Note: This page contains sample records for the topic teacher nonverbal immediacy from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

A Review of Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy: Implications for Intercultural Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews research which has focused upon teacher nonverbal immediacy behaviors, and notes implications for additional research which considers culture as a key research variable. Specifically, the paper: (1) reviews and discusses previous research which has investigated nonverbal communication in classrooms, with an emphasis on teacher

Ikeda, Tomoko; Beebe, Steven A.

2

Exploring the Relationship between Perceived Teacher Nonverbal Immediacy and Perceived Teacher Misbehaviors on Student Course Retention in Urban Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This quantitative study explores the relationship between student perceptions of teacher nonverbal immediacy and student course retention as well as the relationship between student perceptions of teacher misbehaviors and student course retention within the context of an urban community college. Additionally, this study investigates the mediating…

Habash, Samira H.

2010-01-01

3

Teacher Immediacy Scales: Testing for Validity across Cultures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cross-cultural validity of teacher immediacy scales is a constant concern in instructional communication research. The present study examines the validity of two existing teacher immediacy scales: the Revised Nonverbal Immediacy Measure (RNIM) and the Chinese Teacher Immediacy Scale (CTIS) in U.S., Chinese, German, and Japanese cultures. Results…

Zhang, Qin; Oetzel, John G.; Gao, Xiaofang; Wilcox, Richard G.; Takai, Jiro

2007-01-01

4

Constructing and Validating a Teacher Immediacy Scale: A Chinese Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to construct and validate a scale of perceived teacher immediacy from a Chinese cultural perspective. Based on the immediacy-exchange theories that emphasize the core role culture plays in the assessment of immediacy, this study argues that the validity and reliability of existing teacher verbal and nonverbal immediacy

Zhang, Qin; Oetzel, John G.

2006-01-01

5

Students' Silent Messages: Can Teacher Verbal and Nonverbal Immediacy Moderate Student Use of Text Messaging in Class?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between teacher immediacy and college students' use of text messaging in class. Using a cross-sectional survey sample (N=228), structural equation model analyses showed that students' learning motivation does not mediate the potential effects of teacher immediacy and students' use of text messaging in…

Wei, Fang-Yi Flora; Wang, Y. Ken

2010-01-01

6

Communication Apprehension, Nonverbal Immediacy, and Negative Expectations for Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Collects data to determine the effects of communication apprehension and nonverbal immediacy upon students' expectations of themselves as learners and to examine relationships among students' traitlike communication apprehension, self-perceived immediacy and instructors' evaluations. Finds that, as apprehension increased, immediacy decreased. (PA)

O'Mara, Joan; And Others

1996-01-01

7

Immediacy Scale Represents Four Factors: Nonverbal and Verbal Components Predict Student Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Immediacy communicates psychological availability and warmth. In the classroom, instructor immediacy is traditionally measured with ratings of nonverbal and verbal behaviors. Although nonverbal immediacy has been accepted as a legitimate measure of immediacy, the validity of verbal items has been questioned. In the present study, we examined face…

Wilson, Janie H.; Locker, Lawrence, Jr.

2008-01-01

8

The relationship between verbal teacher immediacy behaviors and student learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research has indicated that nonverbal teacher behaviors such as smiling, vocal expressiveness, movement about the classroom, and relaxed body position are salient low?inference variables of a process which results in a product of increased cognitive and affective learning. This study identified a set of verbal teacher immediacy behaviors which similarly relate to increased student learning. Results indicated differentiated use

Joan Gorham

1988-01-01

9

An Empirical Comparison of Three Theories of Nonverbal Immediacy Exchange.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a contrastive test of three immediacy-exchange theories: expectancy violations theory; discrepancy arousal theory; and cognitive valence theory. States findings from opposite-sex friend dyads (one of whom was an undergraduate student) failed to find unequivocal support for a single theory. Suggests existing immediacy-exchange theories…

Andersen, Peter A.; Guerrero, Laura K.; Jorgensen, Peter F.; Buller, David B.

1998-01-01

10

Stay out of My Space! Territoriality and Nonverbal Immediacy as Predictors of Roommate Satisfaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study utilize d direct observation to explore the relationship between nonverbal communication variables (immediacy and territoriality) and roommate satisfaction. Data were collected from 51 roommate pairs (N = 102) at a small liberal arts college. Participants were asked to engage in a discussion about a time they had to negotiate activities…

Erlandson, Karen

2012-01-01

11

The Effect of Face Threat Mitigation on Instructor Credibility and Student Motivation in the Absence of Instructor Nonverbal Immediacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Instructor nonverbal immediacy has been associated with a range of positive student outcomes, but it is difficult to convey in an online environment. We investigated whether the text-based variable of face threat mitigation (FTM) alone--without the visual cues of nonverbally immediate behaviors--could significantly raise students' motivation…

Trad, Laura; Katt, James; Miller, Ann Neville

2014-01-01

12

The Relationship of Instructor Self-Disclosure, Nonverbal Immediacy, and Credibility to Student Incivility in the College Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we examined the potential mediating role of instructor credibility in the relationship of instructor self-disclosure and nonverbal immediacy to student incivility in the college classroom. Four hundred thirty-eight students completed online questionnaires regarding the instructor of the class they attended prior to the one in which…

Miller, Ann Neville; Katt, James A.; Brown, Tim; Sivo, Stephen A.

2014-01-01

13

Students' Attributions of Instructor Credibility as a Function Of Students' Expectations of Instructional Technology Use and Nonverbal Immediacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the interaction effect of nonverbal immediacy and expected instructional technology use on students' initial reports of instructor credibility. Participants included 549 college students who were randomly assigned to one of eight scenarios depicting first-day class sessions across four levels of technology use and two levels of…

Schrodt, Paul; Witt, Paul L.

2006-01-01

14

Student and Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors and the Influence of Teacher Immediacy Behaviors on Student Motivation to Learn Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Assessment on Educational Progress signals that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete globally in an ever changing scientific society. As a result, legislation mandated that all students be assessed and show proficiency in scientific literacy beginning in Grade 4 with the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 2002 also known as No Child Left Behind. Research indicates a disturbing decline in the number of U.S. students pursuing more rigorous science courses in high school, majoring in scientific areas in college, and choosing future careers in science. With a need to improve science instruction and enhance science literacy for all students, this study focuses on immediate communication behaviors of the classroom teacher as a deciding factor in the opinions of high school students towards science. The purpose of this study was to reveal high school science student perceptions of teacher communication patterns, both verbal and nonverbal, and how they influence their motivation to learn science. The researcher utilized a nonexperimental, quantitative research design to guide this study. Teacher and student data were collected using the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ). The Student Motivation to Learn Instrument (SMLI) across gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status survey was used to evaluate student motivation in science. Participants were encouraged to be honest in reporting and sharing information concerning teacher communication behaviors. The data revealed that teacher immediacy behaviors, both verbal and nonverbal, were perceived differently in terms of student gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic class. The results showed that teachers who display positive communication behaviors and use challenging questioning followed with positive responses create pathways to potentially powerful relationships. These relationships between teachers and students can lead to increased student motivation and academic achievement in the science classroom.

Littlejohn, Vania

15

Effects of Sex and Setting on Students' Interpretation of Teachers' Excessive Use of Immediacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a message interpretation perspective, this study (N = 379) examined how sex of the student, sex of the teacher, and the setting affect the messages students receive from a teacher's excessive use of immediacy. Results reveal that students interpret excessive immediacy from female teachers as caring, but the same behavior from male teachers

Rester, Carolyn H.; Edwards, Renee

2007-01-01

16

The Effect of Instructor Nonverbal Immediacy Behaviors and Feedback Sensitivity on Hispanic Students' Affective Learning Outcomes in Ninth-Grade Writing Conferences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to show how instructor use of nonverbal immediacy behaviors influence Hispanic students' affective learning in ninth-grade writing conferences, regardless of the level of feedback sensitivity provided. According to Kluger and DeNisi's (1996) feedback intervention theory, when feedback is direct and targeted on the…

Martin, Laura; Mottet, Timothy P.

2011-01-01

17

Instructional communication in the televised classroom: The effects of system design and teacher immediacy on student learning and satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study was designed to investigate the effects of conveyance system design and social presence, in the form of teacher immediacy behavior, on perceived student learning and satisfaction in the televised classroom. Results indicate that system design and teacher immediacy behavior strongly impact student learning and satisfaction. System variables such as interactivity and clear audio and video transmission positively

Michael Zane Hackman; Kim B. Walker

1990-01-01

18

The Relationship of Teachers' Use of Humor in the Classroom to Immediacy and Student Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates teachers' use of humor in relationship to immediacy and affective learning outcomes. Reports that (1) amount and type of humor influenced learning; (2) students were particularly aware of tendentious humor; (3) an overdependence on tendentious humor diminished affect; (4) male and female students perceive humor differently; and (5)…

Gorham, Joan; Christophel, Diane M.

1990-01-01

19

Use of Teacher Nonverbal Cues with Handicapped Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers can use nonverbal forms of communication (facial expression, gestures, space, eye contact, body orientation, tone of voice, and head nod/head shake) to enhance the communication process with their handicapped students. (CL)

Hillison, John; Crunkilton, John R.

1983-01-01

20

Who Is Controlling the Interaction? The Effect of Nonverbal Mirroring on Teacher-Student Rapport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effect of nonverbal mirroring on teacher-student rapport in one-on-one interactions. Nonverbal mirroring refers to the unconscious mimicry of the postures, mannerisms, facial expressions, and other behaviors of one's interaction partner in social interactions. In a within-subjects paradigm, students had four…

Jiang-yuan, Zhou; Wei, Guo

2012-01-01

21

Interpersonal Interactions in Instrumental Lessons: Teacher/Student Verbal and Non-Verbal Behaviours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined verbal and non-verbal teacher/student interpersonal interactions in higher education instrumental music lessons. Twenty-four lessons were videotaped and teacher/student behaviours were analysed using a researcher-designed instrument. The findings indicate predominance of student and teacher joke among the verbal behaviours with…

Zhukov, Katie

2013-01-01

22

Preservice Music Teachers' and Therapists' Nonverbal Behaviors and Their Relationship to Perceived Rapport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of the two studies reported in the article was to determine whether or not a relationship exists between preservice music therapists' and teachers' nonverbal behaviors and their perceived rapport. In study 1, evaluators (N = 56) viewed a stimulus tape consisting of 15 45-second segments of 15 preservice music therapists leading songs…

Darrow, Alice-Ann; Johnson, Christopher

2009-01-01

23

Statistics Anxiety and Instructor Immediacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between instructor immediacy and statistics anxiety. It was predicted that students receiving immediacy would report lower levels of statistics anxiety. Using a pretest-posttest-control group design, immediacy was measured using the Instructor Immediacy scale. Statistics anxiety was…

Williams, Amanda S.

2010-01-01

24

Testing the Neutralizing Effect of Instructor Immediacy on Student Course Workload Expectancy Violations and Tolerance for Instructor Unavailability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates how an instructor's use of relational messages, specifically nonverbal immediacy behaviors, may neutralize how students interpret instructor course workload demands and student expectations for instructor availability. It was hypothesized that instructor immediacy would temper instructor course workload demands that…

Mottet, Timothy P.; Parker-Raley, Jessica; Cunningham, Cory; Beebe, Steven A.; Raffeld, Paul C.

2006-01-01

25

Early Childhood Preservice Teachers' Use of Verbal and Non-Verbal Guidance Strategies across Classroom Contexts  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Observations of preservice teachers often lack information about specific strategies they use when guiding children's behavior. This study investigated how preservice teachers used verbal and non-verbal behavior modification techniques within structured and transition classroom contexts. Using an on-the-mark 20- second observe and 10-second…

Caudle, Lori A.; Jung, Min-Jung; Fouts, Hillary N.; Wallace, Heather S.

2014-01-01

26

Nonverbal Behavior and Nonverbal Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Article summarizes suppositions implicit in approaches to body language" studies, stresses conceptual distinction between nonverbal behavior as communication and other non-verbal behavior and suggests criteria for nonverbal communication investigations. (Author/PD)

Wiener, Morton; And Others

1972-01-01

27

The Importance of Nonverbal Aspects of Communication in Teaching and the Pre- and Inservice Teacher Education Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to express and decode nonverbal cues is assumed to be an essential quality in communication and teaching. To validate, generalize and expand upon earlier research on the importance of nonverbal competencies in communication and teaching, i.e., the relationship of nonverbal competencies (e.g., expressiveness/"charisma" and nonverbal

Klinzing, Hans Gerhard

2009-01-01

28

The Development of Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom: Teachers' Perceptions of Students in Grades K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Found that teachers perceive that their students (1) have developed many behavioral conversational skills prior to contact with school and (2) reveal very little development in their emotional expression abilities. (PD)

Andersen, Peter A.; And Others

1985-01-01

29

The Effects of Instructor Immediacy Behaviors in Online Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research has indicated that instructor immediacy is associated with learning outcomes, satisfaction, and motivation. However, few researchers have examined instructor immediacy in the context of online learning. This study is the first large experiment (n = 433) to empirically investigate the effects of instructor immediacy behaviors…

Schutt, Maria; Allen, Brock S.; Laumakis, Mark A.

2009-01-01

30

Nonverbal Communication in One-to-One Music Performance Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study explored nonverbal communication in one-to-one music performance instruction by investigating relationships among nonverbal sensitivity, nonverbal behaviors and lesson effectiveness. Subjects (N = 120) comprised 60 college teachers and 60 of their non-music major students. Using the Music Lesson Evaluation Form, lesson effectiveness was…

Kurkul, Wen W.

2007-01-01

31

Functional employment of nonverbal social reinforcers in dyadic learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analyzed the role of nonverbal communication in interpersonal learning via an extension of the double agent research procedure. The new procedure permitted detection of the subtle use of nonverbal behaviors by teachers as positive and negative feedback to learners and also the degree to which this information was used by learners. 40 randomly constructed teacher-learner dyads were subgrouped into 4

Marilyn Shea; Howard M. Rosenfeld

1976-01-01

32

Microteaching, feedback, dogmatism, and nonverbal perceptiveness.  

PubMed

This exploratory study examines the relationship between various conditions of feedback in peer microteaching, the personality dimension dogmatism, and nonverbal perceptiveness. Ss were 74 trainee teachers who were assigned to feedback conditions on the basis of dogmatism scores and then participated in a seven-week treatment period. The statistical procedure known as part correlation was used to gain measures of the extent to which Ss changed their nonverbal perceptiveness. This measure of change in nonverbal perceptiveness was related to dogmatic tendencies and feedback conditions. Although no consistent relationship was found to exist between dogmatism and change in nonverbal perceptiveness, there was a strong indication of dogmatic Ss changing their nonverbal perceptiveness when involved in the treatment condition peer microteaching with public feedback. PMID:845836

Hansford, B C

1977-03-01

33

The Effects of Cognitive Coaching and Nonverbal Classroom Management on Teacher Efficacy and Perceptions of School Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers in this study participated in a 3-year grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education Fund for Innovation in Education. The purpose of the grant was to provide teachers with support in implementing standards-based education. Both treatment and control groups of teachers received instruction in implementing standards-based education from…

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Green, Kathy E.; Lyons, Cherie A.; Rogers, Mary S.; Swords, Marcia E.

34

Nonverbal communication affect in children.  

PubMed

A paradign was tested for measuting the tendency of children to send accurate nonverbal signals to others via spontaneous facial expressions and gestures. This paradign was derived from studies on adults that suggest that women are more accurate nonverbal "sendres" than men in certain situations. Eighteeen male and 11 female preschoolers (aged 4 to 6 years) watched a series of emotionally loaded color slides while they were observed via a hidden television camera by their mothers. Results indicated that significant overall communciation occurred, with large individual differences in "sending ability" between children. There was no evidence of a large sex difference in sending ability in choldren, although on one measure girls were more accurate senders than boys when viewed by undergraduates. Sending ability was positively related to teacher's ratings of activity level, aggressiveness, impulsiveness, bossiness, sociability, etc., and negatively related ti shyness, cooperation, emotional inhibition and control, etc. PMID:1159612

Buck, R

1975-04-01

35

The Acquisition of Nonverbal Attitudes and Behaviors in Schoolchildren, Grades K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An investigation examined teachers' perceptions of nonverbal behaviors of their students within a developmental paradigm. A questionnaire was sent to 901 elementary and secondary school teachers from a 4-state area. It asked teachers to estimate the percentage of students who engaged in 24 nonverbal classroom behaviors of 4 general types:…

Andersen, Peter A.; And Others

36

The teacher?student relationship as an interpersonal relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communication skills, as defined by Burleson and Samter (1990), were examined in the teacher?student relationship. Three questions guided this investigation: (a) with regard to effective teaching, what are students’ perceptions of the importance of communication skills and immediacy behaviors? (b) what is the relationship between students’ perceptions of teachers’ use of communication skills, immediacy behaviors, motivation and learning? and (c)

Ann Bainbridge Frymier; Marian L. Houser

2000-01-01

37

Nonverbal Communication in "Friends"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This activity uses video clips from a popular sitcom, "Friends," to help students grasp the relational, rule-governed, and culture-specific nature of nonverbal communication. It opens students' eyes to nonverbal behaviors that are happening on a daily basis so that they not only master the knowledge but are able to apply it. While other popular…

Chang, Yanrong

2006-01-01

38

Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This kit presents all components of the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT), a newly developed instrument designed to measure the general intelligence and cognitive abilities of children and adolescents (ages 5 through 17) who may be disadvantaged by traditional verbal and language-loaded measures such as children with speech, language,…

Bracken, Bruce A.; McCallum, R. Steve

39

Nonverbal Communication in Psychotherapy  

PubMed Central

The mental status examination is the objective portion of any comprehensive psychiatric assessment and has key diagnostic and treatment implications. This includes elements such as a patient's baseline general appearance and behavior, affect, eye contact, and psychomotor functioning. Changes in these parameters from session to session allow the psychiatrist to gather important information about the patient. In psychiatry, much emphasis is placed on not only listening to what patients communicate verbally but also observing their interactions with the environment and the psychiatrist. In a complimentary fashion, psychiatrists must be aware of their own nonverbal behaviors and communication, as these can serve to either facilitate or hinder the patient-physician interaction. In this article, clinical vignettes will be used to illustrate various aspects of nonverbal communication that may occur within the setting of psychotherapy. Being aware of these unspoken subtleties can offer a psychiatrist valuable information that a patient may be unwilling or unable to put into words.

Gentile, Julie P.

2010-01-01

40

Nonverbal Communication: Increasing Awareness in the General Music Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Busy music teachers try to strike a balance between everything that they want to accomplish in a lesson and the constraints of their own teaching circumstances. What is sometimes overlooked in their efforts to fulfill their expectations is how their students really see them and what they are communicating to them with their bodies. Nonverbal

Battersby, Sharyn L.

2009-01-01

41

Effective Teaching in the Multi-Cultural Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Community college instructors and administrators need to understand teacher immediacy research and the role of immediacy in the multi-cultural classroom. Immediacy can be viewed as a combination of nonverbal behaviors used to accentuate a verbal message and reduce physical and psychological distance between interactants. Janis Andersen's research…

Gotch, Donna; Brydges, Michael

42

A Theory of Nonverbal Creativity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nonverbal creativity, here primarily referring to scientific or mathematical creativity, is considered a function of a set of psychophysiological characteristics. The most important of these, necessary and sufficient for nonverbal creativity, is seen to be a slight dominance of hippocampal or cortical inhibitory activity over reticular, or…

Anderson, Charles C.

43

Nonverbal learning disability.  

PubMed

Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) is described as a subtype of specific learning disability where the source of the disability is a difficulty in processing nonverbal information. The child with NLD presents with problems in visual, spatial, and tactile perception but with strengths in rote verbal skills. Traditionally, these children were recognized by their difficulties in arithmetic which presented a stark contrast with their strengths in spelling and decoding text. They also exhibited a split between their verbal IQ (VIQ) and performance IQ (PIQ) scores with the VIQ being significantly higher than PIQ. Over time, however, diagnostic criteria have evolved and the broadened definition of the NLD syndrome has led many to question the utility and uniqueness of the NLD diagnosis. In addition, shifting diagnostic standards have made research results difficult to replicate. In short, the research to date leaves many unanswered questions about (1) the definition of the NLD syndrome, (2) the pervasiveness of the academic, social and psychopathological difficulties, (3) the source of the NLD syndrome, and (4) the degree to which it overlaps with other conditions. This chapter outlines a brief history of the NLD syndrome, how it is currently conceptualized, and some of the current debate about the unanswered questions above. PMID:23622171

Volden, Joanne

2013-01-01

44

A Statistical Assessment of Two Measures of Citation: The Impact Factor and the Immediacy Index.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of an investigation designed to determine whether the impact factor or the immediacy index--two derivative measures of citation analysis--provide useful insights into qualitative relationships among scientific journals indicate that neither measure is significant. (MBR)

Tomer, Christinger

1986-01-01

45

An Investigation of Nonverbal Communication.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The subject addressed is nonverbal communication, it evolvement into a new scientific study called kinesics, and its relationship to the spoken word. Data was gathered through literary research. This posed a problem inasmuch as kinesics is a new field and...

B. D. Wheeler P. R. Hammock

1972-01-01

46

Nonverbal Communication: Readings with Commentary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These twenty-two readings in five areas of nonverbal communication emphasize the most recent work indicating significant trends in research. The selections represent several perspectives, including those of Ray L. Birdwhistell, Allen T. Dittman, Albert E. Scheflen, Robert Sommer, Edward T. Hall, Ralph V. Exline, and Adam Kendon. Some of the essays…

Weitz, Shirley, Ed.

47

Nonverbal Communication among Italian Americans.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participant observation and author introspection were used to collect data in this study of nonverbal communication among Italian Americans in three large American cities. Discussion is given to kinesics (gestures and signs), haptics (touch), proxemics (interiors of homes, exteriors of homes, and spatial arrangements at a wedding dinner), and…

Ferri-Bernardoni, Joseph M.

48

Nonverbal components of empathic communication  

Microsoft Academic Search

Examined the relative contribution of verbal and nonverbal behaviors to the judged level of empathy in a repeated measures analysis of variance design. 26 counselors with an average of 1,500 hours counseling experience viewed films of 48 counselor-client dyads. Ss then rated the 48 combinations of eye contact, trunk lean, body orientation, distance, and predetermined verbal empathy message on a

Richard F. Haase; Donald T. Tepper

1972-01-01

49

An Exploratory Study of Relational, Persuasive, and Nonverbal Communication in Requests for Tissue Donation  

PubMed Central

This study explores the effects of tissue requesters’ relational, persuasive, and nonverbal communication on families’ final donation decisions. One thousand sixteen (N=1,016) requests for tissue donation were audiotaped and analyzed using the Siminoff Communication Content and Affect Program, a computer application specifically designed to code and assist with the quantitative analysis of communication data. This study supports the important role of communication strategies in health-related decision making. Families were more likely to consent to tissue donation when confirmational messages (e.g., messages that expressed validation or acceptance) or persuasive tactics such as credibility, altruism, or esteem were used during donation discussions. Consent was also more likely when family members exhibited nonverbal immediacy or disclosed private information about themselves or the patient. The results of a hierarchical log-linear regression revealed that the use of relational communication during requests directly predicted family consent. The results provide information about surrogate decision making in end-of-life situations and may be used to guide future practice in obtaining family consent to tissue donation.

SIMINOFF, LAURA A.; TRAINO, HEATHER M.; GORDON, NAHIDA H.

2011-01-01

50

Teachers' Opinions about the Use of Body Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective communication occurs with non-verbal and verbal tools. In this study the body language as non-verbal communication tool is taken to be examined, and teachers' opinions about the use and importance of body language in education are surveyed. Eight open-ended questions are asked to 100 teachers. As a result, it is shown that teachers

Benzer, Ahmet

2012-01-01

51

How Instructor Immediacy Behaviors Affect Student Satisfaction and Learning in Web-based Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that instructor immediacy behaviors in web-based Master of Business Administration courses were positive predictors of student learning and course satisfaction; and that other factors such as student attitudes towards course software, length of course, and prior student and instructor experience with web-based courses were also significant…

Arbaugh, J. B.

2001-01-01

52

Effects of Communication Environment, Immediacy, and Communication Apprehension on Cognitive and Affective Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the relationships among immediacy, communication apprehension, and learning outcomes between two class formats: mixed-size sections (i.e., large-lecture/break-out sections) versus self-contained sections. Indicates that students' cognitive learning outcomes were slightly greater in the mixed-size sections versus self-contained sections.…

Messman, Susan J.; Jones-Corley, Jennifer

2001-01-01

53

Spatial Working Memory and Arithmetic Deficits in Children with Nonverbal Learning Difficulties  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Visuospatial working memory and its involvement in arithmetic were examined in two groups of 7- to 11-year-olds: one comprising children described by teachers as displaying symptoms of nonverbal learning difficulties (N = 21), the other a control group without learning disabilities (N = 21). The two groups were matched for verbal abilities, age,…

Mammarella, Irene Cristina; Lucangeli, Daniela; Cornoldi, Cesare

2010-01-01

54

Body, Identity and Interaction: Interpreting Nonverbal Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study of nonverbal communication continues to grow across the spectrum of research in many fields of study. Good textbooks and research studies are available to the scholar and the student, and courses about nonverbal behavior and communication are found in modern curricula. This book focuses on the complex, often hidden, processes that…

Canfield, Allan

55

Independence of Terminal-Link Entry Rate and Immediacy in Concurrent Chains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Phase 1, 4 pigeons were trained on a three-component multiple concurrent-chains procedure in which components differed only in terms of relative terminal-link entry rate. The terminal links were variable-interval schedules and were varied across four conditions to produce immediacy ratios of 4:1, 1:4, 2:1, and 1:2. Relative terminal-link entry…

Berg, Mark E.; Grace, Randolph C.

2004-01-01

56

Center for Non-Verbal Studies  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Center for Non-Verbal Studies in Spokane, Washington, scientifically studies all modes of non-verbal communication including body movement, gesture, facial expression, and adornment to name a few. Visitors to the site should definitely take a look at the "Nonverbal Dictionary of Gestures, Signs, and Body Language Cues" link, which intriguingly covers everything from the "Adam's-Apple-Jump" to the "Zygomatic Smile." Some of the other entries include Fingertip Cue, Flashbulb Eyes, and Table-Slap. The topics on the left hand menu go more in-depth than the dictionary entries. The "Nonverbal Brain" link begins with a quote by Hippocrates: "Men ought to know that from the brain, and from the brain only, arise our pleasures, joys, laughter and jests, as well as our sorrows, pains, griefs and tears." Finally, visitors can also learn about the literature, evolution, and media approaches to the nonverbal brain.

57

Counselor Verbal Intervention, Nonverbal Behavior, and Social Power.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Undergraduates viewed videotaped counseling sessions, defined by verbal and nonverbal variables and two male counselors. Use of interpretation and responsive nonverbal behavior was perceived as more expert, attractive, and trustworthy than restatement and unresponsive nonverbal behavior. Counselor verbal intervention interacted with nonverbal

Claiborn, Charles D.

1979-01-01

58

The Association between the Relational Teaching Approach and Teacher Job Satisfaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the relational teaching approach (RTA), comprising behaviors indicative of competence, immediacy, and humor. Examines the association between the RTA and teacher satisfaction. Finds that it is within teachers' control to enhance satisfaction with their job by developing a repertoire of interpersonal skills. (RS)

Graham, Elizabeth E.; And Others

1992-01-01

59

[Non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease].  

PubMed

This review underlines the importance of non-verbal communication in Alzheimer's disease. A social psychological perspective of communication is privileged. Non-verbal behaviors such as looks, head nods, hand gestures, body posture or facial expression provide a lot of information about interpersonal attitudes, behavioral intentions, and emotional experiences. Therefore they play an important role in the regulation of interaction between individuals. Non-verbal communication is effective in Alzheimer's disease even in the late stages. Patients still produce non-verbal signals and are responsive to others. Nevertheless, few studies have been devoted to the social factors influencing the non-verbal exchange. Misidentification and misinterpretation of behaviors may have negative consequences for the patients. Thus, improving the comprehension of and the response to non-verbal behavior would increase first the quality of the interaction, then the physical and psychological well-being of patients and that of caregivers. The role of non-verbal behavior in social interactions should be approached from an integrative and functional point of view. PMID:18786877

Schiaratura, Loris Tamara

2008-09-01

60

Nonverbal Communication in the Contemporary Operating Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Nonverbal behavior (NVB) is a key part of communication, arguably accounting for considerably more of the communicative message than that contained in verbal exchanges. This is especially true when a language barrier exists, as it does for many Soldiers s...

B. Strong D. Matsumoto K. A. Metcalf L. Roan M. Yager

2009-01-01

61

Perception of Nonverbal Emotion Cues by Children with Nonverbal Learning Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to document deficits in the perception of nonverbal emotion cues that have been implicated as a cause of social maladjustment in children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD). Thirty-three children between the ages of 9 and 14 identified as having NLD, verbal learning disabilities (VLD), or as nonlearning disabled psychiatric controls were administered the Diagnostic

Victoria L. Petti; Sylvia L. Voelker; Douglas L. Shore; Susan E. Hayman-Abello

2003-01-01

62

The Relationship between Teacher Immediacy Behaviours and Distant Learners' Social Presence Perceptions in Videoconferencing Applications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Videoconferencing systems combine face-to-face and mediated interactions in distance education. We extend the use of a Social Presence measure to on-site (face-to-face) learners and distant learners. Comparison between physically present and distant located learners did not indicate significant differences in social presence. Also results indicate…

Bozkaya, Mujgan

2008-01-01

63

Nonverbal accommodation in health care communication.  

PubMed

This exploratory study examined patterns of nonverbal accommodation within health care interactions and investigated the impact of communication skills training and gender concordance on nonverbal accommodation behavior. The Nonverbal Accommodation Analysis System (NAAS) was used to code the nonverbal behavior of physicians and patients within 45 oncology consultations. Cases were then placed in one of seven categories based on patterns of accommodation observed across the interaction. Results indicated that across all NAAS behavior categories, physician-patient interactions were most frequently categorized as joint convergence, followed closely by asymmetrical-patient convergence. Among paraverbal behaviors, talk time, interruption, and pausing were most frequently characterized by joint convergence. Among nonverbal behaviors, eye contact, laughing, and gesturing were most frequently categorized as asymmetrical-physician convergence. Differences were predominantly nonsignificant in terms of accommodation behavior between pre- and post-communication skills training interactions. Only gesturing proved significant, with post-communication skills training interactions more likely to be categorized as joint convergence or asymmetrical-physician convergence. No differences in accommodation were noted between gender-concordant and nonconcordant interactions. The importance of accommodation behavior in health care communication is considered from a patient-centered care perspective. PMID:24138223

D'Agostino, Thomas A; Bylund, Carma L

2014-07-01

64

Three Characteristics of Effective Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses three characteristics that are often associated with successful music educators. The three characteristics discussed include nonverbal communication, teacher self-efficacy, and servant leadership. Although there is no magical combination of characteristics that will produce an effective music teacher, these three attributes…

Steele, Natalie A.

2010-01-01

65

Nonverbal indicators of deception: A new theoretical perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study tested a theory of nonverbal behavior during deception. The theory is based on ability to monitor and ability to control nonverbal behaviors. The nonverbal behaviors of sixteen criminal justice students were coded during lying and truthing. Results lend limited support to the theory: (1) Contrary to earlier theories, this theory predicted that easily monitored and controlled gestures would

John E. Hocking; Dale G. Leathers

1980-01-01

66

Adult Attachment Style and Nonverbal Closeness in Dating Couples  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the nonverbal correlates of attachment style during interaction with a dating partner. Sixty-one heterosexual couples completed a self-report measure of attachment style and then were videotaped while discussing positive aspects of their relationships. The partners' nonverbal behaviors were coded for specific nonverbal cues and qualities theoretically associated with attachment style. A more secure attachment style was generally

Joan S. Tucker; Sherry L. Anders

1998-01-01

67

Unspoken Cultural Influence: Exposure to and Influence of Nonverbal Bias  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors examined the extent to which nonverbal behavior contributes to culturally shared attitudes and beliefs. In Study 1, especially slim women elicited especially positive nonverbal behaviors in popular television shows. In Study 2, exposure to this nonverbal bias caused women to have especially slim cultural and personal ideals of female beauty and to have especially positive attitudes toward slim

Max Weisbuch; Nalini Ambady

2009-01-01

68

An Objective Approach to Student Teacher Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Rankin Interaction Analysis System, a system of recording behavioral events as they occur between teacher and students is described. Its purpose is to provide a method for teachers and supervisors to evaluate verbal and nonverbal behavior of student teachers in physical education. (Author/MJB)

Rankin, Kelly

1978-01-01

69

Teaching Nonverbal Communication from a Humanities Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The amorphous nature of nonverbal study can benefit from the unifying yet pluralistic perspective of the humanities and liberal arts. Those who teach, write, and create under the broad rubric of the humanities appreciate the complexity of human life and try to honor the subtle and the special in human actions and creations. When addressed from…

Jensen, Marvin D.

1984-01-01

70

Instructor's Guide: Nonverbal Communication for Mine Emergencies.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This training program will provide miners with a set of nonverbal hand signals that they can use in the event of an emergency which requires donning an SCSR. The training prepares miners to use these hand signals by providing practice in the form of three...

C. L. Kosmoski C. Y. K. Westerman K. A. Margolis L. Mallett

2012-01-01

71

The checklist of nonverbal pain indicators (CNPI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article critiques the literature on existing pain assessment instruments for cognitively impaired elders and reports findings of pilot testing of the Checklist of Nonverbal Pain Indicators. This instrument was designed to measure pain behaviors in cognitively impaired elders. Instrument testing was conducted on a population of elderly patients with hip fractures. Interrater reliability showed 93% agreement on the dichotomous

Karen S Feldt

2000-01-01

72

Nonverbal learning disabilities: A critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a critical review of the term and concept of nonverbal learning disability (NLD). After a brief historical introduction, the article focuses on the apparent rarity of NLD; the hypothesis of the frequent co-occurrence of emotional disorder, depression, and suicide in NLD; the white matter hypothesis as an explanation of the origin of NLD; and the question of

Otfried Spreen

2011-01-01

73

Nonverbal Cues to Deception in Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate nonverbal facial, body, and paralanguage cues to deception in children. A sample of 31 Hispanic and Black second and third grade students were videotaped while playing a color identification that required six honest and six deceptive verbal responses to a randomized stimulus presentation. Frame-by-frame…

Shimmin, Harold; Noel, Richard C.

74

Nonverbal Expectancy Effects in the Political Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Expectancy effects--the unconscious shaping of receiver behavior by signalling sender expectations--while recognized in science, have not been documented extensively from a communication perspective, nor are nonverbal aspects of expectancy effects fully known. Expectancy is a function of three elements, the sender's predisposition (including…

Corder, Lloyd E.

75

Nonverbal Effects in Memory for Dialogue.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Memory for everyday conversational speech may be influenced by the nonverbally communicated emotion of the speaker. In order to investigate this premise, three videotaped scenes with bipolar emotional perspectives (joy/fear about going away to college, fear/anger about having been robbed, and disgust/interest regarding a friend's infidelity) were…

Narvaez, Alice; Hertel, Paula T.

