and CHCl3 did not interfere with the identification of chlorinated hydrocarbons. This highly-sensitive and -specific sensor paves the way for developing field-deployable sensors for in-situ and real-time monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in groundwater and surface water.

  11. Mortality among aircraft manufacturing workers

    PubMed Central

    Boice, J. D.; Marano, D. E.; Fryzek, J. P.; Sadler, C. J.; McLaughlin, J. K.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risk of cancer and other diseases among workers engaged in aircraft manufacturing and potentially exposed to compounds containing chromate, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and mixed solvents. METHODS: A retrospective cohort mortality study was conducted of workers employed for at least 1 year at a large aircraft manufacturing facility in California on or after 1 January 1960. The mortality experience of these workers was determined by examination of national, state, and company records to the end of 1996. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were evaluated comparing the observed numbers of deaths among workers with those expected in the general population adjusting for age, sex, race, and calendar year. The SMRs for 40 cause of death categories were computed for the total cohort and for subgroups defined by sex, race, position in the factory, work duration, year of first employment, latency, and broad occupational groups. Factory job titles were classified as to likely use of chemicals, and internal Poisson regression analyses were used to compute mortality risk ratios for categories of years of exposure to chromate, TCE, PCE, and mixed solvents, with unexposed factory workers serving as referents. RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 77,965 workers who accrued nearly 1.9 million person-years of follow up (mean 24.2 years). Mortality follow up, estimated as 99% complete, showed that 20,236 workers had died by 31 December 1996, with cause of death obtained for 98%. Workers experienced low overall mortality (all causes of death SMR 0.83) and low cancer mortality (SMR 0.90). No significant increases in risk were found for any of the 40 specific cause of death categories, whereas for several causes the numbers of deaths were significantly below expectation. Analyses by occupational group and specific job titles showed no remarkable mortality patterns. Factory workers estimated to have been routinely exposed to chromate were not at increased risk of total cancer (SMR 0.93) or of lung cancer (SMR 1.02). Workers routinely exposed to TCE, PCE, or a mixture of solvents also were not at increased risk of total cancer (SMRs 0.86, 1.07, and 0.89, respectively), and the numbers of deaths for specific cancer sites were close to expected values. Slight to moderately increased rates of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were found among workers exposed to TCE or PCE, but none was significant. A significant increase in testicular cancer was found among those with exposure to mixed solvents, but the excess was based on only six deaths and could not be linked to any particular solvent or job activity. Internal cohort analyses showed no significant trends of increased risk for any cancer with increasing years of exposure to chromate or solvents. CONCLUSIONS: The results from this large scale cohort study of workers followed up for over 3 decades provide no clear evidence that occupational exposures at the aircraft manufacturing factory resulted in increases in the risk of death from cancer or other diseases. Our findings support previous studies of aircraft workers in which cancer risks were generally at or below expected levels.   PMID:10615290

  12. Green remediation: enhanced reductive dechlorination using recycled rinse water as bioremediation substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Gaynor; McKeon, Tom [CALIBRE Systems, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD) has rapidly become a remedy of choice for use on chlorinated solvent contamination when site conditions allow. With this approach, solutions of an organic substrate are injected into the affected aquifer to stimulate biological growth and the resultant production of reducing conditions in the target zone. Under the reducing conditions, hydrogen is produced and ultimately replaces chlorine atoms on the contaminant molecule causing sequential dechlorination. Under suitable conditions the process continues until the parent hydrocarbon precursor is produced, such as the complete dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) to ethene. The process is optimized by use of a substrate that maximizes hydrogen production per unit cost. When natural biota are not present to promote the desired degradation, inoculates can be added with the substrate. The in-situ method both reduces cost and accelerates cleanup. Successful applications have been extended from the most common chlorinated compounds perchloroethylene (PCE) and TCE and related products of degradation, to perchlorate, and even explosives such as RDX and trinitrotoluene on which nitrates are attacked in lieu of chloride. In recent work, the process has been further improved through use of beverage industry wastewaters that are available at little or no cost. With material cost removed from the equation, applications can maximize the substrate loading without significantly increasing total cost. The extra substrate loading both accelerates reaction rates and extends the period of time over which reducing conditions are maintained. In some cases, the presence of other organic matter in addition to simple sugars provides for longer performance times of individual injections, thereby working in a fashion similar to emulsified vegetable oil. The paper discusses results of applications at three different sites contaminated with chlorinated ethylenes. The applications have included wastewaters of both natural fruit juices and corn syrup solutions from carbonated beverages. Cost implications include both the reduced cost of substrate and the cost avoidance of needing to pay for treatment of the wastewater. (authors)

  13. Contributions of Fe Minerals to Abiotic Dechlorination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  14. Promising Emerging Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most applications of enhanced in situ bioremediation are based on biological reductive dechlorination. Anaerobic metabolism can also produce reactive minerals that allow for in situ biogeochemical transformation of chlorinated organic contaminants such as PCE, TCE, and cis-DCE. ...

  15. SURFACTANT-ENHANCED SOLUBILIZATION OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE AND DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN PUMP AND TREAT REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the enhanced solubilization of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) in nonionic surfactant solutions of Triton X-100, Brij-30, Igepal CA-720, and Tergitol NP-10 (alkylpolyoxyethylenes). urfact...

  16. MICROBIAL UTILIZATION OF VADOSE ZONE ORGANIC CARBON FOR REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous extracts from a calcareous spodosol were used as the primary substrate to study the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE). A comparison was made between extracts obtained using pure water and water saturated with trichloroethene (TCE). The latter solutions w...

  17. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The organic contaminants that are most commonly detected in groundwater are low-molecular-weight, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and chloroform. The authors exposed unsatu...

  18. MECHANISMS, CHEMISTRY, AND KINECTICS OF ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF CIS-DICHLOROETHENE AND VINYL CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) have been widely used by industry, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Energy for cleaning engines, clothes, and electronic components. Through leakage and improper disposal practices, these ...

  19. DETERMINATION OF CHLOROETHENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH SOLID PHASE MICRO EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical method has been developed to determine the chloroethene series, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE),cisdichloroethene (cis-DCE) andtransdichloroethene (trans-DCE) in environmental biotreatment studies using gas chromatography coupled with a solid phase mi...

  20. BIODEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: REACTIONS NEAR DNAPL AND ENZYME FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most common organic chemical groundwater contaminants at DOE sites, as well as at DOD and industrial facilities. Included are the solvents trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). Commonly these contaminan...

  1. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  2. Applications of Monitored Natural Attenuation in the USA (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) is widely applied in the USA to control the risk associated with ground water contamination from chlorinated solvents such a tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). MNA relies on the natural processes of degradation, sorption an...

  3. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1 . Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1 . Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is w...

  4. IN-PLACE REGENERATION OF SVE LOADED GAC USING FENTON'S REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten out of the 25 most frequently detected groundwater contaminants at hazardous waste sites are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) 1. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are among the top three 1. Granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption is widel...

  5. Fashioning a Greener Shade of Clean: Commercialization of Professional Wet Cleaning in the Garment Care Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Sinsheimer; Cyrus Grout; Angela Namkoong; Robert Gottlieb

    2004-01-01

    This report, “Fashioning a Greener Shade Clean: Commercialization of Professional Wet Cleaning in the Garment Care Industry”, is one in a series of reports by the Pollution Prevention Education and Research Center at Occidental College designed to address the significant environmental and health impacts associated with the use of perchloroethylene (PCE), the chemical cleaning solvent used by the vast majority

  6. Chlorination byproducts induce gender specific autistic-like behaviors in CD1 mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara Rose Guariglia; Edmund C. Jenkins; Kathryn K. Chadman; Guang Y. Wen

    In 2000, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) released a report concerning elevated autism prevalence and the presence water chlorination byproducts in the municipal drinking water supply in Brick Township, New Jersey. The ATSDR concluded that it was unlikely that these chemicals, specifically chloroform, bromoform (Trihalomethanes; THMs) and tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene; PCE) had contributed to the prevalence of

  7. Measuring economic losses from ground water contamination: An investigation of household avoidance costs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles W. Abdalla

    1990-01-01

    Economic losses from ground water contamination were estimated in a central Pennsylvania community. The averting expenditures method was applied via a mail survey of households in which water contained the unregulated volatile organic chemical, perchloroethylene (PCE). Expenditures were estimated at $148,900 (1987 dollars) over the six-month contamination period or approximately $252 per household annually. These costs underestimate the lower bound

  8. CONTROLLED RELEASE, BLIND TEST OF DNAPL REMEDIATION BY ETHANOL FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone was established within a sheet-pile isolated cell through a controlled release of perchloroethylene (PCE) to evaluate DNAPL remediation by in-situ cosolvent flushing. Ethanol was used as the cosolvent, and the main remedia...

  9. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  10. Monitoring the decontamination of a site polluted by DNAPLs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audí-Miró, C.; Espinola, R.; Torrentó, C.; Otero, N.; Rossi, A.; Palau, J.; Soler, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to monitor the decontamination of a site polluted by DNAPLs coming from an automotive industry. The contamination was caused by the poor management of the waste generated by the industrial activity, which was discharged into a seepage pit. As a result, soil contamination was produced in the seepage pit area and a plume of DNAPLs-contaminated groundwater was generated. To recover the original environmental quality, a dual action was proposed: in the first place, the removal of the source of contamination and in the second one, the treatment of the DNAPLs plume. The elimination of the source of contamination consisted on a selective excavation of the seepage pit and an offsite management of the contaminated land. To restore the groundwater quality, a passive treatment system using a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) of zero valent iron (ZVI) was implemented. In order to determine the efficiency of the remediation actions, a chemical, isotopic and hydrogeological control of the main solvents detected in groundwater (perchloroethylene -PCE-, trichloroethene -TCE- and cis-dichloroethylene -cis-DCE-) has been established. Results show a decrease in PCE concentration that has been attributed to the removal of the source more than to a degradation process. However, the presence of PCE by-products, TCE and cis-DCE, might indicate a possible PCE biotic degradation. ?13CPCE values analyzed upstream and downstream of the barrier don't show isotopic changes associated to the PRB (values are around -20‰ in all the sampling points). TCE might have experienced a natural advanced degradation process according to the high concentration of cis-DCE found prior the installation of the PRB and the isotopic enrichment in ?13CTCE in some specific areas of the plume (-19.9‰ in the source and -16‰ before the barrier). Slight isotopic changes have been observed in the water flow in a far distance after the barrier (-15.4‰). ?13Ccis-DCE experienced an enrichment upstream to downstream of the barrier (from -15.5‰ to -11.5‰) indicating that a possible abiotic degradation due to the PRB is being produced. However, an enrichment in ?13Ccis-DCE from the focus area to the barrier (from -19.9‰ to -15.5‰) was also detected, suggesting that biotic degradation of cis-DCE is occurring in the field. As a conclusion, preliminary concentration and isotopic results seem to indicate that the PRB does not intercept the whole contaminated plume. The installation of a monitoring system of multilevel piezometers of new construction around the PRB has been proposed in order to study in detail the underground sections most affected by pollution and help to define patterns of migration of DNAPLs in the subsurface, giving the possibility to improve the design of the ZVI-PRB.

  11. Biological degradation of tetrachloroethylene in methanogenic conditions. Final report, 12 July 1991-11 January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gossett, J.M.; DiStefano, T.D.; Stover, M.A.

    1994-06-01

    Research objective: investigate anaerobic biodegradation of perchloroethylene (PCE). Specific objectives: determine if the presence of PCE is necessary to sustain dechlorination of vinyl chloride (VC), delineate the role of hydrogen (H2) in PCE reductive dechlorination, investigate the ability of the high level PCE/methanol (MeOH) culture to utilize low levels of PCE, and determine the applicability of an Anaerobic Attached-film Expanded-bed (AAFEB) reactor to achieve PCE dechlorination. The investigators determined: by using a VC-fed culture unable to sustain ETH production, that the presence of PCE is required to sustain VC dechlorination, H2 acts as the electron donor directly used for the reductive dechlorination of PCE to ethene, the PCE/MeOH culture was able to use ppb levels of PCE due to the small requirement for electron donor (H2) by the culture, and that the loss of the dechlorinating biomass from the support matrix, and/or the inability of the culture to support PCE dechlorination at low concentrations, led to the failure of the AAFEB reactor system. Biodegradation, Tetrachloroethylene, Methanogenesis, Fixed-film reactors, Biological treatment, Chlorinated hydrocarbons.

  12. COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR Aerobic Degradation of Mixtures of

    E-print Network

    Wood, Thomas K.

    (TCE) INTRODUCTION Both tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are suspected carcinogens carcinogen (McCarty, 1997). Both VC and cis-DCE are U.S. Environmental Protection Agency priority pollut carcinogen (Mc- Clay et al., 1996). Because of this ecological risk posed by soil and water contaminated

  13. Compound-specific isotope analysis: Questioning the origins of a trichloroethene plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberts, S.M.; Braun, C.; Jones, S.

    2008-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios of trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2- dichloroethene, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene were determined by use of gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectroscopy to determine whether compound-specific stable carbon isotopes could be used to help understand the origin and history of a TCE groundwater plume in Fort Worth, TX. Calculated ??13C values for total chlorinated ethenes in groundwater samples, which can approximate the ??13C of a spilled solvent if all degradation products are accounted for, were useful for determining whether separate lobes of the plume resulted from different sources. Most notably, values for one lobe, where tetrachloroethene (PCE) has been detected periodically, were outside the range for manufactured TCE but within the range for manufactured PCE, whereas values for a separate lobe, which is downgradient of reported TCE spills, were within the range for manufactured TCE. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  14. DNAPLs at DOE sites: Background and assessment of characterization technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Junk, G.A.; Haas, W.J. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program (CMST-IP) within the Office of Technology Development (OTD) has responsibility for identification, evaluation, and delivery of technologies needed for the work of the Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. This report addresses part of that responsibility by providing summary information on DNAPL site characterization. A dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is a source of contamination that can persist in the subsurface for decades before dissipating completely into the vapor phase and groundwater. The DNAPL chemicals of particular concern to the DOE are chlorinated volatile organic compounds (Cl VOCS) such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE). These Cl VOCs were used in multiple ton quantities at DOE sites and were often released to the subsurface. The predicted fate of released Cl VOC liquid is downward movement through the soil under the force of gravity. As it moves, some of the Cl VOC liquid becomes trapped in the soil pores as residual saturation. The liquid also moves rapidly downward if small fractures are present. This migration continues until an impermeable or semi-permeable layer is encountered. Then lateral movement or spreading occurs. The downward and lateral migration in the subsurface leads to DNAPL pools, lenses, and residual saturation that can cause long-term contamination of groundwater at levels well above drinking water standards. Although Cl VOCs have been detected as dissolved components in the groundwater and as vapor in the soil gas at several DOE sites, direct evidence of their presence as DNAPL is sparse and no measurements of the amounts of DNAPL present within a given volume of subsurface have been made. Consequently, unresolved DNAPL issues exist at DOE sites.

  15. Removing hexavalent chromium from subsurface waters with anion-exchange resin

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    Some subsurface waters at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), is also present in the ground water; however, the source of the Cr(VI) may be natural. The Cr(VI) still must be treated if brought to the surface because its concentration exceeds discharge standards. We are planning facilities for removing the VOCs and Cr(VI) to a level below the discharge standards. The planned treatment includes the following steps: (1) Pumping the water to the surface facility. (2) Purging the VOCs with air and absorbing them on activated carbon. The VOCs in LLNL`s subsurface waters are primarily chlorinated organic solvents, such as dichloroethylene (DCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}). Contamination levels range from tens to thousands of parts per billion. (3) Filtering the water. (4) Passing the water through anion-exchange resin to remove the Cr. The Cr in LLNL subsurface waters occurs almost entirely as Cr(VI), which exists as the chromate anion, CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, at environmental pH. Cr levels range from tens to hundreds of parts per billion. (5) Discharging the treated water into the local arroyos. The relevant discharge criteria are 5 ppb total VOCs, 11 ppb Cr(VI), and pH between 6.5 and 8.5, inclusive. This report describes laboratory experiments undertaken to learn how the proposed treatment facility can be expected to operate. The laboratory results are expected to supply vendors with the detailed performance specifications needed to prepare bids on the Cr removal portion of the treatment facility. The treatment facility is expected to process 60 gallons per minute (gpm) of water by stripping VOCs with 720 standard cubic feet per minute (scfm) of air and removing Cr(VI) with 60 ft{sup 3} of resin.

  16. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Muftikian, Rosy (Tucson, AZ); Korte, Nic (Grand Junction, CO)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  17. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Muftikian, Rosy (Tucson, AZ); Korte, Nic (Grand Junction, CO)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products.

  18. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1998-06-02

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  19. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-03-18

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds. 10 figs.

  20. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Muftikian, Rosy (Tucson, AZ); Korte, Nic (Grand Junction, CO)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from effluents containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. The present invention also provides kits, devices, and other instruments that use the above-mentioned palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds.

  1. Dechlorination of TCE with palladized iron

    DOEpatents

    Fernando, Q.; Muftikian, R.; Korte, N.

    1997-04-01

    The present invention relates to various methods, such as an above-ground method and an in-ground method, of using a palladized iron bimetallic system for the dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds from various effluents or contaminated soil containing the same. The use of palladized iron bimetallic system results in the dechlorination of the chlorinated organic compound into environmentally safe reaction products. 10 figs.

  2. SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF ORGANIC SULFUR FROM COAL BY PERCHLOROETHYLENE EXTRACTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunggyu Lee; Sunil K. Kesavan; Byung G. Lee; Amit Ghosh; Conrad J. Kulik

    1989-01-01

    Desulfurization of coal involves the removal of both the inorganic and organic forms of sulfur. Several physical methods are available for the removal of inorganic sulfur which is normally represented by pyritic and sulfatic sulfur. Removal of organic sulfur requires the use of chemical cleaning methods. This paper presents the results of an organic sulfur removal technique which employs an

  3. Bubbleless gas transfer technology for the in situ remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J.R.; Kurz, M.D.

    1999-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the ability of hydrogen to supply reducing equivalents for the reductive dehalogenation of perchloroethylene (PCE). This objective will be accomplished by two types of activities. First, laboratory experiments will compare the kinetics of hydrogen-mediated dehalogenation with natural routes of loss (hydrolysis and natural attenuation). Secondly, bench-scale column experiments will be performed to demonstrate hydrogen-mediated reductive dehalogenation in aquifer sediments.

  4. Human Health Effects of Tetrachloroethylene: Key Findings and Scientific Issues

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Karen A.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Cooper, Glinda S.; Bale, Ambuja S.; Kopylev, Leonid; Barone, Stanley; Makris, Susan L.; Glenn, Barbara; Subramaniam, Ravi P.; Gwinn, Maureen R.; Dzubow, Rebecca C.; Chiu, Weihsueh A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completed a toxicological review of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE) in February 2012 in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Objectives: We reviewed key findings and scientific issues regarding the human health effects of PCE described in the U.S. EPA’s Toxicological Review of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene). Methods: The updated assessment of PCE synthesized and characterized a substantial database of epidemiological, experimental animal, and mechanistic studies. Key scientific issues were addressed through modeling of PCE toxicokinetics, synthesis of evidence from neurological studies, and analyses of toxicokinetic, mechanistic, and other factors (tumor latency, severity, and background rate) in interpreting experimental animal cancer findings. Considerations in evaluating epidemiological studies included the quality (e.g., specificity) of the exposure assessment methods and other essential design features, and the potential for alternative explanations for observed associations (e.g., bias or confounding). Discussion: Toxicokinetic modeling aided in characterizing the complex metabolism and multiple metabolites that contribute to PCE toxicity. The exposure assessment approach—a key evaluation factor for epidemiological studies of bladder cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma—provided suggestive evidence of carcinogenicity. Bioassay data provided conclusive evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Neurotoxicity was identified as a sensitive noncancer health effect, occurring at low exposures: a conclusion supported by multiple studies. Evidence was integrated from human, experimental animal, and mechanistic data sets in assessing adverse health effects of PCE. Conclusions: PCE is likely to be carcinogenic to humans. Neurotoxicity is a sensitive adverse health effect of PCE. Citation: Guyton KZ, Hogan KA, Scott CS, Cooper GS, Bale AS, Kopylev L, Barone S Jr, Makris SL, Glenn B, Subramaniam RP, Gwinn MR, Dzubow RC, Chiu WA. 2014. Human health effects of tetrachloroethylene: key findings and scientific issues. Environ Health Perspect 122:325–334;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307359 PMID:24531164

  5. Microbial degradation of chloroethenes in groundwater systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul M. Bradley

    2000-01-01

    The chloroethenes, tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are among the most common contaminants detected in groundwater systems. As recently as 1980, the consensus was that chloroethene compounds were not significantly biodegradable in groundwater. Consequently, efforts to remediate chloroethene-contaminated groundwater were limited to largely unsuccessful pump-and-treat attempts. Subsequent investigation revealed that under reducing conditions, aquifer microorganisms can reductively dechlorinate PCE and

  6. Stability of nitrate-ion in simulated deposition samples used for quality-assurance activities by the U. S. Geological Survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. V. Eckhardt; K. A. Pearsall

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have been detected in water from five public-supply wells and six cooling-water wells that tap the Magothy aquifer at Roosevelt Field. The cooling water is discharged after use to the water table aquifer through a nearby recharge basin and a subsurface drain field. Three plumes of TCE in groundwater have been delineated -

  7. SORPTION OF NONIONIC SURFACTANT OLIGOMERS TO SEDIMENT AND PCE DNAPL: EFFECTS ON PCE DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT. (R826650)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction of surfactant mixtures to the subsurface for the purpose of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation requires consideration of the effects of surfactant sorption to sediment and nonaqueous phase liquids. These effects include alteration of the solubiliz...

  8. Solvent extraction of elemental sulfur from coal and a determination of its source using stable sulfur isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hackley, Keith C.; Buchanan, D.H.; Coombs, K.; Chaven, C.; Kruse, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    Hot tetrachloroethene (perchloroethylene, PCE) extracts significant amounts of elemental sulfur (So) from weathered coals but not from pristine coals. The objective of this study was to determine whether So extracted by PCE is an oxidation product of pyrite or whether it originates in some way from unstable, organically-bound sulfur. The isotopic composition of the PCE-extracted So was compared to the isotopic compositions of the pyritic and the organic sulfur in a coal. The So was shown to have an isotopic signature similar to the pyritic sulfur. Additionally, the isotopic differences observed between the pyritic, So and sulfatic sulfur were consistent with bacterial mediated oxidation of sulfide sulfur (pyrite) as the source of both the sulfatic and elemental sulfur. ?? 1990.

  9. Degradation of Perchloroethene by zero-valent iron evaluated by carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Simon; Watzinger, Andrea; Reichenauer, Thomas G.

    2014-05-01

    Perchloroethene (PCE) is a widely spread groundwater contaminant in formally used industrial sites. Zero valent iron (ZVI) is used for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) of PCE contaminants in the groundwater. A key factor in the application of in situ remediation technologies is a proper monitoring of contaminant reduction. The measurement of the stable isotope ratio is a promising method that is already used for quantifying microbial degradation of chlorinated contaminants. The carbon isotope ratio of PCE, measured by - isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled to a gas chromatograph via a combustion interface (GC-C-IRMS), increases during degradation of PCE and can be directly related to the degree of degradation. It can be used to directly quantify chemical degradation and thus serves as a useful monitoring tool for groundwater remediation. An experiment to determine the carbon isotopic fractionation factor was performed as a lab experiment using Nanofer Star (NANOIRON). Two different PCE concentrations (c1: 220mgL-1, c2: 110mgL-1) mixed with 0.5 g of ZVI were sealed under deoxygenated conditions in 250 ml glas bottles locked with mininert caps. The bottles were incubated on a shaker for 865 h. Samples were taken weekly to measure the change in the carbon isotopic ratio of PCE as well as its concentration. Results showed a strong increase in the carbon isotope ratio (?-value) of PCE (start: -27 o end: -4 ), which indicates a significant dechlorination process of PCE. Beside PCE also one degradation product (Trichloroethylene - TCE) was measured. TCE was further dechlorinated as indicated by the ?-value change of TCE from -26 o to -4 oȦn unexpected intermediate value of -45 o for TCE was observed in the experiment. This fluctuation could be induced by the time depending concentration due to degradation and conversation processes. Furthermore, it seems that the progress of the ?-value is affected by the starting concentration of PCE (?-value of c1 < c2) as there is a higher ratio of PCE to ZVI.

  10. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODELING OF THREE WATERBORNE CHLOROETHANES IN CHANNEL CATFISH, ICTALURUS PUNCTATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based toxicokinetic model for fish was used to describe the uptake and disposition of three chlorinated ethanes in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). atfish were simultaneously exposed to 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TCE), pentachloroethane (PCE), and hexachlo...

  11. Aerobic/anaerobic/aerobic sequenced biodegradation of a mixture of chlorinated ethenes, ethanes and methanes in batch bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Frascari, Dario; Fraraccio, Serena; Nocentini, Massimo; Pinelli, Davide

    2013-01-01

    A novel aerobic/anaerobic/aerobic treatment was implemented in batch reactors containing aquifer materials from a site contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), vinyl chloride (VC), 1,1,2-trichloroethane (1,1,2-TCA) and chloroform (CF). Consortia grown aerobically on methane, propane, n-pentane and n-hexane completely biodegraded the chlorinated solvent mixture, via aerobic cometabolism of VC, CF, TCE and 1,1,2-TCA, followed by PCE reductive dechlorination (RD) to 1,2-cis-dichlorothylene (cis-DCE) or TCE, and cis-DCE/TCE cometabolism in a further aerobic phase. n-Hexane was the best substrate. No electron donor was supplied for RD, which likely utilized cellular material produced during the aerobic phase. Chloride release was stoichiometric with chlorinated solvent biodegradation. According to the Lepidium sativum ecotoxicity test, a decreased toxicity was observed with propane, n-pentane and n-hexane, but not methane. A kinetic study of PCE RD allowed to estimate the PCE maximum specific rate (0.57 ± 0.07 mg mg(protein)(-1) day(-1)) and half-saturation constant (6.7 ± 1.5 mg L(-1)). PMID:23201903

  12. Anionic surfactant remediation of soil columns contaminated by nonaqueous phase liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Dwarakanath; K Kostarelos; Gary A Pope; Doug Shotts; William H Wade

    1999-01-01

    A variety of column experiments have been completed for the purpose of selecting and evaluating suitable surfactants for remediation of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The various NAPLs tested in the laboratory experiments were tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), jet fuel (JP4) and a dense nonaqueous phase liquid from a site at Hill Air Force Base, UT. Both Ottawa sand and Hill

  13. Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Sites Technologies to Address Excavated VOC Contaminated Soil

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soils. The technical assistance team was composed of technical approximately 1,800 cubic yards of soil/sediment contaminated with organic solvents (TCE, PCE) and with U with a strategy for addressing contaminated soils at Plant 6. As part of this request at Areas 3A/4A and Plant 6

  14. Detoxification of vinyl chloride to ethene coupled to growth of an anaerobic bacterium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianzhong He; Kirsti M. Ritalahti; Kun-Lin Yang; Stephen S. Koenigsberg; Frank E. Löffler

    2003-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) are ideal solvents for numerous applications, and their widespread use makes them prominent groundwater pollutants. Even more troubling, natural biotic and abiotic processes acting on these solvents lead to the accumulation of toxic intermediates (such as dichloroethenes) and carcinogenic intermediates (such as vinyl chloride). Vinyl chloride was found in at least 496 of the 1,430

  15. Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents and Fuel Components (BTEX and MTBE) in Ground Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored Natural Attenuation is widely used in the USA to deal with ground water contamination from fuel components such as the BTEX compounds or MTBE or TBA and from chlorinated solvents such as PCE, TCE, and TCA. This presentation reviews the theory and practice of MNA in the...

  16. In-situ characterization using pulsed laser systems and hyperspectral imaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosemarie Catherine Chinni

    2002-01-01

    We are investigating the use of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) to detect volatile organic compounds (VOCs) mainly BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-, m -, and p-xylenes) and some organochlorides, such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and carbon tetrachloride, found in the environment. The long term objective of this work is to develop a system for measuring and identifying a

  17. 7 Cometabolic Bioremediation T. C. Hazen

    E-print Network

    Hazen, Terry

    7 Cometabolic Bioremediation T. C. Hazen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA.1007/978-3-540-77587-4_185, # Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2010 #12;Abstract: Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contami- nants, e.g., PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane

  18. EFFECT OF FENTON'S REAGENT ON SUBSURFACE MICROBIOLOGY AND BIODEGRADATION CAPACITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microcosm studies were conducted to determine the effect of Fenton's reagent on subsurface microbiology and biodegradation capacity in a DNAPL (PCE/TCE) contaminated aquifer previously treated with the reagent. Groundwater pH declined from 5 to 2.4 immediately after the treatmen...

  19. Accelerated Anaerobic Bioremediation of a Solvent Source Area Using Direct Injection, Dover AFB, DE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aleisa Bloom; Laurie Stenberg; Robert Lyon; David Fox; Albert Buell

    A solvent source area consisting primarily of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) was located adjacent to the hazardous waste storage building (Site SS07) at Dover Air Force Base (DAFB), Delaware. The selected treatment for the site focuses on the source area using accelerated anaerobic biodegradation (AAB) by direct- push injection methods to distribute substrate and nutrients and natural attenuation for

  20. Induction of toluene oxidation activity in pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 by chlorinated solvents and alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, K.; Streger, S.H.; Steffan, R.J. [Envirogen Inc., Lawrenceville, NJ (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Toluene oxidation activity in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain ENVPC5 was induced by trichloroethylene (TCE), and induction was followed by the degradation of TCE. Higher levels of toluene oxidation activity were achieved in the presence of a supplemental growth substrate such as glutamate, with levels of activity of up to 86% of that observed with toluene-induced cells. Activity in P. mendocina KR1 was also induced by cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, chloroethane, hexane, pentane, and octane, but not by trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. Toluene oxidation was not induced by TCE in Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4, P. putida F1, Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV110, or Pseudomonas sp. strain ENV113. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Multilayer fiber optic chemical sensors employing organically modified SiO2 and mixed TiO2/SiO2 sol gel membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivens, Delana A.; Schiza, Maria V.; Angel, S. M.

