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1

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, Health

Provancher, William

2

Associate Dean for Clinical Research Informatics Center for Biomedical Informatics Research, Department of Medicine  

E-print Network

Associate Dean for Clinical Research Informatics Center for Biomedical Informatics Research clinical informatics. The position will bridge the Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research in clinical research informatics and providing strategic support broadly. The position will require leadership

Quake, Stephen R.

3

Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education  

Microsoft Academic Search

National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services

Heng-Shuen Chen; Fei-Ran Guo; Chien-Tsai Liu; Yue-Joe Lee; Jye-Horng Chen; Chia-Chin Lin; Sheng-Mou Hou; Bor-Shen Hsieh

1998-01-01

4

Eight Years of Distance Teaching and Learning in Biomedical Informatics at OHSU  

E-print Network

Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Oregon Health & Science at OHSU William Hersh, MD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical EpidemiologyEight Years of Distance Teaching and Learning in Biomedical Informatics at OHSU William Hersh, MD

Chapman, Michael S.

5

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

6

Challenges and Opportunities in Clinical Research Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth and visibility of clinical research informatics has increased significantly over the last several years. National informatics research and development projects such as the NCI's caBIG initiative and the NIH's broad-ranging CTSA program have brought to light numerous challenges and opportunities specific to clinical research informatics. During the AMIA 2006 Annual Symposium, the Clinical Trials Working Group (CTWG) hosted

Philip R. O. Payne; Peter J. Embi; Christopher G. Chute; Ida Sim; Douglas Fridmsa; Charles Jaffe

7

Teaching clinical informatics to third-year medical students: negative results from two controlled trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Prior educational interventions to increase seeking evidence by medical students have been unsuccessful. METHODS: We report two quasirandomized controlled trials to increase seeking of medical evidence by third-year medical students. In the first trial (1997–1998), we placed computers in clinical locations and taught their use in a 6-hour course. Based on negative results, we created SUMSearch(TM), an Internet site

Robert G Badgett; Judy L Paukert; Linda S Levy

2001-01-01

8

Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-01-01

9

Informatics and the clinical laboratory.  

PubMed

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-08-01

10

Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World.  

PubMed

This chapter gives an educational overview of: * health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions * health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings * major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation * using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. PMID:20407180

Liaw, Siaw Teng; Gray, Kathleen

2010-01-01

11

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in  

E-print Network

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) 1 Data Mining and Health Informatics in Cancer Medicine #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 2 #12;ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Lab http://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 3 Oncologists Medical physicists

Li, Jing

12

The Interactions Between Clinical Informatics and Bioinformatics : A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the past decade, Stanford Medical Informatics has combined clinical informatics and bioinformatics research and training in an explicit way. The interest in applying informatics techniques to both clinical problems and problems in basic science can be traced to the Dendral project in the 1960s. Having bioinformatics and clinical informatics in the same academic unit is still somewhat unusual and

RUSS B. ALTMAN

2000-01-01

13

Current status of ontologies in Biomedical and Clinical Informatics Rishi Kanth Saripalle  

E-print Network

1 Current status of ontologies in Biomedical and Clinical Informatics Rishi Kanth Saripalle for managing research data in the field of biomedical and clinical informatics. These huge data sets cannot, biomedical ontologies, medical informatics, clinical informatics, clinical decision support systems

Demurjian, Steven A.

14

Core Content for the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Core Content for Clinical Informatics defines the boundaries of the discipline and informs the Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Clinical Informatics. The Core Content includes four major categories: fundamentals, clinical decision making and care process improvement, health information systems, and leadership and management of change. The AMIA Board of Directors approved the Core Content for Clinical Informatics in

REED M. GARDNER; J. MARC OVERHAGE; ELAINE B. STEEN; BENSON S. MUNGER; JOHN H. HOLMES; JEFFREY J. WILLIAMSON; E. DETMER

15

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS POLICY FOR CLINICAL RANKS  

E-print Network

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS POLICY FOR CLINICAL RANKS ADOPTED MAY 2, 2001 This document establishes the policy for clinical ranks for the IU School of Informatics. This document is supplemental to the IU School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure Guidelines for promotion in clinical rank appointments

Zhou, Yaoqi

16

Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education.  

PubMed

National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services including mail, netnews, bulletin board systems (BBS), world wide web (WWW), gopher, ftp and local file servers. To implement an interactive learning environment, the authors first tried mail lists, newsgroups and BBS. Next an integrated learning system prototype on the WWW was developed to provide functions including online syllabus, discussion boards simulated to BBS, online talk, interactive case studies, virtual classroom with video on demand (VOD) and Internet medical resources. The results showed that after the medical students completed the required course of medical informatics and had good network access using a network to communicate with each other became a daily practice. In the future, the system will extend to the tutoring of clinical practice and continuing medical education. The authors expect a national medical education network and more international cooperation and exchange. PMID:9726493

Chen, H S; Guo, F R; Liu, C T; Lee, Y J; Chen, J H; Lin, C C; Hou, S M; Hsieh, B S

1998-06-01

17

[Medical informatics in research, teaching and patient management].  

PubMed

The field of medical informatics in its current understanding is defined and criteria distinguishing this field from similar areas are provided. Special consideration is given to its position at a School of Medicine - in particular to the University of Vienna Medical School with the Vienna General Hospital as its teaching hospital. Demands for medical informatics and electronic data processing (EDP) in this extended field of activity come from four different sources: (1) research in medical informatics, (2) teaching of medical informatics as well as EDP training, (3) EDP service for research and teaching, and (4) EDP hospital operations to assist patient care. (Purely administrative EDP demands are not considered here.) It is shown that the different demands can be fulfilled by the usually available institutions involved in medical informatics and EDP at a School of Medicine. At many places these institutions are as follows: (1) a department or division of medical informatics with a possibly attached computer center dedicated to provide assistance in the area of research and teaching, (2) the computer center of the respective university the School of Medicine belongs to, (3) the computer center of the hospital-owned institution responsible for all EDP activities connected to patient care, and (4) external software companies and EDP training centers. To succeed in the development of an exhaustive, school-wide system of medical informatics and EDP that considers the different demands in research, teaching, and EDP hospital operations equally, close and well-suited coordination between the institutions involved is necessary. PMID:7871786

Adlassnig, K P

1995-01-01

18

Clinical Health Informatics Meets Medical Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical Health Informatics (CHI), including integrated electronic medical records (EMR), is playing an increasingly important role in medical practice. It is widely felt that these tools have the potential to improve the quality of medical care and patient outcomes, while increasing efficiency and controlling overall health care costs. Studies have demonstrated the ability of CHI to have a significant impact

Jeffrey Phillips

2008-01-01

19

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE CLINICAL RESEARCH AND INFORMATICS: TRANSLATION INTO QUALITY  

E-print Network

CLINICAL AND TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE CLINICAL RESEARCH AND INFORMATICS: TRANSLATION the Clinical Research and Informatics: Translation into Quality (CRITiQ) pilot project program INTO QUALITY PILOT PROJECT PROGRAM Program Goals The Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) has

Sibille, Etienne

20

Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools  

PubMed Central

Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform. PMID:23248762

Lee, Roy E.; McClintock, David S.; Balis, Ulysses J.; Baron, Jason M.; Becich, Michael J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Brodsky, Victor B.; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D.; Henricks, Walter H.; Kim, Jiyeon Y.; Klepseis, Veronica E.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lane, William J.; Levy, Bruce P.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Park, Seung L.; Sinard, John H.; Tuthill, Mark J.; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

21

The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

Sora, Sebastian A.

2008-01-01

22

Innovations in clinical trials informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will investigate innovations in information management for use in clinical trials. The application typifies a complex, adaptive, distributed and information-rich environment for which continuous innovation is necessary. Organisational innovation is highlighted as well as the technical innovations in workflow processes and their representation as an integrated set of web services. Benefits realization uncovers further innovations in the business

Ron Summers; Hiten Vyas; Nilesh Dudhal; Neil F. Doherty; Crispin R. Coombs; Mark Hepworth

2008-01-01

23

Teaching a Web-based course in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Librarians at Virginia Commonwealth University teach a course in Health Informatics as part of a distance learning Doctoral program for allied health professionals. This paper discusses the experience of developing and delivering a Web-based course for the curriculum. Lessons learned fall into the categories of communication, technology, and resources.

Lynne U. Turman; Phyllis C. Self; Pascal V. Calarco

2004-01-01

24

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT  

E-print Network

in the School of Informatics, clinical, lecturer tracks, research associates with teaching assignments shallINDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, IUPUI #12;INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL

Zhou, Yaoqi

25

Clinical Decision Support Systems in Biomedical Informatics and their Limitations  

E-print Network

Clinical Decision Support Systems in Biomedical Informatics and their Limitations Alberto De la Abstract Clinical decision support systems can be categorized in three types: information management are needed. The main goal with clinical decision support systems is to emulate a clinician's thought process

Demurjian, Steven A.

26

Informatics  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

27

AMIA Board White Paper: Core Content for the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Core Content for Clinical Informatics defines the boundaries of the discipline and informs the Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in Clinical Informatics. The Core Content includes four major categories: fundamentals, clinical decision making and care process improvement, health information systems, and leadership and management of change. The AMIA Board of Directors approved the Core Content for Clinical Informatics in

Reed M. Gardner; J. Marc Overhage; Elaine B. Steen; Benson S. Munger; John H. Holmes; Jeffrey J. Williamson; Don E. Detmer

2009-01-01

28

The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.  

PubMed

The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the pathology informatics asset in the network. Though the above approach has been in place less than a year, we are presenting it now as a technical note to allow for further discussion of evolving educational opportunities in pathology informatics and clinical informatics in general, and to highlight the importance of having a flexible fellowship with active participation from its fellows. PMID:25191621

Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

2014-01-01

29

Translating Clinical Informatics Interventions into Routine Clinical Care: How Can the RE-AIM Framework Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Clinical informatics intervention research suffers from a lack of attention to external validity in study design, implementation, evaluation, and reporting. This hampers the ability of others to assess the fit of a clinical informatics intervention with demonstrated efficacy in one setting for implementation in their setting. The objective of this model formulation paper is to demonstrate the applicability of

SUZANNE BAKKEN; M. RULAND

2010-01-01

30

Area of Concentration in Translational Informatics The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science  

E-print Network

Area of Concentration in Translational Informatics The Committee on Clinical & Translational, and computational biology to clinical and translational research. Translational informatics can improve of laboratory research into clinical practice. CoUrSEWorK in Translational Informatics draws from a broad range

Stephens, Matthew

31

UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User Guide SOP No.: CI-002  

E-print Network

UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User Guide SOP No ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Clinical Informatics User Provision Procedure Page 1/10 Step Action 1 Access to QA Portal You can access QA Analytics /Dashboards #12;UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User

George, Steven C.

32

Designing Biomedical Informatics Infrastructure for Clinical and Translational Science  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) rests largely on information flowing smoothly at multiple levels, in multiple directions, across multiple locations. Biomedical Informatics (BI) is seen as a backbone that helps to manage information flows for the translation of knowledge generated and stored in silos of basic science into bedside…

La Paz Lillo, Ariel Isaac

2009-01-01

33

Teaching Clinical Psychology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching Clinical Psychology, created by Dr. John Suler of Rider University, is devoted to �sharing ideas and resources for teaching clinical psychology.� Helpful for students and educators in the fields of mental health and human services counseling, this site contains practical in-class exercises, such as an exercise which illustrates what it is like to share secrets with strangers, and syllabi for courses in the clinical psychology curriculum. There are also larger projects for students, including an in-depth analysis of a psychotherapy case study and a role-play project which has students administer, score, and interpret a series of psychological tests given to a classmate.

Suler, John R., 1955-

34

Bridging the gap between biological and clinical informatics in a graduate training program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several training programs in biomedical informatics in the United States are attempting to integrate biological and clinical informatics. However, significant differences in the cultures underlying these two disciplines pose barriers to a uniform educational solution. This paper recounts the experience at Columbia University in adapting a graduate program with an initial focus on clinical informatics to train bioinformaticians. The analysis

Stephen B. Johnson; Richard A. Friedman

2007-01-01

35

Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

2014-01-01

36

PearlTrees web-based interface for teaching informatics in the radiology residency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiology and imaging informatics education have rapidly evolved over the past few decades. With the increasing recognition that future growth and maintenance of radiology practices will rely heavily on radiologists with fundamentally sound informatics skills, the onus falls on radiology residency programs to properly implement and execute an informatics curriculum. In addition, the American Board of Radiology may choose to include even more informatics on the new board examinations. However, the resources available for didactic teaching and guidance most especially at the introductory level are widespread and varied. Given the breadth of informatics, a centralized web-based interface designed to serve as an adjunct to standardized informatics curriculums as well as a stand-alone for other interested audiences is desirable. We present the development of a curriculum using PearlTrees, an existing web-interface based on the concept of a visual interest graph that allows users to collect, organize, and share any URL they find online as well as to upload photos and other documents. For our purpose, the group of "pearls" includes informatics concepts linked by appropriate hierarchal relationships. The curriculum was developed using a combination of our institution's current informatics fellowship curriculum, the Practical Imaging Informatics textbook1 and other useful online resources. After development of the initial interface and curriculum has been publicized, we anticipate that involvement by the informatics community will help promote collaborations and foster mentorships at all career levels.