76

Nonverbal Poetry: Family Life-Space Diagrams.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines life-space diagrams as a form of nonverbal poetry which taps personal feelings, tells a story, and characterizes a particular life situation, forming a useful therapy technique that provides a family the opportunity to examine its internal family relationships. Offers two case studies, discusses five levels of knowing and awareness, and…

Bardill, Donald R.

2001-01-01

77

Minimum impact and immediacy of citations to physics open archives of arXiv.org: Science Citation Index based reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work has calculated the minimum Open Archive Impact Factors and Open Archive Immediacy Index for the Physics Classes of arXiv.org as calculated for traditional journals in Journal Citation Reports of Institute of Scientific Information using Science Citation Index without the citation by the classes itself. The calculated Impact Factors reveal that High-Energy Physics classes of arXiv.org ('hep-th', 'hep-lat',

E. R. Prakasan; Anil Sagar; V. L. Kalyane; Anil Kumar; Stevan Harnad

2003-01-01

78

Dissociating verbal and nonverbal audiovisual object processing  

PubMed Central

This fMRI study investigates how audiovisual integration differs for verbal stimuli that can be matched at a phonological level and nonverbal stimuli that can be matched at a semantic level. Subjects were presented simultaneously with one visual and one auditory stimulus and were instructed to decide whether these stimuli referred to the same object or not. Verbal stimuli were simultaneously presented spoken and written object names, and nonverbal stimuli were photographs of objects simultaneously presented with naturally occurring object sounds. Stimulus differences were controlled by including two further conditions that paired photographs of objects with spoken words and object sounds with written words. Verbal matching, relative to all other conditions, increased activation in a region of the left superior temporal sulcus that has previously been associated with phonological processing. Nonverbal matching, relative to all other conditions, increased activation in a right fusiform region that has previously been associated with structural and conceptual object processing. Thus, we demonstrate how brain activation for audiovisual integration depends on the verbal content of the stimuli, even when stimulus and task processing differences are controlled.

Hocking, Julia; Price, Cathy J.

2009-01-01

79

Verbal and Nonverbal Metaphor with Children in Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The metaphor is typically viewed as a verbal form of expression in traditional talk therapies. However, this definition excludes nonverbal metaphors that children use when they express themselves through play. In this article, the authors examine the use of therapeutic metaphors, both verbal and nonverbal, with children. The roles of the child,…

Chesley, Gayle L.; Gillett, Dodie A.; Wagner, William G.

2008-01-01

80

Slap What? An Interactive Lesson in Nonverbal Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the use of nonverbal communication strategies for fostering social health in middle school students. It outlines a teaching technique designed to help students better understand nonverbal cues and their role in maintaining healthy interpersonal relationships. The technique begins with the card game "Slap What?" where the…

Haithcox-Dennis, Melissa J.

2011-01-01

81

Nonverbal Social Interaction Skills of Children with Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many children with learning disabilities (LD) face problems in their nonverbal communication, which constitutes an important component of their social skills. This study explores the frequency of nonverbal initiations and responses of 36 children with LD and 36 children without LD matched for age and gender, who were observed for 40 min during the…

Agaliotis, Ioannis; Kalyva, Efrosini

2008-01-01

82

Walking the Walk: Understanding Nonverbal Communication through Walking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nonverbal communication is fundamental to any comprehensive examination of human interaction. This article presents an activity that can be easily applied by any instructor as a starting point for a discussion of nonverbal communication, or as a demonstration of learning points previously discussed. Instructors should have a slight background in…

Harper, Vernon B., Jr.

2006-01-01

83

Promoting Social Skills Among Students With Nonverbal Learning Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The numbers are staggering: About one- third of students with learning disabili- ties (already the largest group of stu- dents with disabilities) have nonverbal, or social, disabilities. Students with nonverbal learning disabilities, then, not only face academic challenges but have difficulty meeting social expecta- tions, as well as many of life's other demands (see box, \\

Stephanie Morris

84

The Nonverbal Communication Field Trip in Organizational Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An effective communication learning experience is the nonverbal communication field trip in organizational settings. Objectives for this activity include defining and describing nonverbal areas such as "proxemics,""chronemics,""objectics,""kinesics,""haptics," and "vocalics," and to observe these areas in an organizational setting. The experience…

Wright, David W.

85

Nonverbal expressiveness and physical attractiveness as mediators of interpersonal perceptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines the impact of spontaneous nonverbal expressiveness and physical attractiveness on the formation of initial interpersonal impressions. It was hypothesized that in the absence of a relationship history with a person, those people who provide more spontaneous, uncensored, nonverbal information would be viewed as more interpersonally attractive. In addition, as a secondary focus of the study, data were

Ronald M. Sabatelli; Michal Rubin

1986-01-01

86

Teaching about Verbal and Nonverbal Communication: A New Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The encoding and decoding of verbal and nonverbal cues is basic to the process of social interaction. A method of teaching about verbal and nonverbal communication--the Interpersonal Perception Task (IPT)--consists of a videotape divided into 30 brief scenes. After each scene viewers answer an interpretive question by decoding the verbal and…

Costanzo, Mark; Archer, Dane

87

Using Nonverbal Tests to Help Identify Academically Talented Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Language-reduced (nonverbal) ability tests are the primary talent identification tools for ELL children. The appropriate use of such tests with low-SES and minority children is more nuanced. Whenever language-reduced tests are used for talent identification, nonverbal tests that measure more than figural reasoning abilities should be employed. For…

Lohman, David F.; Gambrell, James L.

2012-01-01

88

Locus of control, interpersonal trust, and nonverbal communication accuracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two measures of nonverbal sensitivity to facial cues, sensitivity to unknown others, and sensitivity to an intimate other, along with a measure of general sending accuracy, were obtained from 48 married couples (20–31 yrs old). Rotter's Internal–External Locus of Control Scale and the Rotter Trust Scale were administered. It was predicted that (a) internal Ss would demonstrate better nonverbal encoding

Ronald M. Sabatelli; Ross Buck; Albert Dreyer

1983-01-01

89

Unspoken cultural influence: exposure to and influence of nonverbal bias.  

PubMed

The authors examined the extent to which nonverbal behavior contributes to culturally shared attitudes and beliefs. In Study 1, especially slim women elicited especially positive nonverbal behaviors in popular television shows. In Study 2, exposure to this nonverbal bias caused women to have especially slim cultural and personal ideals of female beauty and to have especially positive attitudes toward slim women. In Study 3, individual differences in exposure to such nonverbal bias accounted for substantial variance in pro-slim attitudes, anti-fat attitudes, and personal ideals of beauty, even after controlling for several third variables. In Study 4, regional differences in exposure to nonverbal bias accounted for substantial variance in regional unhealthy dieting behaviors, even after controlling for several third variables. PMID:19469590

Weisbuch, Max; Ambady, Nalini

2009-06-01

90

The Relationship between Student Perceptions of Instructor Humor and Student's Reports of Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Finds that a high humor orientation (HO) was associated with increased undergraduate student perceptions of learning; and that high HO students reported learning more with a high HO teacher. Examines perceived teacher humor orientation in relation to nonverbal immediacy and socio-communicative style. (SR)

Wanzer, Melissa Bekelja; Frymier, Ann Bainbridge

1999-01-01

91

Nonverbal behavior during face-to-face social interaction in schizophrenia: a review.  

PubMed

Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia display social cognitive deficits. However, little is known about patients' nonverbal communication during their social encounters with others. This review identified 17 studies investigating nonverbal communication in patients' unscripted face-to-face interactions, addressing a) nonverbal differences between patients and others, b) nonverbal behavior of the patients' partners, c) the association between nonverbal behavior and symptoms, and d) the association between nonverbal behavior and social outcomes. Patients displayed fewer nonverbal behaviors inviting interaction, with negative symptoms exacerbating this pattern. Positive symptoms were associated with heightened nonverbal behavior. Patients' partners changed their own nonverbal behavior in response to the patient. Reduced prosocial behaviors, inviting interaction, were associated with poorer social outcomes. The evidence suggests that patients' nonverbal behavior, during face-to-face interaction, is influenced by patients symptoms and impacts the success of their social interactions. PMID:24375212

Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G T; McCabe, Rosemarie

2014-01-01

92

Larger than Life: Humans' Nonverbal Status Cues Alter Perceived Size  

PubMed Central

Background Social dominance and physical size are closely linked. Nonverbal dominance displays in many non-human species are known to increase the displayer's apparent size. Humans also employ a variety of nonverbal cues that increase apparent status, but it is not yet known whether these cues function via a similar mechanism: by increasing the displayer's apparent size. Methodology/Principal Finding We generated stimuli in which actors displayed high status, neutral, or low status cues that were drawn from the findings of a recent meta-analysis. We then conducted four studies that indicated that nonverbal cues that increase apparent status do so by increasing the perceived size of the displayer. Experiment 1 demonstrated that nonverbal status cues affect perceivers' judgments of physical size. The results of Experiment 2 showed that altering simple perceptual cues can affect judgments of both size and perceived status. Experiment 3 used objective measurements to demonstrate that status cues change targets' apparent size in the two-dimensional plane visible to a perceiver, and Experiment 4 showed that changes in perceived size mediate changes in perceived status, and that the cue most associated with this phenomenon is postural openness. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that nonverbal cues associated with social dominance also affect the perceived size of the displayer. This suggests that certain nonverbal dominance cues in humans may function as they do in other species: by creating the appearance of changes in physical size.

Marsh, Abigail A.; Yu, Henry H.; Schechter, Julia C.; Blair, R. J. R.

2009-01-01

93

The Logic of Young Children's (Nonverbal) Behaviour.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses teachers' sensitivity in the context of young children's peer conflicts. Explains that young children need to experience their own actions as logical and sound and that they co-construct logic-in-action (procedural knowledge) long before they can verbalize their logic. Maintains that teachers who do not respect children's logic often…

Singer, Elly

2002-01-01

94

Liberally Educated Teachers: The Potential for Reducing Educational Fragmentation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The liberal education of teachers is based on two types of knowledge: a professional training in education and methodology, and the academic knowledge upon which specific teaching skills are built. This second type develops perception, interpretation, application, and verbal and nonverbal skills. Liberally educated teachers can understand and…

Agnew, Ann T.

95

Teacher Radar: The View from the Front of the Class  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the NASPE beginning teacher standards, the ability to manage and motivate students is fundamental to effective teaching. To be truly effective at managing and motivating students, teachers need to monitor and react to class behavior and class feedback (verbal and nonverbal) while simultaneously giving instructions or feedback. This…

Owens, Lynn

2006-01-01

96

The Development and Validation of a Simulation Device to Measure Teacher Affective Sensitivity. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This investigation developed and validated a simulation device to measure a teacher's ability to identify verbal and nonverbal emotions expressed by a student. The instrument, Teacher Affective Sensitivity Scale (TASS), consisted of videotaped excerpts of teacher-learner interactions from actual and simulated episodes. Each simulation excerpt was…

Kravas, Constance H.

97

Using Asynchronous Video to Achieve Instructor Immediacy and Closeness in Online Classes: Experiences from Three Cases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research sought to understand the experiences of students and instructors with asynchronous video (video-mail) using webcams in three online sections of teacher education classes at Brigham Young University. We examined the experiences of students through scores and comments posted in student ratings surveys, and the experiences of…

Griffiths, Michael; Graham, Charles

2010-01-01

98

Nonverbal imitation skills in children with specific language delay.  

PubMed

Research in children with language problems has focussed on verbal deficits, and we have less understanding of children's deficits with nonverbal sociocognitive skills which have been proposed to be important for language acquisition. This study was designed to investigate elicited nonverbal imitation in children with specific language delay (SLD). It is argued that difficulties in nonverbal imitation, which do not involve the processing of structural aspects of language, may be indicative of sociocognitive deficits. Participants were German-speaking typically developing children (n=60) and children with SLD (n=45) aged 2-3 ½ years. A novel battery of tasks measured their ability to imitate a range of nonverbal target acts that to a greater or lesser extent involve sociocognitive skills (body movements, instrumental acts on objects, pretend acts). Significant group differences were found for all body movement and pretend act tasks, but not for the instrumental act tasks. The poorer imitative performance of the SLD sample was not explained by motor or nonverbal cognitive skills. Thus, it appeared that the nature of the task affected children's imitation performance. It is argued that the ability to establish a sense of connectedness with the demonstrator was at the core of children's imitation difficulty in the SLD sample. PMID:23896360

Dohmen, Andrea; Chiat, Shula; Roy, Penny

2013-10-01

99

The Role of Student Predispositions on Student Expectations for Instructor Communication Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the relationship of three student predispositions to their expectations for instructor communication behavior. Examines students' communication apprehension, grade and learning orientation, and humor orientation in relation to students' expectations for teachers' use of verbal and nonverbal immediacy behaviors, clarity behaviors, and…

Frymier, Ann Bainbridge; Weser, Benjamin

2001-01-01

100

Broader Autism Phenotype and Nonverbal Sensitivity: Evidence for an Association in the General Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the relationship between characteristics of the Broader Autism Phenotype (BAP) and nonverbal sensitivity,\\u000a the ability to interpret nonverbal aspects of communication, in a non-clinical sample of college students. One hundred and\\u000a two participants completed a self-report measure of the BAP, the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ), and two tests of nonverbal\\u000a sensitivity, the Test of Nonverbal Cue Knowledge

Brooke Ingersoll

2010-01-01

101

Nonverbal Behavior and the Vertical Dimension of Social Relations: A Meta-Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vertical dimension of interpersonal relations (relating to dominance, power, and status) was examined in association with nonverbal behaviors that included facial behavior, gaze, interpersonal distance, body movement, touch, vocal behaviors, posed encoding skill, and others. Results were separately summarized for people's beliefs (perceptions) about the relation of verticality to nonverbal behavior and for actual relations between verticality and nonverbal

Judith A. Hall; Erik J. Coats; Lavonia Smith LeBeau

2005-01-01

102

Association Between Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors and Nonverbal IQ in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study explored the relationship between nonverbal IQ and restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) in 830 children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. The role of chronological age as a moderator of this relationship was also investigated. For many behaviors, there was a significant interaction between nonverbal IQ and chronological age, such that nonverbal IQ (NVIQ) was more strongly related to

Somer L. Bishop; Jennifer Richler; Catherine Lord

2006-01-01

103

Right Hemispheric Dysfunction in Nonverbal Learning Disabilities: Social, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Adults and Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review addresses recent research on social and nonverbal learning disabilities. Involvement of right hemispheric dysfunction in these disabilities has been hypothesized, as studies with adults have suggested that documented right hemisphere damage may lead to deficits in social skills, prosody, spatial orientation, problem solving, and recognition of nonverbal cues. Studies of children purported to evidence nonverbal learning disabilities are

Margaret Semrud-Clikeman; George W. Hynd

1990-01-01

104

Physicians' Nonverbal Rapport Building and Patients' Talk About the Subjective Component of Illness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Considers how physicians' nonverbal communication is sometimes associated with patients' affective satisfaction. Examines the relationship between physicians' nonverbal rapport building and patients' disclosure of information related to the subjective component of illness. Considers implications for understanding the role of physicians' nonverbal

Duggan, Ashley P.; Parrott, Roxanne L.

2001-01-01

105

The Logic of Young Children's (Nonverbal) Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper asserts that teachers need to understand the logic of young children's behavior in their joint play and in their conflicts in order to respond sensitively, and that children construct logic-in-action (procedural knowledge) long before they are able to verbalize their logic in narratives. The basic assumption of the paper is that there…

Singer, Elly

106

The Effect of Illustrations on Children's Nonverbal Responses to Literature.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A sample of 118 children in kindergarten through grade three participated in this study of the effects of illustrations on pupils' nonverbal responses to the story "The Giving Tree." Children in the experimental group were shown none of the illustrations in the book; the control group were shown all of the original illustrations. After hearing the…

Donlan, Dan

107

Nonverbal Responses of Primary School Students to "The Giving Tree."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In order to discover whether the nonverbal responses to literature of primary grade children--in the form of drawings--provide significant information about their feelings toward literature, this study measured primary children's responses to "The Giving Tree." Ninety children in four grade levels (kindergarten through third grade) listened to the…

Donlan, Dan

108

MRI and nonverbal cognitive deficits in children with neurofibromatosis 1.  

PubMed

Magnetic resonance imaging brain scans and neuropsychological assessments of 17 children who met the NIH consensus diagnostic criteria for neurofibromatosis Type 1 were carried out in order to determine if there is a relationship between presence of high intensity signal abnormalities on MRI scans and nonverbal cognitive deficits. Cranial MRI scans in 10 patients (58.8%) demonstrated high intensity signal abnormalities, most frequently in the cerebral peduncles. Fifteen patients had nonverbal cognitive deficits (88.2%), including difficulty judging the orientation of lines, matching complex visual stimulus configurations, recalling pictures of faces, as well as copying and drawing from memory a complex geometric figure. There was not a significant association between nonverbal neuropsychological deficits and presence of high intensity signal abnormalities on MRI scans, possibly because the location of these hyperintense abnormalities was typically below the level of the basal ganglia. These findings suggest that the high intensity signal lesions seen on the MRI scans of children with neurofibromatosis Type 1 do not predict or explain their nonverbal cognitive deficits. PMID:9157104

Bawden, H; Dooley, J; Buckley, D; Camfield, P; Gordon, K; Riding, M; Llewellyn, G

1996-12-01

109

Young Children's Understanding of Markedness in Non-Verbal Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Speakers often anticipate how recipients will interpret their utterances. If they wish some other, less obvious interpretation, they may "mark" their utterance (e.g. with special intonations or facial expressions). We investigated whether two- and three-year-olds recognize when adults mark a non-verbal communicative act--in this case a pointing…

Liebal, Kristin; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

2011-01-01

110

A Competitive Nonverbal False Belief Task for Children and Apes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nonverbal false belief task was administered to children (mean age 5 years) and two great ape species: chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") and bonobos ("Pan paniscus"). Because apes typically perform poorly in cooperative contexts, our task was competitive. Two versions were run: in both, a human competitor witnessed an experimenter hide a reward in…

Krachun, Carla; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

2009-01-01

111

Nonverbal Communication Skills in Young Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The study was to examine nonverbal communication in young children with autism. Methods: The participants were 23 young children with autism (mean CA = 32.79 months), 23 CA and MA-matched children with developmental delay and 22 18-20-month-old, and 22 13-15-month-old typically developing toddlers and infants. The abbreviated Early…

Chiang, Chung-Hsin; Soong, Wei-Tsuen; Lin, Tzu-Ling; Rogers, Sally J.

2008-01-01

112

Nonverbal Learning Disability Explained: The Link to Shunted Hydrocephalus  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A nonverbal learning disability is believed to be caused by damage, disorder or destruction of neuronal white matter in the brain's right hemisphere and may be seen in persons experiencing a wide range of neurological diseases such as hydrocephalus and other types of brain injury (Harnadek & Rourke 1994). This article probes the relationship…

Rissman, Barbara

2011-01-01

113

Writing without Words: A Nonverbal Approach to Reading Fiction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Argues that awareness of nonverbal elements of communication increase the reader's comprehension of literary works by authors who use these elements in character development. Focuses on regulators, affect displays, and adaptors (identified by Ekman and Friesen) and physical appearance, vocalics, touch, space, time, and artifacts (identified by…

Portch, Stephen

1982-01-01

114

Responses to Communication Breakdowns by Nonverbal Children with Developmental Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Communication skills are important for children with developmental disabilities to be functional and independent in their own lives. This study examined influences of different types of listener feedback or breakdowns on repair behaviors of nonverbal children with disabilities during semi-structured opportunities at snack time. Three preschool…

Erbas, Dilek

2005-01-01

115

Nonverbal Sensitivity: Consequences for Learning and Satisfaction in Genetic Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study aims to explore the role of interactants' nonverbal sensitivity, anxiety and sociodemographic characteristics in learning and satisfaction within the genetic counseling context. Design/methodology/approach: This is a combined simulation and analogue study. Simulations were videotaped with 152 prenatal and cancer genetic…

Roter, D. L.; Erby, L. H.; Hall, J. A.; Larson, S.; Ellington, L.; Dudley, W.

2008-01-01

116

Nonverbal auditory agnosia with lesion to Wernicke's area  

PubMed Central

We report the case of patient M, who suffered unilateral left posterior temporal and parietal damage, brain regions typically associated with language processing. Language function largely recovered since the infarct, with no measurable speech comprehension impairments. However, the patient exhibited a severe impairment in nonverbal auditory comprehension. We carried out extensive audiological and behavioral testing in order to characterize M’s unusual neuropsychological profile. We also examined the patient’s and controls’ neural responses to verbal and nonverbal auditory stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We verified that the patient exhibited persistent and severe auditory agnosia for nonverbal sounds in the absence of verbal comprehension deficits or peripheral hearing problems. Acoustical analyses suggested that his residual processing of a minority of environmental sounds might rely on his speech processing abilities. In the patient’s brain, contralateral (right) temporal cortex as well as perilesional (left) anterior temporal cortex were strongly responsive to verbal, but not to nonverbal sounds, a pattern that stands in marked contrast to the controls’ data. This substantial reorganization of auditory processing likely supported the recovery of M’s speech processing.

Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Leech, Robert; Dick, Frederic

2009-01-01

117

Contrastive Analysis of American and Arab Nonverbal and Paralinguistic Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To achieve effective intercultural communication, participants must understand how behavioral differences may lead to miscommunication. Such behavioral differences can be illustrated by Arab and American nonverbal behavior. Individualism is the ideal for the American middle class, whereas Arabs are motivated by public opinion. Yet in the Arab…

Safadi, Michaela; Valentine, Carol Ann

118

The Relationship between Nonverbal Cognitive Functions and Hearing Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between hearing loss and memory and attention when nonverbal, visually presented cognitive tests are used. Method: Hearing loss (pure-tone audiometry) and IQ were measured in 30 participants with mild to severe hearing loss. Participants performed cognitive tests of pattern recognition memory,…

Zekveld, Adriana A.; Deijen, Jan Berend; Goverts, S. Theo; Kramer, Sophia E.

2007-01-01

119

Children Assess Informant Reliability Using Bystanders' Non-Verbal Cues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent findings show that preschool children are selective with respect to whom they ask for information and whose claims they endorse. In particular, they monitor an informant's record of past accuracy or inaccuracy and use that record to gauge future trustworthiness. We ask if preschoolers also monitor the non-verbal cues of assent or dissent…

Fusaro, Maria; Harris, Paul L.

2008-01-01

120

A natural language teaching paradigm for nonverbal autistic children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to attempt to improve verbal language acquisition for nonverbal autistic children by manipulating traditional teaching techniques so they incorporated parameters of natural language interactions and motivational techniques. Within a multiple baseline design, treatment was conducted in a baseline condition with trials presented serially in a traditional analogue clinical format where the therapist presented instructions,

Robert L. Koegel; Mary C. O'Dell; Lynn Kern Koegel

1987-01-01

121

Avoiding Communication: Verbal and Nonverbal Dimensions of Defensiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Defining defensiveness as a protective reaction resulting from fear or a threat to one's face or ego, this paper provides a perspective on both verbal and nonverbal aspects of defensiveness. First, the paper examines two trait-like communication predispositions--communication apprehension and touch avoidance--which arguably produce defensive…

Andersen, Peter A.; Guerrero, Laura Knarr

122

Cognitive Biases and Nonverbal Cue Availability in Detecting Deception  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In potentially deceptive situations, people rely on mental shortcuts to help process information. These heuristic judgments are often biased and result in inaccurate assessments of sender veracity. Four such biases--truth bias, visual bias, demeanor bias, and expectancy violation bias--were examined in a judgment experiment that varied nonverbal

Burgoon, Judee K.; Blair, J. Pete; Strom, Renee E.

2008-01-01

123

Usefulness of Nonverbal Cues from Participants in Usability Testing Sessions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We investigated the effect nonverbal cues have on the ability of usability experts to detect usability problems within a stimulus set. The pilot study included nine voluntary participants who completed five tasks using the Internet Movie Database website. These sessions were recorded using TechSmith Morae software, where there were two types of recordings produced: one included video of the screen,

Karen Long; Lara Styles; Terence Andre; William Malcom

124

A Method for Teaching about Verbal and Nonverbal Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the Interpersonal Perception Task (IPT), a videotape of brief scenes for teaching about verbal and nonverbal communication. Reports that the IPT includes all communication channels, several categories of interaction, and an objective criterion of accurate judgment. Discusses communications cues, using the IPT to introduce research…

Costanzo, Mark; Archer, Dane

1991-01-01

125

Matched False-Belief Performance during Verbal and Nonverbal Interference  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Language has been shown to play a key role in the development of a child's theory of mind, but its role in adult belief reasoning remains unclear. One recent study used verbal and nonverbal interference during a false-belief task to show that accurate belief reasoning in adults necessarily requires language (Newton & de Villiers, 2007). The…

Dungan, James; Saxe, Rebecca

2012-01-01

126

Issues in Teaching Pragmatics, Prosody, and Non-Verbal Communication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After setting definitions of pragmatics, prosody, and nonverbal communication, this paper reviews politeness theories and research in these fields, discussing their implications for teaching. It is posited that learners whose first language and native culture are more similar to the target language (TL) and culture are more likely to experience TL…

Hurley, Daniel Sean

1992-01-01

127

Non-Verbal Cognitive Development and Language Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Specific language impairment (SLI) is currently partly defined by the presence of non-verbal IQ scores in the normal range. However, not only is there a debate concerning where "normal thresholds" should be, but increasing information about the presence of processing deficits in SLI have led some researchers to question the use of IQ…

Botting, Nicola

2005-01-01

128

The Importance of Nonverbal Elements in Online Chat  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Communication is often not so much what people write or say but how they write and often what they do not say. Thus, meaning in real-world chat messages depends not only on the words they use but also on how they express meaning through nonverbal cues. Online chat is simple, direct, and unrestrained. While it contains many of the elements of…

Gajadhar, Joan; Green, John

2005-01-01

129

Nonverbal Communication Deficits and Response to Performance Feedback in Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Aspects of recent behavioral and cognitive theories of depression were evaluated. Social-skill concepts were conceived as involving two component processes, termed "receptive" and "expressive" communication, and the ability of depressed subjects to engage in these behaviors was studied within a nonverbal communication paradigm. (Editor)

Prkachin, Kenneth M.; And Others

1977-01-01

130

Power Moves: Complementarity in Dominant and Submissive Nonverbal Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies examine complementarity (vs. mimicry) of dominant and submissive nonverbal behaviors. In the first study, participants interacted with a confederate who displayed either dominance (through postural expansion) or submission (through postural constriction). On average, participants exposed to a dominant confederate decreased their postural stance, whereas participants exposed to a submissive confederate increased their stance. Further, participants with complementing responses

Larissa Z. Tiedens; Alison R. Fragale

2003-01-01

131

Verbal and Nonverbal Communication in the Initiation of Sex.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A two-part pilot study investigated and categorized the roles verbal and nonverbal communication play in the initiation of sexual intercourse. The study also explored the manner in which partners accept or reject sexual overtures, the contexts and antecedents of sexual initiation, and the changes in sexual behavior which occur as a consequence of…

Cavanaugh, Dan; And Others

132

Children's Talking and Listening within the Classroom: Teachers' Insights  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research suggests that social communication (verbal and non-verbal) plays a key role in students' and teachers' elementary-school experiences. Within the framework of sociocognitive developmental theory, this qualitative study investigates teachers' experiences and perceptions of children's talking and listening habits within…

Bosacki, Sandra; Rose-Krasnor, Linda; Coplan, Robert J.

2014-01-01

133

The Development of a Questionnaire To Describe Science Teacher Communication Behavior in Taiwan and Australia.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and validation of a questionnaire, the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ), that assesses student perceptions of five important teacher behaviors: (1) Challenging; (2) Encouragement and Praise; (3) Non-Verbal Support; (4) Understanding and Friendly; and (5) Controlling. (Contains 49 references.)…

She, Hsiao-Ching; Fisher, Darrell

2000-01-01

134

An Investigation of the Teacher Behavior of Wait-Time During an Inquiry Science Lesson.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was designed to investigate the nonverbal teacher behavior of wait-time. Wait-time is the silence in a conversation following a teacher or student utterance. The primary purpose of the investigation was to document some of the behavioral and cognitive effects of wait-time and to delineate the interrelationships between the various forms…

Fowler, Thaddeus W.

135

Study on Nonverbal Communication by Avatars and Pictograms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the design guideline of webs that use avatars and pictograms to promote nonverbal communication smoothly in a virtual space. The shops for clothes, consumer electronic, and furniture are constructed in the virtual space. The web sites using the avatar and the pictogram for shopping were examined. To investigate the usability, three kinds of the web layered structures were examined. The screen layout evaluation by the eyeball movement measurement was also carried out.

Shimoe, Yuta; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Nosu, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Koji

136

Assessing pain control in nonverbal critically ill adults.  

PubMed

The accurate assessment of pain in nonverbal patients is difficult, with nurses often relying on a variety of methods to determine medication impact. Much of the evidence to date suggests that commonly used indicators of pain may not effectively measure the true extent of distress in patients unable to verbalize their level of discomfort. A recent pilot study of an existing and newly developed pain assessment scale reinforces this concern. PMID:14639117

Odhner, Margaret; Wegman, Deborah; Freeland, Nancy; Steinmetz, Ann; Ingersoll, Gail L

2003-01-01

137

Nonverbal Decoding Skills and Relationship Well-Being in Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relation between nonverbal decoding skills and relationship well-being. Sixty college students were administered tests of their abilities to identify the affective meanings in facial expressions and tones of voice. The students also completed self-report measures of relationship well-being and depression. Correlational analyses indicated that errors in decoding facial expressions and

John S. Carton; Emily A. Kessler; Christina L. Pape

1999-01-01

138

Type A behavior, nonverbal expressive style, and health.  

PubMed

Understanding the precise nature of the links among styles of behavior, emotional expression, and the development of heart disease is a major challenge in psychology and health. In the present research, 60 men at high risk for coronary heart disease were examined in terms of their expressive style, their specific nonverbal cues, their personality, and their health. As assessed by the self-report Jenkins Activity Survey (JAS; Jenkins, Zyzanski, & Rosenman, 1979), half the men were Type A and half were Type B. To provide a more refined grouping, the men were further classified on the basis of scores on the Affective Communication Test (ACT; H. S. Friedman, Prince, Riggio, & DiMatteo, 1980), a self-report measure of nonverbal expressiveness. In the framework of theory and research on nonverbal expressive style, videotapes of the men were extensively rated and coded in terms of their judged appearance, the actual audio and video nonverbal cues emitted, and the words said (transcript). Two groups of Type A individuals were found--one that was repressed, tense, and illness-prone, but another that was healthy, talkative, in control, and charismatic. Furthermore, in addition to the expected healthy Type B men, a subgroup of Type B men was found who were submissive, repressed, tense, have an external locus of control, and may be illness-prone. A refined conception of the Type A behavior pattern is deemed necessary in light of these findings. Implications for improving the validity of the Type A construct and understanding the link between psychosocial factors and disease are discussed. PMID:3998991

Friedman, H S; Hall, J A; Harris, M J

1985-05-01

139

Right hemispheric dysfunction in nonverbal learning disabilities: social, academic, and adaptive functioning in adults and children.  

PubMed

This review addresses recent research on social and nonverbal learning disabilities. Involvement of right hemispheric dysfunction in these disabilities has been hypothesized, as studies with adults have suggested that documented right hemisphere damage may lead to deficits in social skills, prosody, spatial orientation, problem solving, and recognition of nonverbal cues. Studies of children purported to evidence nonverbal learning disabilities are reviewed and compared with the results from studies of adults with right hemisphere damage. Specific subtypes of nonverbal learning disabilities are reviewed, including the nonverbal perceptual-organization-output subtype, Asperger's Syndrome, Developmental Gerstmann Syndrome, left hemisyndrome, right hemisphere syndrome, and right parietal lobe syndrome. Finally, implications and future research needs are addressed. The need for a diagnostic nosology and improved and validated intervention techniques is stressed as is early identification of these types of specific nonverbal learning disabilities. PMID:2181523

Semrud-Clikeman, M; Hynd, G W

1990-03-01

140

Effects of Nonverbally Communicated Personal Warmth on the Intelligence Test Performance of Indian and Eskimo Adolescents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nonverbal cues which enthnographic analysis suggested were central to communicating personal warmth to Indian and Eskimo adolescents did produce significant changes on intelligence test performance. (Author/KM)

Kleinfeld, J. S.

1973-01-01

141

A Nonverbal Phoneme Deletion Task Administered in a Dynamic Assessment Format  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of the project was to design a nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme deletion that may prove useful with individuals who demonstrate complex communication needs (CCN) and are unable to communicate using natural speech or who present with moderate-severe speech impairments. Method: A nonverbal dynamic assessment of phoneme…

Gillam, Sandra Laing; Fargo, Jamison; Foley, Beth; Olszewski, Abbie

2011-01-01

142

Management and Training across Cultures: Importance of Non-Verbal Communication Strategies--A Case Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that cross-cultural and language barriers pose formidable challenges to managers, a case study examined the application of selective nonverbal communication strategies (nonverbal cues, learning by observation, and the organization of learning) for management and training development efforts within diverse cultural environments. Source…

Potoker, Elaine

143

Nonverbal Communication, Music Therapy, and Autism: A Review of Literature and Case Example  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a review of nonverbal literature relating to therapy, music, autism, and music therapy. Included is a case study of a woman with autism who was nonverbal. The case highlights and analyzes behaviors contextually. Interpretations of communication through the music therapy, musical interactions, and the rapport that developed through the music therapy treatment process are provided.

Michael J. Silverman

2008-01-01

144

Nonverbal Communication, Music Therapy, and Autism: A Review of Literature and Case Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a review of nonverbal literature relating to therapy, music, autism, and music therapy. Included is a case study of a woman with autism who was nonverbal. The case highlights and analyzes behaviors contextually. Interpretations of communication through the music therapy, musical interactions, and the rapport that developed…

Silverman, Michael J.

2008-01-01

145

The Effect of Nonverbal Signals on Student Role-Play Evaluations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although salespeople have long been urged to recognize and adapt to customer needs and wants by observing communications style and other cues or signals by the buyer, nonverbal communications by the salesperson have received much less empirical scrutiny. However, nonverbal communications may be important in this context; research in several…

Taute, Harry A.; Heiser, Robert S.; McArthur, David N.

2011-01-01

146

Virtual Chironomia: A Multimodal Study of Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in a Virtual World  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This mixed methods study examined the various aspects of multimodal use of non-verbal communication in virtual worlds during dyadic negotiations. Quantitative analysis uncovered a treatment effect whereby people with more rhetorical certainty used more neutral non-verbal communication; whereas people that were rhetorically less certain used more…

Verhulsdonck, Gustav

2010-01-01

147

"Date with an Angel": A Non-Verbal Communication Teaching Tip.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents a strategy for teaching non-verbal communication skills to students in high school or college. The strategy uses the movie "Date with an Angel" to teach the non-verbal skills. According to the paper, the activity can be used at the beginning of a unit or course to get the students interested in important concepts/aspects of…

Long, Toni

148

Nonverbal Behaviors within Communicator Style as Possible Predictors of Hireability in Employment Interviews.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to identify the nonverbal behaviors predicting hireability, as well as the nonverbal behaviors candidates employ that predict hireability. Subjects were 25 campus recruiters, each of whom was given a cover letter explaining the purpose of the study and three copies of a Likert-type questionnaire on a single communicator…

Sampugnaro, Vincent J.; And Others

149

Estimating the Prevalence of Adolescent Nonverbal Peer Pressures: An Exploratory Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Surveyed ninth graders regarding the prevalence of nonverbal pressures in their daily experiences, noting gender differences. Students reported high levels of exposure to and conformity with nonverbal pressure, with differences in prevalence of receiving threatening gestures, space invasion from males, trust toward deceptive smiles from males, and…

Duryea, Elias J.; Herrera, Denise; Parkes, Jay

2002-01-01

150

Shake My Hand: Making the Right First Impression in Business with Nonverbal Communications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a hand shaking exercise dealing with making a good first impression with nonverbal communication. Asks students to list the characteristics of a good first impression. Discusses how the instructor teaches the students how to shake hands well. Discusses a broader approach regarding learning nonverbal behavior. (SC)

Hiemstra, Kathleen M.