    1997-05-01

    Fiber-optic sensors have been developed that incorporate multi-layer organically modified silica sol-gel membranes. pH sensors use a single layer hydrophilic organo-silica sol-gel membrane with a covalently attached pH sensitive dye, hydroxypyrene trisulfonic acid. The hydrophilic coating is made by copolymerizing silanol-terminated polydimethylsiloxane and tetraethylorthosilicate with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Unlike previous methods, which use acid as a catalyst, we have found that a base catalyst produces optically transparent gels. The sol-gel coated sensors are simple to make and require drying and aging times of as little as one day. Sensors made using these gels exhibit very good long-term stability, fast response times and no dye leaching. pCO2 sensors were fabricated using the same pH sensitive sol-gel layer overcoated with a hydrophobic high organic content sol- gel membrane. The response of the pH and pCO2 sensors is very fast due to the high porosity of the sol-gel membranes. Although in-situ sensors have been described for a number of organic and inorganic species, many volatile organochloride compounds (VOCs), such as perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), have been difficult to measure using current fiber-optic sensor transduction schemes. One of the optical sensors described here is a multilayer (3-4) sol-gel system that incorporates a TiO2/SiO2 membrane to degrade VOCs into smaller, detectable products. Upon exposure to UV light, TiO2, a semiconductor with a bandgap of 3.2 eV, produces highly reactive electron-hole pairs that are capable of photodegrading most organic compounds. The VOCs mentioned above are sensitive to degradative oxidation on TiO2 surfaces. During photodegradation of VOCs a number of products are formed including H+, HCl, CO2 and a number of smaller hydrocarbons. These products are produced in the TiO2 membrane and on TiO2 surfaces and the products diffuse into the nearby indicator membrane where they are detected. Carbon dioxide and protons produced are detected by the pH sensitive indicator layer described above. pH and CO2 sensors, and preliminary data for the measurement of VOCs will be presented.

  2. Mixed Redox Catalytic Destruction of Chlorinated Solvents in Soils and Groundwater: From the Laboratory to the Field

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Rupp, Erik; Bell, Suzanne; Willinger, Martin; Foley, Theresa; Barbaris, Brian; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Arnold, Robert G.; Betterton, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A new thermocatalytic method to destroy chlorinated solvents has been developed in the laboratory and tested in a pilot field study. The method employs a conventional Pt/Rh catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb. Reactions proceed at moderate temperatures in the simultaneous presence of oxygen and a reductant (mixed redox conditions) to minimize catalyst deactivation. In the laboratory, stable operation with high conversions (above 90% at residence times shorter than 1 s) for perchloroethylene (PCE) is achieved using hydrogen as the reductant. A molar ratio of H2/O2 = 2 yields maximum conversions; the temperature required to produce maximum conversions is sensitive to influent PCE concentration. When a homologous series of aliphatic alkanes is used to replace hydrogen as the reductant, the resultant mixed redox conditions also produce high PCE conversions. It appears that the dissociation energy of the C–H bond in the respective alkane molecule is a strong determinant of the activation energy, and therefore the reaction rate, for PCE conversion. This new method was employed in a pilot field study in Tucson, Arizona. The mixed redox system was operated semicontinuously for 240 days with no degradation of catalyst performance and complete destruction of PCE and trichloroethylene in a soil vapor extraction gas stream. Use of propane as the reductant significantly reduced operating costs. Mixed redox destruction of chlorinated solvents provides a potentially viable alternative to current soil and groundwater remediation technologies. PMID:18991945

  3. Prenatal and Early Childhood Exposure to Tetrachloroethylene and Adult Vision

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Kelly D.; Janulewicz, Patricia A.; Rowe, Susannah; Weinberg, Janice M.; Winter, Michael R.; Martin, Brett R.; Vieira, Veronica M.; White, Roberta F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Tetrachloroethylene (PCE; or perchloroethylene) has been implicated in visual impairments among adults with occupational and environmental exposures as well as children born to women with occupational exposure during pregnancy. Objectives: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study, we examined the association between prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and deficits in adult color vision and contrast sensitivity. Methods: We estimated the amount of PCE that was delivered to the family residence from participants’ gestation through 5 years of age. We administered to this now adult study population vision tests to assess acuity, contrast sensitivity, and color discrimination. Results: Participants exposed to higher PCE levels exhibited lower contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies compared with unexposed participants, although the differences were generally not statistically significant. Exposed participants also exhibited poorer color discrimination than unexposed participants. The difference in mean color confusion indices (CCI) was statistically significant for the Farnsworth test but not Lanthony’s D-15d test [Farnsworth CCI mean difference = 0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.003, 0.10; Lanthony CCI mean difference = 0.07, 95% CI: –0.02, 0.15]. Conclusions: Prenatal and early childhood exposure to PCE-contaminated drinking water may be associated with long-term subclinical visual dysfunction in adulthood, particularly with respect to color discrimination. Further investigation of this association in similarly exposed populations is necessary. PMID:22784657

  4. TRANSPORT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) IN NATURAL SOIL BY ELECTROOSMOSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation, primarily due to low mobilization of the contaminants and difficulty in uniform delivery of treatment reagents. An alternative approach using electroosmosis (EO) is used to mob...

  5. Survey of subsurface treatment technologies for environmental restoration sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Wright, Jerome L.

    2003-08-01

    This report provides a survey of remediation and treatment technologies for contaminants of concern at environmental restoration (ER) sites at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. The sites that were evaluated include the Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater, Technical Area V, and Canyons sites. The primary contaminants of concern at these sites include trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and nitrate in groundwater. Due to the low contaminant concentrations (close to regulatory limits) and significant depths to groundwater ({approx}500 feet) at these sites, few in-situ remediation technologies are applicable. The most applicable treatment technologies include monitored natural attenuation and enhanced bioremediation/denitrification to reduce the concentrations of TCE, PCE, and nitrate in the groundwater. Stripping technologies to remove chlorinated solvents and other volatile organic compounds from the vadose zone can also be implemented, if needed.

  6. Passive and active soil gas sampling at the Mixed Waste Landfill, Technical Area III, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    McVey, M.D.; Goering, T.J. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peace, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01

    The Environmental Restoration Project at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico is tasked with assessing and remediating the Mixed Waste Landfill in Technical Area III. The Mixed Waste Landfill is a 2.6 acre, inactive radioactive and mixed waste disposal site. In 1993 and 1994, an extensive passive and active soil gas sampling program was undertaken to identify and quantify volatile organic compounds in the subsurface at the landfill. Passive soil gas surveys identified levels of PCE, TCE, 1,1, 1-TCA, toluene, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, dichloroethyne, and acetone above background. Verification by active soil gas sampling confirmed concentrations of PCE, TCE, 1,1,1-TCA, and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane at depths of 10 and 30 feet below ground surface. In addition, dichlorodifluoroethane and trichlorofluoromethane were detected during active soil gas sampling. All of the volatile organic compounds detected during the active soil gas survey were present in the low ppb range.

  7. Determination of fumigants in cereals and cereal products by capillary gas chromatography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Willy Gaston Van Rillaer; Hedwig Beernaert; Willy Dejonckheere

    1988-01-01

    Zusammenfassung Es wurden zwei Methoden für die quantitative Bestimmung der Restmengen von Begasungsmitteln wie 1,2-Dichlorethan (EDC), Tetrachlorkohlenstoff (CCl4), Trichlorethylen (TCE), 1,2-Dibromethan (EDB) und Tetrachlorethylen (PCE) im Getreide, insbesondere Weizen, und in Lebensmitteln beschrieben. Das erste Verfahren basiert auf einer Mikrodampfdestillation-Lösungsmittelextraktion, während für das zweite die Kopfraumtechnik verwendet wurde. Da mehrfache Kopfraum-Extraktion bei der Bestimmung des Tetrachlorkohlenstoffes in Getreide zu zeitraubend

  8. Phytoscreening for chlorinated solvents using rapid in vitro SPME sampling: Application to urban plume in Verl, Germany

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Limmer, M.A.; Balouet, J.-C.; Karg, F.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Burken, J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid detection and delineation of contaminants in urban settings is critically important in protecting human health. Cores from trees growing above a plume of contaminated groundwater in Verl, Germany, were collected in 1 day, with subsequent analysis and plume mapping completed over several days. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) analysis was applied to detect tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to below nanogram/liter levels in the transpiration stream of the trees. The tree core concentrations showed a clear areal correlation to the distribution of PCE and TCE in the groundwater. Concentrations in tree cores were lower than the underlying groundwater, as anticipated; however, the tree core water retained the PCE:TCE signature of the underlying groundwater in the urban, populated area. The PCE:TCE ratio can indicate areas of differing degradation activity. Therefore, the phytoscreening analysis was capable not only of mapping the spatial distribution of groundwater contamination but also of delineating zones of potentially differing contaminant sources and degradation. The simplicity of tree coring and the ability to collect a large number of samples in a day with minimal disruption or property damage in the urban setting demonstrates that phytoscreening can be a powerful tool for gaining reconnaissance-level information on groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. The use of SPME decreases the detection level considerably and increases the sensitivity of phytoscreening as an assessment, monitoring, and phytoforensic tool. With rapid, inexpensive, and noninvasive methods of detecting and delineating contaminants underlying homes, as in this case, human health can be better protected through screening of broader areas and with far faster response times. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. Microbial based chlorinated ethene destruction

    DOEpatents

    Bagwell, Christopher E. (Aiken, SC); Freedman, David L. (Clemson, SC); Brigmon, Robin L. (North Augusta, SC); Bratt, William B. (Atlanta, GA); Wood, Elizabeth A. (Marietta, GA)

    2009-11-10

    A mixed culture of Dehalococcoides species is provided that has an ability to catalyze the complete dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes such as PCE, TCE, cDCE, 1,1-DCE and vinyl chloride as well as halogenated ethanes such as 1,2-DCA and EDB. The mixed culture demonstrates the ability to achieve dechlorination even in the presence of high source concentrations of chlorinated ethenes.

  10. SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY OF TETRACHLOROETHYLENE (PERCHLOROETHYLENE) ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER OF RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study provides data on the effects of tetrachloroethylene in drinking solutions. The acute oral LD(50) was determined in male and female Charles River rats and found to be 3835 mg/kg for males and 3005 mg/kg for females. Male and female rats received theoretical daily doses o...

  11. Degradation of perchloroethylene in cosolvent solutions by zero-valent iron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Clayton J. Clark; P. S. C. Rao; Michael D. Annable

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of sites contaminated by chlorinated organic compounds is a significant priority in the environmental field. Subsequently, the addition of cosolvent solutions for in situ flushing of contaminated source zones has been successfully field tested. However, the treatment of effluent fluids in such cleanup efforts is an often overlooked component of this technology implementation. The purpose of this research was

  12. Subchronic toxicity of tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene) administered in the drinking water of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, J.R.; Condie, L.W. Jr.; Borzelleca, J.F.

    1986-07-01

    This study provides data on the effects of tetrachloroethylene in drinking solutions. The acute oral LD50 in male and female Charles River rats was found to be 3835 mg/kg for males and 3005 mg/kg for females. Male and female rats received theoretical daily doses of 14,400, and 1400 mg tetrachloroethylene/kg body wt/day for 90 consecutive days. There were no compound-related deaths. Body weights were significantly lower in male and female rats at the higher doses. There were no consistent dose-related effects on any of the hematological, clinical chemistry, or urinalysis parameters. 5'-Nucleotidase activity was increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting possible hepatotoxicity; however, other serum indicators of hepatic function were unaffected by the treatment. There were no gross pathological effects observed. Liver and kidney body weight ratios, but not brain weight ratios, were elevated at the higher doses. There was no other evidence of compound-related toxicity. These data suggest that exposure of humans to reported levels of tetrachloroethylene in drinking water (approximately 1 microgram/liter) does not constitute a serious health hazard.

  13. Degradation of perchloroethylene and nitrate by high-activity modified green rusts 

    E-print Network

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    2006-10-30

    , nitrate reduction by GR-F(Cu) and GR-F(Pt) was further studied to determine the effects on degradation rates of pH, Cu(II) addition, and initial nitrate concentration. A reaction model with four sequential steps was proposed to describe the process...

  14. CATALYTIC STEAM REFORMING OF CHLOROCARBONS: TRICHLOROETHANE, TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND PERCHLOROETHYLENE. (R822721C633)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (?13C and ?37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ? ?C/?Cl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems to catalyse PCE reductive dechlorination according to a different mechanism. In another study, an m value of 2.5±0.8 was found for PCE anaerobic dechlorination by a bacterial consortium dominated by species closely related to Desulfitobacterium aromaticivorans strain UKTL (consortia A) [2]. This value is indistinguishable from the one found for PceATCE within a 95% confidence interval although the reductive dehalogenase protein sequence of consortia A is distinctly different from the sequences of our two cultures. This suggests that the reaction mechanism is not related to the similarities between reductive dehalogenases. References 1. Abe, Y., et al., Carbon and Chlorine Isotope Fractionation during Aerobic Oxidation and Reductive Dechlorination of Vinyl Chloride and cis-1,2-Dichloroethene. Environmental Science & Technology, 2009. 43(1): p. 101-107. 2. Wiegert, C., et al., Carbon and Chlorine Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Degradation of Tetra- and Trichloroethene. Environmental Science & Technology, 2013. 47(12): p. 6449-6456.

  16. Geohydrology and distribution of volatile organic compounds in ground water in the Casey Village area, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Conger, Randall W.; Grazul, Kevin E.

    1998-01-01

    Casey Village and the adjoining part of the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) are underlain by the Late Triassic-age Stockton Formation, which consists of a dipping series of siltstones and sandstones. The direction of vertical ground-water gradients in the Stockton Formation varies among well locations and sometimes with time. Vertical gradients can be substantial; the difference in water levels at one well pair (two wells screened at different depths) was 7.1 ft (feet) over a 32-ft vertical section of the aquifer. Potentiometric-surface maps show a groundwater divide that bisects the Casey Village area. For wells screened between 18 and 64 ft below land surface (bls), the general ground-water gradient is to the east and northeast on the east side of the divide and to the south and southwest on the west side of the divide. For wells screened between 48 and 106 ft bls, the general ground-water gradient is to the northeast on the east side of the divide and to the southwest and northwest on the west side of the divide. An aquifer test at one well in Casey Village caused drawdown in wells on the opposite side of the ground-water divide on the NAWC and shifted the ground-water divide in the deeper potentiometric surface to the west. Drawdowns formed an elliptical pattern, which indicates anisotropy; however, anisotropy is not aligned with strike or dip. Hydraulic stress caused by pumping crosses stratigraphic boundaries. Between 1993 and 1996, the trichloroethylene (TCE) concentration in water samples collected from wells in Casey Village decreased. The highest concentration of TCE measured in water from one well decreased from 1,200 mg/L (micrograms per liter) in 1993 when domestic wells were pumped in Casey Village to 140 mg/L in 1996, 3 years after the installation of public water and the cessation of domestic pumping. This suggests that pumping of domestic wells may have contributed to TCE migration. Between 1993 and 1996, the tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentration in water samples collected from wells in Casey Village decreased only slightly. The highest concentration of PCE measured in water from one well decreased from 720 mg/L in 1993 to 630 mg/L in 1996. The distribution of TCE and PCE in ground water indicates the presence of separate PCE and TCE plumes, each with a different source area. The TCE plume appears to be moving in two directions away from the ground-water divide area. The pumping of a domestic well may have caused TCE migration into the ground-water divide area. From the divide area, the TCE plume appears to be moving both to the east and the west under the natural hydraulic gradient. Aquifer-isolation tests conducted in the well with the highest TCE concentrations showed that concentrations of TCE in water samples from the isolated intervals were similar but slightly lower in the deeper isolated zones than in the shallower isolated zones. Upward flow was measured in this well during geophysical logging. If the source of TCE to the well was from shallow fractures, upward flow of less contaminated water could be flushing TCE from the immediate vicinity of this well. This may help explain why the concentration of TCE in water from this well decreased an order of magnitude between 1993 and 1996.

  17. Sustainable remediation: electrochemically assisted microbial dechlorination of tetrachloroethene-contaminated groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sayali S; Adetutu, Eric M; Rochow, Jacqueline; Mitchell, James G; Ball, Andrew S

    2014-01-01

    Microbial electric systems (MESs) hold significant promise for the sustainable remediation of chlorinated solvents such as tetrachlorethene (perchloroethylene, PCE). Although the bio-electrochemical potential of some specific bacterial species such as Dehalcoccoides and Geobacteraceae have been exploited, this ability in other undefined microorganisms has not been extensively assessed. Hence, the focus of this study was to investigate indigenous and potentially bio-electrochemically active microorganisms in PCE-contaminated groundwater. Lab-scale MESs were fed with acetate and carbon electrode/PCE as electron donors and acceptors, respectively, under biostimulation (BS) and BS-bioaugmentation (BS-BA) regimes. Molecular analysis of the indigenous groundwater community identified mainly Spirochaetes, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and ? and ?-Proteobacteria. Environmental scanning electron photomicrographs of the anode surfaces showed extensive indigenous microbial colonization under both regimes. This colonization and BS resulted in 100% dechlorination in both treatments with complete dechlorination occurring 4 weeks earlier in BS-BA samples and up to 11.5 ?A of current being generated. The indigenous non-Dehalococcoides community was found to contribute significantly to electron transfer with ?61% of the current generated due to their activities. This study therefore shows the potential of the indigenous non-Dehalococcoides bacterial community in bio-electrochemically reducing PCE that could prove to be a cost-effective and sustainable bioremediation practice. PMID:24119162

  18. DNAPL Extraction/Oleofilter Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hazel, C.

    1997-11-03

    A short term, low flow DNAPL extraction test was performed from May 29 - 30, 1997, to gather additional information about the possibility of using monitoring well MSB-3D to recover source contamination from the M-Area Aquifer. Although no visible, free phase material was recovered, the groundwater did contain perchloroethylene (PCE) at and above aqueous solubility. Improvements in the pumping configuration were identified for future trials. Prior to final treatment in the M1 air stripper, the groundwater was passed through an Oleofiltration system to evaluate its capability as a treatment technology. The Oleofilter uses a combination of conventional gravity assisted separation with coalescing plates and a final polishing filter using proprietary coated granules to remove hydrocarbons. Although free phase DNAPL was not processed through the Oleofilter, the groundwater containing high levels of dissolved PCE was treated efficiently. Initially the Oleofilter removed 99 percent of the PCE. As the test progressed, this removal rate decreased to 83 percent as the granules became loaded with PCE. Longer term testing, perhaps with periodic backflushing, is required to determine the effective granule capacity.

  19. Effects of capillary pressure and use of polymer solutions on dense, non-aqueous-phase liquid retention and mobilization in a rough-walled fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Longino, B.L.; Kueper, B.H. (Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1999-07-15

    In this laboratory study, perchloroethylene (PCE) was permitted to migrate through a horizontal rough-walled limestone fracture under controlled conditions to assess fracture retention capacity. Retention of immiscible-phase PCE in the absence of an applied wetting-phase hydraulic gradient varied between 11% and 26% of the fracture volume. A portion of this residual could be removed through water flooding; however, even at the maximum applied hydraulic gradient of 1.0, residual PCE remained in the fracture. The observed correlation of reduced residual saturation with capillary number (N[sub c]) demonstrated that this rough-walled fracture exhibited behavior similar to that of a porous medium under water-flooding conditions. For a given hydraulic gradient, polymer-enhanced floods (using xanthan gum) were not as successful as conventional water flooding at removing residual from the fracture. The traditional form of the capillary number became an increasingly poor predictor of mobilization behavior as the viscosity of the displacing phase was increased. Incorporation of ([mu][sub w]/[mu][sub nw])[sup [minus]0.5] into the traditional capillary number provided a more appropriate dimensionless group with which to correlate residual PCE saturation in the fracture as [mu][sub w] increased.

  20. Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB) for the remediation of groundwater simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Erto, A; Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Musmarra, D

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) made with activated carbon, namely a Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB), is put forward as an effective technique for the remediation of aquifers simultaneously contaminated by some chlorinated organic compounds. A design procedure, based on a computer code and including different routines, is presented as a tool to accurately describe mass transport within the aquifer and adsorption/desorption phenomena occurring inside the barrier. The remediation of a contaminated aquifer near a solid waste landfill in the district of Napoli (Italy), where Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and Trichloroethylene (TCE) are simultaneously present, is considered as a case study. A complete hydrological and geotechnical site characterization, as well as a number of dedicated adsorption laboratory tests for the determination of activated carbon PCE/TCE adsorption capacity in binary systems, are carried out to support the barrier design. By means of a series of numerical simulations it is possible to determine the optimal barrier location, orientation and dimensions. PABs appear to be an effective remediation tool for the in-situ treatment of an aquifer contaminated by PCE and TCE simultaneously, as the concentration of both compounds flowing out of the barrier is everywhere lower than the regulatory limits on groundwater quality. PMID:24747934

  1. Use of Mini-Sprinklers to Strip Trichloroethylene and Tetrachloroethylene from Contaminated Ground Water.

    SciTech Connect

    Brerisford, Yvette, C.; Bush, Parshall, B.; Blake, John, I.; Bayer, Cassandra L.

    2003-01-01

    Berisford, Y.C., P.B. Bush, J.I. Blake, and C.L. Bayer. 2003. Use of mini-sprinklers to strip trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene from contaminated ground water. J. Env. Qual. 32:801-815. Three low-volume mini-sprinklers were tested for their efficacy to strip trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) from water. Deionized water spiked with TCE and PCE was pumped through a mini-sprinkler supported on top of a 1.8-m-tall. Water was collected in collection vessels at 0.61 and 1.22 m above the ground on support columns that were spaced at 0.61-m intervals from the riser base, and samples were composited per height and distance from the riser. Overall, air-stripping reduced dissolved concentrations of TCE and PCE by 99.1 to 100 and 96.9 to 100%, respectively. Mini-sprinklers offer the advantages of (i) easy setup in series that can be used on practically any terrain; (ii) operation over a long period of time that does not threaten aquifer depletion; (iii) use in small or confined aquifers in which the capacity is too low to support large irrigation or pumping systems; and (iv) use in forests in which the small, low-impact droplets of the mini-sprinklers do not damage bark and in which trees can help manage (via evapotransporation) excess waste water.

  2. Insights into the use of time-lapse GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations of DNAPL migration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.H.; Poeter, E.P.

    2007-01-01

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) saturations determined from GPR surveys were used as observations for inversion of multiphase flow simulations of a PCE injection experiment (Borden 9??m cell), allowing for the estimation of optimal bulk intrinsic permeability values. The resulting fit statistics and analysis of residuals (observed minus simulated PCE saturations) were used to improve the conceptual model. These improvements included adjustment of the elevation of a permeability contrast, use of the van Genuchten versus Brooks-Corey capillary pressure-saturation curve, and a weighting scheme to account for greater measurement error with larger saturation values. A limitation in determining PCE saturations through one-dimensional GPR modeling is non-uniqueness when multiple GPR parameters are unknown (i.e., permittivity, depth, and gain function). Site knowledge, fixing the gain function, and multiphase flow simulations assisted in evaluating non-unique conceptual models of PCE saturation, where depth and layering were reinterpreted to provide alternate conceptual models. Remaining bias in the residuals is attributed to the violation of assumptions in the one-dimensional GPR interpretation (which assumes flat, infinite, horizontal layering) resulting from multidimensional influences that were not included in the conceptual model. While the limitations and errors in using GPR data as observations for inverse multiphase flow simulations are frustrating and difficult to quantify, simulation results indicate that the error and bias in the PCE saturation values are small enough to still provide reasonable optimal permeability values. The effort to improve model fit and reduce residual bias decreases simulation error even for an inversion based on biased observations and provides insight into alternate GPR data interpretations. Thus, this effort is warranted and provides information on bias in the observation data when this bias is otherwise difficult to assess. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Direct mass spectrometric studies of the destruction of hazardous wates. 2. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of trichloroethylene over TiO[sub -2]: Products and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M.R.; Jacoby, W.A.; Blake, D.M.; Milne, T.A. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) over titanium dioxide was investigated as a potential method for destroying this common pollutant. The results from this study agree with earlier studies in that high levels of destruction of TCE were achieved. Accompanying these high rates of destruction were high quantum yields (approaching unity). However, direct-sampling mass spectrometry and gas-phase Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that there are significant quantities of byproducts produced [phosgene, dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC), carbon monoxide, molecular chlorine]. The DCAC has been rationalized on the basis of a chemical reaction mechanism in which the TCE molecules are oxidized in a chain reaction involving Cl atoms. This mechanism appears to be validated by tests with other chlorinated ethylenes (perchloroethylene, dichloroethylenes). Phosgene may arise at least partially from the photocatalytic oxidation of DCAC, and molecular chlorine may result from the recombination of chlorine atoms. The results of this study are discussed relative to aqueous-phase photocatalytic oxidation of TCE where chlorinated intermediates have been observed. 24 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Introduction Competition for H2 in a PCE-contaminated aquifer

    E-print Network

    is a bacterial anaerobic respiration in which CEs are sequentially reduced to harmless ethene. The interestingA detected on the site In presence of Fe(III) organohalide respiring bacteria are outcompeted for H2 (fig.2. Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) belong to the most common groundwater contaminants. Organohalide respiration

  5. Risk-based economic decision analysis of remediation options at a PCE-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Gitte; Friis-Hansen, Peter; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-05-01

    Remediation methods for contaminated sites cover a wide range of technical solutions with different remedial efficiencies and costs. Additionally, they may vary in their secondary impacts on the environment i.e. the potential impacts generated due to emissions and resource use caused by the remediation activities. More attention is increasingly being given to these secondary environmental impacts when evaluating remediation options. This paper presents a methodology for an integrated economic decision analysis which combines assessments of remediation costs, health risk costs and potential environmental costs. The health risks costs are associated with the residual contamination left at the site and its migration to groundwater used for drinking water. A probabilistic exposure model using first- and second-order reliability methods (FORM/SORM) is used to estimate the contaminant concentrations at a downstream groundwater well. Potential environmental impacts on the local, regional and global scales due to the site remediation activities are evaluated using life cycle assessments (LCA). The potential impacts on health and environment are converted to monetary units using a simplified cost model. A case study based upon the developed methodology is presented in which the following remediation scenarios are analyzed and compared: (a) no action, (b) excavation and off-site treatment of soil, (c) soil vapor extraction and (d) thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction by electrical heating of the soil. Ultimately, the developed methodology facilitates societal cost estimations of remediation scenarios which can be used for internal ranking of the analyzed options. Despite the inherent uncertainties of placing a value on health and environmental impacts, the presented methodology is believed to be valuable in supporting decisions on remedial interventions. PMID:20117877

  6. Dechlorination of PCE by mixtures of green rust and zero-valent iron 

    E-print Network

    Marchal, Fabienne

    2002-01-01

    such as pH (8, 9, and 10), ZVI pretreatment, and preparation method of the mixtures (GR[S]?? synthesized in the presence of ZVI; GR[S]?? and ZVI mixed after preparation). For all the experimental conditions evaluated, the activities of these reductants...

  7. College Last Name First Name Email Major Eudy Parker pce2 Religious Studies

    E-print Network

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Lakhani Shirin sfl1 Anthroplogy, Psychology Luu Aida aida Anthropology, Sociology Minor Pullano Joe jmp6 Cristina cbb2 Health Sciences Lam Michael mtl1 Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Bioengineering Walker Julie nadhika.r Political Science, Policy Studies Yao Xuan xy4 Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Philosophy Athlete

  8. Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids Batch and Column Experiments

    E-print Network

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    of the art for plume treatment · Injectable nano-scaled zero valent iron particles (nZVI) have potential hydrocarbons, heavy metals, pesticides etc.) NAPASAN-Particle Flakes D50 = 900 nm aS = 1.3 m²/g Thickness ~ 70

  9. HYDROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN SULFATE-REDUCING ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS DURING PCE DEHALOGENATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite recent progress made evaluating the role of hydrogen (H2) as a key electron donor in the anaerobic remediation of chloroethenes, few studies have focused on the evaluation of hydrogen thresholds relative to reductive dehalogenation in sulfidogenic environments. Competitio...

  10. Time-Dependent Interfacial Properties and DNAPL Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Tuck, D.M.

    1999-03-10

    Interfacial properties play a major role in governing where and how dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) move in the subsurface. Interfacial tension and contact angle measurements were obtained for a simple, single component DNAPL (tetrachloroethene, PCE), complex laboratory DNAPLs (PCE plus Sudan IV dye), and a field DNAPL from the Savannah River Site (SRS) M-Area DNAPL (PCE, trichloroethene [TCE], and maching oils). Interfacial properties for complex DNAPLs were time-dependent, a phenomenon not observed for PCE alone. Drainage capillary pressure-saturation curves are strongly influenced by interfacial properties. Therefore time-dependence will alter the nature of DNAPL migration and penetration. Results indicate that the time-dependence of PCE with relatively high Sudan IV dye concentrations is comparable to that of the field DNAPL. Previous DNAPL mobility experiments in which the DNAPL was dyed should be reviewed to determine whether time-dependent properties influenced the resutls. Dyes appear to make DNAPL more complex, and therefore a more realistic analog for field DNAPLs than single component DNAPLs.