Licurse, Mindy Y.; Cook, Tessa S.

2014-03-01

37

A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics  

PubMed Central

Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a pathology informatician, the core knowledge set expected of a person trained in the field and, more fundamentally, it helps to define the scope of the field within Pathology and healthcare in general. PMID:23024890

McClintock, David S.; Levy, Bruce P.; Lane, William J.; Lee, Roy E.; Baron, Jason M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Dighe, Anand S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

38

Clinical communication: a new informatics paradigm.  

PubMed Central

Observational studies of clinical workers in a hospital setting suggest that communication problems are a significant source of inefficiency. The need to reduce interruptions, improve contactability, and the sharing of informal information suggests that a mobile communication system capable of supporting asynchronous messaging, role-based contact, and communication policies would be beneficial. A prototype of such a system is described. PMID:8947619

Coiera, E.

1996-01-01

39

School of Informatics Teaching Programme Review 2425 November 2008 School Response  

E-print Network

by teaching support providers. 6.21 The team recommends that the School reviews and identifies the gaps this when the university review of student support is published this autumn. v. DoSs are encouraged to haveSchool of Informatics Teaching Programme Review 24­25 November 2008 School Response The School

Edinburgh, University of

40

AMIA Board White Paper: Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of a training program to be certified in the subspecialty of clinical informatics. They also specify accreditation requirements for clinical informatics training programs. The AMIA Board of Directors approved this document in November 2008.

Charles Safran; M. Michael Shabot; Benson S. Munger; John H. Holmes; Elaine B. Steen; John R. Lumpkin; Don E. Detmer

2009-01-01

41

A review of analytics and clinical informatics in health care.  

PubMed

Federal investment in health information technology has incentivized the adoption of electronic health record systems by physicians and health care organizations; the result has been a massive rise in the collection of patient data in electronic form (i.e. "Big Data"). Health care systems have leveraged Big Data for quality and performance improvements using analytics-the systematic use of data combined with quantitative as well as qualitative analysis to make decisions. Analytics have been utilized in various aspects of health care including predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, home health monitoring, finance, and resource allocation. Visual analytics is one example of an analytics technique with an array of health care and research applications that are well described in the literature. The proliferation of Big Data and analytics in health care has spawned a growing demand for clinical informatics professionals who can bridge the gap between the medical and information sciences. PMID:24696396

Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A

2014-04-01

42

Clinical Informatics: A New Paradigm for Advances in BioMedical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The medical informatics field is going through a rapid change. The current model used is one of patient to physician, with information technology as a value added segment. However, with rapid developments in hardware and software, innovations in the medical informatics field can take a quantum leap forward by changing its basic model of thinking. The evolving field of medical

B. W. Trevor Rohm; C. E. Tapie

2007-01-01

43

Model Formulation: Translating Clinical Informatics Interventions into Routine Clinical Care: How Can the RE-AIM Framework Help?  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveClinical informatics intervention research suffers from a lack of attention to external validity in study design, implementation, evaluation, and reporting. This hampers the ability of others to assess the fit of a clinical informatics intervention with demonstrated efficacy in one setting for implementation in their setting. The objective of this model formulation paper is to demonstrate the applicability of the

Suzanne Bakken; Cornelia M. Ruland

2009-01-01

44

Perspectives on Clinical Informatics: Integrating Large-Scale Clinical, Genomic, and Health Information for Clinical Care  

PubMed Central

The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K.

2013-01-01

45

Adapting social media as a scaffolding tool for teaching health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is an applied hybrid discipline of health and life sciences, computer science and business. Teaching this subject to undergraduate students, presents the challenge of learning without the assistance of internship or work experience that enable placing the learning in context. We used the university's learning management software as a form of social medium to stimulate discussions in preparation

Karen Day; Stewart Wells

2009-01-01

46

A Workshop in Clinical Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A one-day workshop for medical faculty (but also adapted for nursing and allied health instructors) has been designed that incorporates both attitudinal and cognitive objectives, including learning the characteristics of effective clinical teaching, evaluating an observed clinical teaching situation, and applying the characteristics of effective…

Stritter, Frank T.; Hain, Jack H.

1977-01-01

47

The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe): an informatics foundation for the science of clinical research.  

PubMed

To date, the scientific process for generating, interpreting, and applying knowledge has received less informatics attention than operational processes for conducting clinical studies. The activities of these scientific processes - the science of clinical research - are centered on the study protocol, which is the abstract representation of the scientific design of a clinical study. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) is an OWL 2 model of the entities and relationships of study design protocols for the purpose of computationally supporting the design and analysis of human studies. OCRe's modeling is independent of any specific study design or clinical domain. It includes a study design typology and a specialized module called ERGO Annotation for capturing the meaning of eligibility criteria. In this paper, we describe the key informatics use cases of each phase of a study's scientific lifecycle, present OCRe and the principles behind its modeling, and describe applications of OCRe and associated technologies to a range of clinical research use cases. OCRe captures the central semantics that underlies the scientific processes of clinical research and can serve as an informatics foundation for supporting the entire range of knowledge activities that constitute the science of clinical research. PMID:24239612

Sim, Ida; Tu, Samson W; Carini, Simona; Lehmann, Harold P; Pollock, Brad H; Peleg, Mor; Wittkowski, Knut M

2014-12-01

48

Image Informatics for Clinical and Preclinical Biomedical Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Biomedical informatics refers to the study of the application of computational and statistical algorithms, data structures, and methods to improve communication, understanding and management of biomedical information. Our objective through this chapter is to describe and demonstrate our research in the use of biomedical image databases - in both preclinical and clinical settings - to classify, predict, research, diagnose, and otherwise learn from the informational content encapsulated in historical image repositories. This will be accomplished by detailing our approach of describing image content in a Bayesian probabilistic framework to achieve learning from retrieved populations of similar images. We will use specific examples from two biomedical applications to describe anatomic segmentation, statistical feature generation and indexing, efficient retrieval architectures, and predictive results.

Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Wall, Jonathan [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL

2008-01-01

49

The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health records, support for adverse event detection and reporting, and greater investment in research at the intersection of informatics and patient safety. Leading organizations have demonstrated that health care informatics approaches can improve safety. Nevertheless, significant obstacles today limit optimal application of health informatics to safety within most provider environments. The authors offer a series of recommendations for addressing these challenges. PMID:18436896

Kilbridge, Peter M.; Classen, David C.

2008-01-01

50

The Informatics Opportunities at The Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Healthcare providers have a basic responsibilityto protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe healthcare organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health records, support

Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

51

The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

PETER M. KILBRIDGE; DAVID C. CLASSEN

2008-01-01

52

Viewpoint Paper: The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

2008-01-01

53

Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association.  

PubMed

The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG) of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI), to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper. PMID:14567875

Little, David R; Zapp, John A; Mullins, Henry C; Zuckerman, Alan E; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Kevin B

2003-01-01

54

Kenneth J. Turner. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees, Biomedical Informatics, Copyright Elsevier, October 2008.  

E-print Network

Kenneth J. Turner. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees, Biomedical Informatics, Copyright Elsevier, October 2008. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees Kenneth J. Turner, and to demonstrate the approach on healthcare examples created by the CGT (Clinical Guidance Tree) project. Approach

Turner, Ken

55

Research Paper: Clinical Research Informatics: Challenges, Opportunities and Definition for an Emerging Domain  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesClinical Research Informatics, an emerging sub-domain of Biomedical Informatics, is currently not well defined. A formal description of CRI including major challenges and opportunities is needed to direct progress in the field.DesignGiven the early stage of CRI knowledge and activity, we engaged in a series of qualitative studies with key stakeholders and opinion leaders to determine the range of challenges

Peter J. Embi; Philip R. O. Payne

2009-01-01

56

NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ?  

E-print Network

Clinical Research Informatics Applied to: Oral Systemic Research Dental and Craniofacial Research #12;The and oral microbiome samples. Clinical Research Informatics: Informatics Infrastructure for Dental PracticeNIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ? Dental

Senes, Alessandro

57

Foundational biomedical informatics research in the clinical and translational science era: a call to action.  

PubMed

Advances in clinical and translational science, along with related national-scale policy and funding mechanisms, have provided significant opportunities for the advancement of applied clinical research informatics (CRI) and translational bioinformatics (TBI). Such efforts are primarily oriented to application and infrastructure development and are critical to the conduct of clinical and translational research. However, they often come at the expense of the foundational CRI and TBI research needed to grow these important biomedical informatics subdisciplines and ensure future innovations. In light of this challenge, it is critical that a number of steps be taken, including the conduct of targeted advocacy campaigns, the development of community-accepted research agendas, and the continued creation of forums for collaboration and knowledge exchange. Such efforts are needed to ensure that the biomedical informatics community is able to advance CRI and TBI science in the context of the modern clinical and translational science era. PMID:20962120

Payne, Philip R O; Embi, Peter J; Niland, Joyce

2010-01-01

58

Clinical Genome Informatics (CGI) and its Social Informational Infrastructure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary CGI is an essential informatics to support genomic medicine that is a medicine based on genome information. We believe that CGI domain must be a key technological field to establish the gene based medicine or pharmacogenomics. We analyzed the requirements to the social informational infrastructure in CGI domain and have developed the required technologies. In concrete terms, the coupling

Jun Nakaya

2007-01-01

59

RESEARCH INFORMATICS Usage and Impact Summary  

E-print Network

CENTER FOR RESEARCH INFORMATICS Usage and Impact Summary 08.26.13 #12;01. CLINICAL & TRANSLATIONAL & Translational Informatics Bioinfromatics Core Clinical Cancer Genetics Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases Center for Research Informatics Clinical and Translational Informatics Ecology & Evolution External

Allesina, Stefano

60

Clinical Informatics and Its Usefulness for Assessing Risk and Preventing Falls and Pressure Ulcers in Nursing Home Environments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing homes have lagged in the development and use of technology and clinical informatics. This paper describes a practical model of translating clinical informatics research into practice. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessment data collected by nursing homes nationwide is translated into knowledge-based information that supports continuous quality improvement. It does so by providing timely Web-based reports alerting staff to

Christie Teigland; Richard Gardiner; Hailing Li; Colene Byrne

61

Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

to public health informatics, consumer health, translational informatics linking clinical and bioinformatics, and clinical informatics with an emphasis on clinical decision support and patient outcomesIndiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health

Zhou, Yaoqi

62

Information Warehouse – A Comprehensive Informatics Platform for Business, Clinical, and Research Applications  

PubMed Central

Since its inception in 1997, the IW (Information Warehouse) at the Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) has gradually transformed itself from a single purpose business decision support system to a comprehensive informatics platform supporting basic, clinical, and translational research. The IW today is the combination of four integrated components: a clinical data repository containing over a million patients; a research data repository housing various research specific data; an application development platform for building business and research enabling applications; a business intelligence environment assisting in reporting in all function areas. The IW is structured and encoded using standard terminologies such as SNOMED-CT, ICD, and CPT. The IW is an important component of OSUMC’s Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) informatics program. PMID:21347019

Kamal, Jyoti; Liu, Jianhua; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Dyta, Ravi; Rogers, Patrick; Mekhjian, Hagop S.

2010-01-01

63

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education  

PubMed Central

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

64

Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care  

PubMed Central

Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

2014-01-01

65

winter 2015 Health Informatics  

E-print Network

healthcare delivery and clinical effectiveness. UC Davis Extension, a leader in health informatics education informatics with an emphasis on its application to various clinical settings. MarK Carroll, M. traVis naGler, M.s., is a research data manager at the Biomedical informatics, Clinical

California at Davis, University of

66

Informatics tools to improve clinical research study implementation. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

In complex multisite clinical research trials, potential problems are compounded when multiple personnel at different sites are responsible for primary data collection, data entry, report form design, etc. This article describes how informatics tools can help identify and correct flawed procedures and data problems early, contributing to overall study success. For example, a value that is flagged as “bad” soon after data entry is more likely to be correctable because source documents and data originators are more readily available.

