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1

Clinical microbiology informatics.  

PubMed

The clinical microbiology laboratory has responsibilities ranging from characterizing the causative agent in a patient's infection to helping detect global disease outbreaks. All of these processes are increasingly becoming partnered more intimately with informatics. Effective application of informatics tools can increase the accuracy, timeliness, and completeness of microbiology testing while decreasing the laboratory workload, which can lead to optimized laboratory workflow and decreased costs. Informatics is poised to be increasingly relevant in clinical microbiology, with the advent of total laboratory automation, complex instrument interfaces, electronic health records, clinical decision support tools, and the clinical implementation of microbial genome sequencing. This review discusses the diverse informatics aspects that are relevant to the clinical microbiology laboratory, including the following: the microbiology laboratory information system, decision support tools, expert systems, instrument interfaces, total laboratory automation, telemicrobiology, automated image analysis, nucleic acid sequence databases, electronic reporting of infectious agents to public health agencies, and disease outbreak surveillance. The breadth and utility of informatics tools used in clinical microbiology have made them indispensable to contemporary clinical and laboratory practice. Continued advances in technology and development of these informatics tools will further improve patient and public health care in the future. PMID:25278581

Rhoads, Daniel D; Sintchenko, Vitali; Rauch, Carol A; Pantanowitz, Liron

2014-10-01

2

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

3

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report  

E-print Network

Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, HealthClinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems

Provancher, William

4

Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-01-01

5

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in  

E-print Network

-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 3 Oncologists Medical physicistsASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) 1 Data Mining and Health Informatics in Cancer Medicine #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 2 #12;ASU

Li, Jing

6

Clinical informatics sub-specialty board certification.  

PubMed

Increased funding for health information technology and the advance of electronic health records in hospitals and practices have created the need for a new specialist: the clinical informatician. Clinical informatics was recognized in 2011 as the latest subspecialty in medicine by the American Board of Medical Specialties. This article reviews the need for this new specialty as well as the steps necessary for its creation. The content and training requirements for clinical informatics are discussed as well as eligibility criteria for taking the board examination. Training programs as well as board preparation are addressed along with the expected impact that this new field will have on the practice of medicine. PMID:24187144

Lehmann, Christoph U; Shorte, Vanessa; Gundlapalli, Adi V

2013-11-01

7

Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools  

PubMed Central

Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform. PMID:23248762

Lee, Roy E.; McClintock, David S.; Balis, Ulysses J.; Baron, Jason M.; Becich, Michael J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Brodsky, Victor B.; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D.; Henricks, Walter H.; Kim, Jiyeon Y.; Klepseis, Veronica E.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lane, William J.; Levy, Bruce P.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Park, Seung L.; Sinard, John H.; Tuthill, Mark J.; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

8

The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

Sora, Sebastian A.

2008-01-01

9

Informatics  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

10

A Clinical Informatics Network (CLINT) to support the practice of evidence-based health care.  

PubMed

CLINT, which stands for Clinical Informatics NeTwork, is one of the clinical informatics initiatives in development at McMaster University's Health Information Research Unit. CLINT is a microcomputer-based system of over 60 workstations providing 24 hour availability of a set of clinical information resources to clinicians throughout our teaching hospital. CLINT encompasses three domains: (1) a user adaptable clinician-computer interface, (2) unique evidence-based health care content, and (3) automated data collection and viewing tools. An objective of the CLINT project is to determine CLINT's impact on the practice of health care. Early analysis of our data has revealed that over the past year, there has been widespread use of CLINT by clinicians from all clinical domains. Our next task is to evaluate CLINT's usefulness. PMID:8947702

Langton, K B; Horsman, J; Hayward, R S; Ross, S A

1996-01-01

11

Designing Biomedical Informatics Infrastructure for Clinical and Translational Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) rests largely on information flowing smoothly at multiple levels, in multiple directions, across multiple locations. Biomedical Informatics (BI) is seen as a backbone that helps to manage information flows for the translation of knowledge generated and stored in silos of basic science into bedside…

La Paz Lillo, Ariel Isaac

2009-01-01

12

Aligning Biomedical Informatics with Clinical and Translational Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical and translational science (CTS) rests largely on information flowing smoothly at multiple levels, in multiple directions, across multiple locations. Hence, Biomedical Informatics (BI) is seen as a backbone that can help to manage the information flows for the process of translation. However, the two concepts may end up being applied incongruently, if uncoordinated. This paper summarizes the objectives for

Arkalgud Ramaprasad

2009-01-01

13

Building blocks for a clinical imaging informatics environment.  

PubMed

Over the past 20 years, imaging informatics has been driven by the widespread adoption of radiology information and picture archiving and communication and speech recognition systems. These three clinical information systems are commonplace and are intuitive to most radiologists as they replicate familiar paper and film workflow. So what is next? There is a surge of innovation in imaging informatics around advanced workflow, search, electronic medical record aggregation, dashboarding, and analytics tools for quality measures (Nance et al., AJR Am J Roentgenol 200:1064-1070, 2013). The challenge lies in not having to rebuild the technological wheel for each of these new applications but instead attempt to share common components through open standards and modern development techniques. The next generation of applications will be built with moving parts that work together to satisfy advanced use cases without replicating databases and without requiring fragile, intense synchronization from clinical systems. The purpose of this paper is to identify building blocks that can position a practice to be able to quickly innovate when addressing clinical, educational, and research-related problems. This paper is the result of identifying common components in the construction of over two dozen clinical informatics projects developed at the University of Maryland Radiology Informatics Research Laboratory. The systems outlined are intended as a mere foundation rather than an exhaustive list of possible extensions. PMID:24248276

Kohli, Marc D; Warnock, Max; Daly, Mark; Toland, Christopher; Meenan, Chris; Nagy, Paul G

2014-04-01

14

PearlTrees web-based interface for teaching informatics in the radiology residency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiology and imaging informatics education have rapidly evolved over the past few decades. With the increasing recognition that future growth and maintenance of radiology practices will rely heavily on radiologists with fundamentally sound informatics skills, the onus falls on radiology residency programs to properly implement and execute an informatics curriculum. In addition, the American Board of Radiology may choose to include even more informatics on the new board examinations. However, the resources available for didactic teaching and guidance most especially at the introductory level are widespread and varied. Given the breadth of informatics, a centralized web-based interface designed to serve as an adjunct to standardized informatics curriculums as well as a stand-alone for other interested audiences is desirable. We present the development of a curriculum using PearlTrees, an existing web-interface based on the concept of a visual interest graph that allows users to collect, organize, and share any URL they find online as well as to upload photos and other documents. For our purpose, the group of "pearls" includes informatics concepts linked by appropriate hierarchal relationships. The curriculum was developed using a combination of our institution's current informatics fellowship curriculum, the Practical Imaging Informatics textbook1 and other useful online resources. After development of the initial interface and curriculum has been publicized, we anticipate that involvement by the informatics community will help promote collaborations and foster mentorships at all career levels.

Licurse, Mindy Y.; Cook, Tessa S.

2014-03-01

15

A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics  

PubMed Central

Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a pathology informatician, the core knowledge set expected of a person trained in the field and, more fundamentally, it helps to define the scope of the field within Pathology and healthcare in general. PMID:23024890

McClintock, David S.; Levy, Bruce P.; Lane, William J.; Lee, Roy E.; Baron, Jason M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Dighe, Anand S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

16

Case report medical eponyms: an applied clinical informatics opportunity.  

PubMed

Medical eponyms are medical words derived from people's names. Eponyms, especially similar sounding eponyms, may be confusing to people trying to use them because the terms themselves do not contain physiologically descriptive words about the condition they refer to. Through the use of electronic health records (EHRs), embedded applied clinical informatics tools including synonyms and pick lists that include physiologically descriptive terms associated with any eponym appearing in the EHR can significantly enhance the correct use of medical eponyms. Here we describe a case example of two similar sounding medical eponyms--Wegener's disease and Wegner's disease-- which were confused in our EHR. We describe our solution to address this specific example and our suggestions and accomplishments developing more generalized approaches to dealing with medical eponyms in EHRs. Integrating brief physiologically descriptive terms with medical eponyms provides an applied clinical informatics opportunity to improve patient care. PMID:23646083

Baskaran, L N Guptha Munugoor; Greco, P J; Kaelber, D C

2012-01-01

17

Deconstruction of Socio-Technical Information Systems with Virtual Exploration Environments as a Method of Teaching Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The working group Didactics of Informatics at the University of Paderborn (Germany) develops and evaluates a multimedia exploration platform for information systems (MEPIS) to the needs of teaching and learning informatics at secondary schools. This paper describes the basic ideas within a system-oriented approach of didactics of informatics and…

Magenheim, Johann S.

18

New Approaches in Teaching Medical Informatics to Medical Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

As technologies of information and communication are integrated incrementally with all facets of everyday life, it is reasonable to expect a penetration into educational procedures as well. This is also true for the case of medical\\/health informatics. In this paper, we describe our approach to facilitate the provision of online medical informatics modules with all those tools (Moodle) and standards

Panagiotis D. Bamidis; Stathis Th. Konstantinidis; Eleni Kaldoudi; Charalampos Bratsas; Maria M. Nikolaidou; Dimitris Koufogiannis; Nicos Maglaveras; Costas Pappas

2008-01-01

19

Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

PubMed Central

The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of a training program to be certified in the subspecialty of clinical informatics. They also specify accreditation requirements for clinical informatics training programs. The AMIA Board of Directors approved this document in November 2008. PMID:19074295

Safran, Charles; Shabot, M. Michael; Munger, Benson S.; Holmes, John H.; Steen, Elaine B.; Lumpkin, John R.; Detmer, Don E.

2009-01-01

20

Informatics Teaching from the Students' Point of View  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Branches of science and technical/engineering study have for a long time been the less favoured disciplines and students have not been interested in studying them. Informatics/computer education, based on its character, belongs to these disciplines, but on the contrary it belongs rather to the group of popular school subjects. The paper presents…

Zahorec, Jan; Haskova, Alena

2013-01-01

21

School of Informatics Teaching Programme Review 2425 November 2008 School Response  

E-print Network

3.9). Academic management in the School is under review and clearer lines of responsibility to help build relationships. iii. Review the personnel management structure to ensure that there wereSchool of Informatics Teaching Programme Review 24­25 November 2008 School Response The School

Edinburgh, University of

22

Adapting social media as a scaffolding tool for teaching health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is an applied hybrid discipline of health and life sciences, computer science and business. Teaching this subject to undergraduate students, presents the challenge of learning without the assistance of internship or work experience that enable placing the learning in context. We used the university's learning management software as a form of social medium to stimulate discussions in preparation

Karen Day; Stewart Wells

2009-01-01

23

Viewpoint Paper: The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

2008-01-01

24

Continued on Page 17 Issue 14, Fall 2013 Newsletter of the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology  

E-print Network

Continued on Page 17 Issue 14, Fall 2013 Newsletter of the Department of Medical Informatics................8 Student/Alumni News ...........14 DMICE Tracks From the Chair he Department of Medical Informatics the Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE) and industry, the IDL is focused on driving

Chapman, Michael S.

25

International Co-Teaching of Medical Informatics for Training-the-Trainers in Content and Distance Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this technologically advanced age, much emphasis is put on collaboration in education at many levels. As a result, faculty co-teaching (collaborative teaching) has grown dramatically. This paper introduces how two instructors from different countries (USA and Turkey), one experienced in online teaching and the other in medical informatics,…

Lewis, Kadriye O.; Sincan, Murat

2009-01-01

26

Research on Clinical Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical education research indicates little has been done to improve teaching effectiveness of attending physicians on hospital wards. Moreover, there have been few studies to determine what the attending physician should attempt to accomplish with medical school trainees. More data collected in clinical settings are needed. (RD)

And Others; Daggett, Christopher J.

1979-01-01

27

Eight Years of Distance Teaching and Learning in Biomedical Informatics at OHSU  

E-print Network

, 2005) � Growing recognition of importance of "secondary use" of clinical data for (Safran, 2007, Australia. CD-ROM P421. Safran, C., Bloomrosen, M., et al. (2007). Toward a national framework for the secondary use of health data: an American Medical Informatics Association white paper. Journal

Chapman, Michael S.

28

Teaching Clinical Psychology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching Clinical Psychology, created by Dr. John Suler of Rider University, is devoted to �sharing ideas and resources for teaching clinical psychology.� Helpful for students and educators in the fields of mental health and human services counseling, this site contains practical in-class exercises, such as an exercise which illustrates what it is like to share secrets with strangers, and syllabi for courses in the clinical psychology curriculum. There are also larger projects for students, including an in-depth analysis of a psychotherapy case study and a role-play project which has students administer, score, and interpret a series of psychological tests given to a classmate.

Suler, John R., 1955-

2006-12-02

29

Addressing the biomedical informatics needs of a microarray laboratory in a clinical microbiology context.  

PubMed

For an effective integration of microarray-based technologies in clinical settings a number of contributions from biomedical informatics technologies and techniques are needed to facilitate the improvement of the phases of experimental design, image analysis, data management, annotation, and analysis. In this communication we briefly present the state-of-the-art in the application of biomedical informatics to laboratories conducting microarray experiments and how our unit is coping with these requirements imposed by the routine clinical work of the National Centre of Microbiology, a reference laboratory for the Spanish Health System. PMID:18487706

Lopez-Campos, Guillermo; Lopez Alonso, Victoria; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando

2008-01-01

30

Clinical Informatics and Its Usefulness for Assessing Risk and Preventing Falls and Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing homes have lagged in the development and use of technology and clinical informatics. This paper describes a practical model of translating clinical informatics research into practice. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment data collected by nursing homes nationwide is translated into knowledge-based information that supports continuous quality improvement. It does so by providing timely Web-based reports alerting staff to

Christie Teigland; Richard Gardiner; Hailing Li; Colene Byrne

31

Developing health informatics as a recognised professional domain supporting clinical and health management activity.  

PubMed

This paper puts forward a case for use of the term "health informatics" to be deployed as a catalyst to collective recognition of the contribution that technology, information handling and decision support can provide to effective health care internationally. It cautions against disregarding the impact that the collective 'health informatics' may have on cohesion and recognition across the specialist clinical areas, management sectors and diverse professions involved in specialist areas. It also recognises that commonality of standards and consistency of protocols can be identified in many of the technical and clinical specialist areas, confirming the basis for a collective term. Having looked at potentially generic factors in the development of both a learned society and professional regulation body in the UK, the paper concludes that without recognition of the collective term "health informatics" there will be an grossy extended time frame before any of those working in this area gain the recognition and respect of a formal discipline. PMID:17396757

Roberts, Jean

2006-01-01

32

Clinical Teaching: Some Experimental Observations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study attempted to measure some effects of a 2-week postbaccalaureate workshop on clinical teaching (teaching which provides children with individualized materials and procedures) and to assess administrative encouragement and appreciation of clinical experimentation and innovation. An experimental group of 20 experienced elementary teachers who…

Scott, Ralph

33

Informatic nephrology.  

PubMed

Biomedical informatics in Health (BIH) is the discipline in charge of capturing, handling and using information in health and biomedicine in order to improve the processes involved with assistance and management. Informatic nephrology has appeared as a product of the combination between conventional nephrology with BIH and its development has been considerable in the assistance as well as in the academic field. Regarding the former, there is increasing evidence that informatics technology can make nephrological assistance be better in quality (effective, accessible, safe and satisfying), improve patient's adherence, optimize patient's and practitioner's time, improve physical space and achieve health cost reduction. Among its main elements, we find electronic medical and personal health records, clinical decision support system, tele-nephrology, and recording and monitoring devices. Additionally, regarding the academic field, informatics and Internet contribute to education and research in the nephrological field. In conclusion, informatics nephrology represents a new field which will influence the future of nephrology. PMID:23065430

Musso, Carlos; Aguilera, Jerónimo; Otero, Carlos; Vilas, Manuel; Luna, Daniel; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

2013-08-01

34

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education  

PubMed Central

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

35

Cancer Clinical and Translational Informatics Goals — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

36

Informatics tools to improve clinical research study implementation. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

In complex multisite clinical research trials, potential problems are compounded when multiple personnel at different sites are responsible for primary data collection, data entry, report form design, etc. This article describes how informatics tools can help identify and correct flawed procedures and data problems early, contributing to overall study success. For example, a value that is flagged as “bad” soon after data entry is more likely to be correctable because source documents and data originators are more readily available.

37

Evaluating informatics applications - clinical decision support systems literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews clinical decision support systems (CDSS) literature, with a focus on evaluation. The literature indicates a general consensus that clinical decision support systems are thought to have the potential to improve care. Evidence is more equivocal for guidelines and for systems to aid physicians with diagnosis. There also is general consensus that a variety of systems are little

Bonnie Kaplan

2001-01-01

38

Clinical teachers’ experiences of nursing and teaching.  

E-print Network

??Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)%%%Abstract Clinical teachers’ experiences of nursing and teaching Clinical nurse teachers’ experiences of nursing and teaching undergraduate nursing students on clinical placement… (more)

Forbes, Helen

2007-01-01

39

Neonatal Informatics: Optimizing Clinical Data Entry and Display  

PubMed Central

Displaying the vast amount of clinical data that exist in electronic medical records without causing information overload or interfering with provider thought processes is a challenge. To support the transformation of data into information and knowledge, effective electronic displays must be flexible and guide physicians’ thought processes. Applying research from cognitive science and human factors engineering offers promise in improving the electronic display of clinical information. Objectives After completing this article, readers should be able to: Appreciate the importance of supporting provider thought processes during both data entry and data review. Recognize that information does not need to be displayed and reviewed in the same way the data are entered. PMID:22557935

Palma, Jonathan P.; Brown, Patrick J.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

2012-01-01

40

Teaching and Learning School Informatics: A Concept-Based Pedagogical Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

While informatics is a well-established discipline in higher education around the world, it is not the case in secondary education, with the exception of a few countries. Generally, what is taught is not informatics as a subject with its own methods, concepts, and principles, but some software tools with the goal that the use is sufficient for students to acquire

Said Hadjerrouit

2009-01-01

41

Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: Physical Exam  

E-print Network

state of clinical skills teaching · Teaching clinical skills through a coaching relationship in style, or they concluded the criticism was no longer relevant to their current level of performance. #12

Myers, Lawrence C.

42

Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-01-01

43

Teaching Health Informatics to the Net Generation: A New Baseline for Building Capability?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The current generation of medical students are the Net Generation. However there is a dearth of data on their Internet use to inform universities' approaches to using the Internet, especially Web 2.0, most effectively in medical education .In particular, we have little information on students' skills base to use in planning to build greater informatics capacity in the Australian

Kathleen Gray; Gregor Kennedy; Terry Judd

44

Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

Stead, William W.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

1999-01-01

45

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying\\u000a essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences\\u000a of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during\\u000a workplace learning and training. This study is based on

Kathleen Gray; Jenny Sim

2011-01-01

46

People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009); (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011). A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008). With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS) as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003); (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005); (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011). At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1) a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs); and 2) a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI), Computer Science (CS), Information Science (IS), and Information Technology (IT) disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the establishment of a formal BMI academic unit and the perceived relationship between BMI, CS, IS, and IT leaders. Subsequent thematic analysis of the aforementioned public domain documents demonstrated a discordance between perceived and reported integration across and between BMI, CS, IS, and IT programs and leaders with relevance to the CTS domain. Conclusion Differences in people, organization, and leadership factors do influence the effectiveness of CTS programs, particularly with regard to the ability to access and leverage BMI, CS, IS, and IT expertise and resources. Based on this finding, we believe that the development of a better understanding of how optimal BMI, CS, IS, and IT organizational structures and leadership models are designed and implemented is critical to both the advancement of CTS and ultimately, to improvements in the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare. PMID:23388243

2013-01-01

47

Research Paper: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of a Clinical Informatics Consult Service: Impact on Evidence-based Decision-making and Knowledge Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo determine the effectiveness of providing synthesized research evidence to inform patient care practices via an evidence based informatics program, the Clinical Informatics Consult Service (CICS).DesignConsults were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: CICS Provided, in which clinicians received synthesized information from the biomedical literature addressing the consult question or No CICS Provided, in which no information was provided.MeasurementOutcomes

Shelagh A. Mulvaney; Leonard Bickman; Nunzia B. Giuse; E. Warren Lambert; Nila A. Sathe; Rebecca N. Jerome

2008-01-01

48

Triangular model integrating clinical teaching and assessment  

PubMed Central

Structuring clinical teaching is a challenge facing medical education curriculum designers. A variety of instructional methods on different domains of learning are indicated to accommodate different learning styles. Conventional methods of clinical teaching, like training in ambulatory care settings, are prone to the factor of coincidence in having varieties of patient presentations. Accordingly, alternative methods of instruction are indicated to compensate for the deficiencies of these conventional methods. This paper presents an initiative that can be used to design a checklist as a blueprint to guide appropriate selection and implementation of teaching/learning and assessment methods in each of the educational courses and modules based on educational objectives. Three categories of instructional methods were identified, and within each a variety of methods were included. These categories are classroom-type settings, health services-based settings, and community service-based settings. Such categories have framed our triangular model of clinical teaching and assessment. PMID:24624002

Abdelaziz, Adel; Koshak, Emad

2014-01-01

49

Informatics in radiology: RADTF: a semantic search-enabled, natural language processor-generated radiology teaching file.  

PubMed

Storing and retrieving radiology cases is an important activity for education and clinical research, but this process can be time-consuming. In the process of structuring reports and images into organized teaching files, incidental pathologic conditions not pertinent to the primary teaching point can be omitted, as when a user saves images of an aortic dissection case but disregards the incidental osteoid osteoma. An alternate strategy for identifying teaching cases is text search of reports in radiology information systems (RIS), but retrieved reports are unstructured, teaching-related content is not highlighted, and patient identifying information is not removed. Furthermore, searching unstructured reports requires sophisticated retrieval methods to achieve useful results. An open-source, RadLex(®)-compatible teaching file solution called RADTF, which uses natural language processing (NLP) methods to process radiology reports, was developed to create a searchable teaching resource from the RIS and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The NLP system extracts and de-identifies teaching-relevant statements from full reports to generate a stand-alone database, thus converting existing RIS archives into an on-demand source of teaching material. Using RADTF, the authors generated a semantic search-enabled, Web-based radiology archive containing over 700,000 cases with millions of images. RADTF combines a compact representation of the teaching-relevant content in radiology reports and a versatile search engine with the scale of the entire RIS-PACS collection of case material. PMID:20801868

Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew; Biswal, Sandip; Kamaya, Aya; Rubin, Daniel L

2010-11-01

50

Biomedical informatics and translational medicine  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics involves a core set of methodologies that can provide a foundation for crossing the "translational barriers" associated with translational medicine. To this end, the fundamental aspects of biomedical informatics (e.g., bioinformatics, imaging informatics, clinical informatics, and public health informatics) may be essential in helping improve the ability to bring basic research findings to the bedside, evaluate the efficacy of interventions across communities, and enable the assessment of the eventual impact of translational medicine innovations on health policies. Here, a brief description is provided for a selection of key biomedical informatics topics (Decision Support, Natural Language Processing, Standards, Information Retrieval, and Electronic Health Records) and their relevance to translational medicine. Based on contributions and advancements in each of these topic areas, the article proposes that biomedical informatics practitioners ("biomedical informaticians") can be essential members of translational medicine teams. PMID:20187952

2010-01-01

51

Dental school teaching clinics as cost centers.  

PubMed

Increasing net patient revenues from teaching clinics is one of the alternatives available to dental schools seeking to alleviate economic pressures. Managerial decisions directed to this end require accurate and useful data on clinic finances and economic organization. An important step in this direction can be taken by defining the teaching clinic as a cost center, that is as an economic entity in a dental school with identifiable specific resources, costs, and revenues. This paper describes the accounting and economics frameworks within which resources and costs are classified and allocated into direct and indirect, and fixed and variable categories. The development and structure of a cost-revenue model designed for the teaching clinics at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine is described to illustrate an application of the cost center concept. PMID:7798400

Doherty, N; Cordes, D

1994-01-01

52

Supporting collaboration through a nursing informatics curriculum stage II.  

PubMed Central

Collaboration is at the center of the process used to design, implement and evaluate an integrated informatics curriculum in a baccalaureate nursing program. This paper describes the second stage of a process to design the informatics nursing courses. The challenges to foster faculty collaborative relationships as well as to enhance the course content of all nursing informatics curriculum. A number of strategies were used to develop the collaborative efforts between the faculty and nursing staff in the clinical agencies. Information technology was incorporated into the didactic and clinical portions of courses through the use of creative teaching strategies. Therefore, the faculty have ensured a blend of information, technology, and the clinical care process throughout the curriculum. PMID:1482910

Travis, L. L.; Hoehn, B.; Spees, C.; Hribar, K.; Youngblut, J.

1992-01-01

53

What is biomedical informatics?  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

2009-01-01

54

An informatics approach to medication adherence assessment and improvement using clinical, billing, and patient-entered data.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe an integrated informatics approach to aggregating and displaying clinically relevant data that can identify problems with medication adherence and facilitate patient-provider communication about strategies to improve medication use. We developed a clinical dashboard within an electronic health record (EHR) system that uses data from three sources: the medical record, pharmacy claims, and a personal health record. The data are integrated to inform clinician-patient discussions about medication adherence. Whereas prior research on assessing patterns of medication adherence focused on a single approach using the EHR, pharmacy data, or patient-entered data, we present an approach that integrates multiple electronic data sources increasingly found in practice. Medication adherence is a complex challenge that requires patient and provider team input, necessitating an integrated approach using advanced EHR, clinical decision support, and patient-controlled technologies. Future research should focus on integrated strategies to provide patients and providers with the right combination of informatics tools to help them adequately address the challenge of adherence to complex medication therapies. PMID:24076751

Dixon, Brian E; Jabour, Abdulrahman M; Phillips, Erin O'Kelly; Marrero, David G

2014-01-01

55

Clinical Teachers' Opinions about Bedside-based Clinical Teaching  

PubMed Central

Objectives: In recent years, there has been a decline in estimated time spent on bedside teaching. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical teachers’ perceptions and practice of, and approaches to, bedside teaching. Methods: The study site was Ninewells Hospital in Dundee, UK. A self-administered questionnaire was developed and piloted on full-time clinical academic university staff. Responses were solicited to 36 questions relating to teaching experience, familiarity with the 12 learning outcomes of Dundee Medical School's curriculum, and perception and practice of basic bedside etiquette. For each of these items, a comparison between consultants and specialist registrars (SPRs) was carried out. Results: Out of the 64 clinical teachers approached, 45 (70%) participated in the study: 26 of them (57.7%) were consultants and 19 (42.3%) SPRs. A total of 17 (65%) of the consultants had been trained to teach medical students at the bedside, while only 9 SPRs (47%) had had similar training. In addition, 13 consultants (50%) reported being familiar with Dundee Medical School's 12 learning outcomes, while only 7 (36%) SPRs were familiar with it. Obstacles reported by consultants and SPRs were groups of over 6 students (65% versus 61%, respectively), a limited number of patients with good clinical signs (67% versus 63%, respectively), a shorter length of stay in hospital (73% versus 68%, respectively), lack of privacy in crowded wards (76% versus 73%, respectively), and interruptions from telephones and visitors (57% versus 64%, respectively). Conclusion: Effective clinical teacher training and a thorough understanding of curriculum outcomes are crucial to successful bedside clinical teaching. Identifying obstacles to bedside clinical teaching will contribute to a more effective and efficient programme. PMID:23573392

Shehab, Abdullah

2013-01-01

56

Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,…

Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

2008-01-01

57

tranSMART: An Open Source and Community-Driven Informatics and Data Sharing Platform for Clinical and Translational Research.  

PubMed

tranSMART is an emerging global open source public private partnership community developing a comprehensive informatics-based analysis and data-sharing cloud platform for clinical and translational research. The tranSMART consortium includes pharmaceutical and other companies, not-for-profits, academic entities, patient advocacy groups, and government stakeholders. The tranSMART value proposition relies on the concept that the global community of users, developers, and stakeholders are the best source of innovation for applications and for useful data. Continued development and use of the tranSMART platform will create a means to enable "pre-competitive" data sharing broadly, saving money and, potentially accelerating research translation to cures. Significant transformative effects of tranSMART includes 1) allowing for all its user community to benefit from experts globally, 2) capturing the best of innovation in analytic tools, 3) a growing 'big data' resource, 4) convergent standards, and 5) new informatics-enabled translational science in the pharma, academic, and not-for-profit sectors. PMID:24303286

Athey, Brian D; Braxenthaler, Michael; Haas, Magali; Guo, Yike

2013-01-01

58

Research and teaching with the AFTOL SBD: an informatics resource for fungal subcellular and biochemical data.  

PubMed

The Structural and Biochemical Database (SBD), developed as part of the US NSF-funded Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL), is a multi-investigator project. It is a major resource to present and manage morphological and biochemical information on Fungi and serves as a phyloinformatics tool for the scientific community. It also is an important resource for teaching mycology. The database, available at http://aftol.umn.edu, includes new and previously published subcellular data on Fungi, supplemented with images and literature links. Datasets automatically combined in NEXUS format from the site permit independent and combined (with molecular data) phylogenetic analyses. Character lists, a major feature of the site, serve as primary reference documents of subcellular and biochemical characters that distinguish taxa across the major fungal lineages. The character lists illustrated with images and drawings are informative for evolutionary and developmental biologists as well as educators, students and the public. Fungal Subcellular Ontology (FSO), developed as part of this effort is a primary initiative to provide a controlled vocabulary describing subcellular structures unique to Fungi. FSO establishes a full complement of terms that provide an operating ontological framework for the database. Examples are provided for using the database for teaching. PMID:24563838

Arun Kumar, T K; Blackwell, Meredith; Letcher, Peter M; Roberson, Robert W; McLaughlin, David J

2013-12-01

59

Museum Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

2003-01-01

60

Informatics: A Brief Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

He, Shaoyi

2003-01-01

61

Medical informatics: reasoning methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The progress of medical informatics has been characterized by the development of a wide range of reasoning methods. These reasoning methods are based on organizing principles that make use of the various relations existing in medical domains: associations, probabilities, causality, functional relationships, temporal relations, locality, similarity, and clinical practice. Some, such as those based on associations and probabilities have been

William J. Long

2001-01-01

62

The context of clinical teaching and learning in Australia.  

PubMed

Gaining clinical experience for an extended period of time in teaching hospitals is one of the enduring strengths of medical education. Teaching hospitals have recently faced significant challenges, with increasing specialisation of services and workload pressures reducing clinical learning opportunities. New clinical teaching environments have been established in Australia, particularly in rural and regional areas; these are proving to be ideal contexts for student learning. The new clinical teaching environments have shown the importance of developing symbiotic relationships between universities and health services. Symbiotic clinical learning is built around longitudinal, patient-based learning emphasising priority health concerns. The symbiotic framework provides a basis for reconstructing clinical teaching in teaching hospitals so th@they continue to play a vital role in Australian medical education, with additional clinical experience provided by primary care and community, rural and regional hospitals. PMID:22509881

Ash, Julie K; Walters, Lucie K; Prideaux, David J; Wilson, Ian G

2012-04-16

63

Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

2014-01-01

64

Teaching communication skills to clinical students.  

PubMed Central

Seven years' experience in teaching communication skills to first year clinical students at St Mary's Hospital School of Medicine is described. The first component consists of a day during the introductory clinical course; this is divided into a lecture and small seminar groups and involves behavioural scientists and clinicians from many departments. The second component uses simulated patients and video feedback and takes place in small groups later in the year. Participation of the students through active critical discussion, role play, and interactive video feedback are important aspects in the success of the course. The methods have been refined through evaluation by students and tutors. This article aims to allow others, already running or considering such a course, to develop effective courses within the practical constraints of their own institutions. Images p1325-a PMID:8518575

McManus, I C; Vincent, C A; Thom, S; Kidd, J

1993-01-01

65

A centralized informatics infrastructure for the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Clinical trial networks (CTNs) were created to provide a sustaining infrastructure for the conduct of multisite clinical trials. As such, they must withstand changes in membership. Centralization of infrastructure including knowledge management, portfolio management, information management, process automation, work policies, and procedures in clinical research networks facilitates consistency and ultimately research.Purpose In 2005, the National Institute on Drug Abuse

Jeng-Jong Pan; Meredith Nahm; Paul Wakim; Carol Cushing; Lori Poole; Betty Tai; Carl F Pieper

2009-01-01

66

Standards Enabling the Conduct of Clinical Research — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

67

[Current issues of medical informatics].  