  11. Probabilistic Health Risk Assessment of Chemical Mixtures: Importance of Travel Times and Connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface contamination cases giving rise to groundwater pollutions are extensively found in all industrialized countries. Under this pressure, risk assessment methods play an important role in population protection by (1) quantifying the potential impact on human health of an aquifer contamination and (2) helping and driving decisions of groundwater-resource managers. Many reactive components such as chlorinated solvents or nitrates potentially experience attenuation processes under common geochemical conditions. This represents an attractive and extensively used remediation solution but leads often to the production of by-products before to reach a harmless chemical form. This renders mixtures of contaminants a common issue for groundwater resources managers. In this case, the threat posed by these contaminants to human health at a given sensitive location greatly depends on the competition between reactive and advective-dispersive characteristic times. However, hydraulic properties of the aquifer are known to be spatially variable, which can lead to the formation of preferential flow channels and fast contamination pathways. Therefore, the uncertainty on the spatial distribution of the aquifer properties controlling the plume travel time may then play a particular role in the human health risk assessment of chemical mixtures. We investigate here the risk related to a multispecies system in response to different degrees of heterogeneity of the hydraulic conductivity (K or Y =ln(K)). This work focuses on a Perchloroethylene (PCE) contamination problem followed by the sequential first-order production/biodegradation of its daughter species Trichloroethylene (TCE), Dichloroethylene (DCE) and Vinyl Chlorine (VC). For this specific case, VC is known to be a highly toxic contaminant. By performing numerical experiments, we evaluate transport through three-dimensional mildly (?Y 2=1.0) and highly (?Y 2=4.0) heterogeneous aquifers. Uncertainty on the hydraulic conductivity field is considered through a Monte Carlo scheme, and statistics of the total risk for human health (RT) related to the mixtures of the four carcinogenic plumes are evaluated. Results show two distinct spatiotemporal behavior of the RT estimation. Simulations in highly heterogeneous aquifers display a lower mean of RT close to the injection and higher further away. We explain this by the distinct ranges of travel times and connectivity metrics related to the two sets of aquifers. A high ?Y 2 trends to decrease the travel time (and increase the connectivity). Early travel times, associated to channeling effects, are intuitively perceived as an indicator for high risk. However, in our case, early travel times lead a limited production of highly toxic daughter species and a lower total risk. Our results reflect then the interplay between the characteristic reactive time for each component and the characteristic travel time of the plume since the production of VC depends on these factors.

  12. Probabilistic approach to estimating indoor air concentrations of chlorinated volatile organic compounds from contaminated groundwater: a case study in San Antonio, Texas.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jill E; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic model, based on the Johnson-Ettinger algorithm, developed to characterize the current and historic exposure to tricholorethylene (TCE) and tetrachlorethylene (PCE) in indoor air from plumes of groundwater contamination emanating from the former Kelly Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. We estimate indoor air concentration, house by house, in 30?101 homes and compare the estimated concentrations with measured values in a small subset of homes. We also compare two versions of the Johnson-Ettinger model: one used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and another based on an alternative parametrization. The modeled mean predicted PCE concentration historically exceeded PCE screening levels (0.41 ug/m(3)) in 5.5% of houses, and the 95th percentile of the predicted concentration exceeded screening levels in 85.3% of houses. For TCE, the mean concentration exceeded the screening level (0.25 ug/m(3)) in 49% of homes, and the 95th percentile of the predicted concentration exceeded the screening level in 99% of homes. The EPA model predicts slightly lower indoor concentrations than the alternative parametrization. Comparison with measured samples suggests both models, with the inputs selected, underestimate indoor concentrations and that the 95th percentiles of the predicted concentrations are closer to measured concentrations than predicted mean values. PMID:21162557

  13. A New, Rapid, Precise and Sensitive Method for Chlorine Stable Isotope Analysis of Chlorinated Aliphatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Acker, M. R.; Shahar, A.; Young, E. D.; Coleman, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAH) are recognized common groundwater contaminants. Because of their physico-chemical properties, their lifespan in groundwater is in the order of decades (Pankow and Cherry, 1996). Stable isotopes can play a role in determining the rate and extent of CAH attenuation (Slater, 2003). The use of chlorine has been hampered by the current time consuming and insensitive analytical methods. We present a new analytical procedure to measure chlorine stable isotope values using a gas chromatograph coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometer (GC-MC-ICP-MS). The GC has a Porapack Q packed column. The carrier gas was helium and the temperature was constant at 160°C. The GC was coupled to the MC-ICP-MS by heated stainless steel tubing. Our high resolution spectra showed that 37Cl is free of its main interference 36Ar-H over a range of 0.004 amu. Two pure CAH, trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE), were used for zero enrichment (sample relative to itself) and standard-sample difference measurements. Integrations and background corrections of transient signals were performed using Microsoft Excel after import of the raw data from the MC-ICPMS acquisition software. Zero enrichment tests with TCE and PCE yielded ?37Cl of -0.04±0.16‰ and -0.03±0.17‰, respectively, results for sample injections of 0.12 to 0.02 microliters. Accuracy was tested by injecting 0.24 microliters of a 50/50 mixture of TCE and PCE of known isotopic compositions as the difference between the two solvents was of paramount interest. The ?37Cl(TCE) value of PCE was -1.99±0.16‰. A highly satisfactory comparison with the conventional method is shown by published values for TCE and PCE, -2.04±0.12‰ and -0.30±0.14‰, respectively (Jendrzejewski et al., 2001), giving a ?37Cl(TCE) value for PCE of -2.34±0.18‰. These tests of the GC-MC-ICP-MS method showed that we can obtain reproducible and accurate Cl isotope values using an internal standard. This method also offers increased sensitivity (down to 20 microgram chlorine) and a quicker and simpler procedure allowing its possible application to a wider range of CAH samples and other organic compounds. Jendrzejewski, N, Eggenkamp, HGM and Coleman ML (2001). Characterisation of chlorinated hydrocarbons from chlorine and carbon isotopic compositions: scope of application to environmental problems. Appl. Geochem. 16, 1021-1031. Pankow, JF and Cherry, JA (1996). Dense chlorinated solvents and other DNAPLs in groundwater: history, behavior, and remediation. Waterloo Press, Portland, Or. Slater, GF (2003). Stable isotope forensics - When isotopes work. Env. Forensics 4, 13-23.

  14. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  15. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Kummer Sanitary Landfill, Beltrami County, Minnesota (second remedial action) September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Kummer Sanitary Landfill is a 40-acre site located in Northern Township, Beltrami County, Minnesota. Between 1971 and 1983 the site operated as a sanitary landfill, accepting mixed municipal waste. Beginning in 1974, demolition debris consisting of fly ash and sawdust were disposed of onsite. In 1982 and 1983 the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency sampled ground water from onsite monitoring wells and discovered 19 VOCS including TCE, PCE, and benzene. In 1984, VOCs were also discovered in offsite shallow residential wells downgradient of the site; consequently, in 1985 the site was ordered closed. Approximately 244 homes affected by contaminated ground water. Although there is no documentation of hazardous waste disposal at the site, it is believed that small quantities of wastes such as paint thinner, solvents, and pesticides were included in municipal wastes. The primary contaminants of concern affecting ground water and soil are VOCs such as TCF, PCE and benzene. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  16. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Raymark Site, operable unit 1, Montgomery County, PA. (First remedial action), December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-30

    The 7-acre Raymark site is an active metal manufacturing and electroplating plant in the Borough of Hatboro, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The site, located in an industrial area, is approximately 100 feet from the nearest residence. The nearest surface water is Pennypack Creek, which flows 4,000 feet southwest of the site. As part of the rivet manufacturing processes at the plant, VOCs, including 30 to 40 gallons of TCE, were used daily at the site to clean and degrease metal parts. The ROD addresses the soil/source of contamination as the final action at the site and is referred to as OU1. The drinking water and risks posed by groundwater (OU2 and OU3, respectively) were addressed in a previous 1990 ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil/source are VOCs, including 1,2-DCE, PCE, and TCE. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  17. Permanganate Treatment of DNAPLs in Reactive Barriers and Source Zone Flooding Schemes - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, F.W.

    2000-10-01

    This study provides a detailed process-level understanding of the oxidative destruction of the organic contaminant emphasizing on reaction pathways and kinetics. A remarkable rise in the MnO{sup {minus}} consumption rate with TCA and PCE mixtures proves that the phase transfer catalysts have the ability to increase oxidation rate of DNAPLs either in pure phase or mixtures and that there is significant potential for testing the catalyzed scheme under field conditions. Secondly, as an attempt to enhance the oxidation of DNAPL, we are trying to exploit cosolvency effects, utilizing various alcohol-water mixtures to increase DNAPL solubilization. Preliminary results of cosolvency experiments indicate the enhancement in the transfer of nonaqueous phase TCE to TBA-water solution and the rate of TCE degradation in aqueous phase.

  18. Nonpoint sources of volatile organic compounds in urban areas - Relative importance of land surfaces and air

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, T.J.; Bender, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly detected in urban waters across the United States include gasoline-related compounds (e.g. toluene, xylene) and chlorinated compounds (e.g. chloroform, tetrachloroethane [PCE], trichloroethene [TCE]). Statistical analysis of observational data and results of modeling the partitioning of VOCs between air and water suggest that urban land surfaces are the primary nonpoint source of most VOCs. Urban air is a secondary nonpoint source, but could be an important source of the gasoline oxygenate methyl-tert butyl ether (MTBE). Surface waters in urban areas would most effectively be protected by controlling land-surface sources.

  19. Intelligent Unmanned Monitoring of Remediated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Emile Fiesler, Ph.D.

    2001-06-01

    During this Phase I project, IOS demonstrated the feasibility of combining digital signal processing and neural network analysis to analyze spectral signals from pure samples of several typical contaminants. We fabricated and tested a prototype system by automatically analyzing Raman spectral data taken in the Vadose zone at the 321 M site in the M area of DOE's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This test demonstration proved the ability of IOS's technology to detect the target contaminants, tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), in isolation, and to detect the spectra of these contaminants in real-world noisy samples taken from a mixture of materials obtained from this typical remediation target site.

  20. Electron donor availability for microbial reductive processes following thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kelly E; Costanza, Jed; Pennell, Kurt D; Löffler, Frank E

    2011-12-15

    Thermal treatment is capable of removing significant free-phase chlorinated solvent mass while potentially enhancing bioremediation effectiveness by establishing temperature gradients in the perimeter of the source zone and by increasing electron donor availability. The objectives of this study were to determine the potential for enhanced reductive dechlorination activity at the intermediate temperatures that establish in the perimeter of the heated source zone, and to evaluate the effect of electron donor competition on the performance of the microbial reductive dechlorination process. Microcosms, constructed with tetrachloroethene- (PCE-) and trichloroethene- (TCE-) impacted soils from the Great Lakes, IL, and Ft. Lewis, WA, sites were incubated at temperatures of 24, 35, 50, 70, and 95 °C for 4 months. Reductive dechlorination did not occur in microcosms incubated at temperatures above 24 °C even though mesophilic PCE-to-cis-1,2-dichloroethene dechlorinators were present in Ft. Lewis soil suggesting electron donor limitations. Five days after cooling the microcosms to 24 °C and bioaugmentation with the methanogenic, PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium OW, at least 85% of the initial PCE and TCE were dechlorinated, but dechlorination ceased prior to complete conversion to ethene. Subsequent biostimulation with hydrogen gas mitigated the dechlorination stall, and conversion to ethene resumed. The results of this study demonstrated that temperatures >35 °C inhibit reductive dechlorination activity at the Great Lakes and Ft. Lewis sites, and that the majority of reducing equivalents released from the soil matrix during heat treatment are consumed in methanogenesis rather than reductive dechlorination. These observations suggest that bioaugmenting thermal treatment sites with cultures that do not contain methanogens may allow practitioners to realize enhanced dechlorination activity, a potential benefit of coupling thermal treatment with bioremediation. PMID:22048015

  1. Are reactive transport models reliable tools for reconstructing historical contamination scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, P.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation will be based on a recent project effort that I completed while serving as a member of National Academy of Sciences and Engineering panel. The primary goal of this congressionally-mandated project effort was to review scientific evidence on the association between adverse health effect s and exposure to a contaminated water supply system at the U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (CLJ) in North Carolina. The detailed NRC study report was released in June 2009, and is available at this NRC weblink: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12618. Multiple water supply systems at this Marine Base were contaminated with harmful chemicals, such as PCE, TCE and other waste products, since the early 50s. In 1982, a routine water quality survey completed at the site indicated the presence of several volatile organic compounds including PCE and TCE. Further investigations revealed that there are several waste disposal facilities located on-site that have discharged TCE and other waste products into groundwater systems. In addition, there was also an off-site dry cleaning facility located close to the Tarawa Terrace in-take well locations that disposed PCE into the subsurface environment. The dry cleaner has been using PCE since 1953 and disposed various forms of PCE-contaminated wastes in a septic tank and in several shallow pits. Therefore, the residents who lived in Tarawa Terrace on-site family housing units had the potential to be exposed to these harmful environmental contaminants through the drinking water source. In late 1980s, the concerns raised by CLJ public lead to an epidemiological study to evaluate the potential associations of utero and infant exposures to the VOCs and childhood cancers and birth defects. The study included births occurring during the period of 1968-1985 to women who were pregnant while they resided at the base. Since there was no monitoring data available for the study period (1968-1982), researchers used reactive transport models to reconstruct the historical concentration levels. In this presentation, I will first briefly review the details of the contamination problem and the modeling results. Later I will use the field study to answer the following questions: 1) Are reactive transport modeling tools sufficiently reliable for reconstructing historical VOC contamination at field sites? 2) What are the benefits of using reactive transport models for resolving policy problems related to a groundwater risk/exposure assessment problem? Finally, we will use this example to answer a rhetorical question—-how much complexity is too much complexity?

  2. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Raymark site, Hatboro Borough, Montgomery County, PA. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 7-acre Raymark site is an active metal manufacturing and electroplating plant in the Borough of Hatboro, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. The site is in an industrial area. As part of the rivet manufacturing process at the plant, VOCs, including 30 to 40 gallons of TCE, were used daily at the site to clean and degrease metal parts. The EPA discovered TCE in the Hatboro public water supply wells. Further EPA site investigations from 1980 to 1987 identified TCE in soil and other wells onsite and adjacent to the property and seem to indicate that contaminants from the site may have been at least a contributing source of contamination in the downgradient public water supply wells. Other chemical contaminants identified in samples from the public water supply wells, including TCA, did not seem to originate at the site, thus indicating several distinct sources for the contamination. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses contaminated drinking water and ground water, which are referred to as Operable Units 2 and 3 (OU2 and OU3), respectively. The soil/source contamination (OU1), will be addressed in a subsequent ROD. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including TCE and PCE.

  3. Effectiveness of Polycarboxylate Superplasticizers in UltraHigh Strength Concrete: The Importance of PCE Compatibility with Silica Fume

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johann Plank; Christof Schroefl; Mirko Gruber; Matthias Lesti; Roland Sieber

    2009-01-01

    Methacrylate ester as well as allylether based polycarboxylates (PCEs) were synthesized to plasticize pastes of cement and silica fume having a water\\/cement ratio of 0.22. Methacrylate ester copolymers were found to disperse cement well, whereas allylether copolymers are more effective with silica fume. Mechanistic investigations revealed that in cement pore solution, the surface charge of silica fume becomes positive by

  4. 76 FR 13182 - Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs; 345 North 700 East, Richfield PCE Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ...Agreement should be addressed to Virginia G. Phillips, Enforcement Specialist (8ENF-RC...FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Virginia Phillips, Enforcement Specialist, (8ENF-RC...303) 312-6197. It is so agreed: Andrew M. Gaydosh, Assistant Regional...

  5. Can Inspectors Really Improve the Quality of Teaching in the PCE Sector? Classroom Observations under the Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Matt

    2006-01-01

    For some years now, teachers in the post compulsory sector have been lambasted in educational circles for what some perceive as the poor quality of teaching and learning in classrooms. Such criticisms have tended to emanate from those responsible for inspecting the sector's provision. In fact, when Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education) and…

  6. EFFECTIVE REMOVAL OF TCE IN A LABORATORY MODEL OF A PRB CONSTRUCTED WITH PLANT MULCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  7. Phreatophyte influence on reductive dechlorination in a shallow aquifer contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, R.W.; Jones, S.A.; Kuniansky, E.L.; Harvey, G.; Lollar, B.S.; Slater, G.F.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoremediation uses the natural ability of plants to degrade contaminants in groundwater. A field demonstration designed to remediate aerobic shallow groundwater contaminated with trichloroethene began in April 1996 with the planting of cottonwood trees, a short-rotation woody crop, over an approximately 0.2-ha area at the Naval Air Station, Fort Worth, Texas. The project was developed to demonstrate capture of contaminated groundwater and degradation of contaminants by phreatophytes. Analyses from samples of groundwater collected from July 1997 to June 1998 indicate that tree roots have the potential to create anaerobic conditions in the groundwater that will facilitate degradation of trichloroethene by microbially mediated reductive dechlorination. Organic matter from root exudates and decay of tree roots probably stimulate microbial activity, consuming dissolved oxygen. Dissolved oxygen concentrations, which varied across the site, were smallest near a mature cottonwood tree (about 20 years of age and 60 meters southwest of the cottonwood plantings) where degradation products of trichloroethene were measured. Oxidation of organic matter is the primary microbially mediated reaction occurring in the groundwater beneath the planted trees whereas near the mature cottonwood tree, data indicate that methanogenesis is the most probable reaction occurring. Reductive dechlorination in groundwater either is not occurring or is not a primary process away from the mature tree. Carbon-13 isotope values for trichloroethene are nearly identical at locations away from the mature tree, further confirming that dechlorination is not occurring at the site.

  8. SABRE MULTI-LAB, STATISTICALLY-BASED MICROCOSM STUDY FOR TCE SOURCE ZONE REMEDIATION (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SABRE (source area bioremediation) is a public/private consortium of twelve companies, two government agencies, and three research institutions whose charter is to determine if enhanced anaerobic bioremediation can result in effective and quantifiable treatment of chlorinated sol...

  9. In situ TCE degradation mediated by complex dehalorespiring communities during biostimulation processes

    PubMed Central

    Dugat?Bony, Eric; Biderre?Petit, Corinne; Jaziri, Faouzi; David, Maude M.; Denonfoux, Jérémie; Lyon, Delina Y.; Richard, Jean?Yves; Curvers, Cyrille; Boucher, Delphine; Vogel, Timothy M.; Peyretaillade, Eric; Peyret, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Summary The bioremediation of chloroethene contaminants in groundwater polluted systems is still a serious environmental challenge. Many previous studies have shown that cooperation of several dechlorinators is crucial for complete dechlorination of trichloroethene to ethene. In the present study, we used an explorative functional DNA microarray (DechloArray) to examine the composition of specific functional genes in groundwater samples in which chloroethene bioremediation was enhanced by delivery of hydrogen?releasing compounds. Our results demonstrate for the first time that complete biodegradation occurs through spatial and temporal variations of a wide diversity of dehalorespiring populations involving both Sulfurospirillum, Dehalobacter, Desulfitobacterium, Geobacter and Dehalococcoides genera. Sulfurospirillum appears to be the most active in the highly contaminated source zone, while Geobacter was only detected in the slightly contaminated downstream zone. The concomitant detection of both bvcA and vcrA genes suggests that at least two different Dehalococcoides species are probably responsible for the dechlorination of dichloroethenes and vinyl chloride to ethene. These species were not detected on sites where cis?dichloroethene accumulation was observed. These results support the notion that monitoring dechlorinators by the presence of specific functional biomarkers using a powerful tool such as DechloArray will be useful for surveying the efficiency of bioremediation strategies. PMID:22432919

  10. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  11. PLANT MULCH TO TREAT TCE IN GROUND WATER IN A PRB (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the past ten years, passive reactive barriers (PRBs) have found widespread application to treat chlorinated solvent contamination in ground water. The traditional PRB commonly uses granular zero-valent iron and/or iron alloys as filling materials for treatment of chlorinated ...

  12. Treatability of TCE-contaminated clay soils at the Rinsewater Impoundment, Michoud Assembly Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, A.J.; Gilbert, V.P.; Hewitt, J.D.; Koran, L.J. Jr.; Jennings, H.L.; Donaldson, T.L.; West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Marshall, D.S.

    1995-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has conducted treatability studies on clay soils taken from the Rinsewater Impoundment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Michoud Assembly Facility. The soils are contaminated with up to 3000 mg/kg of trichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, less than 10 mg/kg of trans-1,2-DCE, and less than 10 mg/kg of vinyl chloride. The goal of the study described in this report was to identify and test in situ technologies and/or develop a modified treatment regime to remove or destroy volatile organic compounds from the contaminated clay soils. Much of the work was based upon previous experience with mixed-region vapor stepping and mixed-region peroxidation. Laboratory treatments were performed on intact soil cores that were taken from contaminated areas at the Rinsewater Impoundment at MAF. Treatability studies were conducted on soil that was close to in situ conditions in terms of soil structure and contaminant concentrations.

  13. TCE DEGRADATION BY BUTANE-OXIDIZING BACTERIA CAUSES A SPECTRUM OF TOXIC EFFECTS. (R828772)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  14. BIOENHANCED IN-WELL VAPOR STRIPPING TO TREAT TRICHLOROETHYLENE(TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Removal of chlorinated solvent contaminants at their subsurface source is one of the most challenging problems for remediation of these prevalent contaminants. Here, the solvents are generally present as dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The potential for applicatio...

  15. IMPACT OF TURBIDITY ON TCE AND DEGRADATION PRODUCTS IN GROUND WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated particulate concentrations in ground water samples can bias contaminant concentration data. This has been particularly problematic for metal analyses where artificially increased turbidity levels can affect metals concentrations and confound interpretation of the data. H...

  16. A Tracer Test to Characterize Treatment of TCE in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracer test was conducted to characterize the flow of ground water surrounding a permeable reactive barrier constructed with plant mulch (a biowall) at the OU-1 site on Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This biowall is intended to intercept and treat ground water contaminated by ...

  17. BENCH-SCALE PERFORMANCE OF PARTITIONING ELECTRON DONORS FOR TCE DNAPL BIOREMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the Source Area Bioremediation (SABRE) project, an international collaboration of twelve companies, two government agencies and three research institutions, is to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated ethen...

  18. COMBINATION OF A SOURCE REMOVAL REMEDY AND BIOREMEDIATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF A TCE CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historical disposal practices of chlorinated solvents have resulted in the widespread contamination of ground-water resources. These ground-water contaminants exist in the subsurface as free products, residual and vapor phases, and in solution. The remediation of these contamin...

  19. Sorption model of trichloroethylene (TCE) and benezene in municipal landfill materials

    E-print Network

    Chuang, Yuh-Lin

    1995-01-01

    /C0 = 1) and unsaturated conditions. The sorption rate was found to be proportional to the difference between equilibrium and instantaneous concentration of trace gas on sorbing material. The sorption mechanism predominated at the beginning...

  20. Persulfate oxidation for in situ remediation of TCE. II. Activated by chelated ferrous ion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chenju Liang; Clifford J Bruell; Michael C Marley; Kenneth L Sperry

    2004-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a technique used to remediate contaminated soil and groundwater systems. It has been postulated that sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) can be activated by transition metal ions such as ferrous ion (Fe2+) to produce a powerful oxidant known as the sulfate free radical (SO4?) with a redox potential of 2.6 V, which can potentially destroy organic

  1. RECONSTRUCTING POPULATION EXPOSURES FROM DOSE BIOMARKERS: INHALATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) AS A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a well-established toxicological tool designed to relate exposure to a target tissue dose. The emergence of federal and state programs for environmental health tracking and the availability of exposure monitoring through bi...

  2. Sustainability of TCE Removal in the Mulch Biowalls at Altus AFB

    EPA Science Inventory

    A permeable mulch biowall was installed in June 2002 at Landfill 3 (LF-03), Operable Unit 1 (OU-1), Altus AFB, Oklahoma. The demonstration was conducted by Parsons for the AFCEE Technology Transfer Outreach Office. The biowall is approximately 455 feet long, by 24 feet deep, by...

  3. IN SITU CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF TCE IN GROUNDWATER AT A LEGACY RAILROAD SITE

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    of water and 84 pounds of VOCs · In situ chemical oxidation with permanganate in 2004: concentrations, Illinois October 28-29, 2014 #12;Overview · Site Background · Source Areas and VOC Concentrations · Geology process · Active case since 1980s · Part of regional Superfund groundwater VOC plume #12;Site Background

  4. Characterization of anaerobic chloroethene-dehalogenating activity in several subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Skeen, R.S.; Gao, J.; Hooker, B.S.; Quesenberry, R.D.

    1996-11-01

    Anaerobic microcosms of subsurface soils from four locations were used to investigate the separate effects of several electron donors on tetrachloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination activity. The substrates tested were methanol, formate, lactate, acetate, and sucrose. Various levels of sulfate-reducing, acetogenic, fermentative, and methanogenic activity were observed in all sediments. PCE dechlorination was detected in all microcosms, but the amount of dehalogenation varied by several orders of magnitude. Trichloroethylene was the primary dehalogenation product; however, small amounts of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride were also detected in several microcosms. Lactate-amended microcosms showed large amounts of dehalogenation. in three of the four sediments. One of the two sediments which showed positive activity with lactate also had large amounts of delialogenation with methanol. Sucrose, formate, and acetate also stimulated large amounts of delialogenation in one sediment that showed activity with lactate. These results suggest that lactate may be an appropriate substrate for screening sediments for PCE or TCE delialogenation activity, but that the microbial response is not sufficient for complete in situ bioremediation. A detailed study of the Victoria activity revealed that delialogenation rates were more similar to the Cornell culture than to rates measured for methanogens, or a methanol-enriched sediment culture. This may suggest that these sediments contain a highly efficient delialogenation activity similar to the Cornell culture. This assertion is supported further by the fact that an average of 3% of added reducing equivalents could be diverted to dehalogenation in tests which were conducted using PCE-saturated hexadecane as a constant source of PCE during incubation. Further evidence is needed to confirm this premise. The application of these results to in situ bioremediation of highly contaminated areas are discussed.

  5. Chlorinated solvents in groundwater of the United States.

    PubMed

    Moran, Michael J; Zogorski, John S; Squillace, Paul J

    2007-01-01

    Four chlorinated solvents-methylene chloride, perchloroethene (PCE), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and trichloroethene (TCE)-were analyzed in samples of groundwater taken throughout the conterminous United States by the U.S. Geological Survey. The samples were collected between 1985 and 2002 from more than 5,000 wells. Of 55 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyzed in groundwater samples, solvents were among the most frequently detected. Mixtures of solvents in groundwater were common and may be the result of common usage of solvents or degradation of one solvent to another. Relative to other VOCs with Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs), PCE and TCE ranked high in terms of the frequencies of concentrations greater than or near MCLs. The probability of occurrence of solvents in groundwater was associated with dissolved oxygen content of groundwater, sources such as urban land use and population density, and hydraulic properties of the aquifer. The results reinforce the importance of understanding the redox conditions of aquifers and the hydraulic properties of the saturated and vadose zones in determining the intrinsic susceptibility of groundwater to contamination by solvents. The results also reinforce the importance of controlling sources of solvents to groundwater. PMID:17265929

  6. Field test of single well DNAPL characterization using alcohol injection/extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Rhoden, M.L.; Riha, B.; Burdick, S. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-10-29

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. The authors performed injection/extraction characterization tests in six existing wells in A/M Area. Water concentrations for TCE and/or PCE in these wells ranged from 0% to 100% of solubility. For each test, small amounts of solubilizing solution were used to try to confirm or deny the presence or absence of DNAPL in the immediate vicinity of the well screen.

  7. Microbiota associated with the migration and transformation of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Liu, Fei; Xie, Yuxuan; Zhu, Lingling; Han, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Pollution of groundwater with chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) is a serious environmental problem which is threatening human health. Microorganisms are the major participants in degrading these contaminants. Here, groundwater contaminated for a decade with CAHs was investigated. Numerical simulation and field measurements were used to track and forecast the migration and transformation of the pollutants. The diversity, abundance, and possible activity of groundwater microbial communities at CAH-polluted sites were characterized by molecular approaches. The number of microorganisms was between 5.65E+05 and 1.49E+08 16S rRNA gene clone numbers per liter according to quantitative real-time PCR analysis. In 16S rRNA gene clone libraries constructed from samples along the groundwater flow, eight phyla were detected, and Proteobacteria were dominant (72.8 %). The microbial communities varied with the composition and concentration of pollutants. Meanwhile, toluene monooxygenases and methane monooxygenases capable of degradation of PCE and TCE were detected, demonstrating the major mechanism for PCE and TCE degradation and possibility for in situ remediation by addition of oxygen in this study. PMID:23420483

  8. DESORPTION BEHAVIOR OF TRICHLOROETHENE AND TETRACHLOROETHENE IN U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER SITE UNCONFINED AQUIFER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, K; Robert G. Riley, R; James E. Szecsody, J; A. V. Mitroshkov, A; C. F. Brown, C; Brian02 Looney, B

    2007-01-10

    Sorption is governed by the physico-chemical processes that partition solutes between the aqueous and solid phases in aquifers. For environmental systems, a linear equilibrium relationship between the amount of contaminant in the alternative phases is often assumed. In this traditional approach, the distribution coefficient, or K{sub d}, is a ratio of contaminant associated with the solid phase to the contaminant in the water phase. Recent scientific literature has documented time-dependant behaviors in which more contaminant mass is held in the solid phase than predicted by the standard model. Depending on the specific conceptualization, this has been referred to as nonlinear sorption, time-variable sorption, or ''irreversible sorption''. The potential impact of time-variable sorption may be beneficial or detrimental depending on the specific conditions and remediation goals. Researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been studying this process to evaluate how various soil types will affect this process for sites contaminated with chlorinated solvents. The results described in this report evaluate sorption-desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in Savannah River Site (SRS) soils. The results of this study will be combined with ongoing PNNL research to provide a more comprehensive look at this process and its impact on contaminant plume stability and sustainability. Importantly, while the results of the study documented differences in sorption properties between two tested SRS soils, the data indicated that ''irreversible sorption'' is not influencing the sorption-desorption behaviors of TCE and PCE for these soils.