67

An Academic-Business Partnership for Advancing Clinical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A partnership between a university school of nursing and a health care information technology supplier resulted in the Simulated E-hEalth Delivery System (SEEDS). This program enables nursing students to learn clinical skills in a state-of-the-art environment using a live-production, clinical information system designed for care delivery. (JOW)

Connors, Helen R.; Weaver, Charlotte; Warren, Judith; Miller, Karen L.

2002-01-01

68

Evaluating informatics applications - clinical decision support systems literature review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews clinical decision support systems (CDSS) literature, with a focus on evaluation. The literature indicates a general consensus that clinical decision support systems are thought to have the potential to improve care. Evidence is more equivocal for guidelines and for systems to aid physicians with diagnosis. There also is general consensus that a variety of systems are little

Bonnie Kaplan

2001-01-01

69

Cancer Clinical and Translational Informatics Goals — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

70

Security Informatics Security Informatics  

E-print Network

engineering, management information systems, economics, informatics or related disciplines. Our graduates is managed or with security incident response teams? #12;Sample M.S. Security Informatics Program of Study 1Security Informatics Security Informatics Security Informatics is the study and design

Camp, L. Jean

71

New challenges for clinical informatics: knowledge management tools  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is widely recognized that medicine has reached a crisis point. Doctors can no longer memorize or effectively apply the vast amounts of scientific knowledge that are relevant to their clinical practice. Estimates suggest that human knowledge doubles every 33 years [1], while the expansion of medical knowledge is currently estimated at doubling about every 19 years. In contrast, our

H. Heathfield; G. Louw

1999-01-01

72

Biobanking Informatics Infrastructure to Support Clinical and Translational Research  

PubMed Central

The University of Utah Health Sciences (UUHSC) and Intermountain Healthcare (IH) support high value clinical and translational research programs. The Utah Biohealth Initiative will facilitate next generation research by leveraging the combined resources of both institutions through an infrastructure which links biospecimens and electronic health records (EHR). During phase I of the Utah BioHealth Initiative (UBI) the participating institutions developed a legal, regulatory and information technology infrastructure that supports clinical and translational research, and advances our understanding of health and disease, improves healthcare value and health for current and future generations of Utahns. We used the Federated Utah Research and Translational Health electronic Repository (FURTHeR) 1 to combine EHR and biospecimen data from an actual study populated by both institutions to demonstrate the robustness of the infrastructure. PMID:24303252

LaSalle, Bernie; Varner, Michael; Botkin, Jeff; Jackson, Marc; Stark, Louisa; Cessna, Melissa; Orthner, Carolyn; Hulse, Nathan; Bernasconi, Aldo; Madsen, Randy; Schultz, Dustin; Bradshaw, Richard; Mitchell, Joyce

73

Gentle interruptions: transformative approaches to clinical teaching.  

PubMed

This conceptual article, drawn from the authors' shared teaching experiences and recent student and clinician evaluation data, set out to reveal and then address some common problems faced by clinical educators and nursing students in the time-constrained, complex, specialized field of clinical learning. We explain and argue the benefits of transformative learning and outline specific strategies for building skills in transformative education, such as interrogating clinical routines and habits, teaching diplomacy skills, and using a process of interruption. Clinical educators can use these strategies to move beyond unwittingly serving the status quo toward consciously contributing to change. PMID:17711067

McAllister, Margaret; Tower, Marion; Walker, Rachel

2007-07-01

74

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during workplace learning and training. This study is based on a broad review of the literature on clinical informatics education and training; its findings support international analyses and suggest that new strategic efforts among stakeholders in the healthcare system are required to make progress in building workforce capacity in this field, in Australia and elsewhere. PMID:20544387

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-03-01

75

FACULTY POSITION IN BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth has launched a major initiative in biomedical  

E-print Network

, and the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Clinical Informatics Program. Dartmouth is located FACULTY POSITION IN BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS The Geisel School informatics through the Collaboratory for Healthcare and Biomedical Informatics

Myers, Lawrence C.

76

INFORMATICS 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

, MBBS, MD, MS 12:30 Lunch, included in tuition #12;4th ANNUAL heALth iNformAtics 1:45 Clinical VirtualHEALTH INFORMATICS PROGRAM 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE The Integration of Care: Innovations and Informatics Office of Continuing Medical Education and the UC Davis Health Informatics Program www

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

77

A domain analysis model for eIRB systems: addressing the weak link in clinical research informatics.  

PubMed

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. PMID:24929181

He, Shan; Narus, Scott P; Facelli, Julio C; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R; Hurdle, John F

2014-12-01

78

Toxicological and clinical computational analysis by the Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff of the US FDA\\/CDER  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff at US FDA\\/CDER has established a consortium of collaborators who are engaged in harvesting data from FDA archives and creating QSAR models of animal toxicological and human health effect endpoints. Databases of animal toxicology studies and human clinical trial and surveillance data have been compiled and the non-proprietary portions are being made publicly

Daniel R. Benz; Edwin J. Matthews; Naomi L. Kruhlak; Anna A. Frid; Barbara L. Minnier; Joseph F. Contrera

79

Performance of using Oracle XMLDB in the evaluation of CDISC ODM for a clinical study informatics system  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes potential strategies for data modeling and implementation as part of the general architecture of CSIS, a clinical study and informatics system that has been developed for the National Institute of Neuroscience and Stroke (NINDS). We discuss the NINDS requirements and how they influenced the system design, with an emphasis on dynamic form creation. We also evaluate open

Shaohua Alex Wang; Yang Fann; Huey Cheung; Frank Pecjak; Barg Upender; Adam Frazin; Raj Lingam; Sarada Chintala; Gladys Wang; M. Kellog; Robert L. Martino; Calvin A. Johnson

2004-01-01

80

Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-01-01

81

Evaluating the informatics for integrating biology and the bedside system for clinical research  

PubMed Central

Background Selecting patient cohorts is a critical, iterative, and often time-consuming aspect of studies involving human subjects; informatics tools for helping streamline the process have been identified as important infrastructure components for enabling clinical and translational research. We describe the evaluation of a free and open source cohort selection tool from the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) group: the i2b2 hive. Methods Our evaluation included the usability and functionality of the i2b2 hive using several real world examples of research data requests received electronically at the University of Utah Health Sciences Center between 2006 - 2008. The hive server component and the visual query tool application were evaluated for their suitability as a cohort selection tool on the basis of the types of data elements requested, as well as the effort required to fulfill each research data request using the i2b2 hive alone. Results We found the i2b2 hive to be suitable for obtaining estimates of cohort sizes and generating research cohorts based on simple inclusion/exclusion criteria, which consisted of about 44% of the clinical research data requests sampled at our institution. Data requests that relied on post-coordinated clinical concepts, aggregate values of clinical findings, or temporal conditions in their inclusion/exclusion criteria could not be fulfilled using the i2b2 hive alone, and required one or more intermediate data steps in the form of pre- or post-processing, modifications to the hive metadata, etc. Conclusion The i2b2 hive was found to be a useful cohort-selection tool for fulfilling common types of requests for research data, and especially in the estimation of initial cohort sizes. For another institution that might want to use the i2b2 hive for clinical research, we recommend that the institution would need to have structured, coded clinical data and metadata available that can be transformed to fit the logical data models of the i2b2 hive, strategies for extracting relevant clinical data from source systems, and the ability to perform substantial pre- and post-processing of these data. PMID:19863809

2009-01-01

82

Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class,…

Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

2008-01-01

83

Biomedical informatics training at Stanford in the 21st century  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Stanford Biomedical Informatics training program began with a focus on clinical informatics, and has now evolved into a general program of biomedical informatics training, including clinical informatics, bioinformatics and imaging informatics. The program offers PhD, MS, distance MS, certificate programs, and is now affiliated with an undergraduate major in biomedical computation. Current dynamics include (1) increased activity in informatics

Russ B. Altman; Teri E. Klein

2007-01-01

84

Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

Wilson, Diane

85

Mentored Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah  

E-print Network

, but not limited to, clinical informatics, informatics for personalized medicine, translational informatics Mentored Postdoctoral Fellowship Program Department of Biomedical Informatics, University of Utah The Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah is recruiting to build

Feschotte, Cedric

86

A survey of informatics platforms that enable distributed comparative effectiveness research using multi-institutional heterogeneous clinical data  

PubMed Central

Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has the potential to transform the current healthcare delivery system by identifying the most effective medical and surgical treatments, diagnostic tests, disease prevention methods and ways to deliver care for specific clinical conditions. To be successful, such research requires the identification, capture, aggregation, integration, and analysis of disparate data sources held by different institutions with diverse representations of the relevant clinical events. In an effort to address these diverse demands, there have been multiple new designs and implementations of informatics platforms that provide access to electronic clinical data and the governance infrastructure required for inter-institutional CER. The goal of this manuscript is to help investigators understand why these informatics platforms are required and to compare and contrast six, large-scale, recently funded, CER-focused informatics platform development efforts. We utilized an 8-dimension, socio-technical model of health information technology use to help guide our work. We identified six generic steps that are necessary in any distributed, multi-institutional CER project: data identification, extraction, modeling, aggregation, analysis, and dissemination. We expect that over the next several years these projects will provide answers to many important, and heretofore unanswerable, clinical research questions. PMID:22692259

Sittig, Dean F.; Hazlehurst, Brian L.; Brown, Jeffrey; Murphy, Shawn; Rosenman, Marc; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Wilcox, Adam B.

2012-01-01

87

Performance of Using Oracle XMLDB in the Evaluation of CDISC ODM for a Clinical Study Informatics System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper describes potential strategies for data modeling and implementation,as part of the general architecture of CSIS, a Clinical Study and Informatics System that has been developed,for the National Institute of Neuroscience ,and Stroke (NINDS). We discuss ,the NINDS requirements and how they influenced the system design, with an emphasis on dynamic,form ,creation. We also ,evaluate open ,standards ,such

Shaohua Alex Wang; Yang Fann; Huey Cheung; Frank Pecjak; Barg Upender; Adam Frazin; Raj Lingam; Sarada Chintala; Gladys Wang; Marc Kellogg; Robert L. Martino; Calvin A. Johnson

2004-01-01

88

Factors in the development of clinical informatics competence in early career health sciences professionals in Australia: a qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying\\u000a essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences\\u000a of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their university education and during\\u000a workplace learning and training. This study is based on

Kathleen Gray; Jenny Sim

2011-01-01

89

Selection of disease-specific biomarkers by integrating inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics in AECOPD patients: a preliminary study  

PubMed Central

Abstract Systemic inflammation is a major factor influencing the outcome and quality of patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and acute exacerbations (AECOPD). Because of the inflammatory complexity, a great challenge is still confronted to optimize the identification and validation of disease-specific biomarkers. This study aimed at developing a new protocol of specific biomarker evaluation by integrating proteomic profiles of inflammatory mediators with clinical informatics in AECOPD patients, understand better their function and signal networks. Plasma samples were collected from healthy non-smokers or patients with stable COPD (sCOPD) or AECOPD on days 1 and 3 of the admission and discharging day (day 7–10). Forty chemokines were measured using a chemokine multiplex antibody array. Clinical informatics was achieved by a Digital Evaluation Score System (DESS) for assessing severity of patients. Chemokine data was compared among different groups and its correlation with DESS scores was performed by SPSS software. Of 40 chemokines, 30 showed significant difference between sCOPD patients and healthy controls, 16 between AECOPD patients and controls and 13 between AECOPD patients and both sCOPD and controls, including BTC, IL-9, IL-18Bpa, CCL22,CCL23, CCL25, CCL28, CTACK, LIGHT, MSPa, MCP-3, MCP-4 and OPN. Of them, some had significant correlation with DESS scores. There is a disease-specific profile of inflammatory mediators in COPD and AECOPD patients which may have a potential diagnostics together with clinical informatics of patients. Our preliminary study suggested that integration of proteomics with clinical informatics can be a new way to validate and optimize disease-special biomarkers. PMID:21883889

Chen, Hong; Song, Zhenju; Qian, Mengjia; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

2012-01-01

90

Development of a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system to enhance rehabilitation clinical trials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clinical trials usually have a demand to collect, track and analyze multimedia data according to the workflow. Currently, the clinical trial data management requirements are normally addressed with custom-built systems. Challenges occur in the workflow design within different trials. The traditional pre-defined custom-built system is usually limited to a specific clinical trial and normally requires time-consuming and resource-intensive software development. To provide a solution, we present a user customizable imaging informatics-based intelligent workflow engine system for managing stroke rehabilitation clinical trials with intelligent workflow. The intelligent workflow engine provides flexibility in building and tailoring the workflow in various stages of clinical trials. By providing a solution to tailor and automate the workflow, the system will save time and reduce errors for clinical trials. Although our system is designed for clinical trials for rehabilitation, it may be extended to other imaging based clinical trials as well.