PubMed

Due to the modern high standards of information technologies it is only natural to promote our medical care and to ensure a new quality of clinical services. Information technologies should be introduced into the medical field with due respect to clearly predetermined principles. Analyzed in the paper are the key reasons for a huge number of problems occurring in the sphere of medical informatics; optimal methods of medical-informatics introduction are defined. PMID:15101199

Pokrovski?, V I; Lishchuk, V A; Shevchenko, G V

2004-01-01

68

Bioethics for clinicians: 25. Teaching bioethics in the clinical setting  

PubMed Central

BIOETHICS IS NOW TAUGHT IN EVERY CANADIAN MEDICAL SCHOOL. Canada needs a cadre of teachers who can help clinicians learn bioethics. Our purpose is to encourage clinician teachers to accept this important responsibility and to provide practical advice about teaching bioethics to clinicians as an integral part of good clinical medicine. We use 5 questions to focus the discussion: Why should I teach? What should I teach? How should I teach? How should I evaluate? How should I learn? PMID:11338804

McKneally, Martin F.; Singer, Peter A.

2001-01-01

69

Accelerating translational research by clinically driven development of an informatics platform--a case study.  

PubMed

Translational medicine is becoming increasingly dependent upon data generated from health care, clinical research, and molecular investigations. This increasing rate of production and diversity in data has brought about several challenges, including the need to integrate fragmented databases, enable secondary use of patient clinical data from health care in clinical research, and to create information systems that clinicians and biomedical researchers can readily use. Our case study effectively integrates requirements from the clinical and biomedical researcher perspectives in a translational medicine setting. Our three principal achievements are (a) a design of a user-friendly web-based system for management and integration of clinical and molecular databases, while adhering to proper de-identification and security measures; (b) providing a real-world test of the system functionalities using clinical cohorts; and (c) system integration with a clinical decision support system to demonstrate system interoperability. We engaged two active clinical cohorts, 747 psoriasis patients and 2001 rheumatoid arthritis patients, to demonstrate efficient query possibilities across the data sources, enable cohort stratification, extract variation in antibody patterns, study biomarker predictors of treatment response in RA patients, and to explore metabolic profiles of psoriasis patients. Finally, we demonstrated system interoperability by enabling integration with an established clinical decision support system in health care. To assure the usefulness and usability of the system, we followed two approaches. First, we created a graphical user interface supporting all user interactions. Secondly we carried out a system performance evaluation study where we measured the average response time in seconds for active users, http errors, and kilobits per second received and sent. The maximum response time was found to be 0.12 seconds; no server or client errors of any kind were detected. In conclusion, the system can readily be used by clinicians and biomedical researchers in a translational medicine setting. PMID:25203647

Abugessaisa, Imad; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Tsipras, Giorgos; Lindblad, Staffan; Sandin, Charlotta; Nikamo, Pernilla; Ståhle, Mona; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Tegnér, Jesper

2014-01-01

70

Accelerating Translational Research by Clinically Driven Development of an Informatics Platform-A Case Study  

PubMed Central

Translational medicine is becoming increasingly dependent upon data generated from health care, clinical research, and molecular investigations. This increasing rate of production and diversity in data has brought about several challenges, including the need to integrate fragmented databases, enable secondary use of patient clinical data from health care in clinical research, and to create information systems that clinicians and biomedical researchers can readily use. Our case study effectively integrates requirements from the clinical and biomedical researcher perspectives in a translational medicine setting. Our three principal achievements are (a) a design of a user-friendly web-based system for management and integration of clinical and molecular databases, while adhering to proper de-identification and security measures; (b) providing a real-world test of the system functionalities using clinical cohorts; and (c) system integration with a clinical decision support system to demonstrate system interoperability. We engaged two active clinical cohorts, 747 psoriasis patients and 2001 rheumatoid arthritis patients, to demonstrate efficient query possibilities across the data sources, enable cohort stratification, extract variation in antibody patterns, study biomarker predictors of treatment response in RA patients, and to explore metabolic profiles of psoriasis patients. Finally, we demonstrated system interoperability by enabling integration with an established clinical decision support system in health care. To assure the usefulness and usability of the system, we followed two approaches. First, we created a graphical user interface supporting all user interactions. Secondly we carried out a system performance evaluation study where we measured the average response time in seconds for active users, http errors, and kilobits per second received and sent. The maximum response time was found to be 0.12 seconds; no server or client errors of any kind were detected. In conclusion, the system can readily be used by clinicians and biomedical researchers in a translational medicine setting. PMID:25203647

Abugessaisa, Imad; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Tsipras, Giorgos; Lindblad, Staffan; Sandin, Charlotta; Nikamo, Pernilla; Stahle, Mona; Malmstrom, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Tegner, Jesper

2014-01-01

71

Clinical teaching and learning in midwifery and women's health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although there is an abundance of literature about clinical teaching in the health professions, a much smaller body of information focuses on the art and science of clinical teaching in midwifery and women's health. We reviewed preceptor handbooks, training manuals, and Web sites created by nursing and nurse-midwifery education programs, medical and pharmacy schools, and national associations of health professionals.

Jeanne Raisler; Michelle O'Grady; Jody Lori

2003-01-01

72

How Does Gender Interact with Clinical Teachers' Perceptions of Clinical Teaching?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzed 816 medical professors' perceptions of clinical teaching, as measured with the online version of the Clinical Teaching Perception Inventory, and examined difficulties that female professors faced in becoming the ideal clinical teacher. While describing themselves as a clinical teacher, female professors rated themselves lower…

Masunaga, Hiromi; Hitchcock, Maurice A.

2011-01-01

73

INFORMATICS Knowledge Management  

E-print Network

MEDICAL INFORMATICS Knowledge Management and Data Mining in Biomedicine #12;INTEGRATED SERIES, Friedrich, Kaluza, Abdelkafi & Kreutler #12;MEDICAL INFORMATICS Knowledge Management and Data Mining ............................................................................................xxxix UNITI: Foundational Topics in Medical Informatics Chapter 1: Knowledge Management. Data Mining

Athens, University of

74

Structural relationships within medical informatics.  

PubMed Central

This study seeks to increase our understanding of the structure of Medical Informatics. In particular, it focuses on the relationships between information science and information technology on the one hand, and biomedical research, clinical practice, and medical education on the other, that have defined "medical informatics." Using indexing terms and MeSH tree structures assigned to medical informatics literature covered by MEDLINE, co-occurrence analysis provides a "map" of the field. Major research and application focuses arrayed within the map elucidate a finer structure than reported previously. Dimensions "Techniques vs. Systems" and "Signs & Symptoms vs. Processes" form the two axes of the map and relate to the relationships underlying the indexing assignments given to the literature studied. Related studies underway using the INSPEC database will provide a complementary perspective on the structure of medical informatics as a field. PMID:11079952

Morris, T. A.

2000-01-01

75

Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics  

PubMed Central

The Human Genome Project (HGP) provided the initial draft of mankind's DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized.[7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it's hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future. PMID:23248761

Gullapalli, Rama R.; Desai, Ketaki V.; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

2012-01-01

76

From unmet clinical need to entrepreneurship: taking your informatics solution to market.  

PubMed

This paper will describe the process for taking a decision support solution to market as a start-up business. The nurse inventor and Co-Founder of RightCare Solutions, Inc. will share the steps from answering a clinical question, to registering an invention, creating a business plan and company, obtaining venture funding, and launching a commercial product. We will share positives about the experience such as how to get start-up funds, gaining national exposure and access to an excellent team, disseminating your work broadly, further enhancing the product, and obtaining equity, and financial rewards. We will discuss cons such as losing control, dilution of ownership, and conflict of interest. This paper will encourage nurse informaticians to think differently and learn about the steps in the process from an experienced team. PMID:24943561

Bowles, Kathryn H; Heil, Eric

2014-01-01

77

BioInformatics BioInformatics  

E-print Network

BigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Bioinformatics group, Utrecht University, the Netherlands Patterns in genome and regulome evolution: insights

Shamir, Ron

78

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

79

Informatics in radiology: development of a research PACS for analysis of functional imaging data in clinical research and clinical trials.  

PubMed

Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) provide limited flexibility for the development of novel research methods. By contrast, the research model of data access is more flexible but has vulnerabilities in numerous areas. No single monolithic application can fulfill the diverse and rapidly changing needs of the clinical imaging research community. Instead, the focus should be on the interoperability of preexisting systems. To a large extent, this can be achieved by means of a unified interface for storing and retrieving data. The concept of a research PACS combines the advantages of the clinical and research models of data access while eliminating the disadvantages. A research PACS streamlines the data management process. Instead of a single software program, it consists of a confederation of independent applications brought together by the ability to store and retrieve data in a common database. A prototype research PACS has been developed that is based on the Extensible Neuroimaging Archive Toolkit (XNAT) in association with two new in-house tools: a data selection tool and a data archiving tool. By taking as an example the comparison of regions of interest in multifunctional liver data, it was demonstrated that this framework allows a number of in-house and open-source applications originally designed to work on a stand-alone basis to be integrated into a unified workflow, with minimal redevelopment effort. PMID:22929148

Doran, Simon J; d'Arcy, James; Collins, David J; Andriantsimiavona, Rado; Orton, Matthew; Koh, Dow-Mu; Leach, Martin O

2012-01-01

80

The Influence of Computers and Informatics on Mathematics and Its Teaching. Science and Technology Education Series, 44.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1985 the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI) published the first edition of a book of studies on the topic of the influence of computers on mathematics and the teaching of mathematics. This document is an updated version of that book and includes five articles from the 1985 ICMI conference at Strasbourg, France; reports…

Cornu, Bernard, Ed.; Ralston, Anthony, Ed.

81

Toward an Ecological Perspective of Resident Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are…

Smith, C. Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-01-01

82

TEACHING CLINICAL NURSING BY CLOSED CIRCUIT TV.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

TO TEST THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CLOSED-CIRCUIT TELEVISION IN TRAINING NURSES, THIS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT EVALUATED THREE EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS OF 15 STUDENTS AND FOUR CONTROL GROUPS OF 10 STUDENTS. IN ADDITION TO INCREASING TEACHING CAPACITY BY FIVE STUDENTS PER INSTRUCTOR, THE FOLLOWING BENEFITS WERE NOTED FROM SEVEN EVALUATIVE QUESTIONS POSED TO…

GRIFFIN, GERALD J.; KINSINGER, ROBERT E.

83

An Analysis of Educational Informatization Level of Students, Teachers, and Parents: In Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Korea is recognized as one of the most advanced countries in terms of informatization. The development of informatization has impacted education, and education informatization has contributed to the improvement of teaching in the classroom. Accordingly, education informatiozation is one of the paramount pedagogical issues in South Korea. This…

Kim, JaMee; Lee, WonGyu

2011-01-01

84

Teaching clinical reasoning by making thinking visible: an action research project with allied health clinical educators  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical reasoning is fundamental to all forms of professional health practice, however it is also difficult to teach and learn because it is complex, tacit, and effectively invisible for students. In this paper we present an approach for teaching clinical reasoning based on making expert thinking visible and accessible to students. Methods Twenty-one experienced allied health clinical educators from three tertiary Australian hospitals attended up to seven action research discussion sessions, where they developed a tentative heuristic of their own clinical reasoning, trialled it with students, evaluated if it helped their students to reason clinically, and then refined it so the heuristic was targeted to developing each student’s reasoning skills. Data included participants’ written descriptions of the thinking routines they developed and trialed with their students and the transcribed action research discussion sessions. Content analysis was used to summarise this data and categorise themes about teaching and learning clinical reasoning. Results Two overriding themes emerged from participants’ reports about using the ‘making thinking visible approach’. The first was a specific focus by participating educators on students’ understanding of the reasoning process and the second was heightened awareness of personal teaching styles and approaches to teaching clinical reasoning. Conclusions We suggest that the making thinking visible approach has potential to assist educators to become more reflective about their clinical reasoning teaching and acts as a scaffold to assist them to articulate their own expert reasoning and for students to access and use. PMID:24479414

2014-01-01

85

Engineering Polymer Informatics  

E-print Network

Engineering Polymer Informatics Nico Adams, Jen Ryder, Nicholas England, David Jessop, Peter Corbett, Peter Murray-Rust Our mission is to develop an informatics toolbox, which will take into account the special computational needs of polymers...

Adams, Nico; Ryder, Jennifer; Jessop, David M; Corbett, Peter; Murray-Rust, Peter

2007-12-17

86

Integrated Case Learning: teaching clinical reasoning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Learning how to ‘think like doctors’ can be difficult for undergraduate medical students in their early clinical years. Our\\u000a model of collaborative Integrated Case Learning (ICL) and simulated clinical reasoning aims to address these issues. Taking\\u000a a socio-cultural perspective, this study investigates the reflective learning interactions and practices of clinical thinking\\u000a that emerged in the ICL environment. We also explore

Natalie Radomski; John Russell

2010-01-01

87

A framework for clinical teaching: A passion-centered philosophy.  

PubMed

Clinical nurse educators are facing a number of new challenges in pediatric acute care settings that necessitate revisions to their teaching approaches. In this paper, we present a theoretical discussion of a philosophy of nursing education based on a passion for teaching that, when implemented by clinical nursing faculty, promotes positive learning environments in which nursing students feel supported, valued, and engaged. A revised leadership framework, as originally set out by Day (2004), is utilized to explore the essential philosophical underpinnings of passion that nurse educators may consider as they seek to promote positive student outcomes in clinical nursing education. Beatty et al. (2009) argued that there is a growing conviction that every teacher needs a carefully formulated teaching philosophy. Similarly, we contend that all clinical nurse educators critically evaluate their understanding of the meanings and experiences that motivate and frame their values of teaching. We suggest that teaching with passion promotes the development of a positive learning environment and lends itself to rewarding and successful learning experiences. PMID:20570213

Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Ferguson, Linda

2010-11-01

88

Integrated Case Learning: Teaching Clinical Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning how to "think like doctors" can be difficult for undergraduate medical students in their early clinical years. Our model of collaborative Integrated Case Learning (ICL) and simulated clinical reasoning aims to address these issues. Taking a socio-cultural perspective, this study investigates the reflective learning interactions and…

Radomski, Natalie; Russell, John

2010-01-01

89

Using Clinical Cases to Teach General Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A clinical study was designed and used to show the relationship of health and medicine, in a typical clinical scenario, where many chemical principles are involved and that an integrated knowledge of chemistry and biology is essential to the understanding, diagnosing and treating of illnesses. A case study would be a positive learning experience…

Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Kosky, Charles; Vaz, Geraldine S.; Martin, Charlotte L.

2004-01-01

90

Terminal Behavioral Objectives for Teaching Clinical Toxicology to Clinical Pharmacists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a first step in the development of a competency-based clinical toxicology clerkship, a set of terminal behavioral objectives were developed that reflect the anticipated role that clinical pharmacists should play as part of the clinical toxicology team. The evaluation approaches used at the University of Utah are presented. (LBH)

Veltri, Joseph C.; And Others

1976-01-01

91

Toward an ecological perspective of resident teaching clinic.  

PubMed

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are over-simplified for real patients with multiple chronic diseases, and local features that influence behavior but are not aligned with core values. Many are looking for a new conceptual structure to guide them. In this paper we briefly review several theories of action from the social and complexity sciences, and synthesize these into a coherent 'ecological perspective'. This perspective focuses on stabilizing features and narrative, which select for behaviors in clinic much like organisms are selected for in an ecosystem. We have found this perspective to be a useful guide for design, measurement, and joint learning in the teaching clinic. PMID:18766451

Smith, C Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-12-01

92

[Planning nursing teaching: educational purposes and clinical competence].  

PubMed

Thinking about nursing education implies articulating this issue with the expressions of theoretical frameworks, from the perspective of a pedagogical aspect that includes both constructivism and competencies. The objective was to characterize, from a longitudinal view, the construction of care competencies that exist in the teaching plans of nursing undergraduate programs. This exploratory-descriptive study used a qualitative approach. Documentary analysis was performed on the nine teaching plans of undergraduate care subjects. The ethical-legal aspects were guaranteed, so that data was collected only after the study had been approved by the Research Ethics Committee. The data evidenced a curriculum organization centered on subjects, maintaining internal rationales that seem to resist summative organizations. Signs emerge of hardly substantial links between any previous knowledge and the strengthening of critical judgment and clinical reasoning. As proposed, the study contributed with reconsiderations for the teaching-learning process and showed the influence of constructivism on the proposal of clinical competencies. PMID:19655664

Dell'Acqua, Magda Cristina Queiroz; Miyadahira, Ana Maria Kazue; Ide, Cilene Aparecida Costardi

2009-06-01

93

Clinical Trials Support -Research Associate II Animal Cancer Center Oncology Clinical Trials Program -Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Clinical Trials Support - Research Associate II Animal Cancer Center Oncology Clinical Trials Program - Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Oncology Clinical Trials Program the daily schedule for the clinical trials rotation o Patient care including, obtaining owner history

Stephens, Graeme L.

94

Resident Preferences for the Clinical Teaching of Ambulatory Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of family medicine residents' preferences for the content areas of family medicine emphasized by those attending physicians perceived by the residents as the "best" clinical teachers is discussed. Specific teaching behaviors are identified, and a statistical analysis of the preferences of residents is provided. (Author/MLW)

Stritter, Frank T.; Baker, Richard M.

1982-01-01

95

The use of outreach clinics for teaching undergraduate restorative dentistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aim: To examine the experience of being an outreach teacher of undergraduate restorative dentistry; to describe the desirable characteristics of such teachers; and to consider the management of outreach teaching. Design: A three year pilot of an outreach course in fourth year restorative dentistry began in 2001. Students spent one day per week treating adults in NHS community dental clinics,

A. Elkind; C. Watts; A. Qualtrough; C. Potter; J. Duxbury; F. Blinkhorn; I. Taylor; R. Turner; A. S. Blinkhorn

2007-01-01

96

Computer-Based Management of a Clinical Teaching Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A University of Florida College of Dentistry management system is described that uses a computer to assist in the matching of patients and dental students, the monitoring of patient care, and the tracking of student clinical progress in a teaching environment that emphasizes the comprehensive patient care approach. (Author/MLW)

And Others; Fast, Thomas B.

1980-01-01

97

Clinical Teaching by Video-Enhanced Study Club Discussion Sessions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Loma Linda University School of Dentistry's "study club" method of teaching operative dentistry involves a four-hour clinical operating session and an hour-long discussion immediately following. Videotape recordings of the operative procedures are used successfully in the discussion period to enhance observation and recall. (MSE)

Roberts, Douglass B.; And Others

1988-01-01

98

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical school anatomy curriculum. The article suggests practical advice on the integration of the method into a curriculum as an additional learning opportunity with traditional lab practicums and clinical teaching skills.

Dr. Paul G McMenamin (University of Western Australia Anatomy and Human Biology)

2008-08-01

99

Teaching Perspectives and Usage of Journal Writing by Clinical Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between teaching perspectives (TPs), faculty usage and perceptions of reflective journaling (RJ), and demographic characteristics among clinical faculty in nursing, social work, and counseling. A combination of causal-comparative and correlational designs was utilized, with stratified…

Alschuler, Mari L.

2012-01-01

100

Feasibility of Incorporating Alternative Teaching Methods into Clinical Clerkships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction, interactive video, and videotapes as alternative methods of instruction in clinical clerkship modules on diabetes and hypertension. The 17 participants were more interested in balancing time between patient contact and alternative teaching methods and had better knowledge,…

Berman, Judith; And Others

1990-01-01

101

Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

2014-01-01

102

Teaching courses in clinical trial research methods.  

PubMed

This article describes nine separate elements that are part of any course: 1) the teachers, 2) the students, 3) expectations and attitudes of the teachers, 4) expectations and attitudes of the students, 5) a strategy of how to achieve the expectations, 6) materials to use, 7) types of presentations, 8) organizing the individual sessions, and 9) time and place for the course and each of its sessions. The relationship of each of these elements to a course on clinical-trial research methods is discussed. Approaches to use for designing an overall curriculum for a school, company, or regulatory authority also are discussed. Sixteen separate courses are identified and briefly described. Several methods to enhance the effectiveness of individual lectures or discussions are mentioned. Potential courses, as well as those currently offered, should be periodically evaluated by all institutions that are involved in the area of clinical-trial research methods. PMID:1880213

Spilker, B

1991-06-01

103

Electronic medical records in clinical teaching.  

PubMed

The purpose of the project was to provide students with experiences to develop their technology competency and examine student perceptions about an academic electronic medical record (EMR) as a learning tool. Nurse educators need to integrate EMRs into their curricula to give students practice in the use of electronic documentation and retrieval of clinical information. The findings of this study indicated that students' use of EMRs at least 5 times resulted in the development of positive perceptions about their EMR experience. PMID:25073041

Warboys, Ina; Mok, Wai Yin; Frith, Karen H

2014-01-01

104

Integration of Technology and Informatics in Curriculum Working Group Paul Gorman, M.D. (Chair)  

E-print Network

) Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology Jeff Kraakevik, M.D. (Liaison) Neurology Donn Spight, M (general internal medicine) Bill Hersh, M.D. Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Shannon McIntegration of Technology and Informatics in Curriculum Working Group Paul Gorman, M.D. (Chair

Chapman, Michael S.

105

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School -SISS  

E-print Network

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School - SISS Building of health data - Medical records staff looking to extend their skills - Public health trainees to introducing multilevel models Clinical INFORMATICS & HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH GROUP ­ www

Doran, Simon J.

106

A new method of assessment of clinical teaching: ROC analysis.  

PubMed

Twenty-five clinical dental students with varying clinical experience were presented with case records consisting of a clinical history and a panoramic radiograph for 25 patients with bilateral lower third molars ('wisdom teeth'). The students were asked to indicate how certain they were that each lower third molar tooth needed removal using a 6-point rating scale. Immediately following the task, the students were presented with information on the indications for removal of lower third molars in the form of a lecture by a senior academic clinical teacher. One week later the students were asked to repeat the rating study, under the same conditions as before, using a further 25 clinical cases. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, which provides a graphical and quantitative assessment of a group of observers' ability to detect need for treatment, was utilized to examine differences between junior and senior students and between the matched pre-training and post-training experiments. The ability of junior students to assign lower third molars for surgery was statistically no better than random selection of cases. Formal clinical teaching significantly improved this group's performance, but had no effect on the performance of senior students. Senior students were significantly better able correctly to assign lower third molars for surgical intervention than junior students. Therefore this study shows that clinical experience has a significantly greater influence on treatment-planning ability than formal teaching. ROC analysis is a useful tool for assessing the effectiveness of methods of undergraduate training. PMID:7623703

Brickley, M R; Prytherch, I M; Kay, E J; Shepherd, J P

1995-03-01

107

[Clinical communication--a structured teaching model].  

PubMed

A 16-hour course of patient-centered consultation skills, aimed at senior medical students and clinicians, is presented. The goal is to train participants in communication skills which at the same time stimulate the development of a good therapeutic relationship and allow effective gathering of relevant clinical information. The article describes a consultation model in five consecutive steps--opening, exploration, hypothesis testing, negotiations over management, and closure. Each phase confronts the doctor with typical tasks to be solved through adequate dialogue with the patient. The course is based on active student participation through role play, dialogue, reciprocal observation and group analysis of videotaped consultations between the participants and real patients. The article gives a detailed presentation of structures and techniques applied in the course, and describes how this training in consultation skills was developed. PMID:10997084

Schei, E; Baerheim, A; Meland, E

2000-08-20

108

Pearls of wisdom for clinical teaching: expert educators reflect.  

PubMed

A group of expert educators, each with more than 20 years of experience in midwifery education, was asked to contribute a "pearl (or pearls) of wisdom" for clinical teaching. Despite minimal instructions regarding what type of wisdom was being solicited, remarkable similarities emerged from the educators' contributions. Themes included the need for self-evaluation to become a competent preceptor, the role-modeling function of the preceptor, the development of critical thinking in students, the need to appreciate students' varying learning styles and individual ways of functioning, and the use of positive reinforcement. Although these may seem like universally accepted concepts in clinical teaching, one contributor related stories she heard from students about "hazing" behaviors that have a negative impact on learning. This points to the need for ongoing education about being an educator, another theme echoed in several of the contributions. PMID:14660952

Lichtman, Ronnie; Varney Burst, Helen; Campau, Nancy; Carrington, Betty; Diegmann, Elaine K; Hsia, Lily; Thompson, Joyce E

2003-01-01

109

Classroom as clinic: a model for teaching clinical reasoning in occupational therapy education.  

PubMed

One way to help students transfer their academic skills of data gathering and analysis to clinical settings is to teach them the clinical reasoning process outlined by Joan Rogers. This paper describes a format for teaching that process through the use of carefully structured in-class evaluations of physically disabled guest speakers who role-model as clients. Pre- and posttesting of the performance of 78 students during these in-class evaluation sessions showed a significant improvement over a semester in students' abilities to accurately analyze preassessment data and to formulate appropriate treatment plans. Qualitative outcomes are also discussed. PMID:3688117

Neistadt, M E

1987-10-01

110

The Multiple Dimensions of Interoperability and Data Standards in the Clinical and Translational Research Domains — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

111

Health Informatics: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

1996-01-01

112

Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics: European Efforts to Facilitate Synergy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade there have been several attempts to rethink the basic strategies and scope of medical informatics. Meanwhile, bioinformatics has only recently experienced a similar debate about its scientific character. Both disciplines envision the development of novel diagnostic, therapeutic, and management tools, and products for patient care. A combination of the expertise of medical informatics in developing clinical

Victor Maojo; Ilias Iakovidis; Fernando Martín-sánchez; José Crespo; Casimir A. Kulikowski

2001-01-01

113

Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology  

E-print Network

of radiology stud- ies, radiologist review and reporting of image findings, and oncolo- gist review, significant advances have been made in imaging informatics to support clinical imaging. Most radiologyCurrent and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology Mia A. Levy, MD, PhD* and Daniel L

Rubin, Daniel L.

114

Preprint -Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics -Preprint Pratt, et al. -Incorporating ... 1  

E-print Network

information systems for clinical settings [1, 2]. In this article, we argue that, as medical informatics. Our goal is to improve synergies between medical informatics and CSCW. Most medical informationPreprint - Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics - Preprint Pratt, et al

McDonald, David W.

115

INFORMATICS 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

and Informatics Office of Continuing Medical Education and the UC Davis Health Informatics Program wwwHEALTH INFORMATICS PROGRAM 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE The Integration of Care: Innovations, MD Professor of Psychiatry Director, Health Informatics Graduate Program GUEST FACULTY Faculty Yan

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

116

Web-based informatics education: lessons learned from five years in the trenches.  

PubMed Central

Duke University has a five-year history with high-quality and clinically oriented informatics web-based nursing informatics education. This paper highlights an overview of instructional methods used and pedagogical considerations for both students and faculty. To do the job well, faculty workload for web-based instruction has been more than double the time and effort required for teaching an on-campus course. Results suggest that virtual teamwork is difficult but possible for highly motivated students. Committed to excellence, Duke's program finds that most students do well in achieving their goals and achieving Duke's high standards of academic rigor, however some students are not successful with on-line courses. PMID:12463835

Goodwin, L. K.

2002-01-01

117

Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics?  

E-print Network

to each student's motivation, interests, and academic research plan. In addition to the student's main leaders of the informatics domain. Each student is extended personal care and support from top to become one of the dominant areas of academic inquiry in the 21st century. Rising from the traditional

Banbara, Mutsunori

118

Origins of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

Collen, Morris F.

1986-01-01

119

A survey of informatics approaches to whole-exome and whole-genome clinical reporting in the electronic health record  

PubMed Central

Purpose Genome-scale clinical sequencing is being adopted more broadly in medical practice. The National Institutes of Health developed the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program to guide implementation and dissemination of best practices for the integration of sequencing into clinical care. This study describes and compares the state of the art of incorporating whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing results into the electronic health record, including approaches to decision support across the six current CSER sites. Methods The CSER Medical Record Working Group collaboratively developed and completed an in-depth survey to assess the communication of genome-scale data into the electronic health record. We summarized commonalities and divergent approaches. Results Despite common sequencing platform (Illumina) adoptions, there is a great diversity of approaches to annotation tools and workflow, as well as to report generation. At all sites, reports are human-readable structured documents available as passive decision support in the electronic health record. Active decision support is in early implementation at two sites. Conclusion The parallel efforts across CSER sites in the creation of systems for report generation and integration of reports into the electronic health record, as well as the lack of standardized approaches to interfacing with variant databases to create active clinical decision support, create opportunities for cross-site and vendor collaborations. PMID:24071794

Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Amendola, Laura; Aronson, Samuel J.; Garraway, Levi; Gray, Stacy; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Jarvik, Gail; Karavite, Dean; Lebo, Matthew; Plon, Sharon E.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Weck, Karen E.; White, Peter S.; Yang, Yaping

2014-01-01

120

Physicians' Perceptions of Clinical Teaching: A Qualitative Analysis in the Context of Change  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Change is ubiquitous. Current trends in both educational and clinical settings bring new challenges to clinicians and have the potential to threaten the quality of clinical teaching. Objective: To investigate hospital specialists' perceptions of clinical teaching in the context of change. Design: Qualitative study using in-depth…

Knight, Lynn V.; Bligh, John

2006-01-01

121

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 1, 5364 53 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

and Informatics, Vilnius Virtual Learning Environments as a Supplement to Traditional Teaching Joana LIPEIKIENE for distance education but they are being used increasingly as supplement of traditional classroom based, Lithuania e-mail: joanal@ktl.mii.lt Received: April 2003 Abstract. Many factors influence teaching nowadays

Boyer, Edmond

122

Small Group Teaching: Clinical Correlation with a Human Patient Simulator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The popularity of the problem-based learning paradigm has stimulated new interest in small group, interactive teaching techniques. Medical educators of physiology have long recognized the value of such methods, using animal-based laboratories to demonstrate difficult physiological principles. Due to ethical and other concerns, a replacement of this teaching tool has been sought. Here, the author describes the use of a full-scale human patient simulator for such a workshop. The simulator is a life-size mannequin with physical findings (palpable pulses, breath/heart sounds, blinking eyes, etc.) and sophisticated mechanical and software models of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. It can be connected to standard physiological monitors to reproduce a realistic clinical environment. In groups of 10, first-year medical students explore StarlingÃÂs law of the heart, the physiology of the Valsalva maneuver, and the function of the baroreceptor in a clinically realistic context using the simulator. With the use of a novel pre-/postworkshop assessment instrument that included student confidence in their answers, student confidence improved for all questions and survey items following the simulator session (P 85% of the students rating the workshop "very good" or "excellent."

Dr. Tammy Y. Euliano (University of Florida College of Medicine Dept. of Anesthesiology)

2001-03-01

123

Informatics in radiology: improving clinical work flow through an AIM database: a sample web-based lesion tracking application.  

PubMed

Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web-based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. PMID:22745220

Abajian, Aaron C; Levy, Mia; Rubin, Daniel L

2012-01-01

124

INFORMATICS ISSN 03333590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333­3590 Structure Comparison and Structure Patterns Ingvar Eidhammer Bergen, Norway #12; #12; Structure Comparison and Structure Patterns Ingvar Eidhammer, Inge Jonassen, 1999 Abstract This article investigate different aspects regarding pairwise and multiple structure com

Jonassen, Inge

125

Emerging Vaccine Informatics  

PubMed Central

Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

2010-01-01

126

Unravelling the tangled taxonomies of health informatics.  