  9. Review Of Low-Flow Bladder Pump And High-Volume Air Piston Pump Groundwater Sampling Systems At Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, S. S.; Bailey, G. A.; Jackson, T. O.

    2003-02-25

    Since 1996, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) has run both a portable high-volume air-piston pump system and a dedicated, low-flow bladder pump system to collect groundwater samples. The groundwater contaminants of concern at SNL/NM are nitrate and the volatile organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloethene (PCE). Regulatory acceptance is more common for the high-volume air piston pump system, especially for programs like SNL/NM's, which are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes logistical and analytical results of the groundwater sampling systems used at SNL/NM. With two modifications to the off-the-shelf low-flow bladder pump, SNL/NM consistently operates the dedicated low-flow system at depths greater than 450 feet below ground surface. As such, the low-flow sampling system requires fewer personnel, less time and materials, and generates less purge and decontamination water than does the high-volume system. However, the bladder pump cannot work in wells with less than 4 feet of water. A review of turbidity and laboratory analytical results for TCE, PCE, and chromium (Cr) from six wells highlight the affect or lack of affects the sampling systems have on groundwater samples. In the PVC wells, turbidity typically remained < 5 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) regardless of the sampling system. In the wells with a stainless steel screen, turbidity typically remained < 5 NTU only with the low-flow system. When the high-volume system was used, the turbidity and Cr concentration typically increased an order of magnitude. TCE concentrations at two wells did not appear to be sensitive to the sampling method used. However, PCE and TCE concentrations dropped an order of magnitude when the high-volume system was used at two other wells. This paper recommends that SNL/NM collaborate with other facilities with similar groundwater depths, continue to pursue regulatory approval for using dedicated the lowflow system, and review data for sample system affects on nitrate concentrations.

  10. Is Bioaugmentation in Combination with Biostimulation Effective for in Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents in Groundwater?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPat-Polasko, L.; Conlan, L.; Baffert, S.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the field-scale study was to evaluate the effectiveness of biostimulation and bioaugmentation for in situ biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater. Elevated levels of tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene, were detected in groundwater. The natural attenuation evaluation showed that reductive dechlorination was occurring in several of the on-site monitor wells where the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were less than 1 mg/L. However, the oxidation reduction potential (ORP) significantly varied in on-site and off-site wells. The results of bench-scale testing indicated that a variety of carbon substrates were effective at reducing the DO to levels that were favorable for reductive dechlorination. The lactate amended bioaugmented microcosms showed the highest level of reductive dechlorination, followed by EOS® amended. However, the indigenous microbial population was not able to successfully degrade PCE to ethene. When a microbial consortium including Dehalococcoides was added to the microcosms, complete reductive dechlorination was observed. A pair of recirculation wells was installed to inject the carbon source and microbial population into the groundwater. After a push-pull test was performed to evaluate the mobility of the microbial amendment, lactate was injected to promote highly reduced conditions in the groundwater. Once the ORP was less -150 mV, the Dehalococcoides consortium was injected into the groundwater and recirculated using the paired recirculation wells. Within 3 months after carbon substrate injection, more than a 70% reduction in PCE and TCE was observed in the downgradient monitor well. Likewise, there was a significant decrease in ORP in the impacted wells. This presentation will discuss how the amendments impacted the chlorinated solvent concentrations, microbial community and chemistry of the groundwater in the area around the recirculation wells compared to non-impacted wells.

  11. Removal of contaminants in leachate from landfill by waste steel scrap and converter slag.

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung-Taek; Lee, Jai-Young; Yoon, Jeyong

    2007-08-01

    This study may be the first investigation to be performed into the potential benefits of recycling industrial waste in controlling contaminants in leachate. Batch reactors were used to evaluate the efficacy of waste steel scrap and converter slag to treat mixed contaminants using mimic leachate solution. The waste steel scrap was prepared through pre-treatment by an acid-washed step, which retained both zero-valent iron site and iron oxide site. Extensive trichloroethene (TCE) removal (95%) occurred by acid-washed steel scrap within 48 h. In addition, dehalogenation (Cl(-) production) was observed to be above 7.5% of the added TCE on a molar basis for 48 h. The waste steel scrap also removed tetrachloroethylene (PCE) through the dehalogenation process although to a lesser extent than TCE. Heavy metals (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) were extensively removed by both acid-washed steel scrap and converter slag through the adsorption process. Among salt ions (NH (4)(+) , NO (3)(-) , and PO (4)(3-) ), PO (4)(3-) was removed by both waste steel scrap (100% within 8 h) and converter slag (100% within 20 min), whereas NO (3)(-) and NH (4)(+ ) were removed by waste steel scrap (100% within 7 days) and converter slag (up to 50% within 4 days) respectively. This work suggests that permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with waste steel scrap and converter slag might be an effective approach to intercepting mixed contaminants in leachate from landfill. PMID:17492478

  12. Chlorinated organic compounds in ground water at Roosevelt Field, Nassau County, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, D.A.; Pearsall, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have been detected in water from five public-supply wells and six cooling-water wells that tap the Magothy aquifer at Roosevelt Field, a 200-acre area that is now a large shopping mall and office-building complex. The cooling water is discharged after use to the water table (upper glacial) aquifer through a nearby recharge basin and a subsurface drain field. Three plumes of TCE in groundwater have been delineated--the source plume, which has penetrated both aquifers , and two more recent plumes emanating from the two discharge sites in the water-table aquifer. Concentrations of inorganic constituents in the three plumes are the same as those in ambient water in the area. The two secondary plumes discharged cooling water extended at least 1,000 ft south-southeastward in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Pumping at wells screened in the middle and basal sections of the Magothy aquifers, where clay layers are absent and sandy zones provide good vertical hydraulic connection within the aquifer system, has increased the rate of downward contaminant advection. The transient increases in downward movement are cumulative over time and have brought TCE to the bottom of the Magothy aquifer, 500 ft below land surface. (USGS)

  13. Stability of nitrate-ion in simulated deposition samples used for quality-assurance activities by the U. S. Geological Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhardt, D.A.V.; Pearsall, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) have been detected in water from five public-supply wells and six cooling-water wells that tap the Magothy aquifer at Roosevelt Field. The cooling water is discharged after use to the water table aquifer through a nearby recharge basin and a subsurface drain field. Three plumes of TCE in groundwater have been delineated - the source plume, which has penetrated both aquifers, and two more recent plumes emanating from the two discharge sites in the water-table aquifer. Concentrations of inorganic constituents in the three plumes are the same as those in ambient water in the area. The two secondary plumes discharged cooling water extended at least 1,000 ft south-southeastward in the direction of regional groundwater flow. Pumping at wells screened in the middle and basal sections of the Magothy aquifers, where clay layers are absent and sandy zones provide good vertical hydraulic connection within the aquifer system, has increased the rate of downward contaminant advection. The transient increases in downward movement are cumulative over time and have brought TCE to the bottom of the Magothy aquifer, 500 ft below land surface. 38 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Decontamination of chemical warfare agents using perchloroethylene–Marlowet IHF–H 2 O-based microemulsions: wetting and extraction properties on realistic surfaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Wellert; Henrik Imhof; Michael Dolle; Hans-Jürgen Altmann; André Richardt; Thomas Hellweg

    2008-01-01

    At the present time, considerable efforts are being made to develop new media for the decontamination of a variety of toxic\\u000a compounds. In the present contribution, new microemulsions with promising properties are presented. Moreover, the decontamination\\u000a of surfaces, with an emphasis on varnished metal surfaces of exterior and interior equipment, is investigated using these\\u000a microemulsions. Studies of the phase behavior

  15. Relating mRNA and protein biomarker levels in a Dehalococcoides and Methanospirillum-containing community.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Annette R; Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Heavner, Gretchen L; Richardson, Ruth E

    2015-03-01

    To better understand the quantitative relationships between messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein biomarkers relevant to bioremediation, we quantified and compared respiration-associated gene products in an anaerobic syntrophic community. Respiration biomarkers for Dehalococcoides, an organohalide reducer, and Methanospirillum, a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, were quantified via qRT-PCR for mRNA and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) of proteotypic peptides for protein. mRNA transcripts of the Dehalococcoides reductive dehalogenases PceA, TceA, and DMC1545, and hydrogenase HupL, as well as the Methanospirillum oxidoreductases MvrD and FrcA were shown to be similarly regulated with respect to their temporal responses to substrate addition. However, MvrD was two orders of magnitude lower in mRNA abundance. Per cell, Dehalococcoides protein biomarkers quantified were more abundant than Methanospirillum proteins. Comparing mRNA with protein abundance, poor correlations were observed between mRNA transcript levels and the net protein produced. For example, Dehalococcoides HupL and TceA transcripts were similarly abundant though TceA was far more abundant at the protein level (167?±?121 vs. 1095?±?337 proteins per cell, respectively). In Methanospirillum, MvrD maintained comparable per-cell protein abundance to FrcA (42?±?14 vs. 60?±?1 proteins per cell, respectively) despite the significantly lower transcript levels. Though no variability in protein decay rates was observed, the mRNA translation rate quantified for TceA was greater than the other Dehalococcoides targets monitored. These data suggest that there is considerable variation in the relationship between mRNA abundance and protein production both across transcripts within an organism and across organisms. This highlights the importance of empirically based studies for interpreting biomarker levels in environmentally relevant organisms. PMID:25467924

  16. Evaluation of a Chlorinated Compounds Plume in a Fractured Sandstone Aquifer in Mid- West, US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Z.; Aravena, R.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Meyer, J. R.; Hunkeler, D.

    2009-05-01

    A study was carried out in the sedimentary fractured rock site located in Mid West, US, which was impacted by a DNAPL spill estimated to occur in the 1950's and 1960's. The majority of the DNAPL has accumulated in the upper portion of the Lone Rock Formation (referred to as Layer 5) and a VOC plume of more than 3km long has formed. The DNAPL is mainly composed of 1,1,1-TCA, PCE, TCE and BTEX, while large amounts of degradation products such as cis-DCE and 1,1-DCA have been found in the plume. Detailed geochemical and carbon isotope analysis in September 2007 showed that complete degradation of PCE and TCE to cis-DCE in Layer 5 had been achieved from the source to the middle of the plume and the dechlorination reaction stalled at cis-DCE, which is in agreement with the redox condition in this part of the plume. On the other hand, degradation of 1,1,1-TCA to 1,1-DCA was incomplete. The fringes of the plume are characterized by the presence of PCE and TCE in agreement with aerobic conditions in this part of the plume. A historical data review from 1992 to 2006 revealed two phases of degradation in Layer 5. The first phase corresponded with the period before 2001, when there was no significant degradation, while the second phase corresponded with the period after 2001, when significant degradation occurred. The occurrence of the second phase was related to a large scale DNAPL pumping in the source zone during 1999 to 2002, which caused a great increase of contaminant concentrations in the plume including large amounts of ketones and BTEX serving as electron donors and substrates for microbial dechlorination. Thus, subsequent degradation of chlorinated compounds occurred extensively in the plume. The contaminant concentration and the shape of the plume has been modified since 2003 by a hydraulic barrier system. This case study shows that the long term degradation pattern and contaminant distribution at the site has been controlled by plume management practices including DNAPL pumping in the source area and the creation of a hydraulic barrier system in the middle of the plume.

  17. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  18. APPLICATION AND USE OF DOSE ESTIMATING EXPOSURE MODEL (DEEM) FOR ROUTE TO ROUTE DOSE COMPARISONS AFTER EXPOSURE TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Route-to-route extrapolations are a crucial step in many risk assessments. Often the doses which result In toxicological end points in one route must be compared with doses resulting from typical environmental exposures by another route. In this case we used EPA's Dose Estimati...

  19. Relative contribution of set cathode potential and external mass transport on TCE dechlorination in a continuous-flow bioelectrochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Verdini, Roberta; Aulenta, Federico; de Tora, Francesca; Lai, Agnese; Majone, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Microbial bioelectrochemical systems, which use solid-state cathodes to drive the reductive degradation of contaminants such as the chlorinated hydrocarbons, are recently attracting considerable attention for bioremediation applications. So far, most of the published research has focused on analyzing the influence of key (bio)electrochemical factors influencing contaminant degradation, such as the cathode potential, whereas only few studies have examined the potential impact of mass transport phenomena on process performance. Here we analyzed the performance of a flow-through bioelectrochemical reactor, continuously fed with a synthetic groundwater containing trichloroethene at three different linear fluid velocities (from 0.3m d(-1) to 1.7m d(-1)) and three different set cathode potentials (from -250mV to -450mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). The obtained results demonstrated that, in the range of fluid velocities which are characteristics for natural groundwater systems, mass transport phenomena may strongly influence the rate and extent of reductive dechlorination. Nonetheless, the relative importance of mass transport largely depends on the applied cathode potential which, in turn, controls the intrinsic kinetics of biological reactions and the underlying electron transfer mechanisms. PMID:25950501

  20. 78 FR 15721 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to OMB for Review and Approval; Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ...NESHAP for Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaning Facilities (Renewal) AGENCY: Environmental...OECA-2012-0659, to: (1) EPA online, using www.regulations.gov...NESHAP for Perchloroethylene Dry Cleaning Facilities (Renewal). ICR...

  1. ENRICHMENT OF HIGH RATE PCE DECHLORINATION AND COMPARATIVE STUDY OF LACTATE, METHANOL, AND HYDROGEN AS ELECTRON DONORS TO SUSTAIN ACTIVITY. (R826694C703)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. STIMULATION OF REDUCTIVE DECHLORINATION OF TETRA- CHLOROETHENE (PCE) IN ANAEROBIC AQUIFER MICROCOSMS BY ADDITION OF SHORT-CHAIN ORGANIC ACIDS OR ALCOHOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of the addition of common fermentation products on the dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene was studied in methanogenic slurries made with aquifer solids. Lactate, propionate, crotonate, butyrate, and ethanol stimulated dehalogenation activity, while acetate, methanol, ...

  3. Genomic determinants of organohalide-respiration in Geobacter lovleyi, an unusual member of the Geobacteraceae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geobacter lovleyi is a unique member of the Geobacteraceae because strains of this species share the ability to couple tetrachloroethene (PCE) reductive dechlorination to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) with energy conservation and growth (i.e., organohalide respiration). Strain SZ also reduces U(VI) to U(IV) and contributes to uranium immobilization, making G. lovleyi relevant for bioremediation at sites impacted with chlorinated ethenes and radionuclides. G. lovleyi is the only fully sequenced representative of this distinct Geobacter clade, and comparative genome analyses identified genetic elements associated with organohalide respiration and elucidated genome features that distinguish strain SZ from other members of the Geobacteraceae. Results Sequencing the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome revealed a 3.9 Mbp chromosome with 54.7% GC content (i.e., the percent of the total guanines (Gs) and cytosines (Cs) among the four bases within the genome), and average amino acid identities of 53–56% compared to other sequenced Geobacter spp. Sequencing also revealed the presence of a 77 kbp plasmid, pSZ77 (53.0% GC), with nearly half of its encoded genes corresponding to chromosomal homologs in other Geobacteraceae genomes. Among these chromosome-derived features, pSZ77 encodes 15 out of the 24 genes required for de novo cobalamin biosynthesis, a required cofactor for organohalide respiration. A plasmid with 99% sequence identity to pSZ77 was subsequently detected in the PCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strain KB-1 present in the PCE-to-ethene-dechlorinating consortium KB-1. Additional PCE-to-cis-DCE-dechlorinating G. lovleyi strains obtained from the PCE-contaminated Fort Lewis, WA, site did not carry a plasmid indicating that pSZ77 is not a requirement (marker) for PCE respiration within this species. Chromosomal genomic islands found within the G. lovleyi strain SZ genome encode two reductive dehalogenase (RDase) homologs and a putative conjugative pilus system. Despite the loss of many c-type cytochrome and oxidative-stress-responsive genes, strain SZ retained the majority of Geobacter core metabolic capabilities, including U(VI) respiration. Conclusions Gene acquisitions have expanded strain SZ’s respiratory capabilities to include PCE and TCE as electron acceptors. Respiratory processes core to the Geobacter genus, such as metal reduction, were retained despite a substantially reduced number of c-type cytochrome genes. pSZ77 is stably maintained within its host strains SZ and KB-1, likely because the replicon carries essential genes including genes involved in cobalamin biosynthesis and possibly corrinoid transport. Lateral acquisition of the plasmid replicon and the RDase genomic island represent unique genome features of the PCE-respiring G. lovleyi strains SZ and KB-1, and at least the latter signifies adaptation to PCE contamination. PMID:22616984

  4. Modeling GPR data to interpret porosity and DNAPL saturations for calibration of a 3-D multiphase flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sneddon, Kristen W.; Powers, Michael H.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Poeter, Eileen P.

    2002-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) are a pervasive and persistent category of groundwater contamination. In an effort to better understand their unique subsurface behavior, a controlled and carefully monitored injection of PCE (perchloroethylene), a typical DNAPL, was performed in conjunction with the University of Waterloo at Canadian Forces Base Borden in 1991. Of the various geophysical methods used to monitor the migration of injected PCE, the U.S. Geological Survey collected 500-MHz ground penetrating radar (GPR) data. These data are used in determining calibration parameters for a multiphase flow simulation. GPR data were acquired over time on a fixed two-dimensional surficial grid as the DNAPL was injected into the subsurface. Emphasis is on the method of determining DNAPL saturation values from this time-lapse GPR data set. Interactive full-waveform GPR modeling of regularized field traces resolves relative dielectric permittivity versus depth profiles for pre-injection and later-time data. Modeled values are end members in recursive calculations of the Bruggeman-Hanai-Sen (BHS) mixing formula, yielding interpreted pre-injection porosity and post-injection DNAPL saturation values. The resulting interpreted physical properties of porosity and DNAPL saturation of the Borden test cell, defined on a grid spacing of 50 cm with 1-cm depth resolution, are used as observations for calibration of a 3-D multiphase flow simulation. Calculated values of DNAPL saturation in the subsurface at 14 and 22 hours after the start of injection, from both the GPR and the multiphase flow modeling, are interpolated volumetrically and presented for visual comparison.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 1): Stamina Mills site, North Smithfield, RI. (First remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The five-acre Stamina Mills site is a former textile weaving and finishing facility in North Smithfield, Providence County, Rhode Island. A portion of the site is within the 100-year floodplain and wetland area of the Branch River. The manufacturing process used cleaning solvents, acids, bases and dyes for coloring, pesticides for moth proofing, and plasticizers to coat fabrics. Mill process wastes were placed in a landfill onsite. EPA initiated three removal actions from 1984 to 1990, including an extension of the municipal water supply to residents obtaining water from the affected aquifer; and treatment of two underground and one above-ground storage tanks, followed by offsite disposal. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides a final remedy and addresses both source control and management of contaminated ground water migration at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, debris, sediment, and ground water are VOCs including TCE and PCE; other organics including pesticides; and metals including chromium.

  6. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Syosset Landfill, Nassau County, Syosset, NY. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-27

    The 35-acre Syosset Landfill site is a closed municipal landfill in Syosset, Oyster Bay, New York. From 1933 to 1975, commercial, industrial, residential, demolition, and agricultural wastes, sludge, and ash were disposed of in the onsite landfill. Typical wastes included heavy metals, solvents, organics, oils, sludges, and metal hydroxides. The county closed the landfill in 1975 because of suspected ground water contamination. Subsequent studies have confirmed ground water contamination beneath and downgradient of the site resulting from landfill leachate. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses source control at the site. A subsequent ROD will address onsite ground water contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; other organics; and metals including arsenic.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Gold Coast, Florida (first remedial action), September 1987. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-11

    The Gold Coast Oil Corporation (GCO) site is located within a commercial/industrial/residential area and located over the Biscayne Aquifer, the sole source aquifer for the area. GCO, along with Solvent Extraction, Inc., were in the business of distilling mineral spirits, lacquer thinner, and reclaiming solvents. Blowdown from these operations was sprayed directly onto the ground and 53 drums of sludge-contaminated soil were stored onsite. No waste was shipped offsite during the 11 years of operation. Investigations of illegally dumped and stored sludge and onsite wells took place in 1980 and in 1981. In 1982 CSX Transportation evicted GCO from the property and agreed to voluntarily clean up the site. Soil and ground water are contaminated with TCE, PCE, other VOCS, lead, and other heavy metals. The selected remedial action for this site are given. The estimated total cost for this remedial action is $3,711,600 with present worth OandM of $74,850.

  8. Untersuchungen zur Sorptionsreversibilität von organischen Schadstoffen in Aktivkohle, Holzkohle und Zeolith Y-200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElHaddad, Engy; Ensinger, Wolfgang; Schüth, Christoph

    2013-09-01

    Numerous studies have shown that sorption of organic contaminants in soils is dominated by the natural organic carbon content ( C org) of the soil. However, it is still under discussion whether sorption processes are fully reversible or whether an irreversibly sorbed contaminant fraction remains in the soil. This is especially important when considering soil remediation measures and its targets. In multi-stage sorption-desorption batch experiments with TCE, PCE, ortho-xylene and para-xylene and with the sorbents activated carbon, charcoal and a hydrophobic zeolite Y-200, the reversibility of sorption was studied. It could be shown that the structural features of the sorbents are of ample importance for the occurrence of a desorption-resistant fraction. While sorption was mainly reversible for the micro-porous zeolite Y-200 with a rigid pore network, charcoal and the activated carbon showed significant desorption hysteresis. However, following a subsequent sorption step, this fraction eventually desorbs and is re-mobilized.

  9. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 1, Final report: Final report text data in tabular form, Disk 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This project was designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of ground water and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms were stimulated to degrade trichlorethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated aquifer and adjacent vadose zone. The principle carbon/energy source nutrient used in this demonstration was methane (natural gas). In situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency, safety, and public and regulatory acceptability. This report describes the preliminary results of the demonstration and provides conclusions only for those measures that the Bioremediation Technical Support Group felt were so overwhelmingly convincing that they do not require further analyses. Though this report is necessarily superficial it does intend to provide a basis for further evaluating the technology and for practitioners to immediately apply some parts of the technology.

  10. Induced Infiltration Animation: Woburn Wells G & H and the Aberjona River

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Bair

    It is still unknown whether the cluster of childhood leukemia cases in east Woburn was caused by TCE and PCE contamination from five known sources of contamination within the capture zones of municipal wells G and H, or whether the leukemias were caused by induced infiltration of Aberjona River water, which may have contained dissolved concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and lead. Several papers have been written about the arsenic, chromium, and lead contamination in Woburn. These papers could be read, combined with a broad discussion about mobility of heavy metals under different oxidation states, hypotheses drawn by the class, and experiments designed by the students to ascertain whether contaminated river water could have reached wells G and H. Designing an experiment to test an hypothesis is a higher-order thinking skill needed by all scientists and engineers.

  11. Surfactant-enhanced solubilization of tetrachloroethylene and degradation products in pump-and-treat remediation. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the enhanced solubilization of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and 1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) in nonionic surfactant solutions of Triton X-100, Brij-30, Igepal CA-720, and Tergitol NP-10 (alkylpolyoxyethylenes). Surfactant solubilization is being considered as a means to enhance mobile phase solubilities of ground-water contaminants for the purpose of improving the efficiency of pump and treat remediation. The primary objectives of the study were to observe the solubilization of relatively hydrophilic organic solutes at system temperatures similar to ground-water conditions and to determine if solubilization can be linearly correlated to the octanol/water partition coefficient, as has been observed by others for hydrophobic organic solutes. The results of the study show that surfactant solubilization of hydrophilic solutes is highly correlated with their octanol/water partition coefficient when corrected for temperature effects. It was also observed that there appears to be little difference in solubilizing efficiency between the four surfactants.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Rocky Flats Plant (USDOE), Operable Unit 2, Golden, CO. (Fourth remedial action), September 1992. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant (USDOE) (Operable Unit 2) site is part of the 6,550-acre Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons research, development, production, and plutonium processing complex in Jefferson County Colorado. Since 1951, DOE has used the site for manufacturing components for nuclear weapons, processing plutonium, and fabricating, machining, and assembling components from metals. The ROD addresses OU2, which includes the 903 Pad and Lip Area, Mound Area, and East Trenches Area, which are located southeast of the Rocky Flats Plant, and provides an interim remedy for contaminated soil and ground water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylenes; inorganics; metals, including arsenic, chromium, and lead; and radioactive materials.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Ott/Story/Cordova Chemical site, North Muskegon, MI. (Second remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-29

    The Ott/Story/Cordova Chemical site is a former specialty chemical manufacturing facility in Dalton Township, Muskegon County, Michigan. Chemical products manufactured onsite included intermediate items used in manufacturing pharmaceuticals, dyestuffs, agricultural chemicals, diisocyanates, and herbicides. In 1977, the State negotiated with a new site owner to remove several thousand drums, thousands of cubic yards of lagoon sludges, and to destroy or to neutralize phosgene gas left onsite. In 1982, an alternate water supply was undertaken and financed in part by the State and a former owner. The ROD addresses aquifer restoration. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, toluene, vinyl chloride, and xylenes; other organics including 1,2 dichloroethane and pesticides; and metals including arsenic.

  14. Comparison of diffusion- and pumped-sampling methods to monitor volatile organic compounds in ground water, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, July 1999-December 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archfield, Stacey A.; LeBlanc, Denis R.

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate diffusion sampling as an alternative method to monitor volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in ground water, concentrations in samples collected by traditional pumped-sampling methods were compared to concentrations in samples collected by diffusion-sampling methods for 89 monitoring wells at or near the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod. Samples were analyzed for 36 VOCs. There was no substantial difference between the utility of diffusion and pumped samples to detect the presence or absence of a VOC. In wells where VOCs were detected, diffusion-sample concentrations of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) were significantly lower than pumped-sample concentrations. Because PCE and TCE concentrations detected in the wells dominated the calculation of many of the total VOC concentrations, when VOC concentrations were summed and compared by sampling method, visual inspection also showed a downward concentration bias in the diffusion-sample concentration. The degree to which pumped- and diffusion-sample concentrations agreed was not a result of variability inherent within the sampling methods or the diffusion process itself. A comparison of the degree of agreement in the results from the two methods to 13 quantifiable characteristics external to the sampling methods offered only well-screen length as being related to the degree of agreement between the methods; however, there is also evidence to indicate that the flushing rate of water through the well screen affected the agreement between the sampling methods. Despite poor agreement between the concentrations obtained by the two methods at some wells, the degree to which the concentrations agree at a given well is repeatable. A one-time, well-bywell comparison between diffusion- and pumped-sampling methods could determine which wells are good candidates for the use of diffusion samplers. For wells with good method agreement, the diffusion-sampling method is a time-saving and cost-effective alternative to pumped-sampling methods in a long-term monitoring program, such as at the Massachusetts Military Reservation.

  15. Characterization of the methanotrophic bacterial community present in a trichloroethylene-contaminated subsurface groundwater site.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, J P; Jiménez, L; Rosario, I; Hazen, T C; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    Groundwater, contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), was collected from 13 monitoring wells at Area M on the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site near Aiken, S.C. Filtered groundwater samples were enriched with methane, leading to the isolation of 25 methanotrophic isolates. The phospholipid fatty acid profiles of all the isolates were dominated by 18:1 omega 8c (60 to 80%), a signature lipid for group II methanotrophs. Subsequent phenotypic testing showed that most of the strains were members of the genus Methylosinus and one isolate was a member of the genus Methylocystis. Most of the methanotroph isolates exhibited soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) activity. This was presumptively indicated by the naphthalene oxidation assay and confirmed by hybridization with a gene probe encoding the mmoB gene and by cell extract assays. TCE was degraded at various rates by most of the sMMO-producing isolates, whereas PCE was not degraded. Savannah River Area M and other groundwaters, pristine and polluted, were found to support sMMO activity when supplemented with nutrients and then inoculated with Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. The maximal sMMO-specific activity obtained in the various groundwaters ranged from 41 to 67% compared with maximal rates obtained in copper-free nitrate mineral salts media. This study partially supports the hypothesis that stimulation of indigenous methanotrophic communities can be efficacious for removal of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons from subsurface sites and that the removal can be mediated by sMMO. PMID:8368829

  16. Use of plume mapping data to estimate chlorinated solvent mass loss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, J.R.; Neupane, P.P.

    2006-01-01

    Results from a plume mapping study from November 2000 through February 2001 in the sand-and-gravel surficial aquifer at Dover Air Force Base, Delaware, were used to assess the occurrence and extent of chlorinated solvent mass loss by calculating mass fluxes across two transverse cross sections and by observing changes in concentration ratios and mole fractions along a longitudinal cross section through the core of the plume. The plume mapping investigation was conducted to determine the spatial distribution of chlorinated solvents migrating from former waste disposal sites. Vertical contaminant concentration profiles were obtained with a direct-push drill rig and multilevel piezometers. These samples were supplemented with additional ground water samples collected with a minipiezometer from the bed of a perennial stream downgradient of the source areas. Results from the field program show that the plume, consisting mainly of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-1,2-DCE), was approximately 670 m in length and 120 m in width, extended across much of the 9- to 18-m thickness of the surficial aquifer, and discharged to the stream in some areas. The analyses of the plume mapping data show that losses of the parent compounds, PCE and TCE, were negligible downgradient of the source. In contrast, losses of cis-1,2-DCE, a daughter compound, were observed in this plume. These losses very likely resulted from biodegradation, but the specific reaction mechanism could not be identified. This study demonstrates that plume mapping data can be used to estimate the occurrence and extent of chlorinated solvent mass loss from biodegradation and assess the effectiveness of natural attenuation as a remedial measure.