1999-01-01

151

The Influence of refractoriness upon comprehension of non-verbal auditory stimuli  

Microsoft Academic Search

An investigation of non-verbal auditory comprehension in two patients with global aphasia following stroke is reported. The primary aim of the investigation was to establish whether refractory access disorders can affect non-verbal input modalities. All previous reports of refractoriness, a cognitive syndrome characterized by response inconsistency, sensitivity to temporal factors and insensitivity to item frequency, have involved comprehension tasks which

Sebastian J. Crutch; Elizabeth K. Warrington

2008-01-01

152

The Use of Nonverbal Cues To Assess Affect and Effect in Communication Training and Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper was envisioned as largely a literature review, but surprisingly, there was very little to find besides a comprehensive body of information pertaining to nonverbal aspects of pedagogy almost exclusively dealing with management of the instructor's nonverbal behavior. The paper, therefore, presents what seems to be the most salient cues…

Rollman, Steven A.; Gaut, Deborah Roach

153

Nonverbal Imitation and Toddlers Mastery of Verbal Means of Achieving Coordinated Action.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzed toddlers' verbal speech concurrent with nonverbal behavior. Fourteen dyads of unfamiliar peers were observed at 16, 20, 24, and 32 months of age. Found that six types of speech increased in frequency only after the peer partners had shown a marked increase in their readiness to imitate each others' nonverbal actions. (MOK)

Eckerman, Carol O.; Didow, Sharon M.

1996-01-01

154

On Being Consistent: The Role of Verbal–Nonverbal Consistency in First Impressions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Extant research suggests that people seem deceitful and difficult to understand when their verbal behavior is inconsistent with their nonverbal behavior. Building on this literature, we examined the impact of behavioral coherence on impression formation: We expected people to be likeable to the extent that their verbal and nonverbal behavior was consistent (i.e., coherent). In two studies, participants were videotaped

Max Weisbuch; Nalini Ambady; Asha L. Clarke; Shawn Achor; Jeremy Veenstra-Vander Weele

2010-01-01

155

Role Taking Ability, Nonverbal Sensitivity, Language and Social Adjustment of Deaf Adolescents.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents study results regarding the social cognitive abilities of deaf adolescents. Explains that role taking ability and nonverbal sensitivity was evaluated in a series of tests. Reports low performance in social cognitive abilities. Suggests that language plays a role in social adjustment. Concludes that nonverbal sensitivity is an important…

Weisel, Amatzia; Bar-Lev, Hagit

1992-01-01

156

Nonverbal Social Skills of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability Diagnosed with Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in adults with intellectual disability (ID), yet little is known about depressive behaviors in an ID population. This study examined the nonverbal social skills of 18 adults with mild ID diagnosed with depression and a matched sample of adults with mild ID without depression. Nonverbal

Hartley, Sigan L.; Birgenheir, Denis G.

2009-01-01

157

Performance of Greek and American Students on the Matrix Analogies Test: A Measure of Nonverbal Ability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates performance of children (N=731) on the Matrix Analogies Test-Short Form (MAT-SF) as a measure of nonverbal intelligence. Analysis revealed that performance of Greek children was similar to an American sample. Findings suggest that MAT-SF can be used as a screening measure of nonverbal intelligence with Greek children using the US…

Petrogiannis, Konstantinos G; Bardos, Achilles N.; Randou, Elena

1999-01-01

158

A Study of Verbal and Nonverbal Communication in Second Life--The ARCHI21 Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three-dimensional synthetic worlds introduce possibilities for nonverbal communication in computer-mediated language learning. This paper presents an original methodological framework for the study of multimodal communication in such worlds. It offers a classification of verbal and nonverbal communication acts in the synthetic world "Second Life"…

Wigham, Ciara R.; Chanier, Thierry

2013-01-01

159

Universals of Nonverbal Behavior: A Review of Literature and Statement of Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Universals in nonverbal behavior represent an important issue in the study of the cross-cultural communication. Perhaps the most well-known research in nonverbal universals was conducted by Paul Ekman, who examined literate and preliterate cultures from various language groups and identified six universal facial expressions: happiness, sadness,…

Garner, Patrick H.

160

Comparison of Performance on Two Nonverbal Intelligence Tests by Adolescents with and without Language Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Definitions of specific language impairment (SLI), for both research and clinical purposes, often state that nonverbal IQ scores must be within normal limits. This use of nonverbal IQ has been criticized on several grounds, including lack of equivalence between tests. In the current study, a sample of 204 adolescents with and without language…

Miller, Carol A.; Gilbert, Erin

2008-01-01

161

Cultural patterns in Dutch and Surinam nonverbal behavior: An analysis of simulated police\\/citizen encounters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Differences in nonverbal behavioral patterns in a simulated police interview setting were examined. One group of subjects was asked to tell the truth to a police officer whereas the other group was asked to deceive the officer. Major differences between our study and other deception studies include the distinction between nonverbal behavior displayed while listening and while speaking, and the

Aldert Vrij; Frans Willem Winkel

1991-01-01

162

The Effectiveness of Social Skills Intervention Targeting Nonverbal Communication for Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome and Related Pervasive Developmental Delays.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated the effectiveness of an 8-week social skills intervention targeting nonverbal communication for eight adolescents with Asperger syndrome. Although minimal nonverbal communication skills development was apparent, some social relationships were developed and the ability of some participants to read the nonverbal communication of…

Barnhill, Gena P.; Cook, Katherine Tapscott; Tebbenkamp, Kelly; Myles, Brenda Smith

2002-01-01

163

The Role of Pictures and Gestures as Nonverbal Aids in Preschoolers' Word Learning in a Novel Language  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research suggests that presenting redundant nonverbal semantic information in the form of gestures and/or pictures may aid word learning in first and foreign languages. But do nonverbal supports help all learners equally? We address this issue by examining the role of gestures and pictures as nonverbal supports for word learning in a…

Rowe, Meredith L.; Silverman, Rebecca D.; Mullan, Bridget E.

2013-01-01

164

The Relation of Nonverbal Processing Ability of Faces and Voices and Children's Feelings of Depression and Competence  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relation between nonverbal processing ability and feelings of depression and competence was evaluated in children between the ages of 7 and 11 years (N = 142). They were administered tests to measure their receptive nonverbal ability and feelings of depression and competence. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that nonverbal ability was related to feelings of competence in boys and girls,

Stephen Nowicki Jr; Erin Carton

1997-01-01

165

Inhibitory versus facilitory interference for finger-tapping to verbal and nonverbal, motor, and sensory tasks.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate lateralized effects of concurrent verbal and nonverbal tasks on right- and left-hand finger-tapping. In addition to the verbal vs. nonverbal dichotomy, both motor and sensory tasks were used. It was predicted that a verbal motor task (reading aloud) would lead to more inhibitory interference for right-hand tappings than would a sensory verbal task (watching and remembering slides with nonsense syllables). Similarly, it was predicted that a motor nonverbal task (humming a tune) would lead to more left-hand inhibitory interference than would a sensory nonverbal task (watching pairs of spatial patterns). Results showed a predicted lateralized right-hand decrement in finger-tapping during the motor verbal task. However, an increase in left-hand tapping frequency above baseline was observed during both sensory tasks, while no significant difference was observed between the hands for the motor nonverbal task. PMID:3782443

Dalen, K; Hugdahl, K

1986-12-01

166

[Verbal and nonverbal intelligence in children with language development disorders].  

PubMed

Difficulties in language acquisition seem to be serious, if there are additional problems like intellectual and/or emotional/social impairment, which are often reported [10]. These additional problems and the definition of specific language impairment as a developmental disorder, restricted to language acquisition seem to be contradictory [17]. Aim of that study is to look for specific language impaired children with similar cognitive abilities and though to investigate, if there are children without additional cognitive problems considering the definition of specific language impairment. 93 children, between 4;0 and 6;6 years old, were diagnostized as specific language impaired (ICD-10) and were assessed by the "Hannover Wechsler Intelligenztest für das Vorschulalter (HAWIVA)" [6] (german version of WPPSI). Cluster analysis showed, that 1/3 of the specific language impaired children presented no additional cognitive problems and 2/3 of them showed cognitive problems regarding nonverbal and verbal intelligence indeed. These additional cognitive problems indicate that there may be a more basic cognitive defect underlying specific language impairment [15]--at least for a group of specific language impaired children. Furthermore the nonverbal and verbal intellectual difficulties emphasize to general developmental support of specific language impaired children for optimal improvement in language acquisition. PMID:10592924

Willinger, U; Eisenwort, B

1999-01-01

167

Daily verbal and nonverbal expression of osteoarthritis pain and spouse responses.  

PubMed

The current study applied a model of pain communication to examine the distinction between verbal and nonverbal pain expression in their prediction of punishing, empathic, and solicitous spouse responses to patient pain. It was hypothesized that on days when patients engaged in more nonverbal expression, spouses would respond more positively (ie, with less punishing and more solicitous and empathic behavior). The same pattern was predicted for verbal expression. In addition, it was expected that associations between patient nonverbal pain expression and positive spouse responses would be strengthened, and that the association with punishing responses would be weakened, on days when levels of verbal pain expression were higher than usual, regardless of daily pain severity. In a 22-day diary study, 144 individuals with knee osteoarthritis and their spouses completed daily measures of pain expression, spouse responses, health, and affect. The predicted positive main effect of nonverbal expression on empathic and solicitous responses was supported by the data, as was the positive main effect for verbal pain expression. Results from moderation analyses partially supported our hypothesis in that patients' nonverbal pain expression was even more strongly related to empathic and solicitous spouse responses on days of high verbal pain expression, and patients were buffered from spouse punishing responses on days when both nonverbal and verbal expression were high. These findings suggest that pain expression in both verbal and nonverbal modes of communication is important for positive and negative spousal responses. PMID:23791895

Wilson, Stephanie J; Martire, Lynn M; Keefe, Francis J; Mogle, Jacqueline A; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Schulz, Richard

2013-10-01

168

The Role of Nonverbal and Verbal Communication in a Multimedia Informed Consent Process  

PubMed Central

Objective Nonverbal and verbal communication elements enhance and reinforce the consent form in the informed consent process and need to be transferred appropriately to multimedia formats using interaction design when re-designing the process. Methods Observational, question asking behavior, and content analyses were used to analyze nonverbal and verbal elements of an informed consent process. Results A variety of gestures, interruptions, and communication styles were observed. Conclusion In converting a verbal conversation about a textual document to multimedia formats, all aspects of the original process including verbal and nonverbal variation should be one part of an interaction community-centered design approach.

Plasek, Joseph M.; Pieczkiewicz, David S.; Mahnke, Andrea N.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Starren, Justin B.; Westra, Bonnie L.

2011-01-01

169

Predicting FCI gain with a nonverbal intelligence test  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We have administered both a commercial, nonverbal intelligence test (the GAMA) and Lawsonâs Classroom Test of Scientific Reasoning to students in two introductory physics classes to determine if either test can successfully predict normalized gains on the Force Concept Inventory. Since gain on the FCI is known to be related to gender, we adopted a linear model with gain on the FCI as the dependent variable and gender and a test score as the independent variables. We found that the GAMA score did not predict a significant amount of variation beyond gender. Lawsonâs test, however, did predict a small but significant variation beyond gender. When simple linear regressions were run separately for males and females with the Lawson score as a predictor, we found that the Lawson score did not significantly predict gains for females but was a marginally significant predictor for males.

Semak, M. R.; Dietz, R. D.; Pearson, R. H.; Willis, C. W.

2014-02-01

170

Taking a Stance through Visual Texts: Novice Teachers as Educational Agents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Drawing on qualitative methodologies that integrate verbal and non-verbal texts, this study investigated novice teachers' attributions of their experiences of internship, as conveyed through a visual text. Novices were invited to design a visual text that represented their experience during internship, as part of a national call entitled…

Orland-Barak, Lily; Maskit, Ditza

2014-01-01

171

Discovering the General in the Particular: A Case Study of an Exemplary Teacher's Beliefs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the teaching practices of Maria, a special educator who worked with students who had multiple disabilities, were nonverbal, and used augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). It highlighted the complex, interdependent, and dynamic nature of teacher knowledge, beliefs, and practices and evaluated what Maria knew and…

McGhie-Richmond, Donna R.; Jordan, Anne; Underwood, Kathryn

172

Songs My Student Taught Me: Narrative of an Early Childhood Cello Teacher  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Out of the mouth of babes (and even more nonverbal) has come perhaps the wisest music teacher education I have ever received. In this narrative I share my foibles as a young, over-confident, and naive music instructor who, through a great amount of error, eventually learned the value of letting a child lead his own music learning. Throughout this…

Hendricks, Karin S.

2013-01-01

173

The Use of Modeling, Feedback, and Practice Variables to Influence Science Teacher Behavior  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research related to science teacher education which suggests that specific verbal and non-verbal instructional skills can be developed by providing positive models of desired behavior, varying the amount of practice teaching during the training, providing specific feedback on limited behaviors, and modifying training according to trainee…

Koran, J. J., Jr.

1972-01-01

174

The Impact of Nonverbal Communications on the Public Services Functions of Libraries.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annotated, selected bibliography of 21 monographs and articles on non-verbal communication is designed to help library personnel develop their perceptions of body language, thereby helping them respond more appropriately to user queries. Introductory...

K. Weiss

1976-01-01

175

The Nonverbal Transmission of Intergroup Bias: A Model of Bias Contagion with Implications for Social Policy  

PubMed Central

Social and policy interventions over the last half-century have achieved laudable reductions in blatant discrimination. Yet members of devalued social groups continue to face subtle discrimination. In this article, we argue that decades of anti-discrimination interventions have failed to eliminate intergroup bias because such bias is contagious. We present a model of bias contagion in which intergroup bias is subtly communicated through nonverbal behavior. Exposure to such nonverbal bias “infects” observers with intergroup bias. The model we present details two means by which nonverbal bias can be expressed—either as a veridical index of intergroup bias or as a symptom of worry about appearing biased. Exposure to this nonverbal bias can increase perceivers’ own intergroup biases through processes of implicit learning, informational influence, and normative influence. We identify critical moderators that may interfere with these processes and consequently propose several social and educational interventions based on these moderators.

Weisbuch, Max; Pauker, Kristin

2013-01-01

176

Culture and Social Relationship as Factors of Affecting Communicative Non-verbal Behaviors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this paper is to link a bridge between social relationship and cultural variation to predict conversants' non-verbal behaviors. This idea serves as a basis of establishing a parameter based socio-cultural model, which determines non-verbal expressive parameters that specify the shapes of agent's nonverbal behaviors in HAI. As the first step, a comparative corpus analysis is done for two cultures in two specific social relationships. Next, by integrating the cultural and social parameters factors with the empirical data from corpus analysis, we establish a model that predicts posture. The predictions from our model successfully demonstrate that both cultural background and social relationship moderate communicative non-verbal behaviors.

Akhter Lipi, Afia; Nakano, Yukiko; Rehm, Mathias

177

Birth order effects on nonverbal IQ scores in autism multiplex families.  

PubMed

Lord (1992) published a brief report showing a trend for decreasing nonverbal IQ scores with increasing birth order in a sample of 16 autism multiplex families, and urged replication in a larger sample. In this report, analyses of nonverbal IQ scores for a sample of 144 autism multiplex families indicated that nonverbal IQ scores were significantly lower in secondborn compared with firstborn siblings with autism. This birth order effect was independent of gender as well as the age differences within sib pairs. No such birth order effects were found for social or communicative deficits as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R), but there was a modest tendency for increased scores for ritualistic behaviors for the firstborn sibs. Further, there were no gender differences on nonverbal IQ scores in this sample. Results are discussed in terms of implications for genetic studies of autism. PMID:11794410

Spiker, D; Lotspeich, L J; Dimiceli, S; Szatmari, P; Myers, R M; Risch, N

2001-10-01

178

The Development and Validation of a Nonverbal Measure of Self-Esteem: The Sliding Person Test.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Validity evidence from several studies for a nonverbal measure of self-esteem, the Sliding Person Test (SPERT), is presented. Results of the studies indicate the utility of the measure for elementary through college students. (JKS)

Karmos, Ann H.

1979-01-01

179

Pain Assessment in the Nonverbal Patient: Position Statement with Clinical Practice Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article presents the position statement and clinical practice recommendations for pain assessment in the nonverbal patient developed by an appointed Task Force and approved by the ASPMN Board of Directors.

Keela Herr; Patrick J. Coyne; Tonya Key; Renee Manworren; Margo McCaffery; Sandra Merkel; Jane Pelosi-Kelly; Lori Wild

2006-01-01

180

Does Sexual Orientation Have an Impact on Nonverbal Behavior in Interpersonal Communication?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores the impact of sexual orientation on the nonverbal behavior of individuals in dyadic communication situations.\\u000a It is hypothesized that the patterns of nonverbal behavior displayed in dyads with and without an individual with an open\\u000a homosexual orientation are different from those in dyads with heterosexual participants only. An observational study was conducted\\u000a with a total of 24

Tobias Knöfler; Margarete Imhof

2007-01-01

181

[Changes in test norms of spelling achievement and nonverbal intelligence].  

PubMed

The norms of the spelling test R-T Form C "Moselfahrt" (Althoff et al. 1974) from the year 1968 and of the nonverbal intelligence test CFT 20 (form A/part 1) from the year 1977 (Weiss 1987) are evaluated for their actual validity. In 1995, both original tests were being administered to an epidemiological sample (N = 592) of adolescents and young adults in the age of 16 to 30 years having passed at least their obligatory amount of school years. These results are being compared to those of the original norm samples. Using the norms for the CFT 20 from 1977 adolescents and young adults achieve in the year 1995 a mean IQ of 110.8 points, equaling a yearly IQ-gain of 0.6 IQ-points. This exceeds the expected gain of 0.33 IQ-points annually according to the literature and indicates a distinct change of norms. There were no significant gender differences found. The distribution of mistakes in the spelling test R-T "Moselfahrt" compared to the original norm sample from 1968 changes considerably as well and requires revised test norms. With an increase from 9-11 mistakes (depending on the age norm) to 19.8 mistakes the mean amount of mistakes is almost being doubled. Extremely high numbers of mistakes occurred more frequent and could not be differentiated according to the old norms. Using the original norms from 1968 in the year of 1995 12.4% of the sample achieve with a T-score of 20 the lower limit of the measured value scale and the overall mean has decreased by 1.2 standard deviations to T-score = 38.48% of the sample reach a result that equates percentage 10 or less which is interpreted as insufficient school mark. Women's mean spelling achievement is significantly better than men's. Causes and implications of this scissors-like development of deteriorated spelling achievement and increased nonverbal intelligence are being discussed. Tables containing the new standardization scores are included in the appendix. PMID:12050936

Zerahn-Hartung, Claudia; Strehlow, Ulrich; Haffner, Johann; Pfüller, Ute; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz

2002-04-01

182

Estimating Working Memory Capacity for Lists of Nonverbal Sounds  

PubMed Central

Working memory (WM) capacity limit has been extensively studied in the domains of visual and verbal stimuli. Previous studies have suggested a fixed WM capacity of typically about 3 or 4 items, based on the number of items in working memory reaching a plateau after several items as the set size increases. However, the fixed WM capacity estimate appears to rely on categorical information in the stimulus set (Olsson & Poom, 2005). We designed a series of experiments to investigate nonverbal auditory WM capacity and its dependence on categorical information. Experiments 1 and 2 used simple tones and revealed capacity limit of up to 2 tones following a 6-s retention interval. Importantly, performance was significantly higher at set sizes 2, 3, and 4 when the frequency difference between target and test tones was relatively large. In Experiment 3, we added categorical information to the simple tones, and the effect of tone change magnitude decreased. Maximal capacity for each individual was just over 3 sounds, in the range of typical visual procedures. We propose that two types of information, categorical and detailed acoustic information, are kept in WM, and that categorical information is critical for high WM performance.

Li, Dawei; Cowan, Nelson; Saults, J. Scott

2012-01-01

183

Spatial attention determines the nature of nonverbal number representation.  

PubMed

Coordinated studies of adults, infants, and nonhuman animals provide evidence for two systems of nonverbal number representation: a "parallel individuation" system that represents individual items and a "numerical magnitude" system that represents the approximate cardinal value of a group. However, there is considerable debate about the nature and functions of these systems, due largely to the fact that some studies show a dissociation between small (1-3) and large (>3) number representation, whereas others do not. Using event-related potentials, we show that it is possible to determine which system will represent the numerical value of a small number set (1-3 items) by manipulating spatial attention. Specifically, when attention can select individual objects, an early brain response (N1) scales with the cardinal value of the display, the signature of parallel individuation. In contrast, when attention cannot select individual objects or is occupied by another task, a later brain response (P2p) scales with ratio, the signature of the approximate numerical magnitude system. These results provide neural evidence that small numbers can be represented as approximate numerical magnitudes. Further, they empirically demonstrate the importance of early attentional processes to number representation by showing that the way in which attention disperses across a scene determines which numerical system will deploy in a given context. PMID:20961170

Hyde, Daniel C; Wood, Justin N

2011-09-01

184

Nonverbal communication of caregivers in Slovenian nursing homes.  

PubMed

This study aimed at determining the characteristics of nonverbal communication (NVC) of caregivers in Slovene nursing homes. The cross-sectional study was performed on 267 randomly selected caregivers from 27 randomly selected nursing homes. Facial expressions/head movements, hand gestures/trunk movements, and modes of speaking/paralinguistic signals were observed. The caregivers manifested altogether 11,324 NVC expressions. Those definitely reflecting positive attitude prevailed and accounted for 59.3% of all expressions, whereas those definitely reflecting negative attitude were very rare and accounted for 9.1% of all expressions, at a ratio of 6.5:1 (p<0.001). Differences were statistically highly significant between genders (men manifested negative attitude expressions significantly more frequently, 11.8%) and professions (social helpers manifested positive attitude expressions significantly less frequently, 56.4%; other professionals manifested negative attitude expressions significantly less frequently, 5.4%) (p<0.001). The results were similar within groups of NVC expressions. Although our study showed that caregivers in Slovene nursing homes use positive attitude expressions much more frequently than negative there is a reason for concern due to a general decline in positive values and beliefs in Slovene society. Promoting positive attitude NVC among new generations of caregivers in nursing homes need to become one of the most important contents of their life-long learning and training. PMID:21388693

Zaletel, Marija; Kovacev, Asja Nina; Mikus, Ruza Pandel; Kragelj, Lijana Zaletel

2012-01-01

185

Perceived gesture dynamics in nonverbal expression of emotion.  

PubMed

Recent judgment studies have shown that people are able to fairly correctly attribute emotional states to others' bodily expressions. It is, however, not clear which movement qualities are salient, and how this applies to emotional gesture during speech-based interaction. In this study we investigated how the expression of emotions that vary on three major emotion dimensions-that is, arousal, valence, and potency-affects the perception of dynamic arm gestures. Ten professional actors enacted 12 emotions in a scenario-based social interaction setting. Participants (N = 43) rated all emotional expressions with muted sound and blurred faces on six spatiotemporal characteristics of gestural arm movement that were found to be related to emotion in previous research (amount of movement, movement speed, force, fluency, size, and height/vertical position). Arousal and potency were found to be strong determinants of the perception of gestural dynamics, whereas the differences between positive or negative emotions were less pronounced. These results confirm the importance of arm movement in communicating major emotion dimensions and show that gesture forms an integrated part of multimodal nonverbal emotion communication. PMID:24422246

Dael, Nele; Goudbeek, Martijn; Scherer, K R

2013-01-01

186

Active versus passive maintenance of visual nonverbal memory.  

PubMed

Forgetting over the short term has challenged researchers for more than a century, largely because of the difficulty of controlling what goes on within the memory retention interval. But the "recent-negative-probe" procedure offers a valuable paradigm, by examining the influences of (presumably) unattended memoranda from prior trials. Here we used a recent-probe task to investigate forgetting for visual nonverbal short-term memory. The target stimuli (two visually presented abstract shapes) on a trial were followed after a retention interval by a probe, and participants indicated whether the probe matched one of the target items. Proactive interference, and hence memory for old trial probes, was observed, whereby participants were slowed in rejecting a nonmatching probe on the current trial that nevertheless matched a target item on the previous trial (a recent-negative probe). The attraction of the paradigm is that, by uncovering proactive influences of past-trial probe stimuli, it can be argued that active maintenance in memory of those probes is unlikely. In two experiments, we recorded such proactive interference of prior-trial items over a range of interstimulus (ISI) and intertrial (ITI) intervals (between 1 and 6 s, respectively). Consistent with a proposed two-process memory conception (the active-passive memory model, or APM), actively maintained memories on current trials decayed, but passively "maintained," or unattended, visual memories of stimuli on past trials did not. PMID:24390797

McKeown, Denis; Holt, Jessica; Delvenne, Jean-Francois; Smith, Amy; Griffiths, Benjamin

2014-08-01

187

Foetal antiepileptic drug exposure and verbal versus non-verbal abilities at three years of age.  

PubMed

We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled pregnant females with epilepsy on monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study seeks to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin and valproate). This report compares verbal versus non-verbal cognitive outcomes in 216 children who completed testing at the age of three years. Verbal and non-verbal index scores were calculated from the Differential Ability Scales, Preschool Language Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Verbal abilities were lower than non-verbal in children exposed in utero to each drug. Preconceptional folate use was associated with higher verbal outcomes. Valproate was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes. Performance was negatively associated with valproate dose for both verbal and non-verbal domains and negatively associated with carbamazepine dose for verbal performance. No dose effects were seen for lamotrigine and phenytoin. Since foetal antiepileptic drug exposure is associated with lower verbal than non-verbal abilities, language may be particularly susceptible to foetal exposure. We hypothesize that foetal drug exposure may alter normal cerebral lateralization. Further, a dose-dependent relationship is present for both lower verbal and non-verbal abilities with valproate and for lower verbal abilities with carbamazepine. Preconceptional folate may improve cognitive outcomes. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings, extend the study to other drugs, define the risks associated with drug treatment for seizures in the neonates, and understand the underlying mechanisms. PMID:21224309

Meador, Kimford J; Baker, Gus A; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D; Pennell, Page B; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W

2011-02-01

188

Foetal antiepileptic drug exposure and verbal versus non-verbal abilities at three years of age  

PubMed Central

We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled pregnant females with epilepsy on monotherapy from 1999 to 2004. The study seeks to determine if differential long-term neurodevelopmental effects exist across four commonly used drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, phenytoin and valproate). This report compares verbal versus non-verbal cognitive outcomes in 216 children who completed testing at the age of three years. Verbal and non-verbal index scores were calculated from the Differential Ability Scales, Preschool Language Scale, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test and Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration. Verbal abilities were lower than non-verbal in children exposed in utero to each drug. Preconceptional folate use was associated with higher verbal outcomes. Valproate was associated with poorer cognitive outcomes. Performance was negatively associated with valproate dose for both verbal and non-verbal domains and negatively associated with carbamazepine dose for verbal performance. No dose effects were seen for lamotrigine and phenytoin. Since foetal antiepileptic drug exposure is associated with lower verbal than non-verbal abilities, language may be particularly susceptible to foetal exposure. We hypothesize that foetal drug exposure may alter normal cerebral lateralization. Further, a dose-dependent relationship is present for both lower verbal and non-verbal abilities with valproate and for lower verbal abilities with carbamazepine. Preconceptional folate may improve cognitive outcomes. Additional research is needed to confirm these findings, extend the study to other drugs, define the risks associated with drug treatment for seizures in the neonates, and understand the underlying mechanisms.

Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael

2011-01-01

189

Teacher communication behavior and its association with students' cognitive and attitudinal outcomes in science in Taiwan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the study described in this article a questionnaire was employed that can be used to assess students' and teachers' perceptions of science teachers' interpersonal communication behaviors in their classroom learning environments. The Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ) has five scales: Challenging, Encouragement and Praise, Non-Verbal Support, Understanding and Friendly, and Controlling. The TCBQ was used with a large sample of secondary science students in Taiwan, which provided additional validation data for the TCBQ for use in Taiwan and cross-validation data for its use in English-speaking countries. Girls perceived their teachers as more understanding and friendly than did boys, and teachers in biological science classrooms exhibited more favorable behavior toward their students than did those in physical science classrooms. Differences were also noted between the perceptions of the students and their teachers. Positive relationships were found between students' perceptions of their teachers' communication behaviors and their attitudes toward science. Students' cognitive achievement scores were higher when students perceived their teacher as using more challenging questions, as giving more nonverbal support, and as being more understanding and friendly. The development of both teacher and student versions of the TCBQ enhances the possibility of the use of the instrument by teachers.

She, Hsiao-Ching; Fisher, Darrell

2002-01-01

190

Student Communication Behaviors and Their Influence on Teachers and Teaching in the American Classroom: A Review of Recent Communication Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review of literature examines student communication behaviors and their influence on teachers and teaching. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, it reviews recent communication research that examines student communication behaviors and how their verbal and nonverbal messages have been shown to influence the instructional process in…

Mottet, Timothy P.

191

Nonverbal Communication in First Impression Formation: The Relationship of Proxemics and Kinesics to Interpersonal Perception Processes in the U.S. Navy.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis reviews the literature in the field of nonverbal communications, with the major emphasis being placed on first impression formation, particularly in the Navy setting. The social situation is examined as it affects nonverbal communication. The ...

A. W. Wittig

1975-01-01

192

Developmental Trajectories of Verbal and Nonverbal Skills in Individuals with a History of Specific Language Impairment: From Childhood to Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To investigate the longitudinal trajectories of verbal and nonverbal skills in individuals with a history of specific language impairment (SLI) from childhood to adolescence. This study focuses on SLI only and investigates within-participant measures across abilities. Method: Verbal and nonverbal skills were assessed in 242 children with…

Conti-Ramsden, Gina; St. Clair, Michelle C.; Pickles, Andrew; Durkin, Kevin

2012-01-01

193

Counselor Nonverbal Self-Disclosure and Fear of Intimacy during Employment Counseling: An Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Illustration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the effects of nonverbal self-disclosure within the dynamic of aptitude-treatment interaction. Participants (N = 94) watched a video of a career counseling session aimed at helping the jobseeker to find employment. The video was then edited to display 3 varying degrees of nonverbal self-disclosure. In conjunction with the…

Carrein, Cindy; Bernaud, Jean-Luc

2010-01-01

194

Grammatical Tense Deficits in Children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI) and Nonspecific Language Impairment: Relationships with Nonverbal IQ over Time  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between children's language acquisition and their nonverbal intelligence has a long tradition of scientific inquiry. Current attention focuses on the use of nonverbal IQ level as an exclusionary criterion in the definition of specific language impairment (SLI). Grammatical tense deficits are known as a clinical marker of SLI, but…

Rice, Mabel L.; Tomblin, J. Bruce; Hoffman, Lesa; Richman, W. Allen; Marquis, Janet

2004-01-01

195

Responding to Minor Misbehavior through Verbal and Nonverbal Responses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Maintaining a positive classroom environment that will encourage learning is a challenge, particularly in classes that require frequent interventions due to students' disruptive behaviors. Punitive disciplinary reactions are generally ineffective when responding to students who are frequently disruptive. More importantly, negative teacher

Dhaem, Jeanne

2012-01-01

196

Nonverbal Communication: Implications for the Global Music Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many American schools today have richly diverse classrooms composed of immigrants with a limited vocabulary or little command of the English language. Now more than ever, music educators must explore new, creative, and effective ways to communicate with this ever-changing student population. Although most teachers rely primarily on verbal…

Battersby, Sharyn L.; Bolton, Jami

2013-01-01

197

I Can't Keep Your Face and Voice Out of My Head: Neural Correlates of an Attentional Bias Toward Nonverbal Emotional Cues.  

PubMed

Emotional information can be conveyed by verbal and nonverbal cues with the latter often suggested to exert a greater influence in shaping our perceptions of others. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study sought to explore attentional biases toward nonverbal signals by investigating the interaction of verbal and nonverbal cues. Results obtained in this study underline the previous suggestions of a "nonverbal dominance" in emotion communication by evidencing implicit effects of nonverbal cues on emotion judgements even when attention is directed away from nonverbal signals and focused on verbal cues. Attentional biases toward nonverbal signals appeared to be reflected in increasing activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) assumed to reflect increasing difficulties to suppress nonverbal cues during task conditions that asked to shift attention away from nonverbal signals. Aside the DLPFC, results suggest the right amygdala to play a role in attention control mechanisms related to the processing of emotional cues. Analyses conducted to determine the cerebral correlates of the individual ability to shift attention between verbal and nonverbal sources of information indicated that higher task-switching abilities seem to be associated with the up-regulation of right amygdala activation during explicit judgments of nonverbal cues, whereas difficulties in task-switching seem to be related to a down-regulation. PMID:23382516

Jacob, Heike; Brück, Carolin; Domin, Martin; Lotze, Martin; Wildgruber, Dirk

2014-06-01

198

Addressing Underrepresentation of Gifted Minority Children Using the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the effectiveness of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT) in identifying gifted black and Hispanic students in a total population of 20,270 students (K-12). Analysis indicated that similar percentages of white (5.6%), black (5.1%), and Hispanic (4.4%) children earned an NNAT score in the 95th percentile rank. (Contains…

Naglieri, Jack A.; Ford, Donna Y.

2003-01-01

199

Verbal and Nonverbal Semantic Processing in Children with Developmental Language Impairment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to clarify whether semantic integration is impaired in verbal and nonverbal auditory domains in children with developmental language impairment (a.k.a., LI and SLI), the present study obtained behavioral and neural responses to words and environmental sounds in children with language impairment and their typically developing…

Cummings, Alycia; Ceponiene, Rita

2010-01-01

200

Nonverbal communication, play, and language in Greek young children with Williams syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated nonverbal communicative abilities, functional play, and symbolic play in 11 toddlers with Williams syndrome (WS) during spontaneous communication. The WS group was compared with a group of typically developing (TD) children matched for linguistic abilities. Results demonstrated that children with WS exhibited significantly less spontaneous functional play and imaginary play compared to TD children. On the other

Christina F. Papaeliou; Helen Fryssira; Anastassios Kodakos; Maria Kaila; Evangelia Benaveli; Konstantinos Michaelides; Vassilis Stroggilos; Maria Vrettopoulou; Nikitas Polemikos

2011-01-01

201

Americans and Japanese Nonverbal Communication. Linguistic Communications 15 (Papers in Japanese Linguistics 3).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each culture has its own nonverbal as well as its verbal language. Movements, gestures and sounds have distinct and often conflicting interpretations in different countries. For Americans communicating with Japanese, misunderstandings are of two types: Japanese behavior which is completely new to the American, and Japanese behavior which is…

Taylor, Harvey M.