PubMed

Even though informatics is a term used commonly in healthcare, it can be a confusing and disengaging one. Many definitions exist in the literature, and attempts have been made to develop a clear taxonomy. Despite this, informatics is still a term that lacks clarity in both its scope and the classification of sub-terms that it encompasses. This paper reviews the importance of an agreed taxonomy and explores the challenges of establishing exactly what is meant by health informatics (HI). It reviews what a taxonomy should do, summarises previous attempts at categorising and organising HI and suggests the elements to consider when seeking to develop a system of classification. The paper does not provide all the answers, but it does clarify the questions. By plotting a path towards a taxonomy of HI, it will be possible to enhance understanding and optimise the benefits of embracing technology in clinical practice. PMID:25207619

Barrett, David; Liaw, S T; de Lusignan, Simon

2014-01-01

127

NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2009-01-01

128

Teaching About Substance Abuse with Objective Structured Clinical Exams  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Although residents commonly manage substance abuse disorders, optimal approaches to teaching these specialized interviewing and intervention skills are unknown. OBJECTIVE We developed a Substance Abuse Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) to teach addiction medicine competencies using immediate feedback. In this study we evaluated OSCE performance, examined associations between performance and self-assessed interest and competence in substance abuse, and assessed learning during the OSCE. DESIGN Five-station OSCE, including different substance abuse disorders and readiness to change stages, administered during postgraduate year-3 ambulatory rotations for 2 years. PARTICIPANTS One hundred and thirty-one internal and family medicine residents. MEASUREMENTS Faculty and standardized patients (SPs) assessed residents' general communication, assessment, management, and global skills using 4-point scales. Residents completed a pre-OSCE survey of experience, interest and competence in substance abuse, and a post-OSCE survey evaluating its educational value. Learning during the OSCE was also assessed by measuring performance improvement from the first to the final OSCE station. RESULTS Residents performed better (P<.001) in general communication (mean ± SD across stations = 3.12 ± 0.35) than assessment (2.65 ± 0.32) or management (2.58 ± 0.44), and overall ratings were lowest in the contemplative alcohol abuse station (2.50 ± 0.83). Performance was not associated with residents' self-assessed interest or competence. Perceived educational value of the OSCE was high, and feedback improved subsequent performance. CONCLUSIONS Although internal and family medicine residents require additional training in specialized substance abuse skills, immediate feedback provided during an OSCE helped teach needed skills for assessing and managing substance abuse disorders. PMID:16704387

Parish, Sharon J; Ramaswamy, Megha; Stein, Melissa R; Kachur, Elizabeth K; Arnsten, Julia H

2006-01-01

129

Understanding the limitations of next generation sequencing informatics, an approach to clinical pipeline validation using artificial data sets.  

PubMed

The advantages of massively parallel sequencing are quickly being realized through the adoption of comprehensive genomic panels across the spectrum of genetic testing. Despite such widespread utilization of next generation sequencing (NGS), a major bottleneck in the implementation and capitalization of this technology remains in the data processing steps, or bioinformatics. Here we describe our approach to defining the limitations of each step in the data processing pipeline by utilizing artificial amplicon data sets to simulate a wide spectrum of genomic alterations. Through this process, we identified limitations of insertion, deletion (indel), and single nucleotide variant (SNV) detection using standard approaches and described novel strategies to improve overall somatic mutation detection. Using these artificial data sets, we were able to demonstrate that NGS assays can have robust mutation detection if the data can be processed in a way that does not lead to large genomic alterations landing in the unmapped data (i.e., trash). By using these pipeline modifications and a new variant caller, AbsoluteVar, we have been able to validate SNV mutation detection to 100% sensitivity and specificity with an allele frequency as low 4% and detection of indels as large as 90 bp. Clinical validation of NGS relies on the ability for mutation detection across a wide array of genetic anomalies, and the utility of artificial data sets demonstrates a mechanism to intelligently test a vast array of mutation types. PMID:24528889

Daber, Robert; Sukhadia, Shrey; Morrissette, Jennifer J D

2013-12-01

130

Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.  

PubMed

Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care. PMID:19581026

Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

2010-01-01

131

The new education frontier: clinical teaching at night.  

PubMed

Regulations that restrict resident work hours and call for increased resident supervision have increased attending physician presence in the hospital during the nighttime. The resulting increased interactions between attendings and trainees provide an important opportunity and obligation to enhance the quality of learning that takes place in the hospital between 6 PM and 8 AM. Nighttime education should be transformed in a way that maintains clinical productivity for both attending and resident physicians, integrates high-quality teaching and curricula, and achieves a balance between patient safety and resident autonomy. Direct observation of trainees, instruction in communication, and modeling of cost-efficient medical practice may be more feasible during the night than during daytime hours. To realize the potential of this educational opportunity, training programs should develop skilled nighttime educators and establish metrics to define success. PMID:24362386

Hanson, Joshua T; Pierce, Read G; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet

2014-02-01

132

Neonatal Informatics: Transforming Neonatal Care Through Translational Bioinformatics  

PubMed Central

The future of neonatal informatics will be driven by the availability of increasingly vast amounts of clinical and genetic data. The field of translational bioinformatics is concerned with linking and learning from these data and applying new findings to clinical care to transform the data into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. As a result of advances in translational informatics, the care of neonates will become more data driven, evidence based, and personalized. PMID:22924023

Palma, Jonathan P.; Benitz, William E.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Butte, Atul J.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

2012-01-01

133

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-print Network

Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

134

National Institute of Informatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Informatics is a field that is gaining importance around the globe, and the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Japan seeks "to advance integrated research and development activities in information-related fields, including networking, software, and content." First-time visitors should note that most of the materials in the site can be located in sections such as "Research & Project" and "Services". Before delving into these areas, visitors may wish to take a look at the most recent issue of "NII Today" via the homepage. Afterwards, visitors should look over the "Research" area. Here they will find summaries of research projects, working papers, and information about their international partnerships. The "Services" area is well worth a look as it contains links to additional informatics databases that will be of use to scholars and students within the field.

135

Gap Analysis of Biomedical Informatics Graduate Education Competencies  

PubMed Central

Graduate training in biomedical informatics (BMI) is evolving rapidly. BMI graduate programs differ in informatics domain, delivery method, degrees granted, as well as breadth and depth of curricular competencies. Using the current American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) definition of BMI core competencies as a framework, we identified and labeled course offerings within graduate programs. From our qualitative analysis, gaps between defined competencies and curricula emerged. Topics missing from existing graduate curricula include community health, translational and clinical research, knowledge representation, data mining, communication and evidence-based practice. PMID:24551403

Ritko, Anna L.; Odlum, Michelle

2013-01-01

136

Community Informatics in Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter provides a reflection on Community Informatics (CI) practice as a means of contextualising its role in emerging civil society and its governance at the local or regional level. CI is more than electronically enabled interpersonal communication; it has a pluralistic potential, it is ubiquitous and it comes bundled with paradoxes. It does not sit easily with the existing

Wal Taylor

137

Cancer Imaging Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Informatics Workshop September 25-27, 2002 Ellen Feigal, M.D. Acting Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, NCI Imaging is Key to Cancer Research The ability to detect, through imaging, the molecular changes associated with a tumor cell will improve our ability to detect and stage tumors, select appropriate treatments, monitor the effectiveness of a treatment, and determine prognosis.

138

Business, Economics & Informatics  

E-print Network

Master School of Law School of Science School of Business, Economics & Informatics School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy School of Arts Professional Services Department of History of Art and Screen Media Department of Media and Cultural Studies Department of European Cultures and Languages

Cocea, Mihaela

139

Business, Economics & Informatics  

E-print Network

Master School of Law School of Science School of Business, Economics & Informatics School of Social Sciences, History and Philosophy School of Arts Professional Services Department of History of Art Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies Department of Cultures and Languages Department of English

Crawford, Ian

140

Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics 2013 Handbook Page 1 Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics  

E-print Network

of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program in Informatics beginning in the fall of 2005 and offered on the Bloomington systems, adaptive systems, computational intelligence, and artificial life. Bio- inspired systems development and implementation, ontologies, mining clinical data, and natural language processing. § Human

Indiana University

141

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective  

PubMed Central

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

142

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Ophthalmology Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Veterinary Teaching Hospital College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University year of direct clinical activity in the ophthalmology hospital service. This includes overseeing assistance for all other services in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and will provide medical and surgical

Stephens, Graeme L.

143

Informatics, evidence-based care, and research; implications for national policy: a report of an American Medical Informatics Association health policy conference  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increased level of activity in the biomedical and health informatics world (e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records) that, in the near future, will yield a wealth of available data that we can exploit meaningfully to strengthen knowledge building and evidence creation, and ultimately improve clinical and preventive care. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2008 Health

Meryl Bloomrosen; Don E. Detmer

2010-01-01

144

Meeting Highlights: Genome Informatics  

PubMed Central

We bring you the highlights of the second Joint Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Wellcome Trust ‘Genome Informatics’ Conference, organized by Ewan Birney, Suzanna Lewis and Lincoln Stein. There were sessions on in silico data discovery, comparative genomics, annotation pipelines, functional genomics and integrative biology. The conference included a keynote address by Sydney Brenner, who was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (jointly with John Sulston and H. Robert Horvitz) a month later. PMID:18629014

Ashurst, Jennifer

2003-01-01

145

Teaching Clinical Problem Solving in a Preclinical Operative Dentistry Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method developed at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine for teaching modification of cavity design to large numbers of preclinical students in operative dentistry is reported. It standardizes the learning process for this complex problem-solving skill. (MLW)

Silvestri, Anthony R., Jr.; Cohen, Steven N.

1981-01-01

146

Student Preferences Regarding Teaching Methods in a Drug-Induced Diseases and Clinical Toxicology Course  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To determine which teaching method in a drug-induced diseases and clinical toxicology course was preferred by students and whether their preference correlated with their learning of drug-induced diseases. Design. Three teaching methods incorporating active-learning exercises were implemented. A survey instrument was developed to analyze students’ perceptions of the active-learning methods used and how they compared to the traditional teaching method (lecture). Examination performance was then correlated to students’ perceptions of various teaching methods. Assessment. The majority of the 107 students who responded to the survey found traditional lecture significantly more helpful than active-learning methods (p=0.01 for all comparisons). None of the 3 active-learning methods were preferred over the others. No significant correlations were found between students’ survey responses and examination performance. Conclusions. Students preferred traditional lecture to other instructional methods. Learning was not influenced by the teaching method or by preference for a teaching method. PMID:23966726

Gim, Suzanna

2013-01-01

147

The relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical teaching effectiveness in nursing faculty.  

PubMed

Nursing faculty play an important role in facilitating nursing student learning and shaping student experience in the clinical setting. Emotional intelligence (EI) in clinical nursing faculty may be one avenue to develop teaching effectiveness. This study investigated the relationship between EI and clinical teaching effectiveness of nursing faculty in an undergraduate nursing program. Using a cross-sectional correlation design, data were collected from a convenience sample of nursing faculty (N = 47) using the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (EQ-i:S), the Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory (NCTEI) and a demographic data page. The results indicated a statistically significant positive relationship between the EQ-i:S and the NCTEI total scores (rs = .599, P < .01) and between many subscales of these tools. These findings contribute new knowledge to nursing education, including the following: (a) a significant relationship between EI and clinical teaching effectiveness exists, (b) faculty exhibit effective overall EI functioning with room to enhance competencies, and (c) faculty members see themselves as effective in their clinical teaching. Implications for clinical teaching practice include the need for faculty development and strengthening the faculty-student relationship. Possibilities for future research are discussed. PMID:22818193

Allen, Dianne E; Ploeg, Jenny; Kaasalainen, Sharon

2012-01-01

148

Teaching clinical ethics as a professional skill: bridging the gap between knowledge about ethics and its use in clinical practice.  

PubMed Central

Ethical reasoning and decision-making may be thought of as 'professional skills', and in this sense are as relevant to efficient clinical practice as the biomedical and clinical sciences are to the diagnosis of a patient's problem. Despite this, however, undergraduate medical programmes in ethics tend to focus on the teaching of bioethical theories, concepts and/or prominent ethical issues such as IVF and euthanasia, rather than the use of such ethics knowledge (theories, principles, concepts, rules) to clinical practice. Not surprisingly, many students and clinicians experience considerable difficulty in using what they know about ethics to help them make competent ethical decisions in their day-to-day clinical practice. This paper describes the development of a seminar programme for teaching senior medical students a more systematic approach to ethical reasoning and analysis and clinical decision-making. PMID:7608948

Myser, C; Kerridge, I H; Mitchell, K R

1995-01-01

149

Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience  

PubMed Central

Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school.

Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

2014-01-01

150

Comparison of student learning among three teaching methodologies in the pediatric clinical setting.  

PubMed

Facilitating effective clinical learning for pediatric nursing students is becoming increasingly challenging and limited in opportunities. Hospital leaders are concerned about the critical thinking and prioritization skills of new graduates and believe that inpatient clinical experiences are the only way to develop these skills. This study sought to compare the effectiveness of three different clinical teaching schedules in preparing nursing students to care for children and their families. Teaching methodology was randomly assigned to various amount of times in acute care inpatient settings. Student knowledge, clinical decision making, and student satisfaction and perception of learning were measured. No statistically significant differences among groups for either knowledge scores or clinical reasoning scores were noted. Student satisfaction results did not reveal differences among groups. Study findings will help educators to better plan clinical experiences and more effectively utilize an array of settings to optimize the clinical learning of pediatric nursing content. PMID:23952776

Kubin, Laura; Fogg, Niki; Wilson, Cecilia Elaine; Wilson, Jennifer

2013-09-01

151

Training Residents in Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

Jerant, Anthony F.

1999-01-01

152

Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS project covers the whole information grid: education content, management, information services, infrastructure and user training at several levels--schools, school boards and Ministry of Education and Science. Informatization is the maintained process of creating the technical, economical and…

Bicevskis, Janis; Andzans, Agnis; Ikaunieks, Evalds; Medvedis, Inga; Straujums, Uldis; Vezis, Viesturs

2004-01-01

153

The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

Clark, David

2006-01-01

154

School of Informatics Course Questionnaire  

E-print Network

School of Informatics Course Questionnaire The School of Informatics welcomes constructive comments Organisation office on Appleton Tower level 4. If you prefer, you can also complete this questionnaire online: http://www.inf.ed.ac.uk/admin/ITO/questionnaires You can also provide feedback directly to your

Koehn, Philipp

155

XML Databases and Biomedical Informatics  

E-print Network

XML Databases and Biomedical Informatics A report by James Lindsay for UCONN CSE 300, Spring 2008 Web Consortium, as a free and open standard [13-16]. In the field of biomedical informatics one of the long standing open problems is finding a way to share medical data across a variety of mediums. XML has

Demurjian, Steven A.

156

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Graduate Programs  

E-print Network

.indiana.edu/graduate/programs. #12;Real-world experience Whether you're destined for an industry, research, or academic career. Curiosity about the world and a commitment to solving problems motivate our faculty. Students work side sciences informatics (bio, chemical, and health) � Machine learning � Music informatics � Natural lang

Menczer, Filippo

157

Page 1 of 10 Informatics  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Signals & Spectrum and Relay Communications Steve McLaughlin IDCOM, School of Engineering & Electronics #12;Page 2 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Steve McLaughlin · Signals and Spectrum

Edinburgh, University of

158

Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching

Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

2010-01-01

159

A Clinical Model of Parents' Awareness for Effectiveness of Teaching Chinese-Americans Chinese Language.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper illustrates the Clinical Model of Parents' Awareness (CMPA) for effectiveness of teaching Chinese Americans based on a previous research finding, the Patterns of Chinese Americans' Learning Chinese Learning Environment (PCACLE). The clinical model includes eight components: (1) prepare a teacher-parent conferences; (2) present 5…

Lai, Su-Huei

160

Radiation Therapy Students' Teaching Expectations of Therapists over the Course of Clinical Practicums: A Longitudinal Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Students' expectations of clinical teachers have been well researched, yet little is known about whether expectations change as students become competent and approach graduation. Radiation therapists are usually engaged in clinical teaching; for their involvement to be of value to students, they must have an understanding of what students need from them. This longitudinal study sought to determine whether students'

Caitlin Gillan; Cathryne Palmer

2009-01-01

161

Developing and Validating a Conceptual Model of Recurring Problems in Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recurrent problems in medical teaching clinic are common and difficult to address because of complex interpersonal dynamics. To minimize this difficulty, we developed a conceptual model that simplifies problems and identifies the root cause of tension between groups in clinic. We used recursive analysis and modeling of the data from a larger…

Smith, C. Scott; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Francovich, Chris; Christiano, Jennifer

2006-01-01

162

A Clinic to Teach Good Programming Practices Abstract We present an approach to emphasizing good  

E-print Network

A Clinic to Teach Good Programming Practices Abstract ­ We present an approach to emphasizing good writing. We present our model for a good programming practices clinic, and discuss our experiences and security, are overlooked by necessity. The reasons are complex. One key reason is the amount of material

Bishop, Matt

163

Medical informatics and health care organizations.  

PubMed

A dialogue between upper management and operational elements over an organization's informatics policies and procedures could take place in an environment in which both parties could succeed. Excellent patient care practices can exist in organizational settings where upper management is not concerned with the specifics of the medical care process. But as the medical care process itself becomes costly, complex, and part of the purview of upper management, solutions to ambiguous informatics policies and practices need to be found. As the discussion of cost determination suggests, a comprehensive "top-down" solution may not be feasible. Allowing patient care expertise to drive the design and implementation of clinical computing modules without unduly restrictive specifications from above is probably the best way to proceed. But if the organization needs to know the specifics of a treatment episode, then the informatics definitions specific to treatment episodes need to be unambiguous and consistently applied. As the discussion of Social Security numbers suggests, communication of information across various parts of the organization not only requires unambiguous data structure definitions, but also suggests that the communication process not be dependent on the content of the messages. Both ideas--consistent data structure definitions for essential data and open system communication architectures--are current in the medical informatician's vocabulary. The same ideas are relevant to the management and operation of large and diffuse health care enterprises. The lessons we are learning about informatics policy and practice controls in clinical computing need to be applied to the enterprise as a whole. PMID:1921663

Holden, F M

1991-01-01

164

A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

1989-01-01

165

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

McMenamin, Paul G.

2008-01-01

166

Orientation for new teachers. Workshop on clinical teaching skills.  

PubMed Central

Since 1987, McGill University's Department of Family Medicine has invited new faculty to an orientation workshop. Workshop topics cover learning agreements and principles of adult learning, effective teaching methods, and feedback and evaluation. Workshop methods aim to promote active participation and experiential learning. PMID:7894284

Steinert, Y.; Lawn, N.; Handfield-Jones, R.; Nasmith, L.; Lussier, D.; Levitt, C.

1995-01-01

167

Synergy between medical informatics and bioinformatics: facilitating genomic medicine for future health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we review the results of BIOINFOMED, a study funded by the European Commission (EC) with the purpose to analyse the different issues and challenges in the area where Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics meet. Traditionally, Medical Informatics has been focused on the intersection between computer science and clinical medicine, whereas Bioinformatics have been predominantly centered on the intersection

Fernando Martín-sánchez; Ilias Iakovidis; S. Nørager; Victor Maojo; Piet C. De Groen; Johan Van Der Lei; T. Jones; Klaus Abraham-fuchs; R. Apweiler; Ankica Babic; R Baud; V Breton; P Cinquin; P Doupi; M Dugas; R Eils; R Engelbrecht; P Ghazal; P Jehenson; C Kulikowski; K Lampe; G De Moor; S Orphanoudakis; N Rossing; B Sarachan; A Sousa; G Spekowius; G Thireos; G Zahlmann; J Zvárová; I Hermosilla; F. J Vicente

2004-01-01

168

Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS  

E-print Network

the best course of action for patients given the radiologic imaging results and other clinical data radiologic imaging, a key component of patient-centered radiology. The goals of this article are to reviewInformatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Radiology1 Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Informatics

Rubin, Daniel L.

169

Teaching of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics in UK medical schools: current status in 2009  

PubMed Central

AIM To describe the current structure, delivery and assessment of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (CPT) teaching in UK medical schools. METHODS An online questionnaire was distributed to the person with overall responsibility for CPT teaching at all UK medical schools in June 2009. RESULTS Thirty of the 32 UK medical schools responded. 60% of schools have a CPT course although in 72% this was an integrated vertical theme. At 70% of schools pharmacologists have overall responsibility for CPT teaching (clinical 67%, non-clinical 33%); at 20% teaching is run by a non-specialist clinician and at 7% by a pharmacist. Teaching is commonly delivered by NHS clinicians (87%) and clinical pharmacists (80%) using lectures (90%) but additionally 50% of schools use e-Learning and 63% have a student formulary. CPT is assessed throughout the curriculum at many schools through written, practical examinations and course work. 90% of schools have specific CPT content in their written examinations. 90% of respondents believed that their students were ‘fairly’ to ‘well’ prepared for the foundation year but only 37% of schools gather data on the competence of their graduates. CONCLUSIONS CPT teaching in UK medical schools is very diverse. Most schools do not assess the performance of their graduates as prescribers and there is a lack of evidence that many of the teaching approaches employed are suitable for the development of prescribing skills. It is vital that developments in CPT teaching are driven by validated, real-world assessments of the prescribing skills of medical students and newly qualified doctors. PMID:20642558

O'Shaughnessy, Lelia; Haq, Inam; Maxwell, Simon; Llewelyn, Martin

2010-01-01

170

Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

(Health Informatics, Bioinformatics, Human-Computer Interaction, and Media Arts & Science), and three Baccalaureate programs (Informatics, Health Information Administration, and Media Arts & Science). Nearly 1Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health

Zhou, Yaoqi

171

Teaching Softly in Hard Environments: Meanings of Small-Group Reflective Teaching to Clinical Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A vast literature exists on teaching reflection and reflective practice to trainees in small groups, yet with few exceptions the literature does not address the benefits of these interactions to faculty. Like multiculturalism or cultural competency, the literature assumes that faculty have themselves "achieved" these propensities and that trainees…

Whiting, Ellen; Wear, Delese; Aultman, Julie M.; Zupp, Laurie

2012-01-01

172

University teaching hospital and private clinic collaboration to enhance veterinary educational opportunities at Mississippi State University.  

PubMed

The College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University established a not-for-profit corporation (MSU-CVM-COS) to develop and manage private specialty clinics that would enhance teaching and student learning, increase caseload, and generate revenue. The corporation currently operates the Animal Emergency and Referral Center (AERC) and the Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC) as affiliates of Mississippi State University. These privately managed facilities provide access to advanced medical equipment, enhance clinical service and teaching, and promote the College's One Health initiative. PMID:24384387

Tyner, C Lee; Harkness, John; Hoblet, Kent; Zumwalt, Lauren; Templeton, Karen; McLaughlin, Ron

2014-01-01

173

Web Intelligence Meets Brain Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we outline a vision of Web Intelligence (WI) research from the viewpoint of Brain Informatics (BI), a new\\u000a interdisciplinary field that systematically studies the mechanisms of human information processing from both the macro and\\u000a micro viewpoints by combining experimental cognitive neuroscience with advanced information technology. BI studies human brain\\u000a from the viewpoint of informatics (i.e., human brain

Ning Zhong; Jiming Liu; Yiyu Yao; Jing-long Wu; Shengfu Lu; Yulin Qin; Kuncheng Li; Benjamin W. Wah

2006-01-01

174

Clinical teaching effectiveness described in relation to learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students.  

PubMed

Grounded in cumulative findings on teaching effectiveness from K-12 education, higher education, and professional education, this process-product study empirically explored the relationship between 24 specific teacher behaviors generally thought to be effective for student learning and learning outcomes of baccalaureate nursing students. Two measures of learning in a critical care practicum taught by staff nurse preceptors were used: performance in the practicum as assessed on a clinical evaluation instrument developed by faculty, and performance on a standardized test of knowledge in critical care. Important aspects of clinical teaching effectiveness included the ability to set clear objectives to help students organize their learning, to ask appropriate questions, to provide specific and timely feedback to students, and to convey a positive, concerned attitude. Certain teaching behaviors showed significant relationships with cognitive learning outcomes, while others were tied to performance outcomes. PMID:7990000

Krichbaum, K

1994-09-01

175

Medical Informatics in Croatia - a Historical Survey  

PubMed Central

A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

2014-01-01

176

From Information Technology to Informatics: The Information Revolution in Dental Education  

PubMed Central

The capabilities of information technology (IT) have advanced precipitously in the last fifty years. Many of these advances have enabled new and beneficial applications of IT in dental education. However, conceptually, IT use in dental schools is only in its infancy. Challenges and opportunities abound for improving how we support clinical care, education, and research with IT. In clinical care, we need to move electronic dental records beyond replicating paper, connect information on oral health to that on systemic health, facilitate collaborative care through teledentistry, and help clinicians apply evidence-based dentistry and preventive management strategies. With respect to education, we should adopt an evidence-based approach to IT use for teaching and learning, share effective educational content and methods, leverage technology-mediated changes in the balance of power between faculty and students, improve technology support for clinical teaching, and build an information infrastructure centered on learners and organizations. In research, opportunities include reusing clinical care data for research studies, helping advance computational methods for research, applying generalizable research tools in dentistry, and reusing research data and scientific workflows. In the process, we transition from a focus on IT—the mere technical aspects of applying computer technology—to one on informatics: the what, how, and why of managing information. PMID:22262557

Schleyer, Titus K.; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P.; Spallek, Heiko; Dziabiak, Michael P.; Johnson, Lynn A.

2014-01-01

177

An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a novel approach to teaching gross anatomy to medical students. The article explains an explorative learning approach that builds students analytical, reasoning and communication (written and oral). The methods used require students to develop a patient case based on clinical outcomes.

Dr. Christo T Philip (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine); Dr. Kenneth P Unruh (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)

2008-05-01

178

Comparison of Clinical Teaching by Residents and Attending Physicians in Inpatient and Lecture Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined differences in the clinical teaching of 21 medical residents and 19 attending physicians in 2 settings: inpatient care and lectures. Results indicated that ratings were generally similar for the two groups, but setting was a significant source of variance. Self-assessments were similar. Implications for instruction are discussed.…

Bergen, Merlynn R.; And Others

1993-01-01

179

Computer-Simulated Psychotherapy as an Aid in Teaching Clinical Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how Elisa, a widely known computer program which simulates the responses of a psychotherapist, can be used as a teaching aid in undergraduate clinical psychology classes. Provides information on conducting the exercise, integrating it into the course syllabus, and evaluating its impact on students. (JDH)

Suler, John R.

1987-01-01

180

Using clinical teaching assistants to foster student engagement in online courses  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid growth in delivery of online courses in business programs has resulted in concern among faculty that the educational experience in online courses will be less rich and that the courses will too closely mirror independent study experiences. The authors undertook a pilot project regarding the use of Clinical Teaching Assistants in large enrollment online courses as a strategy

Kerry Gatlin; Paulette Alexander

181

An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Translating basic sciences into a clinical framework has been approached through the implementation of various teaching techniques aimed at using a patient case scenario to facilitate learning. These techniques present students with a specific patient case and lead the students to discuss physiological processes through analysis of provided data…

Philip, Christo T.; Unruh, Kenneth P.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

2008-01-01

182

Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities…

Greene, John Richard T.

2009-01-01

183

Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.  

PubMed

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

2002-01-01

184

Evolving Health Informatics Semantic Frameworks and Metadata-Driven Architectures  

E-print Network

Evolving Health Informatics Semantic Frameworks and Metadata-Driven Architectures Jim Davies, will revolutionise both medical and clinical research, and the impact on healthcare delivery will be dramatic advances in methods and tools for automatic, metadata- driven data sharing and integration. And of course

Melham, Tom

185

Problematising Teaching through a "Critical" Perspective on Clinical Supervision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper takes as its starting point the well-known and extensively used process of clinical supervision and shows how what started over 30 years ago as a collaborative process has been harnessed into a sophisticated mechanism of teacher inspection and surveillance. It shows how this co-option has occurred historically through the progressive…

Smyth, John

186

02 College of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School o  

E-print Network

of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of Informatics

Tanaka, Jiro

187

Discovery Informatics: AI Opportunities in Scientific Discovery  

E-print Network

Discovery Informatics: AI Opportunities in Scientific Discovery Yolanda Gil Information Sciences and replicate processes of scientific discovery. This article discusses Discovery Informatics as an emerging and information systems to understand, automate, improve, and innovate processes of scientific discovery

Gil, Yolanda

188

Laboratory Exercises to Teach Clinically Relevant Chemistry of Antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To design, implement, and evaluate student performance on clinically relevant chemical and spectral laboratory exercises on antibiotics. Design. In the first of 2 exercises, second-year pharmacy students enrolled in an integrated laboratory sequence course studied the aqueous stability of ß-lactam antibiotics using a spectral visual approach. In a second exercise, students studied the tendency of tetracycline, rifamycins, and fluoroquinolones to form insoluble chelate complexes (turbidity) with polyvalent metals. Assessment. On a survey to assess achievement of class learning objectives, students agreed the laboratory activities helped them better retain important information concerning antibiotic stability and interactions. A significant improvement was observed in performance on examination questions related to the laboratory topics for 2012 and 2013 students compared to 2011 students who did not complete the laboratory. A 1-year follow-up examination question administered in a separate course showed >75% of the students were able to identify rifamycins-food interactions compared with <25% of students who had not completed the laboratory exercises. Conclusion. The use of spectral visual approaches allowed students to investigate antibiotic stability and interactions, thus reinforcing the clinical relevance of medicinal chemistry. Students’ performance on questions at the 1-year follow-up suggested increased retention of the concepts learned as a result of completing the exercises. PMID:24672070

Chelette, Candace T.

2014-01-01

189

Why we need a large-scale open metadata initiative in health informatics - a vision paper on open data models for clinical phenotypes.  

PubMed

Clinical phenotypes are very complex and not well described. For instance, more than 100.000 biomedical concepts are needed to describe clinical properties of patients. At present, information systems dealing with clinical phenotype data are based on secret, heterogeneous and incompatible data models. This is the root cause for the well-known grand challenge of semantic interoperability in healthcare: data exchange and analysis of medical information systems has major limitations. This problem slows down medical progressand wastes time of health care professionals. A large-scale open metadata initiative can foster exchange, discussion and consensus regarding data models for clinical phenotypes. This would be an important contribution to improve information systems in healthcare and to solve the grand challenge of semantic interoperability. PMID:23920688

Dugas, Martin

2013-01-01

190

ICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I  

E-print Network

topics and issues in biomedical informatics including electronic medical records, Obama care] E. Shortliffe and J. Cimino, Eds. Biomedical Informatics, Computer Applications in Health Care and Biomedical Informatics (Ch. 4), System Design and Engineering in Health Care (Ch. 6), Imaging and Structural

Reed, Nancy E.

191

A systematic view on medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatics is defined as the scientific discipline concerned with the systematic processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care. The domain of medical informatics (including health informatics), its aim, methods and tools, and its relevance to other disciplines in medicine and health sciences are outlined. It is recognized that one of the major tasks of medical

A. Hasman; R. Haux; A. Albert

1996-01-01

192

MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY  

E-print Network

MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY Authors: Bansard J.Y (1,2), Rebholz, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, U.K. 4 Erasmus University Medical Center, Dept of Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical #12;Abstract This paper reports on an analysis of the bioinformatics and medical informatics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu  

E-print Network

and medical discovery at unprecedented rates and levels. Biomedical informatics played a leading roleBIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Informatics from Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) After completion of the five

194

Medical Informatics: Searching for Underlying Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

abstractions also are attractive for defining the core contributions of basic research in informatics We can understand many central activities within informatics in terms defining, refining, applying, and evaluating domain ontologies and problem - solving methods Conclusion: Construing work in medical informatics in terms of actions involving ontologies and problem - solving methods may move us closer to a theoretical

Mark A. Musen

2002-01-01

195

Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics1  

E-print Network

1 Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics1 Peter Szolovits, Ph.D. Laboratory for Computer critical decision. This paper surveys historical and contemporary approaches taken by medical informatics. Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics. Methods of Information in Medicine, 34:111­21, 1995 #12

Szolovits, Peter

196

Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics 1  

E-print Network

1 Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics 1 Peter Szolovits, Ph.D. Laboratory for Computer critical decision. This paper surveys historical and contemporary approaches taken by medical informatics. Uncertainty and Decisions in Medical Informatics. Methods of Information in Medicine, 34:111--21, 1995 #12; 2

Szolovits, Peter

197

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT  

E-print Network

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, IUPUI #12;INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL of the university and campus faculties.* *Constitution of the Indiana University Faculty, Article 2, Section 2.4(A

Zhou, Yaoqi

198

Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

2014-01-01

199

Training Multidisciplinary Biomedical Informatics Students: Three Years of Experience  

PubMed Central

Objective The European INFOBIOMED Network of Excellence 1 recognized that a successful education program in biomedical informatics should include not only traditional teaching activities in the basic sciences but also the development of skills for working in multidisciplinary teams. Design A carefully developed 3-year training program for biomedical informatics students addressed these educational aspects through the following four activities: (1) an internet course database containing an overview of all Medical Informatics and BioInformatics courses, (2) a BioMedical Informatics Summer School, (3) a mobility program based on a ‘brokerage service’ which published demands and offers, including funding for research exchange projects, and (4) training challenges aimed at the development of multi-disciplinary skills. Measurements This paper focuses on experiences gained in the development of novel educational activities addressing work in multidisciplinary teams. The training challenges described here were evaluated by asking participants to fill out forms with Likert scale based questions. For the mobility program a needs assessment was carried out. Results The mobility program supported 20 exchanges which fostered new BMI research, resulted in a number of peer-reviewed publications and demonstrated the feasibility of this multidisciplinary BMI approach within the European Union. Students unanimously indicated that the training challenge experience had contributed to their understanding and appreciation of multidisciplinary teamwork. Conclusion The training activities undertaken in INFOBIOMED have contributed to a multi-disciplinary BMI approach. It is our hope that this work might provide an impetus for training efforts in Europe, and yield a new generation of biomedical informaticians. PMID:18096914

van Mulligen, Erik M.; Cases, Montserrat; Hettne, Kristina; Molero, Eva; Weeber, Marc; Robertson, Kevin A.; Oliva, Baldomero; de la Calle, Guillermo; Maojo, Victor

2008-01-01

200

[Teaching and learning in the clinical field: perspective of teachers, nurses and nursing students].  