Wang, Ximing; Martinez, Clarisa; Wang, Jing; Liu, Ye; Liu, Brent

2014-03-01

91

A Survey of the Convergence Between Clinical Informatics and Clinical Engineering  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past fifty years, developments in science and technology have been achieving significant improvements in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. As a consequence of this development, the clinical engineering field was emerged to handle the increasing number of medical equipment used in today's hospital. At the beginning, the clinical engineering's role was to support and advance patient care

R. Hussein

2006-01-01

92

People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009); (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011). A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008). With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS) as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003); (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005); (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011). At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1) a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs); and 2) a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI), Computer Science (CS), Information Science (IS), and Information Technology (IT) disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the establishment of a formal BMI academic unit and the perceived relationship between BMI, CS, IS, and IT leaders. Subsequent thematic analysis of the aforementioned public domain documents demonstrated a discordance between perceived and reported integration across and between BMI, CS, IS, and IT programs and leaders with relevance to the CTS domain. Conclusion Differences in people, organization, and leadership factors do influence the effectiveness of CTS programs, particularly with regard to the ability to access and leverage BMI, CS, IS, and IT expertise and resources. Based on this finding, we believe that the development of a better understanding of how optimal BMI, CS, IS, and IT organizational structures and leadership models are designed and implemented is critical to both the advancement of CTS and ultimately, to improvements in the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare. PMID:23388243

2013-01-01

93

Towards a web-based GIS for teaching geo-informatics at under-graduate level in developing countries: a case study of Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In developing countries, the number of experts and students in geo-informatics domain are very limited compared to experts and students of sciences that could benefit from geo-informatics. In this research, we study the possibility of providing an online education system for teaching geo-informatics at under-graduate level. The hypothesis is that in developing countries, such as Iran, a web-based geo-education system can greatly improve the quantity and quality of knowledge of students in undergraduate level, which is an important step that has to be made in regard of the famous "Geo for all" motto. As a technology for conducting natural and social studies, geo-informatics offers new ways of viewing, representing and analysing information for transformative learning and teaching. Therefore, we design and present a conceptual framework of an education system and elaborate its components as well as the free and open source services and software packages that could be used in this framework for a specific case study: the Web GIS course. The goal of the proposed framework is to develop experimental GI-services in a service-oriented platform for education purposes. Finally, the paper ends with concluding remarks and some tips for future research direction.

Mobasheri, A.; Vahidi, H.; Guan, Q.

2014-04-01

94

Research Paper: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial of a Clinical Informatics Consult Service: Impact on Evidence-based Decision-making and Knowledge Implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo determine the effectiveness of providing synthesized research evidence to inform patient care practices via an evidence based informatics program, the Clinical Informatics Consult Service (CICS).DesignConsults were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: CICS Provided, in which clinicians received synthesized information from the biomedical literature addressing the consult question or No CICS Provided, in which no information was provided.MeasurementOutcomes

Shelagh A. Mulvaney; Leonard Bickman; Nunzia B. Giuse; E. Warren Lambert; Nila A. Sathe; Rebecca N. Jerome

2008-01-01

95

Military Research Needs in Biomedical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2001 U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) Biomedical Informatics Roadmap Meeting was devoted to developing a strategic plan in four focus areas: Hospital and Clinical Informatics, E-Health, Combat Health Informatics, and Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computation. The driving force of this Roadmap Meeting was the recent accelerated pace of change in biomedical informatics in which emerging technologies have

Jaques Reifman; Gary R Gilbert; Lawrence Fagan; Richard Satava

2002-01-01

96

Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

Stead, William W.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

1999-01-01

97

Clinical teaching strategies in nursing (3rd ed.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suzanne H. Campbell is a contributing author (Chapter 8).\\u000aBook Description: This textbook presents a comprehensive framework for planning, guiding, and evaluating learning activities for undergraduate and graduate nursing students in clinical settings. It presents clinical teaching strategies that are effective and practical in a rapidly changing health care environment. It describes a range of teaching strategies useful for courses

Kathleen B. Gaberson; Marilyn H. Oermann; Suzanne Hetzel Campbell

2010-01-01

98

Hand-Held Video for Clinical Skills Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In health care education a balance needs to be struck between theoretical and practical teaching. Undergraduates typically split their time between clinical placement and university-based teaching blocks. A proportion of the time spent in preparation for clinical practice placements will be spent in the classroom or in simulation suites. The…

Edwards, Mark; Jones, Steve; Murphy, Fiona

2007-01-01

99

Connecting Science and Research to Clinical Care through Informatics — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

100

Incorporating active-learning techniques into the photonics-related teaching in the Erasmus Mundus Master in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology"  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, we present a teaching methodology using active-learning techniques in the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of the Erasmus Mundus Master's Degree in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology" (CIMET). A part of the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of this Master's is dedicated to the study of image sensors and methods to evaluate their image quality. The teaching methodology that we present consists of incorporating practical activities during the traditional lectures. One of the innovative aspects of this teaching methodology is that students apply the concepts and methods studied in class to real devices. For this, students use their own digital cameras, webcams, or cellphone cameras in class. These activities provide students a better understanding of the theoretical subject given in class and encourage the active participation of students.

Pozo, Antonio M.; Rubiño, Manuel; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Nieves, Juan L.

2014-07-01

101

tranSMART: An Open Source and Community-Driven Informatics and Data Sharing Platform for Clinical and Translational Research  

PubMed Central

tranSMART is an emerging global open source public private partnership community developing a comprehensive informatics-based analysis and data-sharing cloud platform for clinical and translational research. The tranSMART consortium includes pharmaceutical and other companies, not-for-profits, academic entities, patient advocacy groups, and government stakeholders. The tranSMART value proposition relies on the concept that the global community of users, developers, and stakeholders are the best source of innovation for applications and for useful data. Continued development and use of the tranSMART platform will create a means to enable “pre-competitive” data sharing broadly, saving money and, potentially accelerating research translation to cures. Significant transformative effects of tranSMART includes 1) allowing for all its user community to benefit from experts globally, 2) capturing the best of innovation in analytic tools, 3) a growing ‘big data’ resource, 4) convergent standards, and 5) new informatics-enabled translational science in the pharma, academic, and not-for-profit sectors. PMID:24303286

Athey, Brian D.; Braxenthaler, Michael; Haas, Magali; Guo, Yike

2013-01-01

102

Clinical Teaching Associate/Preceptor Selection & Program Orientation  

E-print Network

interest. Advanced Practice Nursing Level: Eligible individuals must: Possess formal education for the Approval of Educational Programs in Nursing Preparing Candidates for Licensure as Practical or RegisteredClinical Teaching Associate/Preceptor Selection & Program Orientation Domain/Division: Academic

Chapman, Michael S.

103

Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course  

PubMed Central

Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in “Web 2.0”) in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1) serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2) actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP) was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software). Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki) and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics) given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12%) in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation is an effective mechanism for mastery of content. Future residents taking this course will continue to build on this wiki, keeping content current, and thereby benefit from this collaborative teaching tool. PMID:23024891

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; MacPherson, Trevor; Pantanowitz, Liron

2012-01-01

104

Health Informatics in Six Places Bill Lober, MD  

E-print Network

Health Informatics in Six Places Bill Lober, MD Director of Informatics, I-TECH Director, Clinical Constrained Settings May 19th, 2011 Jan Flowers Technical Program Manager jflow2@uw.edu Clinical Informatics Informatics Research Group Schools of Medicine, Nursing, and Public Health University of Washington lober

Anderson, Richard

105

Toward an Ecological Perspective of Resident Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are…

Smith, C. Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-01-01

106

Evaluation of a teaching strategy based on integration of clinical subjects, virtual autopsy, pathology museum, and digital microscopy for medical students**  

PubMed Central

Background: Learning pathology is fundamental for a successful medical practice. In recent years, medical education has undergone a profound transformation toward the development of an integrated curriculum incorporating both basic science and clinical material. Simultaneously, there has been a shift from a magisterial teaching approach to one centered around problem-based learning. Now-a-days, informatics tools are expected to help better implement these strategies. Aim: We applied and evaluated a new teaching method based on an active combination of clinical problems, gross pathology, histopathology, and autopsy pathology, all given through informatics tools, to teach a group of medical students at the Universidad de Santander, Colombia. Design: Ninety-four medical students were followed in two consecutive semesters. Students were randomized to receive teaching either through traditional methodology or through the new integrated approach. Results: There was no significant difference between the intervention group and the control group at baseline. At the end of the study, the scores in the intervention group were significantly higher compared to the control group (3.91/5.0 vs. 3.33/5.0, P = 0.0008). Students and tutors endorsed the benefits of the integrated approach. Participants were very satisfied with this training approach and rated the program an 8.7 out of 10, on average. Conclusion: This study confirms that an integrated curriculum utilizing informatics systems provides an excellent opportunity to associate pathology with clinical medicine early in training of medical students. This can be possible with the use of virtual microscopy and digital imaging. PMID:25191624

Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Raju, Sharat; Echeverri, Jorge H.

2014-01-01

107

Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100  

E-print Network

1 Introduction to Health InformaticsIntroduction to Health Informatics HINF1100HINF1100 Fall 2006.cs.dal.ca/~sraza) ObjectivesObjectives Understanding Health Informatics Objectives Practices 3 © Dr. Syed Sibte Raza Abidi, (www.cs.dal.ca/~sraza) Information Flow in a ClinicalInformation Flow in a Clinical Environment

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

108

ICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I  

E-print Network

), Standards in Biomedical Informatics (Ch. 7), Clinical Decision-Support Systems (Ch. 20). #12;ICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I Tues: 3:00 - 5:40pm Location: TBD Biomedical Informatics, an emerging interdisciplinary field, deals with biomedical information, data, and knowledge

Reed, Nancy E.

109

Quantifying physician teaching productivity using clinical relative value units  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To design and test a customizable system for calculating physician teaching productivity based on clinical relative value\\u000a units (RVUs).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING\\/PARTICIPANTS: A 550-bed community teaching hospital with 11 part-time faculty general internists.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Academic year 1997–98 educational activities were analyzed with an RVU-based system using teaching value multipliers (TVMs).\\u000a The TVM is the ratio of the value of a unit

Michael M. Yeh; Daniel F. Cahill

1999-01-01

110

To be presented at the IFIP Working Group 3.2 Working Conference "Informatics Curricula, TEaching Methods and best  

E-print Network

education in Sub- Saharan Africa Jens Kaasbøll1 and Esselina Macome2 1 Department of Informatics, University, macome@nambu.uem.mz Abstract: Most Sub-Saharan Universities do not have the needed capacity for Master Asian countries have high profiled computer industries that have become major export businesses, Sub-Saharan

Kaasbøll, Jens

111

Teaching clinical reasoning by making thinking visible: an action research project with allied health clinical educators  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical reasoning is fundamental to all forms of professional health practice, however it is also difficult to teach and learn because it is complex, tacit, and effectively invisible for students. In this paper we present an approach for teaching clinical reasoning based on making expert thinking visible and accessible to students. Methods Twenty-one experienced allied health clinical educators from three tertiary Australian hospitals attended up to seven action research discussion sessions, where they developed a tentative heuristic of their own clinical reasoning, trialled it with students, evaluated if it helped their students to reason clinically, and then refined it so the heuristic was targeted to developing each student’s reasoning skills. Data included participants’ written descriptions of the thinking routines they developed and trialed with their students and the transcribed action research discussion sessions. Content analysis was used to summarise this data and categorise themes about teaching and learning clinical reasoning. Results Two overriding themes emerged from participants’ reports about using the ‘making thinking visible approach’. The first was a specific focus by participating educators on students’ understanding of the reasoning process and the second was heightened awareness of personal teaching styles and approaches to teaching clinical reasoning. Conclusions We suggest that the making thinking visible approach has potential to assist educators to become more reflective about their clinical reasoning teaching and acts as a scaffold to assist them to articulate their own expert reasoning and for students to access and use. PMID:24479414

2014-01-01

112

Informatics Moments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The informatics moment is the moment when a person seeks help in using some digital technology that is new to him or her. This article examines the informatics moment in people's everyday lives as they sought help at a branch public library. Four types of literacy were involved: basic literacy (reading and writing), computer literacy (use of a…

Williams, Kate

2012-01-01

113

Health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics is the development and assessment of methods and systems for the acquisition, processing and interpretation of patient data with the help of knowledge from scientific research. This definition implies that health informatics is not tied to the application of computers but more generally to the entire management of information in healthcare. The focus is the patient and the

Michael Imhoff; Andrew Webb

2001-01-01

114

Terminal Behavioral Objectives for Teaching Clinical Toxicology to Clinical Pharmacists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a first step in the development of a competency-based clinical toxicology clerkship, a set of terminal behavioral objectives were developed that reflect the anticipated role that clinical pharmacists should play as part of the clinical toxicology team. The evaluation approaches used at the University of Utah are presented. (LBH)

Veltri, Joseph C.; And Others

1976-01-01

115

Integrated Case Learning: Teaching Clinical Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning how to "think like doctors" can be difficult for undergraduate medical students in their early clinical years. Our model of collaborative Integrated Case Learning (ICL) and simulated clinical reasoning aims to address these issues. Taking a socio-cultural perspective, this study investigates the reflective learning interactions and…

Radomski, Natalie; Russell, John

2010-01-01

116

Evaluating the teaching of clinical preventive medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A study was undertaken to determine the amount, methods, and adequacy of instruction in clinical preventive medicine topics in the medical school curriculum at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) in the 1996–1997 academic year.Methods: A protocol of 35 clinical preventive medicine topics was developed. The preclinical (Years 1 and 2) curriculum was evaluated by reviewing all syllabi

Larry L Dickey; Kim Tran

2001-01-01

117

The teaching of clinical skills at a postgraduate hospital.  