202

Listening Behaviors of Married Couples: An Exploration of Nonverbal Presentation to a Relational Outsider  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the nonverbal behaviors of spouses as they listened to their partners present an area of disagreement in their marriage to a relational outsider. Ninety-four married couples, representing a range of marital satisfaction levels, engaged in an interview with a researcher about areas of disagreement in their relationships. A…

Doohan, Eve-Anne

2007-01-01

203

Nonverbal Communication Performance and Perceptions Associated with Reticence: Replications and Classroom Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two studies that replicated and extended J. K. Burgoon and R. C. Koper's research by examining nonverbal behavior patterns, relational message interpretations, and credibility evaluations associated with communication reticence. Challenges the traditional view that reticence produces pronounced performance decrements and discusses…

Burgoon, Judee K.; And Others

1987-01-01

204

Developmental Right-Hemisphere Syndrome: Clinical Spectrum of the Nonverbal Learning Disability.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study reports clinical characteristics of developmental right-hemisphere syndrome, a nonverbal learning disability, in 20 children (mean age 9.5 years) who also manifested attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, graphomotor problems, and slow performance. Diagnostic criteria included emotional and interpersonal difficulties, paralinguistic…

Gross-Tsur, Varda; And Others

1995-01-01

205

Can Human-Taught Primates Produce a Non-Verbal Language?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The debate over whether primates can be taught visual language is examined, and evidence of use of nonverbal language in primate studies is compared with the language criteria of a number of linguistic researchers. Background information on language, visual language (including sign language), and the parameters of the studies is offered, including…

Jaramillo, James A.

206

Nonverbal Learning Disability: How To Recognize It and Minimize Its Effects. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This digest provides an overview of nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) along with principles for designing and implementing instructional interventions to address its effects. It begins by explaining characteristics of students with NLD, including their tendency to focus on details rather than on the larger picture, the difficulties they may…

Foss, Jean M.

207

Nonverbal Communication Tests as Predictors of Success in Psychology and Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The selection and development of six tests measuring the ability to receive and interpret nonverbal communications are described, as is an attempt to gather evidence of their value as predictors of success in two occupations requiring high levels of interpersonal skills-- psychology and counseling. The tests were: (1) Inter-Person Perception Test;…

Livingston, Samuel A.

208

On Intersubjective Engagement in Autism: A Controlled Study of Nonverbal Aspects of Conversation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Does autism involve a deficit in intersubjective engagement with other persons? We studied nonverbal communication in children and adolescents with and without autism (n = 12 per group), group-matched for chronological age and verbal mental age, during 3 min of a videotaped interview. In keeping with previous studies, there were only subtle but…

Garcia-Perez, Rosa M.; Lee, Anthony; Hobson, R. Peter

2007-01-01

209

Quality Matters! Differences between Expressive and Receptive Non-Verbal Communication Skills in Adolescents with ASD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We analyzed several studies of non-verbal communication (prosody and facial expressions) completed in our lab and conducted a secondary analysis to compare performance on receptive vs. expressive tasks by adolescents with ASD and their typically developing peers. Results show a significant between-group difference for the aggregate score of…

Grossman, Ruth B.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

2012-01-01

210

Non-Verbal Communication Training: An Avenue for University Professionalizing Programs?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In accordance with today's workplace expectations, many university programs identify the ability to communicate as a crucial asset for future professionals. Yet, if the teaching of verbal communication is clearly identifiable in most university programs, the same cannot be said of non-verbal communication (NVC). Knowing the importance of the…

Gazaille, Mariane

2011-01-01

211

Increasing Social Interaction Using Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching with Nonverbal School-Age Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Children with autism display marked deficits in initiating and maintaining social interaction. Intervention using play routines can create a framework for developing and maintaining social interaction between these children and their communication partners. Method: Six nonverbal 5- to 8-year-olds with autism were taught to engage in…

Franco, Jessica H.; Davis, Barbara L.; Davis, John L.

2013-01-01

212

Are Fine-Motor Impairments a Defining Feature of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities in Children?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most commonly used model of nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) is the Rourke model. This model includes bilateral deficits in psychomotor skills as a primary neuropsychological deficit. Extant studies have identified attentional issues as one of the components seen in many children with NVLD. Forty-five children divided into three groups completed a battery of tests including psychomotor skills. Groups were

Alison Wilkinson-Smith; Margaret Semrud-Clikeman

2012-01-01

213

Nonverbal intelligence of soccer players according to their age, gender and educational level  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was to investigate the nonverbal intelligence of soccer players according to their age, gender and educational level. For this purpose, data were collected from 353 soccer players using adapted version of the TONI-2. The soccer players had a mean age of 14.78 years. Collected data was analyzed by ANOVA for age groups, t statistics for comparisons of gender

Erkut Konter; Irfan Yurdabakan

2010-01-01

214

Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication and Coordination in Mission Control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this talk I will present some video-materials gathered in Mission Control during simulations. The focus of the presentation will be on verbal and non-verbal communication between the officers in the front and backroom, especially the practices that have evolved around a peculiar communications technology called voice loops.

Vinkhuyzen, Erik; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

215

Counselor Ethnicity, Counselor Nonverbal Behavior, and Session Outcome with Asian American Clients: Initial Findings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of counselor nonverbal behaviors revealed that European American counselors displayed significantly greater frequency of adaptors, postural shifts, and smiles than did Asian American counselors. The frequency of smiles was significantly positively correlated with client-rated session positivity and session arousal, and the frequency of…

Kim, Bryan S. K.; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Li, Lisa C.

2003-01-01

216

Nonverbal Communication Among Black Female Dyads: An Assessment of Intimacy, Gender, and Race.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Studied three types of nonverbal intimacy cues (smiling behavior, eye contact, and synchronous leaning forward) in Black female, Black male, and White male dyads. Results indicated that combined effects of race and gender make it incorrect to generalize previous research on "Blacks" or on "women" to Black women. (GC)

Smith, Althea

1983-01-01

217

Reduction of Left Visual Field Lexical Decision Accuracy as a Result of Concurrent Nonverbal Auditory Stimulation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To investigate whether concurrent nonverbal sound sequences would affect visual-hemifield lexical processing, lexical-decision performance of 24 strongly right-handed students (12 men, 12 women) was measured in three conditions: baseline, concurrent neutral sound sequence, and concurrent emotional sound sequence. With the neutral sequence,…

Van Strien, Jan W.

2004-01-01

218

Interpretation of Facial Expressions of Affect in Children with Learning Disabilities with Verbal or Nonverbal Deficits.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ability to identify six facial expressions was studied in 48 nondisabled children and 76 children with learning disabilities (LD) ages 9 through 12. Overall, the nondisabled group had better interpretive ability. Among LD children, those with verbal deficits had better ability than either those with nonverbal deficits and or those with both…

Dimitrovsky, Lilly; Spector, Hedva; Levy-Shiff, Rachel; Vakil, Eli

1998-01-01

219

The Use and Frequency of Verbal and Non-Verbal Praise in Nurture Groups  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nurture groups are a form of provision for children with social, emotional, behavioural and learning difficulties. The study examines the interactions between children and staff--in particular, the frequency and effects of verbal and non-verbal praise--and discusses how this contributes to its effectiveness as a positive intervention instrument…

Bani, Maria

2011-01-01

220

Concurrent and Predictive Validity of the Raven Progressive Matrices and the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concurrent and predictive validities of the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT) and Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) were investigated in a large group of Italian third-and fifth-grade students with different sociocultural levels evaluated at the beginning and end of the school year. CPM and NNAT scores were related to math and…

Balboni, Giulia; Naglieri, Jack A.; Cubelli, Roberto

2010-01-01

221

A Communication-Based Intervention for Nonverbal Children with Autism: What Changes? Who Benefits?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This article examines the form and function of spontaneous communication and outcome predictors in nonverbal children with autism following classroom-based intervention (Picture Exchange Communication System [PECS] training). Method: 84 children from 15 schools participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of PECS (P. Howlin, R.…

Gordon, Kate; Pasco, Greg; McElduff, Fiona; Wade, Angie; Howlin, Pat; Charman, Tony

2011-01-01

222

Verbal Learning Strategies of Adolescents and Adults with the Syndrome of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although many psychometric studies of individuals with the syndrome of nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) have been conducted, one relatively neglected area has been the study of their performance on explicit verbal memory measures. We examined the performance of adolescents and adults with NLD on the California Verbal Learning Test, a measure allowing analysis of self-initiated learning strategies, and compared their

Nancy J. Fisher; John W. Deluca

1997-01-01

223

Nonverbal communication of affect in preschool children: Relationships with personality and skin conductance  

Microsoft Academic Search

A slide-viewing paradigm measuring the tendency to communicate accurate nonverbal messages via spontaneous facial expressions and gestures was applied to 13 male and 11 female preschoolers (aged 4–6 yrs). Ss watched 16 emotionally loaded color slides while, unknown to them, their mothers viewed their reactions via TV. Ss' skin conductance (SC) was monitored during the experiment, and they had been

Ross Buck

1977-01-01

224

Cultural Difference in Stereotype Perceptions and Performances in Nonverbal Deductive Reasoning and Creativity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A total of 182 undergraduate students from China and the United States participated in a study examining the presence of stereotypical perceptions regarding creativity and deductive reasoning abilities, as well as the influence of stereotype on participants' performance on deductive reasoning and creativity in nonverbal form. The results showed…

Wong, Regine; Niu, Weihua

2013-01-01

225

Low-Level Defective Processing of Non-Verbal Sounds in Dyslexic Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We compared processing of non-verbal auditory stimuli by dyslexic and non-dyslexic children using electrophysiological methods. The study included 39 children (17 with dyslexia plus 22 controls) assessed via frontal, central, parietal, and temporal electrodes. As an extension of previous P300 event-related potential studies, we analysed variations…

Ucles, Paulino; Mendez, Mario; Garay, Jose

2009-01-01

226

Nonverbal Behavior, Status, and Gender: How Do We Understand Their Relations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The causes of gender differences in nonverbal behavior are not well understood. The present article discusses status as a possible explanation and analyzes some of the methodological and conceptual challenges associated with testing that hypothesis. The study by Helweg-Larsen, Cunningham, Carrico, and Pergram (2004), which investigated gender in…

Hall, Judith A.

2006-01-01

227

The neural correlates of verbal and non-verbal semantic processing deficits in neurodegenerative disease  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the neural correlates of verbal and non-verbal semantic processing in neurodegenerative disease. Background Semantic memory is often impaired in neurodegenerative disease. Neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies suggest that the semantic processing of verbal and non-verbal stimuli may depend on partially distinct brain networks. Methods We examined this possibility using voxel-based morphometry to correlate performance on verbal and non-verbal versions of a semantic association task with regional gray matter atrophy in 144 individuals with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Results Results showed that, regardless of stimulus type, semantic processing correlated with atrophy in both temporal lobes. In addition, material-specific correlations were found in left temporal regions for verbal stimuli and the right fusiform gyrus for non-verbal stimuli. Conclusions These results provide evidence for a differential role of the left and right hemispheres in the extraction of semantic information from verbal and pictorial representations. Areas in the right inferior temporal lobe may be necessary to access structural descriptions of visually presented objects.

Butler, Christopher R.; Brambati, Simona M.; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria-Luisa

2009-01-01

228

Verbal and Non-Verbal Development in SLI Children after Early Intervention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of all the developmental difficulties that may be present in childhood, language impairment is probably the most common. It is of vast importance to prevent cumulative negative consequences of these impairments. The present study evaluates the effects of a language and activity-based intervention programme on verbal and non-verbal performance and…

Sajaniemi, Nina; Suhonen, Eira; Kontu, Elina

2010-01-01

229

The Sliding Person Test--A Non-Verbal Measure of Self-Esteem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sliding Person Test (SPERT) is a nonverbal measure of self-ideal discrepancy. The original test was a wooden manipulative which Joseph S. Karmos designed in order to pursue the 1962 conclusions of John Shlien, that even at a high level of abstraction, self-esteem is not without and it is more related to the unique and personal items which an…

Karmos, Ann H.; Karmos, Joseph S.

230

The Development of Nonverbal Communication Behavior in School Children, Grades K-12.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to examine how different kinds of children's nonverbal behavior developed across grade levels. The six kinds of behavior studied were (1) proxemic, or observance of personal space; (2) haptic, or touching behavior; (3) oculesic, or gazing; (4) kinesic, or interpreting emotions from facial expressions; (5) vocalic, or…

Andersen, Peter A.; And Others

231

Intentional Communication in Nonverbal and Verbal Low-Functioning Children with Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we characterized profiles of communicative functions and forms of children with autism and intellectual disability (n = 26), as compared to typically developing children (n = 26) with a comparable nonverbal mental age (2-5 years). Videotapes of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales--Developmental Profile were analyzed using…

Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Jansen, Rianne; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

2011-01-01

232

Social skills and nonverbal decoding of emotions in very preterm children at early school age  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the nonverbal decoding of emotion in a group of very preterm children and its relationship to social skills and problem behaviours. All children born less than 30 weeks gestation were prospectively enrolled in developmental follow-up. At 8 years of age, 112 children were assessed using the Receptive Faces subtest of the Diagnostic

Crista Wocadlo; Ingrid Rieger

2006-01-01

233

The Effect of Nonverbal Cues on the Interpretation of Utterances by People with Visual Impairments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The purpose of this article is to explore the effect of nonverbal information (gestures and facial expressions) provided in real time on the interpretation of utterances by people with total blindness. Methods: The article reports on an exploratory study performed on two groups of participants with visual impairments who were tested…

Sak-Wernicka, Jolanta

2014-01-01

234

Recognition, Expression, and Understanding Facial Expressions of Emotion in Adolescents with Nonverbal and General Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) have been found to be worse at recognizing facial expressions than children with verbal learning disabilities (LD) and without LD. However, little research has been done with adolescents. In addition, expressing and understanding facial expressions is yet to be studied among adolescents with LD…

Bloom, Elana; Heath, Nancy

2010-01-01

235

Training Students to Decode Verbal and Nonverbal Cues: Effects on Confidence and Performance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study conducted with 105 university students investigated the effectiveness of using previous research findings as a means of teaching students how to interpret verbal and nonverbal behavior (decoding). Practice may be the critical feature for training in decoding. Research findings were successfully converted into educational techniques. (SLD)

Costanzo, Mark

1992-01-01

236

The use and frequency of verbal and non-verbal praise in nurture groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nurture groups are a form of provision for children with social, emotional, behavioural and learning difficulties. The study examines the interactions between children and staff – in particular, the frequency and effects of verbal and non-verbal praise – and discusses how this contributes to its effectiveness as a positive intervention instrument for all children. Results from structured observations confirmed that

Maria Bani

2011-01-01

237

The Nonverbal Expression of Pride: Evidence for Cross-Cultural Recognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present research tests whether recognition for the nonverbal expression of pride generalizes across cultures. Study 1 provided the first evidence for cross-cultural recognition of pride, demonstrating that the expression generalizes across Italy and the United States. Study 2 found that the pride expression generalizes beyond Western cultures; individuals from a preliterate, highly isolated tribe in Burkina Faso, West Africa,

Jessica L. Tracy; Richard W. Robins

2008-01-01

238

Gender-Specific Development of Nonverbal Behaviours and Mild Depression in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Individual differences in depressive symptoms have been linked with social skill deficits in adults and children, yet empirical studies on adolescents are lacking. The present research examines age and gender differences in nonverbal behaviour between mildly depressed and nondepressed (pre-) adolescents during conversations with an…

Van Beek, Yolanda; Van Dolderen, Marlies S. M.; Demon Dubas, Judith J. S.

2006-01-01

239

Use of a Non-Navigational, Non-Verbal Landmark Task in Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two hundred and twenty two children (104 females), 1-8 years of age and young adults, were tested for up to 25 days on five versions of a non-verbal, non-navigational landmark task that had previously been used for monkeys. In monkeys, performance on this task is severely impaired following damage to the parietal cortex. For the basic task, the…

Overman, William; Pierce, Allison; Watterson, Lucas; Coleman, Jennifer K.

2013-01-01

240

The Role of Timing in Testing Nonverbal IQ in Children with ASD  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

15 School-aged high functioning children on the autistic spectrum were compared with a neurotypical cohort on the WISC-III and the KABC-II, to determine the impact of the relatively more strict timing criteria of the former test on the evaluation of nonverbal intelligence. Significant group effects, showing lower performance by the ASD group were…

McGonigle-Chalmers, Margaret; McSweeney, Meabh

2013-01-01

241

The Introduction of Non-Verbal Communication in Greek Education: A Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: The introductory part of this paper underlines the research interest of the educational community in the issue of non-verbal communication in education. The question for the introduction of this scientific field in Greek education enter within the context of this research which include many aspects. Method: The paper essentially…

Stamatis, Panagiotis J.

2012-01-01

242

Concurrent Validity of the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence with Learning Disabled Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), and Wide Range Achievement Test were compared for 66 learning disabled children in grades one through six. The TONI mean score was found to be significantly different from the WISC-R Performance Intelligence Quotient (IQ). Implications…

Haddad, Frederick A.

1986-01-01

243

Nonverbal Requesting and Problem-Solving by Toddlers with Down Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The association between nonverbal requesting (as measured by the Early Social Communication Scales) and problem-solving skills (as measured by an object retrieval task) was examined in 16 toddlers who had Down syndrome, 18 toddlers with developmental disabilities of mixed etiologies, and 19 typically developing infants and toddlers. Toddlers with…

Fidler, Deborah J.; Philofsky, Amy; Hepburn, Susan L.; Rogers, Sally J.

2005-01-01

244

Effect of Race, Sex, Nonverbal Communication and Verbal Communication of Perception of Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2X2X2X2 study tested the effect of a) nonverbal communication (NVC), b) verbal communication (VC), 3) race of communicator, and d) sex of perceiver on the perception of leadership. Results indicated that when one pits NVC against VC, NVC proved to be more potent in the perception of leadership. (Author/NQ)

Gitter, A. George; And Others

1975-01-01

245

Foetal Antiepileptic Drug Exposure and Verbal versus Non-Verbal Abilities at Three Years of Age  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We previously reported that foetal valproate exposure impairs intelligence quotient. In this follow-up investigation, we examined dose-related effects of foetal antiepileptic drug exposure on verbal and non-verbal cognitive measures. This investigation is an ongoing prospective observational multi-centre study in the USA and UK, which has enrolled…

Meador, Kimford J.; Baker, Gus A.; Browning, Nancy; Cohen, Morris J.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Kalayjian, Laura A.; Kanner, Andres; Liporace, Joyce D.; Pennell, Page B.; Privitera, Michael; Loring, David W.

2011-01-01

246

Intentional communication in nonverbal and verbal low-functioning children with autism.  

PubMed

In this study we characterized profiles of communicative functions and forms of children with autism and intellectual disability (n=26), as compared to typically developing children (n=26) with a comparable nonverbal mental age (2-5 years). Videotapes of the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales - Developmental Profile were analyzed using a standardized observation scheme in which three main functions were distinguished: behavior regulation, social interaction, and joint attention. Different forms of communication were also investigated: gestures, vocalizations/verbalizations, and eye gaze. Results indicated that in typically developing children the proportion of communication for the purpose of joint attention was much higher than for behavior regulation, whereas in children with autism the opposite pattern was seen. Low-functioning nonverbal children with autism mainly communicated for behavior regulation and not or only rarely for declarative purposes. Generally, this subgroup used the least complex forms to communicate. Low-functioning verbal children with autism differed from typically developing children only in the rate, not in the proportion of communication for specific functions. Combinations of three different communicative forms were used by verbal children with autism less frequently than by typically developing children. Learning outcomes: After reading this paper, readers should be able to: (1) describe early development of communicative functions, (2) explain differences in communication profiles with respect to form and function between verbal and nonverbal low-functioning children with autism and typically developing children matched on nonverbal mental age and (3) discuss clinical implications of the findings for communication interventions in verbal and nonverbal low-functioning children with autism. PMID:21889773

Maljaars, Jarymke; Noens, Ilse; Jansen, Rianne; Scholte, Evert; van Berckelaer-Onnes, Ina

2011-01-01

247

Teacher Perceptions of Teacher Bullying  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This mixed-methods study examined elementary teachers' perceptions of teacher-student bullying. Grounded in previous research on peer bullying, the study posed several questions: to what extent did teachers perceive bullying of students by other teachers as a serious matter requiring intervention? Did they perceive teacher bullying as more serious…

Zerillo, Christine; Osterman, Karen F

2011-01-01

248

A qualitative analysis of the nonverbal and verbal interactions of low achieving students in two contrasting science instructional settings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research project was designed to describe and analyze the verbal and non-verbal interactions of low achieving students during science lessons taught in two contrasting science instructional settings. (1) Teacher-centered, textbook-dominated instruction and (2) Student-centered, materials-dominated instruction. This study provided the unique opportunity to observe individual students under both sets of conditions. Systematic classroom observation, non-structured student interviews, and student documents were used in the analysis. Levels of behavioral involvement were found to be lower during student-centered, materials-dominated lessons, however, increased frequencies, more varied types, and higher cognitive levels of verbal interaction were observed. Teacher-centered, text-dominated lessons yielded increased levels of on-task behavior, however, incidences of verbal interaction were observed to be decreased, less varied, and lower in cognitive level. The findings of this study suggest that the levels of behavioral involvement of low achieving students may be enhanced by increased structuring of the science learning environment. The findings suggest that additional structure in the form of task-specific directions and specific, short time allotments would enable low achieving students to better define a researchable question, and plan and conduct an investigation to answer the question. Low achieving students appeared to lack small group interaction skills needed to complete activities in the materials-dominated format. Groups of four tended to splinter: pairs would break off or students just worked individually. If groups of four are desired, the evidence from this study would suggest clearly defined expectations and shorter work times and more structure are needed for more effective group work. Questions remain concerning the ability for elementary science teachers to monitor the learning environment and learning processes, particularly in less structured classroom settings. Finally, this study questions the depth and breadth of content presented in many textbooks and supplemental materials, particularly in light of current educational theory regarding conceptual understanding and transfer. Additional research is needed to identify types and amounts of structure to impose on the learning environment and to define processes to help low achieving students optimize conceptual understandings.

Logan, Laverne K.

249

E.m.p.a.T.h.y.: a tool to enhance nonverbal communication between clinicians and their patients.  

PubMed

There is a gap in the medical education literature on teaching nonverbal detection and expression of empathy. Many articles do not address nonverbal interactions, instead focusing on "what to say" rather than "how to be." This focus on verbal communication overlooks the essential role nonverbal signals play in the communication of emotions, which has significant effects on patient satisfaction, health outcomes, and malpractice claims. This gap is addressed with a novel teaching tool for assessing nonverbal behavior using the acronym E.M.P.A.T.H.Y.-E: eye contact; M: muscles of facial expression; P: posture; A: affect; T: tone of voice; H: hearing the whole patient; Y: your response. This acronym was the cornerstone of a randomized controlled trial of empathy training at Massachusetts General Hospital, 2010-2012. Used as an easy-to-remember checklist, the acronym orients medical professionals to key aspects of perceiving and responding to nonverbal emotional cues. An urgent need exists to teach nonverbal aspects of communication as medical practices must be reoriented to the increasing cultural diversity represented by patients presenting for care. Where language proficiency may be limited, nonverbal communication becomes more crucial for understanding patients' communications. Furthermore, even in the absence of cultural differences, many patients are reluctant to disagree with their clinicians, and subtle nonverbal cues may be the critical entry point for discussions leading to shared medical decisions. A detailed description of the E.M.P.A.T.H.Y. acronym and a brief summary of the literature that supports each component of the teaching tool are provided. PMID:24826853

Riess, Helen; Kraft-Todd, Gordon

2014-08-01

250

Nonverbal and verbal cognitive discrepancy profiles in autism spectrum disorders: influence of age and gender.  

PubMed

Research suggests that discrepant cognitive abilities are more common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and may indicate an important ASD endophenotype. The current study examined the frequency of IQ discrepancy profiles (nonverbal IQ > verbal IQ [NVIQ > VIQ], verbal IQ > nonverbal IQ [VIQ > NVIQ], and no split) and the relationship of gender, age, and ASD symptomatology to IQ discrepancy profile in a large sample of children with ASD. The NVIQ > VIQ profile occurred at a higher frequency than expected, had more young males, and showed more autism symptoms than the other groups. Results suggest that the NVIQ > VIQ profile may be less likely to represent a subtype of ASD, but rather a common developmental pathway for children with ASD and other disorders. PMID:24450323

Ankenman, Katy; Elgin, Jenna; Sullivan, Katherine; Vincent, Logan; Bernier, Raphael

2014-01-01

251

Selecting a response form for nonverbal persons: Facilitated communication, pointing systems, or sign language?  

PubMed

The three major types of augmentative communication for nonverbal persons consist of writing (or typing), pointing, and signing. These alternative response forms are examined in terms of their advantages and disadvantages for establishing effective verbal behavior. In addition, these systems are examined using the concepts from Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior (i.e., mand, tact, intraverbal, and autoclitic). The results of this analysis show that sign language has the most advantages and the fewest disadvantages, and more closely parallels speech in terms of the verbal operants. Although, the current trend is to favor facilitated communication (typing) and pointing systems, both of these response forms have several disadvantages that impede the development of the verbal operants. It is suggested that for many nonverbal individuals sign language is a better alternative response form, and has a better chance of improving speech. PMID:22477084

Sundberg, M L

1993-01-01

252

Selecting a response form for nonverbal persons: Facilitated communication, pointing systems, or sign language?  

PubMed Central

The three major types of augmentative communication for nonverbal persons consist of writing (or typing), pointing, and signing. These alternative response forms are examined in terms of their advantages and disadvantages for establishing effective verbal behavior. In addition, these systems are examined using the concepts from Skinner's (1957) analysis of verbal behavior (i.e., mand, tact, intraverbal, and autoclitic). The results of this analysis show that sign language has the most advantages and the fewest disadvantages, and more closely parallels speech in terms of the verbal operants. Although, the current trend is to favor facilitated communication (typing) and pointing systems, both of these response forms have several disadvantages that impede the development of the verbal operants. It is suggested that for many nonverbal individuals sign language is a better alternative response form, and has a better chance of improving speech.

Sundberg, Mark L.

1993-01-01

253

Quality matters! Differences between expressive and receptive non-verbal communication skills in adolescents with ASD  

PubMed Central

We analyzed several studies of non-verbal communication (prosody and facial expressions) completed in our lab and conducted a secondary analysis to compare performance on receptive vs. expressive tasks by adolescents with ASD and their typically developing peers. Results show a significant between-group difference for the aggregate score of expressive tasks, but not for the aggregate score of receptive tasks. There was also a significant within-group difference among individuals with ASD for expressive vs. receptive performance. Our data indicate that adolescents with ASD can achieve receptive accuracy in non-verbal communication, but show significant qualitative deficits in expressive skills across a range of tasks, which may have a significant negative impact on their success as social communicators.

Grossman, Ruth B.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

2012-01-01

254

Learning social attitudes: children's sensitivity to the nonverbal behaviors of adult models during interracial interactions.  

PubMed

White children show marked ingroup race preferences and a relative devaluation of Black people. The origin of these early interracial attitudes is to a large extent still unclear. The studies here test the possibility that preschool-aged children are particularly sensitive to the nonverbal behaviors performed by White adults during interracial interactions. In Study 1, children were shown a video displaying an interaction between a White and a Black adult. Across conditions, the White adult's verbal behaviors were either friendly or neutral, whereas his nonverbal behaviors showed either easiness (e.g., closeness, high eye contact) or uneasiness (e.g., distance, avoidance of eye contact). Results revealed that participants shaped their attitudes toward the Black target accordingly, independently from the White adults' verbal behaviors. Study 2 replicated the basic findings and demonstrated that the observed effects generalized to other Black targets. Results are discussed in relation to current approaches to understanding the formation of racial attitudes among children. PMID:18716043

Castelli, Luigi; De Dea, Cristina; Nesdale, Drew

2008-11-01

255

[Non-verbal communication of patients with intestinal cancer treated with ostomy].  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to analyze the nonverbal communication of the participants in a group of bowel cancer ostomy bearers. The type of the investigation was exploratory and observational. The investigation was carried out in a Teaching Hospital. The population was composed by 5 persons, bearing ostomy due to bowel cancer. There were 5 meetings in October and November of 2001. Data was gathered through video recording and field notes. Among the findings we remark the room small size forced the participants to maintain a very close distance that led in difficulties for their spontaneous expression. This article clarifies that the reading of the nonverbal communication enabled the understanding the universe of the investigated persons. PMID:14692274

Paegle, Silene Oliveira; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

2003-01-01

256

Schizophrenia and the Immediacy Mechanism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author comments on the article "The Primacy of Cognition in Schizophrenia," by R. W. Heinrichs and states that to the pursuit of schizophrenic/normal differences, there is no end. Heinrichs used meta-analyses to argue persuasively for the primacy of cognition for this role. His conclusion not only elicited agreement from both researchers and…

Salzinger, Kurt

2006-01-01

257

Media Bias in Interviewers’ Nonverbal Behavior: Potential Remedies, Attitude Similarity and Meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research demonstrated that viewers’ judgments of an interviewee are influenced by the nonverbal behavior of the interviewer.\\u000a In studies of this media bias effect, judges view a short political interview with a friendly or a hostile interviewer, and\\u000a then rate their impressions of the interviewee, whose behavior remains identical in all conditions. The present research utilizes\\u000a the same design

Elisha Babad; Eyal Peer

2010-01-01

258

Relationship of Physicians’ Nonverbal Communication Skill to Patient Satisfaction, Appointment Noncompliance, and Physician Workload  

Microsoft Academic Search

A field study of 28 residents in family practice was conducted. Physicians’ self-reports of empathy, self-monitoring ability, and affective communication skill as well as their objectively measured nonverbal communication skills were examined as predictors of patient satisfaction, appointment noncompliance, and physician workload (schedule density). Physicians completed the Hogan Empathy Scale, Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale, Affective Communication Test, short form of the

M. Robin DiMatteo; Ron D. Hays; Louise M. Prince

1986-01-01

259

Transcript-based computer animation of movement: Evaluating a new tool for nonverbal behavior research  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new approach for the use of computer animation in experimental nonverbal research is introduced. The method was evaluated\\u000a in a pilot study comparing video recordings of movement in dyadic interactions with computer animations based on transcripts\\u000a of the behavior, to determine whether similar impression effects could be obtained. At the core of our development is a software\\u000a tool allowing

Gary Bente; Anita Petersen; Nicole C. Krämer; Jan Peter de Ruiter

2001-01-01

260

Executive functioning and non-verbal intelligence as predictors of bullying in early elementary school.  

PubMed

Executive function and intelligence are negatively associated with aggression, yet the role of executive function has rarely been examined in the context of school bullying. We studied whether different domains of executive function and non-verbal intelligence are associated with bullying involvement in early elementary school. The association was examined in a population-based sample of 1,377 children. At age 4 years we assessed problems in inhibition, shifting, emotional control, working memory and planning/organization, using a validated parental questionnaire (the BRIEF-P). Additionally, we determined child non-verbal IQ at age 6 years. Bullying involvement as a bully, victim or a bully-victim in grades 1-2 of elementary school (mean age 7.7 years) was measured using a peer-nomination procedure. Individual bullying scores were based on the ratings by multiple peers (on average 20 classmates). Analyses were adjusted for various child and maternal socio-demographic and psychosocial covariates. Child score for inhibition problems was associated with the risk of being a bully (OR per SD?=?1.35, 95%CI: 1.09-1.66), victim (OR per SD?=?1.21, 95%CI: 1.00-1.45) and a bully-victim (OR per SD?=?1.55, 95%CI: 1.10-2.17). Children with higher non-verbal IQ were less likely to be victims (OR?=?0.99, 95%CI: 0.98-1.00) and bully-victims (OR?=?95%CI: 0.93-0.98, respectively). In conclusion, our study showed that peer interactions may be to some extent influenced by children's executive function and non-verbal intelligence. Future studies should examine whether training executive function skills can reduce bullying involvement and improve the quality of peer relationships. PMID:24337736

Verlinden, Marina; Veenstra, René; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Jansen, Pauline W; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning

2014-08-01

261

Comprehension of humor in children with nonverbal learning disabilities, reading disabilities, and without learning disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The normal development of humor in children has been well documented with a predictable course that is tied to social, cognitive,\\u000a and linguistic development in children. This study explored humor comprehension in children with nonverbal learning disabilities\\u000a (NVLD). Children with NVLD were compared with children with reading disabilities and a comparison group of children with no\\u000a learning disabilities to assess

Margaret Semrud-Clikeman; Kimberly Glass

2008-01-01

262

A nonverbal test of knowledge attribution: a comparative study on dogs and children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The sensitivity of eleven pet dogs and eleven 2.5-year-old children to others’ past perceptual access was tested for object-specificity\\u000a in a playful, nonverbal task in which a human Helper’s knowledge state regarding the whereabouts of a hidden toy and a stick\\u000a (a tool necessary for getting the out-of-reach toy) was systematically manipulated. In the four experimental conditions the\\u000a Helper either

Zs. Virányi; J. Topál; Á. Miklósi; V. Csányi

2006-01-01

263

Neuropsychological Differences Among Children With Asperger Syndrome, Nonverbal Learning Disabilities, Attention Deficit Disorder, and Controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Confusion is present as to possible diagnostic differences between Asperger syndrome (AS) and Nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) and the relation of these disorders to attentional difficulties. Three-hundred and forty-five children participated in this study in 5 groups; NLD, AS, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Combined type, ADHD: Inattentive type, and controls. The NLD group showed particular difficulty on visual-spatial, visual-motor,

Margaret Semrud-Clikeman; Jenifer Walkowiak; Alison Wilkinson; Gina Christopher

2010-01-01

264

The Effects of an Embodied Conversational Agent's Nonverbal Behavior on User's Evaluation and Behavioral Mimicry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Against the background that recent studies on embodied conversational agents demonstrate the importance of their behavior,\\u000a an experimental study is presented that assessed the effects of different nonverbal behaviors of an embodied conversational\\u000a agent on the users´ experiences and evaluations as well as on their behavior. 50 participants conducted a conversation with\\u000a different versions of the virtual agent Max, whose

Nicole C. Krämer; Nina Simons; Stefan Kopp

2007-01-01

265

NEWEST teachers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NEWEST, or NASA Educational Workshops for Elementary School Teachers, is a two-week honors program for teachers, sponsored by NASA, the National Science Teachers Association, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the International Technology Education-Association. A total of 25 teachers from the United States and U.S. State Department schools in Europe are chosen to work with NASA and other federal agency science and engineering professionals. Pictured, participants make hot air balloons as part of their activities.

1996-01-01

266

Network structure underlying resolution of conflicting non-verbal and verbal social information.  