PubMed

This is a qualitative research, which used the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz approach. Its purpose was meeting and discussing the expectations of teachers, nurses and students about teaching in the clinical field. Nine teachers, eleven nurses and eleven students of the Nursing Graduation grade from a public university of São Paulo were included in this study. Data were collected in 2012. As the results showed, there are expectations about the link between theory and practice that clinical teaching can offer and also the desire that such instruction enable the learners to develop a pro-active and participatory attitude. The reciprocity of perspectives was evident and should be considered when academic projects focused on nursing education are developed. PMID:25271572

Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto de; Domingos, Selisvane Ribeiro da Fonseca; Oliveira, Deíse Moura de; Ito, Thaís Norika

2014-07-01

201

An immodest proposal: pay equity for nursing faculty who do clinical teaching.  

PubMed

Pay equity, the concept of equal pay for equal or comparable work, will continue to be of paramount importance to women as the 20th century draws to a close. While it might have been anticipated that women in academic settings would enjoy pay equity, clinical teaching in nursing education provides a model for gender discrimination as related to women's work. Elements of proposal development and a case study for contesting pay inequity are presented. PMID:1318966

Boughn, S

1992-05-01

202

Teachers' Perceptions of and Responses to Student Evaluation of Teaching: Purposes and Uses in Clinical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student evaluation of teaching (SET) only becomes an effective tool for improving teaching and learning when the relevant stakeholders seriously consider and plan appropriate actions according to student feedback. It is common practice in medical education to provide clinical teachers with student feedback. However, there is limited evidence about…

Wong, Wai Yee; Moni, Karen

2014-01-01

203

Do Expert Clinical Teachers Have a Shared Understanding of What Constitutes a Competent Reasoning Performance in Case-Based Teaching?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explore the assessment challenge related to case based learning we study how experienced clinical teachers--i.e., those who regularly teach and assess case-based learning--conceptualize the notion of competent reasoning performance for specific teaching cases. Through an in-depth qualitative case study of five expert teachers, we investigate…

Gauthier, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.

2014-01-01

204

Best practice or last resort? Employing graduate teaching assistants as clinical instructors.  

PubMed

Many institutions need to employ GTAs, and students need the teaching experience that working as a GTA offers. Some recommendations to support a positive outcome are as follows: (1) GTAs should not make up a significantly large percentage of the total clinical faculty employed. Yet within reasonable limits, employ GTAs, wherever possible; (2) evaluate GTAs’ performance on an ongoing as well as summative basis to be sure that they are meeting expectations set for providing instruction; and (3) hire new faculty members who worked previously as a GTA or in similar roles to ensure faculty succession with educators who are clinical experts. PMID:25137444

Pressler, Jana L; Kenner, Carole A

2014-01-01

205

Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics  

PubMed Central

The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

2011-01-01

206

Postgraduate Prospectus SchoolofInformatics  

E-print Network

, computation and communication in both computer systems and natural systems such as the brain, our genes and human language.An education at Edinburgh offers you a sound foundation in the traditional subjects in scholarship and learning. For us, informatics is critical to the development of science, technology

Edinburgh, University of

207

Policy Implications of Education Informatics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

2010-01-01

208

Teaching medical students a clinical approach to altered mental status: simulation enhances traditional curriculum  

PubMed Central

Introduction Simulation-based medical education (SBME) is increasingly being utilized for teaching clinical skills in undergraduate medical education. Studies have evaluated the impact of adding SBME to third- and fourth-year curriculum; however, very little research has assessed its efficacy for teaching clinical skills in pre-clerkship coursework. To measure the impact of a simulation exercise during a pre-clinical curriculum, a simulation session was added to a pre-clerkship course at our medical school where the clinical approach to altered mental status (AMS) is traditionally taught using a lecture and an interactive case-based session in a small group format. The objective was to measure simulation's impact on students’ knowledge acquisition, comfort, and perceived competence with regards to the AMS patient. Methods AMS simulation exercises were added to the lecture and small group case sessions in June 2010 and 2011. Simulation sessions consisted of two clinical cases using a high-fidelity full-body simulator followed by a faculty debriefing after each case. Student participation in a simulation session was voluntary. Students who did and did not participate in a simulation session completed a post-test to assess knowledge and a survey to understand comfort and perceived competence in their approach to AMS. Results A total of 154 students completed the post-test and survey and 65 (42%) attended a simulation session. Post-test scores were higher in students who attended a simulation session compared to those who did not (p<0.001). Students who participated in a simulation session were more comfortable in their overall approach to treating AMS patients (p=0.05). They were also more likely to state that they could articulate a differential diagnosis (p=0.03), know what initial diagnostic tests are needed (p=0.01), and understand what interventions are useful in the first few minutes (p=0.003). Students who participated in a simulation session were more likely to find the overall AMS curriculum useful (p<0.001). Conclusion Students who participated in a simulation exercise performed better on a knowledge-based test and reported increased comfort and perceived competence in their clinical approach to AMS. SBME shows significant promise for teaching clinical skills to medical students during pre-clinical curriculum. PMID:23561054

Sperling, Jeremy D.; Clark, Sunday; Kang, Yoon

2013-01-01

209

The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index  

PubMed Central

Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to contribute to filling gaps in digitized biodiversity data; (b) assisting countries potentially in need (for example mega-diverse) to mobilize resources and collect data that could be used in decision-making; and (c) allowing identification of which biodiversity informatics-resourced countries could afford to assist countries lacking in biodiversity informatics capacity, and which data-rich countries should benefit most from such help. PMID:22373233

2011-01-01

210

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

Maeland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

211

Medical Informatics Education at Medical Faculty of Sarajevo University - 15 Years Experience  

PubMed Central

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED In Bosnia and Herzegovina, Medical informatics has been a separate subject for the last 15 years with regard to Medical curriculum at the biomedical faculties in the country (1,2). Education in the field of Medical informatics is based on the concept which is used in developed countries, according to the recommendations of the working groups EDU – Education of Medical Informatics, of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) and International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA). Theoretical and practical teaching and training performance as a whole is performed by use of the computer equipment, and the final knowledge check of the students is also performed using the Data Base Management System MS Access specifically designed to cover full teaching and training material by using question sets in the data base which encircled nearly 1500 question combinations. The distance learning is logical step that can further improve this method of education. In this paper, authors present 15 years of experience of Medical informatics education at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Medical Informatics, as an obligatory subject, was introduced to the biomedical faculties in Sarajevo (medical, dental and pharmaceutical as well as the High medical school) in 1992 and 1993. Students have practical computer exercises for a period of 7 weeks. Students had training in Excel, Word etc. During the semester, the students perform specific operation such as creation of data carrier for manipulation with medical information. The information was analyzed by statistical program such as Excel. From 2002 years Medical Informatics is divided in two parts in order to facilitate data processing and other procedure that are necessary to perform at time when student’s knowledge of medicine is sufficient for practicing specific tasks that include management the data about patient, anamnesis and similar parameters cause we noticed that students without such knowledge cannot figure out the whole picture without difficulties. The Theoretical part of examination is done using the multiple choice answer form provided by special software with randomly selected questions for each student. Such way of practical and theoretical path of final exam make possible to perform such procedures such as electronic registration for exam and distance testing. Possibilities of introduction of distance learning in medical curriculum are the title of project which has been realizing at Cathedra for medical Informatics, Medical faculty since year 2002. Our undergraduate and postgraduate students are satisfied with contents and organization of the teaching process. PMID:24109152

Masic, Izet

2008-01-01

212

The scope and direction of health informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

213

The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2001-01-01

214

MRI of the brain, head, neck and spine. A teaching atlas of clinical applications  

SciTech Connect

This book is a teaching atlas of the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, head, neck and spine. It demonstrates how choices of MRI parameters are reflected in the images and which selection can best be made to achieve optimal results. It supplies an extensive collection of images of pathological conditions based on the author's experience and a collection of over 5000 documented MRI studies of both adults and children. In the introduction to each chapter an overview is given of the specific diagnostic problem and the potential MRI solution. In the case studies the application of these MRI techniques are carefully explained.

Valk, J.

1988-01-01

215

[Movies as a teaching resource for infectious diseases and clinical microbiology].  

PubMed

Since its inception, the cinema has constantly provided a reflection of infectious diseases because of their omnipresence in life and their importance to individuals and society. Few infectious diseases escape its eye, to the extent that the cinema constitutes an authentic treatise on these phenomena. The cinema is a very valuable educational resource, able to supplement classical teaching methods and to encourage critical thinking among students. The enormous flow of information, images, sounds, consequences, situations, and points of view that it provides should not be wasted and can be of great use, both in the spread of ideas and in training in infectious diseases and clinical microbiology. PMID:12372238

García-Sánchez, José Elías; Fresnadillo, María José; García-Sánchez, Enrique

2002-10-01

216

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me?  

E-print Network

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me? Geo, and GIS, to study Physical and Human Geography. This degree brings together aspects of Geography, Computer will develop from a degree in Geography with Geo-Informatics are wide-ranging and include excellent time

Harman, Neal.A.

217

Doctoral specialization in nursing informatics.  

PubMed Central

A prototype program of doctoral study has been developed at the University of Maryland School of Nursing to prepare students with nursing expertise in the conceptualization and research of computer based information systems in hospitals, industry and other health care organizations. The graduate will be prepared to design effective nursing information systems; create innovative information technology; conduct research regarding integration of technology with nursing practice, administration, and education; and develop theoretical, practice, and evaluation models for nursing informatics. PMID:1807601

Gassert, C. A.; Mills, M. E.; Heller, B. R.

1991-01-01

218

Informatics: the key to efficiency.  

PubMed

In India a computer-based national health management information system is being implemented by linking more than 450 districts on a network. This and other actions in the field of informatics technology could significantly raise the efficiency of the country's health sector by making decisions more logical, speeding them up and monitoring their impact, and could help to improve the utilization of scarce resources. PMID:7546180

Indrayan, A

1995-01-01

219

Description logics in medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Description logics and related formalisms are being applied in at least v e applica- tions in medical informatics|terminology, intelligent user interfaces, decision sup- port and semantic indexing, language technology, and systems integration. Impor- tant issues include size, complexity, connectivity, and the wide range of granularity required|medical terminologies require on the order of 250,000 concepts, some in- volving a dozen or

Alan Rector

2003-01-01

220

Everyday ethics in internal medicine resident clinic: an opportunity to teach  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Being a good doctor requires competency in ethics. Accordingly, ethics education during residency training is important. We studied the everyday ethics-related issues (i.e. ordinary ethics issues commonly faced) that internal medical residents encounter in their out-patient clinic and determined whether teaching about these issues occurred during faculty preceptor–resident interactions. METHODS This study involved a multi-method qualitative research design combining observation of preceptor-resident discussions with preceptor interviews. The study was conducted in two different internal medicine training programme clinics over a 2-week period in June 2007. Fifty-three residents and 19 preceptors were observed, and 10 preceptors were interviewed. Transcripts of observer field notes and faculty interviews were carefully analysed. The analysis identified several themes of everyday ethics issues and determined whether preceptors identified and taught about these issues. RESULTS Everyday ethics content was considered present in 109 (81%) of the 135 observed case presentations. Three major thematic domains and associated sub-themes related to everyday ethics issues were identified, concerning: (i) the Doctor–Patient Interaction (relationships; communication; shared decision making); (ii) the Resident as Learner (developmental issues; challenges and conflicts associated with training; relationships with colleagues and mentors; interactions with the preceptor), and; (iii) the Doctor–System Interaction (financial issues; doctor–system issues; external influences; doctor frustration related to system issues). Everyday ethics issues were explicitly identified by preceptors (without teaching) in 18 of 109 cases (17%); explicit identification and teaching occurred in only 13 cases (12%). CONCLUSIONS In this study a variety of everyday ethics issues were frequently encountered as residents cared for patients. Yet, faculty preceptors infrequently explicitly identified or taught these issues during their interactions with residents. Ethics education is important and residents may regard teaching about the ethics-related issues they actually encounter to be highly relevant. A better understanding of the barriers to teaching is needed in order to promote education about everyday ethics in the out-patient setting. PMID:21649704

Carrese, Joseph A; McDonald, Erin L; Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; Khaira, Kiran; Beach, Mary Catherine; Hughes, Mark T

2011-01-01

221

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-01-01

222

Curriculum gaps in teaching clinical skills to Iranian undergraduate medical students  

PubMed Central

Introduction The inefficacy of clinical skill education during the clerkship has been reported in several studies. The present study was conducted to evaluate the competency of medical students in performing several clinical skills through an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), aiming to evaluate the quality of the existing curriculum in the clerkship phase. Material and methods The cross sectional study was conducted at the end of the clerkship period, before the students had entered the internship. The OSCE exam was conducted in the morning (2 different tracts) and in the evening (2 similar tracts) and 86 students participated in the exam. Each tract consisted of seven stations. The students’ points in the stations assessing history taking and clinical skills were compared. Results The students gained the highest points in the history taking stations, whereas the procedure stations accounted for the lowest points; there was a significant difference between these stations (p < 0.001). The female students achieved higher scores in the OSCE exam compared to males (p = 0.004). Conclusions The OSCE exam revealed the inefficacy of the current medical curriculum in teaching the required clinical skill to undergraduate medical students during the clerkship. PMID:23671443

Mirzazadeh, Azim; Bavarian, Behrouz; Labaf, Ali; Afshari, Ali; Nikoo, Mohammad; Meshkani, Zahra Sadat

2013-01-01

223

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university.  

PubMed

Objective : The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods : Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results : During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion : New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-10-01

224

Incorporating healthcare informatics into the strategic planning process in nursing education.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe the incorporation of healthcare informatics into the strategic planning process in nursing education. An exemplar from the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York School of Nursing, is interwoven throughout the article. The challenges and successes inherent in a paradigm shift embracing the multifaceted adoption of technology in higher education are illustrated. The paradigm shift that necessitated this change, the need for informatics standards and competencies identified by regulatory agencies and the relationship of the triad mission of the Academy which includes research, teaching and service are then elucidated. Information pertinent to the strategic planning process is described including the use of a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to facilitate the integration of a healthcare informatics model into a nursing curriculum. PMID:16206693

Sackett, Kay; Jones, Janice; Erdley, W Scott

2005-01-01

225

The Impact of Medical Informatics on Librarianship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The thesis of this paper is that the growth of the field of medical informatics, while seemingly a potential threat to medical librarianship, is in fact an opportunity for librarianship to both extend its reach and also to further define its unique characteristics in contrast to those of medical informatics. Furthermore, because medical…

Dalrymple, Prudence W.

226

Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

Morris, Theodore Allan

2002-01-01

227

Social Informatics: Perspectives, Examples, and Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problems, methods, and domains that help define social informatics and considers how it relates to information science. Topics include the relationship between uses of information and communication technologies (ICT) and organizational effects; the role of the social context; methodological pluralism; and trends in social informatics

Sawyer, Steve; Eschenfelder, Kristin R.

2002-01-01

228

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics  

E-print Network

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics: The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City Marcus Kingdom by Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global) 3 Henrietta Street Covent Garden on urban informatics : the practice and promise of the real-time city / Marcus Foth, editor. p. cm

Paulos, Eric

229

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN?  

E-print Network

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN? MY COURSES HAVE INCLUDED: Software Design I I designed. I chose to become an Informatics major because I wanted to focus on human interaction with computer me to work on a research project at the UCI Medical Center. I'm getting a minor in Political science

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

230

Aims and tasks of medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten major long-term aims and tasks, so to speak ‘grand challenges’, for research in the field of medical informatics, including health informatics, are proposed and described. These are the further development of methods and tools of information processing for: (1) diagnostics (‘the visible body’); (2) therapy (‘medical intervention with as little strain on the patient as possible’); (3) therapy simulation;

Reinhold Haux

1997-01-01

231

PARTICULARITIES OF THE INFORMATICS CRIMINALITY INVESTIGATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informatics criminality represents the social phenomenon characterized by the committing of criminal offences in the field of informatics. This category includes very different criminal offences, some of them being incriminated in certain states of the world while others are not. The computer provides a new object and a new tool for criminals. Taking into account the complexity and variety of

Senior Criminalist; Ioan Truta

232

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository.

Zaïane, Osmar R.

2014-01-01

233

Supporting patient centered computing through an undergraduate nursing informatics curriculum stage III.  

PubMed Central

The patient has been one of the focal points of the process followed to design, implement, and evaluate an integrated informatics curriculum in a baccalaureate nursing program. This paper describes the third stage of a process to design the informatics nursing courses. A challenge is to structure the nursing informatics curriculum so as to enhance the patient care process. A number of strategies were used to focus the curriculum, students, and faculty around the patient. The basic components of the framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. The clinical care process which emphasizes the patient is an inherent part of the conceptual framework in all aspects of the curriculum. Therefore the faculty has ensured a blend of information, technology, and the clinical care process throughout the curriculum. PMID:8130578

Travis, L. L.; Youngblut, J.

1993-01-01

234

Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.  

PubMed

Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd. (Konica-Minolta), Japan, in the 1980-1990s. Major support from the US National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies and private medical imaging industry are appreciated. The NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) Advanced Study Institute (ASI) sponsored the International PACS Conference at Evian, France, in 1990, the contents and presentations of which convinced a half dozen high-level US military healthcare personnel, including surgeons and radiologists, that PACS was feasible and would greatly streamline the current military healthcare services. The impact of the post-conference summary by these individuals to their superiors opened the doors for long-term support of PACS development by the US Military Healthcare Services. PACS and imaging informatics have thus emerged as a daily clinical necessity. PMID:24311236

Huang, H K

2014-01-01

235

What informatics is and isn't.  

PubMed

The term informatics is currently enveloped in chaos. One way to clarify the meaning of informatics is to identify the competencies associated with training in the field, but this approach can conceal the whole that the competencies atomistically describe. This work takes a different approach by offering three higher-level visions of what characterizes the field, viewing informatics as: (1) cross-training between basic informational sciences and an application domain, (2) the relentless pursuit of making people better at what they do, and (3) a field encompassing four related types of activities. Applying these perspectives to describe what informatics is, one can also conclude that informatics is not: tinkering with computers, analysis of large datasets per se, employment in circumscribed health IT workforce roles, the practice of health information management, or anything done using a computer. PMID:23059730

Friedman, Charles P

2013-01-01

236

A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics

Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

1997-01-01

237

Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

2006-01-04

238

Research on informatization construction evaluation of logistics enterprise in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through studying the informatization index systems of both domestic and foreign enterprises, this essay sets up an informatization evaluation index system for enterprises in Henan Province, based on their essential characteristics and present situation. The evaluation index system includes application status of informatization, construction level of enterprise infrastructure, strategic planning level and informatization level of staff. Next, in accordance with

Xiao MeiDan; Liu JunJuan; Liu Bin

2009-01-01

239

zentrum Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie ABTEIlUNG MEDIZINISCHE INFORMATIK centre Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS  

E-print Network

Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS Robert-Koch-Str. 40 D-37075Artment of medicAl informAtics Einleitung Die Abteilung Medizinische Informatik hat in den Jahren 2003 bis 2005 the Department of Medical Informat- ics has moved its research focus from virtual and augmented reality

Gollisch, Tim

240

Michigan Informatics: Informatics for the Public Health Workforce  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As health care job opportunities continue to expand, a number of institutions have been developing online training materials to help support academic public health programs. One such program is the Michigan Informatics (MI-INFO) website, which contains a variety of tutorials that deal with health information and computer skills. All told, the site contains nine tutorials which include titles like "Evidence Based Public Health", "Finding Health Statistics Online", and "Searching the Public Health Literature". Each of the tutorials features key concept overviews, exercises, and case studies. Near the bottom of the site, visitors can find a user manual for the tutorials, and a place where they can offer their own feedback. The site is rounded out by the "Other Resources" area, which contains links to other relevant sites, such as the Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

2007-01-01

241

Career development initiatives in biomedical health informatics.  

PubMed

The disciplines of biomedical engineering and health informatics complement each other. These two scientific fields sometimes strive independently to deliver better health care services. The rapid evolution in data-intensive methods has made practitioners to think about reviewing the educational needs of the biomedical health informatics workforces. This paper discusses the changing skills requirements in biomedical health informatics discipline. The author reports on the challenges faced by IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBS) in the context of continuous career development of the EMBS members. This paper discusses Queensland chapter's initiative towards an integrated career development to address challenges faced by IEEE EMBS. PMID:23367308

Wagholikar, Amol

2012-01-01

242

Case Presentation Format and Clinical Reasoning: A Strategy for Teaching Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described is a strategy for clinicians (residents, attending physicians, and preceptors) to teach medical students how to present and reason out a patient case. Case presentation and teaching principles to facilitate learning the three phases are included. (Author/RH)

Edwards, Janine C.; And Others

1987-01-01

243

Assessment by Attending Physicians of a Seminar Method to Improve Clinical Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study was conducted to determine whether the seminar method (1) is perceived by attending physicians as beneficial, (2) modifies the physicians' attitudes toward teaching, (3) enables attending physicians to define needed teaching changes, (4) motivates them to improve teaching performance, and (5) is perceived as having long-term benefits.…

Skeff, Kelley M.; And Others

1984-01-01

244

The Reflecting Team: An Innovative Approach for Teaching Clinical Skills to Family Practice Residents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objectives: This paper provides a description and evaluation of the reflecting team approach as a teaching method for family practice residents. We have used the reflecting team ap- proach in our longitudinal behavioral health program for 6 years. Our purpose in using this ap- proach is to 1) teach listening and interviewing skills, 2) teach systems-oriented psychosocial inter-

Patricia Lebensohn-Chialvo; Marjorie Crago; Catherine M. Shisslak

245

Health Informatics for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Planning  

PubMed Central

Objective 1. To conduct a review of the role of informatics in pediatric disaster preparedness using all medical databases. 2. To provide recommendations to improve pediatric disaster preparedness by the application of informatics. Methods A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINHL and the Cochrane Library using the key words “children” AND “disaster preparedness and disaster” AND “informatics”. Results A total of 314 papers were initially produced by the search and eight that met the selection criteria were included in the review. Four themes emerged: tools for disaster preparedness, education, reunification and planning and response. Conclusion The literature pertaining to informatics and pediatric disaster preparedness is sparse and many gaps still persist. Current disaster preparedness tools focus on the general population and do not specifically address children. The most progress has been achieved in family reunification; however, the recommendations delineated are yet to be completed. PMID:23616840

Burke, R.V.; Ryutov, T.; Neches, R.; Upperman, J.S.

2010-01-01

246

CASE ANALYSIS FARM AGRICULTURE MCAHNERY INFORMATIZATION  

E-print Network

. In order to facilitate the unified management of the farm machinery operation, the agricultural machinery agricultural technique, which include information management, farm machinery job scheduling, agricultural of agricultural machinery management modernization, the roles and actions of farm machinery informatization

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

247

Standardization in health informatics in Canada.  

PubMed

Around the world, informatics has been cited as a key enabler of health sector reform. Recent reform programs in Canada, reflecting this global consensus, have emphasized the importance of quality information and information technology in meeting their goals. Standards are an important building block for achieving the required comprehensive and integrated health information infrastructure. This paper describes the current status of, and future plans for, health informatics and related standards in Canada. PMID:9600397

Alvarez, R C; Zelmer, J

1998-02-01

248

Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

Wright, Theodore

2014-01-01

249

Evolution of medical informatics in bibliographic databases.  

PubMed

Medical informatics became a medical specialty during the last years and this is evidenced by a great amount of journal articles regarding the subject published worldwide. We compared the presentation of Medical Informatics in two different bibliographic databases: MEDLINE and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences). Previous studies described how Medical Informatics was represented in MEDLINE, but we wanted to compare it to a regional database as LILACS. We search both databases completely (MEDLINE 1966 -2002 and LILACS 1982-2002) using the keyword "Medical Informatics" as MeSH term in MEDLINE and as DeCS term in LILACS, and we added "medical informatics" as text word and analyzed the references obtained as results. We found that MEDLINE properly represents the impact of Medical Informatics in non-Latin-American international journals, but lacks of a considerable amount of articles from this region, while LILACS, although in comparison it is smaller in size, has more articles regarding the subject. So we think that LILACS properly represents the specialty in Latin America and the Caribbean Region. PMID:15360823

Otero, Paula; Pedernera, Federico; Montenegro, Sergio; Borbolla, Damian; Garcia Marti, Sebastián; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

2004-01-01

250

Informatics and modeling challenges in fragment-based drug discovery.  

PubMed

This review summarizes recent developments in fragment-based drug-discovery methods with an emphasis on informatics and modeling requirements. Fragment-based methods have become established as a powerful approach in structure-based lead discovery. A number of successful projects have been announced recently, where fragments have had a central role in hit generation and lead optimization, leading to candidates being considered for clinical trials. Despite these successes, there are still many opportunities for new development, such as improving the structural diversity of fragment libraries, strategies for fragment evolution, and methods for predicting fragment binding modes. PMID:17554855

Hubbard, Roderick E; Chen, Ijen; Davis, Ben

2007-05-01

251

Transformation of antimicrobial stewardship programs through technology and informatics.  

PubMed

The successful integration of technology in antimicrobial stewardship programs has made it possible for clinicians to function more efficiently. With government endorsement of electronic health records (EHRs), EHRs and clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are being used as decision support tools to aid clinicians in efforts to improve antibiotic use. Likewise, medical applications (apps) have provided educational tools easily accessible to clinicians through their mobile devices. In this article, the impact that informatics and technology have had on promoting antibiotic stewardship is described, focusing on EHRs and CDSSs, apps, electronic resources, and social media. PMID:24857394

Kullar, Ravina; Goff, Debra A

2014-06-01

252

Clinical knowledge management at scale: fulfilling the promise of pervasive  

E-print Network

Clinical knowledge management at scale: fulfilling the promise of pervasive computerized clinical. Corporate Manager Clinical Knowledge Management and Decision Support, Clinical Informatics Research and application results 2. Clinical Knowledge Management System Typical knowledge engineering processes

Gabrieli, John

253

AMIA Board white paper: definition of biomedical informatics and specification of core competencies for graduate education in the discipline  

PubMed Central

The AMIA biomedical informatics (BMI) core competencies have been designed to support and guide graduate education in BMI, the core scientific discipline underlying the breadth of the field's research, practice, and education. The core definition of BMI adopted by AMIA specifies that BMI is ‘the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health.’ Application areas range from bioinformatics to clinical and public health informatics and span the spectrum from the molecular to population levels of health and biomedicine. The shared core informatics competencies of BMI draw on the practical experience of many specific informatics sub-disciplines. The AMIA BMI analysis highlights the central shared set of competencies that should guide curriculum design and that graduate students should be expected to master. PMID:22683918

Kulikowski, Casimir A; Shortliffe, Edward H; Currie, Leanne M; Elkin, Peter L; Hunter, Lawrence E; Johnson, Todd R; Kalet, Ira J; Lenert, Leslie A; Musen, Mark A; Ozbolt, Judy G; Smith, Jack W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter Z

2012-01-01

254

CIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing November/December 2004 1 The N-CODES Project  

E-print Network

decisions on an almost continuous basis. Although evidence-based knowledge and stan- dardized guidelinesCIN: Computers, Informatics, Nursing · November/December 2004 1 The N-CODES Project The First Year practice environments demand new approaches to support nurses' clinical decision making. The Nursing

Michel, Howard E.

255

What is done, what is needed and what is realistic to expect from medical informatics standards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatic experts have made considerable progress in the development of standards for orders and clinical results (CEN, HL7, ASTM), EKG tracings (CEN), diagnostic images (DICOM), claims processing (X12 and EDIFAC) and in vocabulary and codes (SNOMED, Read Codes, the MED, LOINC). Considerable work still remains to be carried out. Abstract models of health care information have to be created,

Clement J. McDonald; J. Marc Overhage; Paul Dexter; Blaine Takesue; Jeffrey G. Suico

1998-01-01

256

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future  

E-print Network

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future Hamed and their surrounding environment (e.g., by monitoring their CO2 level [13]). Mental health care has seen less. Electronic records are relatively recent in mental health care and tend to be poorly integrated in clinical

Purver, Matthew

257

Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100  

E-print Network

Health Informatics: Definitions "Medical informatics is the rapidly developing scientific field that deals, communications and information technology and systems to all fields of medicine - medical care, medical education in healthcare? Information about the patient's health Medical record, lab results, medical images, disease

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

258

Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical governance (CG) is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED). Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation, the results of this study would contribute to the development of implementation science and be employed by boards and executives governing other clinical settings to facilitate CG implementation. PMID:22963589

2012-01-01

259

Clinical faculty: taking the lead in teaching quality improvement and patient safety.  

PubMed

Despite efforts by health professional organizations to promote efforts in quality improvement, patient safety, and cost reduction, the issue remains that US medical schools and teaching hospitals do not have an adequate supply of skilled faculties to lead these efforts. Recognizing this need, an expert, multidisciplinary panel was convened by the American Association of Medical Colleges in 2012 to develop a systematic strategy to build a critical mass of academic health center faculties to lead and implement education in those three areas. In the last year, the American Association of Medical Colleges has launched a national institution-based initiative to train faculty in all clinical specialties, which includes those in obstetrics-gynecology. This comprehensive program consists of interactive experiential learning workshops, web-based resources, a national community of learners, implementation of educational initiatives, and dissemination of outcomes. Those faculties will be invaluable in leading and disseminating educational programs that embed quality improvement and patient safety across the continuum of women's healthcare to all faculty members and residents. PMID:24881824

Davis, Nancy L; Davis, David A; Rayburn, William F

2014-09-01

260

A Paradigm for Space Science Informatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Informatics can be defined as the discipline of structuring, storing, accessing, and distributing information describing complex systems. In the fields of Bioinformatics and Geoinformatics, specific tools have been developed through wide community requirements analysis and consensus. In Geoinformatics, the GIS toolset is nearly universal. In Bioinformatics, tools such as BLAST and FASTA are commonly used. One of the key enablers of these science research and analysis systems is a nearly universal acceptance (hence, standardization) of the basic data unit in each field. In Bioinformatics, the gene sequence is the basic data unit. In GIS, the basic unit is gridded data consisting of points, vectors, and polygons. We believe that the time has come for a robust Space Science Informatics field of research, parallel to that of Bioinformatics in the fields of Biology and Medicine, and to that of Geoinformatics in the fields of Geography and Earth Science. In particular, we are investigating the specific case of Astroinformatics as a new paradigm for science research in Astronomy. Any Space Science Informatics discipline must include common methods and standards for spatio-temporal data, metadata, taxonomies, ontologies, data structures, data integration, data cleansing and preparation, data transmission and handling, and more. The need for informatics is driven and motivated by the flood of data coming now and the avalanche of data coming soon within all of our science disciplines. The two traditional approaches to science research (experiment and theory) are making room now for this third stream of research - informatics - which is data-driven and information-centric. We discuss the modalities of space science data that form the basis of informatics: raster (images), spectroscopic, time series, distribution functions, and catalogs. We then discuss specific concepts for Astroinformatics. Finally, we present our emerging view of how a field of Space Science Informatics could grow to stature as a stand-alone subdiscipline.

Borne, K. D.; Eastman, T. E.