PubMed

The teaching of 'clinical skills' is generally held to be central to postgraduate training in psychiatry, but the term itself has so far escaped exact definition. In an effort to study some of the component clinical abilities, their inter-relationships, and the factors promoting their transmission, all junior psychiatrists at the Maudsley Hospital were surveyed for their views on the clinical training they had received. Three hundred and seventy three assessement on 43 units were made. Trainees perceived the academic instruction and advice on formulating cases which they had received as being quite unrelated to the quality of help with interview skills and instruction in practical management, but feedback from the consultant to the trainee on the latter's performance was necessary for a high standard of both academic and practical instruction. Encouragement to do research was transmitted independently of other clinical teaching. Over a 3-year period the standard of multi-disciplinary teamwork appeared to improve, but there was a decline in the standard of academic instruction and in encouragement to do research. These overall differences were due to changes in the teaching staff, rather than alterations in teaching methods. Surveys such as this may help to define the goals of postgraduate clinical training, and also monitor the extent to which an institution is achieving these goals. PMID:7267879

Creed, F; Murray, R M

1981-05-01

118

Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study in a clinical dental anatomy course exploring the effects of storytelling and problem based learning on student satisfaction. The article explains potential reasons as to why this method demonstrated improved satisfaction among students.

2008-03-31

119

Toward an ecological perspective of resident teaching clinic.  

PubMed

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are over-simplified for real patients with multiple chronic diseases, and local features that influence behavior but are not aligned with core values. Many are looking for a new conceptual structure to guide them. In this paper we briefly review several theories of action from the social and complexity sciences, and synthesize these into a coherent 'ecological perspective'. This perspective focuses on stabilizing features and narrative, which select for behaviors in clinic much like organisms are selected for in an ecosystem. We have found this perspective to be a useful guide for design, measurement, and joint learning in the teaching clinic. PMID:18766451

Smith, C Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-12-01

120

Informatics Systems to Assess and Apply Clinical Research on Dental Restorative Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dental biomaterials are used clinically for one or more of the following purposes: to restore function, to enhance esthetics, and to prevent or arrest demineralization of tooth structure. Studies of the clinical performance of restorations and prostheses made from these materials have generally focused on quality assessment and survival statistics. Data from these studies should provide probabilities of specific treatment

K. J. Anusavice

2003-01-01

121

Teaching Perspectives and Usage of Journal Writing by Clinical Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between teaching perspectives (TPs), faculty usage and perceptions of reflective journaling (RJ), and demographic characteristics among clinical faculty in nursing, social work, and counseling. A combination of causal-comparative and correlational designs was utilized, with stratified…

Alschuler, Mari L.

2012-01-01

122

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical school anatomy curriculum. The article suggests practical advice on the integration of the method into a curriculum as an additional learning opportunity with traditional lab practicums and clinical teaching skills.

Dr. Paul G McMenamin (University of Western Australia Anatomy and Human Biology)

2008-08-01

123

Informatics: A Brief Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

He, Shaoyi

2003-01-01

124

Accelerating translational research by clinically driven development of an informatics platform--a case study.  

PubMed

Translational medicine is becoming increasingly dependent upon data generated from health care, clinical research, and molecular investigations. This increasing rate of production and diversity in data has brought about several challenges, including the need to integrate fragmented databases, enable secondary use of patient clinical data from health care in clinical research, and to create information systems that clinicians and biomedical researchers can readily use. Our case study effectively integrates requirements from the clinical and biomedical researcher perspectives in a translational medicine setting. Our three principal achievements are (a) a design of a user-friendly web-based system for management and integration of clinical and molecular databases, while adhering to proper de-identification and security measures; (b) providing a real-world test of the system functionalities using clinical cohorts; and (c) system integration with a clinical decision support system to demonstrate system interoperability. We engaged two active clinical cohorts, 747 psoriasis patients and 2001 rheumatoid arthritis patients, to demonstrate efficient query possibilities across the data sources, enable cohort stratification, extract variation in antibody patterns, study biomarker predictors of treatment response in RA patients, and to explore metabolic profiles of psoriasis patients. Finally, we demonstrated system interoperability by enabling integration with an established clinical decision support system in health care. To assure the usefulness and usability of the system, we followed two approaches. First, we created a graphical user interface supporting all user interactions. Secondly we carried out a system performance evaluation study where we measured the average response time in seconds for active users, http errors, and kilobits per second received and sent. The maximum response time was found to be 0.12 seconds; no server or client errors of any kind were detected. In conclusion, the system can readily be used by clinicians and biomedical researchers in a translational medicine setting. PMID:25203647

Abugessaisa, Imad; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Tsipras, Giorgos; Lindblad, Staffan; Sandin, Charlotta; Nikamo, Pernilla; Ståhle, Mona; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Tegnér, Jesper

2014-01-01

125

Accelerating Translational Research by Clinically Driven Development of an Informatics Platform–A Case Study  

PubMed Central

Translational medicine is becoming increasingly dependent upon data generated from health care, clinical research, and molecular investigations. This increasing rate of production and diversity in data has brought about several challenges, including the need to integrate fragmented databases, enable secondary use of patient clinical data from health care in clinical research, and to create information systems that clinicians and biomedical researchers can readily use. Our case study effectively integrates requirements from the clinical and biomedical researcher perspectives in a translational medicine setting. Our three principal achievements are (a) a design of a user-friendly web-based system for management and integration of clinical and molecular databases, while adhering to proper de-identification and security measures; (b) providing a real-world test of the system functionalities using clinical cohorts; and (c) system integration with a clinical decision support system to demonstrate system interoperability. We engaged two active clinical cohorts, 747 psoriasis patients and 2001 rheumatoid arthritis patients, to demonstrate efficient query possibilities across the data sources, enable cohort stratification, extract variation in antibody patterns, study biomarker predictors of treatment response in RA patients, and to explore metabolic profiles of psoriasis patients. Finally, we demonstrated system interoperability by enabling integration with an established clinical decision support system in health care. To assure the usefulness and usability of the system, we followed two approaches. First, we created a graphical user interface supporting all user interactions. Secondly we carried out a system performance evaluation study where we measured the average response time in seconds for active users, http errors, and kilobits per second received and sent. The maximum response time was found to be 0.12 seconds; no server or client errors of any kind were detected. In conclusion, the system can readily be used by clinicians and biomedical researchers in a translational medicine setting. PMID:25203647

Abugessaisa, Imad; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Tsipras, Giorgos; Lindblad, Staffan; Sandin, Charlotta; Nikamo, Pernilla; Ståhle, Mona; Malmström, Vivianne; Klareskog, Lars; Tegnér, Jesper

2014-01-01

126

Clinical Scenario Clinical Challenge  

E-print Network

Clinical Scenario 1 #12;Clinical Challenge VINCI ­ VA Informatics and Computing Infrastructure #12Phone 4S and 5 2011 may well be the year that AI finally gets real traction in the medical informatics

127

Standards Enabling the Conduct of Clinical Research — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

128

Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology  

E-print Network

, and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology care including clinical and clini- cal research systems and integration of imaging information for clinical decision making. We discuss informatics approaches, significant advances have been made in imaging informatics to support clinical imaging. Most radiology

Rubin, Daniel L.

129

Museum Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

2003-01-01

130

Teaching about substance abuse with objective structured clinical exams  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although residents commonly manage substance abuse disorders, optimal approaches to teaching these specialized interviewing\\u000a and intervention skills are unknown.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE: We developed a Substance Abuse Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) to teach addiction medicine competencies using immediate\\u000a feedback. In this study we evaluated OSCE performance, examined associations between performance and self-assessed interest\\u000a and competence in substance abuse, and assessed

Sharon J. Parish; Megha Ramaswamy; Melissa R. Stein; Elizabeth K. Kachur; Julia H. Arnsten

2006-01-01

131

Assistant or Associate Professor of Medicine Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research  

E-print Network

research interests in clinical informatics, bioinformatics, or both subdisciplines, and who wouldAssistant or Associate Professor of Medicine Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research and the Stanford Cancer Institute The Stanford Center for Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR) within

Quake, Stephen R.

132

Informatics Versus Information Technology - How Much Informatics Is Needed to Use Information Technology - A School Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We discuss the role of computers and informatics in school education in Poland; ‘informatics’ generally stands for ‘computer\\u000a science’. Although, our investigations are based on the situation in Polish schools, the conclusions may apply to other countries.\\u000a The main attention is paid here to didactical approaches in teaching and learning informatics and its applications with the\\u000a emphasis on preparation for

Maciej M. Syslo; Anna Beata Kwiatkowska

2005-01-01

133

Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics  

PubMed Central

The Human Genome Project (HGP) provided the initial draft of mankind's DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized.[7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it's hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future. PMID:23248761

Gullapalli, Rama R.; Desai, Ketaki V.; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

2012-01-01

134

From unmet clinical need to entrepreneurship: taking your informatics solution to market.  

PubMed

This paper will describe the process for taking a decision support solution to market as a start-up business. The nurse inventor and Co-Founder of RightCare Solutions, Inc. will share the steps from answering a clinical question, to registering an invention, creating a business plan and company, obtaining venture funding, and launching a commercial product. We will share positives about the experience such as how to get start-up funds, gaining national exposure and access to an excellent team, disseminating your work broadly, further enhancing the product, and obtaining equity, and financial rewards. We will discuss cons such as losing control, dilution of ownership, and conflict of interest. This paper will encourage nurse informaticians to think differently and learn about the steps in the process from an experienced team. PMID:24943561

Bowles, Kathryn H; Heil, Eric

2014-01-01

135

School of Informatics Course Questionnaire  

E-print Network

return your completed feedback form to the course lecturer or directly to the Informatics Teaching: http://www.inf.ed.ac.uk/admin/ITO/questionnaires You can also provide feedback directly to your Evaluation Please rate the course according to the following attributes, on a scale from 1 to 5. Workload

Koehn, Philipp

136

Are the Teachers Teaching? Measuring the Educational Activities of Clinical Faculty.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A new instrument used at Cornell University (New York) for measuring the teaching activities of clinical medical faculty quantifies levels of teaching and allows comparison of diverse teaching activities, complementing qualitative measures of teaching. Units of activity are weighted to calculate their relative value. (MSE)

Bardes, Charles; Hayes, Joseph G.

1995-01-01

137

[Current issues of medical informatics].  

PubMed

Due to the modern high standards of information technologies it is only natural to promote our medical care and to ensure a new quality of clinical services. Information technologies should be introduced into the medical field with due respect to clearly predetermined principles. Analyzed in the paper are the key reasons for a huge number of problems occurring in the sphere of medical informatics; optimal methods of medical-informatics introduction are defined. PMID:15101199

Pokrovski?, V I; Lishchuk, V A; Shevchenko, G V

2004-01-01

138

Can the Faculty Development Door Swing Both Ways? Science and Clinical Teaching in the 1990s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relationship between clinical teaching and research in the basic sciences is discussed. The same energy expended to enhance clinical research will also efficiently build new curricula; ease the strains associated with assigning a priority to teaching or research; and serve to further science, teaching, and technology transfer. (MLW)

Tedesco, Lisa A.

1988-01-01

139

Enhancing Clinical Teaching with Information Technologies: What Can We Do Right Now?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology can enhance clinical teaching in medicine by increasing the amount of relevant information available to learners, promoting rapid integration of information into the teaching encounter, facilitating information processing in small groups, and helping compensate for discontinuities inherent in the current clinical teaching…

Sandroni, Stephen

1997-01-01

140

Assessing the current state of dental informatics in saudi arabia: the new frontier.  