PubMed

Social judgments often require resolution of incongruity in communication contents. Although previous studies revealed that such conflict resolution recruits brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG), functional relationships and networks among these regions remain unclear. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the functional dissociation and networks by measuring human brain activity during resolving incongruity between verbal and non-verbal emotional contents. First, we found that the conflict resolutions biased by the non-verbal contents activated the posterior dorsal mPFC (post-dmPFC), bilateral anterior insula (AI) and right dorsal pIFG, whereas the resolutions biased by the verbal contents activated the bilateral ventral pIFG. In contrast, the anterior dmPFC (ant-dmPFC), bilateral superior temporal sulcus and fusiform gyrus were commonly involved in both of the resolutions. Second, we found that the post-dmPFC and right ventral pIFG were hub regions in networks underlying the non-verbal- and verbal-content-biased resolutions, respectively. Finally, we revealed that these resolution-type-specific networks were bridged by the ant-dmPFC, which was recruited for the conflict resolutions earlier than the two hub regions. These findings suggest that, in social conflict resolutions, the ant-dmPFC selectively recruits one of the resolution-type-specific networks through its interaction with resolution-type-specific hub regions. PMID:23552078

Watanabe, Takamitsu; Yahata, Noriaki; Kawakubo, Yuki; Inoue, Hideyuki; Takano, Yosuke; Iwashiro, Norichika; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Takao, Hidemasa; Sasaki, Hiroki; Gonoi, Wataru; Murakami, Mizuho; Katsura, Masaki; Kunimatsu, Akira; Abe, Osamu; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

2014-06-01

267

Raised Middle-Finger: Electrocortical Correlates of Social Conditioning with Nonverbal Affective Gestures  

PubMed Central

Humans form impressions of others by associating persons (faces) with negative or positive social outcomes. This learning process has been referred to as social conditioning. In everyday life, affective nonverbal gestures may constitute important social signals cueing threat or safety, which therefore may support aforementioned learning processes. In conventional aversive conditioning, studies using electroencephalography to investigate visuocortical processing of visual stimuli paired with danger cues such as aversive noise have demonstrated facilitated processing and enhanced sensory gain in visual cortex. The present study aimed at extending this line of research to the field of social conditioning by pairing neutral face stimuli with affective nonverbal gestures. To this end, electro-cortical processing of faces serving as different conditioned stimuli was investigated in a differential social conditioning paradigm. Behavioral ratings and visually evoked steady-state potentials (ssVEP) were recorded in twenty healthy human participants, who underwent a differential conditioning procedure in which three neutral faces were paired with pictures of negative (raised middle finger), neutral (pointing), or positive (thumbs-up) gestures. As expected, faces associated with the aversive hand gesture (raised middle finger) elicited larger ssVEP amplitudes during conditioning. Moreover, theses faces were rated as to be more arousing and unpleasant. These results suggest that cortical engagement in response to faces aversively conditioned with nonverbal gestures is facilitated in order to establish persistent vigilance for social threat-related cues. This form of social conditioning allows to establish a predictive relationship between social stimuli and motivationally relevant outcomes.

Wieser, Matthias J.; Flaisch, Tobias; Pauli, Paul

2014-01-01

268

Nonverbal channel use in communication of emotion: how may depend on why.  

PubMed

This study investigated the hypothesis that different emotions are most effectively conveyed through specific, nonverbal channels of communication: body, face, and touch. Experiment 1 assessed the production of emotion displays. Participants generated nonverbal displays of 11 emotions, with and without channel restrictions. For both actual production and stated preferences, participants favored the body for embarrassment, guilt, pride, and shame; the face for anger, disgust, fear, happiness, and sadness; and touch for love and sympathy. When restricted to a single channel, participants were most confident about their communication when production was limited to the emotion's preferred channel. Experiment 2 examined the reception or identification of emotion displays. Participants viewed videos of emotions communicated in unrestricted and restricted conditions and identified the communicated emotions. Emotion identification in restricted conditions was most accurate when participants viewed emotions displayed via the emotion's preferred channel. This study provides converging evidence that some emotions are communicated predominantly through different nonverbal channels. Further analysis of these channel-emotion correspondences suggests that the social function of an emotion predicts its primary channel: The body channel promotes social-status emotions, the face channel supports survival emotions, and touch supports intimate emotions. PMID:21668111

App, Betsy; McIntosh, Daniel N; Reed, Catherine L; Hertenstein, Matthew J

2011-06-01

269

Teacher Pay and Teacher Aptitude  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Can changes in teacher pay encourage more able individuals to enter the teaching profession? So far, studies of the impact of pay on the aptitude distribution of teachers have provided mixed evidence on the extent to which altering teacher salaries represents a feasible solution to the teacher quality problem. One possible reason is that these…

Leigh, Andrew

2012-01-01

270

Teacher Institutes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

By putting teachers back into an intense learning and leadership environment, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is embarking on a major effort to improve the mathematics and science education of the nationâs youth. The three-year $5.5 million Teacher Institute project in Park City, Utah, involves middle and high school mathematics teachers from three school districts, including a small system in McAllen, Texas, and larger systems in Cincinnati, Ohio and Seattle, Washington. In summer resident sessions, the institute at Park City will train middle and secondary school teachers to become teacher-leaders.

271

Patient Attitudes towards Physician Nonverbal Behaviors during Consultancy: Result from a Developing Country  

PubMed Central

Background. Nonverbal behaviors have a significant impact on patients during consultations. This study was undertaken to find out the attitudes and preferences of the patients regarding nonverbal communication during consultations with physicians, in a tertiary care hospital. Methods. A questionnaire based cross-sectional study was carried out at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, during the months of January to March 2012. All patients (>18 years of age) coming for consultancy in the family medicine clinics were approached; out of 133, 120 agreed to participate. The subjects were asked questions regarding physician's comforting touch and eye contact and their responses were noted. The data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square test was used to identify corelations. Results. Overall, 120 patients were enrolled. About 58.3% were men and 41.7% were women with a mean age of 34.9 ± 10.9 years. 95.8% were Muslims and 57.6% had more than 12 years of education. Among females 74% wanted supportive touch from doctors, used to comfort the patient (45%) or to show respect (27.5%) or as healing (30%). 86.1% of the respondents believe that establishing eye contact with the patient shows that the doctor is attentive towards his/her patient. The eye contact should be brief but regular (54.1%) and prolonged staring (36.7%) makes them uncomfortable. Conclusion. Nonverbal communication helps to strengthen the doctor-patient relation as patients do appreciate positive touch and eye contact from their physicians.

Khan, Fahad Hanif; Hanif, Raheela; Tabassum, Rumina

2014-01-01

272

"You Looking at Me?": Investigating 9 and 13 Year-Olds' Ability to Encode and Decode Nonverbal Communication and Demonstrate "Emotional Literacy"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This small-scale study reports the findings from an investigation into non-verbal communication. It primarily seeks to analyse whether 9 and 13 year-olds can encode and decode non-verbal communication in the context of classroom behaviour management. This research showed that, in contrast to previous published research, there were no distinct…

Dickson, Esther; Burton, Neil

2011-01-01

273

Test Review: Hammill, D. D., Pearson, N. A., & Weiderholt, J. L. (2009). "Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2)." Austin, TX: PRO-ED  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents a review of the Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2), a nonverbal intelligence test created to assess reasoning and problem solving of children and adults. The goal of the CTONI-2 is to minimize the influence of language ability on intelligence test scores. Oral or pantomime instructions can…

Delen, Erhan; Kaya, Fatih; Ritter, Nicola L.

2012-01-01

274

Presence of cysts on magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in children with asperger disorder and nonverbal learning disabilities.  

PubMed

The main purpose of this study was to report the existence of previously unidentified brain cysts or lesions in children with nonverbal learning disabilities, Asperger syndrome, or controls. The authors compared the incidence of cysts or lesions on magnetic resonance images (MRIs) in 28 children with nonverbal learning disability, 26 children with Asperger syndrome, and 24 typical controls for abnormalities. In this study, the authors found 25% of children previously diagnosed with nonverbal learning disability to have unsuspected brain abnormalities generally including cysts or lesions in the occipital region, compared with approximately 4% in the Asperger syndrome or control group. The cysts/lesions were found mainly in the occipital lobe, an area responsible for visual/spatial reasoning. It is appropriate to speculate that there might be a connection between anomalous brain development and skill differences among these groups. PMID:21398562

Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Fine, Jodene

2011-04-01

275

Brief report: impression formation in high-functioning autism: role of nonverbal behavior and stereotype activating information.  

PubMed

Little is known about whether stereotypes influence social judgments of autistic individuals, in particular when they compete with tacit face-to-face cues. We compared impression formation of 17 subjects with high-functioning autism (HFA) and 17 age-, gender- and IQ-matched controls. Information about the profession of a job applicant served as stereotype activating information. The target person's nonverbal behavior was presented as a computer animation showing two virtual characters in interaction. Contrary to our hypothesis, HFA participants were as sensitive to nonverbal cues as controls. Moreover, HFA showed a tendency to evaluate persons more positively. This might indicate a routine HFA apply in impression formation in order to compensate for their deficit in intuitive understanding of nonverbal communication cues. PMID:24362848

Schwartz, Caroline; Dratsch, Thomas; Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

2014-07-01

276

Teacher to Teacher: Transgenerational Mentoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative case study examines the relationship of teachers who mentor other teachers. We studied 125 autobiographical portfolios submitted by elementary and secondary teachers who had won awards as outstanding educators from their campuses and were competing at the district level. The research site was a midsize city (population 95,000) in…

Juarez-Torres, Rachel; Hurst, Jeannine Lane; Hurst, Roy

2007-01-01

277

"I'm Pretty Sure That We Will Win!": The Influence of Score-Related Nonverbal Behavioral Changes on the Confidence in Winning a Basketball Game.  

PubMed

The goal of the present research was to test whether score-related changes in opponents' nonverbal behavior influence athletes' confidence in beating their opponents. In an experiment, 40 participants who were experienced basketball players watched brief video clips depicting athletes' nonverbal behavior. Video clips were not artificially created, but showed naturally occurring behavior. Participants indicated how confident they were in beating the presented athletes in a hypothetical scenario. Results indicated that participants' confidence estimations were influenced by opponents' score-related nonverbal behavior. Participants were less confident about beating a leading team and more confident about beating a trailing team, although they were unaware of the actual score during the depicted scenes. The present research is the first to show that in-game variations of naturally occurring nonverbal behavior can influence athletes' confidence. This finding highlights the importance of research into nonverbal behavior in sports, particularly in relation to athletes' confidence. PMID:24918314

Furley, Philip; Schweizer, Geoffrey

2014-06-01

278

Quantifying nonverbal communicative behavior in face-to-face human dialogues  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The referred study is based on the assumption that understanding how humans use nonverbal behavior in dialogues can be very useful in the design of more natural-looking animated talking heads. The goal of the study is twofold: (1) to explore how people use specific facial expressions and head movements to serve important dialogue functions, and (2) to show evidence that it is possible to measure and quantify the entity of these movements with the Qualisys MacReflex motion tracking system. Naturally elicited dialogues between humans have been analyzed with focus on the attention on those nonverbal behaviors that serve the very relevant functions of regulating the conversational flux (i.e., turn taking) and producing information about the state of communication (i.e., feedback). The results show that eyebrow raising, head nods, and head shakes are typical signals involved during the exchange of speaking turns, as well as in the production and elicitation of feedback. These movements can be easily measured and quantified, and this measure can be implemented in animated talking heads.

Skhiri, Mustapha; Cerrato, Loredana

2002-11-01

279

Verbal/nonverbal communication between man and Avatar in virtual mechanical assembly training system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interface environment of a computer still uses a mouse and a keyboard and it is hard for many users including aged person to use computers. The computer operation may become difficult with age even if a person can use a computer currently. Development of the interface system is desired that permits persons to talk to a computer in the same way as they communicate with other ones. Of course the development of such an interface system will be effective for all computer application users in addition to aged person. We developed in this study the man machine interface system that exploits virtual reality in order to bring a talk between a person and a machine close to that between persons. We aimed at realization of bi-directional verbal/nonverbal communication that permits both the user and an avatar rendered in virtual space can use a spoken language and nonverbal behavior such as gesture/a hand gesture. As the field of concrete application, the field of assembling/disassembly of mechanical part is selected. We produced an experimental assembly training system that helps a novice acquire a right assembling procedure of virtual machine. In the system, a user can ask an avatar to show the way to assemble/disassemble mechanical parts whenever he needs help.

Tanaka, Kazuaki; Ozaki, Tomoaki; Abe, Norihiro; Taki, Horikazu

2003-04-01

280

Intuitive geometry and visuospatial working memory in children showing symptoms of nonverbal learning disabilities.  

PubMed

Visuospatial working memory (VSWM) and intuitive geometry were examined in two groups aged 11-13, one with children displaying symptoms of nonverbal learning disability (NLD; n?=?16), and the other, a control group without learning disabilities (n?=?16). The two groups were matched for general verbal abilities, age, gender, and socioeconomic level. The children were presented with simple storage and complex-span tasks involving VSWM and with the intuitive geometry task devised by Dehaene, Izard, Pica, and Spelke (2006 ). Results revealed that the two groups differed in the intuitive geometry task. Differences were particularly evident in Euclidean geometry and in geometrical transformations. Moreover, the performance of NLD children was worse than controls to a larger extent in complex-span than in simple storage tasks, and VSWM differences were able to account for group differences in geometry. Finally, a discriminant function analysis confirmed the crucial role of complex-span tasks involving VSWM in distinguishing between the two groups. Results are discussed with reference to the relationship between VSWM and mathematics difficulties in nonverbal learning disabilities. PMID:22375915

Mammarella, Irene C; Giofrè, David; Ferrara, Rosanna; Cornoldi, Cesare

2013-01-01

281

When voices get emotional: a corpus of nonverbal vocalizations for research on emotion processing.  

PubMed

Nonverbal vocal expressions, such as laughter, sobbing, and screams, are an important source of emotional information in social interactions. However, the investigation of how we process these vocal cues entered the research agenda only recently. Here, we introduce a new corpus of nonverbal vocalizations, which we recorded and submitted to perceptual and acoustic validation. It consists of 121 sounds expressing four positive emotions (achievement/triumph, amusement, sensual pleasure, and relief) and four negative ones (anger, disgust, fear, and sadness), produced by two female and two male speakers. For perceptual validation, a forced choice task was used (n = 20), and ratings were collected for the eight emotions, valence, arousal, and authenticity (n = 20). We provide these data, detailed for each vocalization, for use by the research community. High recognition accuracy was found for all emotions (86 %, on average), and the sounds were reliably rated as communicating the intended expressions. The vocalizations were measured for acoustic cues related to temporal aspects, intensity, fundamental frequency (f0), and voice quality. These cues alone provide sufficient information to discriminate between emotion categories, as indicated by statistical classification procedures; they are also predictors of listeners' emotion ratings, as indicated by multiple regression analyses. This set of stimuli seems a valuable addition to currently available expression corpora for research on emotion processing. It is suitable for behavioral and neuroscience research and might as well be used in clinical settings for the assessment of neurological and psychiatric patients. The corpus can be downloaded from Supplementary Materials. PMID:23444120

Lima, César F; Castro, São Luís; Scott, Sophie K

2013-12-01

282

"Artificial humans": Psychology and neuroscience perspectives on embodiment and nonverbal communication.  

PubMed

"Artificial humans", so-called "Embodied Conversational Agents" and humanoid robots, are assumed to facilitate human-technology interaction referring to the unique human capacities of interpersonal communication and social information processing. While early research and development in artificial intelligence (AI) focused on processing and production of natural language, the "new AI" has also taken into account the emotional and relational aspects of communication with an emphasis both on understanding and production of nonverbal behavior. This shift in attention in computer science and engineering is reflected in recent developments in psychology and social cognitive neuroscience. This article addresses key challenges which emerge from the goal to equip machines with socio-emotional intelligence and to enable them to interpret subtle nonverbal cues and to respond to social affordances with naturally appearing behavior from both perspectives. In particular, we propose that the creation of credible artificial humans not only defines the ultimate test for our understanding of human communication and social cognition but also provides a unique research tool to improve our knowledge about the underlying psychological processes and neural mechanisms. PMID:20620019

Vogeley, Kai; Bente, Gary

2010-01-01

283

Face the noise: embodied responses to nonverbal vocalizations of discrete emotions.  

PubMed

Extensive prior research has shown that the perception of an emotional facial expression automatically elicits a corresponding facial expression in the observer. Theories of embodied emotion, however, suggest that such reactions might also occur across expressive channels, because simulation is based on integrated motoric and affective representations of that emotion. In the present studies, we examined this idea by focusing on facial and experiential reactions to nonverbal emotion vocalizations. In Studies 1 and 2, we showed that both hearing and reproducing vocalizations of anger, disgust, happiness, and sadness resulted in specific facial behaviors, as well as congruent self-reported emotions (Study 2). In Studies 3 and 4, we showed that the inhibition of congruent facial actions impaired listeners' processing of emotion vocalizations (Study 3), as well as their experiences of a concordant subjective state (Study 4). Results support the idea that cross-channel simulations of others' states serve facilitative functions similar to more strict imitations of observed expressive behavior, suggesting flexibility in the motoric and affective systems involved in emotion processing and interpersonal emotion transfer. We discuss implications for embodiment research and the social consequences of expressing and matching emotions across nonverbal channels. PMID:22059840

Hawk, Skyler T; Fischer, Agneta H; Van Kleef, Gerben A

2012-04-01

284

Associations between nonverbal behaviors and subsequent sexual attitudes and behaviors of sexually abused and comparison girls.  

PubMed

This prospective, longitudinal study examined a sample of sexually abused and comparison girls to determine (a) whether there were patterns of behavior that differed between the groups and (b) whether nonverbal behaviors assessed at the initial visit (n = 147; M = 11.11 years; SD = 3.02) might predict sexual attitudes and behaviors at a later point in development (n = 144; M = 18.52 years; SD = 3.52). At the initial assessment, nonverbal behaviors during an interaction with an unknown male interviewer were factor analyzed revealing 3 factors: wary (e.g., pouting), affiliative (e.g., chin resting on hand), and coy (e.g., tongue show). Abused girls scored higher on the coy factor that was related to earlier age at first voluntary intercourse later in development (approximately 7 years later). High scores on the affiliative factor were related to higher sexual permissiveness and less negative attitudes toward sex. Results indicate that sexually abused girls showed early maladaptive patterns in interpersonal interactions, which were subsequently related to risky sexual attitudes and behaviors. PMID:20410025

Negriff, Sonya; Noll, Jennie G; Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Trickett, Penelope K

2010-05-01

285

Nonverbal communication tool for children with severe motor and intellectual disabilities using biochemical measurement.  

PubMed

Children with severe motor and intellectual disabilities (SMID) find it almost impossible to communicate whether they are feeling comfortable or uncomfortable. Most of the children with SMID rely on medical care involving disposable-type life support devices such as tracheostomy tubes or gastric tubes. It is believed that the insertion and removal of these medical devices could cause extreme physical pain under certain circumstances. The authors have previously reported a hand-held type salivary amylase (AMY) activity monitor that can be used to evaluate the sympathetic nervous system. This report proposes a nonverbal communication procedure based on a biochemical measurement using AMY activity for children with SMID. The physiological conditions of these children were evaluated using a hand-held type AMY activity monitor that we fabricated. The AMY activity and heart rate of six subjects, who required daily insertion and removal of tracheostomy tubes or gastric tubes, were simultaneously measured before and after medical care. Apart from one subject who required a respirator due to severe cerebral palsy, the experimental results showed that the AMY value increased sharply by 200 400% after medical care compared to the resting state. Furthermore, the rate of change of AMY activity was 10 times larger than the change in heart rate. Therefore, it is suggested that using these biochemical measurements a nonverbal communication tool for children with SMID can be established. PMID:17280988

Higashi, Tomoyuki; Mizuno, Yasufumi; Oonishi, Mieko; Takeda, Kazunori; Yamaguchi, Masaki

2005-01-01

286

Narrative Skills in Adolescents with a History of SLI in Relation to Non-Verbal IQ Scores  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a debate about whether the language of children with primary language disorders and normal cognitive levels is qualitatively different from those with language impairments who have low or borderline non-verbal IQ (NVIQ). As children reach adolescence, this distinction may be even harder to ascertain, especially in naturalistic settings.…

Wetherell, Danielle; Botting, Nicola; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

2007-01-01

287

Changes in verbal and nonverbal memory following anterior temporal lobe surgery for refractory seizures: effects of sex and laterality  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the effects on verbal and nonverbal memory of anterior temporal lobe (ATL) surgery for epilepsy in 91 patients (46 men, 45 women), all of whom had left-hemisphere dominance for speech. Patients were divided into four groups according to sex and laterality of the excision. The memory tasks were administered shortly before surgery, 6 months postoperatively, and at a

Helge Bjørnæs; Kirsten Engberg Stabell; Geir Ketil Røste; Søren Jacob Bakke

2005-01-01

288

Linking Childhood Poverty and Cognition: Environmental Mediators of Non-Verbal Executive Control in an Argentine Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tests of attentional control, working memory, and planning were administered to compare the non-verbal executive control performance of healthy children from different socioeconomic backgrounds. In addition, mediations of several sociodemographic variables, identified in the literature as part of the experience of child poverty, between…

Lipina, Sebastián; Segretin, Soledad; Hermida, Julia; Prats, Lucía; Fracchia, Carolina; Camelo, Jorge López; Colombo, Jorge

2013-01-01

289

Oral Language Impairments in Developmental Disorders Characterized by Language Strengths: A Comparison of Asperger Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asperger syndrome (AS) and nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) are developmental disorders in which linguistic ability is reported to be stronger than in disorders from which they must be distinguished for diagnosis. Children and adults with AS and NLD share pragmatic weaknesses, atypical social behaviours, and some cognitive features. To date,…

Stothers, M. E.; Cardy, J. Oram

2012-01-01

290

A Novel Method for Teaching the First Instances of Simple Discrimination to Nonverbal Children with Autism in a Laboratory Environment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A novel method for initiating discrimination training with nonverbal children combines a delayed S+ procedure that requires children to refrain from responding to either of 2 physically different choice stimuli until a prompt stimulus is added onto 1 of the choices, and a delayed prompting procedure that presents the same 2-choice stimulus…

Lionello-DeNolf, Karen M.; da Silva Barros, Romariz; McIlvane, William J.

2008-01-01

291

Teaching Approach for Developing Nonverbal Communication Skills in Students with Social Perception Deficits. Part II. Proxemic, Vocalic, and Artifactual Cues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Part 2 of a two-part article individual educational program objectives are applied to nonverbal communication areas as follows: proxemics, or the use of distance, spatial arrangements, and territories; vocalics, or the use of prosodic, paralinguistic, or nonlinguistic features; and artifactual cues involving clothing and cosmetics. (Author/SBH)

Minskoff, Esther H.

1980-01-01

292

Maternal Perceptions of the Importance of Needs and Resources for Children With Asperger Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using an anonymous, mailed survey, this study examined the perceptions of 404 mothers on the availability and the importance of various resources for their children With Asperger syndrome (AS) or a nonverbal learning disorder (NLD). A significant number of mothers (20% to 30%) reported that pragmatics training, social skills training, smaller classes, or a trained aide in the classroom Were

Liza Little

2003-01-01

293

Evidence of Increased Non-Verbal Behavioral Signs of Pain in Adults with Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Chronic Self-Injury  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of pain in relation to self-injurious behavior (SIB) among individuals with intellectual disabilities is not well understood. Some models of SIB are based on altered endogenous opioid system activity which could result in elevated pain thresholds. In this study, non-verbal behavioral signs indicative of pain as measured by the…

Symons, Frank J.; Harper, Vicki N.; McGrath, Patrick J.; Breau, Lynn M.; Bodfish, James W.

2009-01-01

294

Test Review: Wechsler, D., & Naglieri, J.A. (2006). "Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability". San Antonio, TX--Harcourt Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a review of the Wechsler Nonverbal Scale of Ability (WNV), a general cognitive ability assessment tool for individuals' aged 4 year 0 months through 21 years 11 months with English language and/or communicative limitations. The test targets a population whose performance on intelligence batteries might be compromised by…

Massa, Idalia; Rivera, Vivina

2009-01-01

295

The Influence of Manifest Strabismus and Stereoscopic Vision on Non-Verbal Abilities of Visually Impaired Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This research was conducted in order to examine the influence of manifest strabismus and stereoscopic vision on non-verbal abilities of visually impaired children aged between 7 and 15. The sample included 55 visually impaired children from the 1st to the 6th grade of elementary schools for visually impaired children in Belgrade. RANDOT stereotest…

Gligorovic, Milica; Vucinic, Vesna; Eskirovic, Branka; Jablan, Branka

2011-01-01

296

Brief Report: Inner Speech Impairment in Children with Autism Is Associated with Greater Nonverbal than Verbal Skills  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We present a new analysis of Whitehouse, Maybery, and Durkin's (2006, Experiment 3) data on inner speech in children with autism (CWA). Because inner speech development is thought to depend on linguistically mediated social interaction, we hypothesized that children with both autism and a nonverbal greater than verbal (NV greater than V) skills…

Lidstone, Jane S. M.; Fernyhough, Charles; Meins, Elizabeth; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

2009-01-01

297

Adults with Asperger Syndrome with and without a Cognitive Profile Associated with "Non-Verbal Learning Disability." A Brief Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asperger syndrome (AS) and non-verbal learning disability (NLD) are both characterized by impairments in motor coordination, visuo-perceptual abilities, pragmatics and comprehension of language and social understanding. NLD is also defined as a learning disorder affecting functions in the right cerebral hemisphere. The present study investigates…

Nyden, Agneta; Niklasson, Lena; Stahlberg, Ola; Anckarsater, Henrik; Dahlgren-Sandberg, Annika; Wentz, Elisabet; Rastam, Maria

2010-01-01

298

Maternal Perceptions of the Importance of Needs and Resources for Children with Asperger Syndrome and Nonverbal Learning Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey examined the perceptions of 404 mothers on the availability and importance of various resources for their children (ages 4-17) with Asperger syndrome or nonverbal learning disorder. A significant number (20-30%) reported that pragmatics training, social skills training, smaller classes, or a trained aide were not made available. (Contains…

Little, Liza

2003-01-01

299

Status, Gender, and Nonverbal Behavior in Candid and Posed Photographs: A Study of Conversations Between University Employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ninety-six male and female university employees (93% White, 6% African American, 1% Asian) were photographed in dyads while they conversed about working at their university (candid photographs) and again while they deliberately faced the camera (posed photographs). Eight nonverbal behaviors were coded from the photographs, and relative status was ascertained from a postexperimental questionnaire. Status differences were found for upward

Judith A. Hall; Lavonia Smith LeBeau; Jeannette Gordon Reinoso; Frank Thayer

2001-01-01

300

The Relationship among the Test of Nonverbal Intelligence, Ammons' Quick Test, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship among IQs of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R), Test of Nonverbal Intelligence (TONI), and Quick Test (QT) were investigated using 51 students (grades 2-8) with suspected learning problems. The subjects scored significantly higher on the TONI than on the WISC-R Verbal and Full Scales. (Author/VW)

Vance, Booney; And Others

1986-01-01

301

The similar effects of verbal and non-verbal intervening tasks on word recall in an elderly population.  

PubMed

Vulnerability to retroactive interference has been shown to increase with cognitive aging. Consistent with the findings of memory and aging literature, the authors of the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) suggest that a non-verbal task be administered during the test's delay interval to minimize the effects of retroactive interference on delayed recall. The goal of the present study was to determine the extent to which retroactive interference caused by non-verbal and verbal intervening tasks affects recall of verbal information in non-demented, older adults. The effects of retroactive interference on recall of words during Long-Delay recall on the California Verbal Learning Test-II (CVLT-II) were evaluated. Participants included 85 adults age 60 and older. During a 20-minute delay interval on the CVLT-II, participants received either a verbal (WAIS-III Vocabulary or Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-IIIB) or non-verbal (Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices or WAIS-III Block Design) intervening task. Similarly to previous research with young adults (Williams & Donovick, 2008 ), older adults recalled the same number of words across all groups, regardless of the type of intervening task. These findings suggest that the administration of verbal intervening tasks during the CVLT-II do not elicit more retroactive interference than non-verbal intervening tasks, and thus verbal tasks need not be avoided during the delay interval of the CVLT-II. PMID:24641093

Williams, B R; Sullivan, S K; Morra, L F; Williams, J R; Donovick, P J

2014-04-01

302

Interpersonal DeceptionIX. Effects of Social Skill and Nonverbal Communication on Deception Success and Detection Accuracy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interpersonal Deception Theory (IDT) posits that socially skilled individuals are better able to project truthful demeanors and evade detection than are unskilled individuals. IDT also predicts that social skills benefit receivers, making them better able to detect deception. Past research by Riggio, Thcker, Throckmorton, and Widaman in 1987 (in two separate studies) has shown that socially skilled individuals emit nonverbal

Judee K. Burgoon; David B. Buller; Laura K. Guerrero

1995-01-01

303

Measuring Verbal and Non-Verbal Communication in Aphasia: Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of the Scenario Test  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This study explores the psychometric qualities of the Scenario Test, a new test to assess daily-life communication in severe aphasia. The test is innovative in that it: (1) examines the effectiveness of verbal and non-verbal communication; and (2) assesses patients' communication in an interactive setting, with a supportive…

van der Meulen, Ineke; van de Sandt-Koenderman, W. Mieke E.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Ribbers, Gerard M.

2010-01-01

304

The Changing Role Behaviors of Educational Administrators During Role Simulation Training: Perceptions of Verbal and Non-Verbal Interaction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Included in a current genre of studies on dyadic interaction (i.e., communication involving only two people), the study reported herein focuses on dyadic verbal, nonverbal, and proxemic behaviors and their meanings. The study is inductive in nature and is, by intent, descriptive and analytic rather than predictive. The subjects for the study were…

Frank, Frederick P.

305

A System for Real-Time Multimodal Analysis of Nonverbal Affective Social Interaction in User-Centric Media  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a multimodal system for real-time analysis of nonverbal affective social interaction in small groups of users. The focus is on two major aspects of affective social interaction: the synchronization of the affective behavior within a small group and the emergence of functional roles, such as leadership. A small group of users is modeled as a complex system

Giovanna Varni; Gualtiero Volpe; Antonio Camurri

2010-01-01

306

Memory and Reasoning Abilities Assessed by the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test: A Reliable Component Analysis (RCA) Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Applied reliable component analysis (RCA) to the normative data (2,100 children and adolescents) for the Universal Nonverbal Intelligence Test (UNIT) (A. Bracken and R. McCallum, 1998) to allow for the computation of reliable uncorrelated memory and reasoning scores. RCA sores were highly replicable, had good convergent validity, and had greater…

Caruso, John C.; Witkiewitz, Katie

2001-01-01

307

Teaching Young Nonverbal Children with Autism Useful Speech: A Pilot Study of the Denver Model and PROMPT Interventions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This single subject design study examined two models of intervention: Denver Model (which merges behavioral, developmental, and relationship-oriented intervention), and PROMPT (a neuro-developmental approach for speech production disorders). Ten young, nonverbal children with autism were matched in pairs and randomized to treatment. They received…

Rogers, Sally J.; Hayden, Deborah; Hepburn, Susan; Charlifue-Smith, Renee; Hall, Terry; Hayes, Athena

2006-01-01

308

Teachers Supporting Teachers in Learning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diantha Lay is principal of an elementary school in Montgomery County, Maryland. When she wrote this chapter, she was just starting a new position for the county as a staff development teacher. Earlier she had been a second- and a fourth-grade teacher with a passion for science. When her county decided to establish the new position of staff development teacher in every school, Diantha embarked on a new adventure. In this chapter, she describes the formation of teacher study groups as she began to engage colleagues in developing a professional learning community in their school.

Lay, Diantha

2007-01-01

309

Teacher Burnout.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher burnout is characterized by three factors: emotional exhaustion and fatigue; negative, cynical attitudes towards students; and the loss of feelings of accomplishment on the job. Important predictors of burnout include a lack of participation in decision-making, inappropriate job expectations, a lack of teacher autonomy, and role conflict.…

USA Today, 1985

1985-01-01

310

Teacher's Niche  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website has information and links to resources for ocean sciences teachers located in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The resources include professional development opportunities, student opportunities, teaching resources and lessons, and organizations and agencies to connect teachers with ocean science materials.

311

Teacher Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Included in this summary analysis of three journal articles and two documents on teacher evaluation are reports that touch on difficulties facing school officials in developing a teacher evaluation system and suggestions for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of an evaluation system. The first article, by Susan S. Stodolsky, challenges…

Ellis, Thomas I.

1986-01-01

312

Teacher Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-page introduction is followed by summaries of articles and documents on teacher competency testing. George F. Madaus argues that, although tests serve some useful functions, treating them as a major mechanism for reforming education is questionable. Peter A. Garcia examines the negative impact of testing on minority teachers and minorities…

Dunn, Judy; And Others

1987-01-01

313

Teacher's Counselor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An elementary school teacher, an independent free soul, stimulates his students toward a higher plateau of learning but also alienates his fellow teachers, including the school principal. Is it more important to conform or to motivate one's students? An elementary counselor attempts to solve the problem. (RK)

Noon, Elizabeth F.

1977-01-01

314

Teacher Workspaces  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Well-designed and -equipped teacher workspaces provide the opportunity to improve student achievement at every step of their K-12 education. Shared workspace enhances communication among teachers as they evaluate student performance individually and collectively, and share insights with one another. This paper addresses the key elements found in…

Gordon, Douglas

2010-01-01

315

Individual Differences in Inhibitory Control, Not Non-Verbal Number Acuity, Correlate with Mathematics Achievement  

PubMed Central

Given the well-documented failings in mathematics education in many Western societies, there has been an increased interest in understanding the cognitive underpinnings of mathematical achievement. Recent research has proposed the existence of an Approximate Number System (ANS) which allows individuals to represent and manipulate non-verbal numerical information. Evidence has shown that performance on a measure of the ANS (a dot comparison task) is related to mathematics achievement, which has led researchers to suggest that the ANS plays a critical role in mathematics learning. Here we show that, rather than being driven by the nature of underlying numerical representations, this relationship may in fact be an artefact of the inhibitory control demands of some trials of the dot comparison task. This suggests that recent work basing mathematics assessments and interventions around dot comparison tasks may be inappropriate.

Gilmore, Camilla; Attridge, Nina; Clayton, Sarah; Cragg, Lucy; Johnson, Samantha; Marlow, Neil; Simms, Victoria; Inglis, Matthew

2013-01-01

316

Mathematical difficulties in nonverbal learning disability or co-morbid dyscalculia and dyslexia.  

PubMed

The main goal of the present study was to shed further light on the weaknesses of children with different profiles of mathematical difficulties, testing children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD), co-morbid dyscalculia and dyslexia (D&D), or typical development (TD). Sixteen children with NLD, 15 with D&D, and 16 with TD completed tasks derived from Butterworth (2003 ) and divided into: a capacity subscale (i.e., a number-dots comparison task, a number comparison task, and a dots comparison task); and an achievement subscale (i.e., mental calculations and arithmetical fact retrieval). Children with NLD were impaired in the dots comparison task, children with D&D in the mental calculation and arithmetical facts. PMID:23971493

Mammarella, Irene C; Bomba, Monica; Caviola, Sara; Broggi, Fiorenza; Neri, Francesca; Lucangeli, Daniela; Nacinovich, Renata

2013-01-01

317

Evidence for impaired verbal identification but intact nonverbal recognition of fearful body postures in Asperger's syndrome.  