2006-05-01

261

A Cost Analysis of an Introduction to Clinical Medicine Course in a Non-University Teaching Hospital.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analysis of direct costs to teach a 10-week Introduction to Clinical Medicine course to 26 students in the spring of 1995 found that attending physicians worked a total of 736.5 hours, for a cost of $37,303; residents worked 314 hours, at a cost of $4,396; and miscellaneous costs totaled $2,019. The per-student cost was $1,681. (Author/MSE)

Tai, Lee W.; Tulley, John E.

1997-01-01

262

Preliminary report of a Web-based instrument to assess and teach knowledge and clinical thinking to medical student  

PubMed Central

Objectives We report the preliminary development of a unique Web-based instrument for assessing and teaching knowledge and developing clinical thinking called the “Sequential Questions and Answers” (SQA) test. Included in this feasibility report are physicians’ answers to the Sequential Questions and Answers pre- and posttests and their brief questionnaire replies. Methods The authors refined the SQA test case scenario for content, ease of modifications of case scenarios, test uploading and answer retrieval. Eleven geographically distant physicians evaluated the SQA test, taking the pretest and posttest within two weeks. These physicians completed a brief questionnaire about the SQA test. Results Eleven physicians completed the SQA pre- and posttest; all answers were downloaded for analysis. They reported the ease of website login and navigating within the test module together with many helpful suggestions. Their average posttest score gain was 53% (p=0.012). Conclusions We report the successful launch of a unique Web-based instrument referred to as the Sequential Questions and Answers test. This distinctive test combines teaching organization of the clinical narrative into an assessment tool that promotes acquiring medical knowledge and clinical thinking. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of geographically distant physicians to access the SQA instrument. The physicians’ helpful suggestions will be added to future SQA test versions. Medical schools might explore the integration of this multi-language-capable SQA assessment and teaching instrument into their undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:25341203

Tokunaga, Hironobu; Ando, Hirotaka; Obika, Mikako; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Bautista, Miho; Kataoka, Hitomi; Terasawa, Hidekazu

2014-01-01

263

Academic excellence for business and the professions School of Informatics  

E-print Network

Academic excellence for business and the professions School of Informatics Computing Engineering Student life at City How to apply Scholarships: Rewarding Excellence Map and contacts School refer to page for more information. #12;School of Informatics: Undergraduate courses Welcometothe

Weyde, Tillman

264

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Veterinary Teaching Hospital College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University Teaching Hospital (VTH). This includes overseeing interns as well as junior and senior PVM students while. Administrative: Participate in Hospital, Department, College, and University administrative committees as well

Stephens, Graeme L.

265

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Veterinary Teaching Hospital College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University Teaching Hospital is looking for a veterinary dentist to join the dentistry team consisting of 2 faculty and surgery in the small animal hospital for up to 34 weeks per year (65% time commitment). This entails

266

Teaching communication in clinical clerkships: models from the Macy initiative in health communications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical educators have a responsibility to teach students to communicate effectively, yet ways to accomplish this are not well-defined. Sixty-five percent of medical schools teach communication skills, usually in the preclinical years; however, communication skills learned in the preclinical years may decline by graduation. To address these problems the New York University School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School

Adina Kalet; Michele P. Pugnaire; Kathy Cole-Kelly; Regina Janicik; Emily Ferrara; Mark D. Schwartz; Mack Lipkin Jr.; Aaron Lazare

2004-01-01

267

Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient encounters by eliciting the full set of concerns from the patient's perspective and using that information to prioritize and negotiate which clinical issues should most appropriately be dealt with and which (if any) should be deferred to a subsequent visit. Methods Ten physicians from a large physician organization in California with baseline patient survey scores below the statewide 25th percentile participated in the agenda-setting intervention. Eleven physicians matched on baseline scores, geography, specialty, and practice size were selected as controls. Changes in survey summary scores from pre- and post-intervention surveys were compared between the two groups. Multilevel regression models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians and controlled for respondent characteristics were used to examine the effect of the intervention on survey scale scores. Results There was statistically significant improvement in intervention physicians' ability to "explain things in a way that was easy to understand" (p = 0.02) and marginally significant improvement in the overall quality of physician-patient interactions (p = 0.08) compared to control group physicians. Changes in patients' experiences with organizational access, care coordination, and office staff interactions did not differ by experimental group. Conclusion A simple and modest behavioral training for practicing physicians has potential to positively affect physician-patient relationship interaction quality. It will be important to evaluate the effect of more extensive trainings, including those that work with physicians on a broader set of communication techniques. PMID:18194559

Rodriguez, Hector P; Anastario, Michael P; Frankel, Richard M; Odigie, Esosa G; Rogers, William H; von Glahn, Ted; Safran, Dana G

2008-01-01

268

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2010; Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446

Yu, Ping

269

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

, and the potential to achieve international recognition in the field of medical health informatics within the nextTier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

270

MEDINFO 2007 Studies in Health Technology and Informatics  

E-print Network

. Engelbrecht, A. Geissbuhler, C. Lovis and G. Mihalas (Eds.), Connecting Medical Informatics and Bio of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics Building Sustainable Health Systems Part 2 EditedMEDINFO 2007 #12;Studies in Health Technology and Informatics This book series was started in 1990

Hansen, René Rydhof

271

National Institutes of Health Data and Informatics Working Group  

E-print Network

, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, University of Wisconsin- Madison; co-chair Lawrence Professor, Department of Biomedical Informatics and Medical Education, University of Washington Jill P, University of Michigan Medical School Paul Harris, Ph.D., Director, Office of Research Informatics

Bezrukov, Sergey M.

272

Entry Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information  

E-print Network

Entry ­ Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Post-Graduate Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Certificate in Health Informatics and Information 6 Statistics 3 Medical Terminology 3 Management Information Systems 3 System Analysis and Design 3

Cui, Yan

273

Challenges and Communities of Medical Informatics Vagelis Hristidis  

E-print Network

Challenges and Communities of Medical Informatics Research Vagelis Hristidis Computer Science challenges faced when conducting research on medical informatics, and explain some of the aspects that make years ago I got interested in Medical Informatics (MedInf), because I saw that my research could

Hristidis, Vagelis

274

Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001  

E-print Network

Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001 Review What is bioinformatics? An introduction; the most important areas of #12;84 Review Paper Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001 improvements have been,particularlywithreferencetotranscription regulatory systems. (Molecular) bio ­ informatics: bioinformatics is conceptualising biology in terms

Gerstein, Mark

275

University Paris-Est Laboratory of Informatics Gaspard-Monge  

E-print Network

University Paris-Est Laboratory of Informatics Gaspard-Monge Department of Informatics THESIS to obtain the Doctor of Philosophy grade of the University Paris-Est with specialization in Informatics on the inspiring medical imaging applications and many other changes in my personal life. In addition to getting

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

Earth Science Informatics Comes of Age  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The volume and complexity of Earth science data have steadily increased, placing ever-greater demands on researchers, software developers and data managers tasked with handling such data. Additional demands arise from requirements being levied by funding agencies and governments to better manage, preserve and provide open access to data. Fortunately, over the past 10-15 years significant advances in information technology, such as increased processing power, advanced programming languages, more sophisticated and practical standards, and near-ubiquitous internet access have made the jobs of those acquiring, processing, distributing and archiving data easier. These advances have also led to an increasing number of individuals entering the field of informatics as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also encompasses the use of computers and computational methods to support decisionmaking and other applications for societal benefits.

Jodha, Siri; Khalsa, S.; Ramachandran, Rahul

2014-01-01

277

Populations, Patients, Germs and Genes: Ethics Of Genomics and Informatics in Communicable Disease Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter will explore the ways in which genomics (and the informatics tools needed to analyze and interpret them) could,\\u000a potentially, transform our understanding of infectious disease epidemiology, improve disease management and prevention and\\u000a save lives. The integration of microbiological, clinical and environmental data into personalized clinical decision support\\u000a and risk assessment tools will improve both the care of patients

Gwendolyn L. Gilbert; Michael Selgelid

278

Informatics and Quantitative Analysis in Biological Imaging  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biological imaging is now a quantitative technique for probing cellular structure and dynamics and is increasingly used for cell-based screens. However, the bioinformatics tools required for hypothesis-driven analysis of digital images are still immature. We are developing the Open Microscopy Environment (OME) as an informatics solution for the storage and analysis of optical microscope image data. OME aims to automate image analysis, modeling, and mining of large sets of images and specifies a flexible data model, a relational database, and an XML-encoded file standard that is usable by potentially any software tool. With this design, OME provides a first step toward biological image informatics.

Jason Swedlow (University of Dundee;); Ilya Goldberg (National Institutes of Health;Laboratory of Genetics, National Institute on Aging); Erik Brauner (Harvard Medical School;Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology); Peter K. Sorger (Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts Institute of Technology;)

2003-04-04

279

[The Faculty Therapy Clinic in the formation of clinical teaching of internal medicine: on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy].  

PubMed

The V. N. Vinogradov Faculty Therapy Clinic of the Imperial Moscow University (IMU) (then Moscow State University--I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy) was opened under this name in 1846 simultaneously with the Surgery Clinic on Rozhdestvenka Street. The paper shows the continuity of the idea for bedside clinical teaching, whose need was clearly realized just by S. G. Zybelin and which was first done in practice by his follower and the first Director of the Clinical Institute, IMU, F. G. Politkovsky, as well as that of specific forms of implementing of this idea. It is shown that just early internal medicine teaching provided the principles that were stated by M. Ya. Mudrov and that subsequently formed the basis of a course taught at the Department of Faculty Clinic. The original teaching of a theoretical course without a clinic one at the Department of Particular Pathology and Therapy, which was stipulated by the 1835 Charter, gradually lost its importance as clinical teaching was formed. The succession of the Clinical Institute and the Faculty Clinic was also shown in the staff the director of the newly-opened Clinic and Therapy Department Professor was A. I. Over, M. Ya. Mudrov's favorite disciple and the last Director of the Clinical Institute; the adjuvant teacher at the Therapeutic Department of the Clinical Institute was K. Ya. Mlodzeyevsky. This all permits the V. N. Vinogradov Faculty Therapy Clinic to be regarded a competent descendant of the first clinical institutes. In conclusion, there is a clinical analysis of division of an internal medicine course into faculty and hospital courses at the present stage and prospects for teaching therapy are discussed. PMID:20364704

Nedostup, A V; Blagova, O V

2010-01-01

280

Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical InformaticsInformatics  

E-print Network

ICS 313 1 Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical Informatics Systems Outline and Objectives Describe basic concepts in artificial intelligence Understand is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Goals of AI systems fall into four categories: Thinking humanly Thinking

Reed, Nancy E.

281

Fractal Image Informatics: from SEM to DEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we introduce a new branch of Fractal Geometry: Fractal Image Informatics, devoted to the systematic and standardized fractal analysis of images of natural systems. The methods of this discipline are based on the properties of multiscale images of selfaffine fractal surfaces. As proved in the paper, the image inherits the scaling and lacunarity of the surface and

K. Oleschko; J.-F. Parrot; G. Korvin; M. Esteves; M. Vauclin; C. Gaona Salado; S. Cherkasov

2008-01-01

282

Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology  

PubMed Central

There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

2011-01-01

283

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics Components, Objects, and Contracts Research Report No for distributed services. 1 #12;Whence the central role of interfaces as an abstraction mechanism for hiding internal details. The interface description is the basis for composition both from a theoretical point

Steffen, Martin

284

Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging

Vimla L Patel; David R Kaufman

1998-01-01

285

Interpersonal informatics: making social influence visible  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent research in social network science has found that that what we do and say flows through our social network, impacting our friends, our friends' friends, and beyond. Likewise, our own personal choices are also the influenced by the social networks we participate in. We introduce the area of interpersonal informatics, a class of tools that allows groups of people

Elizabeth Bales; William G. Griswold

2011-01-01

286

Evaluation in health informatics: computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of complex medical informatics applications involves not only the information system, but also its impact on the organizational environment in which it is implemented. In instances where these applications cannot be evaluated with traditional experimental methods, computer simulation provides a flexible approach to evaluation. The construction of a computer simulation model involves the development of a model that

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

287

Center for Molecular and Biomolecular Informatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Centre for Molecular and Biomolecular Informatics is the Dutch national centre for computational molecular sciences. The CMBI is strongly committed to a series of educational projects, ranging from high school to postgraduate courses and from local university student courses to international workshops.

288

CATEGORIES FOR INFORMATICS DAVID I. SPIVAK  

E-print Network

, given the standard mathematical con- vention? What is expressed in the symbols (x, y) A Ã? A where using examples from informatics. More concretely, I will first define categories and functors. I hope to be reminded why we might spend time learning category theory. The first is easier. Since

Spivak, David

289

Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)  

SciTech Connect

The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

2003-03-06

290

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine is dependent on using the power of the computerized database to not only feed patient specific information to the health care providers, but to use the epidemiological and statistical information in the data base to improve decision making and ultimately care. The computer is also a powerful tool to facilitate standardizing and monitoring

Terry P. Clemmer

1995-01-01

291

Evaluation in health informatics: social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis comprises a set of research methods that can be used to analyze the relationships among entities such as people, departments, and organizations. The purpose of the analysis is to discover patterns of relationships that affect both individual and organizational attitudes and behavior such as the adoption, diffusion, and use of new medical informatics applications. This paper presents

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

292

Image informatics at a national research center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Image informatics at the Communications Engineering Branch of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications (LHNCBC), an R&D division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), includes document and biomedical images. In both domains, research into computer-assisted methods for information extraction, and the implementation of prototype systems incorporating such methods, is central to our mission. Current document image research

L. Rodney Long; Sameer K. Antani; George R. Thoma

2005-01-01

293

Behavior Informatics and Analytics: Let Behavior Talk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavior is increasingly recognized as a key component in business intelligence and problem-solving. Different from traditional behavior analysis, which mainly focus on implicit behavior and explicit business appearance as a result of business usage and customer demographics, this paper proposes the field of Behavior Informatics and Analytics (BIA), to support explicit behavior involvement through a conversion from transactional data to

Longbing Cao

2008-01-01

294

Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM)  

Cancer.gov

May 15, 2008 12:00 AM - May 18, 2008 12:00 AM Washington State Convention and Trade Center Seattle, WA + Add to Outlook Calendar 2008 Annual Meeting Print This Page Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) News & Events

295

Evaluation of an Instructional Model to Teach Clinically Relevant Medicinal Chemistry in a Campus and a Distance Pathway  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate an instructional model for teaching clinically relevant medicinal chemistry. Methods An instructional model that uses Bloom's cognitive and Krathwohl's affective taxonomy, published and tested concepts in teaching medicinal chemistry, and active learning strategies, was introduced in the medicinal chemistry courses for second-professional year (P2) doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students (campus and distance) in the 2005-2006 academic year. Student learning and the overall effectiveness of the instructional model were assessed. Student performance after introducing the instructional model was compared to that in prior years. Results Student performance on course examinations improved compared to previous years. Students expressed overall enthusiasm about the course and better understood the value of medicinal chemistry to clinical practice. Conclusion The explicit integration of the cognitive and affective learning objectives improved student performance, student ability to apply medicinal chemistry to clinical practice, and student attitude towards the discipline. Testing this instructional model provided validation to this theoretical framework. The model is effective for both our campus and distance-students. This instructional model may also have broad-based applications to other science courses. PMID:18483599

Galt, Kimberly A.

2008-01-01

296

IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs  

PubMed Central

Objectives Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this does not always mean that the program is of an international level. The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) has expertise in the field of education. The IMIA Recommendations on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics guide curricula development. The goal of this article is to show that IMIA can also play the role of accreditation agency and to present the IMIA accreditation protocol and experiences obtained with it. Methods The accreditation procedure used in the Netherlands and Belgium was taken as a template for the design of the IMIA accreditation protocol. In a trial period of one and a half year the protocol is tested out on six health informatics programs. Results An accreditation protocol was designed. For judging the curriculum of a program the IMIA Recommendations are used. The institution has to write a self-assessment report and a site visit committee visits the program and judges its quality, supported by the self-assessment report and discussions with all stakeholders of the program. Conclusions After having visited three programs it appears that the IMIA accreditation procedure works well. Only a few changes had to be introduced. Writing the self-assessment report already appears to be beneficial for the management of the program to obtain a better insight in the quality of their program. PMID:24175114

Mantas, John

2013-01-01

297

Subarachnoid block with Taylor's approach for surgery of lower half of the body and lower limbs: A clinical teaching study  

PubMed Central

Background: Subarachnoid anesthesia is used as the sole anesthetic technique for below umbilical surgeries, but patients with deformed spine represent technical difficulty for its establishment. This study was aimed to find out whether training of Taylor's approach to residents on normal spine is beneficial for establishing subarachnoid block in patients with deformed spine. Materials and Methods: The total of 174 patients of ASA I-III with normal and deformed spine of both genders scheduled for below umbilical surgeries under the subarachnoid block and met the inclusion criteria, were enrolled for this two-phased clinical teaching study. All participating residents have performed more than 100 subarachnoid block with the median and paramedian approach. Residents were randomized into two equal groups. During the first phase program, Group I was taught Taylor's approach by hands on method for the subarachnoid block while Group II kept on observation for the technique. During the second phase of program, Group II was also taught Taylor's approach for establishing the subarachnoid block. Block success was defined according to clinical efficacy. Results: The results of teaching of Taylor's approach were encouraging. Initially, the residents faced difficulty for establishing the subarachnoid block in deformed spine but after learning by observation and practical hands on, both groups had successfully performed the subarachnoid block by Taylor's approach in one or more attempts in patient with deformed spine with the acceptable failure rate of 15%. Conclusion: Taylor's approach for establishing subarachnoid block in deformed spine should be taught to residents on normal spine.

Gupta, Kumkum; Rastogi, Bhawna; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Avinash; Jain, Manish; Singh, V. P.

2012-01-01

298

An Informatics Blueprint for Healthcare Quality Information Systems  

PubMed Central

There is a critical gap in our nation's ability to accurately measure and manage the quality of medical care. A robust healthcare quality information system (HQIS) has the potential to address this deficiency through the capture, codification, and analysis of information about patient treatments and related outcomes. Because non-technical issues often present the greatest challenges, this paper provides an overview of these socio-technical issues in building a successful HQIS, including the human, organizational, and knowledge management (KM) perspectives. Through an extensive literature review and direct experience in building a practical HQIS (the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Outcomes Research Database system), we have formulated an “informatics blueprint” to guide the development of such systems. While the blueprint was developed to facilitate healthcare quality information collection, management, analysis, and reporting, the concepts and advice provided may be extensible to the development of other types of clinical research information systems. PMID:16622161

Niland, Joyce C.; Rouse, Layla; Stahl, Douglas C.

2006-01-01

299

Program management and health care informatics: defining relationships.  

PubMed

The program management (PM) structure is a relatively well-known organizational model for hospitals. A variation of the matrix structure, it allows for an interdisciplinary team of health care providers to facilitate patient care delivery. However, providing such focused care results in a complex, highly information-dependent operational environment. To meet the information needs of such an environment, careful planning in selecting and implementing technology is required. Along with supporting patient care, the technology will also help in managing costs, human resources, quality and utilization, as well as in monitoring performance and outcomes measurement. Focusing specifically on the information technology environment, this article addresses health care informatics (the diverse categories of information and systems) needed to support clinical program managers, executives and others in a PM organization. Examples from both a university-affiliated and a community-based program managed hospital illustrate their approach to PM and information technology. PMID:10140165

Harber, B W; Miller, S A

1994-01-01

300

The role of informatics and decision support in utilization management.  

PubMed

Information systems provide a critical link between clinical laboratories and the clinicians and patients they serve. Strategic deployment of informatics resources can enable a wide array of utilization initiatives and can substantially improve the appropriateness of test selection and results interpretation. In this article, we review information systems including computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, laboratory information systems (LISs), electronic health records (EHRs), laboratory middleware, knowledge management systems and systems for data extraction and analysis, and describe the role that each can play in utilization management. We also discuss specific utilization strategies that laboratories can employ within these systems, citing examples both from our own institution and from the literature. Finally, we review how emerging applications of decision support technologies may help to further refine test utilization, "personalize" laboratory diagnosis, and enhance the diagnostic value of laboratory testing. PMID:24084507

Baron, Jason M; Dighe, Anand S

2014-01-01

301

Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%), 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%). The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76%) and journal clubs (64%). Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%), although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54%) while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%). Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence. PMID:19772570

Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Rosenthal, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schunemann, Holger J

2009-01-01

302

Teaching ethics in psychiatry: a one-day workshop for clinical students.  

PubMed Central

In this paper we describe the objectives of teaching medical ethics to undergraduates and the teaching methods used. We describe a workshop used in the University of Liverpool Department of Psychiatry, designed to enhance ethical sensitivity in psychiatry. The workshop reviews significant historical and current errors in the ethical practice of psychiatry and doctors' defence mechanisms against accepting responsibility for deficiencies in ethical practice. The workshop explores the student doctors' own group ethos in response to ethical dilemmas, and demonstrates how the individual contributes to and is responsible for the group ethos through participation and also through nonparticipation. The student feedback about the workshop is reviewed. The Toronto Ethical Sensitivity Instrument was used to assess whether or not the workshop altered sensitivity. Compared to a control group the attenders' sensitivity was significantly increased (on Student's t-test p equals or is less than 0.002). PMID:7473644

Green, B; Miller, P D; Routh, C P

1995-01-01

303

Utilization of medical imaging informatics and biometrics technologies in healthcare delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  With the large amount of image data accumulated daily from medical imaging modalities and picture archiving and communication\\u000a systems (PACS) in hospitals and from healthcare biometrics related databases, we can take advantage of these data resources\\u000a to investigate innovative clinical service, research and education using the concept of imaging informatics. In this paper\\u000a we present five independent concepts and technologies

H. K. Huang

2008-01-01

304

Informatics Students Across the Globe Learn to Collaborate in Second Life  

PubMed Central

In preparing healthcare professionals to work in the field of informatics, there are many online programs of study. These programs of students include a variety of educational tools. This poster describes the experiences of four student located across the globe learning how to work as a collaborative team. The team used Second Life as a platform to participate in a system life cycle course. The benefits and challenges of the Virtual Clinic environment are highlighted. PMID:24199062

Danforth, Cathleen; Condon, Timothy; DeForest, Robin; Awar, Zeina Al; Marini, Abdellatif; Skiba, Diane J.

2012-01-01

305

International Congress of the European Federation for Medical Informatics Medical Informatics in Europe (MIE'2003), St. Malo (France), 4-7 May 2003  

E-print Network

In 18th International Congress of the European Federation for Medical Informatics Medical Informatics in Europe (MIE'2003), St. Malo (France), 4-7 May 2003 An Approach to Enrich Online Medical Problem Federation for Medical Informatics Medical Informatics in Europe (MIE'2003), St. Malo (France), 4-7 May 2003

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

306

Evaluation: salvation or nemesis of medical informatics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The currently prevailing paradigms of evaluation in medical\\/health informatics are reviewed. Some problems with application of the objectivist approach to the evaluation of real—rather than simulated—(health) information systems are identified. The rigorous application of the objectivist approach, which was developed for laboratory experiments, is difficult to adapt to the evaluation of information systems in a practical real-world environment because such

Jochen R. Moehr

2002-01-01

307

GIMI: Generic Infrastructure for Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breakthroughs in medical informatics have yielded a wealth of data across all aspects of patient care. One of the fundamental goals of e-Science should be facilitate the appropriate use of such data to improve patient care: both in the short-term and the long-term. Developments in Grid technology have brought about the promise of such data being used to, for example,

Andrew C. Simpson; David J. Power; Mark Slaymaker; Eugenia A. Politou

2005-01-01

308

From Terrorism Informatics to Dark Web Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this paper, we provide an overview of “Terrorism Informatics,” a new discipline that aims to study the terrorism phenomena\\u000a with a data-driven, quantitative, and computational approach. We first summarize several critical books that lay the foundation\\u000a for studying terrorism in the new Internet era. We then review important terrorism research centers and resources that are\\u000a of relevance to our

Hsinchun Chen

309

Teaching practice from the perspective of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education, Charles University  

E-print Network

Teaching practice from the perspective of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education, Charles of teaching practice of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education in Prague. In her paper she their teaching practice on subjects related to Computer Science, Informatics and ICT Education in Czech Basic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

310

Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

Reinhold Haux

2004-01-01

311

Social informatics and service learning as teaching models  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have proposed a framework to integrate social and ethical issues into science and engineering curricula. We have also shown how such a framework might be implemented across a curriculum, and how it might be applied to the study of a specific scientific problem. Our framework is based on basic foundations of applied engineering ethics, adaptation of the structure of

William J. McIver; Traxon Rachell

2002-01-01

312

Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Additionally, we suggest core source materials and specific learning activities to support pharmacy informatics education. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging changes in the practice model. These changes are facilitated by pharmacy informatics and will inevitably become commonplace in our graduates’ practice environment. PMID:21829267

Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

2011-01-01

313

Significant improvement of a clinical training course in physical examination after basic structural changes in the teaching content and methods  

PubMed Central

Background: Regular student evaluations at the Technical University Munich indicate the necessity for improvement of the clinical examination course. The aim of this study was to examine if targeted measures to restructure and improve a clinical examination course session lead to a higher level of student satisfaction as well as better self-assessment of the acquired techniques of clinical examination. Methods: At three medical departments of the Technical University Munich during the 2010 summer semester, the quantitative results of 49 student evaluations (ratings 1-6, German scholastic grading system) of the clinical examination course were compared for a course before and a course after structured measures for improvement. These measures included structured teaching instructions, handouts and additional material from the Internet. Results: 47 evaluations were completed before and 34 evaluations after the measures for improvement. The measures named above led to a significant improvement of the evaluative ratings in the following areas: short introduction to the topic of each clinical examination course (from 2.4±1.2 to1.7±1.0; p=0.0020) and to basic measures of hygiene (from 3.8±1.9 to 2.5±1.8; p=0.004), structured demonstration of each clinical examination step (from 2.9±1.5 to 1.8±1.0; p=0.001), sufficient practice of each clinical examination step (from 3.1±1.8 to 2.2±1.4; p=0.030) structured feedback on each clinical examination step (from 3.0±1.4 to 2.3±1.0; p=0.0070), use of handouts (from 5.2±1.4 to 1.8±1.4; p<0.001), advice on additional learning material (from 5.0±1.4 to 3.4±2.0; p<0.001), general learning experience (from 2.4±0.9 to 1.9±0.8; p=0.017), and self-assessment of the acquired techniques of clinical examination (from 3.5±1.3 to 2.5±1.1; p<0.01). Conclusion: Structured changes led to significant improvement in the evaluative ratings of a clinical examination course session concerning preparation of the tutors, structure of the course, and confidence in performing physical examinations. PMID:23737918

Sonne, Carolin; Vogelmann, Roger; Lesevic, H.; Bott-Flugel, Lorenz; Ott, I.; Seyfarth, Melchior

2013-01-01

314

Perspectives on project based teaching and \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper describes a unique educational project that is being implemented in the undergraduate study of Computer Science and Teacher Education. Since 2002, Norway's Nesna University College has been using the example of sexual abuse of children in the teaching of Social Informatics, and in the distance education course \\

Per Arne Godejord

315

Prescribing knowledge in the light of undergraduate clinical pharmacology and therapeutics teaching in India: views of first-year postgraduate students  

PubMed Central

Objectives The study aimed to review the prescribing knowledge of first-year postgraduate doctors in a medical college in India, using the principles of good prescribing, to suggest strategies to improve rational prescribing, and to recommend what curriculum planners can do to accomplish this objective. Methods Fifty first-year postgraduate doctors were asked to fill in a structured questionnaire that sought information regarding their undergraduate training in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, prescribing habits, and commonly consulted drug information sources. Also, the questionnaire assessed any perceived deficiencies in their undergraduate clinical pharmacology teaching and sought feedback regarding improvement in the teaching. Results Eighty-eight percent of residents said that they were taught prescription writing in undergraduate pharmacology teaching; 48% of residents rated their prescribing knowledge at graduation as average, 28% good, 4% excellent, 14% poor, and 4% very poor; 58% felt that their undergraduate training did not prepare them to prescribe safely, and 62% felt that their training did not prepare them to prescribe rationally. Fifty-eight percent of residents felt that they had some specific problems with writing a prescription during their internship training, while 92% thought that undergraduate teaching should be improved. Their suggestions for improving teaching methods were recorded. Conclusions This study concludes that efforts are needed to develop a curriculum that encompasses important aspects of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics along with incorporation of the useful suggestions given by the residents. PMID:23762001

Upadhyaya, Prerna; Seth, Vikas; Sharma, Monika; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Moghe, Vijay Vasant; Khan, Zafar Yab; Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Jain, Shipra Vikram; Soni, Utkarsh; Bhatia, Manohar; Abhijit, Kumar; Goyal, Jaswant

2012-01-01

316

Subject-centered and problem-based approaches to teaching clinical competence in physical therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical therapy students must apply the relevant information learned in their academic and clinical experience to problem solve in treating patients. I compared the clinical cognitive competence in patient care of second-year masters students enrolled in two different curricular programs: modified problem-based (M P-B; n = 27) and subject-centered (S-C; n = 41). Main features of S-C learning include lecture

Ana Maria Villarreal Hilton

2005-01-01

317

Medical Students? Cases as an Empirical Basis for Teaching Clinical Ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify ethical issues that interns encounter in their clinical education and thus build a more empirical basis for the required contents of the clinical ethics curriculum.\\u000aThe authors analyzed a total of 522 required case reports on ethical dilemmas experienced by interns from September 1995 to May 1999 at the medical school of Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. They identified

Marli Huijer; Leeuwen van Evert; Annette Boenink; Gerrit Kimsma

2000-01-01

318

The student-run free clinic: an ideal site to teach interprofessional education?  

PubMed

Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) often include an interprofessional group of health professions students and preceptors working together toward the common goal of caring for underserved populations. Therefore, it would seem that these clinics would be an ideal place for students to participate in an interprofessional collaborative practice and for interprofessional education to occur. This article describes a prospective, observational cohort study of interprofessional attitudes and skills including communication and teamwork skills and attitudes about interprofessional learning, relationships and interactions of student volunteers in a SRFC compared to students who applied and were not accepted to the clinic and to students who never applied to the clinic. This study showed a decrease in attitudes and skills after the first year for all groups. Over the next two years, the total score on the survey for the accepted students was higher than the not accepted students. The students who were not accepted also became more similar to students who never applied. This suggests a protective effect against declining interprofessional attitudes and skills for the student volunteers in a SRFC. These findings are likely a function of the design of the clinical and educational experience in the clinic and of the length of contact the students have with other professions. PMID:24749742

Sick, Brian; Sheldon, Lisa; Ajer, Katy; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lei

2014-09-01

319

Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics.  

PubMed

This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics will be critical to assuring their success as leaders in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:24860688

Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T; Becich, Michael J

2014-01-01

320

Informatics in radiology: Measuring and improving quality in radiology: meeting the challenge with informatics.  

PubMed

Quality is becoming a critical issue for radiology. Measuring and improving quality is essential not only to ensure optimum effectiveness of care and comply with increasing regulatory requirements, but also to combat current trends leading to commoditization of radiology services. A key challenge to implementing quality improvement programs is to develop methods to collect knowledge related to quality care and to deliver that knowledge to practitioners at the point of care. There are many dimensions to quality in radiology that need to be measured, monitored, and improved, including examination appropriateness, procedure protocol, accuracy of interpretation, communication of imaging results, and measuring and monitoring performance improvement in quality, safety, and efficiency. Informatics provides the key technologies that can enable radiologists to measure and improve quality. However, few institutions recognize the opportunities that informatics methods provide to improve safety and quality. The information technology infrastructure in most hospitals is limited, and they have suboptimal adoption of informatics techniques. Institutions can tackle the challenges of assessing and improving quality in radiology by means of informatics. PMID:21997979

Rubin, Daniel L

2011-10-01

321

American College of Medical Informatics Fellows and International Associates, 2008  

PubMed Central

In 2008, 11 new fellows were elected to the American College of Medical Informatics, and were inducted into the College at a ceremony held in conjunction with the American Medical Informatics Association conference in Washington, DC on Nov 9, 2008. A brief synopsis of the background and accomplishments of each of the new fellows is provided here, in alphabetical order.

Masys, Daniel R.