PubMed

Dental informatics is an emerging field that has the potential to transform the dental profession. This study aims to summarize the current applications of dental informatics in Saudi Arabia and to identify the challenges facing expansion of dental informatics in the Saudi context. Search for published articles and specialized forum entries was conducted, as well as interviews with dental professionals familiar with the topic. Results indicated that digital radiography/analysis and administrative management of dental practice are the commonest applications used. Applications in Saudi dental education included: web-based learning systems, computer-based assessments and virtual technology for clinical skills' teaching. Patients' education software, electronic dental/oral health records and the potential of dental research output from electronic databases are yet to be achieved in Saudi Arabia. Challenges facing Saudi dental informatics include: lack of IT infrastructure/support, social acceptability and financial cost. Several initiatives are taken towards the research in dental informatics. Still, more investments are needed to fully achieve the potential of various application of informatics in dental education, practice and research. PMID:25000042

Al-Nasser, Lubna; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Househ, Mowafa

2014-01-01

141

Health Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

2002-01-01

142

Health Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines recent developments in health informatics from a historical and global perspective relating to information management through the interdisciplinary application of information science and technology for the benefits of patients, staff, scientists, managers, and caregivers. Highlights include competition; the World Health Organization;…

MacDougall, Jennifer; Brittain, J. Michael

1994-01-01

143

Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of New Patients Presenting to a Community Teaching Clinic  

PubMed Central

Purpose: We compare patient populations attending chiropractors in the field to those in teaching clinics to allow educational institutions to determine if students are exposed to a similar case mix. The purpose of our study was to describe and compare descriptively the clinical case mix of a recently opened community-based teaching clinic to previously published practice data. Methods: A retrospective descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using new patient records completed at a clinic. Data were extracted using a specifically designed abstraction form. Results: We manually abstracted 649 files. A total of 580 new patient files was included in the analysis, among which 57.7% included female patients with a mean age of 43 years (SD 18), and 42.1% presented with a chief complaint of more than one year in duration. The vast majority of patients complained of spinal pain (81.4%), most commonly low back pain. Almost 92% of the diagnoses were classified as simple (sprain/strain). The average number of visits per patient was 7.4 (SD 11.3); 54.7% received spinal manipulation on their first visit. The majority of patients were referred by the treating intern (64.8%) and about 24% of patients were local residents. Conclusions: Our study contributed to the few studies detailing patients attending chiropractic academic teaching clinics. It provided benchmark demographic and clinical data that may be used for operational planning. Our study suggested that the case mix of this teaching clinic provides interns with appropriate learning opportunities to achieve entry to practice competencies. PMID:23362363

Lishchyna, Natalia; Mior, Silvano

2012-01-01

144

The Influence of Computers and Informatics on Mathematics and Its Teaching. Science and Technology Education Series, 44.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1985 the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI) published the first edition of a book of studies on the topic of the influence of computers on mathematics and the teaching of mathematics. This document is an updated version of that book and includes five articles from the 1985 ICMI conference at Strasbourg, France; reports…

Cornu, Bernard, Ed.; Ralston, Anthony, Ed.

145

Entrepreneurial Learning (Not Teaching) And Informatics (Not Computer) Support: Using Appropriate Learning Styles and Tools to Support the Entrepreneurial Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing dissatisfaction with the standard university model of teaching business courses has led to watershed articles in academic journals, increased experimentation in learning models, and an overall atmosphere of revolution in business learning. The leaders in this revolution, as teachers, students, and key advisors, are practicing and aspiring entrepreneurs. Their contributions are moving us toward models of experiential learning, nontraditional

Scott Browne; Rich Harms

2004-01-01

146

GeneMed: An Informatics Hub for the Coordination of Next-Generation Sequencing Studies that Support Precision Oncology Clinical Trials  

PubMed Central

We have developed an informatics system, GeneMed, for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) molecular profiling-based assignment of cancer therapy (MPACT) clinical trial (NCT01827384) being conducted in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center. This trial is one of the first to use a randomized design to examine whether assigning treatment based on genomic tumor screening can improve the rate and duration of response in patients with advanced solid tumors. An analytically validated next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay is applied to DNA from patients’ tumors to identify mutations in a panel of genes that are thought likely to affect the utility of targeted therapies available for use in the clinical trial. The patients are randomized to a treatment selected to target a somatic mutation in the tumor or with a control treatment. The GeneMed system streamlines the workflow of the clinical trial and serves as a communications hub among the sequencing lab, the treatment selection team, and clinical personnel. It automates the annotation of the genomic variants identified by sequencing, predicts the functional impact of mutations, identifies the actionable mutations, and facilitates quality control by the molecular characterization lab in the review of variants. The GeneMed system collects baseline information about the patients from the clinic team to determine eligibility for the panel of drugs available. The system performs randomized treatment assignments under the oversight of a supervising treatment selection team and generates a patient report containing detected genomic alterations. NCI is planning to expand the MPACT trial to multiple cancer centers soon. In summary, the GeneMed system has been proven to be an efficient and successful informatics hub for coordinating the reliable application of NGS to precision medicine studies. PMID:25861217

Zhao, Yingdong; Polley, Eric C; Li, Ming-Chung; Lih, Chih-Jian; Palmisano, Alida; Sims, David J; Rubinstein, Lawrence V; Conley, Barbara A; Chen, Alice P; Williams, P Mickey; Kummar, Shivaani; Doroshow, James H; Simon, Richard M

2015-01-01

147

Assistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the  

E-print Network

) translational biomedical and clinical informatics; or (4) consumer health and social informatics. SoAssistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the new Indiana University School

Zhou, Yaoqi

148

Climate Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

2013-01-01

149

Small Group Teaching: Clinical Correlation with a Human Patient Simulator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The popularity of the problem-based learning paradigm has stimulated new interest in small group, interactive teaching techniques. Medical educators of physiology have long recognized the value of such methods, using animal-based laboratories to demonstrate difficult physiological principles. Due to ethical and other concerns, a replacement of this teaching tool has been sought. Here, the author describes the use of a full-scale human patient simulator for such a workshop. The simulator is a life-size mannequin with physical findings (palpable pulses, breath/heart sounds, blinking eyes, etc.) and sophisticated mechanical and software models of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. It can be connected to standard physiological monitors to reproduce a realistic clinical environment. In groups of 10, first-year medical students explore StarlingÂ?s law of the heart, the physiology of the Valsalva maneuver, and the function of the baroreceptor in a clinically realistic context using the simulator. With the use of a novel pre-/postworkshop assessment instrument that included student confidence in their answers, student confidence improved for all questions and survey items following the simulator session (P 85% of the students rating the workshop "very good" or "excellent."

Dr. Tammy Y. Euliano (University of Florida College of Medicine Dept. of Anesthesiology)

2001-03-01

150

Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics  

E-print Network

human subjects or clinical data in any way. Many informatics projects will be exempt from full IRBCapstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics A Capstone Project is one of the requirements of the MS in Health Informatics degree at IUPUI. By the end of the first year the student

Zhou, Yaoqi

151

Graduate Group in Health Informatics M.S. Degree Requirements  

E-print Network

to Health Informatics MHI 202 4 units Computer Based Patient Records MHI 209 4 units Clinical Data1 Graduate Group in Health Informatics M.S. Degree Requirements Revised: 2/25/2009 Graduate Council in the field of Health Informatics. Applicants whose native language or whose academic instruction is

Ullrich, Paul

152

Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services  

E-print Network

clinical and molecular, require sophisticated informatics tools. The health of the individualImaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services David S. Mendelson, MD informatics tools and developments can help the radiologist respond to the drive for safety, quality

Rubin, Daniel L.

153

Machine Learning and Software Engineering in Health Informatics  

E-print Network

- text of health informatics, where the scale of clinical practice requires new engineering approachesMachine Learning and Software Engineering in Health Informatics David A. Clifton, Jeremy Gibbons--Health informatics is a field in which the disci- plines of software engineering and machine learning necessarily co

Miller, Alice

154

MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY  

E-print Network

is focused on patient-based clinical research and information technology for medical care (hospitalMEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY Authors: Bansard J.Y (1,2), Rebholz, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, U.K. 4 Erasmus University Medical Center, Dept of Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

155

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

156

Page 1 of 3 Medical Informatics  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 Medical Informatics A Framework for Data and Mined Knowledge Interoperability in Clinical Decision Support Systems R. Sherafat and K. Sartipi and P. Jayaratna International Journal of Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics (IJHSI) vol 5(1), 2010, pages 37-60 Due to reliance on human

Sartipi, Kamran

157

BioInformatics BioInformatics  

E-print Network

BigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Bioinformatics group, Utrecht University, the Netherlands Patterns in genome and regulome evolution: insights

Shamir, Ron

158

Clinical teaching competence inventory for nursing preceptors: instrument development and testing.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument which measures clinical teaching competencies of nursing preceptors. It is necessary to investigate what kinds of teaching competencies are required in modern, more student-centered higher education teaching contexts. Nurses need to possess teaching competence to perform the role of preceptor properly. However, empirical studies exploring teaching competence are rare. Psychometric testing was conducted on a sample of 389 clinical nursing preceptors from three hospitals in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability testing were conducted on the 53-item Clinical Teaching Competencies Scale. Results indicated that principal axis factoring extraction identified four factors through a promax rotation: Student evaluation, goal setting and individual teaching, teaching strategies, and demonstration of organized knowledge. The Cronbach's ? values for the four factors ranged from 0.82-0.87. The Clinical Teaching Competence Inventory was found to have adequate construct validity and internal consistency of reliability for clinical nursing preceptors to assess clinical teaching behaviors in practice settings. PMID:24787255

Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Chiu, Hsiu-Win; Chen, Ya-Lin

2014-02-01

159

Dental Informatics: An Emerging Biomedical Informatics Discipline  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomedical informatics is a maturing discipline. During the last forty years, it has developed into a research discipline of significant scale and scope. One of its subdisciplines, dental informatics, is beginning to emerge as its own entity. While there is a growing cadre of trained dental informaticians, dental faculty and administrators in general are not very familiar with dental informatics

Titus K. L. Schleyer

2003-01-01

160

Teaching nonauthoritarian clinical ethics: using an inventory of bioethical positions.  

PubMed

One area of bioethics education with direct impact on the lives of patients, families, and providers is the training of clinical ethics consultants who practice in hospital-based settings. There is a universal call for increased skills and knowledge among practicing consultants, broad recognition that many are woefully undertrained, and a clear consensus that CECs must avoid an "authoritarian approach" to consultation-an approach, that is, in which the consultant imposes his or her values, ethical priorities, or religious convictions on the stakeholders in an ethics conflict. Yet little work has been done on how to teach CECs not to impose their values in an ethics consultation, or even on the dimensions of this problem. In this essay, I propose a tool for bioethical instruction that targets this question: how can CECs be taught a nonauthoritarian mode of ethical analysis and consultation that can avert the problem of values imposition? PMID:25739778

Fiester, Autumn

2015-03-01

161

An Analysis of Educational Informatization Level of Students, Teachers, and Parents: In Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Korea is recognized as one of the most advanced countries in terms of informatization. The development of informatization has impacted education, and education informatization has contributed to the improvement of teaching in the classroom. Accordingly, education informatiozation is one of the paramount pedagogical issues in South Korea. This…

Kim, JaMee; Lee, WonGyu

2011-01-01

162

Indiana University Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

East 226) · HCI/d Informatics students will meet with Erik Stolterman, Director of HCI/d (INFO 107 of Informatics · HCI Informatics students will meet with Erik Stolterman, Professor of Informatics · Security

Dalkilic, Mehmet

163

Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

2011-01-01

164

Crossing the chasm: information technology to biomedical informatics.  