PubMed

While most studies of emotion recognition in Asperger's Syndrome (AS) have focused solely on the verbal decoding of affective states, the current research employed the novel technique of using both nonverbal matching and verbal labeling tasks to examine the decoding of emotional body postures and facial expressions. AS participants performed as accurately as controls at matching fear body postures, but were significantly less accurate than controls verbally identifying these same stimuli. This profile arguably indicates that that while the AS participants were aware that the fear body posture stimuli represented a distinct emotion, they were unsure as to which specific emotion. In addition, the AS participants took significantly longer than the controls to respond to anger body posture stimuli on a matching task. However, in contrast to previous studies, AS and control participants did not differ significantly in their responses to facial expression stimuli, in terms of either accuracy or response times. PMID:23179341

Doody, John P; Bull, Peter

2013-07-01

318

Like father, like son: periventricular nodular heterotopia and nonverbal learning disorder.  

PubMed

Periventricular nodular heterotopia is a common malformation of cortical development in which the migration of developing neurons destined for the cerebral cortex is abbreviated. Bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia is most commonly an X-linked disorder that involves mutations in the filamin A (FLNA) gene, but an autosomal recessive form and sporadic forms have been identified. To our knowledge, autosomal dominant transmission of isolated periventricular nodular heterotopia has not been reported. Periventricular nodular heterotopia has a heterogeneous phenotype, associated commonly with seizure disorder, and more recently with reading deficits and visual-spatial deficits in some patients. We present a father and son with bilateral periventricular nodular heterotopia and similar visual-spatial learning deficits, consistent with nonverbal learning disability. PMID:18660478

McCann, Marcia V; Pongonis, Stephen J; Golomb, Meredith R; Edwards-Brown, Mary; Christensen, Celanie K; Sokol, Deborah K

2008-08-01

319

The Influence of Expertise in Simultaneous Interpreting on Non-Verbal Executive Processes  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to explore non-verbal executive processes in simultaneous interpreters. Simultaneous interpreters, bilinguals without any training in simultaneous interpreting, and control monolinguals performed the Wisconsin card sorting task (WCST; Experiment 1) and the Simon task (Experiment 2). Performance on WCST was thought to index cognitive flexibility while Simon task performance was considered an index of inhibitory processes. Simultaneous interpreters outperformed bilinguals and monolinguals on the WCST by showing reduced number of attempts to infer the rule, few errors, and few previous-category perseverations. However, simultaneous interpreters presented Simon effects similar to those found in bilinguals and monolinguals. Together, these results suggest that experience in interpreting is associated with changes in control processes required to perform interpreting tasks.

Yudes, Carolina; Macizo, Pedro; Bajo, Teresa

2011-01-01

320

Nonverbal communication, play, and language in Greek young children with Williams syndrome.  

PubMed

This study investigated nonverbal communicative abilities, functional play, and symbolic play in 11 toddlers with Williams syndrome (WS) during spontaneous communication. The WS group was compared with a group of typically developing (TD) children matched for linguistic abilities. Results demonstrated that children with WS exhibited significantly less spontaneous functional play and imaginary play compared to TD children. On the other hand, children with WS showed significantly more showing and giving guided by their parents than TD children. In addition, it was shown that in both groups aspects of symbolic play are correlated with expressive as well as receptive language. These findings are interpreted through the Theory of Intersubjectivity, which contrasts with the Theory of Mind and suggests that shared arbitrary purposes regarding actions on objects constitute presuppositions for the development of language. PMID:21229406

Papaeliou, Christina F; Fryssira, Helen; Kodakos, Anastassios; Kaila, Maria; Benaveli, Evangelia; Michaelides, Konstantinos; Stroggilos, Vassilis; Vrettopoulou, Maria; Polemikos, Nikitas

2011-01-01

321

Emotional signals in nonverbal interaction: dyadic facilitation and convergence in expressions, appraisals, and feelings.  

PubMed

We examined social facilitation and emotional convergence in amusement, sadness, and fear in dynamic interactions. Dyads of friends or strangers jointly watched emotion-eliciting films while they either could or could not communicate nonverbally. We assessed three components of each emotion (expressions, appraisals, and feelings), as well as attention to and social motives toward the co-participant. In Study 1, participants interacted through a mute videoconference. In Study 2, they sat next to each other and either were or were not separated by a partition. Results revealed that facilitation and convergence are not uniform across different emotions and emotion components. Particularly strong supporting patterns emerged for the facilitation of and convergence in smiling. When direct interaction was possible (Study 2), friends showed a general tendency for strong convergence, with the exception of fear-related appraisals. This suggests that underlying processes of emotional contagion and social appraisal are differentially relevant for different emotions. PMID:22471853

Bruder, Martin; Dosmukhambetova, Dina; Nerb, Josef; Manstead, Antony S R

2012-01-01

322

Do individuals with high functioning autism have the IQ profile associated with nonverbal learning disability?  

PubMed Central

Previously researchers have noted a high level of occurrence of the IQ profile associated with nonverbal learning disability (NLD) in Asperger syndrome (ASP) but not in high functioning autism (HFA). We examined the IQ profile scores of a large sample of children (n = 69) and adults (n = 77) with HFA, stringently diagnosed according to ADOS, ADI-R, and DSM-IV criteria, and a corresponding sample of typical child (n = 72) and adult controls (n = 107). At least one of the three primary components of the Wechsler pattern seen in NLD were found in 17–26% of the children and 20–32% of the adults with HFA. All three components occurred in slightly more than 5% of the children and adults with autism. Overall, the VIQ > PIQ profile seen in NLD occurred in 18% of the sample of individuals stringently diagnosed with HFA. Therefore, obtaining this IQ profile is not a valid clinical discriminator between NLD and HFA.

Williams, Diane L.; Goldstein, Gerald; Kojkowski, Nicole; Minshew, Nancy J.

2008-01-01

323

Mild cognitive impairment: effect of education on the verbal and nonverbal tasks performance decline.  

PubMed

We sought to longitudinally evaluate the potential association of educational level with performance on verbal and nonverbal tasks in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated patients with MCI, age >50 years, no medication intake, absent vascular risk factors, and no lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each patient underwent a clinical assessment packet and a series of neuropsychological tests of the language and constructional praxis subtests of Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMGOG) and the Boston naming test (BNT), at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Educational levels were defined taking into account the total years of education, the school level, and diplomas. MCI patients with low education level showed a stepwise reduction in scores of naming objects (NO; P = 0.009), definition (DF; P = 0.012), language (LT; P = 0.021), constructional praxis (CD; P = 0.022), confrontation naming skills (BXB; P = 0.033), phonemic help (BFB; P = 0.041), and BNT (P = 0.002). Analysis of covariance, controlling for baseline scores, showed that education was associated with NO score (P = 0.002), DF score (P = 0.005), LT (P = 0.008), CD score (P = 0.008), BXB score (44.36 ± 1.84, P = 0.0001), BFB (P = 0.022), and BNT (P = 0.004). Our findings indicate that education appeared to affect verbal and nonverbal task performance in MCI patients. Despite the fact that higher educated patients are more acquainted with the tasks, slower deterioration in consecutive follow-up examinations could be explained by the cognitive reserve theory. The potential association of this protective effect with delayed onset of symptoms deserves further investigation. PMID:23139907

Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tsiakiri-Vatamidis, Anna; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Serdari, Aspasia; Heliopoulos, John; Livaditis, Miltos; Piperidou, Charitomeni

2012-09-01

324

Mild cognitive impairment: effect of education on the verbal and nonverbal tasks performance decline  

PubMed Central

We sought to longitudinally evaluate the potential association of educational level with performance on verbal and nonverbal tasks in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated patients with MCI, age >50 years, no medication intake, absent vascular risk factors, and no lesions on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Each patient underwent a clinical assessment packet and a series of neuropsychological tests of the language and constructional praxis subtests of Cambridge Cognitive Examination (CAMGOG) and the Boston naming test (BNT), at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Educational levels were defined taking into account the total years of education, the school level, and diplomas. MCI patients with low education level showed a stepwise reduction in scores of naming objects (NO; P = 0.009), definition (DF; P = 0.012), language (LT; P = 0.021), constructional praxis (CD; P = 0.022), confrontation naming skills (BXB; P = 0.033), phonemic help (BFB; P = 0.041), and BNT (P = 0.002). Analysis of covariance, controlling for baseline scores, showed that education was associated with NO score (P = 0.002), DF score (P = 0.005), LT (P = 0.008), CD score (P = 0.008), BXB score (44.36 ± 1.84, P = 0.0001), BFB (P = 0.022), and BNT (P = 0.004). Our findings indicate that education appeared to affect verbal and nonverbal task performance in MCI patients. Despite the fact that higher educated patients are more acquainted with the tasks, slower deterioration in consecutive follow-up examinations could be explained by the cognitive reserve theory. The potential association of this protective effect with delayed onset of symptoms deserves further investigation.

Vadikolias, Konstantinos; Tsiakiri-Vatamidis, Anna; Tripsianis, Grigorios; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Serdari, Aspasia; Heliopoulos, John; Livaditis, Miltos; Piperidou, Charitomeni

2012-01-01

325

Individual differences in non-verbal number acuity correlate with maths achievement.  

PubMed

Human mathematical competence emerges from two representational systems. Competence in some domains of mathematics, such as calculus, relies on symbolic representations that are unique to humans who have undergone explicit teaching. More basic numerical intuitions are supported by an evolutionarily ancient approximate number system that is shared by adults, infants and non-human animals-these groups can all represent the approximate number of items in visual or auditory arrays without verbally counting, and use this capacity to guide everyday behaviour such as foraging. Despite the widespread nature of the approximate number system both across species and across development, it is not known whether some individuals have a more precise non-verbal 'number sense' than others. Furthermore, the extent to which this system interfaces with the formal, symbolic maths abilities that humans acquire by explicit instruction remains unknown. Here we show that there are large individual differences in the non-verbal approximation abilities of 14-year-old children, and that these individual differences in the present correlate with children's past scores on standardized maths achievement tests, extending all the way back to kindergarten. Moreover, this correlation remains significant when controlling for individual differences in other cognitive and performance factors. Our results show that individual differences in achievement in school mathematics are related to individual differences in the acuity of an evolutionarily ancient, unlearned approximate number sense. Further research will determine whether early differences in number sense acuity affect later maths learning, whether maths education enhances number sense acuity, and the extent to which tertiary factors can affect both. PMID:18776888

Halberda, Justin; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Feigenson, Lisa

2008-10-01

326

Effects of modafinil on non-verbal cognition, task enjoyment and creative thinking in healthy volunteers  

PubMed Central

Background Modafinil, a putative cognitive enhancing drug, has previously been shown to improve performance of healthy volunteers as well as patients with attention deficit disorder and schizophrenia, mainly in tests of executive functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of modafinil on non-verbal cognitive functions in healthy volunteers, with a particular focus on variations of cognitive load, measures of motivational factors and the effects on creative problem-solving. Methods A double-blind placebo-controlled parallel design study evaluated the effect of 200 mg of modafinil (N = 32) or placebo (N = 32) in non-sleep deprived healthy volunteers. Non-verbal tests of divergent and convergent thinking were used to measure creativity. A new measure of task motivation was used, together with more levels of difficulty on neuropsychological tests from the CANTAB battery. Results Improvements under modafinil were seen on spatial working memory, planning and decision making at the most difficult levels, as well as visual pattern recognition memory following delay. Subjective ratings of enjoyment of task performance were significantly greater under modafinil compared with placebo, but mood ratings overall were not affected. The effects of modafinil on creativity were inconsistent and did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions Modafinil reliably enhanced task enjoyment and performance on several cognitive tests of planning and working memory, but did not improve paired associates learning. The findings confirm that modafinil can enhance aspects of highly demanding cognitive performance in non-sleep deprived individuals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Cognitive Enhancers’.

Muller, U.; Rowe, J.B.; Rittman, T.; Lewis, C.; Robbins, T.W.; Sahakian, B.J.

2013-01-01

327

Non-verbal emotion communication training induces specific changes in brain function and structure  

PubMed Central

The perception of emotional cues from voice and face is essential for social interaction. However, this process is altered in various psychiatric conditions along with impaired social functioning. Emotion communication trainings have been demonstrated to improve social interaction in healthy individuals and to reduce emotional communication deficits in psychiatric patients. Here, we investigated the impact of a non-verbal emotion communication training (NECT) on cerebral activation and brain structure in a controlled and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry study. NECT-specific reductions in brain activity occurred in a distributed set of brain regions including face and voice processing regions as well as emotion processing- and motor-related regions presumably reflecting training-induced familiarization with the evaluation of face/voice stimuli. Training-induced changes in non-verbal emotion sensitivity at the behavioral level and the respective cerebral activation patterns were correlated in the face-selective cortical areas in the posterior superior temporal sulcus and fusiform gyrus for valence ratings and in the temporal pole, lateral prefrontal cortex and midbrain/thalamus for the response times. A NECT-induced increase in gray matter (GM) volume was observed in the fusiform face area. Thus, NECT induces both functional and structural plasticity in the face processing system as well as functional plasticity in the emotion perception and evaluation system. We propose that functional alterations are presumably related to changes in sensory tuning in the decoding of emotional expressions. Taken together, these findings highlight that the present experimental design may serve as a valuable tool to investigate the altered behavioral and neuronal processing of emotional cues in psychiatric disorders as well as the impact of therapeutic interventions on brain function and structure.

Kreifelts, Benjamin; Jacob, Heike; Bruck, Carolin; Erb, Michael; Ethofer, Thomas; Wildgruber, Dirk

2013-01-01

328

Judging the urgency of non-verbal auditory alarms: a case study.  

PubMed

When designed correctly, non-verbal auditory alarms can convey different levels of urgency to the aircrew, and thereby permit the operator to establish the appropriate level of priority to address the alarmed condition. The conveyed level of urgency of five non-verbal auditory alarms presently used in the Canadian Forces CH-146 Griffon helicopter was investigated. Pilots of the CH-146 Griffon helicopter and non-pilots rated the perceived urgency of the signals using a rating scale. The pilots also ranked the urgency of the alarms in a post-experiment questionnaire to reflect their assessment of the actual situation that triggers the alarms. The results of this investigation revealed that participants' ratings of perceived urgency appear to be based on the acoustic properties of the alarms which are known to affect the listener's perceived level of urgency. Although for 28% of the pilots the mapping of perceived urgency to the urgency of their perception of the triggering situation was statistically significant for three of the five alarms, the overall data suggest that the triggering situations are not adequately conveyed by the acoustic parameters inherent in the alarms. The pilots' judgement of the triggering situation was intended as a means of evaluating the reliability of the alerting system. These data will subsequently be discussed with respect to proposed enhancements in alerting systems as it relates to addressing the problem of phase of flight. These results call for more serious consideration of incorporating situational awareness in the design and assignment of auditory alarms in aircraft. PMID:15204277

Arrabito, G Robert; Mondor, Todd; Kent, Kimberley

2004-06-22

329

Relationships between Teacher Characteristics, Interpersonal Teacher Behaviour and Teacher Wellbeing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The classroom as a microsystem is characterised by many interpersonal relationships. These relationships are perceived differently by the teacher than they are by the students. In our research we examine the relationship between formal teacher characteristics, interpersonal teacher behaviour as perceived by the teacher, and teacher wellbeing.…

Van Petegem, K.; Creemers, B. P. M.; Rossel, Y.; Aelterman, A.

2005-01-01

330

Teacher Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Find links for teachers below: (Please close all windows when done.) Garden City Schools Teacher Account - Use your current email ID as the google ID. Example schultn. Your initial password is "s12345678", and you will be required to change it when you first login. Example MRC Schedule Home - Garden City Public Schools Favorite Resources Email Login Email Login from Home (off network) MI Star (Zangle) Aesoponline Discovery Education (United Streaming) Frontline Teacher Center (PBS) - FREE online videos, lesson plans, and Web-exclusive resources Freeology-Free Printable Graphic Organizers IT Requests -organization account ...

Schultz, Ms.

2007-04-04

331

Teacher's Counselor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dan DuCote brought in his friend Mike Shane to be the sixth-grade team leader and introduce intraclass instruction. Mike did just that, without consulting the other three teachers. And the war was on! (Editor)

Noon, Elizabeth F.

1977-01-01

332

Substitute Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Our lives are ones of uncertainty and surprise, yin and yang existences. Some things we can control and others we are powerless to command, even with the best intentions. Teachers are not exempt from emergencies, jury duty, and illness. Luckily, most schools plan for such incidents by having willing substitutes on hand. Teachers need to follow the Scout's motto to "be prepared" and keep the classroom running smoothly and efficiently for students and subs.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

333

The Utility of Math Difficulties, Internalized Psychopathology, and Visual-Spatial Deficits to Identify Children With the Nonverbal Learning Disability Syndrome: Evidence for a Visualspatial Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the criteria currently employed to identify children with the nonverbal learning disability syndrome (NVLD). The most widely accepted definition of NVLD relies on deficits in visual-spatial-organizational, tactile-perceptual, psychomotor, and nonverbal problem-solving skills. These deficits are believed to coexist with strengths in rote verbal learning, phoneme-grapheme matching, verbal output, and verbal classification. The combination of these assets and

Bonny J. Forrest

2004-01-01

334

An Integrated Analysis of Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction in Conventional and Distance Learning Environments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As increasing numbers of educational institutions implement distance learning (DL) programs, educators need to know how teaching and learning processes change when teachers and learners are no longer in the same place at the same time. Understanding the theoretical and practical implications of these changes can help teachers to compensate…

Offir, Baruch; Lev, Yossi; Lev, Yael; Barth, Ingrid; Shteinbok, Arkadi

2004-01-01

335

The Functional Anatomy of Non-Verbal (Pitch Memory) Function in Left and Right Anterior Temporal Lobectomy Patients  

PubMed Central

An fMRI pitch memory task was administered to left and right anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) patients. The goal was to verify the neuroanatomical correlates of non-verbal memory, and to determine if pitch memory tasks can identify cognitive risk prior to ATL. The data showed that the bilateral posterior superior temporal lobes implement pitch memory in both ATL patients and NCs (normal controls), indicating that the task can be accomplished with either anterior temporal lobe resected. NCs activate the posterior temporal lobes more strongly than ATL patients during highly accurate performance. In contrast, both ATL groups activate the anterior cingulate in association with accuracy. While our data clarifies the functional neuroanatomy of pitch memory, it also indicates that such tasks do not serve well to lateralize and functionally map potentially “at risk” non-verbal memory skills prior to ATL.

Tracy, Joseph I.; Hernandez, R. Nick; Mayekar, Sonal; Osipowicz, Karol; Corbett, Brian; Pascua, Mark; Sperling, Michael R.; Sharan, Ashwini D.

2012-01-01

336

Towards a physiological signal-based access solution for a non-verbal adolescent with severe and multiple disabilities.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective: To find physiologically arousing stimuli and labile physiological channels in a non-verbal adolescent with severe and multiple congenital disabilities, who did not have a reliable means of communication. Methods: The client was repeatedly presented with visual and audiovisual stimuli, representing variations of six contextual factors over three sessions in a one month period. For each stimulus, reactions were detected in the client's four peripheral autonomic nervous system signals using a rule-based classification algorithm. Results: During the presentation of audiovisual stimuli, the number of physiological reactions significantly differed from that observed in baseline (?(2)?=?3.93, p?=?0.0476). Aural stimuli articulated in an unfamiliar voice, and aural stimuli containing anticipatory patterns were also physiologically arousing. Fingertip temperature was the client's most labile physiological signal. Conclusions: The results of this case study suggest that physiological data may complement caregiver acumen in deciphering the reactions of non-verbal clients with severe and multiple disabilities. PMID:24087842

Memarian, Negar; Blain-Moraes, Stefanie; Chau, Tom

2014-08-01

337

A pilot study on the efficacy of melodic based communication therapy for eliciting speech in nonverbal children with autism.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of melodic based communication therapy (MBCT) to traditional speech and language therapy for eliciting speech in nonverbal children with autism. Participants were 12 nonverbal children with autism ages 5 through 7 randomly assigned to either treatment group. Both groups made significant progress after treatment. The MBCT group progressed significantly in number of verbal attempts after weeks 1 through 4 and number of correct words after weeks 1 and 3, while the traditional group progressed significantly after weeks 4 and 5. No significant differences in number of verbal attempts or number of correct words were noted between groups following treatment. A significant number of new words were heard in the home environment for the MBCT group (p = .04). Participants in the MBCT group had more imitative attempts (p = .03). MBCT appears to be a valid form of intervention for children with autism. PMID:23065117

Sandiford, Givona A; Mainess, Karen J; Daher, Noha S

2013-06-01

338

The Influence of Language Brokering on Hispanic Teenagers' Acculturation, Academic Performance, and Nonverbal Decoding Skills: A Preliminary Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study replicates and extends R. Buriel, W. Perez, T. L. De Ment, D. V. Chavez, and V. R. Moran's (1998) study to assess the influence of language brokering on acculturation, biculturalism, and nonverbal decoding in U.S. culture as well as the subsequent influence of these variables on academic self-efficacy and grade point average. Bilingual Hispanic teenagers attending U.S. public

C. Leah Acoach; Lynne M. Webb

2004-01-01

339

Teaching Young Nonverbal Children with Autism Useful Speech: A Pilot Study of the Denver Model and PROMPT Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This single subject design study examined two models of intervention: Denver Model (which merges behavioral, developmental,\\u000a and relationship-oriented intervention), and PROMPT (a neuro-developmental approach for speech production disorders). Ten\\u000a young, nonverbal children with autism were matched in pairs and randomized to treatment. They received 12 1-h weekly sessions\\u000a of therapy and daily 1-h home intervention delivered by parents. Fidelity criteria

Sally J. Rogers; Deborah Hayden; Susan Hepburn; Renee Charlifue-Smith; Terry Hall; Athena Hayes

2006-01-01

340

Real-Time Recognition of Affective States from Nonverbal Features of Speech and Its Application for Public Speaking Skill Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new classification algorithm for real-time inference of affect from nonverbal features of speech and applies it to assessing public speaking skills. The classifier identifies simultaneously occurring affective states by recognizing correlations between emotions and over 6,000 functional-feature combinations. Pairwise classifiers are constructed for nine classes from the Mind Reading emotion corpus, yielding an average cross-validation accuracy

Tomas Pfister; Peter Robinson

2011-01-01

341

Preparing Preservice Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

One way to improve teacher retention is to adequately prepare preservice teachers while they are enrolled in professional teacher education programs at colleges and universities. In a model developed at Towson University, preservice science teachers gain

Haines, Sarah

2002-09-01

342

Working with New Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Work with first-year teachers in the greater Haifa area is reported. The four teachers continue to meet with their former university teacher education instructor, who helps them in their transition from student to teacher. (LB)

Friedland, Paula

1992-01-01

343

Healthy children show gender differences in correlations between nonverbal cognitive ability and brain activation during visual perception.  

PubMed

Humans perceive textual and nontextual information in visual perception, and both depend on language. In childhood education, students exhibit diverse perceptual abilities, such that some students process textual information better and some process nontextual information better. These predispositions involve many factors, including cognitive ability and learning preference. However, the relationship between verbal and nonverbal cognitive abilities and brain activation during visual perception has not yet been examined in children. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the relationship between nonverbal and verbal cognitive abilities and brain activation during nontextual visual perception in large numbers of children. A significant positive correlation was found between nonverbal cognitive abilities and brain activation in the right temporoparietal junction, which is thought to be related to attention reorienting. This significant positive correlation existed only in boys. These findings suggested that male brain activation differed from female brain activation, and that this depended on individual cognitive processes, even if there was no gender difference in behavioral performance. PMID:24937269

Asano, Kohei; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawashima, Ryuta

2014-08-01

344

How nonverbal communication shapes the doctor-patient relationship: from paternalism to the ethics of care in oncology.  

PubMed

The purpose of this research, led in the wake of years of pressure to reject paternalism, was to study whether controlled practice of nonverbal communication by doctors inheres a continued risk of paternalistic attitudes in oncology clinic interviews (chosen to illustrate the doctor-patient relationship). This study involved qualitative descriptive research based on interview observations and questionnaires and mobilized recognized theory borrowed from sociology and anthropology. We found that the legislative framework governing the doctor-patient relationship has simply shifted the paternalism issue from verbal communication over to a new area that doctors have not yet mastered and patients have not yet understood, i.e., nonverbal communication. This study shows that all the laws framing the doctor-patient relationship can be circumvented, and that by controlling nonverbal communication, the doctor can fall back into paternalism. The rejection of paternalism therefore needs to lead to an appropriate reading of the patient's story, which in ethical terms can only happen if hospital structures are made non-paternalizing by design, if doctors learn to understand the patient's different chronemic timeframe, and if doctors committedly engage in the Hippocratic Oath codified through the ethics of care. PMID:24558741

Bommier, C; Mamzer, M F; Desmarchelier, D; Hervé, C

2013-12-01

345

Narrative retelling in children with neurodevelopmental disorders: is there a role for nonverbal temporal-sequencing skills?  

PubMed

Oral narrative retelling is often problematic for children with communicative and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, beyond a suggested role of language level, little is known about the basis of narrative performance. In this study we examine whether oral narrative retelling might be associated not just with language level but also with skills related to nonverbal narrative temporal sequencing. A diagnostically heterogeneous sample of Swedish-speaking children with a full scale IQ >70 was included in the study (N = 55; age 6-9 years). Narrative retelling skills were measured using the three subscores from the bus story test (BST). Independent predictors included (1) temporal sequencing skills according to a picture arrangement test and (2) a language skills factor consisting of definitional vocabulary and receptive grammar. Regression analyses show that language skills predicted BST Sentence Length and Subordinate Clauses subscores, while both temporal sequencing and language were independently linked with the BST Information subscore. When subdividing the sample based on nonverbal temporal sequencing level, a significant subgroup difference was found only for BST Information. Finally, a principal component analysis shows that temporal sequencing and BST Information loaded on a common factor, separately from the language measures. It is concluded that language level is an important correlate of narrative performance more generally in this diagnostically heterogeneous sample, and that nonverbal temporal sequencing functions are important especially for conveying story information. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:23855443

Johnels, Jakob Åsberg; Hagberg, Bibbi; Gillberg, Christopher; Miniscalco, Carmela

2013-10-01

346

Influence of verbal and nonverbal references to print on preschoolers' visual attention to print during storybook reading.  

PubMed

How much do preschool children look at print within storybooks when adults read to them? This study sought to answer this question as well as to examine the effects of adult verbal and nonverbal references to print on children's visual attention to print during storybook reading. Forty-four preschool-aged children participated in this study designed to determine the amount of visual attention children paid to print in 4 planned variations of storybook reading. Children's visual attention to print was examined when adults commented and questioned about print (verbal print condition) or pointed to and tracked the print (nonverbal print condition), relative to 2 comparison conditions (verbatim reading and verbal picture conditions). Results showed that children rarely look at print, with about 5%-6% of their fixations allocated to print in verbatim and verbal picture reading conditions. However, preschoolers' visual attention to print increases significantly when adults verbally and nonverbally reference print; both reading styles exerted similar effects. The authors conclude that explicit referencing of print is 1 way to increase young children's contacts with print during shared storybook reading. PMID:18473649

Justice, Laura M; Pullen, Paige C; Pence, Khara

2008-05-01

347

Neural correlates of non-verbal social interactions: a dual-EEG study.  

PubMed

Successful non-verbal social interaction between human beings requires dynamic and efficient encoding of others' gestures. Our study aimed at identifying neural markers of social interaction and goal variations in a non-verbal task. For this, we recorded simultaneously the electroencephalogram from two participants (dual-EEG), an actor and an observer, and their arm/hand kinematics in a real face-to-face paradigm. The observer watched "biological actions" performed by the human actor and "non-biological actions" performed by a robot. All actions occurred within an interactive or non-interactive context depending on whether the observer had to perform a complementary action or not (e.g., the actor presents a saucer and the observer either places the corresponding cup or does nothing). We analysed the EEG signals of both participants (i.e., beta (~20 Hz) oscillations as an index of cortical motor activity and motor related potentials (MRPs)). We identified markers of social interactions by synchronising EEG to the onset of the actor's movement. Movement kinematics did not differ in the two context conditions and the MRPs of the actor were similar in the two conditions. For the observer, however, an observation-related MRP was measured in all conditions but was more negative in the interactive context over fronto-central electrodes. Moreover, this feature was specific to biological actions. Concurrently, the suppression of beta oscillations was observed in the actor's EEG and the observer's EEG rapidly after the onset of the actor's movement. Critically, this suppression was stronger in the interactive than in the non-interactive context despite the fact that movement kinematics did not differ in the two context conditions. For the observer, this modulation was observed independently of whether the actor was a human or a robot. Our results suggest that acting in a social context induced analogous modulations of motor and sensorimotor regions in observer and actor. Sharing a common goal during an interaction seems thus to evoke a common representation of the global action that includes both actor and observer movements. PMID:24157538

Ménoret, Mathilde; Varnet, Léo; Fargier, Raphaël; Cheylus, Anne; Curie, Aurore; des Portes, Vincent; Nazir, Tatjana A; Paulignan, Yves

2014-03-01

348

Faculty Can Adjust Communication Environments to Improve Interaction with Students: The Theories That Drive the Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Higher education faculty can be more effective by recognizing what causes immediacy and approach-avoidance behavior in their surroundings, what nonverbal signals they are sending, and how to control their environment, thereby enhancing their interaction with students. This paper examines immediacy theory, approach-avoidance theory, color theory,…

Stowell, Jessica

349

Teacher as Researcher: Teacher Action Research in Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Historically, "teacher action research" and "teacher research" have been terms mostly used at the PK-12 level. Yet, embracing it fully and visibly in the teacher education realm is important because it raises awareness of the critical and transformative aspects of teaching and learning. It allows teacher research to be made visible and validated…

Souto-Manning, Mariana

2012-01-01

350

The Teacher Leader.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet describes the work of teacher leaders. Section 1, "The Teacher Leaders," describes today's teacher leadership. Section 2, "What Is Teacher Leadership?" explains that all teachers have leadership potential, and when teachers lead, principals extend their own capacity, students live in a democratic community of learners, and schools…

Barth, Roland S.

351

EQUIPping Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For many years, publications such as the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996) and The Science Teacher (TST) have encouraged teachers to focus science classes more heavily on inquiry-based instructional practice. One way to improve our teaching practice is to use a benchmark assessment to obtain a solid point of reference that honestly reflects what we do in the classroom, and then to design a developmental plan to raise the level of performance. The Electronic Quality of Inquiry Protocol (EQUIP) is helpful in providing both a benchmark and a guide to improving the quality of inquiry implemented in our classrooms.

White, Chris; Marshall, Jeff; Horton, Robert

2009-04-01

352

Power and status within small groups: An analysis of students' verbal and nonverbal behavior and responses to one another  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this research has been to determine the influence of verbal and nonverbal behavior on power and status within small groups. The interactions which took place within five small groups of students in a middle school spatial reasoning elective were analyzed. Verbal responses to requests for help were analyzed using sequential analysis techniques. Results indicated that the identity of the student asking a question or requesting help in some form or another is a better predictor of whether he/she will receive help than the type of questions he/she asks. Nonverbal behavior was analyzed for social gestures, body language, and shifts in possession of tools. Each nonverbal act was coded as either "positive" (encouraging participation) or "negative" (discouraging participation); and, the researchers found that in groups in which there was unequal participation and less "help" provided among peers (according to the verbal analysis results) there tended to be more "negative" nonverbal behavior demonstrated than in groups in which "shared talk time" and "helping behavior" were common characteristics of the norm. The combined results from the analyses of the verbal and nonverbal behavior of students within small groups were then reviewed through the conflict, power, status perspective of small group interactions in order to determine some common characteristics of high functioning (collaborative) and low functioning (non-collaborative) groups. Some common characteristics of the higher functioning groups include: few instances of conflict, shared "talk time" and decision making, inclusive leadership, frequent use of encouraging social gestures and body language, and more sharing of tools than seizing. Some shared traits among the lower functioning groups include: frequent occurrences of interpersonal conflict, a focus on process (rather than content), persuasive or alienating leadership, unequal participation and power, frequent use of discouraging social gestures and body language, and more seizing of tools than sharing. While "functionality" was easily defined, labeling groups according to this characteristic proved to be a more difficult task. Although there was clearly a "highest functioning" and a "lowest functioning" group among the five, the other three groups fell somewhere in between these two, along a continuum of group functioning.

Morris, Lynnae Carol

353

A Final Column (Rainbow Teachers, Rainbow Students).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents, in a farewell column, some reflections on educational issues and movements concerning rainbow students, including self-esteem, story sharing, nonverbal differences, racial identification, and testing. (TB)

Brooks, Charlotte K.

1996-01-01

354

A developmental ERP study of verbal and non-verbal semantic processing  

PubMed Central

To clarify how different the processing of verbal information is from the processing of meaningful non-verbal information, the present study characterized the developmental changes in neural responses to words and environmental sounds from pre-adolescence (7–9 years) through adolescence (12–14 years) to adulthood (18–25 years). Children and adults’ behavioral and electrophysiological responses (the N400 effect of event-related potentials) were compared during the processing of words and environmental sounds presented in semantically matching and mismatching picture contexts. Behavioral accuracy of picture-sound matching improved until adulthood, while reaction time measures leveled out by age 12. No major electrophysiological changes in the N400 effect were observed between pre-adolescence and adolescence. When compared to adults, children demonstrated significant maturational changes including longer latencies and larger amplitudes of the N400 effect. Interestingly, these developmental differences were driven by stimulus type: the Environmental Sound N400 effect decreased in latency from adolescence to adulthood, while no age effects were observed in response to Words. Thus, while the semantic processing of single words is well established by 7 years of age, the processing of environmental sounds continues to improve throughout development.

Cummings, Alycia; Ceponiene, Rita; Dick, Frederic; Saygin, Ayse Pinar; Townsend, Jeanne

2008-01-01

355

Joint effect of alexithymia and mood on the categorization of nonverbal emotional vocalizations.  

PubMed

The role of stable factors, such as alexithymia (i.e., difficulties identifying and expressing feelings, externally oriented cognitive style), or temporary factors, such as affective states (mood), on emotion perception has been widely investigated in the literature. However, little is known about the separate or joint effect of the alexithymia level and affective states (positive affectivity, negative affectivity) on the recognition of nonverbal emotional vocalizations (NEV) (e.g., laughs, cries, or sighs). In this study, participants had to categorize NEV communicating 10 emotions by selecting the correct verbal emotional label. Results show that the level of alexithymia is negatively correlated to the capacity to accurately categorize negative vocalizations, and more particularly sad NEV. On the other hand, negative affectivity appeared negatively correlated with the ability to accurately categorize NEV in general, and negative vocalizations in particular. After splitting the results by the alexithymia level (high vs. low scorers), significant associations between mood and accuracy rates were found in the group of high alexithymia scorers only. These findings support the idea that alexithymic features act across sensory modalities and suggest a mood-interference effect that would be stronger in those individuals. PMID:24564998

Bayot, Marie; Pleyers, Gordy; Kotsou, Ilios; Lefèvre, Nathalie; Sauter, Disa A; Vermeulen, Nicolas

2014-05-15

356

Nonverbal spatially selective attention in 4- and 5-year-old children.  