  17. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2002-06-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  18. 'Effects of Elevated Temperature on Dehalococcoides Dechlorination Performance and DNA and RNA Biomarker Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, Kelly E [ORNL; Costanza, Jed [University of Tennessee; Cruz-Garcia, Claribel [University of Tennessee; Ramaswamy, Nivedhya [University of Tennessee; Pennell, Kurt [University of Tennessee; Loeffler, Frank E [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Coupling thermal treatment with microbial reductive dechlorination is a promising remedy for tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated source zones. Laboratory experiments evaluated Dehalococcoides (Dhc) dechlorination performance, viability, and biomarker gene (DNA) and transcript (mRNA) abundances during exposure to elevated temperatures. The PCE-dechlorinating consortia BDI and OW produced ethene when incubated at temperatures of 30 C, but vinyl chloride (VC) accumulated when cultures were incubated at 35 or 40 C. Cultures incubated at 40 C for less than 49 days resumed VC dechlorination following cooling; however, incubation at 45 C resulted in complete loss of dechlorination activity. Dhc 16S rRNA, bvcA, and vcrA gene abundances in cultures showing complete dechlorination to ethene at 30 C exceeded those measured in cultures incubated at higher temperatures, consistent with observed dechlorination activities. Conversely, biomarker gene transcript abundances per cell in cultures incubated at 35 and 40 C were generally at least one order-of-magnitude greater than those measured in ethene-producing cultures incubated at 30 C. Even in cultures accumulating VC, transcription of the vcrA gene, which is implicated in VC-to-ethene dechlorination, was up-regulated. Temperature stress caused the up-regulation of Dhc reductive dehalogenase gene expression indicating that Dhc gene expression measurements should be interpreted cautiously as Dhc biomarker gene transcript abundances may not correlate with dechlorination activity.

  19. Mechanisms, Chemistry, and Kinetics of Anaerobic Biodegradation of cis-Dichloroethene and Vinyl Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Spormann, A.M.

    2000-12-01

    Anaerobic biological processes can result in PCE and TCE destruction through conversion to cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) then to vinyl chloride (VC), and finally to ethene. Here, the chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) serve as electron acceptors in energy metabolism, requiring electron donors such as hydrogen from an external source. The purpose of this study was to learn more about the biochemistry of cDCE and VC conversion to ethene, to better understand the requirements for electron donors, and to determine factors affecting the rates of CAH degradation and organism growth. The biochemistry of reductive dehalogenation of VC was studied with an anaerobic mixed culture enriched on VC. In other studies on electron donor needs for dehalogenation of cDCE and VC, competition for hydrogen was found to occur between the dehalogenators and other microorganisms such as methanogens and homoacetogens in a benzoate-acclimated dehalogenating methanogenic mixed culture. Factors affecting the relative rates of destruction of the solvents and their intermediate products were evaluated. Studies using a mixed PCE-dehalogenating culture as well as the VC enrichment for biochemical studies suggested that the same species was involved in both cDCE and VC dechlorination, and that cDCE and VC competitively inhibited each other's dechlorination rate.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, MN. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 82.6-acre Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant (NIROP) site is a weapons system manufacturing facility in Fridley, Minnesota, which began operations in 1940. The site is a government-owned, contractor-operated, plant located just north of the FMC Corp. During the 1970s, paint sludge and chlorinated solvents were disposed of onsite in pits and trenches. In 1981, State investigations identified TCE in onsite water supply wells drawing from the Prairie DuChien/Jordan aquifer, and the wells were shut down. In 1983, EPA found drummed waste in the trenches or pits at the northern portion of the site, and as a result, during 1983 and 1984, the Navy authorized an installation restoration program, during which approximately 1,200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and 42 drums were excavated and landfilled offsite. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remediation of a shallow ground water operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylene.

  1. D-area oil seepage basin bioventing optimization test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, C.J.; Radway, J.C.; Alman, D.; Hazen, T.C.

    1998-12-31

    The D Area Oil Seepage Basin (DOSB) was used from 1952 to 1975 for disposal of petroleum-based products (waste oils), general office and cafeteria waste, and apparently some solvents [trichloroethylene (TCE)/tetrachloroethylene (PCE)]. Numerous analytical results have indicated the presence of TCE and its degradation product vinyl chloride in groundwater in and around the unit, and of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils within the unit. The DOSB is slated for additional assessment and perhaps for environmental remediation. In situ bioremediation represents a technology of demonstrated effectiveness in the reclamation of sites contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents, and has been retained as an alternative for the cleanup of the DOSB. The Savannah River Site is therefore proposing to conduct a field treatability study designed to demonstrate and optimize the effectiveness of in situ microbiological biodegradative processes at the DOSB. The introduction of air and gaseous nutrients via two horizontal injection wells (bioventing) is expected to enhance biodegradation rates of petroleum components and stimulate microbial degradation of chlorinated solvents. The data gathered in this test will allow a determination of the biodegradation rates of contaminants of concern in the soil and groundwater, allow an evaluation of the feasibility of in situ bioremediation of soil and groundwater at the DOSB, and provide data necessary for the functional design criteria for the final remediation system.

  2. Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry for in situ detection of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-05-15

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a specially made IMS analyzer. The PDMS membrane was found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from the liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has measured resolutions of R = 33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 and 74 microg/L in the negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water. PMID:20334385

  3. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Whitten, William B [ORNL; Li, Haiyang [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Xu, Jun [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  4. Anaerobic biotransformation of chlorinated alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorinated alkenes are widely found in contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. The highly chlorinated alkene (i.e., PCE) is not subject to aerobic biotransformation. The aim of this research was to explore the potential of using anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification, sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis) for chlorinated alkenes biotransformation. Contaminated soil samples were used throughout this study. Soil microcosms simulating field anoxic conditions with various nutrients amendment, liquid microcosms as well as enrichment liquid cultures were developed to delineate the dechlorination process. The effect of biomass, chlorinated alkenes concentration and site specific conditions (e.g., temperature and pH) on the dechlorination and the primary metabolic process was investigated. The role of sorption and nutritional needs (i.e., electron donor) were also studied. A preliminary study revealed that denitrification was the least affected by low temperatures as compared to sulfate-reduction and methanogenesis. Although dechlorination took place under sequential denitrifying and methanogenic conditions and under sulfate-reducing conditions, further studies concluded that fermentative and methanogenic bacteria were responsible for the observed dechlorination. In most cases, dechlorination of PCE or TCE resulted in the accumulation of cDCE. However, a VC-producing culture was developed from the PCE-contaminated soil. In general, the dechlorination process could be enhanced by increasing electron donor and biomass concentration. At relatively low concentrations, the dechlorination rate was also increased with increasing chlorinated alkene concentration. Dechlorination even proceeded at high chlorinated alkene concentrations when methane production was inhibited. However, as the concentration of the chlorinated alkenes increased, severe toxicity eventually halted the dechlorination process.

  5. Induced Polarization with Electromagnetic Coupling: 3D Spectral Imaging Theory, EMSP Project No. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Sogade, John

    2004-12-14

    This project was designed as a broad foundational study of spectral induced polarization (SIP) for characterization of contaminated sites. It encompassed laboratory studies of the effects of chemistry on induced polarization, development of 3D forward modeling and inversion codes, and investigations of inductive and capacitive coupling problems. In the laboratory part of the project a physico-chemical model developed in this project was used to invert laboratory IP spectra for the grain size and the effective grain size distribution of the sedimentary rocks as well as the formation factor, porosity, specific surface area, and the apparent fractal dimension. Furthermore, it was established that the IP response changed with the solution chemistry, the concentration of a given solution chemistry, valence of the constituent ions, and ionic radius. In the field part of the project, a 3D complex forward and inverse model was developed. It was used to process data acquired at two frequencies (1/16 Hz and 1/ 4Hz) in a cross-borehole configuration at the A-14 outfall area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) during March 2003 and June 2004. The chosen SRS site was contaminated with Tetrachloroethylene (TCE) and Trichloroethylene (PCE) that were disposed in this area for several decades till the 1980s. The imaginary conductivity produced from the inverted 2003 data correlated very well with the log10 (PCE) concentration derived from point sampling at 1 ft spacing in five ground-truth boreholes drilled after the data acquisition. The equivalent result for the 2004 data revealed that there were significant contaminant movements during the period March 2003 and June 2004, probably related to ground-truth activities and nearby remediation activities. Therefore SIP was successfully used to develop conceptual models of volume distributions of PCE/TCE contamination. In addition, the project developed non-polarizing electrodes that can be deployed in boreholes for years. A total of 28 of these electrodes were deployed at the SRS site in September of 2002. The project found that (1) currently available field instrumentation need to be faster by an order of magnitude for full SIP to be engaged for broadband characterization in the field, (2) some aspects of the capacitive coupling problem in borehole geometries can be solved by use of a high impedance receiver, (3) a careful investigation of ways to adequately compare inversion results to ground-truth data is warranted, (4) more laboratory studies should be directed to understand the influence of micro-organisms and long residence time of contaminants (aging) on spectral IP properties.

  6. GE/NOMADICS IN-WELL MONITORING SYSTEM FOR VERTICAL PROFILING OF DNAPL CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Shaffer; Radislav Potyralio; Joseph Salvo; Timothy Sivavec; Lloyd Salsman

    2003-04-01

    This report describes the Phase I effort to develop an Automated In Well Monitoring System (AIMS) for in situ detection of chlorinated volatile organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater. AIMS is composed of 3 primary components: (a) sensor probe, (b) instrument delivery system, and (c) communication/recharging station. The sensor probe utilizes an array of thickness shear mode (TSM) sensors coated with chemically-sensitive polymer films provides a low-cost, highly sensitive microsensor platform for detection and quantification. The instrument delivery system is used to position the sensor probe in 2 inch or larger groundwater monitoring wells. A communication/recharging station provides wireless battery recharging and communication to enable a fully automated system. A calibration curve for TCE in water was built using data collected in the laboratory. The detection limit of the sensor probe was 6.7 ppb ({micro}g/L) for TCE in water. A preliminary field test was conducted at a GE remediation location and a pilot field test was performed at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). The AIMS system was demonstrated in an uncontaminated (i.e., ''clean'') 2-inch well and in a 4-inch well containing 163.5 ppb of TCE. Repeat measurements at the two wells indicated excellent day-to-day reproducibility. Significant differences in the sensor responses were noted between the two types of wells but they did not closely match the laboratory calibration data. The robustness of the system presented numerous challenges for field work and limited the scope of the SRS pilot field test. However, the unique combination of trace detection (detection limits near the MCL, minimum concentration level) and size (operations in 2-inch or larger groundwater wells) is demonstration of the promise of this technology for long-term monitoring (LTM) applications or rapid site characterization. Using the lessons learned from the pilot field test, a number of design changes are proposed to increase the robustness of the system for extended field studies and commercialization.

  7. 75 FR 27690 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Ambrosia...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ...habitat type, which allows adequate sunlight and airflow for A. pumila (PCE 2...habitat type, which allows adequate sunlight and airflow for A. pumila (PCE 2...habitat type, which allows adequate sunlight and airflow for A. pumila (PCE...

  8. THE EFFECT OF UNCERTAINTY FACTOR PLACEMENT IN A PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODEL OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) FOR ACUTE EXPOSURE GUIDELINE LEVELS (AEGL).

    EPA Science Inventory

    PBPK models may be used in risk assessment to reduce uncertainties associated with dosimetry; however, other considerations may still lead to incorporation of uncertainty factors (UF). We investigated the consequences of incorporating UFs at three different steps in the modeling...

  9. CYTOCHROME P450 1A1 AND STRESS PROTEIN INDUCTION IN EARLY LIFE STAGES OF MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES) EXPOSED TO TRICHLOROETHYLENE (TCE) SOOT AND DIFFERENT FRACTIONS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Results of the basewide monitoring program at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, 1993-1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, C.W.; Cunningham, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Geologic and hydrologic data were collected at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio, as part of Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) that began in 1992. The BMP was designed as a long-term project to character ground-water and surface-water quality (including streambed sediments), describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits the Base, and investigate the effects of activities at WPAFB on regional water quality. Ground water, surface ware, and streambed sediment were sampled in four rounds between August 1993 and September 1994 to provide the analytical data needed to address the objectives of the BMP. Surface-water-sampling rounds were designed to include most of the seasonal hydrologic conditions encountered in southwestern Ohio, including baseflow conditions and spring runoff. Ground-water-sampling rounds were scheduled for times of recession and recharfe. Ground-water data were used to construct water-table, potentiometric, and vertical gradient maps of the WPAFB area. Water levels have not changed significantly since 1987, but the effects of pumping on and near the Base can have a marked effect on water levels in localized areas. Ground-ware gradients generally were downward throughout Area B (the southwestern third of the Base) and in the eastern third of Areas A and C (the northeastern two-thirds of the Base), and were upward in the vicinity of Mad River. Stream-discharge measurements verified these gradients. Many of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level (MCL) exceedances of inorganic constituents in ground water were associated with water from the bedrock. Exceedances of concentrations of chromium and nickel were found consistently in five wells completed in the glacial aquifer beneath the Base. Five organic compounds [trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate] were detected at concentrations that exceeded MCLs; all of the TCE, PCE, and vinyl chloride exceedances were in water from glacial aquifer, whereas the benzene exceedance and most of the bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exceedances were in water from the bedrock. TCE (16 exceedances) and PCE (11 exceedances) most frequently exceeded the MCLs and were detected in the most samples. A decrease in concentrations of inorganic and organic compounds with depth suggest that many constituents detected in ground-water samples are associated partly with human activities, in addition to their natural occurrence. Included in the list of these constituents are nickel, chromium, copper, lead vanadium, zinc, bromide, and nitrate. Many constituents are not found at depths greater than 60 to 80 feet, possibly indicating that human effects on ground-water quality are limited to shallow flow systems. Organic compounds detected in shallow or intermediate-depth wells were aligned mostly with flowpaths that pass through or near identified hazardous-waste sites. Few organic contaminants were detected in surface water. The only organic compound to exceed MCLs for drinking water was bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, but it was detected at concentrations just above the MCL. Inorganic constituents detected at concentration exceeding MCLs include beryllium (twice), lead (once), thallium (once), and gross alpha radiation (once). No polycyclic aromatic (PAHs) were detected in surface-water samples. The highest concentrations of contaminants detected during a storm event were in samples from upgradient locations, indicating that off-Base sources may contribute to surface-water contamination. Inorganic and organic contaminants were found in streambed sediments at WPAFB, primarily in Areas A and C. Trace metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, and cadmium were detected at 16 locations at concentrations considered 'elevated' according to a ranking scheme for sediments. PAHS were the organic compounds detected most frequently and in highest concentrations organo

  11. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Fowler, V.L.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1984-12-21

    A simplified internal gelation process is claimed for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85/sup 0/C) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column. 3 figs.

  12. Preparation of nuclear fuel spheres by flotation-internal gelation

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN); Fowler, Victor L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1987-01-01

    A simplified internal gelation process for the preparation of gel spheres of nuclear fuels. The process utilizes perchloroethylene as a gelation medium. Gelation is accomplished by directing droplets of a nuclear fuel broth into a moving volume of hot perchloroethylene (about 85.degree. C.) in a trough. Gelation takes place as the droplets float on the surface of the perchloroethylene and the resultant gel spheres are carried directly into an ager column which is attached to the trough. The aged spheres are disengaged from the perchloroethylene on a moving screen and are deposited in an aqueous wash column.

  13. Assessment of Soil-Gas, Surface-Water, and Soil Contamination at the Installation Railhead, Fort Gordon, Georgia, 2008-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Harrelson, Larry G.; Ratliff, W. Hagan; Wellborn, John B.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of the Army Environmental and Natural Resources Management Office of the U.S. Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, assessed soil gas, surface water, and soil for contaminants at the Installation Railhead (IR) at Fort Gordon, Georgia, from October 2008 to September 2009. The assessment included delineation of organic contaminants present in soil-gas samples beneath the IR, and in a surface-water sample collected from an unnamed tributary to Marcum Branch in the western part of the IR. Inorganic contaminants were determined in a surface-water sample and in soil samples. This assessment was conducted to provide environmental contamination data to Fort Gordon personnel pursuant to requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Hazardous Waste Permit process. Soil-gas samples collected within a localized area on the western part of the IR contained total petroleum hydrocarbons; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes (referred to as BTEX); and naphthalene above the method detection level. These soil-gas samples were collected where buildings had previously stood. Soil-gas samples collected within a localized area contained perchloroethylene (PCE). These samples were collected where buildings 2410 and 2405 had been. Chloroform and toluene were detected in a surface-water sample collected from an unnamed tributary to Marcum Branch but at concentrations below the National Primary Drinking Water Standard maximum contaminant level (MCL) for each compound. Iron was detected in the surface-water sample at 686 micrograms per liter (ug/L) and exceeded the National Secondary Drinking Water Standard MCL for iron. Metal concentrations in composite soil samples collected at three locations from land surface to a depth of 6 inches did not exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Screening Levels for industrial soil.

  14. Biodegradation of Chlorinated Solvents: Reactions near DNAPL and Enzyme Function

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P. L.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Criddle, Craig, S.

    2003-12-11

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most widespread groundwater contaminants in the country, contamination which is also among the most difficult and expensive for remediation. These solvents are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen, but this biodegradation requires both a food source for the organisms (electron donor) and the presence of chlorinated solvent biodegrading organisms. These two requirements are present naturally at some contamination sites, leading to natural attenuation of the solvents. If one or both requirements are absent, then engineered bioremediation either through addition of an external electron donor or through bioaugmentation with appropriate microorganisms, or both, may be used for site remediation. The most difficult case for cleanup is when a large residual of undissolved chlorinated solvents are present, residing as dense -non-aqueous-phase- liquid ( DNAPL). A major focus of this study was on the potential for biodegradation of the solvents when pre sent as DNAPL where concentrations are very high and potential for toxicity to microorganisms exist. Another focus was on a better understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in chlorinated solvent biodegradation . These studies were directed towards the chlorinated solvents, trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). The potential for biodegradation of TCE and PCE DNAPL was clearly demonstrated in this research. From column soil studies and batch studies we found there to be a clear advantage in focusing efforts at bioremediation near the DNAPL. Here, chlorinated solvent concentrations are the highest, both because of more favorable reaction kinetics and because such high solvent concentrations are toxic to microorganisms, such as methanogens, which compete with dehalogenators for the electron donor. Additionally, biodegradation near a PCE DNAPL results in an enhanced dissolution rate for the chlorinated solvent, by factors of three to five times, leading to a more rapid clean-up of the DNAPL zone. The most favored electron donor to add is one which partitions well with the chlorinated solvent or can be concentrated near it. Unfortunately, an ideal electron donor, such as vegetable oil, is difficult to introduce and mix with DNAPL in the ground, doing this properly remains an engineering challenge. Numerical model studies have indicated that several factors may significantly influence the rate and extent of enhancement, including the inhibitory effects of PCE and cDCE, the level of ED concentration, DNAPL configuration, and competition for ED. Such factors need to be considered when contemplating engineered DNAPL bioremediation. Pseudomonas stuzeri KC is an organism that transforms CT to carbon dioxide and chloride without the formation of the hazardous intermediate, chloroform. This is accomplished by production and secretion of a molecule called PDTC. This study was direct ed towards determining how PDTC works. Cu (II) at a ratio of 1:1 Cu to PDTC was found to result in the most rapid CT transformation, confirming that the PDTC-Cu complex is both a reactant and a catalyst in CT transformation. CT degradation requires that the PDTC be in a reduced form, which is generated by contact with cell components. Fe(II) inhibits CT transformation by PDTC. Studies indicated that this inhibition is enhanced by some compound or factor in the supernatant with molecular weight greater than 10,000 Da. We have made progress in determining what this factor might be, but have not yet been able to identify it. In related studies, we found that CT transformation by another organism, Shewanella oneidensis MR1, also involves an excreted factor, but this factor is different from PDTC and results in chloroform transformation as an intermediate. Our studies have indicated that this factor is similar to vitamin K2, and we have also confirmed that vitamin K2 does transform C T into chloroform.

  15. AN EXAMPLE OF MODEL STRUCTURE DIFFERENCES USING SENSITIVITY ANALYSES IN PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial chemical and an environmental contaminant. TCE and its metabolites may be carcinogenic and affect human health. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models that differ in compartmentalization are developed for TCE metabo...

  16. DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING ELECTROCHEMICAL METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical degradation (ECD) is used to decontaminate organic and inorganic contaminants through oxidative or reductive processes. The ECD of Trichloroethylene (TCE) dechlorinates TCE through electric reduction. TCE dechlorination presented in the literature utilized electro...

  17. EFFECTS OF REACTION PARAMETERS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE RATE AND BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas prod...

  18. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  19. EFFECTS OF REACTOR CONDITIONS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas pr...

  20. Use of Depth-Dependent Sampling to Refine Understanding of Source Areas and Short-Circuit Pathways for Contaminants to Reach Public Supply Wells, High Plains Aquifer, York, Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landon, M. K.; Clark, B. R.

    2005-12-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, an investigation of the processes controlling the transport of natural and anthropogenic contaminants to public-supply wells has been conducted in layered unconsolidated deposits of the High Plains aquifer near York, Nebraska. Thirty-four monitoring wells with 1.5-m long screens were installed in unconfined and confined layers of the aquifer along or near the zone of contribution to a public-supply well. Analysis of samples collected from the supply well, integrating water from the entire screened interval, indicated concentrations of PCE, TCE, and uranium that were below drinking-water standards but of concern as indicators of contamination. However, these contaminants were not detected in monitoring wells less than 30 m from the supply well in the same confined sand layer. Samples were collected from the supply well under typical pumping conditions at five depths in the 18-m long screen using a submersible 2.2-cm diameter bladder pump lowered down an access pipe. The sample depths were selected based on flow profiling using the tracer pulse method. The samples from the bottom half of the screen had oxygen and hydrogen isotopic values and concentrations of PCE, TCE, major ions, excess nitrogen gas, and uranium consistent with water derived from shallow recharge areas in the urban area mixed with relatively older native water from the confined aquifer. The presence of the unconfined-source water only at the bottom of the supply-well screen implies that well-bore leakage in the supply well itself was not the pathway for contaminant movement. Similar mixed unconfined-source water signatures were detected in a few monitoring wells screened in the confined layer along the zone of contribution. This non-uniform distribution of mixed unconfined-source water implies that there are preferential flow paths that permit urban recharge water and contaminants to move through the confining layer. The primary pathway is probably downward leakage of water through well bores or annular spaces of irrigation or older supply wells that penetrate the confining unit. The depth-dependent sampling, combined with monitoring-well data, provided improved understanding of the sources and pathways of contaminants and emphasized the need to explicitly simulate well-bore leakage and transient seasonal pumping cycles in a numerical solute-transport model. The results of the simulations indicated that the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination is dependent upon preferential pathways and transient seasonal vertical-head gradients.

  1. Modeling the effects of naturally occurring organic carbon on chlorinated ethene transport to a public supply well.

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Francis H; Kauffman, Leon J; Widdowson, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    The vulnerability of public supply wells to chlorinated ethene (CE) contamination in part depends on the availability of naturally occurring organic carbon to consume dissolved oxygen (DO) and initiate reductive dechlorination. This was quantified by building a mass balance model of the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which is widely used for public water supply in New Jersey. This model was built by telescoping a calibrated regional three-dimensional (3D) MODFLOW model to the approximate capture zone of a single public supply well that has a history of CE contamination. This local model was then used to compute a mass balance between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and adsorbed organic carbon (AOC) that act as electron donors and DO, CEs, ferric iron, and sulfate that act as electron acceptors (EAs) using the Sequential Electron Acceptor Model in three dimensions (SEAM3D) code. SEAM3D was constrained by varying concentrations of DO and DOC entering the aquifer via recharge, varying the bioavailable fraction of POC in aquifer sediments, and comparing observed and simulated vertical concentration profiles of DO and DOC. This procedure suggests that approximately 15% of the POC present in aquifer materials is readily bioavailable. Model simulations indicate that transport of perchloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) to the public supply well is highly sensitive to the assumed bioavailable fraction of POC, concentrations of DO entering the aquifer with recharge, and the position of simulated PCE source areas in the flow field. The results are less sensitive to assumed concentrations of DOC in aquifer recharge. The mass balance approach used in this study also indicates that hydrodynamic processes such as advective mixing, dispersion, and sorption account for a significant amount of the observed natural attenuation in this system. PMID:24372440

  2. Attenuation of methane and volatile organic compounds in landfill soil covers.

    PubMed

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mosbaek, Hans; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The potential for natural attenuation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in landfill covers was investigated in soil microcosms incubated with methane and air, simulating the gas composition in landfill soil covers. Soil was sampled at Skellingsted Landfill at a location emitting methane. In total, 26 VOCs were investigated, including chlorinated methanes, ethanes, ethenes, fluorinated hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons. The soil showed a high capacity for methane oxidation resulting in very high oxidation rates of between 24 and 112 microg CH4 g(-1) h(-1). All lower chlorinated compounds were shown degradable, and the degradation occurred in parallel with the oxidation of methane. In general, the degradation rates of the chlorinated aliphatics were inversely related to the chlorine to carbon ratios. For example, in batch experiments with chlorinated ethylenes, the highest rates were observed for vinyl chloride (VC) and lowest rates for trichloroethylene (TCE), while tetrachloroethylene (PCE) was not degraded. Maximal oxidation rates for the halogenated aliphatic compounds varied between 0.03 and 1.7 microg g(-1) h(-1). Fully halogenated hydrocarbons (PCE, tetrachloromethane [TeCM], chlorofluorocarbon [CFC]-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) were not degraded in the presence of methane and oxygen. Aromatic hydrocarbons were rapidly degraded giving high maximal oxidation rates (0.17-1.4 microg g(-1) h(-1)). The capacity for methane oxidation was related to the depth of oxygen penetration. The methane oxidizers were very active in oxidizing methane and the selected trace components down to a depth of 50 cm below the surface. Maximal oxidation activity occurred in a zone between 15 and 20 cm below the surface, as this depth allowed sufficient supply of both methane and oxygen. Mass balance calculations using the maximal oxidation rates obtained demonstrated that landfill soil covers have a significant potential for not only methane oxidation but also cometabolic degradation of selected volatile organics, thereby reducing emissions to the atmosphere. PMID:14964359

  3. Microbial dynamics during and after in situ chemical oxidation of chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nora B; Atashgahi, Siavash; van der Wal, Jurgen; Wijn, Geert; Grotenhuis, Tim; Smidt, Hauke; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2015-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) followed by a bioremediation step is increasingly being considered as an effective biphasic technology. Information on the impact of chemical oxidants on organohalide respiring bacteria (OHRB), however, is largely lacking. Therefore, we used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to monitor the abundance of OHRB (Dehalococcoides mccartyi, Dehalobacter, Geobacter, and Desulfitobacterium) and reductive dehalogenase genes (rdh; tceA, vcrA, and bvcA) at a field location contaminated with chlorinated solvents prior to and following treatment with sodium persulfate. Natural attenuation of the contaminants tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) observed prior to ISCO was confirmed by the distribution of OHRB and rdh genes. In wells impacted by persulfate treatment, a 1 to 3 order of magnitude reduction in the abundances of OHRB and complete absence of rdh genes was observed 21 days after ISCO. Groundwater acidification (pH<3) and increase in the oxidation reduction potential (>500 mV) due to persulfate treatment were significant and contributed to disruption of the microbial community. In wells only mildly impacted by persulfate, a slight stimulation of the microbial community was observed, with more than 1 order of magnitude increase in the abundance of Geobacter and Desulfitobacterium 36 days after ISCO. After six months, regeneration of the OHRB community occurred, however, neither D. mccartyi nor any rdh genes were observed, indicating extended disruption of biological natural attenuation (NA) capacity following persulfate treatment. For full restoration of biological NA activity, additional time may prove sufficient; otherwise addition electron donor amendment or bioaugmentation may be required. PMID:24898385

  4. An Isotope Fractionation - Reactive Transport Model to Assess Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, P.; Kuder, T.; Vanderford, M.; Philp, P.; van Breukelen, B.

    2012-04-01

    While compound-specific isotope analysis has been used successfully to demonstrate in situ degradation of chlorinated solvents, it suffers from uncertainty resulting from geological heterogeneity and variability in redox conditions. The primary objective of this project was to create an Isotope Fractionation - Reactive Transport Model (IF-RTM) capable of simultaneously simulating multiple isotopes within a complex reaction network, in this case C, Cl and H isotopes during the sequential degradation of chlorinated ethenes, and with heterogeneous environmental conditions. This IF-RTM can then be used as a tool to quantitatively assess contaminant mass destruction through natural attenuation processes, potentially reducing the required monitoring effort, informing remediation or mitigation efforts, and providing insight into the relative impacts of mass attenuation mechanisms. A greater level of model confidence can be obtained by incorporating isotope fractionation into the model output, rather than the usual concentration only approach. A model code capable of simulating concentration changes and isotope fractionation of multiple isotopes (C, Cl, H) during reductive dechlorination and aerobic degradation has been developed using the biogeochemical speciation and transport modelling programme PHREEQC-2. This model is novel not only because it simulates multiple isotopes, but also because it also incorporates secondary isotope effects in the simulation of chlorine isotope fractionation. Microcosm data, including a dataset representing the first a comprehensive, three-isotope (C, Cl, H) characterisation of the TCE reductive dechlorination sequence will be presented and have been used to calibrate/validate this model. The model was found to be capable of simulating the carbon, chlorine and hydrogen isotope fractionation patterns and change in concentration for TCE and its degradation products throughout the reductive dechlorination process. In the next stage of this project solute transport capability will be added to the model by modifying it to be used with a reactive multi-component transport model such as PHAST. The final IF-RTM product will have the capability of simulating changes in concentrations of the parent compound (e.g. PCE) and its degradation products (e.g. VC) and the isotope ratios (of C, Cl and H) of each compound in 3D space. This IF-RTM can also be modified to include fractionation resulting from physical processes such as hydrodynamic dispersion. The developed model will be tested on a large dataset collected at a contaminated field site, namely the TCE plume at Hill AFB, UT.