PubMed

Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap for Medical Research." The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH's translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers.This report details one academic health center's transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This article describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

Fahy, Brenda G; Balke, C William; Umberger, Gloria H; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L; Conigliaro, Joseph

2011-06-01

165

Metropolis redux: the unique importance of library skills in informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The objective is to highlight the important role that librarians have in teaching within a successful medical informatics program. Librarians regularly utilize skills that, although not technology dependent, are essential to conducting computer-based research. The Metropolis analogy is used to introduce the part librarians play as informatics partners. Science fiction is a modern mythology that, beyond a technical exterior, has lasting value in its ability to reflect the human condition. The teaching of medical informatics, an intersection of technology and knowledge, is also most relevant when it transcends the operation of databases and systems. Librarians can teach students to understand, research, and utilize information beyond specific technologies. Methods: A survey of twenty-six informatics programs was conducted during 2002, with specific emphasis on the role of the library service. Results: The survey demonstrated that librarians currently do have a central role in informatics instruction, and that library-focused skills form a significant part of the curriculum in many of those programs. In addition, librarians have creative opportunities to enhance their involvement in informatics training. As a sample program in the study, the development of the informatics course at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is included. Conclusions: Medical informatics training is a wonderful opportunity for librarians to collaborate with professionals from the sciences and other information disciplines. Librarians' unique combination of human research and technology skills provides a valuable contribution to any program. PMID:15098050

King, Samuel Bishop; MacDonald, Kate

2004-01-01

166

The Relationship of Nursing Faculty Clinical Teaching Behaviors to Student Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Clinical experience is the most important component of nursing education (Gaberson & Oermann, 2007; Walker, 2005). As part of the clinical learning environment, the clinical teaching behaviors of nursing faculty have significant potential to influence students' learning. Nurse educators have a responsibility to provide nursing students with…

Kube, Marcia L.

2010-01-01

167

THE ADAPTATION FOR GROUP CLASSROOM USE OF CLINICAL TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING BRAIN-INJURED CHILDREN.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS STUDY SOUGHT TO DEVELOP A PUBLIC SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR BRAIN-INJURED CHILDREN OF AVERAGE OR LOW AVERAGE INTELLECTUAL POTENTIAL. THE OBJECTIVES WERE--(1) TO COLLECT CLINICAL TUTORING TECHNIQUES BEING USED, (2) TO CLASSIFY CLINICAL TUTORIAL METHODS IN A FRAMEWORK USEFUL FOR DEVELOPING TECHNIQUES FOR GROUP TEACHING, (3) TO ADOPT CLINICAL TUTORIAL…

NOVACK, HARRY S.

168

Qualitative analysis of end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyse end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan. In February 2004, an 8-day NI technology training campaign was held in Taipei for 60 clinical nurses. Excel VBA was used as the tool to teach the clinical nurses, who had never written any programs, but were very interested in informatics. Three projects were determined after detailed discussion and evaluation of clinical needs and technical feasibility between the nurses and the technical support team, which was composed of one experienced informatics professor and one clinical NI assistant. A qualitative analysis was used to interview the three pairs of programming clinical nurses and their direct supervisors with a structured but open questionnaire. Representative concepts were categorized from the data until all were categorized. The concepts were organized under three categories: the purposes, the benefits and the challenges of system development. According to this study, end user computing strategy with Excel VBA was successful so far. PMID:17102334

Hou, I-Ching; Chang, Polun; Wang, Tsen-Yung

2006-01-01

169

THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School -SISS  

E-print Network

to introducing multilevel models Clinical INFORMATICS & HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH GROUP ­ www.clininf.eu The course is hosted by the Clinical Informatics and Health Outcomes Research group: Taught by leadingTHE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School - SISS Building

Doran, Simon J.

170

Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS  

E-print Network

to those procedures that would be most helpful for their pa- tients'clinical context. Informatics methodsInformatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Radiology1 Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Informatics methods and systems in support of clinical care are well established in the health care enterprise

Rubin, Daniel L.

171

Integration of Technology and Informatics in Curriculum Working Group Paul Gorman, M.D. (Chair)  

E-print Network

) Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology Jeff Kraakevik, M.D. (Liaison) Neurology Donn Spight, M (general internal medicine) Bill Hersh, M.D. Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Shannon McIntegration of Technology and Informatics in Curriculum Working Group Paul Gorman, M.D. (Chair

Chapman, Michael S.

172

Biostatistics and Medical Informatics 2012-2013 Committee Assignments  

E-print Network

/13/12), Menggang Yu (begin 1/1/13) Cancer Informatics Shared Resource David Page Clinical Research Committee KyungBiostatistics and Medical Informatics 2012-2013 Committee Assignments 10/1/12 DepartmentalMann Kim Data and Safety Monitoring Committee KyungMann Kim ICTR Clinical Investigations Admissions

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

173

TOWARDS TRANSLATIONAL BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS: INTERPRETABLE MODELS FOR ETIOLOGY, EARLY DIAGNOSIS, AND PROGNOSIS  

E-print Network

TOWARDS TRANSLATIONAL BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS: INTERPRETABLE MODELS FOR ETIOLOGY, EARLY DIAGNOSIS for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Clinical Investigation) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON 2012 Date Committee: Charles David Page, Jr., Professor, Computer Science, Biostatistics and Medical Informatics

Page Jr., C. David

174

Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association Volume 2 Number 5 Sep / Oct 1995 The Practice ofInformatics  

E-print Network

The Practice ofInformatics Internet as Clinical Information System: Application Development Using the WorldJournal of the American Medical Informatics Association Volume 2 Number 5 Sep / Oct 1995 Wide Web Abstract Clinical computing application development at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center

Cimino, James J.

175

'To take care of the patients': Qualitative analysis of Veterans Health Administration personnel experiences with a clinical informatics system  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Veterans Health Administration (VA) has invested significant resources in designing and implementing a comprehensive electronic health record (EHR) that supports clinical priorities. EHRs in general have been difficult to implement, with unclear cost-effectiveness. We describe VA clinical personnel interactions with and evaluations of the EHR. METHODS: As part of an evaluation of a quality improvement initiative, we interviewed

Laura M Bonner; Carol E Simons; Louise E Parker; Elizabeth M Yano; JoAnn E Kirchner

2010-01-01

176

Standards for reporting randomized controlled trials in medical informatics: a systematic review of CONSORT adherence in RCTs on clinical decision support  

PubMed Central

Introduction The Consolidated Standards for Reporting Trials (CONSORT) were published to standardize reporting and improve the quality of clinical trials. The objective of this study is to assess CONSORT adherence in randomized clinical trials (RCT) of disease specific clinical decision support (CDS). Methods A systematic search was conducted of the Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases. RCTs on CDS were assessed against CONSORT guidelines and the Jadad score. Result 32 of 3784 papers identified in the primary search were included in the final review. 181?702 patients and 7315 physicians participated in the selected trials. Most trials were performed in primary care (22), including 897 general practitioner offices. RCTs assessing CDS for asthma (4), diabetes (4), and hyperlipidemia (3) were the most common. Thirteen CDS systems (40%) were implemented in electronic medical records, and 14 (43%) provided automatic alerts. CONSORT and Jadad scores were generally low; the mean CONSORT score was 30.75 (95% CI 27.0 to 34.5), median score 32, range 21–38. Fourteen trials (43%) did not clearly define the study objective, and 11 studies (34%) did not include a sample size calculation. Outcome measures were adequately identified and defined in 23 (71%) trials; adverse events or side effects were not reported in 20 trials (62%). Thirteen trials (40%) were of superior quality according to the Jadad score (?3 points). Six trials (18%) reported on long-term implementation of CDS. Conclusion The overall quality of reporting RCTs was low. There is a need to develop standards for reporting RCTs in medical informatics. PMID:21803926

Berntsen, G; Lassen, K; Bellika, J G; Wootton, R; Lindsetmo, R O

2011-01-01

177

A Model for Interschool Teaching of Humanities during Clinical Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collaborative course was developed in 1980 for senior medical students and other professional school students by the faculties teaching ethics at the four medical schools in or near the District of Columbia. The course in bioethics is described. (MLW)

Glover, Jacqueline; And Others

1984-01-01

178

Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience  

PubMed Central

Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

2014-01-01

179

The Multiple Dimensions of Interoperability and Data Standards in the Clinical and Translational Research Domains — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

180

The origins of informatics.  

PubMed Central

This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

Collen, M F

1994-01-01

181

Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching…

Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

2010-01-01

182

Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

2009-01-01

183

Clinically Oriented Physiology Teaching: Strategy for Developing Critical-Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medicine is an applied science, interpreting evidence and applying it to real life by using clinical reasoning skills and experience. COPT (clinically oriented physiology teaching) was incorporated in physiology instruction aiming to relate the study of physiology to real-life problems, to generate enthusiasm and motivation for learning, and to…

Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K.

2004-01-01

184

Do Student Evaluations Influence the Teaching Skills of Clerkship Clinical Faculty?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Web-based student evaluations of clinical faculty were collected over an 8-year period. There were 19,881 medical student evaluations over the 8-year period for all clinical clerkships, representing a total of 952 faculty. Students used a 5-point Likert scale to rate the teaching effectiveness of faculty. Criterion-based methods and standard…

Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Hoyt, Amy; McNulty, John A.

2013-01-01

185

A NEW APPROACH TO CLINICAL PHARMACY PRACTICE TEACHING IN THE FOUR-YEAR DEGREE COURSE  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a new approach to clinical pharmacy practice teaching for undergraduate students using a clinical tutor model at the school of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Manchester. The results of an evaluation of the first year of the course are also reported T he Government's continuing aim to modernise the National Health Service suggests that

Lyn Hanning; Justine Scanlan; Jennifer Silverthorne; Judy Cantrill; Richard Hey; Stephen Freeborn; Jonathan Cooke

186

Development of a Computer Program for Teaching Periodontal Diagnosis Based on Clinical Epidemiological Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Development of an inexpensive but powerful computer program to teach clinical periodontal diagnosis using epidemiological principles is described. Using probabilistic thinking, the student is guided from application of raw research data to derivation of likelihood ratios and how they affect clinical decision making. Student response was found to…

Fung, Kelvin; And Others

1995-01-01

187

Teaching and clinical educator competency: bringing two worlds together.  

PubMed

More sessional clinical educators are being employed in educational institutions today than ever before. Also identified in the literature are issues affecting sessional clinical educators' ability to develop and maintain educator competency. Using the definition of educator competency by the National League for Nursing (NLN 2005a), explored in this paper are ways of increasing sessional clinical educator competency, such as orientation and mentorship programs to support student learning in clinical environments. Approaches in the form of theoretical models designed to evaluate clinical educator competency are examined. A new Sessional Clinical Educator Competency (SCEC) Framework is offered to provide direction for implementing strategies to develop and evaluate sessional clinical educator competency. Suggested is that the SCEC framework could be useful for educational administrators and sessional clinical educators to assess clinical educator competency. PMID:19572836

Robinson, Cathy P

2009-01-01

188

Continued on Page 17 Issue 14, Fall 2013 Newsletter of the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology  

E-print Network

and Clinical Epidemiology Students Receive Degrees.......2 Evidence-based Practice Center Conducts Reviews transitional for us, as the third round of five-year funding for the Evidence- Based Practice Center came at Oregon Health & Science University. But as always, DMICE manages to move forward. The Evidence- based

Chapman, Michael S.

189

A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?  

PubMed Central

Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

Lamy, J.-B.

2014-01-01

190

Web-based informatics education: lessons learned from five years in the trenches.  

PubMed Central

Duke University has a five-year history with high-quality and clinically oriented informatics web-based nursing informatics education. This paper highlights an overview of instructional methods used and pedagogical considerations for both students and faculty. To do the job well, faculty workload for web-based instruction has been more than double the time and effort required for teaching an on-campus course. Results suggest that virtual teamwork is difficult but possible for highly motivated students. Committed to excellence, Duke's program finds that most students do well in achieving their goals and achieving Duke's high standards of academic rigor, however some students are not successful with on-line courses. PMID:12463835

Goodwin, L. K.

2002-01-01

191

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

McMenamin, Paul G.

2008-01-01

192

October 28. 2009! Informatics Enabled Cancer  

E-print Network

October 28. 2009! Informatics Enabled Cancer Registries to Support Rapid Learning Healthcare Rights Reserved, Duke Medicine 2007 Adjuvant interferon for Sarah S? Observation vs Clinical Trial vs on her personal quality of life, nor the influence of worries about her mother s death · Sarah s clinical

Richardson, David

193

Using Informatics and the Electronic Medical Record to Describe Antimicrobial Use in the Clinical Management of Diarrhea Cases at 12 Companion Animal Practices  

PubMed Central

Antimicrobial drugs may be used to treat diarrheal illness in companion animals. It is important to monitor antimicrobial use to better understand trends and patterns in antimicrobial resistance. There is no monitoring of antimicrobial use in companion animals in Canada. To explore how the use of electronic medical records could contribute to the ongoing, systematic collection of antimicrobial use data in companion animals, anonymized electronic medical records were extracted from 12 participating companion animal practices and warehoused at the University of Calgary. We used the pre-diagnostic, clinical features of diarrhea as the case definition in this study. Using text-mining technologies, cases of diarrhea were described by each of the following variables: diagnostic laboratory tests performed, the etiological diagnosis and antimicrobial therapies. The ability of the text miner to accurately describe the cases for each of the variables was evaluated. It could not reliably classify cases in terms of diagnostic tests or etiological diagnosis; a manual review of a random sample of 500 diarrhea cases determined that 88/500 (17.6%) of the target cases underwent diagnostic testing of which 36/88 (40.9%) had an etiological diagnosis. Text mining, compared to a human reviewer, could accurately identify cases that had been treated with antimicrobials with high sensitivity (92%, 95% confidence interval, 88.1%–95.4%) and specificity (85%, 95% confidence interval, 80.2%–89.1%). Overall, 7400/15,928 (46.5%) of pets presenting with diarrhea were treated with antimicrobials. Some temporal trends and patterns of the antimicrobial use are described. The results from this study suggest that informatics and the electronic medical records could be useful for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use. PMID:25057893

Anholt, R. Michele; Berezowski, John; Ribble, Carl S.; Russell, Margaret L.; Stephen, Craig

2014-01-01

194

Preprint -Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics -Preprint Pratt, et al. -Incorporating ... 1  

E-print Network

information systems for clinical settings [1, 2]. In this article, we argue that, as medical informaticsPreprint - Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics - Preprint Pratt, et al. Biomedical & Health Informatics, University of Washington 2. School of Management and Information Systems

McDonald, David W.