PubMed

Under some conditions 4- and 5-year-old children can differentially process sounds from attended and unattended locations. In fact, the latency of spatially selective attention effects on auditory processing as measured with event-related potentials (ERPs) is quite similar in young children and adults. However, it is not clear if developmental differences in the polarity, distribution, and duration of attention effects are best attributed to acoustic characteristics, availability of non-spatial attention cues, task demands, or domain. In the current study adults and children were instructed to attend to one of two simultaneously presented soundscapes (e.g., city sounds or night sounds) to detect targets (e.g., car horn or owl hoot) in the attended channel only. Probes presented from the same location as the attended soundscape elicited a larger negativity by 80 ms after onset in both adults and children. This initial negative difference (Nd) was followed by a larger positivity for attended probes in adults and another negativity for attended probes in children. The results indicate that the neural systems by which attention modulates early auditory processing are available for young children even when presented with nonverbal sounds. They also suggest important interactions between attention, acoustic characteristics, and maturity on auditory evoked potentials. PMID:22516369

Sanders, Lisa D; Zobel, Benjamin H

2012-07-01

357

Whorf reloaded: language effects on nonverbal number processing in first grade--a trilingual study.  

PubMed

The unit-decade compatibility effect is interpreted to reflect processes of place value integration in two-digit number magnitude comparisons. The current study aimed at elucidating the influence of language properties on the compatibility effect of Arabic two-digit numbers in Austrian, Italian, and Czech first graders. The number word systems of the three countries differ with respect to their correspondence between name and place value systems; the German language is characterized by its inversion of the order of tens and units in number words as compared with digital notations, whereas Italian number words are generally not inverted and there are both forms for Czech number words. Interestingly, the German-speaking children showed the most pronounced compatibility effect with respect to both accuracy and speed. We interpret our results as evidence for a detrimental influence of an intransparent number word system place value processing. The data corroborate a weak Whorfian hypothesis in children, with even nonverbal Arabic number processing seeming to be influenced by linguistic properties in children. PMID:21035126

Pixner, S; Moeller, K; Hermanova, V; Nuerk, H-C; Kaufmann, L

2011-02-01

358

An analysis of the criteria used to diagnose children with Nonverbal Learning Disability (NLD).  

PubMed

Based on a review of the literature, the diagnostic criteria used for children with nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) were identified as follows: (a) low visuospatial intelligence; (b) discrepancy between verbal and visuospatial intelligence; (c) visuoconstructive and fine-motor coordination skills; (d) visuospatial memory tasks; (e) reading better than mathematical achievement; and (f) socioemotional skills. An analysis of the effect size was used to investigate the strength of criteria for diagnosing NLD considering 35 empirical studies published from January 1980 to February 2011. Overall, our results showed that the most important criteria for distinguishing children with NLD from controls were as follows: a low visuospatial intelligence with a relatively good verbal intelligence, visuoconstructive and fine-motor coordination impairments, good reading decoding together with low math performance. Deficits in visuospatial memory and social skills were also present. A preliminary set of criteria for diagnosing NLD was developed on these grounds. It was concluded, however, that-although some consensus is emerging-further research is needed to definitively establish shared diagnostic criteria for children with NLD. PMID:23705673

Mammarella, Irene C; Cornoldi, Cesare

2014-05-01

359

Celebrating Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This essay presents a list of 11 qualities that outstanding teachers possess, including: (1) flexibility (being able to change plans at a moment's notice and make adjustments accordingly); (2) enthusiasm and energy (showing a drive to excite students and model positive behavior); (3) empathy (acting understanding and compassionate of parents as…

Upham, Dayle

360

Teachers' Pets.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews nine teaching aids: (1) "Our World" (Troll); (2) "Comprehensive School Health Education" (Meeks Heit Publishing); (3) "America at School" (Pleasant Company); (4) "Tomie, Tomie, Tomie" (Val Hornburg); (5) "Frog Pondering" (Frog Publications); (6) "TalentEd" (Teacher Ideas Press); (7) "Scholastic Voyages of Discovery" (Scholastic); (8) "Nose…

Broderick, Patricia; Raymond, Allen

1994-01-01

361

Teacher's Counselor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Norma Kuder's teaching career was in jeopardy. Her personal life had been a mess for a long time, and it affected her teaching. Her principal believed that Norma didn't belong in teaching, and he warned her that her contract might not be renewed. Discusses how intelligent action by the school counselor, the principal, and fellow teachers saved a…

Noon, Elizabeth F.

1977-01-01

362

Teacher's Counselor  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A popular elementary school teacher is made to face a past mistake by a student's hostile mother. Describes how, with the advice of her principal and school counselor, she overcame the problem and continued to teach her sixth-grade students. (RK)

Noon, Elizabeth F.

1977-01-01

363

Teacher workshops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Education specialists with the NASA Educator Resource Center conduct a wide variety of workshops throughout the year to aid teachers and educators in coming up with new ideas to inspire their students and also in aiding in the integration of technology into their classrooms.

1993-01-01

364

Male Teacher Shortage: Black Teachers' Perspectives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper the authors draw on the perspectives of black teachers to provide a more nuanced analysis of male teacher shortage. Interviews with two Caribbean teachers in Toronto, Canada, are employed to illuminate the limits of an explanatory framework that foregrounds the singularity of gender as a basis for advocating male teachers as role…

Martino, Wayne; Rezai-Rashti, Goli M.

2010-01-01

365

Male teacher shortage: black teachers’ perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper the authors draw on the perspectives of black teachers to provide a more nuanced analysis of male teacher shortage. Interviews with two Caribbean teachers in Toronto, Canada, are employed to illuminate the limits of an explanatory framework that foregrounds the singularity of gender as a basis for advocating male teachers as role models. The study concludes that

Wayne Martino

2010-01-01

366

Parent Empowerment and Teacher Professionalism: Teachers' Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School decentralization, which has reshaped power relations in the educational system, has empowered teachers and parents. Taking Abbott's approach to professions, the authors examine teachers' perceptions of the implications of parents' empowerment for teacher--parent relations. In-depth interviews with homeroom teachers in affluent urban…

Addi-Raccah, Audrey; Arviv-Elyashiv, Rinate

2008-01-01

367

Teacher to Teacher: Learning from Each Other.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Thirteen teachers and a teacher educator describe a year-long graduate program for experienced teachers in which they learned from each other how to become better teachers. The program, which was situated at Harvard's Graduate School of Education, included an integrative seminar, three required courses, and two elective courses. This book is…

Duckworth, Eleanor

368

TEACHER TRAINING, TEACHER QUALITY AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the effects of various types of education and training on the ability of teachers to promote student achievement. Previous studies on the subject have been hampered by inadequate measures of teacher training and difficulties addressing the non-random selection of teachers to students and of teachers to training. We address all of these limitations by estimating models with student,

Douglas N. Harris; Tim R. Sass

2007-01-01

369

Preparing Preservice Teachers to become Teacher Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since PreK-12 student achievement is the primary focus of schools, all teachers are called to serve as teachers leaders and improve learning on their campuses. Rather than waiting until they have gained experience, teachers can begin acquiring the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of teacher leaders during their preservice programs. Drawing upon…

Bond, Nathan

2011-01-01

370

Poor comprehenders in the classroom: teacher ratings of behavior in children with poor reading comprehension and its relationship with individual differences in working memory.  

PubMed

Differing etiological explanations have been proposed to account for poor comprehenders' difficulties with reading comprehension, with some researchers emphasizing working memory deficits and others arguing for oral language weaknesses playing a key causal role. The authors contrasted these two theoretical accounts using data obtained from direct measures of working memory and from teacher ratings of poor comprehenders' behavior in the classroom. At the group level, poor comprehenders showed weaknesses on verbal but not nonverbal working memory tasks, in keeping with the "language account." However, they also showed evidence of elevated levels of problem behaviors specifically associated with working memory deficits. Further analysis revealed that these group differences in working-memory-related problem behaviors were carried by a small subgroup of poor comprehenders who also displayed domain-general (verbal and nonverbal) working memory problems, argued to be reflective of "genuine" underlying working memory deficits. PMID:22907886

Pimperton, Hannah; Nation, Kate

2014-01-01

371

Teacher's Corner  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the National Park Service comes the Teachers Corner Web site on Badlands National Park. The lesson plans offered include erosion in a box, understanding rock layers, making dirt, muddying the waters, and more. Each lesson page gives a suggested grade range, key concepts, background, materials, procedure, results, and a why section that explains the scientific reasons behind the results. The pages are simple and easy to follow while containing good material that should help kids learn about geology and our national parks.

2001-01-01

372

Teacher Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Resources for Preschool Teachers in the classroom. This link will have emotion faces and a tool to create a solution box for student use. Behavior This is the home page to Positive Behavior Intervention System PBIS Entering data for check points Creative Curriculum NAYEC national page along with the IA page NAEYC IA AEYC Dr. Jean's main page with some YouTube songs Dr. Jean ...

Miller, Heather

2011-12-13

373

The Teacher Advancement Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains two essays discussing the Teacher Advancement Program (TAP) and a criticism of merit pay for teachers. Today's schools are larger, often overcrowded, and frequently staffed by temporary or inexperienced teachers. TAP was created in response to the need for teacher-quality reform. It addresses challenges of teacher quality…

Schiff, Tamara W.

2002-01-01

374

Effects of Teacher Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated the relationship between teacher training and teacher competence. The Classroom Performance Record and the Class Context/Planning Record, two instruments constructed for use with the Virginia Beginning Teacher Assistance Program, were used to study 12 competencies of 230 beginning secondary school teachers. Teachers were…

Dewalt, Mark W.

375

Teacher Conceptions of History.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores teachers' conceptions of the meaning of history. Contends that teachers' conceptions of history tend to place them in one of five typologies: storyteller, scientific historian, relativist/reformer, cosmic philosopher, or eclectic. Finds that these conceptions are related to teacher background, teacher belief, and teacher knowledge.…

Evans, Ronald W.

1989-01-01

376

Mature Teachers Matter  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses the consequences of losing mature teachers due to voluntary separation or retirement and the mindset of a mature teacher that is different from younger teachers in a number of ways. Mature teachers are colleagues over 45 years of age possessing significant experience in the field. Future trends in teacher

Berl, Patricia Scallan

2005-01-01

377

Understanding Teacher Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 12 chapters in this book interpret teacher development in relation to self-development, teacher reflection, teacher biographies, cultures of teaching, teacher careers, teachers' work, gender identity, and classroom practice. The collection begins with an introductory chapter (Andy Hargreaves and Michael G. Fullan) and continues with 11…

Hargreaves, Andy, Ed.; Fullan, Michael G., Ed.

378

A nonverbal test of knowledge attribution: a comparative study on dogs and children.  

PubMed

The sensitivity of eleven pet dogs and eleven 2.5-year-old children to others' past perceptual access was tested for object-specificity in a playful, nonverbal task in which a human Helper's knowledge state regarding the whereabouts of a hidden toy and a stick (a tool necessary for getting the out-of-reach toy) was systematically manipulated. In the four experimental conditions the Helper either participated or was absent during hiding of the toy and the stick and therefore she knew the place(s) of (1) both the toy and the stick, (2) only the toy, (3) only the stick or (4) neither of them. The subjects observed the hiding processes, but they could not reach the objects, so they had to involve the Helper to retrieve the toy. The dogs were more inclined to signal the place of the toy in each condition and indicated the location of the stick only sporadically. However the children signalled both the location of the toy and that of the stick in those situations when the Helper had similar knowledge regarding the whereabouts of them (i.e. knew or ignored both of them), and in those conditions in which the Helper was ignorant of the whereabouts of only one object the children indicated the place of this object more often than that of the known one. At the same time however, both dogs and children signalled the place of the toy more frequently if the Helper had been absent during toy-hiding compared to those conditions when she had participated in the hiding. Although this behaviour appears to correspond with the Helper's knowledge state, even the subtle distinction made by the children can be interpreted without a casual understanding of knowledge-formation in others. PMID:15895261

Virányi, Zs; Topál, J; Miklósi, A; Csányi, V

2006-01-01

379

Computerized training of non-verbal reasoning and working memory in children with intellectual disability.  

PubMed

Children with intellectual disabilities show deficits in both reasoning ability and working memory (WM) that impact everyday functioning and academic achievement. In this study we investigated the feasibility of cognitive training for improving WM and non-verbal reasoning (NVR) ability in children with intellectual disability. Participants were randomized to a 5-week adaptive training program (intervention group) or non-adaptive version of the program (active control group). Cognitive assessments were conducted prior to and directly after training and 1 year later to examine effects of the training. Improvements during training varied largely and amount of progress during training predicted transfer to WM and comprehension of instructions, with higher training progress being associated with greater transfer improvements. The strongest predictors for training progress were found to be gender, co-morbidity, and baseline capacity on verbal WM. In particular, females without an additional diagnosis and with higher baseline performance showed greater progress. No significant effects of training were observed at the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that training should be more intense or repeated in order for effects to persist in children with intellectual disabilities. A major finding of this study is that cognitive training is feasible in this clinical sample and can help improve their cognitive performance. However, a minimum cognitive capacity or training ability seems necessary for the training to be beneficial, with some individuals showing little improvement in performance. Future studies of cognitive training should take into consideration how inter-individual differences in training progress influence transfer effects and further investigate how baseline capacities predict training outcome. PMID:23060775

Söderqvist, Stina; Nutley, Sissela B; Ottersen, Jon; Grill, Katja M; Klingberg, Torkel

2012-01-01

380

More than a face: a unified theoretical perspective on nonverbal social cue processing in social anxiety  

PubMed Central

Processing of nonverbal social cues (NVSCs) is essential to interpersonal functioning and is particularly relevant to models of social anxiety. This article provides a review of the literature on NVSC processing from the perspective of social rank and affiliation biobehavioral systems (ABSs), based on functional analysis of human sociality. We examine the potential of this framework for integrating cognitive, interpersonal, and evolutionary accounts of social anxiety. We argue that NVSCs are uniquely suited to rapid and effective conveyance of emotional, motivational, and trait information and that various channels are differentially effective in transmitting such information. First, we review studies on perception of NVSCs through face, voice, and body. We begin with studies that utilized information processing or imaging paradigms to assess NVSC perception. This research demonstrated that social anxiety is associated with biased attention to, and interpretation of, emotional facial expressions (EFEs) and emotional prosody. Findings regarding body and posture remain scarce. Next, we review studies on NVSC expression, which pinpointed links between social anxiety and disturbances in eye gaze, facial expressivity, and vocal properties of spontaneous and planned speech. Again, links between social anxiety and posture were understudied. Although cognitive, interpersonal, and evolutionary theories have described different pathways to social anxiety, all three models focus on interrelations among cognition, subjective experience, and social behavior. NVSC processing and production comprise the juncture where these theories intersect. In light of the conceptualizations emerging from the review, we highlight several directions for future research including focus on NVSCs as indexing reactions to changes in belongingness and social rank, the moderating role of gender, and the therapeutic opportunities offered by embodied cognition to treat social anxiety.

Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Shachar-Lavie, Iris

2013-01-01

381

Downstream Effects of Maternal Hypothyroxinemia in Early Pregnancy: Nonverbal IQ and Brain Morphology in School-Age Children.  

PubMed

Context: Although maternal hypothyroxinemia is suggested to be related to various adverse consequences in a child's neurodevelopment, the underlying neurobiology is largely unknown. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between maternal hypothyroxinemia in early pregnancy and children's nonverbal intelligence quotient (IQ). Furthermore, we explored whether global brain volumes, cortical thickness, and brain surface area differed between children exposed prenatally to hypothyroxinemia and healthy controls. Design and Setting: The study included a large population-based prospective birth cohort in The Netherlands. Participants: A total of 3727 mother-child pairs with data on prenatal thyroid function at less than 18 weeks of gestation and nonverbal IQ at 6 years participated in the study. In 652 children, brain imaging was performed at 8 years of age. Main Measures: Maternal hypothyroxinemia was defined as free T4 in the lowest 5% of the sample, whereas TSH was in the normal range. At 6 years, children's IQ was assessed using a Dutch test battery. Global brain volumetric measures, cortical thickness, and surface area were assessed using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The children of mothers with hypothyroxinemia in early pregnancy scored 4.3 points IQ lower than the children of mothers with normal thyroid status (95% confidence interval -6.68, -1.81; P = .001). After adjustment for multiple testing, we did not find any differences in brain volumetric measures, cortical thickness, and surface area between children exposed prenatally to hypothyroxinemia and controls. Conclusions: Our findings confirm a large adverse effect of maternal hypothyroxinemia on children's nonverbal IQ at school age. However, we found no evidence that maternal hypothyroxinemia is associated with differences in brain morphology in school-age children. PMID:24684462

Ghassabian, Akhgar; El Marroun, Hanan; Peeters, Robin P; Jaddoe, Vincent W; Hofman, Albert; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning; White, Tonya

2014-07-01

382

Teacher To Teacher: Teachers Want What Students Need  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A recent report from the Southeast Center for Teaching Quality (SECTQ) lends truth to the assumption that teacher working conditions directly affect student achievement. The SECTQ report, "Teacher Working Conditions are Student Learning Conditions," surveyed 32,000 teachers in North Carolina on their perceptions of numerous factors affecting the…

McElroy, Edward J.

2005-01-01

383

Reducing Teacher Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on a case study of inservice training conducted to enhance the teacher/student relationship and reduce teacher anxiety. Found significant improvements in attitudes, classroom management activities, and lower anxiety among teachers. (MD)

Docking, R. A.; Docking, E.

1984-01-01

384

Teacher at Sea.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines the experiences of a teacher in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Teacher At Sea Program in which teachers are placed on NOAA vessels to work with professional scientists doing critical, real world research. (DDR)

Beighley, Karl

1998-01-01

385

Cultural Meaning and Nonverbal Behavior and the Teaching of German: A Progress Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Scholars and teachers are increasingly realizing that language consists of more than the additive nature of learned morphological, syntactical, and lexical items. This paper describes the pragmatic implications of linguistic strings, based on research and interviews with native speakers of American English and standard German. (20 references)…

Rings, Lana

1992-01-01

386

Teacher's Kits  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This document describes two teacher's kits that were developed to facilitate hands-on experiences and outdoor instruction and broaden the experience of using 'Stone Wall Secrets' in the classroom. Each one contains rock samples similar to those encountered by the protagonist in the book, as well as equipment (magnifying glass, compass, etc.) that will aid students in their outdoor investigations of stone walls. Fifteen kits are available to be checked out free of chanrge for short term loan from the Stone Wall Initiative Resource Center.

387

PBS Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The PBS (Public Broadcasting Service) Teachers web site provides access to thousands of lesson plans, teaching activities, videos, and interactive games and simulations for all levels of instruction, Pre-K to 12. These resources are correlated to state, national, and Canadian educational standards and are tied to PBS' on-air and online programming (NOVA, Nature, and others). They are organized by topic (math, science and technology, social studies, and others). Within each topic area the resources are searchable by grade level and subtopic. Other materials include links to blogs on educational topics, news articles and event announcements, a frequently-asked-questions feature, and information on PBS' professional development program, Teacherline.

2002-01-01

388

Applicability of the nonverbal learning disability paradigm for children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.  

PubMed

Chromosome 22qll.2 deletion syndrome (22qllDS) is the most common microdeletion in humans. Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) has been used to describe the strengths and deficits of children with 22q11DS, but the applicability of the label for this population has seldom been systematically evaluated. The goal of the current study was to address how well the NLD diagnosis characterizes children and adolescents with 22q11DS. A total of 74 children and adolescents with 22q11DS were given neurocognitive, socioemotional, and academic assessments to measure aspects of NLD. Of the cohort, 20% met at least 7 of 9 assessed criteria for NLD; 25% showed verbal skills exceeding their nonverbal skills as assessed by an IQ test; and 24% showed the good rote verbal capacity commonly associated with NLD. Hypothesizing that if the entire cohort did not show consistent NLD characteristics, the descriptor might be more accurate for a distinct subgroup, the authors used latent class analysis to divide participants into three subgroups. However, the lines along which the groups broke out were more related to general functioning level than to NLD criteria. All three groups showed a heightened risk for psychiatric illness, highlighting the importance of careful mental health monitoring for all children with 22qllDS. PMID:22572413

Schoch, Kelly; Harrell, Waverly; Hooper, Stephen R; Ip, Edward H; Saldana, Santiago; Kwapil, Thomas R; Shashi, Vandana

2014-01-01

389

Effects of regulating positive emotions through reappraisal and suppression on verbal and non-verbal recognition memory.  

PubMed

Previous research has suggested that regulating emotions through reappraisal does not incur cognitive costs. However, in those experiments, cognitive costs were often assessed by recognition memory for information that was contextually related to the emotionally evocative stimuli and may have been incorporated into the reappraisal script, facilitating memory. Furthermore, there is little research on the cognitive correlates of regulating positive emotions. In the current experiment, we tested memory for information that was contextually unrelated to the emotional stimuli and could not easily be related to the reappraisal. Participants viewed neutral and mildly positive slides and either reappraised, suppressed their emotions, or viewed the images with no emotion regulation instruction. At the same time, they heard abstract words that were unrelated to the picture stimuli. Subsequent verbal recognition memory was lower after reappraising than viewing, whereas non-verbal recognition memory (of the slides) was higher after reappraising, but only for positive pictures and when participants viewed the positive pictures first. Suppression had no significant effect on either verbal or non-verbal recognition scores, although there was a trend towards poorer recognition of verbal information. The findings support the notion that reappraisal is effortful and draws on limited cognitive resources, causing decrements in performance in a concurrent memory task. PMID:23658647

Ortner, Catherine N M; de Koning, Monica

2013-01-01

390

Nonverbal and verbal transmission of disgust from mothers to offspring: effects on children's evaluation of a novel animal.  

PubMed

This study examined parent-offspring communication of disgust-related information and its effects on children's feelings of disgust and fear towards an animal. Mothers were instructed to provide information about a novel animal to their children (N=60) by studying in secrecy either disgusting or neutral attributes that were allegedly characteristic of this animal. First, mothers were instructed to do this in a nonverbal way; then they were also allowed to use verbal utterances. Results indicated that nonverbal communication of disgust by the mothers failed to produce any effects on offspring's subjective evaluations of the animal. However, verbal information transmission did have a differential impact on children's feelings of disgust and fear. That is, children to whom mothers had verbally communicated about a set of disgusting specimens not only displayed higher levels of disgust (Cohen's d=1.02) but also exhibited higher levels of fear (Cohen's d=.62) towards the novel animal as compared to children to whom mothers had verbally communicated about neutral specimens. The effect on fear was mainly due to the fact that children after the verbal neutral information exhibited a clear decline in fear, whereas children to whom mothers had provided verbal disgust information maintained a similar level of fear towards the animal. The implications of these results for the familial transmission of disgust and fear will be discussed. PMID:23611078

Muris, Peter; Mayer, Birgit; Borth, Maraike; Vos, Maruschka

2013-06-01

391

Direct Observation of Mother-Child Communication in Pediatric Cancer: Assessment of Verbal and Non-verbal Behavior and Emotion  

PubMed Central

Objective?To examine the acceptability and feasibility of coding observed verbal and nonverbal behavioral and emotional components of mother–child communication among families of children with cancer.?Methods?Mother–child dyads (N?=?33, children ages 5–17 years) were asked to engage in a videotaped 15-min conversation about the child’s cancer. Coding was done using the Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scale (IFIRS).?Results?Acceptability and feasibility of direct observation in this population were partially supported: 58% consented and 81% of those (47% of all eligible dyads) completed the task; trained raters achieved 78% agreement in ratings across codes. The construct validity of the IFIRS was demonstrated by expected associations within and between positive and negative behavioral/emotional code ratings and between mothers’ and children’s corresponding code ratings.?Conclusions?Direct observation of mother–child communication about childhood cancer has the potential to be an acceptable and feasible method of assessing verbal and nonverbal behavior and emotion in this population.

Dunn, Madeleine J.; Rodriguez, Erin M.; Miller, Kimberly S.; Gerhardt, Cynthia A.; Vannatta, Kathryn; Saylor, Megan; Scheule, C. Melanie

2011-01-01

392

Gains in fluid intelligence after training non-verbal reasoning in 4-year-old children: a controlled, randomized study.  

PubMed

Fluid intelligence (Gf) predicts performance on a wide range of cognitive activities, and children with impaired Gf often experience academic difficulties. Previous attempts to improve Gf have been hampered by poor control conditions and single outcome measures. It is thus still an open question whether Gf can be improved by training. This study included 4-year-old children (N = 101) who performed computerized training (15 min/day for 25 days) of either non-verbal reasoning, working memory, a combination of both, or a placebo version of the combined training. Compared to the placebo group, the non-verbal reasoning training group improved significantly on Gf when analysed as a latent variable of several reasoning tasks. Smaller gains on problem solving tests were seen in the combination training group. The group training working memory improved on measures of working memory, but not on problem solving tests. This study shows that it is possible to improve Gf with training, which could have implications for early interventions in children. PMID:21477197

Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina; Bryde, Sara; Thorell, Lisa B; Humphreys, Keith; Klingberg, Torkel

2011-05-01

393

Applicability of the Nonverbal Learning Disability Paradigm for Children With 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion in humans. Nonverbal learning disability (NLD) has been used to describe the strengths and deficits of children with 22q11DS, but the applicability of the label for this population has seldom been systematically evaluated. The goal of the current study was to address how well the NLD diagnosis characterizes children and adolescents with 22q11DS. A total of 74 children and adolescents with 22q11DS were given neurocognitive, socioemotional, and academic assessments to measure aspects of NLD. Of the cohort, 20% met at least 7 of 9 assessed criteria for NLD; 25% showed verbal skills exceeding their nonverbal skills as assessed by an IQ test; and 24% showed the good rote verbal capacity commonly associated with NLD. Hypothesizing that if the entire cohort did not show consistent NLD characteristics, the descriptor might be more accurate for a distinct subgroup, the authors used latent class analysis to divide participants into three subgroups. However, the lines along which the groups broke out were more related to general functioning level than to NLD criteria. All three groups showed a heightened risk for psychiatric illness, highlighting the importance of careful mental health monitoring for all children with 22q11DS.

Schoch, Kelly; Harrell, Waverly; Hooper, Stephen R.; Ip, Edward H.; Saldana, Santiago; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Shashi, Vandana

2014-01-01

394

Teacher Quality Toolkit  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Teacher Quality Toolkit aims to support the continuum of teacher learning by providing tools that institutions of higher education, districts, and schools can use to improve both preservice and inservice teacher education. The toolkit incorporates McREL?s accumulated knowledge and experience related to teacher quality and standards-based…

Lauer, Patricia A.; Dean, Ceri B.

2004-01-01

395

Helping New Science Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The start of a new school year is a challenging and exciting time for any teacher--and a time when beginning teachers particularly need our support. Working with new science teachers in the New Science Teachers' Support Network (NSTSN) has shown the author

Sterling, Donna R.; Frazier, Wendy M.

2009-07-01

396

Best of Teacher-to-Teacher: The Ultimate Beginner's Guide. NEA Teacher-to-Teacher Books.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this book, beginning teachers from around the country share their favorite chapters from the National Education Association's "Teacher-to-Teacher" books. Each story illustrates step-by-step how teachers tackle a specific restructuring challenge, describing what worked and what did not work in the process. Each chapter includes diagrams,…

National Education Association, Washington, DC.

397

Rhetoric and teacher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent scholarship on teacher education has drawn a sharp contrast between “top–down” and “teacher-directed” approaches to instructional reform. However, this article suggests that all forms of teacher education share a common ground: they are all inescapably rhetorical in nature, aimed at the persuasion of teachers. While reformers may attempt to deny such intentions, they cannot help but employ rhetoric in

Rafael Heller

1999-01-01

398

Being Teachers. Beginnings Workshop.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contains four presentations on teacher professional and personal growth: "The Elephant's Child as Caregiver," (Elizabeth Jones) on the importance of curiosity; and interviews with several teachers--(1) "Teachers and Then Some: Profiles of Three Teachers"; (2) "Becoming Planners: Finding Time and Insight"; and (4) "Backing Away Helpfully: Some…

Wolf, Dennie; Jones, Elizabeth

1998-01-01

399

Helping Teachers become Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For school improvement, more teachers need to function as leaders. Understanding the various dimensions of teacher leadership is requisite knowledge for encouraging the development of more teachers as leaders. Teacher leaders can fulfill multiple roles as they encounter obstacles in schools. The author addresses the challenge of supporting…

Phelps, Patricia H.

2008-01-01

400

Guidelines for Cooperating Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of student teaching and the impact the cooperating teacher has on the student teacher's experience leads to the formulation of guidelines for the cooperating teacher: (1) outline expectations; (2) provide for early and continued successes; and (3) communicate with the student teacher. (JL)

Cusimano, Barbara

1988-01-01

401

Student Teachers Speak Out!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The high teacher attrition and early-career exodus of beginning teachers suggest that traditional methods fall short of providing the support needed by beginning teachers. This qualitative study examined the challenges encountered by student teachers during their practicum experience. Findings suggest that the attrition rate may be at least…

Berridge, Gina G.; Goebel, Vella

2013-01-01

402

Inservicing the Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Compares many teacher inservice programs to the artificial insemination of cows--decisions are made without teacher participation, teachers do not get to join in the act, and no one has much fun. Suggests that teachers be allowed to set their own goals and control their own learning. (Author/WD)

Sharma, Toni

1982-01-01

403

Teacher Education in Canada  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher education programmes within Canada are markedly different in structure and duration across the provinces, which affects programme delivery for teacher candidates and their opportunities for clinical practice. This paper provides a brief overview of Canadian pre-service teacher education, a summary of new teacher induction and mentoring…

Van Nuland, Shirley

2011-01-01

404

Transferability of Norms and Its Implication in Cross-Cultural Gifted Education: Norming Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT) in the Philippine Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is a normative study to investigate the transferability of norms from western-based intelligence tests to Filipino students. More than 2,700 Filipino sixth graders were sampled across the country and administered the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test (NNAT). Scores were then compared to the US normative sample. The results showed no significant…

Vista, Alvin; Grantham, Tarek

2009-01-01

405

Evidence for a Double Dissociation between Spatial-Simultaneous and Spatial-Sequential Working Memory in Visuospatial (Nonverbal) Learning Disabled Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The paper describes the performance of three children with specific visuospatial working memory (VSWM) impairments (Study 1) and three children with visuospatial (nonverbal) learning disabilities (Study 2) assessed with a battery of working memory (WM) tests and with a number of school achievement tasks. Overall, performance on WM tests provides…

Mammarella, Irene C.; Cornoldi, Cesare; Pazzaglia, Francesca; Toso, Cristina; Grimoldi, Mario; Vio, Claudio

2006-01-01

406

Brief Report: Concurrent Validity of the Leiter-R and KBIT-2 Scales of Nonverbal Intelligence for Children with Autism and Language Impairments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The concurrent validity of the KBIT-2 Nonverbal IQ and Leiter-R Brief IQ was evaluated for two groups of children: those with high functioning autism and those with language impairments without autism. Fifty-three children between the ages of 4 and 13 years of age participated in the study. The correlation between the scales was large (r = 0.62)…

Scattone, Dorothy; Raggio, Donald J.; May, Warren

2012-01-01

407

Minority Performance on the Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test, Second Edition, versus the Cognitive Abilities Test, Form 6: One Gifted Program's Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Naglieri Nonverbal Ability Test, Second Edition (NNAT2), is used widely to screen students for possible inclusion in talent development programs. The NNAT2 claims to provide a more culturally neutral evaluation of general ability than tests such as Form 6 of the Cognitive Abilities Test (CogAT6), which has Verbal and Quantitative batteries in…

Giessman, Jacob A.; Gambrell, James L.; Stebbins, Molly S.

2013-01-01

408

Testing the Effects of Nonverbal Behavior Training on Accuracy in Deception Detection with the Inclusion of a Bogus Training Control Group  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous deception detection training studies have compared people receiving training in nonverbal behaviors associated with deception to control groups receiving no training and found that people who are trained are slightly to moderately more accurate than people who have not been trained. Recent research on the relationships between source…

Levine, Timothy; Feeley, Thomas Hugh; Mccornack, Steven; Hughes, Mikayla; Harms, Chad

2005-01-01

409

Sex differences in the ability to recognise non-verbal displays of emotion: A meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to quantify the magnitude of sex differences in humans' ability to accurately recognise non-verbal emotional displays. Studies of relevance were those that required explicit labelling of discrete emotions presented in the visual and/or auditory modality. A final set of 551 effect sizes from 215 samples was included in a multilevel meta-analysis. The results showed a small overall advantage in favour of females on emotion recognition tasks (d = 0.19). However, the magnitude of that sex difference was moderated by several factors, namely specific emotion, emotion type (negative, positive), sex of the actor, sensory modality (visual, audio, audio-visual) and age of the participants. Method of presentation (computer, slides, print, etc.), type of measurement (response time, accuracy) and year of publication did not significantly contribute to variance in effect sizes. These findings are discussed in the context of social and biological explanations of sex differences in emotion recognition. PMID:24400860

Thompson, Ashley E; Voyer, Daniel

2014-11-01

410

Brief report: Inner speech impairment in children with autism is associated with greater nonverbal than verbal skills.  

PubMed

We present a new analysis of Whitehouse, Maybery, and Durkin's (2006, Experiment 3) data on inner speech in children with autism (CWA). Because inner speech development is thought to depend on linguistically mediated social interaction, we hypothesized that children with both autism and a nonverbal > verbal (NV > V) skills profile would show the greatest inner speech impairment. CWA and typically developing controls (n = 23 in each group) undertook a timed mathematical task-switching test, known to benefit from inner speech use. Participants completed the task with and without articulatory suppression (AS), which disrupts inner speech. The hypothesis was supported: AS interference varied with cognitive profile among CWA but not among controls. Only the NV > V autism group showed no AS interference, indicating an inner speech impairment. PMID:19330432

Lidstone, Jane S M; Fernyhough, Charles; Meins, Elizabeth; Whitehouse, Andrew J O

2009-08-01

411

Teacher's Mind Resources: Teacher's Transforming Education  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proposing a teacher-based approach to educational reform, the Teacher's Mind Resources site is built around a recently published study of education, entitled Teaching in Mind: How Teacher Thinking Shapes Education. While largely promotional, the site offers a great deal of perspective into the current analysis of reformist trends and initiatives to stand on its own as a valuable source of insight and inspiration to educators at every level. Philosophically, the site's author is convinced that popular efforts to apply "universal" educational standards are meaningless - if they fail to take into account what each teacher brings to the class as an individual. Thus, it focuses on the teacher's mind as a unique tool destined to interpret every mandated standard differently and uniquely. Offering forums, media, and recently published research in the area, the Teacher's Mind site looks both to inform and engage all users.

2001-01-01

412

Teachers Leading the Way. Voices From the National Teacher Forum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet for teachers reports what participants in the U.S. Department of Education's 1996 National Teacher Forum had to say about teacher leadership. Forum participants were 120 exemplary public and private school teachers nationwide. The report also includes thoughts of teachers who used e-mail to share their ideas on teacher leadership.…

Paulu, Nancy, Ed.; Winters, Kirk, Ed.