2009-01-01

322

Anatoly Kitov -pioneer of Russian informatics Vladimir A. Kitov1  

E-print Network

generation of scientists who had created Russian cybernetics, computer engineering and informatics. DueAnatoly Kitov - pioneer of Russian informatics Vladimir A. Kitov1 , Valery V. Shilov2 1 Fujitsu "MATI" � Russian State Technological University, Orshanskaja 3, 121522 Moscow, Russia shilov

Boyer, Edmond

323

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

Yu, Ping

324

Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09  

E-print Network

1 HINF 1100 Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09 Course Outline Instructor: Raza Abidi, theory, applications and organizational perspectives of health informatics. HINF 1100 is designed Technology in the field of Health Care. The main focus of this course is to enable students to understand

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

325

The ‘language’ of informatics: The nature of information systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This is the second paper in a series examining the fundamental nature of informatics. The aim of the current paper is to provide a more detailed account of the concept of an information system based upon an earlier paper entitled Informatics and the Inca. The paper also builds upon the content of the first paper in this series entitled Neolithic

Paul Beynon-Davies

2009-01-01

326

Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

1989-01-01

327

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

328

Towards a Definition of Health Informatics Ethics Hamman W. Samuel  

E-print Network

Society (BCS), Inter- national Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), Associa- tion for ComputingTowards a Definition of Health Informatics Ethics Hamman W. Samuel Department of Computing Science in medicine leads to new ethical issues that are not covered by medical or computing ethics. We define

Zaiane, Osmar R.

329

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

There is obvious potential for bene- fit from the provision of electronic support for chronic disease manage- ment1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2009; Vol 4(1): e The electronic of articles is retained by authors; originally published in the electronic Journal of Health Informatics (http

Grundy, John

330

Integrating business change: A strategic role for informatics professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pace of business change has long been perceived as accelerating continuously, and even as having become unsustainable. Informatics is by turn a driver, an enabler, and sometimes a constraint of change. Informatics professionals need to be equipped to govern and lead not just IS\\/IT change but wider business change. In 2009 BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT in the

Kevin Johns

2010-01-01

331

Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology  

PubMed Central

Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

2014-01-01

332

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Simulation-Based Teaching versus Traditional Instruction in Medicine: A Pilot Study among Clinical Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare simulator-based teaching with traditional instruction among clinical medical students. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with written pre-post testing. Third-year medical students (n = 38) received either a myocardial infarction (MI) simulation followed by a reactive airways disease (RAD) lecture, or a RAD simulation…

Gordon, James A.; Shaffer, David W.; Raemer, Daniel B.; Pawlowski, John; Hurford, William E.; Cooper, Jeffrey B.

2006-01-01

333

Exploring the biomedical and health informatics educational programs in europe.  

PubMed

The Health Information Technology can improve public health, quality of health care etc. Thus, it is important for professionals to be well educated by training programs. The aim of this paper is to record all the educational programs with specializations in Health Informatics, Medical Informatics, Bioinformatics, Biomedical Informatics and Biomedical Engineering in European Universities and Institutions. An on-line research was conducted on Scopus, PubMed, Scholar Google, and Google. More than 150 universities and colleges in Europe conduct educational programs for these domains. The majority them, expertise in Biomedical Engineering (31%), 22% of the educational programs correspond to Bioinformatics, while Health Informatics studies have 18%. On the last few years, a growth of Health informatics professionals has been observed in Europe. PMID:25000017

Manifava, Eirini; Kolokathi, Aikaterini; Mantas, John

2014-01-01

334

Teaching Advanced Psychopathology: A Method that Promotes Basic Undergraduate Clinical and Research Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students in advanced psychopathology courses can learn key concepts by administering semistructured interviews designed to identify specific mental disorders. Such an active learning approach potentially can help students gain fundamental knowledge about psychopathology and begin to develop clinical and research skills. To explore the value of…

Balsis, Steve; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Zona, Denise Martin; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

2006-01-01

335

Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Teaching for Third-Year Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2-month program for third-year students at Yeshiva's Albert Einstein College of Medicine that provides a model for integrating basic sciences and clinical training is described. It demonstrates the importance of lifelong learning in a field that constantly changes. (Author/MLW)

Croen, Lila G.; And Others

1986-01-01

336

Informing web-based communication curricula in veterinary education: a systematic review of web-based methods used for teaching and assessing clinical communication in medical education.  

PubMed

We determined the Web-based configurations that are applied to teach medical and veterinary communication skills, evaluated their effectiveness, and suggested future educational directions for Web-based communication teaching in veterinary education. We performed a systematic search of CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ERIC limited to articles published in English between 2000 and 2012. The review focused on medical or veterinary undergraduate to clinical- or residency-level students. We selected studies for which the study population was randomized to the Web-based learning (WBL) intervention with a post-test comparison with another WBL or non-WBL method and that reported at least one empirical outcome. Two independent reviewers completed relevancy screening, data extraction, and synthesis of results using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's framework. The search retrieved 1,583 articles, and 10 met the final inclusion criteria. We identified no published articles on Web based communication platforms in veterinary medicine; however, publications summarized from human medicine demonstrated that WBL provides a potentially reliable and valid approach for teaching and assessing communication skills. Student feedback on the use of virtual patients for teaching clinical communication skills has been positive,though evidence has suggested that practice with virtual patients prompted lower relation-building responses.Empirical outcomes indicate that WBL is a viable method for expanding the approach to teaching history taking and possibly to additional tasks of the veterinary medical interview. PMID:24418922

Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Toews, Lorraine; Violato, Claudio; Coe, Jason B

2014-01-01

337

A near-peer teaching program designed, developed and delivered exclusively by recent medical graduates for final year medical students sitting the final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)  

PubMed Central

Background The General Medical Council states that teaching doctors and students is important for the care of patients. Our aim was to deliver a structured teaching program to final year medical students, evaluate the efficacy of teaching given by junior doctors and review the pertinent literature. Methods We developed a revision package for final year medical students sitting the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The package was created and delivered exclusively by recent medical graduates and consisted of lectures and small group seminars covering the core areas of medicine and surgery, with a focus on specific OSCE station examples. Students were asked to complete a feedback questionnaire during and immediately after the program. Results One hundred and eighteen completed feedback questionnaires were analysed. All participants stated that the content covered was relevant to their revision. 73.2% stated that junior doctors delivered teaching that is comparable to that of consultant - led teaching. 97.9% stated the revision course had a positive influence on their learning. Conclusions Our study showed that recent medical graduates are able to create and deliver a structured, formal revision program and provide a unique perspective to exam preparation that was very well received by our student cohort. The role of junior doctors teaching medical students in a formal structured environment is very valuable and should be encouraged. PMID:21414226

2011-01-01

338

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca  

E-print Network

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www at the level of Assistant Professor. Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine was established in 1996 in the Medical Informatics Program, program development in the Faculty of Medicine and in the Health Informatics

Adl, Sina

339

Updated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3  

E-print Network

, International Medical Informatics Association h-takeda@jrhm.jikei.com Abstract. This key note lecture introduces of medical informatics, including health informatics. These were the further development of methods and toolsUpdated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3 1 Professsor Emeritus, Osaka

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Sexually transmitted diseases in northern Nigeria. Five years' experience in a university teaching hospital clinic.  

PubMed Central

Between 1977 and 1981, 3089 patients attended the sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic in Zaria, northern Nigeria. The male-to-female ratio of attenders was 6:1. Postpubertal gonorrhoea accounted for 28.1% of cases, non-specific genital infections for 22.4%, and syphilis for 1.2%. Illiteracy, polygamy, the purdah system, widespread prostitution, and inadequate facilities are factors aiding the spread of these diseases in northern Nigeria. PMID:6687822

Bello, C S; Elegba, O Y; Dada, J D

1983-01-01

341

Five-year experience of clinical ethics consultations in a pediatric teaching hospital.  

PubMed

Our retrospective study presents and evaluates clinical ethics consultations (CECs) in pediatrics as a structure for implementing hospital-wide ethics. We performed a descriptive and statistical analysis of clinical ethics decision making and its implementation in pediatric CECs at Zurich University Children's Hospital. Ninety-five CECs were held over 5 years for 80 patients. The care team reached a consensus treatment recommendation after one session in 75 consultations (89 %) and on 82 of 84 ethical issues (98 %) after two or more sessions (11 repeats). Fifty-seven CECs recommended limited treatment and 23 maximal treatment. Team recommendations were agreed outright by parents and/or patient in 59 of 73 consultations (81 %). Initial dissensus yielded to explanatory discussion or repeat CEC in seven consultations (10 %). In a further seven families (10 %), no solution was found within the CEC framework: five (7 %) required involvement of the child protection service, and in two families, the parents took their child elsewhere. Eventual team-parent/patient consensus was reached in 66 of 73 families (90 %) with documented parental/patient decisions (missing data, n?=?11). Patient preference was assessable in ten CECs. Patient autonomy was part of the ethical dilemma in only three CECs. The Zurich clinical ethics structure produced a 98 % intra-team consensus rate in 95 CECs and reduced initial team-parent dissensus from 21 to 10 %. Success depends closely on a standardized CEC protocol and an underlying institutional clinical ethics framework embodying a comprehensive set of transparently articulated values and opinions, with regular evaluation of decisions and their consequences for care teams and families. PMID:24323344

Streuli, Jürg C; Staubli, Georg; Pfändler-Poletti, Marlis; Baumann-Hölzle, Ruth; Ersch, Jörg

2014-05-01

342

Restorative dentistryThe use of real time video magnification for the pre-clinical teaching of crown preparations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate the effect on the undergraduate learning process of using an alternative method designed to enhance the visual demonstration of taper on full veneer crown preparations (better understanding of the value of taper on preparations early in the teaching programme in restorative dentistry).Design A comparison between the conventional teaching of full veneer crown preparations and the same teaching

P B Robinson; J W Lee

2001-01-01

343

P05.04. Essential Hypertension--A Cross-sectional Audit of Naturopathic Management Strategies in a Teaching Clinic  

PubMed Central

Focus Area: Integrative Approaches to Care A cross-sectional audit of patient charts was conducted in the Robert Schad Naturopathic Clinic (RSNC), the largest naturopathic teaching clinic in North America, to assess the management of essential hypertension (EH) compared to recommendations made by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP). Objectives of this study included the assessment of adherence to 2012 CHEP guidelines, a survey of naturopathic modalities and treatments commonly used for EH in the RSNC, an analysis of efficacy of naturopathic interventions to reduce systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and the delivery of specific recommendations to improve EH management at the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine (CCNM) and the RSNC. Four hundred four patient charts were identified using the ICD-10 code assessment of I10 (Essential Hypertension). Two hundred eighteen files met inclusion criteria. Adherence to CHEP guidelines was measured using categories of (1) blood pressure measurements; (2) correct diagnosis/staging; (3) risk assessment, and (4) objective measures (including physical examination and laboratory investigation). Charts also were assessed for use of naturopathic interventions, for measures of SBP and DBP over time, and for laboratory markers of cardiovascular risk. Results demonstrate that common naturopathic modalities used were dietary interventions, lifestyle interventions, nutritional supplementation, and botanical medicine. Less frequently used modalities for the specific treatment of hypertension included traditional Chinese medicine, physical medicine, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, and counseling. Preliminary analysis indicates that supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids, coenzyme Q10, hibiscus, magnesium, hawthorne, and implementation of diet and exercise recommendations were most closely associated with significant reductions in SBP and DBP. Overall, audit data suggest that the RSNC clinical interns and naturopathic doctors fair well at utilizing and documenting a wide array of evidence-based naturopathic interventions with promising improvements in hypertension.

2013-01-01

344

Food Safety Informatics: A Public Health Imperative  

PubMed Central

To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish “near-in-time” or “just-in-time” electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in “real time” can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

Tucker, Cynthia A.; Larkin, Stephanie N.; Akers, Timothy A.

2011-01-01

345

Fractal Image Informatics: from SEM to DEM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we introduce a new branch of Fractal Geometry: Fractal Image Informatics, devoted to the systematic and standardized fractal analysis of images of natural systems. The methods of this discipline are based on the properties of multiscale images of selfaffine fractal surfaces. As proved in the paper, the image inherits the scaling and lacunarity of the surface and of its reflectance distribution [Korvin, 2005]. We claim that the fractal analysis of these images must be done without any smoothing, thresholding or binarization. Two new tools of Fractal Image Informatics, firmagram analysis (FA) and generalized lacunarity (GL), are presented and discussed in details. These techniques are applicable to any kind of image or to any observed positive-valued physical field, and can be used to correlate between images. It will be shown, by a modified Grassberger-Hentschel-Procaccia approach [Phys. Lett. 97A, 227 (1983); Physica 8D, 435 (1983)] that GL obeys the same scaling law as the Allain-Cloitre lacunarity [Phys. Rev. A 44, 3552 (1991)] but is free of the problems associated with gliding boxes. Several applications are shown from Soil Physics, Surface Science, and other fields.

Oleschko, K.; Parrot, J.-F.; Korvin, G.; Esteves, M.; Vauclin, M.; Torres-Argüelles, V.; Salado, C. Gaona; Cherkasov, S.

2008-05-01

346

Informatics for multi-disciplinary ocean sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions at the time and space scales that are relevant to our state of the art research needs. This presentation will address three areas of the informatics of the end-to-end process: sensors and information extraction in the sensing environment; using diverse data for understanding selected ocean processes; and supporting open data initiatives. A National Science Foundation funded Ocean Observations Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing these areas from the perspective of improving interdisciplinary research. The work includes an assessment of Open Data Access with a paper in preparation. Interoperability and sensors is a new activity that couples with European projects, COOPEUS and NeXOS, in looking at sensors and related information systems for a new generation of measurement capability. A working group on synergies of in-situ and satellite remote sensing is analyzing approaches for more effective use of these measurements. This presentation will examine the steps forward for data exchange and for addressing gaps in communication and informatics.

Pearlman, Jay; Delory, Eric; Pissierssens, Peter; Raymond, Lisa; Simpson, Pauline; Waldmann, Christoph; Williams 3rd, Albert; Yoder, Jim

2014-05-01

347

Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches  

PubMed Central

Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

Embi, Peter J.; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

348

Teaching and Assessing Residents' Skills in Managing Heroin Addiction with Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs)  

PubMed Central

Background Heroin abusing patients present a significant challenge. Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs) allow evaluation of residents’ clinical skills. The objective of our study was to examine resident OSCE performance assessing and managing heroin abuse. Methods Evaluation and comparison of heroin-specific communication, assessment and management skills in a five-station PGY3 substance abuse OSCE. Faculty used a four-point Likert scale to assess residents’ skills; standardized patients provided written comments. Results 265 internal and family medicine residents in an urban university hospital participated over five years. In the heroin station, residents’ skills were better (p<0.001 for both comparisons) in communication (mean overall score 3.16±0.51) than in either assessment (mean overall score 2.66±0.60) or management (mean overall score 2.50±0.73). The mean score for assessing specific high risk behaviors was lower than the mean overall assessment score (2.22±1.01 vs. 2.74±.59, p < 0.0001), and the mean score for recommending appropriate harm reduction management strategies was lower than the mean overall management score (2.39±.89 vs. 2.54±.74, p < 0.005). Standardized patients’ comments reflected similar weaknessess in residents’ skills. Conclusions Assessment and management of heroin abuse were more challenging for residents than general communication. Additional training is required for residents to assess and counsel patients about high risk behaviors. PMID:24159905

Parish, Sharon J.; Stein, Melissa R.; Hahn, Steven R.; Goldberg, Uri; Arnsten, Julia H.

2013-01-01

349

The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp CounselorCamp Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students the chance to interact with IU faculty  

E-print Network

Camp Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students: Fr So Jr Sr MS PhD Major/Minor: ____________________________ High School: __________________ Hometown2013 The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp Counselor

Indiana University

350

The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform  

PubMed Central

Improving healthcare quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of healthcare reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and “meaningful use (MU)” of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

Liu, Yueyi I.

2012-01-01

351

Nursing informatics issues and progress in New Zealand.  

PubMed

This paper presents an updated view of progress made in health informatics in New Zealand since 2003 and also highlights current issues facing nursing informatics. The progress made in health informatics in New Zealand since the national health information development "Working to Add Value through E-information" Project was introduced is outlined. A new Health Information Strategy for New Zealand 2005 has been released to guide the use of innovative information to improve the health outcomes of New Zealanders. This strategy reflects the global trends in healthcare related to epidemiological, demographic, system structure, workforce, service delivery changes and the increase in consumer expectations. PMID:17102319

Honey, Michelle; Westbrooke, Lucy

2006-01-01

352

[Integration of a doctor/patient-communication-training into clinical teaching. Examples from the reform-curricula of Heidelberg and Dreden Universities].  

PubMed

It is an important demand of educational reforms to improve the skills of the communication with patients. To reach this goal neither interdisciplinary courses nor tutorials with paper-cases are sufficient. This is the reason why teaching modules including a training to improve doctor-patient-communication were integrated into the reform-curricula at the universities of Heidelberg (Heidelberger Curriculum Medicale, HEICUMED) and Dresden (Dresdner Integrated Patient-Oriented Learning, DIPOL). These modules were originated in cooperation of psychosomatic/psychotherapeutic clinics with representatives of other departments, which provides a chance to integrate psychosomatic issues into the teaching of other disciplines and to promote basic psychosomatic competences. The concept, the realization, and the results of the evaluation of these teaching modules will be described. The evaluation showed that the students rated them as mainly positive, as more effective than traditional learning and that the training improved their self-efficacy related to communicative competences. PMID:12552412

Jünger, Jana; Köllner, Volker

2003-02-01

353

Informatics in radiology: An open-source and open-access cancer biomedical informatics grid annotation and image markup template builder.  

PubMed

In a routine clinical environment or clinical trial, a case report form or structured reporting template can be used to quickly generate uniform and consistent reports. Annotation and image markup (AIM), a project supported by the National Cancer Institute's cancer biomedical informatics grid, can be used to collect information for a case report form or structured reporting template. AIM is designed to store, in a single information source, (a) the description of pixel data with use of markups or graphical drawings placed on the image, (b) calculation results (which may or may not be directly related to the markups), and (c) supplemental information. To facilitate the creation of AIM annotations with data entry templates, an AIM template schema and an open-source template creation application were developed to assist clinicians, image researchers, and designers of clinical trials to quickly create a set of data collection items, thereby ultimately making image information more readily accessible. PMID:22556315

Mongkolwat, Pattanasak; Channin, David S; Kleper, Vladimir; Rubin, Daniel L

2012-01-01

354

Research on informatization evaluation and development path of clothing industry in Shandong Peninsula based on Analytical Hierarchy Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

Set the weight by Analytical Hierarchy Process, establish informatization evaluation system, study the current situation and problems of clothing industry informatization in Shandong Peninsula. Propose countermeasures accordingly, including formulating integral planning of informatization, choosing informatization construction path suitable to clothing enterprise, grasping the key and difficulty of informatization construction simultaneously.

Yang Xue-kun

2011-01-01

355

Practice and Theory of Research-Oriented Teaching in Advanced Mathematics Based on E-Learning  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of educational informatization and educational resources networked, concepts and methods of advanced mathematics teaching has undergone significant changes. People paid more attention to E-Learning which increasingly has been applied in practice. This paper analyzes the connotations of E-Learning and research-oriented teaching, points out that research-oriented teaching in advanced mathematics based on E-Learning is a new teaching mode

Dajin Yu

2010-01-01

356

Medical student's benefit rates from the clinical teaching rounds and its associated factors in Tehran University of Medical Sciences in the year 2010.  

PubMed

Among the various methods of clinical teaching, rounds and grand rounds are considered as the gold standards. Clinical round includes some standard components and it plays an effective role in student's learning process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the content of teaching rounds in 40 clinical wards in 4 medical teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, and also to assess the learners benefit rate from these programs and determine the factors affecting those. This is a cross sectional, descriptive and analytical study conducted on 318 medical learners in different grades, about the content of clinical rounds. The data collection tool was a questionnaire made by researchers. The validity of the questionnaire according to experts opinions and the reliability with a pilot study conducted on 30 cases were confirmed (?=0.826). Data entered into the SPSS software and for analysis Chi-square, Student's t-test, ANOVA and linear regression analysis tests were used. In this study 20 subjects related to clinical rounds content were assessed. The highest score was related to the subject of diagnosis and the lowest one was related to legal issues. Overall, the mean score of the learner's benefit rate to this method was 3.52 out of five. The level of learner's benefit rate was above the average and the benefit rates according to educational grade, number of the students and faculties were significantly different (P<0.05). Average of the benefit rate among residents were significantly higher than the other medical trainees (P<0.05). In conclusion, in understudied clinical rounds, there has been more emphasized on history taking, clinical examinations and diagnosis subjects, and Issues like: accountability, health economy, patient's nutrition, non-drug treatments and medical legal issues are less considered in the studied rounds. PMID:24442546

Razavi, Seyed Mansour; Mahmoudi, Jaber; Hatmi, Zinat Nadia; Shirazi, Mandana

2013-01-01

357

Cost-outcome description of clinical pharmacist interventions in a university teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Pharmacist interventions are one of the pivotal parts of a clinical pharmacy service within a hospital. This study estimates the cost avoidance generated by pharmacist interventions due to the prevention of adverse drug events (ADE). The types of interventions identified are also analysed. Methods Interventions recorded by a team of hospital pharmacists over a one year time period were included in the study. Interventions were assigned a rating score, determined by the probability that an ADE would have occurred in the absence of an intervention. These scores were then used to calculate cost avoidance. Net cost benefit and cost benefit ratio were the primary outcomes. Categories of interventions were also analysed. Results A total cost avoidance of €708,221 was generated. Input costs were calculated at €81,942. This resulted in a net cost benefit of €626,279 and a cost benefit ratio of 8.64: 1. The most common type of intervention was the identification of medication omissions, followed by dosage adjustments and requests to review therapies. Conclusion This study provides further evidence that pharmacist interventions provide substantial cost avoidance to the healthcare payer. There is a serious issue of patient’s regular medication being omitted on transfer to an inpatient setting in Irish hospitals. PMID:24742158

2014-01-01

358

Farm animal genomics and informatics: an update  

PubMed Central

Farm animal genomics is of interest to a wide audience of researchers because of the utility derived from understanding how genomics and proteomics function in various organisms. Applications such as xenotransplantation, increased livestock productivity, bioengineering new materials, products and even fabrics are several reasons for thriving farm animal genome activity. Currently mined in rapidly growing data warehouses, completed genomes of chicken, fish and cows are available but are largely stored in decentralized data repositories. In this paper, we provide an informatics primer on farm animal bioinformatics and genome project resources which drive attention to the most recent advances in the field. We hope to provide individuals in biotechnology and in the farming industry with information on resources and updates concerning farm animal genome projects. PMID:16275782

Fadiel, Ahmed; Anidi, Ifeanyi; Eichenbaum, Kenneth D.

2005-01-01

359

A spatial informatics for aged care.  

PubMed

Population ageing is the demographic process that characterises the first half of the twenty-first century. Australia's population is already ageing and the states and territories are ageing at different rates. Our understanding of the dementias remains limited and diagnosis in primary care settings is poor. Locating where older people with dementia are and how they are coping is an emerging need in health information management. In this paper we discuss how a spatially informed health information management system could support population ageing and the disconnected systems that address ageing. We illustrate this with examples from our work to show how spatial informatics can advance our understanding of and response to the implications of population ageing. PMID:23823296

Robertson, Hamish; Nicholas, Nick; Georgiou, Andrew; Johnson, Julie; Travaglia, Joanne

2013-01-01

360

Antecedents of the People and Organizational Aspects of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Abstract People and organizational issues are critical in both implementing medical informatics systems and in dealing with the altered organizations that new systems often create. The people and organizational issues area—like medical informatics itself—is a blend of many disciplines. The academic disciplines of psychology, sociology, social psychology, social anthropology, organizational behavior and organizational development, management, and cognitive sciences are rich with research with significant potential to ease the introduction and on-going use of information technology in today's complex health systems. These academic areas contribute research data and core information for better understanding of such issues as the importance of and processes for creating future direction; managing a complex change process; effective strategies for involving individuals and groups in the informatics effort; and effectively managing the altered organization. This article reviews the behavioral and business referent disciplines that can potentially contribute to improved implementations and on-going management of change in the medical informatics arena. PMID:9067874

Lorenzi, Nancy M.; Riley, Robert T.; Blyth, Andrew J. C.; Southon, Gray; Dixon, Bradley J.

1997-01-01

361

A Short History of Medical Informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina  

PubMed Central

The health informatics profession in Bosnia and Herzegovina has relatively long history. Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data, thirty years from the establishment of Society for Medical Informatics BiH, twenty years from the establishment of the Scientific journal “Acta Informatica Medica (Acta Inform Med”, indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central Scopus, Embase, etc.), twenty years on from the establishment of the first Cathedra for Medical Informatics on Biomedical Faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, ten years on from the introduction of the method of “Distance learning” in medical curriculum. The author of this article is eager to mark the importance of the above mentioned Anniversaries in the development of Health informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina and have attempted, very briefly, to present the most significant events and persons with essential roles throughout this period. PMID:24648621

Masic, Izet

2014-01-01

362

Cancer Informatics 2009:8 1930 19 METHODOLOGY SPECIAL ISSUE  

E-print Network

. Email: kei.cheung@yale.edu Copyright in this article, its metadata, and any supplementary data is held.S.A. 3 Center for Medical Informatics, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, U.S.A. 4

Kidd, Kenneth

363

New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.  

PubMed

Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simi?, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

2014-01-01

364

Clinical Features of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu  

PubMed Central

Background: Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children world-wide with the highest incidence in the developing countries. The persistence and effect of this condition require a study of the features and characteristics of the disease especially, within any (each) locality in order to offer possible control solutions. Aim: To determine, the clinical and social characteristics associated with AGE among children seen in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Subjects and Methods: A hospital-based population study in which children admitted in the children emergency room of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital whose parents/caregivers gave their consent were enrolled, over a 7 month period. Appropriate statistical tools: Chi-square, t-tests, correlation and logistic regression were used to determine significant values and associations. Results: A total of 76 children with AGE were enrolled; 69.7% (53/76) were males. The mean age of the subjects was 11.3 (6.6) months. Majority 94.7%, (72/76) of cases of AGE occurred in children less than 24 months, with children 6-11 months contributing the highest percentage 42%, (32/76). The study population was predominantly urban dwellers; 78.9%, (60/76, P = 0.40) and water cistern constituted 77.6% (58/76) of waste disposal method. Those who had potable water supply were 23.7%, (18/76, P = 0.30) and 19.7% of the children were exclusively breast fed. Fever and vomiting were the commonest associated symptoms, occurring in 82.9% (63/76) and 73.7% (56/76) of the subjects respectively. A good percentage of the subjects 64.5%, (49/76) had ORS before presentation. Conclusion: AGE is more common in older infants among those who were not exclusively breast-fed and the severity was unrelated to place of domicile and waste disposal habits. PMID:24116314

Ezeonwu, BU; Ibeneme, CA; Aneke, F; Oguonu, T

2013-01-01

365

Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal  

PubMed Central

Objective With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. Methods The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. Results and discussion The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. Conclusions Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

2013-01-01

366

Psycho-informatics: Big Data shaping modern psychometrics.  

PubMed

For the first time in history, it is possible to study human behavior on great scale and in fine detail simultaneously. Online services and ubiquitous computational devices, such as smartphones and modern cars, record our everyday activity. The resulting Big Data offers unprecedented opportunities for tracking and analyzing behavior. This paper hypothesizes the applicability and impact of Big Data technologies in the context of psychometrics both for research and clinical applications. It first outlines the state of the art, including the severe shortcomings with respect to quality and quantity of the resulting data. It then presents a technological vision, comprised of (i) numerous data sources such as mobile devices and sensors, (ii) a central data store, and (iii) an analytical platform, employing techniques from data mining and machine learning. To further illustrate the dramatic benefits of the proposed methodologies, the paper then outlines two current projects, logging and analyzing smartphone usage. One such study attempts to thereby quantify severity of major depression dynamically; the other investigates (mobile) Internet Addiction. Finally, the paper addresses some of the ethical issues inherent to Big Data technologies. In summary, the proposed approach is about to induce the single biggest methodological shift since the beginning of psychology or psychiatry. The resulting range of applications will dramatically shape the daily routines of researches and medical practitioners alike. Indeed, transferring techniques from computer science to psychiatry and psychology is about to establish Psycho-Informatics, an entire research direction of its own. PMID:24529915

Markowetz, Alexander; B?aszkiewicz, Konrad; Montag, Christian; Switala, Christina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

2014-04-01

367

Framework design and development of an informatics architecture for a systems biology approach to traumatic brain injury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a problem of major medical and socioeconomic significance, although the pathogenesis of its sequelae is not completely understood. As part of a large, multi-center project to study mild and moderate TBI, a database and informatics system to integrate a wide-range of clinical, biological, and imaging data is being developed. This database constitutes a systems-based approach to TBI with the goals of developing and validating biomarker panels that might be used to diagnose brain injury, predict clinical outcome, and eventually develop improved therapeutics. This paper presents the architecture for an informatics system that stores the disparate data types and permits easy access to the data for analysis.

Alaoui, Adil; Kim, Dongkyu; Levine, Betty; Cleary, Kevin; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy

2010-03-01

368

Guideposts to the future--an agenda for nursing informatics.  

PubMed

As new directions and priorities emerge in health care, nursing informatics leaders must prepare to guide the profession appropriately. To use an analogy, where a road bends or changes directions, guideposts indicate how drivers can stay on course. The AMIA Nursing Informatics Working Group (NIWG) produced this white paper as the product of a meeting convened: 1) to describe anticipated nationwide changes in demographics, health care quality, and health care informatics; 2) to assess the potential impact of genomic medicine and of new threats to society; 3) to align AMIA NIWG resources with emerging priorities; and 4) to identify guideposts in the form of an agenda to keep the NIWG on course in light of new opportunities. The anticipated societal changes provide opportunities for nursing informatics. Resources described below within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Committee for Health and Vital Statistics (NCVHS) can help to align AMIA NIWG with emerging priorities. The guideposts consist of priority areas for action in informatics, nursing education, and research. Nursing informatics professionals will collaborate as full participants in local, national, and international efforts related to the guideposts in order to make significant contributions that empower patients and providers for safer health care. PMID:17068358

McCormick, Kathleen A; Delaney, Connie J; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Effken, Judith A; Kendrick, Kathie; Murphy, Judy; Skiba, Diane J; Warren, Judith J; Weaver, Charlotte A; Weiner, Betsy; Westra, Bonnie L

2007-01-01

369

The 4th Decade of Cancer Informatics — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

370

Desirable Features of a National Cancer Informatics Program — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

371

Clinical profile & outcome of H1N1 infected pregnant women in a tertiary care teaching hospital of northern India  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: H1N1 influenza is a recognized cause of febrile respiratory infection worldwide. There are not many studies to show its impact on pregnancy. In the present study we aimed to assess clinical characteristics, obstetric and perinatal outcome of pregnant women with H1N1 infection. Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 24 pregnant women microbiologically positive for H1N1 were included. Maternal characteristics and outcome were recorded. Perinatal outcome which was defined as presence of any of the indicators such as abortion, preterm delivery, intrauterine death and neo natal death was noted. Results: The mean age of the study group was 25.2 ± 3 yr with a mean gestational age of 34.9 ± 4.6 wk. Six patients (25%) had associated co-morbidities. Nine patients (37.5%) presented within 48 h of onset of symptoms and 15 (62.5%) reported after 48 h. In 17 (70.83%) patients treatment was delayed by >48 h. ICU admission was needed in 20.8 per cent patients and mortality rates was 8.3 per cent. There were seven cases of adverse perinatal outcome. Interpretation & conclusions: The presenting symptoms of pregnant women with H1N1 were similar to that of general population. Acquiring infection in late trimester, late initiation of antiviral treatment and presence of co-morbid illness were high risk factors for developing critical illness. Pregnant women with suspected H1N1 influenza should be started on antiviral therapy at the earliest. This is likely to help reduce the ICU admission rates and mortalities in this group of women. PMID:24820841

Singhal, Seema; Sarda, Nivedita; Arora, Renu; Punia, Nikky; Jain, Anil

2014-01-01

372

A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

2012-02-01

373

Criterion-referenced evaluation of day one clinical competencies of veterinary students: VOLES-the VMTH (Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital) Online Evaluation System.  