  5. Evaluation of Dairy Whey as a Subsurface Reactive Barrier Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkiw, E.; Barcelona, M.; Kim, M.

    2006-05-01

    Subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) in remediation of contaminated ground water are currently being utilized and refined as an alternative/supplement to costly pump-and-treat remediation. Identification of efficient reactive materials that are effective in the long-term is essential for the ultimate success of PRBs in ground water remediation. A variety of enhancements have been used: oxidants, reductants or sorbents. Electron donors create/strengthen reducing conditions that are favorable for microbial degradation of chlorinated hydrocarbons. Inexpensive, food-grade electron donors effectively enhance dechlorination activity, and those that are solids that can be slurried and then pressure grouted are the best candidates for maintaining an active biobarrier at low cost. Dried dairy whey (~70% alpha-lactose), a slowly dissolving solid, is a prime candidate. To determine the efficiency of whey in promoting dechlorination, it is essential to identify the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways and perform quantitative analysis of breakdown products. We hypothesize that dissolved whey will undergo microbial degradation (aerobic and anaerobic) to form carboxylic acids, and that in a suboxic/reducing environment the anaerobic products will stimulate the microbial dechlorination of chlorinated hydrocarbons PCE, TCE, and DCE. Analysis of the breakdown products in the absence as well as the presence of chlorinated hydrocarbons will result in the calculation of rate constants. Kinetics will, in turn, provide us with residence time, loading (whey mass), and projected lifetime of the whey PRB under estimated loads of total chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination. Early results from our field-scale effort to treat a TCE-contaminated site show increased concentrations of cis- DCE and VC downgradient from the whey PRBs, indicative of enhanced TCE dechlorination. Results from an initial microcosm experiment show complete disappearance of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of whey. Carboxylic acids appear to be the major products of whey degradation. We will attempt to draw metabolic pathways according to field as well as laboratory results and, ultimately, to apply laboratory reaction kinetics to the field and arrive at more reliable design criteria.

  6. The legacy of chlorinated solvents in the Birmingham aquifer, UK: observations spanning three decades and the challenge of future urban groundwater development.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Turner, Ryan J; Glibbery Née Murcott, Penny; Cuthbert, Mark O

    2012-10-01

    Licensed abstraction well data collected during 1986-2008 from a total of 77 wells mainly located at industrial sites combined with historic land use data from 1975 has allowed insight into the legacy of chlorinated solvent contamination in the Birmingham aquifer that underlies the UK's second largest city. This legacy, expected to be reasonably symptomatic of those occurring in other urban aquifers, was characterised by: dominance of parent solvents, particularly TCE (trichloroethene) that widely exceeded drinking-water quality criteria; greater TCE occurrence in wells in proximity to increased historic land use by the metal/engineering solvent-user industry (the relationship providing a first-pass indicator of future resource development potential); regional groundwater vulnerability controls; well abstraction changes (over months to decades) influential of observed concentration transients and anticipated plume capture or release; persistence of contamination over decades (with less soluble PCE (perchloroethene) showing increased persistence relative to TCE) that was reasonably ascribed to slow contaminant release from DNAPL (dense non-aqueous phase liquid) sources and, or low permeability layers; presence of dechlorination products arising from solvent (bio)degradation, although this key attenuation process appeared to have moderate to weak influence regionally on plumes; and, inadvertent, but significant solvent mass removal from the aquifer by industrial abstractions. Key challenges to realising future urban groundwater development were identified based on the observed legacy and well capture zone simulations. Despite the extensive contamination of the aquifer, it should still be possible to develop wells of high (several megalitres per day) capacity for drinking water supply (or other lower grade uses) without the requirement for solvent treatment. In those areas with higher risk of contamination, our dataset, together with application of emergent risk assessment approaches (that our dataset may serve to validate), could be used to inform potential abstractors as to whether solvent treatment is likely to be required at a particular abstraction site with time. Challenges identified that were relevant to the future development of Birmingham and urban aquifers more generally include the adequacy of groundwater quality monitoring data and uncertainties in contaminant source terms, abstraction well capture zone predictions and plume natural attenuation, in particular degradation rates. The study endorses that despite significant solvent contamination encountered, strategies can, and need, to be increasingly found to reclaim urban aquifer resources and more sustainably meet urban water demands. PMID:23022878

  7. 40 CFR 63.320 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities § 63.320 Applicability...subpart apply to the owner or operator of each dry cleaning facility that uses perchloroethylene. (b) The compliance date for a new dry cleaning system depends on the date...

  8. 40 CFR 63.320 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities § 63.320 Applicability...subpart apply to the owner or operator of each dry cleaning facility that uses perchloroethylene. (b) The compliance date for a new dry cleaning system depends on the date...

  9. Complementing approaches to demonstrate chlorinated solvent biodegradation in a complex pollution plume: Mass balance, PCR and compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Courbet, Christelle; Rivière, Agnès; Jeannottat, Simon; Rinaldi, Sandro; Hunkeler, Daniel; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2011-11-01

    This work describes the use of different complementing methods (mass balance, polymerase chain reaction assays and compound-specific stable isotope analysis) to demonstrate the existence and effectiveness of biodegradation of chlorinated solvents in an alluvial aquifer. The solvent-contaminated site is an old chemical factory located in an alluvial plain in France. As most of the chlorinated contaminants currently found in the groundwater at this site were produced by local industries at various times in the past, it is not enough to analyze chlorinated solvent concentrations along a flow path to convincingly demonstrate biodegradation. Moreover, only a few data were initially available to characterize the geochemical conditions at this site, which were apparently complex at the source zone due to (i) the presence of a steady oxygen supply to the groundwater by irrigation canal losses and river infiltration and (ii) an alkaline pH higher than 10 due to former underground lime disposal. A demonstration of the existence of biodegradation processes was however required by the regulatory authority within a timeframe that did not allow a full geochemical characterization of such a complex site. Thus a combination of different fast methods was used to obtain a proof of the biodegradation occurrence. First, a mass balance analysis was performed which revealed the existence of a strong natural attenuation process (biodegradation, volatilization or dilution), despite the huge uncertainty on these calculations. Second, a good agreement was found between carbon isotopic measurements and PCR assays (based on 16S RNA gene sequences and functional genes), which clearly indicated reductive dechlorination of different hydrocarbons (Tetrachloroethene--PCE-, Trichloroethene--TCE-, 1,2-cisDichloroethene--cis-1,2-DCE-, 1,2-transDichloroethene-trans--1,2-DCE-, 1,1-Dichloroethene--1,1-DCE-, and Vinyl Chloride--VC) to ethene. According to these carbon isotope measurements, although TCE biodegradation seems to occur only in the upgradient part of the studied zone, DCE and VC dechlorination (originating from the initial TCE dechlorination) occurs along the entire flowpath. TCE reductase was not detected among the Dehalococcoides bacteria identified by quantitative PCR (qPCR), while DCE and VC reductases were present in the majority of the population. Reverse transcriptase PCR assays (rt-PCR) also indicated that bacteria and their DCE and VC reductases were active. Mass balance calculations showed moreover that 1,1-DCE was the predominant DCE isomer produced by TCE dechlorination in the upgradient part of the site. Consequently, coupling rt-PCR assays with isotope measurements removes the uncertainties inherent in a simple mass balance approach, so that when the three methods are used jointly, they allow the identification and quantification of natural biodegradation, even under apparently complex geochemical and hydraulic conditions. PMID:22115095

  10. Test plan for Geo-Cleanse{reg_sign} demonstration (in situ destruction of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL))

    SciTech Connect

    Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B.; Accorsi, F.; Dingens, M.; Wilson, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLs, or dense non-aqueous phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only proven cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on destruction of DNAPL either in situ or ex situ have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. The proposed demonstration, as described in this report will evaluate the applicability to DNAPL plumes of a technology proven for in situ destruction of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) such as oils.

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  12. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  13. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): USA Aberdeen Proving Ground, Edgewood, MD. (First remedial action), September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-27

    The 17,000-acre USA Aberdeen - Edgewood site is a military ordnance installation in Edgewood, Maryland. The 4.5-acre Old O-Field site, which is the focus of the Record of Decision (ROD), is a fenced hazardous waste and ordnance disposal area. From 1949 to the mid-1970's, several decontamination and clean-up operations were conducted as a result of munitions explosions. These operations included the application of 1,000 barrels of decontaminating agent non-corrosive containing chlorinated hydrocarbons; soaking the field with several hundred gallons of fuel oil and setting the field ablaze; dispersing lime into the surrounding trees to further reduce the amount of mustard present; and using supertropical bleach, lime, and sodium hydroxide to destroy chemical agents. The ROD provides an interim remedy for contaminated ground water and its effect on surface water. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; and metals including arsenic. The selected remedial action for this interim remedy includes installing a downgradient extraction well network; and pumping and onsite treatment of contaminated ground water using chemical precipitation.

  14. Raman probe. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The Raman probe is deployed in high-level waste tanks with the cone penetrometer (CPT). These technologies are engineered and optimized to work together. All of the hardware is radiation hardened, designed for and tested in the high-radiation, highly caustic chemical environment of US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) waste storage tanks. When deployed in tanks, the system is useful for rapidly assessing the species and concentrations of organic-bearing tank wastes. The CPT was originally developed for geological and groundwater applications, with sensors that measure physical parameters such as soil moisture, temperature, and pH. When deployed, it is hydraulically forced directly into the ground rather than using boring techniques utilized by rotary drilling systems. There is a separate Innovative Technology Summary Report for the CPT, so this report will focus on the changes made specifically to support the Raman probe. The most significant changes involve adapting the Raman probe for in-tank and subsurface field use and developing meaningful real-time data analysis. Testing of the complete LLNL system was conducted in a hot cell in the 222-S Laboratory at the Hanford site in summer 1997. Both instruments were tested in situ on solvent-contaminated soils (TCE and PCE) at the Savannah River Site in February and June 1998. This report describes the technology, its performance, its uses, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned.

  15. Replacement Technologies for Precision Cleaning of Aerospace Hardware for Propellant Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-l13- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. Replacement technologies are being investigated for aerospace hardware and for gauges and instrumentation. This paper includes the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification of aerospace hardware using known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils. The results correlate nonvolatile residue with CFC 113. The studies also include enhancements to aqueous sampling for organic and particulate contamination. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon 225 (HCFC 225), HCFC 141b, HFE 7100(R), and Vertrel MCA(R) was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC 113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autogenous ignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  16. INDUCED POLARIZATION WITH ELECTROMAGNETIC COUPLING: 3D SPECTRAL IMAGING THEORY: EMSP PROJECT NO. 73836

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, F. Dale; Lesmes, David

    2004-12-31

    The principal objective of the project was to develop a non-invasive imaging technique, based on spectral induced polarization (SIP), to characterize in-situ distribution of organic and inorganic contaminants. This was to be an advance over a similar technique offered by the DC resistivity method. The motivation for the choice of IP over resistivity is rooted in the fact that resistivity response is governed by volume distributions of electrical parameters and therefore is relatively insensitive to small changes contributed by the presence of contaminants. IP response on the other hand is governed by the electrochemical properties of the rock-grain pore-fluid interface, which can be significantly altered by the incoming contaminant (ions) over long residence times. Small concentrations of contaminants are the rule rather than the exception thus, the detection threshold for IP, which is more sensitive to small concentrations, is much lower than for resistivity (IP field threshold for PCE/TCE is about 1mg/g). Additionally, the observation that IP depends on the chemistry of the contaminants provided the motivation that a spectral IP response could lead to a database of identifying signatures by which contaminants can be discriminated.

  17. Oxidation of chlorinated ethenes by heat-activated persulfate: kinetics and products.

    PubMed

    Waldemer, Rachel H; Tratnyek, Paul G; Johnson, Richard L; Nurmi, James T

    2007-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) and in situ thermal remediation (ISTR) are applicable to treatment of groundwater contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. ISCO with persulfate (S2O8(2-)) requires activation, and this can be achieved with the heat from ISTR, so there may be advantages to combining these technologies. To explore this possibility, we determined the kinetics and products of chlorinated ethene oxidation with heat-activated persulfate and compared them to the temperature dependence of other degradation pathways. The kinetics of chlorinated ethene disappearance were pseudo-first-order for 1-2 half-lives, and the resulting rate constants-measured from 30 to 70 degrees C--fit the Arrhenius equation, yielding apparent activation energies of 101 +/- 4 kJ mol(-1) for tetrachloroethene (PCE), 108 +/- 3 kJ mol(-1) for trichloroethene (TCE), 144 +/- 5 kJ mol(-1) for cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and 141 +/- 2 kJ mol(-1) for trans-1,2-dichloroethene (trans-DCE). Chlorinated byproducts were observed, but most of the parent material was completely dechlorinated. Arrhenius parameters for hydrolysis and oxidation by persulfate or permanganate were used to calculate rates of chlorinated ethene degradation by these processes over the range of temperatures relevant to ISTR and the range of oxidant concentrations and pH relevant to ISCO. PMID:17328217

  18. Catalytic transformation of persistent contaminants using a new composite material based on nanosized zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ishai; Jacov, Osnat Merom; Cortis, Andrea; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-07-25

    A new composite material based on deposition of nanosized zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and cyanocobalamine (vitamin B12) on a diatomite matrix is presented, for catalytic transformation of organic contaminants in water. Cyanocobalamine is known to be an effective electron mediator, having strong synergistic effects with nZVI for reductive dehalogenation reactions. This composite material also improves the reducing capacity of nZVI by preventing agglomeration of iron nanoparticles, thus increasing their active surface area. The porous structure of the diatomite matrix allows high hydraulic conductivity, which favors channeling of contaminated water to the reactive surface of the composite material resulting in faster rates of remediation. The composite material rapidly degrades or transforms completely a large spectrum of water contaminants, including halogenated solvents like TCE, PCE, and cis-DCE, pesticides like alachlor, atrazine and bromacyl, and common ions like nitrate, within minutes to hours. A field experiment where contaminated groundwater containing a mixture of industrial and agricultural persistent pollutants was conducted together with a set of laboratory experiments using individual contaminant solutions to analyze chemical transformations under controlled conditions. PMID:22680618

  19. Test plan for single well injection/extraction characterization of DNAPL

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Jerome, K.M.; Burdick, S.; Rossabi, J.; Jarosch, T.R.; Eddy-Dilek, C.A.

    1995-12-01

    Soils and groundwater beneath an abandoned Process sewer line in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) contain elevated levels of volatile organic compounds, specifically trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE), two common chlorinated solvents. These compounds have low aqueous solubilities, thus when released to the subsurface in sufficient quantity, tend to exist as immiscible fluids or nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). Because chlorinated solvents are also denser than water, they are referred to by the acronym DNAPLS, or dense non aqueous Phase liquids. Technologies targeted at the efficient characterization or removal of DNAPL are not currently proven. For example, most DNAPL studies rely on traditional soil and water sampling and the fortuitous observation of immiscible solvent. Once DNAPL is identified, soil excavation (which is only applicable to small contained spill sites) is the only ``proven`` cleanup method. New cleanup approaches based on enhanced removal by surfactants and/or alcohols have been proposed and tested at the pilot scale. As described below, carefully designed experiments similar to the enhanced removal methods may provide important characterization information on DNAPLs.

  20. Mean and variance of DNAPL ringer development in a saturated, randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

    SciTech Connect

    Tartakovsky, A. M. (Alexandre M.); Neuman, S. P.; Tartakovsky, D. M. (Daniel M.)

    2001-01-01

    Chlorinated organic solvents such as TCE and PCE are among the most ubiquitous and problematic groundwater contaminants at many sites. They usually enter the subsurface in the form of organic liquids which exhibit low miscibility with water and thus form a separate dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). Here we analyze the movement of DNAPL in a three-dimensional randomly heterogeneous porous medium saturated with water. We consider the fluid interface between DNAPL and water to form a sharp boundary at which the capillary pressure head, assumed equal to the entry pressure head of DNAPL, is prescribed either deterministically or randomly. We treat log hydraulic conductivity as a statistically homogeneous random field with given mean, variance and covariance, This allows us to cast the corresponding boundary-value problem in the form of an integro-differential equation, in which the parameters and domain of integration are random. Expanding this equation in a Taylor series about the mean position of the front, and averaging in probability space, yields leading-order ensemble I moment equations for the mean and variance of front evolution with time. Previously we solved these moment equations analytically in one-dimension with gravity, to first order in the variance of log conductivity, and compared our solution with the results of Monte Carlo sjmulations. Here we solve the same moment equations numerically in two-spatial dimensions without gravity.

  1. Hydrogeological modeling constraints provided by geophysical and geochemical mapping of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razafindratsima, Stephen; Guérin, Roger; Bendjoudi, Hocine; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2014-09-01

    A methodological approach is described which combines geophysical and geochemical data to delineate the extent of a chlorinated ethenes plume in northern France; the methodology was used to calibrate a hydrogeological model of the contaminants' migration and degradation. The existence of strong reducing conditions in some parts of the aquifer is first determined by measuring in situ the redox potential and dissolved oxygen, dissolved ferrous iron and chloride concentrations. Electrical resistivity imaging and electromagnetic mapping, using the Slingram method, are then used to determine the shape of the pollutant plume. A decreasing empirical exponential relation between measured chloride concentrations in the water and aquifer electrical resistivity is observed; the resistivity formation factor calculated at a few points also shows a major contribution of chloride concentration in the resistivity of the saturated porous medium. MODFLOW software and MT3D99 first-order parent-daughter chain reaction and the RT3D aerobic-anaerobic model for tetrachloroethene (PCE)/trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorination are finally used for a first attempt at modeling the degradation of the chlorinated ethenes. After calibration, the distribution of the chlorinated ethenes and their degradation products simulated with the model approximately reflects the mean measured values in the observation wells, confirming the data-derived image of the plume.

  2. Fuzzy Systems Modeling of In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faybishenko, B.; Hazen, T. C.

    2001-12-01

    A large-scale vadose zone-groundwater bioremediation demonstration was conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) by injecting several types of gases (ambient air, methane, and nitrous oxide and triethyl phosphate mixtures) through a horizontal well in the groundwater at a 175 ft depth. Simultaneously, soil gas was extracted through a parallel horizontal well in the vadose zone at a 80 ft depth Monitoring revealed a wide range of spatial and temporal variations of concentrations of VOCs, enzymes, and biomass in groundwater and vadose zone monitoring boreholes over the field site. One of the powerful modern approaches to analyze uncertain and imprecise data chemical data is based on the use of methods of fuzzy systems modeling. Using fuzzy modeling we analyzed the spatio-temporal TCE and PCE concentrations and methanotroph densities in groundwater to assess the effectiveness of different campaigns of air stripping and bioremediation, and to determine the fuzzy relationship between these compounds. Our analysis revealed some details about the processes involved in remediation, which were not identified in the previous studies of the SRS demonstration. We also identified some future directions for using fuzzy systems modeling, such as the evaluation of the mass balance of the vadose zone - groundwater system, and the development of fuzzy-ruled methods for optimization of managing remediation activities, predictions, and risk assessment.

  3. A Transition in the Cumulative Reaction Rate of Two Species Diffusion with Bimolecular Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Harihar; Arshadi, Masoud

    2015-04-01

    Diffusion and bimolecular reaction between two initially separated reacting species is a prototypical small-scale description of reaction induced by transverse mixing. It is also relevant to diffusion controlled transport regimes as encountered in low-permeability matrix blocks in fractured media. In previous work, the reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), which predicts that front motion scales as ?t, and the cumulative reaction rate scales as 1/?t-. We present a general non-dimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the cumulative reaction rate scales as ?t- rather than 1/?t. The duration of this early time regime (where the cumulative rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) depends on the rate parameter, in a manner that is consistently predicted by our non-dimensionalization. We also present results on the scaling of the reaction front width. We present numerical simulations in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media to demonstrate the limited influence of heterogeneity on the behavior of the reaction-diffusion system. We illustrate applications to the practical problem of in-situ chemical oxidation of TCE and PCE by permanganate, which is employed to remediate contaminated sites where the DNAPLs are largely dissolved in the rock matrix.

  4. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): William Dick Lagoons, West Caln Township, Chester County, PA. (First remedial action), June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-28

    The 4.4-acre William Dick Lagoons site is a chemical wastewater disposal site in West Caln Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. An estimated 30 residences located within 1,000 feet of the site use private wells for their drinking water supply. Two other Superfund sites are near the site. From the 1950's to 1970, Mr. William Dick used the lagoons to dispose of wastewater left from cleaning the interiors of chemical and petroleum tank trailers owned primarily by Chemical Leaman Tank Lines, (CLTL), and residual chemical products. Later in 1970, vandalism caused the release of an estimated 300,000 gallons of wastewater into Birch Run, a tributary of the West Branch of Brandywine Creek. As a result of this discharge, more than 2,600 fish died, and water supplies that used Brandywine Creek as a water source were closed. The Record of Decision (ROD) provides an interim remedy and addresses contaminated residential water as Operable Unit 1 (OU1) and ground water as OU2. A future ROD will address source control and will provide a remedy for the cleanup of contaminated soil. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE; other organics including phenols; and metals. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Janesville Ash Beds, WI. (First remedial action), December 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-29

    The Janesville Ash Beds site is being remediated concurrently with the Janesville Old Landfill site and two nearby, non-NPL sites, the Janesville Old Dump and the Janesville New Landfill sites. These four sites comprise the 65-acre Janesville Disposal Facility (JDF) in Janesville, Wisconsin. The Janesville Ash Beds (JAB) site, which is RCRA regulated, operated from 1974 to 1985 and consisted of five ash beds in which industrial liquids and sludges were deposited and allowed to evaporate or dry. The 16-acre Janesville New Landfill site was operated from 1978 to 1985 and accepted municipal and industrial wastes. The second additional site is the 15-acre Janesville Old Dump site which was operated from 1950 to 1963 as a general refuse dump. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and air are VOCs including benzene, PCE, and TCE; and metals including arsenic. Remedial activities at the JDF site will be implemented at three of the sites and include upgrading the landfill cap, and providing site drainage as needed, at the JAB site; treating the landfill gas by extraction and flaring, upgrading the landfill cap, and air monitoring at the Old Landfill site.

  6. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a key component of remediation at many chloroethene-contaminated sites. In some instances, limited accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products may suggest that natural attenuation is not adequate for site remediation. This conclusion is justified when evidence for parent compound (tetrachloroethene, PCE, or trichloroethene, TCE) degradation is lacking. For many chloroethene-contaminated shallow aquifer systems, however, non-conservative losses of the parent compounds are clear but the mass balance between parent compound attenuation and accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products is incomplete. Incomplete mass balance indicates a failure to account for important contaminant attenuation mechanisms, and is consistent with contaminant degradation to non-diagnostic mineralization products. An ongoing technical debate over the potential for mineralization of dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to CO2 in the complete absence of diatomic oxygen has largely obscured the importance of microbial DCE/VC mineralization at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below the current field standard (DO < 0.1-0.5 milligrams per liter) for nominally anoxic conditions. This study demonstrates that oxygen-based microbial mineralization of DCE and VC can be substantial under field conditions that are frequently characterized as "anoxic." Because mischaracterization of operant contaminant biodegradation processes can lead to expensive and ineffective remedial actions, a modified framework for assessing the potential importance of oxygen during chloroethene biodegradation was developed.

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 10): Northside Landfill, Washington (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-30

    The 345-acre Northside Landfill is in a mixed residential and agricultural area, in the northwest corner of the city of Spokane, Spokane County, Washington. The landfill has been used since the 1930s by the city of Spokane and a variety of private and public haulers for disposal of residential and light commercial refuse. The landfill is divided into four disposal units: a refuse unit, a grease skimmings unit, an old open burn unit and a sewage sludge unit. Only the refuse unit is active; however, it is scheduled to close by 1992. The western one-third of the land fill lies over the large Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer (SVRPA). The SVRPA was designated as a sole source of water supply for the Spokane-Coeur d'Alene area by EPA in 1978. Investigations conducted in 1981 and 1983 indicated the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) beneath the site and in offsite residential wells located northwest of the landfill. The city immediately supplied the 19 affected residences with bottled water and has since extended municipal water lines to the area. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCA, and TCE. In addition, iron and lead exceed the secondary drinking water standards offsite.

  8. Characterization and simulation of fate and transport of selected volatile organic compounds in the vicinities of the Hadnot Point Industrial Area and landfill: Chapter A Supplement 6 in Analyses and historical reconstruction of groundwater flow, contaminant fate and transport, and distribution of drinking water within the service areas of the Hadnot Point and Holcomb Boulevard Water Treatment Plants and vicinities, U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, L. Elliott; Suárez-Soto, René J.; Anderson, Barbara A.; Maslia, Morris L.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement of Chapter A (Supplement 6) describes the reconstruction (i.e. simulation) of historical concentrations of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and benzene3 in production wells supplying water to the Hadnot Base (USMCB) Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (Figure S6.1). A fate and transport model (i.e., MT3DMS [Zheng and Wang 1999]) was used to simulate contaminant migration from source locations through the groundwater system and to estimate mean contaminant concentrations in water withdrawn from water-supply wells in the vicinity of the Hadnot Point Industrial Area (HPIA) and the Hadnot Point landfill (HPLF) area.4 The reconstructed contaminant concentrations were subsequently input into a flow-weighted, materials mass balance (mixing) model (Masters 1998) to estimate monthly mean concentrations of the contaminant in finished water 5 at the HPWTP (Maslia et al. 2013). The calibrated fate and transport models described herein were based on and used groundwater velocities derived from groundwater-flow models that are described in Suárez-Soto et al. (2013). Information data pertinent to historical operations of water-supply wells are described in Sautner et al. (2013) and Telci et al. (2013).

  9. Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

    1995-06-01

    Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 {mu}g/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult.

  10. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Greenwood Chemical Site, Operable Unit 2, Newtown, VA. (Second remedial action), December 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    The 5-acre Greenwood Chemical site is a former chemical manufacturing facility in Newtown, Albemarle County, Virginia. All residents who reside within three miles of the site are completely dependent on the ground water underlying the site for their drinking water supply. From the 1950s to 1985, either Cockerville Chemical Company or Greenwood Chemical used the site for manufacturing chemicals for industrial, agricultural, pharmaceutical, and photographic purposes. The companies stored, treated and disposed of chemicals onsite. In 1985, operations ceased at the facility following an explosion and fire. EPA investigations that were conducted after the fire identified elevated levels of cyanide, SVOCs, and VOCs in lagoons and ground water. The ROD addresses the contaminated ground water and surface water as operabe unit 2 (OU2) and provides an interim remedy. A future ROD will address additional contamination of onsite soil. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water and surface water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and toluene; SVOCs including arsenic. The selected remedial action for the site is included.

  12. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Kummer Sanitary Landfill, Northern Township, Beltrami County, MN. (Third remedial action), September 1990. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-29

    The 35-acre Kummer Sanitary Landfill site is an inactive mixed municipal waste landfill in Northern Township, Beltrami County, Minnesota, approximately one mile west of Lake Bemidji. A large residential area lies approximately 1,000 feet east of the site, and there is a hospital directly southwest. The privately owned landfill was operated from 1971 until 1985; however, business records for the site are virtually nonexistent. Operations at the landfill caused the State to take a number of administrative and enforcement actions. Following the discovery of ground water contamination in Northern Township in 1984, the State issued a public health advisory concerning the well water and provided a temporary water supply. Two previous Records of Decision (RODs) in 1985 and 1988 documented the provision of an alternative water supply for the Northern municipal water system as Operable Unit 1 (OU1), and a source control Operable Unit (OU2), which included a cover system to control the source of contamination (OU3). The final ROD addresses ground water contamination. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including benzene, PCE, TCE, and vinyl chloride.

  13. Impact of microbial activities on the mineralogy and performance of column-scale permeable reactive iron barriers operated under two different redox conditions.

    PubMed

    Van Nooten, Thomas; Lieben, François; Dries, Jan; Pirard, Eric; Springael, Dirk; Bastiaens, Leen

    2007-08-15

    The present study focuses on the impact of microbial activities on the performance of various long-term operated laboratory-scale permeable reactive barriers. The barriers contained both aquifer and Fe0 compartments and had received either sulfate or iron(III)-EDTA to promote sulfate-reducing and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, respectively. After dismantlement of the compartments after almost 3 years of operation, DNA-based PCR-DGGE analysis revealed the presence of methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, metal-reducing, and denitrifying bacteria within as well as up- and downgradient of the Fe0 matrix. Under all imposed conditions, the main secondary phases were vivianite, siderite, ferrous hydroxy carbonate, and carbonate green rust as found by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Under sulfate-reduction promoting conditions, iron sulfides were formed in addition, resulting in 7 and 10 times higher degradation rates for PCE and TCE, respectively, compared to unreacted iron. These results indicate that the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria in or around iron barriers and the subsequent formation of iron sulfides might increase the barrier reactivity. PMID:17874779

  14. Soil pore-gas sampling by photoacoustic radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.

    1994-11-01

    Concentrations of volatile organics in a soil pore-gas plume were measured using a commercially available multigas monitor. The monitor is a photoacoustic radiometer (PAR) controlled by an on-board, programmable microprocessor. The measurements determine the extent and location of the vapor plume in the subsurface. At least twelve wells surrounding the sources are measured quarterly. The sources are located in former liquid chemical waste disposal pits and shafts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The primary constituents of the plume are 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA), trichloroethene (TCE), and tetrachloroethene or perchloroethene or perchloroethene (PCE). Four quarters of data are presented for TCA. All were used primarily as solvents and degreasers. Previously the composition of the vapor plume was determined by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer GCMS methods. Photoacoustic radiometry and gas chromatography are discussed giving the advantages and disadvantages of each method, although in this program they are basically complementary. Gas chromatography is a more qualitative method to determine which analytes are present and the approximate concentration. Photoacoustic radiometry, to function well, requires foreknowledge of constituents and serves best to determine how much is present. Measurements are quicker and more direct with photoacoustic methods. Once the constituents to be measured are known, the cost to monitor is much less using photoacoustics, and the results are available more quickly.