413

Animated pedagogical agents: How the presence and nonverbal communication of a virtual instructor affect perceptions and learning outcomes in a computer-based environment about basic physics concepts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One important but under-researched area of instructional technology concerns the effects of animated pedagogical agents (APAs), or lifelike characters designed to enhance learning in computer-based environments. This research sought to broaden what is currently known about APAs' instructional value by investigating the effects of agents' visual presence and nonverbal communication. A theoretical framework based on APA literature published in the past decade guided the design of the study. This framework sets forth that APAs impact learning through their presence and communication. The communication displayed by an APA involves two distinct kinds of nonverbal cues: cognitive (hand and arm gestures) and affective (facial expressions). It was predicted that the presence of an agent would enhance learning and that nonverbal communication would amplify these effects. The research utilized a between-subjects experimental design. Participants were randomly assigned to treatment conditions in a controlled lab setting, and group means were compared with a MANCOVA. Participants received (1) a non-animated agent, (2) an agent with hand and arm gestures, (3) an agent with facial expressions, or (4) a fully animated agent. The agent appeared in a virtual learning environment focused on Kepler's laws of planetary motion. A control group did not receive the visual presence of an agent. Two effects were studied: participants' perceptions and their learning outcomes. Perceptions were measured with an attitudinal survey with five subscales. Learning outcomes were measured with an open-ended recall test, a multiple choice comprehension test, and an open-ended transfer test. Learners presented with an agent with affective nonverbal communication comprehended less than learners exposed to a non-animated agent. No significant differences were observed when a group exposed to a fully animated agent was compared to a group with a non-animated agent. Adding both nonverbal communication channels mitigated the disadvantages of adding just one kind of nonverbal cue. No statistically significant differences were observed on measures of recall or transfer, or on the attitudinal survey. The research supports the notion that invoking a human-like presence in a virtual learning environment prompts strong expectations about the character's realism. When these expectations are not met, learning is hindered.

Frechette, M. Casey

414

Helping Teachers Integrate Internet Resources into the Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses educational benefits of the Internet and what schools are doing to integrate technology into the middle- and high-school curriculum. Reviews pitfalls of technology integration, initiation and implementation tips for administrators, program-evaluation strategies, and censorship issues. The Internet brings immediacy and individualization…

Land, Michael

1997-01-01

415

The development of a questionnaire to describe science teacher communication behavior in Taiwan and Australia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Teachers contribute enormously to a positive social climate in science classes, particularly through their communication with students. This article describes the development and validation of a questionnaire, the Teacher Communication Behavior Questionnaire (TCBQ) (see pp. 723-726), which assesses student perceptions of the following five important teacher behaviors: Challenging, Encouragement and Praise, Non-Verbal Support, Understanding and Friendly, and Controlling. The TCBQ was administered to 1202 students from 30 classes in Taiwan and to 301 students from 12 classes in Australia. The reliability and factorial validity of the TCBQ were found to be satisfactory for both the Taiwanese and Australian data. To further validate the questionnaire and understand the differences in teacher behavior according to the perceptions of students from the two countries, a qualitative approach was used. Students were interviewed (two from each of five classes) in both Taiwan and Australia. The interview questions focused on these students' responses to selected questionnaire items. The results obtained from the interviews supported and helped explain the quantitative results. In an application of the TCBQ in both countries, students' perceptions on four of the scales of the TCBQ were associated with their attitudes to their science classes.

She, Hsiao-Ching; Fisher, Darrell

2000-11-01

416

The Resourceful Teacher.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides hints for the beginning teacher on how to be a dynamic and resourceful science teacher by using ideas gleaned from subscribing to a professional organization and participating in workshops. (ASK)

Molledo, Magdalena

2001-01-01

417

ChemTeacher: Neutron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Neutron page includes resources for teaching students about neutrons.

2011-01-01

418

The Urban Teacher Struggle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores issues related to teaching music in an urban setting. Addresess issues such as budget problems, lack of support, and problems with teachers related to isolation and turnover. Focuses on recruiting minority teachers for urban schools. (CMK)

Renfro, Lisa

2003-01-01

419

ChemTeacher: Fusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Fusion page includes resources for teaching students about the discovery and applications of fusion.

2011-01-01

420

Protecting Teachers' Privacy Rights.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses concerns about school personnel records and legal precedents regarding privacy. Recommends inclusion in teacher education of content about teachers' privacy rights. Lists fair information practices for schools regarding the accuracy of and access to personnel records. (SK)

Spencer, Ray C.; Hoffman, Darlene Haffner

2001-01-01

421

ChemTeacher: Proton  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

ChemTeacher compiles background information, videos, articles, demonstrations, worksheets and activities for high school teachers to use in their classrooms. The Proton page includes resources for teaching students about protons.

2011-01-01

422

Prospective Teacher Attitudes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Article described a measurement instrument that was designed to discriminate between potentially effective and ineffective teachers and eventually screen out those student teachers who failed to qualify. (Author/RK)

Neufeld, J. S.

1975-01-01

423

Help Teachers Help Themselves.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Peer coaching, teacher input, and focus on teaching improvement are important ingredients in an inservice teacher training program in a Palos Hills, Illinois, school district. Program goals and guidelines for training sessions and peer coaching teams are detailed. (CJH)

Barnes, Ronald E.; Murphy, John

1987-01-01

424

Investing in Tomorrow's Teachers  

NSF Publications Database

Over 100 participants represented faculty and administrators from science, mathematics and education departments in two-and-four year colleges, disciplinary professional societies, other organizations and federal agencies, and current preK-12 teachers and pre- service teachers from two-year colleges. Generally, neither two-year colleges, nor the four-year institutions where teachers complete their preparation, nor the schools that hire teachers fully recognize the essential role of two-year ...

425

TeachersFirst  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

TeachersFirst is a web resource for K-12 classroom teachers. It offers lessons and instructional units developed for TeachersFirst as well as reviewed, online resources, with tips for classroom use, for students at all levels. The content is organized alphabetically by subject and by grade level. It is also searchable by keyword. TeachersFirst is a division of Network for Instructional TV, Inc., a not-for-profit learning technologies corporation.

426

Teacher Page - Deutsch Klasse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

On this site you will find the resource needed to teach a German Level I Course. There are links below for lesson plans and a link to the student page. This page is an introductory page for the teacher. Below are four links that will provide teachers with additional resources to use in their classrooms. Teacher Page - Lesson Plans Teacher Page - Resources Student Page - Deutsch Klasse Student WebQuests ...

Barlow, Frau

2009-11-02

427

Teacher and Student Attitudes toward Teacher Feedback  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to explore students' attitudes toward teacher feedback. The study used a triangulation of participants and methods in which the practice of feedback was seen from the perspectives of students and teachers collected from the quantitative data (questionnaires) and qualitative data (open-ended items in questionnaires and interviews).…

Zacharias, Nugrahenny T.

2007-01-01

428

Foregrounding Preservice Teacher Identity in Teacher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The article examines, through comparative case study method, how secondary-language-arts preservice student teachers' identities were constructed by spacetime configurations and what those identities meant to the individuals in the study. It reflects on the findings from two of the preservice secondary arts teachers for the study in two…

Miller, S. J.

2006-01-01

429

Portrayals of Teacher Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research approach describing the career biographies of individual teachers as a means for exploring the idea of professional development and the personal and contextual conditions affecting it is discussed. Implications for inservice teacher education policies and strategies are drawn, and teacher development models are advocated. (MSE)

Invargson, Lawrence; Greenway, Philip

1984-01-01

430

The Resourceful Teacher  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As teachers, we are given quite a list of duties to fulfill. It is tempting to take the easy way and plan your lessons for next week during your planning period. However, to be a truly dynamic teacher you must do more. In science, dynamic teachers have an

Molledo, Magdalena

2001-03-01

431

Vouchers Impact Teachers, Administrators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interviews with participants in the Alum Rock Voucher Project revealed that the effects of a voucher system on teachers were varied and profound: greater teacher autonomy but increased responsibilities; more within-program cohesion but increased competition between programs; and greater parent involvement, requiring teachers to improve…

Nolan, Robert R.; Carey, Helen

1979-01-01

432

Preparing Tomorrow's Physics Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teachers should know how people learn, how the human brain functions, how memory operates and how a brain develops with age and be able to apply this to teaching their subject. However, research indicates that teachers tend to teach the way they have been taught. This article describes the balance needed by future teachers between content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge.

Etkina, Eugenia

2007-11-02

433

Teacher Education in Sweden.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, in reviewing the educational system of Sweden, discussed the traditional system of education, reforms in teacher education, methods courses and current teacher education programs. The School of Education at Malmo was presented as an example of an institute of education. Studies in pedagogics were discussed in relation to teacher

Cotter, Katharine C.

434

Teacher Control and Creativity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains that music teachers can hamper student creativity in music composition by restricting assignments. States that teachers should assign only one parameter, focusing on a broad overarching idea. Provides examples of enabling parameters. Addresses the teacher's response to student work and nurturing musical independence. (CMK)

Wiggins, Jackie

1999-01-01

435

Urban Mathematics Teacher Retention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mathematics teachers are both more difficult to attract and more difficult to retain than social sciences teachers. This fact is not unique to the United States; it is reported as being a problem in Europe as well (Howson, 2002). In the United States, however, the problem is particularly preoccupying. Because of the chronic teacher shortages and…

Hamdan, Kamal

2010-01-01

436

Missouri Teachers Experience Stress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A replication of earlier research involving elementary and secondary teachers in urban schools, this study was conducted to identify selected stress factors experienced by rural elementary school teachers and to analyze relationships between stress symptoms and the degree of stress. A stratified random sample of 387 teachers was mailed a…

Brown, June

437

Evaluating Teacher Evaluation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a growing consensus that evidence of teachers' contributions to student learning should be a component of teacher evaluation systems, along with evidence about the quality of teachers' practice. Value-added models (VAMs), designed to evaluate student test score gains from one year to the next are often promoted as tools to accomplish this…

Darling-Hammond, Linda; Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Haertel, Edward; Rothstein, Jesse

2012-01-01

438

The Teacher Aide Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Tuba City Elementary School, located in a Bureau of Indian Affairs Sub-agency Headquarters on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona, has conducted a teacher aide program since August 1965. Specific teacher aide duties have been developed for routine record-keeping, small group and individual instruction, and supervisory activities. Teacher aides…

Thomas, Hadley A.

439

Fixing Teacher Professional Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The professional development "system" for teachers is, by all accounts, broken. Despite evidence that specific programs can improve teacher knowledge and practice and student outcomes, these programs seldom reach real teachers on a large scale. Typically, reformers address such perceptions of failure by discovering and celebrating new formats and…

Hill, Heather C.

2009-01-01

440

Enchanting Teachers among Us  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The amazing power to enchant students often is a defining hallmark of great teachers. Enchanting teachers, those who make learning exciting and attractive, are all around, and each is effective and inspiring in his or her own unique way. Wonderful teachers generally weave their magic behind closed doors, however, where only their students can…

Richards, Jan

2004-01-01

441

Teachers' Classroom Questions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a large body of literature on the types of questions asked by teachers. Questions are a way that teachers use to bring students around to the correct mathematical concepts and procedures through "the negotiation of meaning for necessary condition of learning" (Voigt, 1992, p. 43). Teachers ask many questions, but we are not sure what…

Sahin, Alpaslan

2007-01-01

442

Teacher Institute Podcasts  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Podcasts for science teachers, by science teachers. In each five-minute episode, you will learn about hands-on activities, science facts, science history, pedagogy tips for new teachers, or other ideas for your science classroom. The clips are available for download as mp3 files.

2009-03-18

443

The Teacher Talent Trove  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher leadership represents a powerful approach to assert the true professionalism that educators have long been seeking. Opportunities abound for teachers to contribute to school reform by demonstrating their leadership skills. This article considers strategies to rebuild the portrait of teachers and thereby encourage strong professional…

Quinn, Terrence

2003-01-01

444

Rethinking Reflection: Teachers' Critiques  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents findings from a study conducted with a teacher focus group asked to read and discuss their responses to selected published teacher narratives of reflective practice. The teachers challenged features of practitioner reflection presented in several of the reading selections as not representative of how they experienced…

Atkinson, Becky M.

2012-01-01

445

ELS Teacher Education Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The ELS (English Language Services) Teacher Education Program is an experimental multi-media self-instructional course in the techniques of teaching English to speakers of other languages. It is designed as an alternate approach to conventional teacher training methods, providing the means of producing new teachers without requiring a professional…

English Language Services, Inc., Washington, DC.

446

Contract Teachers in India  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, we use non-experimental data from government schools in Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh, two of the largest Indian states, to present average school outcomes by contract status of teachers. We find that contract teachers are associated with higher effort than civil service teachers with permanent tenures, before as well as after…

Goyal, Sangeeta; Pandey, Priyanka

2013-01-01

447

Performance Pay for Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

During the past few years, interest in shifting at least a portion of what teachers are paid away from a reliance on a traditional salary schedule to one that incorporates a pay for performance component has reached a new high. Proponents of the approach view it as a way to improve teacher quality by both motivating teachers and--through higher…

Protheroe, Nancy

2011-01-01

448

Teachers as Speakers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Noting that many of the functions undertaken by classroom teachers involve communication skills or skills dependent on an ability to communicate effectively, this paper outlines a course in speech communication specifically for teachers. The paper first lists the teaching, managing, and decision making activities teachers undertake that involve…

Cooper, Pamela J.

449

Teacher? Learner? Both!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers often have questions about how the strategies they learned at a professional development (PD) workshop will work with their students. Wouldn't it be great if teachers had the opportunity to practice implementing new strategies during PD so that they could hone their skills before returning to their classrooms? That's what 35 teachers got…

Hanuscin, Deborah L.; van Garderen, Delinda; Menon, Deepika; Davis, Jeni; Lee, Eun; Smith, Rena

2011-01-01

450

Becoming Teacher Researchers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This serial issue contains eight articles all on the theme of "Becoming Teacher Researchers.""Becoming a Network of Teacher Researchers" (Scott Christian) discusses how portfolios of classroom work provide documentation and encourage more systematic teacher research involving established research techniques. "Identifying Features of Language:…

Benson, Chris, Ed.

1998-01-01

451

Retaining Quality Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated teacher attrition and retention in seven Virginia school divisions representing urban, suburban, and rural localities. Focus group interviews of teachers who stay in their school divisions and telephone interviews of teachers who migrated to another school division or who left the teaching profession revealed a hierarchy of…

Certo, Janine L.; Fox, Jill Englebright

2002-01-01

452

Coaching Beginning Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes the effects of a program designed to train Dutch primary school teachers in skills needed to coach and act as mentors for beginning teachers. The study investigated whether mentors who participated in the training program would implement the target coaching skills and whether the beginning teachers coached by the mentors would…

Veenman, Simon; de Laat, Hanneke; Staring, Corine

453

Mapping Teacher-Faces  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses Deleuze and Guattari's concept of faciality to analyse the teacher's face. According to Deleuze and Guattari, the teacher-face is a special type of face because it is an "overcoded" face produced in specific landscapes. This paper suggests four limit-faces for teacher faciality that actualise different mixes of significance and…

Thompson, Greg; Cook, Ian

2013-01-01

454

Teachers on Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue on standards contains 11 articles written by teachers of English and language arts in Bread Loaf's primarily rural, teacher networks. These narratives describe how teachers in Alaska, South Carolina, Ohio, Massachusetts, Kentucky, Arizona, and New Mexico are implementing state content standards while honoring local contexts for…

Benson, Chris, Ed.

2001-01-01

455

Experienced New Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although many researchers have focused their efforts on studying first-year teachers, little research has been conducted about experienced new teachers, educators who have teaching experience but are new to a school or school system. This qualitative study of the experiences of three experienced new teachers reveals that many experienced new…

Gant, Angela B.

2009-01-01

456

Teachers and Eros  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author links the force of Eros to the teacher's world to suggest that, if the teacher is the keeper of the student's heart and mind, then a teacher's open-mindedness made from a willingness to be affected by the lives of others is the best pedagogical resource, and the most difficult to sustain. The author's thoughts on Eros…

Britzman, Deborah P.

2010-01-01

457

Computer Literacy: Teacher Competencies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document provides assistance to teachers who will present computer literacy courses established by the State Board of Education and required of all seventh and eight grade Texas students, beginning September 1, 1985, and to other educators responsible for teacher training. Designed to guide the teachers' training program, define the necessary…

Texas Education Agency, Austin.

458

Talks to Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In August, 1967, the Bedford program for School and Community Participation in Sex and Family Living Education received a Title III grant to create a Center for the Study of Sex and Family Living Education. The center organized an inservice teacher education program for Bedford teachers grade one through twelve. The inservice teacher education…

Kahn, Esther B.; And Others

459

Vocational Teacher Education Study.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine the present state of vocational education in Kentucky and the supply of and demand for vocational teachers. Results are summarized for vocational teacher education in general and for teachers in the areas of agricultural education, business and office education, marketing and distributive education, health and…

Tulloch, Charlotte

460

Sorting out Teacher Quality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher quality has become a hot topic. Everyone wants to measure it, reward it, or improve it. One reason for this interest is the evidence that teachers differ dramatically in their ability to raise student test scores. Another reason for the current interest in teacher quality is that recent No Child Left Behind requirements focus on highly…

Kennedy, Mary M.

2008-01-01

461

Teacher Educators: Hidden Professionals?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The pace of change in today's society means that there is an ongoing need for teachers to learn, have new knowledge and use new pedagogical approaches to meet the needs of their pupils. For many teachers, this requires redefining their identity as teachers and what "teaching" means in 21st century learning environments. These…

Livingston, Kay

2014-01-01

462

Can One Teacher Help?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a powerful inducement for the teacher to channel the problem of drug addiction to the administrators but the teacher can't ignore it because the prime responsibility of the teacher is the student. This article deals with this relationship. (Author)

Strumpf, Milton

1973-01-01

463

Teacher Leadership for Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the story of a teacher leader who helped lead change in an urban elementary school by creating a new culture of support for beginning teachers. Specifically, she led focused, collaborative inquiry around discussion-based teaching to improve teaching effectiveness, and she created a school-wide coalition of support for beginning teachers to…

Brondyk, Susan; Stanulis, Randi

2014-01-01

464

Adverse Life Events and Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Adolescence: The Role of Non-verbal Cognitive Ability and Negative Cognitive Errors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to test whether negative cognitive errors (overgeneralizing, catastrophizing, selective abstraction,\\u000a and personalizing) mediate the moderator effect of non-verbal cognitive ability on the association between adverse life events\\u000a (life stress) and emotional and behavioral problems in adolescence. The sample consisted of 430 children (aged 11–15 years)\\u000a from three state secondary schools in disadvantaged areas in one

Eirini Flouri; Constantina Panourgia

2011-01-01

465

Teacher Enhancement Institute  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a team building, team teaching strategy with four faculty, can learning strategies such as educational technology and problem based learning be provided to forty local teachers of primary, elementary, and secondary students? The impetus for the effort is to provide information about science and engineering at NASA and motivate students to pursue careers in science and technology. Teachers, identified and selected through a rigorous application procedure, participated in a two week workshop for a graduate credit. Teachers were exposed to computer applications such as INTERNET, MOSAIC, Power Machintosh word processing, NASA scientists, and laboratory experiments. Teachers were evaluated on level and quality of their participation, design of teacher application materials and relevant lesson plans and presentations. The results show that teachers, regardless of preparation and background, can learn science and engineering applications and develop relevant materials to transfer information to their classroom. Follow-up during the academic year will show that teachers are successfully using materials.

Simmons, Ron W.

1994-01-01

466

Possible Factors in Matching Student Teachers with Cooperating Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One common thread throughout the research in agricultural education is that cooperating teachers have been identified as being important and influential to the student teachers' success. If the interaction between student teacher and cooperating teacher is important to the student teaching process, then the matching of a student teacher with a…

Kitchel, Tracy; Torres, Robert M.

2007-01-01

467

Assessing the Student Teacher as a Reading Teacher.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student teachers need to have high quality cooperating teachers as mentors for the development of the best reading teachers possible. The mentor needs to assist the student teacher to achieve diverse attitudes in the teaching of reading. First, the student teacher should be a consumer of reading materials with an appetite for reading. Second, the…

Ediger, Marlow

468

Dissident Teacher Education: A Heterologic Paradigm for Teacher Preparation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As challenges are handed down from state and federal governments to demonstrate utility and efficiency within teacher education programs, it is important to stop and consider the role of teacher education within schooling. Perhaps we should prepare new teachers by asking, "How should we prepare new teachers?" By framing teacher education within a…

Parkison, Paul T.

2012-01-01

469

Teaching with Technology. NEA Teacher-to-Teacher Books.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

NEA Teacher-to-Teacher Books are designed to promote team building, to enhance collegial leadership, and to give all K-12 teachers ideas and strategies for improving student learning. This book describes the personal odysseys of six teachers who have used technology to transform their teaching. Each story illustrates step-by-step how the teachers

National Education Association, Washington, DC.

470

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3)[TM]. Volume 5, Number 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Building Bridges: Data Help Instructional Coach Make Vital Connections with Teachers (Theresa Long); (2) NSDC Tool: Instructional…

Crow, Tracy, Ed.

2009-01-01

471

Teachers Teaching Teachers (T3). Volume 6, Number 3  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teachers Teaching Teachers" ("T3") focuses on coaches' roles in the professional development of teachers. Each issue also explores the challenges and rewards that teacher leaders encounter. This issue includes: (1) Teaching English Language Learners: Mainstream Teachers Make a Stellar Journey as a Team to Transform Classroom Practices (Elsa M.…

Armstrong, Anthony, Ed.

2010-01-01

472

Teacher Quality and Teacher Mobility. Working Paper 57  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using matched student-teacher panel data from the state of Florida, the authors study the determinants of teacher job change and the impact of such mobility on the distribution of teacher quality. The probability a teacher stays at a school increases the more productive they are in their current school. The quality of teachers who exit teaching…

Feng, Li; Sass, Tim

2011-01-01

473

Defining Teacher Educator through the Eyes of Classroom Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to analyze a sample of classroom teachers' definitions of the term "teacher educator" and determine whether they considered themselves to be teacher educators. The extent that classroom teachers' definitions of a teacher educator were influenced by involvement in a university-public school partnership was also…

Korth, Byran B.; Erickson, Lynnette; Hall, Kendra M.

2009-01-01

474

The role of verbal and nonverbal memory in the Family Pictures Subtest: Data from children with specific language impairment  

PubMed Central

This study examined the contribution of verbal and visual memory to performance on the Family Pictures subtest of the Children's Memory Scale. This subtest purports to assess declarative memory functioning in the visual/nonverbal domain. A total of 115 nine-year-old children participated in this study. Fifty-eight had specific language impairment (SLI), whilst the remaining 57 were typically developing (TD), with no history of language difficulties. Results showed that the children with SLI, who had intact declarative memory for visual but not verbal information, obtained significantly lower scores on the Family Pictures subtest when compared to the TD group. Regression analyses revealed that across the entire sample, individual differences on the Family Pictures subtest was best predicted by a measure of verbal working memory. These results question whether the Family Pictures subtest can be considered a measure of visual memory in pediatric populations. These results have implications for the interpretation of scores on this subtest regarding the nature of the types of neurocognitive difficulties children may exhibit.

Lum, Jarrad A. G.; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T.

2012-01-01

475

Cognitive flexibility in verbal and nonverbal domains and decision making in anorexia nervosa patients: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background This paper aimed to investigate cognitive rigidity and decision making impairments in patients diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa Restrictive type (AN-R), assessing also verbal components. Methods Thirty patients with AN-R were compared with thirty age-matched healthy controls (HC). All participants completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery comprised of the Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Hayling Sentence Completion Task, and the Iowa Gambling Task. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to evaluate depressive symptomatology. The influence of both illness duration and neuropsychological variables was considered. Body Mass Index (BMI), years of education, and depression severity were considered as covariates in statistical analyses. Results The AN-R group showed poorer performance on all neuropsychological tests. There was a positive correlation between illness duration and the Hayling Sentence Completion Task Net score, and number of completion answers in part B. There was a partial effect of years of education and BMI on neuropsychological test performance. Response inhibition processes and verbal fluency impairment were not associated with BMI and years of education, but were associated with depression severity. Conclusions These data provide evidence that patients with AN-R have cognitive rigidity in both verbal and non-verbal domains. The role of the impairment on verbal domains should be considered in treatment. Further research is warranted to better understand the relationship between illness state and cognitive rigidity and impaired decision-making.

2011-01-01

476

Disentangling the effects of working memory, language, parental education, and non-verbal intelligence on children's mathematical abilities  

PubMed Central

It is assumed that children’s performance in mathematical abilities is influenced by several factors such as working memory (WM), verbal ability, intelligence, and socioeconomic status. The present study explored the contribution of those factors to mathematical performance taking a componential view of both WM and mathematics. We explored the existing relationship between different WM components (verbal and spatial) with tasks that make differential recruitment of the central executive, and simple and complex mathematical skills in a sample of 102 children in grades 4–6. The main findings point to a relationship between the verbal WM component and complex word arithmetic problems, whereas language and non-verbal intelligence were associated with knowledge of quantitative concepts and arithmetic ability. The spatial WM component was associated with the subtest Series, whereas the verbal component was with the subtest Concepts. The results also suggest a positive relationship between parental educational level and children’s performance on Quantitative Concepts. These findings suggest that specific cognitive skills might be trained in order to improve different aspects of mathematical ability.

Pina, Violeta; Fuentes, Luis J.; Castillo, Alejandro; Diamantopoulou, Sofia

2014-01-01

477

Cortical auditory disorders: a case of non-verbal disturbances assessed with event-related brain potentials.  

PubMed

In the auditory modality, there has been a considerable debate about some aspects of cortical disorders, especially about auditory forms of agnosia. Agnosia refers to an impaired comprehension of sensory information in the absence of deficits in primary sensory processes. In the non-verbal domain, sound agnosia and amusia have been reported but are frequently accompanied by language deficits whereas pure deficits are rare. Absolute pitch and musicians' musical abilities have been associated with left hemispheric functions. We report the case of a right handed sound engineer with the absolute pitch who developed sound agnosia and amusia in the absence of verbal deficits after a right perisylvian stroke. His disabilities were assessed with the Seashore Test of Musical Functions, the tests of Wertheim and Botez (Wertheim and Botez, Brain 84, 1961, 19-30) and by event-related potentials (ERP) recorded in a modified 'oddball paradigm'. Auditory ERP revealed a dissociation between the amplitudes of the P3a and P3b subcomponents with the P3b being reduced in amplitude while the P3a was undisturbed. This is interpreted as reflecting disturbances in target detection processes as indexed by the P3b. The findings that contradict some aspects of current knowledge about left/right hemispheric specialization in musical processing are discussed and related to the literature concerning cortical auditory disorders. PMID:11568403

Johannes, Sönke; Jöbges, Michael E.; Dengler, Reinhard; Münte, Thomas F.

1998-01-01

478

The role of verbal and nonverbal memory in the Family Pictures Subtest: data from children with specific language impairment.  

PubMed

This study examined the contribution of verbal and visual memory to performance on the Family Pictures subtest of the Children's Memory Scale. This subtest purports to assess declarative memory functioning in the visual/nonverbal domain. A total of 115 nine-year-old children participated in this study. Fifty-eight had specific language impairment (SLI), whilst the remaining 57 were typically developing (TD), with no history of language difficulties. Results showed that the children with SLI, who had intact declarative memory for visual but not verbal information, obtained significantly lower scores on the Family Pictures subtest when compared to the TD group. Regression analyses revealed that across the entire sample, individual differences on the Family Pictures subtest was best predicted by a measure of verbal working memory. These results question whether the Family Pictures subtest can be considered a measure of visual memory in pediatric populations. These results have implications for the interpretation of scores on this subtest regarding the nature of the types of neurocognitive difficulties children may exhibit. PMID:23078276

Lum, Jarrad A G; Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Ullman, Michael T

2013-01-01

479

Teacher Retention: Problems and Solutions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a teacher retention crisis in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to answer the following questions: What contributes to teachers leaving the field? How has "No Child Left Behind" affected teacher retention? What can be done to retain good teachers? What impact do school administrators have on teacher retention? After…

McLaurin, Sidney E.; Smith, Willis; Smillie, Amanda

2009-01-01

480

Student Teachers and Legal Issues.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In most cases, a student teacher's actions are subject to the same laws as are the teacher's actions. Numerous laws are enacted each year that affect teachers and their classrooms. Teachers and teacher educators must be kept informed of the legal consequences of their actions or inaction. Researchers sent a survey to area superintendents,…

Monts, Dana R.

481

Rutgers Physics Teacher Preparation Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this talk I will describe my experiences in the Rutgers Physics Teacher Preparation program as a future physics teacher and share how these experiences shaped my career as a physics teacher. The uniqueness of the Rutgers Program is that it prepares physics teachers separately from other science teachers, thus providing them with a firm foundation of how to engage

Chris D'Amato; Eugenia Etkina

2009-01-01

482

Exploring into Teacher's Specialized Practicality  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher specialization is a subject with very strong practicality as regards its essence. This paper analyzes the main problems of the existing teacher professionalism, poses and argues the 3 hypotheses of teacher professionalism. Around the reality of teacher professionalism, the author brings forward and establishes a new teacher evaluation…

Tian, Lian-jin

2010-01-01

483

Teacher Competence as a Basis for Teacher Education: Comparing Views of Teachers and Teacher Educators in Five Western Balkan Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Orientation of teacher preparation toward the development of competence has recently been suggested as a worthwhile direction of change in teacher education in the Western Balkan countries. In this study, 2,354 teachers, teacher educators, and student teachers from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia responded to a…

Pantic, Natasa; Wubbels, Theo; Mainhard, Tim

2011-01-01

484

Elementary School Teachers' Manipulative Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using data from 503 inservice elementary teachers, this study investigated the relationship between teachers' background characteristics, teachers' beliefs about manipulatives, and the frequency with which teachers use manipulatives as part of their mathematics instruction. Findings from the study show that teachers' grade level and beliefs about…

Uribe-Florez, Lida J.; Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

2010-01-01

485

Public Elementary Teacher's Views on Teacher Performance Evaluations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

According to the reports of the national sample of public school teachers of kindergarten through grade 6 who participated in the Survey on Teacher Performance Evaluations, the practice of evaluating elementary school teachers is well established in the n...

1994-01-01

486

Teacher Professional Continuum  

NSF Publications Database

The Teacher Professional Continuum (TPC) program addresses critical issues and needs regarding the recruitment, preparation, induction, retention, and life-long development of K-12 science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers. Its goals are to improve the quality and coherence of teacher learning experiences across the continuum through research that informs teaching practice and the development of innovative resources for the professional development of K-12 STEM ...

487

Physics for Elementary Teachers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Physics for Elementary Teachers (PET) is a curriculum designed to develop lessons for new elementary teachers and teacher candidates. The curriculum is made of seven cycles which are divided into several activities. Each activity follows the same format of understanding physics content, understanding the nature of science, understanding student predictions and ideas, and learning about learning. Each activity can also be included into any elementary, middle, or high school science/physics curriculum.

Goldberg, Fred

2007-05-21

488

No Teacher Left Behind: Valuing Teacher Voice in Elementary Reading Teacher Education Reform  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Elementary teachers have long been absent from the debates surrounding teacher education reform. This research aimed to provide an avenue for teachers to share their insights and beliefs about teacher education. A two-tiered selection produced a sample of over two-hundred elementary teachers for this study. They were asked to compare their own…

Broemmel, Amy D.

2006-01-01

489

Quality Teacher Educators = Quality Teachers? Conceptualizing Essential Domains of Knowledge for Those Who Teach Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Becoming a teacher educator involves more than a job title. One becomes a teacher educator as soon as one does teacher education, but one's professional identity as a teacher educator is constructed over time. Developing an identity and practices in teacher education is best understood as a process of becoming. Though the work of teaching…

Goodwin, A. Lin; Kosnik, Clare

2013-01-01

490

National Teacher Training Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the portal for NTTI (the National Teacher Training Institute), an organization established to train teachers in the use of emerging technologies. NTTI was founded by WNET-TV, New York, to help teachers use video as a meaningful tool in the classroom. It consists of 15 regional institutes where master teachers are trained to conduct Institute workshops and create standards-based multimedia lessons. Resources available on the web site include a database of lesson plans, tips on internet utilization strategies, and listings of upcoming workshops.

2009-08-18

491

Later Leaders in Education: Roma Gans--Teacher of Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Retired teacher Roma Gans is described in terms of her early life and education, early teaching experience, teaching experience at Teachers College, publishing experience, citizenship, and retirement. (DG)

Almy, Millie

1990-01-01

492

Course on Instruments Updates Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a course in chemical instrumentation for high school chemistry teachers, paid for by Union Carbide. Teachers used spectrophotometer, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, atomic absorption spectrograph, gas chromatograph, liquid chromatograph and infrared spectrophotometer. Also describes other teacher education seminars. (JM)

Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

1986-01-01

493

Portrayals of Teacher Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional development and inservice education may be too readily equated. Professional development is an individual process influenced more pervasively by administrative and contextual features of the educational system within which teachers work than it is by the particular forms of inservice education available. Using this concept of teacher

Ingvarson, Lawrence; Greenway, Philip A.

494

Revisiting Teachers as Learners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article revisits the concept of teachers as learners within the context of radical changes that have taken place within the education system in England over the past 25 years. The concept of "professional courage" is discussed and examined in relation to questions and issues raised by Paulo Freire in a series of letters to teachers (1997).…

Thomson, Liz

2008-01-01

495

Management. Teacher's Instructional Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's instructional guide, which is part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, is intended to assist teachers responsible for teaching one- and two-year management programs for Texas high school students. The following are among the items included: (1) introductory…

Hutnyak, Dana

496

Children as Art Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A goal of art learning is always independence, for everyone to become their own art teacher. Teaching for artistic independence can never start too early. As art teachers, children acquire confidence in their art, and in coming to school as artists. Children should be considered artists in residence and visiting artists in schools. It makes sense…

Szekely, George

2011-01-01

497

Beginning Pashto: Teachers' Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teachers' manual is a component of "Beginning Pashto," a set of materials (including a textbook, student workbook, tapescripts, and a glossary) that teaches the Pashto language. The teacher's manual is written for the native speaker of Pashto who is educated but does not have a background in language teaching or an extensive background in…

Tegey, Habibullah; Robson, Barbara

498

Intermediate Pashto. Teachers' Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teachers' guide to the "Intermediate Pashto" textbook (FL 019 797) contains notes for the teacher on each of the fourteen units and sub-sections of the textbook. Unit and section headings are in English and Pashto; virtually all text is in Pashto. (MSE)

Tegey, Habibullah; Robson, Barbara

499

Elementary Teacher Training Specialization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This specialized teacher training program, submitted by Quincy College, Quincy, Illinois as an entry in the 1973 Distinguished Achievement Award Program, provided perspective teachers with increased opportunities and experiences in specific areas of competency. These areas were early childhood education and remedial reading. The Remedial Reading…

Quincy Coll., IL.

500

The British Teachers Centre.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The emergence, development to the present, and future trends of teacher centers in Great Britain are examined. The effects of political decisions, educational expenditure, the Plowden Report, curriculum review, social crises, and other factors on the ways in which teacher centers were organized and have changed are discussed. Problems and possible…

Thornbury, Robert E.