PubMed

This article describes an extensive online criterion-referenced evaluation system for the assessment of veterinary students' achievement during their final year's Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (or equivalent) clinical education. Data are reported for the 2001 to 2009 University of California at Davis veterinary graduates, for a total of more than 1,100 students. These criterion-referenced evaluations extensively document the level of clinical skills attained and demonstrated during the individual clinical rotations that comprise the fourth-year curriculum. On average, in each of the 17,500 clinical rotations undertaken during this time period, student performance was assessed in at least 11 separate areas of skills, knowledge, and professional attributes. This provided more than 200,000 criterion-referenced judgments of the individual clinical attributes of graduates over nine years. The system is based on a previously detailed and validated definition of the skills, knowledge, and professional attributes that students should have demonstrated before graduation. The extensive database that this system has provided has established that this system, termed VOLES (VMTH [Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital] On-Line Evaluation System), is an effective tool to assess the clinical capabilities of veterinary students and their achievement of the "Day One" skills required for entering clinical practice. These expected proficiencies are balanced according to the differing expectations that each area of veterinary clinical practice demands. PMID:22430080

Zeck, Steven; Wall, Judy A; Smith, Bradford P; Wilson, W David; Walsh, Donal A

2012-01-01

374

Informatics Methods to Enable Sharing of Quantitative Imaging Research Data  

PubMed Central

Introduction The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Quantitative Research Network (QIN) is a collaborative research network whose goal is to share data, algorithms and research tools to accelerate quantitative imaging research. A challenge is the variability in tools and analysis platforms used in quantitative imaging. Our goal was to understand the extent of this variation and to develop an approach to enable sharing data and to promote reuse of quantitative imaging data in the community. Methods We performed a survey of the current tools in use by the QIN member sites for representation and storage of their QIN research data including images, image meta-data and clinical data. We identified existing systems and standards for data sharing and their gaps for the QIN use case. We then proposed a system architecture to enable data sharing and collaborative experimentation within the QIN. Results There area variety of tools currently used by each QIN institution. We developed a general information system architecture to support the QIN goals. We also describe the remaining architecture gaps we are developing to enable members to share research images and image meta-data across the network. Conclusions As a research network, the QIN will stimulate quantitative imaging research by pooling data, algorithms and research tools. However, there are gaps in current functional requirements that will need to be met by future informatics development. Special attention must be given to the technical requirements needed to translate these methods into the clinical research workflow to enable validation and qualification of these novel imaging biomarkers. PMID:22770688

Levy, Mia A.; Freymann, John B.; Kirby, Justin S.; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Berglund, Anders E.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Tan, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaotao; Casavant, Thomas L.; Brown, Bartley J.; Braun, Terry A.; Dekker, Andre; Roelofs, Erik; Mountz, James M.; Boada, Fernando; Laymon, Charles; Oborski, Matt; Rubin, Daniel L

2012-01-01

375

DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPUTERIZED INFORMATICS TOOL TO FACILITATE CLINICIAN ACCESS TO A STATES PRESCRIPTION DRUG MONITORING PROGRAM DATABASE.  

E-print Network

??BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A COMPUTERIZED INFORMATICS TOOL TO FACILITATE CLINICIAN ACCESS TO A STATES PRESCRIPTION DRUG MONITORING PROGRAM DATABASE STEVEN JOHN WHITE… (more)

White, Steven John

2013-01-01

376

Informatics critical to public health surveillance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Public health surveillance is the ongoing, systematic collection, analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of data regarding a health-related event for use in public health action to reduce morbidity and mortality and to improve health by effective response management and coordination. As new pressures for early detection of disease outbreaks have arisen, particularly for outbreaks of possible bioterrorism (BT) origin, and as electronic health data have become increasingly available, so has the demand for public health situation awareness systems. Although these systems are valuable for early warning of public health emergencies, there remains the cost of developing and managing such large and complex systems and of investigating inevitable false alarms. Whether these systems are dependable and cost effective enough and can demonstrate a significant and indispensable role in detection or prevention of mass casualty events of BT origin remains to be proven. This article will focus on the complexities of design, analysis, implementation and evaluation of public health surveillance and situation awareness systems and, in some cases, will discuss the key technologies being studied in Center for Biosecurity Informatics Research at University of Texas, Health Science Center at Houston.

Mirhaji, Parsa; Zhang, Jiajie; Smith, Jack W.; Madjid, Mohammad; Casscells, Samuel W.; Lillibridge, Scott R.

2003-09-01

377

National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 162nd NCAB/BSA Meeting  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 1st Joint NCAB/BSA Meeting George A. Komatsoulis, Ph.D. Director (interim) NCIP and the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) • Activities encompassed

378

76 FR 7867 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid® (caBIG®) Support...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid[supreg...data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes...approval. Proposed Collection: Title: cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid...

2011-02-11

379

Welcome! ...from all the staff in the Department of Informatics Welcome to the Department of Informatics, to the School of Engineering and Informatics, and to  

E-print Network

Informatics. Choosing a degree subject and a place to study are important decisions, and we are pleased for and contribute in seminars, exercise classes and practicals: they will help you deepen your understanding and help us make the right decisions over the coming year. We hope that you will enjoy and make the most

Sussex, University of

380

Shared Resources Reported at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers in 2013 Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Center Institution Resource Name Director(s) Shared Resources Reported at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers in 2013 Informatics University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Michigan Cancer Informatics Manion, Frank Tumor Imaging Francis, Isaac Galban, Craig University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Cancer Informatics Services (CIS) Becich, Michael Chandran, Uma USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Southern California Cancer Research Informatics Core (CRIC) Vaishnav, Aarti UW Paul P.

381

Mammotome® biopsy system for the resection of breast lesions: Clinical experience in two high-volume teaching hospitals  

PubMed Central

Ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is regarded as a feasible, effective, minimally invasive and safe method for the removal of benign breast lesions, without the occurrence of serious complications. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome® biopsy system in the treatment of breast lesions. The clinical outcomes of 3,681 patients with breast lesions were evaluated following excisions by ultrasound-guided VABB in two high-volume teaching hospitals. From January 2008 to December 2012, a total of 4,867 ultrasound-guided VABB procedures were performed in the 3,681 patients, who had a mean age of 37.8 years (range, 16–73 years). The parameters examined in this analysis included lesion size, lesion location in the inner breast, Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) ultrasound category and histopathological diagnosis. Ultrasonography follow-up was performed at 3–6 month intervals in order to assess recurrence. The size of the investigated lesions ranged between 6 and 62 mm and a histopathological diagnosis was made in 100% of cases. The results indicated that the majority of specimens (98.89%) were benign. On average, the ultrasound-guided VABB was performed in 10.3 min (range, 7.5–43 min) and the mean number of cores removed in the procedure was 8.1 (range, 3–32). A complete excision was achieved in the majority of cases (99.7%). The presence of a hematoma was the most common complication following the biopsy, and was observed in 27.5% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 25.5 months (range, 1–60 months), during which the rate of recurrence was 4.4%. The results indicated that ultrasound-guided VABB using the Mammotome biopsy system is an effective and safe procedure that is able to rapidly remove the majority of benign breast lesions using a small incision and without the occurrence of scarring or complications. PMID:24137261

JIANG, YANGPING; LAN, HUANRONG; YE, QIAN; JIN, KETAO; ZHU, MIN; HU, XIAOYAN; TENG, LISONG; CAO, FEILIN; LIN, XIANFANG

2013-01-01

382

Situated cognition and cognitive apprenticeship: a model for teaching and learning clinical skills in a technologically rich and authentic learning environment.  

PubMed

The acquisition of a range of diverse clinical skills is a central feature of the pre-registration nursing curriculum. Prior to exposure to clinical practice, it is essential that learners have the opportunity to practise and develop such skills in a safe and controlled environment under the direction and supervision of clinical experts. However, the competing demands of the HE nursing curriculum coupled with an increased number of learners have resulted in a reduced emphasis on traditional apprenticeship learning. This paper presents an alternative model for clinical skills teaching that draws upon the principles of cognitive apprenticeship [Collins, A., Brown, J.S., Newman, S., 1989. Cognitive Apprenticeship: teaching the crafts of reading, writing and mathematics. In: Resnick, L.B. (Ed.) Knowing. Learning and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, New Jersey, pp. 453-494] and situated cognition within a technologically rich and authentic learning environment. It will show how high quality DVD materials illustrating clinical skills performed by expert practitioners have been produced and used in conjunction with CCTV and digital recording technologies to support learning within a pedagogic framework appropriate to skills acquisition. It is argued that this model not only better prepares the student for the time they will spend in the practice setting, but also lays the foundation for the development of a clinically competent practitioner with the requisite physical and cognitive skills who is fit for purpose [UKCC, 1999. Fitness for Practice: The UKCC Commission for Nursing and Midwifery Education. United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting, London]. PMID:16624452

Woolley, Norman N; Jarvis, Yvonne

2007-01-01

383

Governance — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Established in mid-2011 by the NCAB, the IWG is charged with providing strategic guidance and direction on NCI informatics investments that support the Institute’s scientific goals. The IWG provides a venue for identifying high-priority biomedical informatics needs, harmonizing ongoing and proposed informatics projects across NCI programs, both intramural and extramural, and reducing redundancies wherever possible.

384

Research on informatization evaluation and Development Strategy of textile industry in Shandong Peninsula  

Microsoft Academic Search

Set the weight by Analytical Hierarchy Process, establish informatization evaluation system, study the current situation and problems of textile industry informatization in Shandong Peninsula. Propose countermeasures accordingly, including establishing ERP system suitable for textile industry, promoting E-commerce application actively and enhancing supply chain management informatization.

Xue-kun Yang

2010-01-01

385

IHI 2012 CALL FOR PAPERS ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium  

E-print Network

information technology, studies on health informatics in the context of community impact and implicationsIHI 2012 ­ CALL FOR PAPERS 2nd ACM SIGHIT International Health Informatics Symposium January 28 Special Interest Group on Health Informatics (SIGHIT). It is ACM's premier community forum concerned

Xu, Jianliang

386

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David  

E-print Network

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David , Gary Swan, Patrick Lincoln SRI International, Menlo Park, CA Abstract Health informatics is a fertile in health informatics and present high-level ideas about possible approaches using the framework

Ghosh, Shalini

387

Enhancing "Mathematics for Informatics" and its Correlation with Student Pass Rates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, changes in "Mathematics for Informatics" at the Faculty of Organisation and Informatics in the University of Zagreb are described, and correlated with students pass rates. Students at the Faculty work in an interdisciplinary field, studying Informatics within a business context. The main reason for introducing the changes in the…

Divjak, B.; Erjavec, Z.

2008-01-01

388

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2  

E-print Network

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2 , Jaques Reifman, PhD1,3 Trinka. INTRODUCTION Historic advances in medicine and dramatic progress in medical informatics over the last decade of automated monitoring and medical informatics tools. The health care of the soldier of the future, however

389

Ontology-Based Knowledge Discovery and Sharing in Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics  

E-print Network

Ontology-Based Knowledge Discovery and Sharing in Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics: A Brief application in medical and biological areas. Index Terms--bioinformatics; medical informatics; knowledge AND RESEARCH MOTIVATION In medical informatics area, an abundance of digital data has promised a profound

Huang, Jingshan

390

Proposed Design of a Clinical Information System for the Management of Bronchial Asthma  

PubMed Central

This poster categorizes the various applications to aid the management of Pediatric Bronchial Asthma. An attempt is made at classifying the various informatics approaches in this domain. Later, the approach of the proposed Asthma CAMS (Computer Aided Management System) project, being developed by the Child Health Institute and Clinical Informatics Research Group www.cirg.washington.edu at the University of Washington, is discussed.

Huq, S; Karras, BT; Wright, J; Lober, WB; Lozano, P; Zimmerman, FJ

2002-01-01

391

Twelve Tips to Improve Bedside Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasizes the benefits of bedside teaching in medical education. Presents 12 tips to simplify key strategies and describe them in greater depth in order to promote bedside teaching which is an essential method of clinical teaching. (SOE)

Ramani, Subha

2003-01-01

392

A Primer on Aspects of Cognition for Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

As a multidisciplinary field, medical informatics draws on a range of disciplines, such as computer science, information science, and the social and cognitive sciences. The cognitive sciences can provide important insights into the nature of the processes involved in human– computer interaction and help improve the design of medical information systems by providing insight into the roles that knowledge, memory, and strategies play in a variety of cognitive activities. In this paper, the authors survey literature on aspects of medical cognition and provide a set of claims that they consider to be important in medical informatics. PMID:11418539

Patel, Vimla L.; Arocha, Jose F.; Kaufman, David R.

2001-01-01

393

Critical thinking and clinical competence: results of the implementation of student-centered teaching strategies in an advanced practice nurse curriculum.  

PubMed

The nursing profession has advanced dramatically over the past 50 years. People are living longer, technology is advancing at a rapid rate, and patients are presenting more critically ill. The recent move in the US and other countries away from secondary and tertiary care towards primary care will have a dramatic impact on the practice of nursing as the focus of treatment is aimed at prevention and maintenance of health. Budgetary constraints and a shrinking nursing workforce have added additional strain on the ability of nurses to remain clinically competent in this fast-paced healthcare environment. In addition, the demographics of students have shifted, with more adult and ethnically diverse students entering various nursing programs. These changes have compelled schools of nursing worldwide to revise their approach to student education to keep up with the challenge associated with these influences. Terms such as problem-based learning, critical thinking, evidence-based practice, and student-centered teaching strategies have replaced traditional terminology typically linked with education and practice. However, it appears that not all centers of nursing education have embraced the need to change to new methods of teaching and continue to teach as they were taught. This article will detail the approach used to develop and implement problem-based learning in an advanced practice nurse curriculum in the US. The results and recommendations for implementation are discussed based upon student and nurse educator feedback. PMID:17689424

Distler, John W

2007-01-01

394

Efficacy of Individualized Clinical Coaching in a Virtual Reality Classroom for Increasing Teachers' Fidelity of Implementation of Discrete Trial Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discrete-trials teaching (DTT) is an evidence-based practice used in educational programs for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although there is strong demand for preparing teachers to effectively implement DTT, there is a scarcity of published research on such studies. A multiple baseline across participants design was utilized to…

Garland, Krista Vince; Vasquez, Eleazar, III; Pearl, Cynthia

2012-01-01

395

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has shown the benefits of additional anatomical learning and dissection beyond the first year of medical school human gross anatomy, all the way through postgraduate medical training. We have developed an interactive method for teaching eye and orbit anatomy to medical students in their ophthalmology rotation at Duke University…

Kivell, Tracy L.; Doyle, Sara K.; Madden, Richard H.; Mitchell, Terry L.; Sims, Ershela L.

2009-01-01

396

Acute Myocardial Infarction: Clinical Characteristics, Management and Outcome in a Metropolitan Veterans Affairs Medical Center Teaching Hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The influence of race and age on thrombolytic therapy, invasive cardiac procedures and outcomes was assessed in a Veterans Affairs teaching hospital. The influence of Q wave evolution on the use of invasive cardiac procedures and outcome was also assessed.Background. It is not well known how early revascularization procedures for acute myocardial infarction are delivered or influence survival in

Judith K Mickelson; Cynthia M Blum; Jane M Geraci

1997-01-01

397

Composite Patient Reports: A Laboratory Informatics Perspective and Pilot Project for Personalized Medicine and Translational Research  

PubMed Central

Clinical laboratories are a strong and integral partner in personalized health care. Laboratory information systems hold a vast amount of data representing human phenotypes, genotypes, biomarkers, progression of disease and response to therapy. These structured and unstructured free text data are critical for patient care and a resource for personalized medicine and translational research. Laboratory data are integrated into many electronic medical records that provide “summary reports” and “trending” to visualize longitudinal patient data. However, these generic reports are not sufficient to manage complex sub-specialty patients. There is an urgent need for end-user driven composite reports for the care of such patients. Using multiple myeloma as a model, this pilot was performed to assess the needs of stakeholders and create a customized report. This laboratory informatics solution is delivered at the point of care through the hospital EMR. Future work will involve further integration with hospital systems to promote clinical decision support and translational research. PMID:21347168

Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Delgado, Julio C.; Jackson, Brian R.; Tricot, Guido J.; Hill, Harry R.

2009-01-01

398

Composite patient reports: a laboratory informatics perspective and pilot project for personalized medicine and translational research.  

PubMed

Clinical laboratories are a strong and integral partner in personalized health care. Laboratory information systems hold a vast amount of data representing human phenotypes, genotypes, biomarkers, progression of disease and response to therapy. These structured and unstructured free text data are critical for patient care and a resource for personalized medicine and translational research. Laboratory data are integrated into many electronic medical records that provide "summary reports" and "trending" to visualize longitudinal patient data. However, these generic reports are not sufficient to manage complex sub-specialty patients. There is an urgent need for end-user driven composite reports for the care of such patients. Using multiple myeloma as a model, this pilot was performed to assess the needs of stakeholders and create a customized report. This laboratory informatics solution is delivered at the point of care through the hospital EMR. Future work will involve further integration with hospital systems to promote clinical decision support and translational research. PMID:21347168

Gundlapalli, Adi V; Delgado, Julio C; Jackson, Brian R; Tricot, Guido J; Hill, Harry R

2009-01-01

399

Measuring the effectiveness of small-group and web-based training methods in teaching clinical communication: a case comparison study.  

PubMed

Current teaching approaches in human and veterinary medicine across North America, Europe, and Australia include lectures, group discussions, feedback, role-play, and web-based training. Increasing class sizes, changing learning preferences, and economic and logistical challenges are influencing the design and delivery of communication skills in veterinary undergraduate education. The study's objectives were to (1) assess the effectiveness of small-group and web-based methods for teaching communication skills and (2) identify which training method is more effective in helping students to develop communication skills. At the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM), 96 students were randomly assigned to one of three groups (control, web, or small-group training) in a pre-intervention and post-intervention group design. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) was used to measure communication competence within and across the intervention and control groups. Reliability of the OSCEs was determined by generalizability theory to be 0.65 (pre-intervention OSCE) and 0.70 (post-intervention OSCE). Study results showed that (1) small-group training was the most effective teaching approach in enhancing communication skills and resulted in students scoring significantly higher on the post-intervention OSCE compared to the web-based and control groups, (2) web-based training resulted in significant though considerably smaller improvement in skills than small-group training, and (3) the control group demonstrated the lowest mean difference between the pre-intervention/post-intervention OSCE scores, reinforcing the need to teach communication skills. Furthermore, small-group training had a significant effect in improving skills derived from the initial phase of the consultation and skills related to giving information and planning. PMID:23975067

Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Vallevand, Andrea; Violato, Claudio; Hecker, Kent G

2013-01-01

400

From a time standard for medical informatics to a controlled language for health.  

PubMed

CEN ENV 12381 is a European Prestandard focusing on formal representation and explicit reference of temporal information in healthcare informatics and telematics. One of its merits is not just the possibility to represent natural language expressions containing time-related information in a structured way, but also to give some mechanisms on how clinical language itself can be used to convey meaning unambiguously. As such, CEN ENV 12381 introduces the notion of 'controlled language use' in the domain of healthcare. In this paper the principles behind controlled language design and use are explained. Through a detailed study of the inconsistencies and ambiguities that arise when interpreting Snomed procedure terms in the framework of the Galen-In-Use project, it is shown that most of them can be explained as a violation of sound term-formation principles. A proposal is made to develop a controlled language for health and to use it in subsequent versions of coding and classification systems. It is expected that such an endeavour will lead to a more effective application of linguistic engineering in areas such as automatic knowledge acquisition, automatic translation, and terminology validation in the domain of healthcare informatics. PMID:9600408

Ceusters, W; Steurs, F; Zanstra, P; Van Der Haring, E; Rogers, J

1998-02-01

401

Medical informatics academia and industry: a symbiotic relationship that may assure survival of both through health care reform.  

PubMed Central

There are often clear lines drawn identifying the demilitarized zone between medical informatics academics and industry. Academics were "pure" intellectuals sequestered in ivory towers that effectively shielded them from the realities of the world. Industry has historically focused on creating effective products that produce financial return to the corporation. Both the paradigms of academia and industry are quickly becoming dinosaurs in the era of health care reform where both medical informatics academia and industry are under increasing pressure to develop and prove that medical informatics has a positive impact on health care both in terms of the quality of care as well as cost. Unfortunately, neither academia or industry alone are going to be able to successfully complete this task. The purpose of this paper is to describe such a collaborative effort that has produced a computerized decision support system for the management of mechanical ventilation in patients with the Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) that is now installed and supported on three different commercial CIS platforms. This collaborative effort has allowed us to successfully mount a large multi-center clinical trial designed to determine efficacy. PMID:8563277

East, T. D.; Wallace, C. J.; Franklin, M. A.; Kinder, T.; Sailors, R. M.; Carlson, D.; Bradshaw, R.; Morris, A. H.

1995-01-01

402

A materials informatics approach for crystal chemistry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis addresses one of the fundamental questions in materials crystal chemistry, namely why do atoms arrange themselves in the way they do? The ability to broadly design and predict new phases [i.e. crystal structures] can be partly met using concepts that employ phase homologies. Homologous series of compounds are those that seem chemically diverse but can be expressed in terms of a mathematical formula that is capable of producing each chemical member in that crystal structure. A well-established strategy to help discover new compounds -- or at least to try to develop chemical design strategies for discovery -- is to search, organize and classify homologous compounds from known data. These classification schemes are developed with the hope that they can provide sufficient insight to help us forecast with some certainty, specific new phases or compounds. Yet, while the classification schemes (over a dozen have been reported in the last 50 years) have proved to be instructive, mostly in hindsight, but they have had limited impact, if at all, on the a priori design of materials chemistry. The aim of this research project is to develop a totally new approach to the study of chemical complexity in materials science using the tools of information theory and data science, which link diverse and high dimensional data derived from physical modeling and experiments. A very large scale binary AB2 crystallographic database is used as a data platform to develop a new data mining/informatics protocol based on high dimensional recursive partitioning schemes coupled to information theoretic measures to: (1) Identify which type of structure prototype is preferred over another for a given chemistry of compound; (2) discover new classification schemes of structure/chemistry/property relationships that classical homologies do not detect and finally we; (3) Extract and organize the underlying design rules for the formation of a given structure by quantitatively assessing the influence of multidimensional electronic structure attributes. Finally some applications of this new approach are demonstrated; including new ways for linking first principles calculations to crystal structure prediction and group theory to crystal structure transition.

Kong, Chang Sun

403

SCHOOL OF Informatics and Computing January 2011On the Move  

E-print Network

reflects excellent growth in bio- informatics, complex systems, cyber-infrastruc- ture, and security, broadest, and most exciting academic units in the computing and information technology field. The mission, human-computer interaction, and security. We are known for our internationally leading research in areas

Indiana University

404

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS 1 Guest Editorial  

E-print Network

, will be obtained thanks to electronic and software-based systems [9]). A new factor, multimedia and telematics in vehicles, is emerging. This domain includes systems that support information exchanges inside a vehicleIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL INFORMATICS 1 Guest Editorial Special Section on In-vehicle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

www.soic.indiana.edu/career INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING  

E-print Network

School of Informatics and Computing requires all participants in the recruiting program to conduct them processes. Participation in the recruiting program is a privilege, revocable without written notification or revoked, and if I repeat this behavior more than once, I could lose access to all recruiting privileges

Menczer, Filippo

406

Informatics http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/home/pxs  

E-print Network

Advanced Tools for UML: now and in the future Perdita Stevens Division of Informatics University of Edinburgh http://www.dcs.ed.ac.uk/home/pxs #12; Objectives At the end of this tutorial, participants will; What can commercial UML tools help with now? #15; the mechanics of drawing and exporting UML diagrams

Stevens, Perdita

407

Informatics, Development, and Education: The Case of China.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of computers and new information technology in developing countries focuses on China. Highlights include information technology as a tool for national development or as a tool for dependency; Chinese informatics policy; computers in Chinese secondary education; the development of educational software; teacher training; and computer…

Makrakis, Vasilios; Yuan-tu, Liu

1993-01-01

408

Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services  

E-print Network

and imaging technologies. Our future as a specialty is dependent on integrating these informatics solutions (1­3), natural organic changes, or accelerated technological advances. The economics of health care presenting themselves in parallel. There are new and exciting information technologies (ITs) to offer our

Rubin, Daniel L.

409

A stage-based model of personal informatics systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

People strive to obtain self-knowledge. A class of systems called personal informatics is appearing that help people collect and reflect on personal information. However, there is no comprehensive list of problems that users experience using these systems, and no guidance for making these systems more effective. To address this, we conducted surveys and interviews with people who collect and reflect

Ian Li; Anind K. Dey; Jodi Forlizzi

2010-01-01

410

Medical informatics business process reengineering methodology and tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

The redesign of business processes enables major improvements to be achieved in performance, cost, quality, and technical support services. Medical informatics will play a vital role in taking a systematic approach of using information technology to provide health care industry solutions. Several health care management consulting surveys estimate that on a national basis annual cost reductions of more than $36

J. Kaikai

1995-01-01

411

Informatics and Secondary Education in the Netherlands Karl de Leeuw  

E-print Network

their completion of grade 8. By then, it is decided whether they should focus on practical, or vocational training for examination as laid down by the government, the training and certification of informatics teachers examination,3 and the scope and depth of training depends in large measure on the understanding

Ponse, Alban

412

GLOBAL BIODIVERSITY INFORMATICS: SETTING THE SCENE FOR A \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in information and communication technology are allowing new experiences in the integration, analysis and visualization of biodiversity information, and are leading to development of a new field of research, biodiversity informatics. Although this field has great potential in diverse realms, including basic biology, human economics, and public health, much of this potential remains to be explored. The success

V. P. CANHOS; S. SOUZA; R. GIOVANNI; D. A. L. CANHOS

2004-01-01

413

The Impact of Grid Computing in Biomedical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This presentation gives a brief review of current uses of grid architecture in biomedical sciences. We present some of the features available in the definition of grid architecture that are key to provide new informatics solutions to serious road blocks in biomedical and translational sciences. Finally we give a more detailed description of selected research projects using grid architectures for

Julio C. Facelli

2008-01-01

414

Identifying a Prudent Informatics Praxis for Public Health Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tools afforded by biomedical informatics enable not only the critique of modern global intervention strategies but to offer strategies for improving sustainable health care. Often, short-term medical care trips break raise ethical concerns. The concept of 'duffle bag medicine' is introduced as ineffectual health care trips with cultural, social, and environmental flaws. Communication is identified as the mechanism through

Victor T. Nwankwo

415

Pre-School Teachers' Informatics and Information Literacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The life and activities of every man in the period of transition from the second into the third millennium have been marked by epochal changes which appear as the consequence of scientific and technological revolution dominated by highly developed information and communication technology. Informatics and information education based on information…

Tatkovic, Nevenka; Ruzic, Maja; Pecaric, Dilda

2006-01-01

416

The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform  

E-print Network

reducing cost has become a high priority. There has been a push for Accountable Care Organizations, whichThe Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform Yueyi I. Liu, MD, PhD, Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Improving health care quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of health care

Rubin, Daniel L.

417

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net  

E-print Network

electronic Journal of Health Informatics www.eJHI.net 2012; Vol 7(2):e12 Aged Care IT in Australia of Wollongong Abstract This paper reviews the development of aged care IT innovations in Australia in the past decade. It starts with a brief description of the establishment of the Aged Care eConnect project

Yu, Ping

418

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes: different-cameras). · Context ­ pervasive watching systems for Health Smart Homes ­ detection of neuro-degenerative diseases (e ­ model of elderly persons activity in Health Smart Homes ­ evaluation of actimetric perseveration

Fouquet, Yannick

419

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes  

E-print Network

Pervasive informatics and persistent actimetric information in health smart homes Yannick Fouquet (arrows) for localizing dependent people in a health smart home (left) & pressure sensors (right: FSA Seat integrated smart home (HsH). In general, the underlying principle of the HsH consists in continuously

Fouquet, Yannick

420

Department of Computer Science Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 6.2 Computation of values for bigger games . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 7 API of mathematics. However, people have been playing games for ages. It is a natural human behaviour and our basicDepartment of Computer Science Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Comenius University

Oxford, University of

421

An Abridged History of Medical Informatics Education in Europe  

PubMed Central

This contribution presents the development of medical informatics education in Europe. It does not discuss all developments that took place. Rather it discerns several themes that indicate the progress in the field, starting from the initiation phase to the final quality control phase. PMID:24648617

Hasman, Arie; Mantas, John; Zarubina, Tatyana

2014-01-01

422

Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 2012-2013 Committee Assignments  

E-print Network

Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 2012-2013 Committee Assignments 10/1/12 Departmental Management Committee Mark Craven (Ch), Eneida Mendonça, David Page, Jude Shavlik Biostatistics TrainingMets (Arzoomanian to propose change to Rathouz) Biostatistics Shared Resources KyungMann Kim (til 12

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

423

Informatics: The Driving Force for Economy and Science  

E-print Network

and intercultural communication. Perspectives The Master's program prepares you for research-oriented careers in research, students normally do a PhD in a cutting-edge area of informatics, e.g. medical image proces- sing research with industry. Reasons for Studying at the TUM Competence: one of the largest and most important

Cengarle, María Victoria

424

Medical Informatics Education : The University of Utah Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

The University of Utah has been educating health professionals in medical informatics since 1964. Over the 35 years since the program's inception, 272 graduate students have studied in the department. Most students have been male (80 percent) and have come from the United States (75 percent). Students entering the program have had diverse educational backgrounds, most commonly in medicine, engineering,

Gregory A Patton; Reed M Gardner

1999-01-01

425

Toward an Informatics Research Agenda : Key People and Organizational Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

As we have advanced in medical informatics and created many impressive innovations, we also have learned that technologic developments are not sufficient to bring the value of computer and information technologies to health care systems. This paper proposes a model for improving how we develop and deploy information technology. The authors focus on trends in people, organizational, and social issues

Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan; Alan F Dowling; Charles P Friedman; Victor Peel

2001-01-01

426

A Primer on Aspects of Cognition for Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a multidisciplinary field, medical informatics draws on a range of disciplines, such as computer science, information science, and the social and cognitive sciences. The cognitive sciences can provide important insights into the nature of the processes involved in human– computer interaction and help improve the design of medical information systems by providing insight into the roles that knowledge, memory,

VIMLA L. PATEL; José F Arocha; DAVID R. KAUFMAN

2001-01-01

427

The Unified Medical Language System : An Informatics Research Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1986, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) assembled a large multidisciplinary, multisite team to work on the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS), a collaborative research project aimed at reducing fundamental barriers to the application of computers to medicine. Beyond its tangible products, the UMLS Knowledge Sources, and its influence on the field of informatics, the UMLS project is an

Betsy L Humphreys; Donald A B Lindberg; Harold M Schoolman; G Octo Barnett

1998-01-01

428

Informatics and Telematics in Health. Present and Potential Uses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on technical issues associated with informatics--a term covering all aspects of the development and operations of information systems, the supporting computer methodology and technology, and the supporting telecommunications links. The first of six chapters discusses the purpose of the report together with basic assumptions…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

429

Informatics Education in Italian High Schools Maria Carla Calzarossa1  

E-print Network

of domains and educational ini- tiatives. #12;The impact of ICT certifications in Italian Universities and the impact of ICT in the overall education system have been extensively addressed. Comparative studiesInformatics Education in Italian High Schools Maria Carla Calzarossa1 , Paolo Ciancarini2 , Luisa

Massari, Luisa

430

rocha@indiana.edu http://informatics.indiana.edu/rocha  

E-print Network

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;rocha@indiana.edu http://informatics.indiana.edu/rocha INDIANA UNIVERSITY InfoInformrmaticsatics luisluis rocharocha 20072007 uncovering protein Radivojac, Andreas Retchsteiner, Karin Verspoor, Zhiping Wang, Luis M. Rocha Indiana University, USA

Rocha, Luis

431

Data-Brain Modeling Based on Brain Informatics Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a case study on data-brain construction based on brain informatics (BI) methodology. The data-brain is a conceptual brain data model, which represents functional relationships among multiple human brain data sources, with respect to all major aspects and capabilities of human information processing system for systematic investigation and understanding of human intelligence. On one hand, developing such a

Jianhui Chen; Ning Zhong

2008-01-01

432

Informatics: A Novel, Contextualized Approach to Software Engineering Education  

E-print Network

of software design and implementation and managerial aspects of the broader process involved. Informally be situated. That is, we root our approach in the personal, organizational, and societal realities of softwareInformatics: A Novel, Contextualized Approach to Software Engineering Education André van der Hoek

van der Hoek, André

433

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computers are Becoming a Necessary  

E-print Network

�... �Physics �Biology How Why #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Engineering: A Modern View 6 Mousetrap Science our senses: Increasingly mediates our interactions with the physical world and with other people Change our perception of the world: create new virtual worlds (simulation; games) that enhance or replace

Snir, Marc

434

School Subject Informatics (Computer Science) in Russia: Educational Relevant Areas  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article deals with some aspects of studying Informatics in Russian schools. Those aspects are part of the "third dimension" of the Darmstadt model (they are also projected on the other two dimensions of this model) and include evolution of the subject, regulatory norms conforming to the Federal Educational Standards, the learning…

Khenner, Evgeniy; Semakin, Igor

2014-01-01

435

Ontological informatics infrastructure for pharmaceutical product development and manufacturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informatics infrastructure plays a crucial role in supporting different decision making activities related to pharmaceutical product development, pilot plant and commercial scale manufacturing by streamlining information gathering, data integration, model development and managing all these for easy and timely access and reuse. The foundation of such an infrastructure is the explicitly and formally modeled information. This foundation enables knowledge in

Venkat Venkatasubramanian; Chunhua Zhao; Girish Joglekar; Ankur Jain; Leaelaf Hailemariam; Pradeep Suresh; Pavankumar Akkisetty; Ken Morris; Gintaras V. Reklaitis

2006-01-01

436

cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG): Fact Sheet  

Cancer.gov

caBIG stands for the cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid. It is an open-source, open-access, voluntary information network that will enable cancer researchers to share tools, standards, data, applications, and technologies according to agreed upon common standards and needs.