  15. Seasonal variability in anthropogenic halocarbon emissions.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Drew R; Miller, Angela M; Goldstein, Allen H

    2010-07-15

    Ambient concentrations of eight predominantly anthropogenic halocarbons were measured via in situ gas chromatography in California's South Coast air basin for both summer and fall during the 2005 Study of Organic Aerosols at Riverside (SOAR). Ongoing emissions of the banned halocarbons methylchloroform and CFC-11 were observed in the South Coast air basin, whereas CFC-113 emissions have effectively ceased. We estimate anthropogenic emissions in the South Coast air basin for methylchloroform, CFC-11, HCFC-141b, chloroform, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and dichloromethane based on regressions of halocarbon to carbon monoxide mixing ratios and carbon monoxide emission inventories. We estimate per capita methylchloroform and chloroform emissions in the South Coast air basin for the year 2005 to be 6.6 +/- 0.4 g/(person.year) and 19 +/- 1 g/(person.year), respectively. We compare our results to national emission estimates calculated from previous work; for several compounds, emissions in the South Coast air basin are significantly lower than national per capita emissions. We observed strong seasonal differences in anthropogenic emissions of methylchloroform and chloroform; emissions were 4.5 and 2.5 times greater in summer than in fall, respectively. Possible seasonal sources include landfills and water chlorination. We conclude that seasonal variability in methylchloroform emissions has not been included in previous inventories and may cause errors in methylchloroform emission estimates after the year 2000 and seasonally resolved inversion calculations of hydroxyl radical abundance. PMID:20536226

  16. Savannah River Site A/M Area Southern Sector Characterization Cone Penetrometer Report

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, B.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plaingeologic province. This area is characterized by low relief, predominantly unconsolidated sediments of Cretaceous though Tertiary age. A multiple aquifer system underlies the A/M Area and affects the definition and distribution of a contaminant plume. The water table and uppermost confined aquifer (Steed Pond Aquifer) are contaminated with elevated concentrations of trichloroethylene(TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their associated compounds. The deeper aquifers in this area have less widely spread chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination.Cone penetrometer testing was selected as the method of investigation because it is minimally invasive, offers advanced technological capabilities in gathering lithologic data, and offers groundwater sampling capabilities. CPT testing utilizes a hydraulic push tool system. The probe collects real-time data that is processed by computer into soil/lithology classifications. The system can also be used to collect sediment and soil vapor samples although these features were not utilized during this project. Advantages of the CPT system include a small borehole diameter which minimizes cross-contamination of lithologic units, virtual elimination of drill cuttings and fluids that require disposal, collection of various types of undisturbed sediment and water samples and plotting of hydrostratigraphic and lithologic data while in the field.

  17. Cometabolic bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-15

    Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

  18. Surfactant enhanced remediation of soil columns contaminated by residual tetrachloroethylene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. D. Pennell; M. Jin; L. M. Abriola; G. A. Pope

    1994-01-01

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting (14)C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product with water. Miscible displacement experiments were conducted before and after PCE entrapment to determine the influence or residual PCE on column dispersivities. The

  19. NETPLAN Passenger Network Modeling and Simulation

    E-print Network

    Daniels, Thomas E.

    per PCE (Highway) $ travel time cost per PCE (Air) $ travel time cost per PCE (HSR) 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0) $ travel time cost per PCE-mile (Air) $ travel time cost per PCE-mile (HSR) 7 #12;Code Improvement · Energy: No investment in HSR (Unlimited highway and air infrastructure) · Cost = $15.6 T · Case 2: Investment also

  20. Effects of Agriculture and Urbanization on Quality of Shallow Ground Water in the Arid to Semiarid Western United States, 1993-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paul, Angela P.; Seiler, Ralph L.; Rowe, Timothy G.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Within the Western United States, agricultural and rural lands are being developed into commercial and residential areas. With changes in land use and increasing population, greater demands are placed on water resources for agricultural, industrial, and domestic supplies. Many areas in the Western United States rely exclusively on ground water as their source of drinking water. Areas that use surface-water resources often need to supplement this supply with ground water. Generally, shallow ground water is susceptible to fluctuating water quality within relatively short time scales and therefore can be used as an indicator of land-use stresses that may, in time, affect deep aquifer systems. This regional study examines data on shallow ground-water quality collected from 1993 to 2004 from 273 agricultural and 181 urban wells from 7 U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment study units in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, south-central Colorado, and Utah. This report determines important influences that land-use practices may have on the quality of recently recharged ground water, which may ultimately affect deep water supplies within the region. The results of this investigation show that nitrate, the principal species of nitrogen present in ground water, exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 milligrams per liter in water from more than 25 percent of agricultural wells and 10 percent of urban wells. In agricultural areas, the probability of exceeding the USEPA MCL for nitrate is influenced primarily by three factors: fertilizer use, irrigation, and aquifer oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions. At the study-unit level, differences in nutrient concentrations between agricultural and urban land use likely are influenced by ground-water redox conditions within respective aquifer systems. The most commonly detected pesticides belonged to the triazine, urea, amide, and carbamate classes. The triazine herbicides were the predominant pesticides present in both agricultural and urban areas. Simazine and diuron were most frequently detected in shallow ground water within agricultural areas, whereas atrazine, prometon, and tebuthiruon were more commonly detected in urban areas. The carbamate pesticides and the amide, metolachlor, were infrequently detected. Pesticide concentrations in shallow ground water within agricultural or urban land-use settings did not exceed established USEPA MCLs for drinking water. Generally, factors that influenced the detection of pesticides in shallow ground water in the regional area were dissolved oxygen, general soil permeability characteristics, temperature, and depth to screened interval. The most commonly detected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within urban areas were the trihalomethanes (THMs), solvents, and the fuel oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl-ether (MTBE). The most frequently detected THM was chloroform and the primary detected solvents were tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Soil fumigants were detected almost entirely within an agricultural area in the Central Valley of California. The predominant fumigant detected was dibromochloropropane (DBCP), and its occurrence may be a result of its persistence and past use as a soil fumigant. THM concentrations did not exceed the USEPA MCL of 80 micrograms per liter (?g/L) for total THMs in any sample. Two ground-water samples collected within urban areas in Nevada exceeded the USEPA MCL for TCE (5 ?g/L) and the drinking-water advisory for MTBE (20-40 ?g/L). The PCE concentration in one sample from the urban area in Utah and five samples from urban areas within Nevada exceeded the 5 ?g/L MCL. An important factor affecting the detection frequencies of VOCs was the ground-water redox condition. Chloroform and PCE were detected more frequently in well-oxygenated ground water, whereas MTBE was detected more frequently in less-oxygenated water. Multivar

  1. EFFECT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE ON THE EXPLORATORY AND LOCOMOTOR ACTIVITY OF RATS EXPOSED DURING DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common contaminant of underground water supplies. To examine the effect of TCE on the developing central nervous system, rats were exposed to TCE throughout gestation until 21 days postpartum via their dams' drinking water. TCE concentrations of 312 p...

  2. Tetrachloroethene recovery and hazard reduction of spent powders from dry cleaning process.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Elisabetta; Scarsella, Marco; De Filippis, Paolo; Di Palma, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Dry cleaning facilities using perchloroethylene produce a solid waste consisting of spent filtering powders with a high content of residual perchloroethylene, together with dyes and non-volatile residues. Untreated spent powders, classified as hazardous waste, cannot be disposed in landfill and incineration represents the only viable alternative. In this study, together with a full characterisation of the waste, the removal and recovery of the residual perchloroethylene by means of different heat treatments was investigated. In particular, tests of distillation and stripping with air and steam were carried out, evaluating the effectiveness of the treatments by quantifying the residual perchloroethylene in the samples treated. The results obtained show that the spent filtering powders contained about 25%?wt. of perchloroethylene and that the maximum perchloroethylene recovery was obtained by steam stripping; approximately 98% after only 50?minutes. However, this treatment accounted for the production of a liquid mixture containing perchloroethylene and of a solid waste that required a further washing with boiling water to decrease the residual organic content below the eligibility criteria for landfill disposal. PMID:25690329

  3. Dechlorination of commercial PCBs and other multiple halogenated compounds by a sediment-free culture containing Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shanquan; He, Jianzhong

    2013-09-17

    At the contaminated sites, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) frequently coexist with other halogenated compounds, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), chloroethanes, and chloroethenes. The presence of multiple halogenated compounds usually poses toxicity to dehalogenating microbes, because few cultures are capable of detoxifying a broad spectrum of halogenated compounds. In this study, a sediment-free culture, designed as AD14, is able to sequentially remove halogens from PCBs and other cocontaminants. Culture AD14 dechlorinated the commercial PCB mixture-Aroclor 1260-mainly by removing flanked para- and doubly flanked meta-chlorines. It also dehalogenated octa-brominated diphenyl ether mixture predominantly to tetra-BDEs, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) to 4-CP, and tetrachloroethene (PCE)/1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) completely to ethene. When applied to a mixture of the above-mentioned compounds, culture AD14 stepwise removed halogens from 2,4,6-TCP, 1,2-DCA, PCE, PBDEs, and PCBs. Illumina sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that only two known dechlorinating genera, Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter, were present in culture AD14. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the 16S rRNA gene copies of Dehalococcoides and Dehalobacter increased from 1.14 × 10(5) to 7.04 × 10(6) copies mL(-1) and from 1.15 × 10(5) to 8.20 × 10(6) copies mL(-1) after removing 41.13 ?M of total chlorine from PCBs. The above results suggest that both Dehalobacter and Dehalococcoides could be responsible for PCB dechlorination. Although two Dehalococoides mccartyi strains with identical 16S rRNA genes were isolated from the PCBs-dechlorinating mixed culture using trichloroethene (TCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) as alternatives to PCBs, the two isolates are incapable of dechlorinating PCBs. In all, culture AD14 is promising for bioremediation applications at sites cocontaminated with PCBs and other halogenated compounds. PMID:23964900

  4. Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Frank W. Schwartz

    2005-12-13

    This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active agent from controlled release systems of varied forms and applications. We manufactured prototype single- and double-layered matrix-type controlled release systems and tested their release patterns using numerical simulations and column experiments. In a series of simulations, we demonstrated that an encapsulated, dispersed-agent polymeric matrix-type controlled release system could deliver active agent at a predetermined constant rate for long time periods of years and decades. Such long-term, constant release system is useful in the construction of fertilizers, herbicides, or implantable drug delivery devices as well as in subsurface treatment. Construction of more advanced forms of controlled release systems is currently under way.

  5. Middlesex FUSRAP Site - A Path to Site-Wide Closure - 13416

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David M. [ECC, 110 Fieldcrest Ave, Ste 31, Edison, NJ, 08837 (United States)] [ECC, 110 Fieldcrest Ave, Ste 31, Edison, NJ, 08837 (United States); Edge, Helen [US Army Corps of Engineers - NYD, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY, 10278 (United States)] [US Army Corps of Engineers - NYD, 26 Federal Plaza, Room 1811, New York, NY, 10278 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The road-map to obtaining closure of the Middlesex Sampling Plant FUSRAP site in Middlesex, New Jersey (NJ) has required a multi-faceted approach, following the CERCLA Process. Since 1998, the US ACE, ECC, and other contractors have completed much of the work required for regulatory acceptance of site closure with unrestricted use. To date, three buildings have been decontaminated, demolished, and disposed of. Two interim storage piles have been removed and disposed of, followed by the additional removal and disposal of over 87,000 tons of radiologically and chemically-impacted subsurface soils by the summer of 2008. The US ACE received a determination from the EPA for the soils Operable Unit, (OU)-1, in September 2010 that the remedial excavations were acceptable, and meet the criteria for unrestricted use as required by the 2004 Record of Decision (ROD) for OU-1. Following the completion of OU-1, the project delivery team performed additional field investigation of the final Operable Unit for Middlesex, OU-2, Groundwater. As of December 2012, the project delivery team has completed a Supplemental Remedial Investigation, which will be followed with a streamlined Feasibility Study, Proposed Plan, and ROD. Several years of historical groundwater data was available from previous investigations and the FUSRAP Environmental Surveillance Program. Historical data indicated sporadic detections of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), with no apparent trend or pattern indicating extent or source of the VOC impact. In 2008, the project delivery team initiated efforts to re-assess the Conceptual Site Model (CSM) for groundwater. The bedrock was re-evaluated as a leaky multi-unit aquifer, and a plan was developed for additional investigations for adequate bedrock characterization and delineation of groundwater contaminated primarily by CT, TCE, and tetrachloroethene (PCE). The investigation was designed to accumulate multiple lines of evidence to determine the source and to delineate the extent of contamination, as required to complete the CERCLA Process and gain regulatory acceptance. Investigative techniques included in-well vertical flow tracing, borehole geophysics and packer testing of temporary test holes to characterize contamination in the bedrock fractures beneath the site, and to delineate likely source areas. (authors)

  6. TRICHLOROETHYLENE IHIBITS VOLTAGE-SENSITIVE CALCIUM CURRENTS IN DIFFERENTIATED PC 12 CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: It has been demonstrated recently that volatile organic compounds (VOCs)such as toluene, perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene inhibit function of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSSC). Such actions are hypothesized to contribute to the acute neurotoxicity of...

  7. VAPOR EMISSIONS FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS INTO BUILDINGS: COIV1PAR1SON BETWEEN PREDICTIONS FROM TRANSPORT MODELS AND FIELD MEASUREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VAPOR EMISSIONS FROM CONTAMINATED SOILS INTO BUILDINGS: COIV1PAR1SON BETWEEN PREDICTIONS FROM: contaminated soil, soil-vapor émissions into buildings, field measurements, models prédictions 1. Summary Soil, contaminated with chlorinated solvents (trichloroethene and perchloroethylene) in unsaturated soils

  8. ATMOSPHERIC PERSISTENCE OF EIGHT AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric lifetimes were estimated for eight air toxic chemicals (i.e., methylene chloride, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, ethylene dichloride, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, 1,3-butadiene, and ethylene oxide). Seven of the eight chemicals were removed from the atmosp...

  9. 40 CFR 63.326 - Implementation and enforcement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Perchloroethylene Air Emission Standards for Dry Cleaning Facilities § 63.326 Implementation and enforcement. (a) This subpart can be implemented and...

  10. 76 FR 66663 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and AIM Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ...Standards and Limitations for Organic material Emissions for Area...perchloroethylene or methylene chloride. (7) Additional labeling...rule, ``National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...rule, ``National Volatile Organic Compound Emission...

  11. 75 FR 69910 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, California Air Resources Board-Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ...feasible reduction in volatile organic compounds emitted by consumer...air contaminants methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, or trichloroethylene...Subpart C, National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Authority:...

  12. 76 FR 62004 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, California Air Resources Board-Consumer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...feasible reduction in volatile organic compounds emitted by consumer...air contaminants methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, or trichloroethylene...subpart C, National Volatile Organic Compound Emission Standards...recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Authority:...

  13. 75 FR 74545 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Final Rule Designating Critical Habitat for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ...amid taller vegetation obtain adequate sunlight by growing taller and more slender compared...described in PCE 1, that provide adequate sunlight, and airflow for wind pollination...plants can no longer receive adequate sunlight and airflow (PCE 2)....

  14. Participant-centered Education: Building a New WIC Nutrition Education Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Deehy; Fatima S Hoger; Jan Kallio; Kay Klumpyan; Karen Sell; Linda Yee

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveTo assess the readiness of the Western Region Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) states to implement participant-centered nutrition education (PCE) and to develop a PCE model for WIC service delivery.

  15. REDUCTIVE BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE TO ETHENE DURING ANAEROBIC DEGRADATION OF TOLUENE: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE AND KINETICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reductive biotransformation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to ethene occurred during anaerobic degradation of toluene in an enrichment culture. Ethene was detected as a dominant daughter product of PCE dechlorination with negligible accumulation of other partially chlorinated ethenes...

  16. DNAPL source control by reductive dechlorination with iron-based degradative solidification/stabilization

    E-print Network

    Do, Si Hyun

    2009-05-15

    on PCE dechlorination with ISM indicated that the increase of Fe(II) in ISM increased rate constants and decreased the solubility of targets. The half-life was increased with increasing total PCE concentration. The product analysis implied...

  17. Reactive Transport Modeling of Chemical and Isotope Data to Identify Degradation Processes of Chlorinated Ethenes in a Diffusion-Dominated Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J. C.; Damgaard, I.; Jeannottat, S.; Hunkeler, D.; Broholm, M. M.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are among the most widespread contaminants in the subsurface and a major threat to groundwater quality at numerous contaminated sites. Many of these contaminated sites are found in low-permeability media, such as clay tills, where contaminant transport is controlled by diffusion. Degradation and transport processes of chlorinated ethenes are not well understood in such geological settings, therefore risk assessment and remediation at these sites are particularly challenging. In this work, a combined approach of chemical and isotope analysis on core samples, and reactive transport modeling has been used to identify the degradation processes occurring at the core scale. The field data was from a site located at Vadsby, Denmark, where chlorinated solvents were spilled during the 1960-70's, resulting in contamination of the clay till and the underlying sandy layer (15 meters below surface). The clay till is heavily contaminated between 4 and 15 mbs, both with the mother compounds PCE/TCE and TCA and the daughter products (DCE, VC, ethene, DCA), indicating the occurrence of natural dechlorination of both PCE/TCE and TCA. Intact core samples of length 0.5m were collected from the source zone (between 6 and 12 mbs). Concentrations and stable isotope ratios of the mother compounds and their daughter products, as well as redox parameters, fatty acids and microbial data, were analyzed with discrete sub-sampling along the cores. More samples (each 5 mm) were collected around the observed higher permeability zones such as sand lenses, sand stringers and fractures, where a higher degradation activity was expected. This study made use of a reactive transport model to investigate the appropriateness of several conceptual models. The conceptual models considered the location of dechlorination and degradation pathways (biotic reductive dechlorination or abiotic ?-elimination with iron minerals) in three core profiles. The model includes diffusion in the matrix, sequential reductive dechlorination, abiotic degradation, isotope fractionation due to degradation and due to diffusion in the clay matrix, as heavier isotopes are expected to diffuse slower than lighter ones. The isotope data are shown to be crucial to distinguish between the tested conceptual models for transport and degradation, and made it possible to select a unique conceptual model for each core profile. This study reveals that biotic and abiotic degradation occurred concurrently in several zones inside the clay matrix, and that abiotic degradation of cis-DCE was the dominant attenuation process in the cores. Furthermore reductive dechlorination of cis-DCE to VC, and further to ethene, was documented in several zones in the low-permeability media. Previous studies have shown that degradation might be limited to high permeability zones in clay tills, thus limiting the applicability of remediation strategies based on enhanced biodegradation. Therefore the occurrence of degradation inside the clay matrix is an important finding, that is further supported by microbial and chemical data. Improved understanding of degradation processes in clay tills is useful for improving the reliability of risk assessment and the design of remediation schemes for chlorinated solvents.

  18. Possible factors controlling the effectiveness of bioenhanced dissolution of non-aqueous phase tetrachloroethene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Chu; P. K. Kitanidis; P. L. McCarty

    2004-01-01

    Tetrachloroethene (PCE) is a widespread subsurface contaminant. When PCE exists in the form of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), it becomes a long term threat to groundwater quality. It has been recognized that treating the resulting plumes from PCE source zones alone is not effective because the long life of NAPL source zones may dictate the overall remediation time. Recent studies

  19. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa sand was evaluated in four column experiments. Residual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product ...

  20. SURFACTANT ENHANCED REMEDIATION OF SOIL COLUMNS CONTAMINATED BY RESIDUAL TETRACHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of aqueous surfactant solutions to recover tetrachloroethylene (PCE) entrapped in Ottawa and was evaluated in four column experiments. esidual PCE was emplaced by injecting 14 C-labeled PCE into water-saturated soil columns and displacing the free product with water. ...

  1. Long-term mass transfer and mixing-controlled reactions of a DNAPL plume from persistent residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2014-02-01

    Understanding and being able to predict the long-term behavior of DNAPL (i.e., PCE and TCE) residuals after active remediation has ceased have become increasingly important as attention at many sites turns from aggressive remediation to monitored natural attenuation and long-term stewardship. However, plume behavior due to mass loading and reactions during these later phases is less studied as they involve large spatial and temporal scales. We apply both theoretical analysis and pore-scale simulations to investigate mass transfer from DNAPL residuals and subsequent reactions within the generated plume, and, in particular, to show the differences between early- and late-time behaviors of the plume. In the zone of entry of the DNAPL entrapment zone where the concentration boundary layer in the flowing groundwater has not fully developed, the pore-scale simulations confirm the past findings based on laboratory studies that the mass transfer increases as a power-law function of the Peclét number, and is enhanced due to reactions in the plume. Away from the entry zone and further down gradient, the long-term reactions are limited by the available additive and mixing in the porous medium, thereby behave considerably differently from the entry zone. For the reaction between the contaminant and an additive with intrinsic second-order bimolecular kinetics, the late-time reaction demonstrates a first-order decay macroscopically with respect to the mass of the limiting additive, not with respect to that of the contaminant. The late-time decay rate only depends on the intrinsic reaction rate and the solubility of the entrapped DNAPL. At the intermediate time, the additive decays exponentially with the square of time (t2), instead of time (t). Moreover, the intermediate decay rate also depends on the initial conditions, the spatial distribution of DNAPL residuals, and the effective dispersion coefficient.

  2. A method for quantifying bioavailable organic carbon in aquifer sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rectanus, H.V.; Widdowson, M.; Novak, J.; Chapelle, F.

    2005-01-01

    The fact that naturally occurring microorganisms can biodegrade PCE and TCE allows the use of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) as a remediation strategy at chlorinated solvent-contaminated sites. Research at numerous chlorinated solvent sites indicates an active dechlorinating microbial population coupled with an ample supply of organic carbon are conditions needed to sustain reductive dechlorination. A series of extraction experiments was used to compare the ability of the different extractants to remove organic carbon from aquifer sediments. The different extractants included pyrophosphate, sodium hydroxide, and polished water. Pyrophosphate served as a mild extractant that minimally alters the organic structure of the extracted material. Three concentrations (0.1, 0.5, and 1%) of pyrophosphate extracted 18.8, 24.9, and 30.8% of sediment organic carbon, respectively. Under alkali conditions (0.5 N NaOH), which provided the harshest extractant, 30.7% of the sediment organic carbon was recovered. Amorphous organic carbon, measured by potassium persulfate oxidization, consisted of 44.6% of the sediment organic carbon and served as a baseline control for maximum carbon removal. Conversely, highly purified water provided a minimal extraction control and extracted 5.7% of the sediment organic carbon. The removal of organic carbon was quantified by aqueous TOC in the extract and residual sediment organic carbon content. Characterization of the organic carbon extracts by compositional analysis prior and after exposure to the mixed culture might indicate the type organic carbon and functional groups used and/or generated by the organisms. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  3. IMPROVED DOWN-HOLE CPT TOOLS FOR THE DETECTION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin L. Gildea; Stephen P. Farrington, P.E.; Wesley L. Bratton, Ph.D., PE

    1998-09-01

    Conventional soil and groundwater sampling procedures present many opportunities for loss of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by exposing sample media to the atmosphere during transfers between sampling devices and containers, ultimately affecting the quality of the analytical results. Inaccurate characterization data often leads to improperly designed remedial systems that slow the clean-up process and increase the cost. For these reasons, in situ methods for sample extraction and real time analysis provide attractive alternatives to conventional sampling and analysis. Under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the investigators continued development of a system that combines High Speed Gas Chromatography techniques with Cone Penetration Testing to achieve near-real time analysis of soils and groundwater for chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbon contamination (PCE, TCE, BTEX) during site characterization. The system combines three new CPT tools with an up-hole analyzer. The Dynamic Thermal Desorption (DTD) probe provides the up-hole analyzer with continuously sampled soil gas, enhancing detection limits by heating the soil matrix during penetration to thermally desorb volatile organic contaminants. The CPT In Situ Purge Probe (CISP) purges a water sample in situ, transferring the purge gas up-hole for analysis. Alternatively, soil gas or purge gas from the DTD probe or the CISP can be diverted to a Downhole Trap Module (DTM), which traps contaminants on conventional trap media for later analysis in a fixed laboratory. While the effectiveness of the CISP was hampered by the tendency of fine grained materials to clog its sample inlet filter, the DTD probe and the DTM were demonstrated to perform their intended functions well.

  4. Savannah River Site DNAPL technical program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J.E.; Looney, B.B.; Rossabi, J.; Bergren, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    This document was developed by the environmental remediation and technology development organizations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and is the Site technical program plan to address the remediation of residual chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents in the groundwater and the soil. These solvents are often labeled dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). At SRS, the primary DNAPL constituents of concern are trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE); two commonly used industrial organic solvents. The goal of the technical program plan is to provide clear objectives for DNAPL characterization and remediation activities at SRS. Developed by a task team of researchers at SRS, the objectives and program description document a coordinated, programmatic approach to identify solutions to the complex problem of DNAPL contamination. The purposes of this program are to expedite the development and application of technologies for DNAPL characterization and remediation, to provide a well characterized {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} site to perform the work, and to facilitate DNAPL remediation at SRS. Given the appropriate resources, SRS will provide an intelligent application of technical skills and confidence toward the remediation of DNAPLS. We have completed an initial characterization of DNAPLs that provides unique data on the location, nature, and extent of DNAPL occurrences at a field site. Future activities will leverage the initial characterization data for DNAPLs at SRS to demonstrate efficient progression through the characterization phase leading to cleanup. The initial characterization data provides a tool to focus this program`s activities. As a result, solutions to the complex problem of DNAPL contamination will be tested and demonstrated in the most cost-effective manner. Where appropriate, the program will rely on identifying and utilizing innovative technologies developed by industry and universities.

  5. A kinetic model of the ozone/hydrogen-peroxide process for treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process in laboratory scale experiments and to subsequently develop a generic mathematical model of the O{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} process for the treatment of ground water containing various organic contaminants, especially halogenated hydrocarbons. The process model was evaluated for the case of a stirred, semi-batch reactor in three regions determined by the relative feed rate of ozone and peroxide. In region I, where peroxide feed rate is less than the stoichiometric optimum, the rate of reaction is limited by the hydrogen peroxide feed rate. In region II, the ratio of ozone and peroxide feed rate is near the stoichiometric optimum. In region III, the reaction rate is limited by the rate of ozone transfer into the liquid phase, i.e., the higher the ozone content in the feed gas, the larger the reaction rate. The process model suggests that too large a dose of peroxide will have an inhibitive effect on the oxidation rate. The mass transfer/reaction rate model can be used as a tool for estimating k{sub M,OH}, the rate constant for the reaction of organic substrate with the OH radical. The estimated values of k{sub PCE,OH} (2.1 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) and k{sub TCE,OH} (3.5 {times} 10{sup 9} M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}) for tetra- and trichloro-ethylene respectively, are in good agreement with the literature values. The process model can also be utilized to rationalize the effect of OH scavengers in ground waters. For typical ground waters in Southern California, the model suggests that removal of bicarbonate by softening will enhance the rate of oxidation of organic micropollutants.

  6. Methods of preparation and modification of advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles, their properties and application in water treatment technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Jan; Kašlík, Josef; Med?ík, Ivo; Petala, Eleni; Zbo?il, Radek; Slunský, Jan; ?erník, Miroslav; Stav?lová, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles are commonly used in modern water treatment technologies. Compared to conventionally-used macroscopic iron or iron microparticles, the using of nanoparticles has the advantages given mainly by their generally large specific surface area (it drives their high reactivity and/or sorption capacity), small dimensions (it allows their migration e.g. in ground water), and particular physical and chemical properties. Following the applications of zero-valent iron particles in various pilot tests, there arose several critical suggestions for improvements of used nanomaterials and for development of new generation of reactive nanomaterials. In the presentation, the methods of zero-valent iron nanoparticles synthesis will be summarized with a special attention paid to the thermally-induced solid-state reaction allowing preparation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in an industrial scale. Moreover, the method of thermal reduction of iron-oxide precursors enables to finely tune the critical parameters (mainly particle size and morphology, specific surface area, surface chemistry of nanoparticles etc.) of resulting zero-valet iron nanoparticles. The most important trends of advanced nanoparticles development will be discussed: (i) surface modification of nanomaterilas, (ii) development of nanocomposites and (iii) development of materials for combined reductive-sorption technologies. Laboratory testing of zero-valent iron nanoparticles reactivity and migration will be presented and compared with the field observations: the advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles were used for groundwater treatment at the locality contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons (VC, DCE, TCE and PCE) and reacted nanoparticles were extracted from the sediments for their fate assessment. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic "Competence Centres" (project No. TE01020218) and the EU FP7 (project NANOREM).