437

A stimulus to define informatics and health information technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Despite the growing interest by leaders, policy makers, and others, the terminology of health information technology as well as biomedical and health informatics is poorly understood and not even agreed upon by academics and professionals in the field. DISCUSSION: The paper, presented as a Debate to encourage further discussion and disagreement, provides definitions of the major terminology used in

William R Hersh

2009-01-01

438

To Compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate in Teaching Information Mastery to Clinical Residents: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate regarding the amount and speed of information retrieval and users' satisfaction. Method A cross-over randomized trial was conducted in February 2009 in Tehran University of Medical Sciences that included 44 year-one or two residents who participated in an information mastery workshop. A one-hour lecture on the principles of information mastery was organized followed by self learning slide shows before using each database. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to answer 2 clinical scenarios using either UpToDate or PubMed Clinical Queries then crossed to use the other database to answer 2 different clinical scenarios. The proportion of relevantly answered clinical scenarios, time to answer retrieval, and users' satisfaction were measured in each database. Results Based on intention-to-treat analysis, participants retrieved the answer of 67 (76%) questions using UpToDate and 38 (43%) questions using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001). The median time to answer retrieval was 17 min (95% CI: 16 to 18) using UpToDate compared to 29 min (95% CI: 26 to 32) using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001). The satisfaction with the accuracy of retrieved answers, interaction with UpToDate and also overall satisfaction were higher among UpToDate users compared to PubMed Clinical Queries users (P<0.001). Conclusions For first time users, using UpToDate compared to Pubmed Clinical Querries can lead to not only a higher proportion of relevant answer retrieval within a shorter time, but also a higher users' satisfaction. So, addition of tutoring pre-appraised sources such as UpToDate to the information mastery curricula seems to be highly efficient. PMID:21858142

Sayyah Ensan, Ladan; Faghankhani, Masoomeh; Javanbakht, Anna; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

2011-01-01

439

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 373384 373 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 373­384 373 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics, and community expertise. It requires teachers with intellectual curiosity, creativity, ongoing personal learning in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 373-384" #12;374 S. Martinez The Myth of Insufficient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program  

PubMed Central

Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful iPad users. To facilitate collection of information through the iPad, the design of electronic data-input forms should consider the participants’ reported negative perceptions towards typing data through mobile devices. Technology deployment projects should gather sufficient evidence from pilot studies in order to guide efforts to adapt resources and infrastructure to relevant needs of Family Medicine teachers and learners. PMID:25138307

2014-01-01

441

VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure VINCI Organization  

E-print Network

/CDW VINCI Veterans Affairs #12;· Establish a National Research Infrastructure · Develop New Data Privacy language processing? · Increasing demands for more detailed clinical data · Quality Measures · Evidence

442

From classroom teaching to clinical practice: experiences of senior dental students regarding the shortened dental arch concept.  

PubMed

This study explored the barriers to a meaningful translation of didactic classroom instruction to clinical practice, using the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept as a case study. A combination of survey and individual and group interviews (a mixed-methods approach) was used to collect data related to the SDA. The cohort consisted of senior dental students and their clinical teachers at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. The response rates were 100 percent for the students (n=73) and 78 percent for the clinical teachers (n=16). Triangulation was employed to eliminate bias and strengthen the reliability of the research. In the quantitative analysis, most students (81 percent) reported having heard about the SDA concept at the university, but their responses revealed an absence of clinical implementation. The students agreed that patients can function adequately with an SDA and agreed with presenting it as a treatment option to patients. In the qualitative analysis, a "change in the clinical requirements," "being empowered by exposing them to SDA literature," and "change in health policies" were recommended measures to increase implementation of the SDA approach clinically. The students were positive about the SDA as a treatment option, but the lack of adequate knowledge and encouragement in clinical implementation was a hindrance to its use. PMID:24882776

Khan, Saadika B; Chikte, Usuf M E; Omar, Ridwaan

2014-06-01

443

Exposome informatics: considerations for the design of future biomedical research information systems.  

PubMed

The environment's contribution to health has been conceptualized as the exposome. Biomedical research interest in environmental exposures as a determinant of physiopathological processes is rising as such data increasingly become available. The panoply of miniaturized sensing devices now accessible and affordable for individuals to use to monitor a widening range of parameters opens up a new world of research data. Biomedical informatics (BMI) must provide a coherent framework for dealing with multi-scale population data including the phenome, the genome, the exposome, and their interconnections. The combination of these more continuous, comprehensive, and personalized data sources requires new research and development approaches to data management, analysis, and visualization. This article analyzes the implications of a new paradigm for the discipline of BMI, one that recognizes genome, phenome, and exposome data and their intricate interactions as the basis for biomedical research now and for clinical care in the near future. PMID:24186958

Martin Sanchez, Fernando; Gray, Kathleen; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Lopez-Campos, Guillermo

2014-01-01

444

The informatics nurse specialist as change agent. Application of innovation-diffusion theory.  

PubMed

The informatics nurse specialist (INS) is often the primary change agent in facilitating the implementation of clinical information systems (CIS) in healthcare settings. The INS has a unique understanding of the nursing issues that can affect the change process, and thus is in a key position to facilitate positive implementation outcomes. Innovation-diffusion theory is particularly useful in its application to the change agent role of the INS. With this theoretical knowledge, the INS can design CIS training interventions according to the psychological phenomena of Rogers' Innovation-Decision Process. An understanding of the decision-making process and the distribution of different rates of innovation adoption within a given population enable the INS to anticipate and address influential factors that affect the implementation process. Thus, Innovation-Diffusion Theory may be used as a powerful cognitive tool for the INS in facilitating the diffusion process and nurses' adoption of the technology in practice. PMID:11105401

Hilz, L M

2000-01-01

445

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the inclusion and advantage of dissection in clinical rotations during medical school. Specifically, this study demonstrates the benefits of eye dissection in an ophthalmology rotation in post graduate medical training.

2009-07-27

446

Preparing our future physicians: integrating medical informatics into the undergraduate medical education curriculum.  

PubMed

This paper describes how two medical schools have integrated "medical informatics" into their undergraduate medical education programs with the aim of preparing their students for future practice. It describes the components or elements of the informatics programs, how learning opportunities have been integrated into the curricula, how the informatics programs have evolved, and future directions. The medical schools approached the task of introducing informatics in a parallel way. Following needs identification, similar topic areas, goals, and specific informatics learning objectives were developed. These were used as a basis for implementation and evaluation. In general, the topic areas selected are: computer literacy, communications, information retrieval and management, computer-aided learning, patient management, office practice management, and hospital information systems. Learning opportunities in informatics were integrated for the above goals, in accordance with how the curriculum was organized in each school. These opportunities, and the support activities provided will be described. PMID:10168948

Kaufman, D M; Jennett, P A

1997-01-01

447

Nanoinformatics: new challenges for biomedical informatics at the nano level.  

PubMed

Over the last decades Nanotechnology has promised to advance science and technology in many areas. Within medicine, Nanomedicine promises to deliver new methods for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. As the amount of available information is rapidly growing, new Biomedical Informatics approaches have to be developed to satisfy the increasing demand on data and knowledge management. In 2007, a new sub-discipline, already named "Nanoinformatics", was created with support from the US National Science Foundation. In Europe, a project named ACTION-Grid was launched in 2008 with support from the European Commission to analyze the challenges and agenda for developing Nanoinformatics as a discipline related to Nanotechnology, Biomedicine and Informatics. For MIE 2009, members of this consortium proposed a workshop to discuss the scientific and strategic issues associated with this topic. Nanoinformatics aims to create a bridge between Nanomedicine and Information Technology applying computational methods to manage the information created in the nanomedical domain. PMID:19745461

De La Iglesia, Diana; Chiesa, Stefano; Kern, Josipa; Maojo, Victor; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Potamias, George; Moustakis, Vassilis; Mitchell, Joyce A

2009-01-01

448

The Challenges of Publishing on Health Informatics in Developing Countries  

PubMed Central

Summary The Journal of Health Informatics in Developing Countries was established to meet a perceived need for Health Informaticians in developing countries to be able to share the results of their research in an affordable and easy-to-access online publication. The journal was developed using the open source platform “Open Journal System,” and has now published 67 articles across 13 issues. A collaborative editorial approach has been established to address the problems of limited research budgets, difficulties with translating to English and other problems specific to authors from developing countries. The journal faces many challenges including ensuring future financial sustainability and inclusion in journal indexing systems. However, the continuing support of an international body of Associate Editors and Editorial Board Members has enabled a wide range of useful and informative health informatics research to be disseminated across the developing world. PMID:24155794

Paton, C.; Househ, M.; Malik, M.

2013-01-01

449

Where does informatics fit in health care organizations?  

PubMed

Why is medical informatics important to health care leaders? As an emerging science, informatics focuses on applying computing and communication technology to decision making for clinicians and managers. It enhances the understanding of how information and communication systems can impact the work health care managers must accomplish. As the cost of technology for digital information management continues to decline, organizations and individuals will look for ways to offset the human costs of managing and conveying information. The way of the paper medical record is being replaced by the less expensive and more efficient digital information systems. Leaders of health care organizations need to look for every opportunity to deploy networks and computers to reduce the labor costs of data collection, storage, retrieval, and analysis. PMID:10167481

Ruffin, M

1997-01-01

450

ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.  

PubMed

The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process. PMID:24429021

2014-02-01

451

Bioimage informatics: a new area of engineering biology.  

PubMed

In recent years, the deluge of complicated molecular and cellular microscopic images creates compelling challenges for the image computing community. There has been an increasing focus on developing novel image processing, data mining, database and visualization techniques to extract, compare, search and manage the biological knowledge in these data-intensive problems. This emerging new area of bioinformatics can be called 'bioimage informatics'. This article reviews the advances of this field from several aspects, including applications, key techniques, available tools and resources. Application examples such as high-throughput/high-content phenotyping and atlas building for model organisms demonstrate the importance of bioimage informatics. The essential techniques to the success of these applications, such as bioimage feature identification, segmentation and tracking, registration, annotation, mining, image data management and visualization, are further summarized, along with a brief overview of the available bioimage databases, analysis tools and other resources. PMID:18603566

Peng, Hanchuan

2008-09-01

452

Reducing Health Cost: Health Informatics and Knowledge Management as a Business and Communication Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Health informatics has the potential to improve the quality and provision of care while reducing the cost of health care delivery.\\u000a However, health informatics is often falsely regarded as synonymous with information management (IM). This chapter (i) provides\\u000a a clear definition and characteristic benefits of health informatics and information management in the context of health care\\u000a delivery, (ii) identifies and

Regina Gyampoh-Vidogah; Robert Moreton; David Sallah

2010-01-01

453

The Use and Interpretation of Quasi-Experimental Studies in Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quasi-experimental study designs, often described as nonrandomized, pre-post intervention studies, are common in the medical informatics literature. Yet little has been written about the benefits and limitations of the quasi-experimental approach as applied to informatics studies. This paper outlines a relative hierarchy and nomen- clature of quasi-experimental study designs that is applicable to medical informatics intervention studies. In addition, the

ANTHONY D. HARRIS; JESSINA C. MCGREGOR; ELI N. PERENCEVICH; JON P. FURUNO; JINGKUN ZHU; DAN E. PETERSON; JOSEPH FINKELSTEIN

454

An international course on strategic information management for medical informatics students: aim, content, structure, and experiences  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report on a course for medical informatics students on hospital information systems, especially on its strategic information management. Starting as course at the Medical Informatics Program of the University of Heidelberg\\/University of Applied Sciences Heilbronn, it is now organized as international course in the framework of the International Partnership for Health Informatics Education (http:\\/\\/www.iphie.org) jointly for medical information science

Reinhold Haux; Elske Ammenwerth; W. J. Ter Burg; J. Pilz; Monique W. M. Jaspers

2004-01-01

455

The pathology informatics curriculum wiki: Harnessing the power of user-generated content  

PubMed Central

Background: The need for informatics training as part of pathology training has never been so critical, but pathology informatics is a wide and complex field and very few programs currently have the resources to provide comprehensive educational pathology informatics experiences to their residents. In this article, we present the “pathology informatics curriculum wiki”, an open, on-line wiki that indexes the pathology informatics content in a larger public wiki, Wikipedia, (and other online content) and organizes it into educational modules based on the 2003 standard curriculum approved by the Association for Pathology Informatics (API). Methods and Results: In addition to implementing the curriculum wiki at http://pathinformatics.wikispaces.com, we have evaluated pathology informatics content in Wikipedia. Of the 199 non-duplicate terms in the API curriculum, 90% have at least one associated Wikipedia article. Furthermore, evaluation of articles on a five-point Likert scale showed high scores for comprehensiveness (4.05), quality (4.08), currency (4.18), and utility for the beginner (3.85) and advanced (3.93) learners. These results are compelling and support the thesis that Wikipedia articles can be used as the foundation for a basic curriculum in pathology informatics. Conclusions: The pathology informatics community now has the infrastructure needed to collaboratively and openly create, maintain and distribute the pathology informatics content worldwide (Wikipedia) and also the environment (the curriculum wiki) to draw upon its own resources to index and organize this content as a sustainable basic pathology informatics educational resource. The remaining challenges are numerous, but largest by far will be to convince the pathologists to take the time and effort required to build pathology informatics content in Wikipedia and to index and organize this content for education in the curriculum wiki. PMID:20805963

Kim, Ji Yeon; Gudewicz, Thomas M.; Dighe, Anand S.; Gilbertson, John R.

2010-01-01

456

Social Work Informatics: A New Specialty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of technology in social work practice has risen dramatically over the past 10 years. Clinical interventions such as psychotherapy using telephones, interactive video, and the Internet are gaining in popularity. For a discipline traditionally tied to face-to-face interaction, many concerns about moving to technology-based practices have…

Parker-Oliver, Debra; Demiris, George

2006-01-01

457

Medical students' perspectives on biomedical informatics learning objectives  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To explore medical student perspectives regarding the importance of biomedical informatics learning objectives to career development, and the amount of emphasis that should be placed on content associated with these objectives in the curriculum. Methods A Web-based survey was e-mailed to 405 students enrolled at the University of Utah, School of Medicine in spring 2008. Respondents rated the importance of biomedical informatics learning objectives using a five-point Likert-type scale, and indicated whether this content should be given a minimal, moderate or large amount of emphasis. ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test were conducted to determine differences in perceived importance and desired emphasis by academic year. Results A total of 259 medical students submitted a survey for an overall response rate of 63.9%. Learning objectives associated with the physician role of Clinician received the highest overall rating (mean = 3.29 ± 0.47). Objectives for the physician roles of Clinician, Life-long Learner and Manager received higher ratings than the Educator/Communicator and Researcher roles in terms of both perceived importance and amount of emphasis. Student ratings of importance varied significantly by academic year, with third-year students consistently assigning lower ratings to learning objectives for the Educator/Communicator, Researcher and Manager roles compared to students in some other years. Conclusions Study results suggest that biomedical informatics content is desired by medical students at the University of Utah. Study findings are being used to inform efforts to integrate biomedical informatics content into the curriculum and may assist other medical schools seeking to incorporate similar content.

Richardson, Stephanie J.; Sheng, Xiaoming; Mitchell, Joyce A.

2013-01-01

458

Implementation and Evaluation of a Medical Informatics Distance Education Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveGiven the need for continuing education in medical informatics for mid-career professionals, the authors aimed to implement and evaluate distance learning courses in this area.DesignThe authors performed a needs assessment, content and technology planning, implementation, and student evaluation.MeasurementsThe needs assessment and student evaluations were assessed using a combination of Likert scale and free-form questions.ResultsThe needs assessment indicated much interest in

William R Hersh; Katherine Junium; Mark Mailhot; Patricia Tidmarsh

2001-01-01

459

People and ideas in medical informatics - a half century review.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. Reviewing the onset and the rapid changes to make realistic predictions on the future of medical informatics. METHODS. Pointing to the contributions of the early pioneers, who had their roots in other disciplines and by illustrating that from the onset an interdisciplinary approach was characteristic for our field. RESULTS. Some of the reasons for the changes in medical informatics are that nobody was able to predict the advent of the personal computer in the 1970s, the world-wide web in 1991, and the public start of the Internet in 1992, but foremost that nobody expected that it was not primarily the hardware or the software, but human factors that would be crucial for successful applications of computers in health care. In the past sometimes unrealistic expectations were held, such as on the impact of medical decision-support systems, or on the overly optimistic contributions of electronic health records. Although the technology is widely available, some applications appear to be far more complex than expected. Health care processes can seldom be fully standardized. Humans enter at least in two very different roles in the loop of information processing: as subjects conducting care - the clinicians - and as subjects that are the objects of care - the patients. CONCLUSIONS. Medical informatics lacks a specific methodology; methods are borrowed from adjacent disciplines such as physics, mathematics and, of course, computer science. Human factors play a major role in applying computers in health care. Everyone pursuing a career in biomedical informatics needs to be very aware of this. It is to be expected that the quality of health care will increasingly be assessed by computer systems to fulfill the requirements of medical evidence. PMID:21938345

van Bemmel, J H

2011-01-01

460

Science and Engineering Information Integration and Informatics (SEIII)  

NSF Publications Database

Effective on the day this program solicitation is posted by NSF, the deadline for Science and Engineering Information Integration and Informatics proposals is March 4, 2004, December 15, 2004 and December 15, annually, thereafter. Full Proposal Preparation Instructions: This solicitation contains information that supplements the standard Grant Proposal Guide (GPG) proposal preparation guidelines. More comprehensive information on NSF Award Conditions is contained in the NSF Grant Policy ...

461

Supporting the emergence of dental informatics with an online community.  

PubMed

Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. As an emerging field, dental informatics faces many challenges and barriers to establishing itself as a full-fledged discipline; these include the small number of geographically dispersed DI researchers as well as the lack of DI professional societies and DI-specific journals. E-communities have the potential to overcome these obstacles by bringing researchers together at a resources hub and giving them the ability to share information, discuss topics, and find collaborators. In this paper, we discuss our assessment of the information needs of individuals interested in DI and discuss their expectations for an e-community so that we can design an optimal electronic infrastructure for the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The 256 survey respondents indicated they prefer electronic resources over traditional print material to satisfy their information needs. The most frequently expected benefits from participation in the DIOC were general information (85% of respondents), peer networking (31.1%), and identification of potential collaborators and/or research opportunities (23.2%). We are currently building the DIOC electronic infrastructure: a searchable publication archive and the learning center have been created, and the people directory is underway. Readers are encouraged to access the DIOC Website at www.dentalinformatics.com and initiate a discussion with the authors of this paper. PMID:18271498

Spallek, H; Irwin, J Y; Schleyer, T; Butler, B S; Weiss, P M

2007-07-01

462

Exploration of the e-patient phenomenon in nursing informatics.  

PubMed

The availability of health information on the Internet has equalized opportunities for knowledge between patients and their health care providers, creating a new phenomenon called the e-patient. E-patients use technology to actively participate in their health care and assume higher levels of responsibility for their own health and wellness. This phenomenon has implications for nursing informatics research related to e-patients and potential collaboration with practitioners in developing a collective wisdom. Nursing informatics can use the data, information, knowledge, and wisdom (DIKW) framework to understand how e-patients and clinicians may achieve this collective wisdom. Nurse informaticists can use constructivism and Gadamerian hermeneutics to bridge each stage of this framework to illustrate the fundamentals of patient and clinician interactions and commonality of language to achieve a collective wisdom. Examining the e-patient phenomenon will help nurse informaticists evaluate, design, develop, and determine the effectiveness of information systems used by e-patients. The Internet can facilitate a partnership between the patient and clinician and cultivate a collective wisdom, enhanced by collaboration between nurse informatics and e-patients. PMID:22221955

Gee, Perry M; Greenwood, Deborah A; Kim, Katherine K; Perez, Susan L; Staggers, Nancy; DeVon, Holli A

2012-01-01

463

Trends in biomedical informatics: most cited topics from recent years  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics is a young, highly interdisciplinary field that is evolving quickly. It is important to know which published topics in generalist biomedical informatics journals elicit the most interest from the scientific community, and whether this interest changes over time, so that journals can better serve their readers. It is also important to understand whether free access to biomedical informatics articles impacts their citation rates in a significant way, so authors can make informed decisions about unlock fees, and journal owners and publishers understand the implications of open access. The topics and JAMIA articles from years 2009 and 2010 that have been most cited according to the Web of Science are described. To better understand the effects of free access in article dissemination, the number of citations per month after publication for articles published in 2009 versus 2010 was compared, since there was a significant change in free access to JAMIA articles between those years. Results suggest that there is a positive association between free access and citation rate for JAMIA articles. PMID:22180873

Kim, Hyeon-Eui; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Kim, Jihoon

2011-01-01

464

A reference ontology for biomedical informatics: the Foundational Model of Anatomy  

E-print Network

to the structural organization of the human body. It encompasses the material objects from the molecular; Bioinformatics; Biomedical informatics; Anatomy; Mereotopology; Embryology; Developmental biology; UMLS 1

Washington at Seattle, University of

465

Informatics in dental education: a horizon of opportunity.  

PubMed

Computers have presented society with the largest array of opportunities since the printing press. More specifically in dental education they represent the path to freedom from the memory-based curriculum. Computers allow us to be constantly in touch with the entire scope of knowledge necessary for decision making in every aspect of the process of preparing young men and women to practice dentistry. No longer is it necessary to spend the energy or time previously used to memorize facts, test for retention of facts or be concerned with remembering facts when dealing with our patients. Modern information management systems can assume that task allowing dentists to concentrate on understanding, skill, judgement and wisdom while helping patients deal with their problems within a health care system that is simultaneously baffling in its complexity and overflowing with options. This paper presents a summary of the choices facing dental educators as computers continue to afford us the freedom to look differently at teaching, research and practice. The discussion will elaborate some of the ways dental educators must think differently about the educational process in order to utilize fully the power of computers in curriculum development and tracking, integration of basic and clinical teaching, problem solving, patient management, record keeping and research. Some alternative strategies will be discussed that may facilitate the transition from the memory-based to the computer-based curriculum and practice. PMID:2622376

Abbey, L M

1989-11-01

466

A Step Forward in Teaching Addiction Counselors How to Supervise Motivational Interviewing Using a Clinical Trials Training Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

A clinical trials training approach to supervision is a promising and empirically supported method for preparing addiction counselors to implement evidence-based behavioral treatments in community treatment programs. This supervision approach has three main components: (1) direct observation of treatment sessions; (2) structured performance feedback about counselors' treatment adherence and competence; and (3) coaching to improve the ability of counselors to

Steve Martino; Steve Gallon; Samuel A. Ball; Kathleen M. Carroll

2008-01-01

467

Teaching Commercial Law in the Third Year: A Short Report on a Business Organizations and Commercial Law Clinic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The development and implementation of a clinic to offer advanced study in business organizations and commercial law transactions for third-year law students at Wayne State University (Michigan) are described. The course builds vertically on prior study and puts students in contact with practicing lawyers in an academic setting. Considerations…

Dolan, John F.; McNair, Russell A., Jr.

1995-01-01

468

Isolated rural general practice as the focus for teaching core clinical rotations to pre-registration medical students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have successfully demonstrated that medical students can achieve success in core clinical rotations with long term attachments in small groups to rural general \\/ family practices. METHODS: In this study, three students from a class of 226 volunteered for this 1-year pilot program, conducted by the University of Queensland in 2004, for medical students in the 3rd

Stephen A Margolis; Llewellyn M Davies; Valmae Ypinazar

2005-01-01

469

Clinical Decision-Support Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical decision-support systems (CDSS) apply best-known medical knowledge to patient data for the purpose of generating case-specific decision-support advice. CDSS forms the cornerstone of health informatics research and practice. It is an embedded concept in almost all major clinical information systems and plays an instrumental role in helping health care achieve its ultimate goal: providing high- quality patient care while,

Kai Zheng

470

Twenty five years of medical informatics education at Heidelberg\\/Heilbronn: discussion of a specialized curriculum for medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The specialized university curriculum for medical informatics (MI) at the University of Heidelberg\\/School of Technology Heilbronn is one of the oldest educational approaches in the field of MI and has been successful now for 25 years with about 1000 graduates (Diplom-Informatikerin der Medizin or Diplom-Informatiker der Medizin). It belongs to the category of dedicated master's programs for MI and is

F. J Leven; R Haux

1998-01-01

471

A Viewpoint on Evidence-based Health Informatics, Based on a Pilot Survey on Evaluation Studies in Health Care Informatics  

PubMed Central

Concerned about evidence-based health informatics, the authors conducted a limited pilot survey attempting to determine how many IT evaluation studies in health care are never published, and why. A survey distributed to 722 academics had a low response rate, with 136 respondents giving instructive comments on 217 evaluation studies. Of those studies, half were published in international journals, and more than one-third were never published. Reasons for not publishing (with multiple reasons per study possible) included: “results not of interest for others” (1/3 of all studies), “publication in preparation” (1/3), “no time for publication” (1/5), “limited scientific quality of study” (1/6), “political or legal reasons” (1/7), and “study only conducted for internal use” (1/8). Those reasons for non-publication in health informatics resembled those reported in other fields. Publication bias (preference for positive studies) did not appear to be a major issue. The authors believe that widespread application of guidelines in conducting health informatics evaluation studies and utilization of a registry for evaluation study results could improve the evidence base of the field. PMID:17329724

Ammenwerth, Elske; de Keizer, Nicolette

2007-01-01

472

Clinical Examination of Three Methods of Teaching Reading Comprehension to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: From Research to Classroom Applications.  

PubMed

This study shows how to integrate research-based teaching methods in reading comprehension with real classroom teaching activities. The performance of 30 male (n = 13; mean age = 11.51 years) and female (n = 17; mean age = 12.11 years) deaf and hard-of-hearing students from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was examined under three teaching conditions: the key word strategy, modified reciprocal teaching, and the basic reading approach. Analyses showed that the key word strategy and modified reciprocal teaching significantly enhanced students' overall performance in reading comprehension scores. Results revealed that any one of these three methods would be adequate for teaching factual information. However, results indicated that the key word strategy and modified reciprocal teaching would be better for teaching factual information, comprehension, and memorization skills than the basic reading approach. PMID:15448064

Al-Hilawani, Yasser A

2003-01-01

473

A Conceptual and Empirical Review of the Meaning, Measurement, Development, and Teaching of Intervention Competence in Clinical Psychology  

PubMed Central

Through the course of this paper we discuss several fundamental issues related to the intervention competence of psychologists. Following definitional clarification and proposals for more strictly distinguishing competence from adherence, we interpret Dreyfus and Dreyfus’s (1986) five stage theory of competence development (from novice to expert) within a strictly clinical framework. Existing methods of competence assessment are then evaluated, and we argue for the use of new and multiple assessment modalities. Next, we utilize the previous sections as a foundation to propose methods for training and evaluating competent psychologists. Lastly, we discuss several potential impediments to large scale competence assessment and education, such as the heterogeneity of therapeutic orientations and what could be termed a lack of transparency in clinical training. PMID:18952334

Barber, Jacques P.

2009-01-01

474

76 FR 24889 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid® (caBIG®) Support...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid[supreg...Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes...number. Proposed Collection: Title: cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid...

2011-05-03

475

Quantum Bio-Informatics II From Quantum Information to Bio-Informatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of quantum-like representation in economy cognitive science, and genetics / L. Accardi, A. Khrennikov and M. Ohya -- Chaotic behavior observed in linea dynamics / M. Asano, T. Yamamoto and Y. Togawa -- Complete m-level quantum teleportation based on Kossakowski-Ohya scheme / M. Asano, M. Ohya and Y. Tanaka -- Towards quantum cybernetics: optimal feedback control in quantum bio informatics / V. P. Belavkin -- Quantum entanglement and circulant states / D. Chru?ci?ski -- The compound Fock space and its application in brain models / K. -H. Fichtner and W. Freudenberg -- Characterisation of beam splitters / L. Fichtner and M. Gäbler -- Application of entropic chaos degree to a combined quantum baker's map / K. Inoue, M. Ohya and I. V. Volovich -- On quantum algorithm for multiple alignment of amino acid sequences / S. Iriyama and M. Ohya --Quantum-like models for decision making in psychology and cognitive science / A. Khrennikov -- On completely positive non-Markovian evolution of a d-level system / A. Kossakowski and R. Rebolledo -- Measures of entanglement - a Hilbert space approach / W. A. Majewski -- Some characterizations of PPT states and their relation / T. Matsuoka -- On the dynamics of entanglement and characterization ofentangling properties of quantum evolutions / M. Michalski -- Perspective from micro-macro duality - towards non-perturbative renormalization scheme / I. Ojima -- A simple symmetric algorithm using a likeness with Introns behavior in RNA sequences / M. Regoli -- Some aspects of quadratic generalized white noise functionals / Si Si and T. Hida -- Analysis of several social mobility data using measure of departure from symmetry / K. Tahata ... [et al.] -- Time in physics and life science / I. V. Volovich -- Note on entropies in quantum processes / N. Watanabe -- Basics of molecular simulation and its application to biomolecules / T. Ando and I. Yamato -- Theory of proton-induced superionic conduction in hydrogen-bonded systems / H. Kamimura -- Massive collection of full-length complementary DNA clones and microarray analyses: keys to rice transcriptome analysis / S. Kikuchi -- Changes of influenza A(H5) viruses by means of entropic chaos degree / K. Sato and M. Ohya -- Basics of genome sequence analysis in bioinformatics - its fundamental ideas and problems / T. Suzuki and S. Miyazaki -- A basic introduction to gene expression studies using microarray expression data analysis / D. Wanke and J. Kilian -- Integrating biological perspectives: a quantum leap for microarray expression analysis / D. Wanke ... [et al.].

Accardi, L.; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

2009-02-01

476

Level of awareness of mammography among women attending outpatient clinics in a teaching hospital in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Mammography has been used in developed countries with considerable success but very little is known about this imaging modality in low resource settings. This study examined the level of awareness of mammography and determined factors influencing the level of awareness. Methods We conducted a hospital based cross sectional study to investigate the level of awareness of mammography among 818 randomly selected women attending the General Outpatient clinics (GOP) of the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan, Nigeria. Independent predictors of level of awareness of mammography were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results The proportion of women who ever heard of mammography was 5%, and they demonstrated poor knowledge of the procedure. Those with primary or secondary levels of education were about three times less likely to be aware of mammography when compared with those with tertiary level of education (OR?=?0.3, 95% CI, 0.12 – 0.73). Also, participation in community breast cancer prevention activities (OR?=?3.4, 95% CI, 1.39 – 8.36), and previous clinical breast examination (OR?=?2.34, 95% CI, 1.10 – 4.96) independently predicted mammography awareness. Newspapers and magazines appeared to be the most important sources of information about mammography screening. Conclusion The level of awareness of mammography is poor among women attending outpatient clinics in the studied population. Interventions promoting awareness of this screening procedure should give particular attention to the illiterate and older women while clinicians performing breast examinations shoul