  7. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume, Grindsted, Denmark: 1. Experimental setup, tracer movement, and fate of aromatic and chlorinated compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Bjerg, Poul L.; Pedersen, JøRn K.; MosbæK, Hans; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1999-04-01

    A continuous, natural-gradient field injection experiment, involving 18 xenobiotic compounds and bromide as tracers, was performed in the anaerobic region of a leachate plume downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark. The injection lasted for 195 days, and within this period a continuous cloud was established. Over a period of 924 days the cloud movement was monitored in approximately 70 discrete sampling points in the central part of the cloud, and the spatial distribution was described by seven cloud snapshots involving 400-700 sampling points. The bromide cloud movement closely followed the varying flow direction predicted by the water table measurements. Moment analysis showed decreasing tracer flow velocities and reduced capture of bromide mass with time, which may be explained by varying flow conditions (direction, hydraulic gradient) and the heterogeneous geological conditions in the sandy aquifer. Naphthalene, having the highest log Kow value, was the most retarded compound, with a retardation of less than 10%. Therefore sorption was not considered to be a significant attenuation process for any of the compounds studied. Transformation under iron-reducing conditions was observed for toluene, o-xylene, TeCM, 1,1,1-TCA, PCE, and TCE, while transformation of benzene and napthalene was not detected in the aquifer within the time frame of this study. First-order transformation rates were in the range of 0.028-0.039 d-1 and 0.0014-0.0028 d-1 for the aromatic compounds toluene and o-xylene, respectively. The rates for the chlorinated aliphatic compounds, tetrachloromethane, 1,1,1- trichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene, were >0.7 d-1, 0.0044-0.0054 d-1, 0.0012-0.0038 d-1, and 0.0003-0.001 d-1, respectively. Long lag periods and slow transformation rates were observed for some of the compounds, suggesting that lack of transformation reported in the literature may be attributable to short experimental periods in those studies.

  8. In Situ Bioremediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in Hydraulically-Tight Sediments: Challenges and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2011-12-01

    Chlorinated ethenes, like perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), have been widely used by many industries, especially in developed countries like Japan. Because of their wide applications, lack of proper regulation, poor handing, storage and disposal practices in the past, chlorinated ethenes have become a type of the most prevalent contaminants for soils and groundwater pollution. For the sake of their degradability, bioremediation has been considered as a potentially cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach for cleanup of chlorinated ethenes in situ. In this presentation, we briefly overview the status of soil and groundwater pollution, the recent amendment of the Soil Contamination Countermeasures Act in Japan, comparison between the bioremediation and other techniques like pump and treat, and the mechanisms of reductive dechlorination, direct oxidation and co-metabolism of chlorinated ethenes. We then introduce and discuss some recent challenges and advancements in in-situ bioremediation including technologies for accelerating bio-degradation of chlorinated ethenes, technologies for assessing diffusive properties of dissolved hydrogen in hydraulically-tight soil samples, and combination of bioremediation with other techniques like electro-kinetic approach. Limiting factors that may cause incomplete remediation and/or ineffectiveness of bioremediation are examined from biochemical, geochemical and hydro-geological aspects. This study reconfirmed and illustrated that: 1) The key factor for an effective bioremediation is how to disperse a proper accelerating agent throughout the polluted strata, 2) The effective diffusion coefficient of dissolved hydrogen in geologic media is relatively big and is almost independent on their permeability, and 3) To effectively design and perform an accelerated bioremediation, a combination of natural migration with pressurized injection and/or other approaches, like electro-migration, for stimulating mass transport could be necessary depending on the hydraulic properties, like porosity and permeability of a stratum.

  9. Practical Solutions for the Design of Accelerated In Situ Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takeuchi, M.; Komai, T.

    2010-12-01

    Bioremediation is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly approach for clean-up of hazardous chemicals from polluted geoenvironments, especially toxic organic compounds, like perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) from low-permeability strata at depths. The use of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC) or Oxygen Release Compound (ORC) is a common practice to accelerate anaerobic bioremediation or aerobic bioremediation, depending on the chemical forms of pollutants to be treated. An effective remediation, however, needs effective mixing of, and interaction between the bacteria, target compound(s), injected HRC or ORC as well as other substances if necessary. An understanding of migration behavior of dissolved hydrogen and dissolved oxygen in geological formations is, therefore, an important research subject for predicting potential areas of remediation during acceptable time periods. In this study, 3 practical solutions to the plane source, point source and line source diffusions which correspond to the semi-infinite, spherical and cylindrical models were derived and used to discuss the diffusive transport through low permeability geological media. A series of parameter studies using feasible values for the diffusion coefficient obtained from both literature survey and independent laboratory experiments were performed. Expected areas of hydrogen or oxygen migration were assumed to be from several tens of centimeters to a few meters with consideration of practical pollution problems, and acceptable remediation time periods were considered to be from several months to the maximum of 10-15 years. The results obtained from this study illustrated that transport of chemical substances, like dissolved hydrogen or oxygen used for accelerated bioremediation, due to diffusion is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusion coefficient. The area of migration due to natural diffusion could be very limited. To effectively design and perform an accelerated bioremediation, a combination of natural migration with pressurized injection and/or other approaches, like electro-migration, for stimulating mass transport could be necessary depending on the hydraulic properties, like porosity and permeability of a stratum.

  10. Treatment of chlorinated ethenes in groundwater with ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, P.B. [IBM Corp., Essex Junction, VT (United States); Armstrong, J.; Couture, M. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A study was conducted to enhance the performance of an advanced oxidation process in treating chlorinated ethenes in groundwater at IBM`s groundwater treatment system at its Essex Junction, Vermont facility. A model describing the reaction kinetics and mass transfer of a co-current ozone injection process is presented. This model, in conjunction with experiments, demonstrates that the treatment performance of the ozone treatment process at a given ozone/air concentration and ozone mass flowrate cannot be improved by varying process operating parameters such as number of ozone injectors utilized, use of a static mixer, or variation of groundwater flowrate through each injector. This is because dissolved ozone reaches equilibrium with the injected ozone/air mixture within two seconds of initial contact. Also, the Venturi-type ozone injection system presently in use destroys nearly half of the injected ozone. Injection of hydrogen peroxide in conjunction with ozone increases the overall tetrachloroethylene (PCE) treatment efficiency by a factor of four (in comparison to ozone alone) at a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/O{sub 3} mass ratio of between 1 and 2. Treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) is enhanced by a factor of two. This enhancement of the oxidative treatment process results in a reduction in solvent mass load to a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption system located downstream, thus potentially reducing the usage GAC and regeneration of spent GAC. However, residual hydrogen peroxide and/or hydroxyl free radicals from the oxidation process effluent may interact adversely with certain grades of GAC; the causes of this interaction and methods to attenuate it (i.e., the use of more resistant grades of GAC) are discussed. Overall O{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/GAC system operating costs can potentially be reduced significantly (up to $20K annually). An economic analysis and system operation/cost optimization study are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Health Assessment Document for Trichloroethylene Synthesis and Characterization (2001, External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment presents EPA's most current evaluation of the potential health risks from exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE). TCE exposure is associated with several adverse health effects, including neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, developmental toxicity, liver toxicity, kidney t...

  12. DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE UNDER HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMAL SOURCE-ZONE REMOVAL CONDITIONS (POSTER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a contaminant commonly found in the subsurface at industrial and military installations in the United States. Oxidation of TCE (C2HCl3) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ions (Cl-) has been reported to occu...

  13. DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE UNDER HIGH-TEMPERATURE THERMAL SOURCE-ZONE REMOVAL CONDITIONS (ABSTRACT ONLY)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a contaminant commonly found in the subsurface at industrial and military installations in the United States. Oxidation of TCE (C2HCl3) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and chloride ions (Cl-) has been reported to occu...

  14. Comparative Study on the Implication of Three Nanoparticles on the Removal of Trichloroethylene by Adsorption - The Pilot and Rapid Small-Scale Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of three commercially-available nanoparticles (NPs) on trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC) was investigated. TCE Adsorption isotherm and column breakthrough experiments were conducted in the presence and absence of silicon dioxide (S...

  15. Cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 in a chemostat with toluene as the primary substrate.

    PubMed Central

    Landa, A S; Sipkema, E M; Weijma, J; Beenackers, A A; Dolfing, J; Janssen, D B

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 is capable of cometabolic degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) if the organism is grown on certain aromatic compounds. To obtain more insight into the kinetics of TCE degradation and the effect of TCE transformation products, we have investigated the simultaneous conversion of toluene and TCE in steady-state continuous culture. The organism was grown in a chemostat with toluene as the carbon and energy source at a range of volumetric TCE loading rates, up to 330 mumol/liter/h. The specific TCE degradation activity of the cells and the volumetric activity increased, but the efficiency of TCE conversion dropped when the TCE loading was elevated from 7 to 330 mumol/liter/h. At TCE loading rates of up to 145 mumol/liter/h, the specific toluene conversion rate and the molar growth yield of the cells were not affected by the presence of TCE. The response of the system to varying TCE loading rates was accurately described by a mathematical model based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and competitive inhibition. A high load of 3,400 mumol of TCE per liter per h for 12 h caused inhibition of toluene and TCE conversion, but reduction of the TCE load to the original nontoxic level resulted in complete recovery of the system within 2 days. These results show that P. cepacia can stably and continuously degrade toluene and TCE simultaneously in a single-reactor system without biomass retention and that the organism is more resistant to high concentrations and shock loadings of TCE than Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. PMID:7524444

  16. Contrasting carbon isotope fractionation during biodegradation of trichloroethylene and toluene: Implications for intrinsic bioremediation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Sherwood Lollar; G. F. Slater; J. Ahad; B. Sleep; J. Spivack; M. Brennan; P. MacKenzie

    1999-01-01

    In experiments involving anaerobic biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE), ?13C values for residual TCE changed from ?30.4‰ to values more enriched than ?16‰. All data exhibit a consistent correlation between ?13C value of the residual TCE and the extent of biodegradation of TCE, described by a fractionation factor (?) of 0.9929. In contrast, during aerobic biodegradation of toluene by two separate

  17. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling of two binary mixtures: metabolic activation of carbon tetrachloride by trichloroethylene and metabolic inhibition of chloroform by trichloroethylene.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction between trichloroethylene (TCE) and chloroform (CHCI3) has been described as less than additive, with co-exposure to TCE and CHC13 resulting in less hepatic and renal toxicity than observed with CHCl3 alone. In contrast, the nonadditive interaction between TCE and...

  18. Beneath the District Averages: Intradistrict Differences in Teacher Compensation Expenditures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malkus, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Previous research indicates that typical district budgeting practices mask large between-school teacher compensation expenditures (TCE) differences, that teacher sorting drives those TCE differences, and that TCE differences drive overall resource inequities. While scarce accurate school-level resource data has hindered intradistrict equity…

  19. EFFECT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE ON MALE SEXUAL BEHAVIOR: POSSIBLE OPIOID ROLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent which is widely used as an industrial degreasing agent. Workers exposed to TCE often exhibit symptoms similar to those symptoms produced by narcotics. The present studies evaluated the effects of TCE exposure on measure...

  20. Documentation of trichloroethylene for the material safety data sheet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. C. Fields; L. MacDonald

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of all available research data to evaluate and determine the toxic effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) for the Material Safety Data Sheet. It is a study of the toxic effects on humans and animals of exposure to various concentrations of TCE. The study, which includes chronic exposure to TCE causing damage to the skin, eyes, and all

  1. QUANTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electrochemical dechlorination of Trichloroethylene (TCE) in aqueous phase was studied using graphite as a cathode in a packed bed reactor in a closed system. TCE contaminated matrix solution was circulated through the electrochemical reactor where TCE was reduced at the graphite...

  2. INHALATION EXPOSURE IN THE HOME TO VOLATILE ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS OF DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The field studies show that indoor air concentrations of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) can be substantial when TCE-contaminated water is used domestically. Using a model shower, increases in TCE water concentrations, water temperature and drop path (time) increased the stea...

  3. Evaluating the risk of liver cancer in humans exposed in trichloroethylene using physiological models

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.W. (Armstrong Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)); Allen, B.C. (Clement Assoc., Ruston, LA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widespread environmental pollutant. TCE is classified as a rodent carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Using the rodent cancer bioassay findings and estimates of metabolized dose, the SPA has estimated lifetime exposure cancer risks for humans that ingest TCE in drinking water or inhale TCE. In this study, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) model for mice was used to simulate selected gavage and inhalation bioassays with TCE. Plausible dose-metrics thought to be linked with the mechanism of action for TCE carcinogenesis were selected. These dose-metrics, adjusted to reflect an average amount per day for a lifetime, were metabolism of TCE (AMET, mg/kg/day) and systemic concentration of TCA (AUCTCA, mg/L/day). These dose-metrics were then used in a linearized multistage model to estimate AMET and AUCTCA values that correspond to liver cancer risks of 1 in 1 million in mice. A human PB-PK model for TCE was then used to predict TCE concentrations in drinking water and air that would provide AMET and AUCTCA values equal to the predicted mice AMET and AUCTCA values that correspond to liver cancer risks of 1 in 1 million. For the dose-metrics, AMET and AUCTCA, the TCE concentrations in air wave 10.0 and 0.1 ppb TCE (continuous exposure), respectively, and in water, 7 and 4 [mu] TCE/L, respectively.

  4. ELECTROCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE USING GRANULAR-GRAPHITE ELECTRODES: IDENTIFICATION AND QUALIFICATION OF DECHLORINATION PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TCE was successfully dechlorinated in aqueous solution using granular graphite as the cathode in a mixed electrochemical reactor. In experiments with an initial TCE concentration of less than 100 mg/l, TCE was reduced approximately by 75% in the reactor under an applied cell volt...

  5. Biotransformation of trichloroethylene by a phenol-induced mixed culture

    SciTech Connect

    Shurtliff, M.M. [CH2M Hill, Gainesville, FL (United States); Parkin, G.F.; Gibson, D.T. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Weathers, L.J. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using a mixed culture of aerobic, phenol-induced organisms. Abiotic experiments showed that sorption of TCE to biomass was negligible in the systems studied. The effects of influent phenol and TCE concentration on the TCE degradation capacity of the culture were studied using chemostats. A relationship exists between the influent phenol/TCE ratio and TCE biodegradation. TCE transformation yields ranged from 0.052 to 0.222 mg TCE removed/mg phenol removed. Monod kinetic coefficients for phenol degradation were determined. Monod kinetic coefficients were also determined for TCE biotransformation by resting cells. The concept of transformation capacity was used to model the decrease in active biomass concentration caused by TCE transformation. In mineralization studies using {sup 14}C-labeled TCE, 22% of the degraded mass of TCE was transformed to carbon dioxide, 8.8% was incorporated into biomass, 42% was transformed to nonvolatile products, with the remaining, unrecovered 27% most likely transformed into volatile or semivolatile products.

  6. Intermolecular interaction in complexes of tetracyanoethylene with amines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Pen'kovskii

    1972-01-01

    Solutions of tetracyanoethylene (TCE) in pyridine and its homologs (piperidine and triethylamine) and also a solution of the complex of 2,2'-dipyridyl with TCE in acetone were investigated. The EPR spectra of these systems show hyperfine structure of nine components with splitting constants characteristic of TCE radical anions. This indicates complete electron transfer from the nitrogen atom in the amine to

  7. Characterization of an H2-utilizing enrichment culture that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to vinyl chloride and ethene in the absence of methanogenesis and acetogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maymó-Gatell, X; Tandoi, V; Gossett, J M; Zinder, S H

    1995-11-01

    We have been studying an anaerobic enrichment culture which, by using methanol as an electron donor, dechlorinates tetrachloroethene (PCE) to vinyl chloride and ethene. Our previous results indicated that H2 was the direct electron donor for rductive dechlorination of PCE by the methanol-PCE culture. Most-probable-number counts performed on this culture indicated low numbers (< or equal to 10(4)/ml)) of methanogens and PCE dechlorinators using methanol and high numbers (> or equal to 10(6)/ml)) of sulfidogens, methanol-utilizing acetogens, fermentative heterotrophs, and PCE dechlorinators using H2. An anaerobic H2-PCE enrichment culture was derived from a 10(-6) dilution of the methanol-PCE culture. This H2-PCE culture used PCE at increasing rates over time when transferred to fresh medium and could be transferred indefinitely with H2 as the electron donor for the PCE dechlorination, indicating that H2-PCE can serve as an electron donor-acceptor pair for energy conservation and growth. Sustained PCE dechlorination by this culture was supported by supplementation with 0.05 mg of vitamin B12 per liter, 25% (vol/vol) anaerobic digestor sludge supernatant, and 2 mM acetate, which presumably served as a carbon source. Neither methanol nor acetate could serve as an electron donor for dechlorination by the H2-PCE culture, and it did not produce CH4 or acetate from H2-CO2 or methanol, indicating the absence of methanogenic and acetogenic bacteria. Microscopic observatios of the pruified H2-PCE culture showed only two major morphotypes: irregular cocci and small rods. PMID:8526505

  8. Trichloroethylene degradation by two independent aromatic-degrading pathways in alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, A.R.; Kim, Y. (Oklahoma State Univ. Stillwater (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4) degrades trichloroethylene (TCE) by a chromosomal phenol-dependent pathway and by the plasmid-encoded 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid pathway. The two pathways were independent and exhibited different rates of removal and capacities for quantity of TCE removed. The phenol-dependent pathway was more rapid (0.2 versus 0.06 nmol of TCE removed per min per mg of protein) and consumed all detectable TCE. The 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-dependent pathway removed 40 to 60% of detectable TCE.

  9. Mineralization of trichloroethylene by heterotrophic enrichment cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, T.J.; Ringelberg, D.; Mikell, A.T.; White, D.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. for Applied Microbiology]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., Knoxville, TN (United States); Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.

    1988-12-31

    Microbial consortia capable of aerobically degrading greater than 99% of 50 mg/l exogenous trichloroethylene (TCE) have been enriched from TCE contaminated subsurface sediments. Concentrations of TCE greater than 300 mg/l were not degraded nor was TCE used as a sole energy source. Successful electron donors for growth included tryptone-yeast extract, methanol, methane or propane. The optimum temperature for growth was 22--37 C and the ph optimum was 7.0--8.1. Utilization of TCE occurred only after apparent microbial growth had ceased. The major end products recovered were hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Minor products included dichloroethylene, vinylidine chloride and possibly chloroform.

  10. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    PubMed Central

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including from hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. Strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  11. Characterization of trichloroethylene adsorption onto waste biocover soil in the presence of landfill gas.

    PubMed

    He, Ruo; Su, Yao; Kong, Jiaoyan

    2015-09-15

    Waste biocover soils (WBS) have been demonstrated to have great potential in mitigating trichloroethylene (TCE) emission from landfills, due to the relatively high TCE-degrading capacity. In this study, the characteristics of TCE adsorption on WBS in the presence of the major landfill gas components (i.e., CH4 and CO2) were investigated in soil microcosms. The adsorption isotherm of TCE onto WBS was fitted well with linear model within the TCE concentrations of 7000ppmv. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto WBS was affected by temperature, soil moisture content and particle size, of which, temperature was the dominant factor. The adsorption capacity of TCE onto the experimental materials increased with the increasing organic matter content. A significantly positive correlation was observed between the adsorption capacity of TCE and the organic matter content of experimental materials that had relatively higher organic content (r=0.988, P=0.044). To better understand WBS application in practice, response surface methodology was developed to predict TCE adsorption capacity and emissions through WBS in different landfills in China. These results indicated that WBS had high adsorption capacity of TCE in LFG and temperature should be paid more attention to manipulate WBS to reduce TCE emissions from landfills. PMID:25909498

  12. Effects of toxicity, aeration, and reductant supply on trichloroethylene transformation by a mixed methanotrophic culture.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Cohen, L; McCarty, P L

    1991-01-01

    The trichloroethylene (TCE) transformation rate and capacity of a mixed methanotrophic culture at room temperature were measured to determine the effects of time without methane (resting), use of an alternative energy source (formate), aeration, and toxicity of TCE and its transformation products. The initial specific TCE transformation rate of resting cells was 0.6 mg of TCE per mg of cells per day, and they had a finite TCE transformation capacity of 0.036 mg of TCE per mg of cells. Formate addition resulted in increased initial specific TCE transformation rates (2.1 mg/mg of cells per day) and elevated transformation capacity (0.073 mg of TCE per mg of cells). Significant declines in methane conversion rates following exposure to TCE were observed for both resting and formate-fed cells, suggesting toxic effects caused by TCE or its transformation products. TCE transformation and methane consumption rates of resting cells decreased with time much more rapidly when cells were shaken and aerated than when they remained dormant, suggesting that the transformation ability of methanotrophs is best preserved by storage under anoxic conditions. PMID:2036009

  13. Phytotoxicity and fate of 1,1,2-trichloroethylene: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Inderjit; Asakawa, Chikako; Kakuta, Hideo

    2003-06-01

    1,1,2-Trichloroethylene (TCE), a chlorinated organic contaminant, poses serious environmental concerns. A study was conducted to evaluate the phytotoxicity of TCE to a crop species and its fate in vermiculite. Growth bioassays were carried out using carrot (Daucus carota L.) as the test species. Three different concentrations, 0.25, 0.50, and 1 ppm were used to evaluate phytotoxicity of TCE. When added to petri plates with cotton pads, TCE did not have any effect on carrot seedling growth. However, when added to vermiculite, it significantly suppressed growth. Shoot growth was inhibited only at the 1 ppm concentration. Recovery experiments were carried out to study the fate of TCE in vermiculite. A significant decline in the percent recovery was observed with time. Interestingly, TCE additional peaks (unknown organic molecules) were detected with declining concentrations. The available chloride ion concentration in vermiculite containing 1 ppm of TCE for 24 hr was significantly higher compared to control. PMID:12918919

  14. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium †

    PubMed Central

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rate, methane dependence, and mechanism of TCE biodegradation. TCE biodegradation by strain 46-1 appears to be a cometabolic process that occurs when the organism is actively metabolizing a suitable growth substrate such as methane or methanol. It is proposed that TCE biodegradation by methanotrophs occurs by formation of TCE epoxide, which breaks down spontaneously in water to form dichloroacetic and glyoxylic acids and one-carbon products. Images PMID:16347616

  15. Robust Resilience and Substantial Interest: A Survey of Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement among University Students in the UK and Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ilina; Bard, Imre; Jackson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Use of ‘smart drugs’ among UK students is described in frequent media reports as a rapidly increasing phenomenon. This article reports findings from the first large-scale survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) among students in the UK and Ireland. Conducted from February to September 2012, a survey of a convenience sample of 877 students measured PCE prevalence, attitudes, sources, purposes and ethics. Descriptive and logistic regression statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Lifetime prevalence of PCE using modafinil, methylphenidate or Adderall was under 10%, while past regular and current PCE users of these substances made up between 0.3%–4% of the survey population. A substantial majority of students was unaware of and/or uninterested in PCE; however about one third of students were interested in PCE. PCE users were more likely to be male, British and older students; predictors of PCE use included awareness of other students using PCEs, ADHD symptomatology, ethical concerns, and alcohol and cannabis use. The survey addresses the need for better evidence about PCE prevalence and practices among university students in the UK. We recommend PCE-related strategies for universities based on the survey findings. PMID:25356917

  16. Robust resilience and substantial interest: a survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among university students in the UK and Ireland.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ilina; Bard, Imre; Jackson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Use of 'smart drugs' among UK students is described in frequent media reports as a rapidly increasing phenomenon. This article reports findings from the first large-scale survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) among students in the UK and Ireland. Conducted from February to September 2012, a survey of a convenience sample of 877 students measured PCE prevalence, attitudes, sources, purposes and ethics. Descriptive and logistic regression statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Lifetime prevalence of PCE using modafinil, methylphenidate or Adderall was under 10%, while past regular and current PCE users of these substances made up between 0.3%-4% of the survey population. A substantial majority of students was unaware of and/or uninterested in PCE; however about one third of students were interested in PCE. PCE users were more likely to be male, British and older students; predictors of PCE use included awareness of other students using PCEs, ADHD symptomatology, ethical concerns, and alcohol and cannabis use. The survey addresses the need for better evidence about PCE prevalence and practices among university students in the UK. We recommend PCE-related strategies for universities based on the survey findings. PMID:25356917

  17. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Individuals: A Compensation for Cognitive Deficits or a Question of Personality?

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Larissa J.; Wunderli, Michael D.; Vonmoos, Matthias; Römmelt, Andreas T.; Baumgartner, Markus R.; Seifritz, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing bioethical debate on pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) in healthy individuals is often legitimated by the assumption that PCE will widely spread and become desirable for the general public in the near future. This assumption was questioned as PCE is not equally save and effective in everyone. Additionally, it was supposed that the willingness to use PCE is strongly personality-dependent likely preventing a broad PCE epidemic. Thus, we investigated whether the cognitive performance and personality of healthy individuals with regular nonmedical methylphenidate (MPH) use for PCE differ from stimulant-naïve controls. Twenty-five healthy individuals using MPH for PCE were compared with 39 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls regarding cognitive performance and personality assessed by a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery including social cognition, prosocial behavior, decision-making, impulsivity, and personality questionnaires. Substance use was assessed through self-report in an interview and quantitative hair and urine analyses. Recently abstinent PCE users showed no cognitive impairment but superior strategic thinking and decision-making. Furthermore, PCE users displayed higher levels of trait impulsivity, novelty seeking, and Machiavellianism combined with lower levels of social reward dependence and cognitive empathy. Finally, PCE users reported a smaller social network and exhibited less prosocial behavior in social interaction tasks. In conclusion, the assumption that PCE use will soon become epidemic is not supported by the present findings as PCE users showed a highly specific personality profile that shares a number of features with illegal stimulant users. Lastly, regular MPH use for PCE is not necessarily associated with cognitive deficits. PMID:26107846

  18. N-Acetylcysteine protects against trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity by attenuating oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Ma, Huaxian; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze, E-mail: mfkhan@utmb.edu

    2013-11-15

    Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is known to induce autoimmunity both in humans and animal models. However, mechanisms underlying TCE-mediated autoimmunity remain largely unknown. Previous studies from our laboratory in MRL +/+ mice suggest that oxidative stress may contribute to TCE-induced autoimmune response. The current study was undertaken to further assess the role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity by supplementing with an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, 250 mg/kg/day through drinking water). TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum levels of anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies. TCE exposure also led to significant induction of anti-malondiadelhyde (MDA)- and anti-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-protein adduct antibodies which were associated with increased ANA in the sera along with increased MDA-/HNE-protein adducts in the livers and kidneys, and increases in protein oxidation (carbonylation) in the sera, livers and kidneys, suggesting an overall increase in oxidative stress. Moreover, TCE exposure also resulted in increased release of IL-17 from splenocytes and increases in IL-17 mRNA expression. Remarkably, NAC supplementation attenuated not only the TCE-induced oxidative stress, IL-17 release and mRNA expression, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-Sm antibodies in the sera. These results provide further support to a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmune response. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for preventive and/or therapeutic strategies. - Highlights: • TCE led to increased autoantibodies, supporting its potential to induce autoimmunity. • TCE exposure led to increases in lipid perioxidation and protein carbonyls. • TCE exposure resulted in increased IL-17 release and in IL-17 mRNA expression. • NAC supplementation attenuated both TCE-induced oxidative stress and autoimmunity. • The findings further support a role of oxidative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity.

  19. Effects of inhalation of organic chemical air contaminants on murine lung host defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1986-05-01

    The potential health hazards of exposure to threshold limit value (TLV) concentrations of acetaldehyde, acrolein, propylene oxide, chloroform, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, allyl chloride, methylene chloride, ethylene trichloride, perchloroethylene, benzene, phenol, monochlorobenzene, and benzyl chloride, compounds which may be present in the ambient or work room atmosphere were investigated. The effects of single and multiple 3-hr inhalation exposures were evaluated in mice by monitoring changes in their susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcus aerosol infection and pulmonary bactericidal activity to inhaled Klebsiella pneumoniae. When significant changes in these parameters were found, further exposures were performed at reduced vapor concentrations until the no-measurable-effect level was reached. Multiple exposures on 5 consecutive days were then performed at this concentration. Significant increases in susceptibility to respiratory streptococcus infection were observed after single 3-hr exposure to TLV concentrations of methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, and ethylene trichloride. For methylene chloride and perchloroethylene, these exposure conditions also resulted in significantly decreased pulmonary bactericidal activity.

  20. Use of specific gene analysis to assess the effectiveness of surfactant-enhanced trichloroethylene cometabolism.

    PubMed

    Liang, S H; Liu, J K; Lee, K H; Kuo, Y C; Kao, C M

    2011-12-30

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of in situ bioremediation of trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated groundwater using specific gene analyses under the following conditions: (1) pretreatment with biodegradable surfactants [Simple Green™ (SG) and soya lecithin (SL)] to enhance TCE desorption and dissolution, and (2) supplementation with SG, SL, and cane molasses as primary substrates to enhance the aerobic cometabolism of TCE. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), and nucleotide sequence analysis were applied to monitor the variations in specific activity-dependent enzymes and dominant microorganisms. Results show that TCE-degrading enzymes, including toluene monooxygenase, toluene dioxygenase, and phenol monooxygenase, were identified from sediment samples collected from a TCE-spill site. Results from the microcosm study show that addition of SG, SL, or cane molasses can enhance the aerobic cometabolism of TCE. The TCE degradation rates were highest in microcosms with added SL, the second highest in microcosms containing SG, and lowest in microcosms containing cane molasses. This indicates that SG and SL can serve as TCE dissolution agents and act as primary substrates for indigenous microorganisms. Four dominant microorganisms (Rhodobacter sp., Methyloversatilis sp., Beta proteobacterium sp., and Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava) observed in microcosms might be able to produce TCE-degrading enzymes for TCE cometabolic processes. PMID:22071259