195

Markov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David  

E-print Network

informatics. We focus on two important problems in this domain: (1) improving various clinical criteria usedMarkov Logic Networks in Health Informatics Shalini Ghosh, Natarajan Shankar, Sam Owre, Sean David , Gary Swan, Patrick Lincoln SRI International, Menlo Park, CA Abstract Health informatics is a fertile

Ghosh, Shalini

196

University of Warsaw Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics  

E-print Network

University of Warsaw Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics Piotr Dittwald Computational Institute of Informatics, University of Warsaw dr hab. Pawel Stankiewicz Baylor College of Medicine, Houston and unique clinical database. Secondly, we present various analyses of mass spectrometry data. In particular

Bechler, Pawel

197

IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy  

E-print Network

IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy Revised ­ 9/16/02 Tenure-track candidates in the IU School of Informatics shall undergo a more comprehensive annual review process in the third year of their appointment to assist them in assessing their progress towards tenure. Lecturer and Clinical rank faculty have

Zhou, Yaoqi

198

Teaching clinical pharmacology and therapeutics: selective for fourth-year medical students.  

PubMed

Teaching clinical pharmacology remains both a lifelong learning process and a lifelong challenge for clinical pharmacologists and other medical educators. In the current information age, with an explosion of drug-related data, the prime topic for discussion is how to teach clinical pharmacology. This article describes our response to the challenges in developing a selective course in clinical pharmacology, and our experience from the first 2 years of the course. Our emphasis is on how to provide in an efficient way knowledge, skills, and attitudes students will need as physicians in the coming decades. Faculty from the Center for Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Pittsburgh in conjunction with faculty from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a one-month intensive course in clinical pharmacology. The integrated course program consists of four overlapping components: 1) general clinical pharmacology (focused on individualization of drug therapy); 2) rational prescribing principles (general principles of drug selection, how to prepare a personal formulary); 3) disease-specific clinical topics (pharmacotherapy of diseases and medical conditions most commonly seen in routine medical practice); and 4) workshops for special attention topics (pharmacokinetics, pain treatment, toxicology, dialysis). In congruence with established educational goals, the course includes drug-, patient-, and disease-oriented concepts. A variety of learning formats (didactic and interactive lectures, one-day problem-based learning sessions, small group case discussions, self-directed and small group directed learning, quizzes, and computer-assisted learning) are used to teach students how to apply the general concepts of clinical pharmacology and rational pharmacotherapy to clinical medicine, and to prepare them to become independent lifelong learners in therapeutics. Student feedback from the first 2 years of this course indicates that this multi-modal teaching format is effective. The majority of students who took the course in clinical pharmacology in 1997 found it to be very beneficial. PMID:9725541

Tofovic, S P; Branch, R A; Jackson, E K; Cressman, M D; Kost, C K

1998-08-01

199

RN, CIO: an executive informatics career.  

PubMed

The Chief Information Officer (CIO) position is a viable new career track for clinical informaticists. Nurses, especially informatics nurses, are uniquely positioned for the CIO role because of their operational knowledge of clinical processes, communication skills, systems thinking abilities, and knowledge about information structures and processes. This article describes essential knowledge and skills for the CIO executive position. Competencies not typical to nurses can be learned and developed, particularly strategic visioning and organizational finesse. This article concludes by describing career development steps toward the CIO position: leadership and management; healthcare operations; organizational finesse; and informatics knowledge, processes, methods, and structures. PMID:16027535

Staggers, Nancy; Lasome, Caterina E M

2005-01-01

200

An analysis of pre-service family planning teaching in clinical and nursing education in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Promoting family planning (FP) is a key strategy for health, economic and population growth. Sub-Saharan Africa, with one of the lowest contraceptive prevalence and highest fertility rates globally, contributes half of the global maternal deaths. Improving the quality of FP services, including enhancing pre-service FP teaching, has the potential to improve contraceptive prevalence. In efforts to improve the quality of FP services in Tanzania, including provider skills, this study sought to identify gaps in pre-service FP teaching and suggest opportunities for strengthening the training. Methods Data were collected from all medical schools and a representative sample of pre-service nursing, Assistant Medical Officer (AMO), Clinical Officer (CO) and assistant CO schools in mainland Tanzania. Teachers responsible for FP teaching at the schools were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Observations on availability of teaching resources and other evidence of FP teaching and evaluation were documented. Relevant approved teaching documents were assessed for their suitability as competency-based FP teaching tools against predefined criteria. Quantitative data were analyzed using EPI Info 6 and qualitative data were manually analyzed using content analysis. Results A total of 35 pre-service schools were evaluated for FP teaching including 30 technical education and five degree offering schools. Of the assessed 11 pre-service curricula, only one met the criteria for suitability of FP teaching. FP teaching was typically theoretical with only 22.9% of all the schools having systems in place to produce graduates who could skillfully provide FP methods. Across schools, the target skills were the same level of competence and skewed toward short acting methods of contraception. Only 23.3% (n?=?7) of schools had skills laboratories, 76% (n?=?22) were either physically connected or linked to FP clinics. None of the degree providing schools practiced FP at its own teaching hospital. Teachers were concerned with poor practical exposure and lack of teaching material. Conclusions Pre-service FP teaching in Tanzania is theoretical, poorly guided, and skewed toward short acting methods; a majority of the schools are unable to produce competent FP service providers. Pre-service FP training should be strengthened with more focus on practical skills. PMID:25016391

2014-01-01

201

NN. Joint JD/MHI (Master of Health Informatics) Degree Program: NKU Chase College of Law and the NKU College of Informatics offer a joint JD/MHI degree.  

E-print Network

addresses both areas of clinical informatics and health information systems, with a focus organizations, learn various clinical informatics datahandling methods, and solve particular problemsNN. Joint JD/MHI (Master of Health Informatics) Degree Program: NKU Chase College of Law

Acosta, Charles A.

202

Teaching Softly in Hard Environments: Meanings of Small-Group Reflective Teaching to Clinical Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A vast literature exists on teaching reflection and reflective practice to trainees in small groups, yet with few exceptions the literature does not address the benefits of these interactions to faculty. Like multiculturalism or cultural competency, the literature assumes that faculty have themselves "achieved" these propensities and that trainees…

Whiting, Ellen; Wear, Delese; Aultman, Julie M.; Zupp, Laurie

2012-01-01

203

Health Informatics: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

1996-01-01

204

What Is Nursing Informatics?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology has developed to the point of providing a means to manage nursing and related health-care data effectively for nursing administrators, educators, practitioners, and researchers. Therefore, the newly recognized area of nursing informatics is important to the nursing profession as a whole. Nursing informatics is defined as the…

McGonigle, D.; And Others

205

The Value of Intelligent Multimedia Simulation for Teaching Clinical Decision-Making Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines advantages and disadvantages of multimedia simulation in nursing education. Provides an example of a modular design with an integrated intelligent agent and knowledge base for teaching clinical decision making. Concludes that this approach overcomes some of the problems of intelligent tutoring systems. Contains 40 references. (SK)

Garrett, Bernard M.; Callear, David

2001-01-01

206

An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a novel approach to teaching gross anatomy to medical students. The article explains an explorative learning approach that builds students analytical, reasoning and communication (written and oral). The methods used require students to develop a patient case based on clinical outcomes.

Dr. Christo T Philip (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)

2008-05-01

207

An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Translating basic sciences into a clinical framework has been approached through the implementation of various teaching techniques aimed at using a patient case scenario to facilitate learning. These techniques present students with a specific patient case and lead the students to discuss physiological processes through analysis of provided data…

Philip, Christo T.; Unruh, Kenneth P.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

2008-01-01

208

Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility in the United Kingdom. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support other activities…

Greene, John Richard T.

2009-01-01

209

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Professor. Description Summary The Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital is looking for a veterinary dentist to join the dentistry team consisting of 2 faculty

210

Teaching as a Clinical Practice Profession: Implications for Teacher Preparation and State Policy. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Issue Brief, written through a collaboration between two federally funded technical assistance and research dissemination centers, the New York Comprehensive Center (NYCC) and the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality (TQ Center), describes what "teaching as a clinical practice profession" means to those in the field of teacher…

Alter, Jamie; Coggshall, Jane G.

2009-01-01

211

The teaching and organisation of clinical pharmacology in European medical schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

A World Health Organisation (European Regional Office) working party has been established to review the progress of clinical pharmacology in European countries. As part of this review a questionnaire on the teaching of chlinical pharmacology was sent to the Deans of all 350 medical schools in the region. Very few replies were received from U.S.S.R., Greece and Portugal and these

M. Orme; F. Sjoqvist; J. Bircher; M. Bogaert; M. N. G. Dukes; M. Eichelbaum; L. F. Gram; H. Huller; I. Lunde; G. Tognoni

1990-01-01

212

Problematising Teaching through a "Critical" Perspective on Clinical Supervision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper takes as its starting point the well-known and extensively used process of clinical supervision and shows how what started over 30 years ago as a collaborative process has been harnessed into a sophisticated mechanism of teacher inspection and surveillance. It shows how this co-option has occurred historically through the progressive…

Smyth, John

213

Origins of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

Collen, Morris F.

1986-01-01

214

Clinical utility and impact of autopsies on clinical practice among doctors in a large teaching hospital in Ghana  

PubMed Central

Background Autopsies can provide a good indication of the quality of patient care, in terms of the accuracy of clinical diagnosis and the quality of treatment given. Designs This was a cross-sectional study among clinicians at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) in 2012. Data were collected with a 69-item, self-administered, structured questionnaire. A total of 215 questionnaires were sent out and 119 clinicians responded. Data were collected on the benefits and utility of autopsies for medical practice, care of patients, and management of clinical wards. Survey data were analyzed by simple descriptive statistics (i.e. proportions, ratios, and percentages). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Objective This study examined the views of clinicians regarding the utility of autopsies and their influence on clinical practice in a large teaching hospital in Ghana. Results Overall, clinicians in KBTH agreed that autopsy reports are useful in answering clinical questions (55/119; 46.2%), confirming or verifying clinical diagnoses (54/119; 45.4%), providing information on unsuspected diagnoses (40/119; 33.6%), and for medical education (90/119; 75.6%). Overall, 70/119 (58.8%) of clinicians agreed that autopsy findings improve completeness and reliability of death certification and provide information on clinical effectiveness of treatment and patient management. However, only 23/119 (19.3%) of sampled clinicians had personal interactions with a pathologist during autopsy processes and 93/119 (78.2%) had not attended any autopsy demonstrations in the past 6 months. Attendance of pathologists at clinicopathological meetings of clinical departments of KBTH was minimal. Unfortunately, the use of autopsy reports for auditing clinical diagnostic performance was not seen as essential. Conclusion Strengthening the interaction between doctors and pathologists is essential in improving the autopsy process and utilization in the hospital. KBTH should create opportunities for doctors to attend autopsy demonstrations and for pathologists to attend clinicopathological meetings in the hospital. PMID:24499743

Tette, Edem; Yawson, Alfred E.; Tettey, Yao

2014-01-01

215

Current trends and challenges in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the roles of health informatics in modern health planning and delivery and defines the key challenges and opportunities for promoting high-quality and cost-effective care. It describes the main information management and technology drivers that improve the generation, use and flow of health information, categorizing these drivers under the headings of healthcare complexity, policy and priorities, clinical support

A. C. Norris

2002-01-01

216

Clinical Informatics in Critical Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care information systems have the potential to enable better care of patients in much the same manner as the widespread use of the automobile and telephone did in the early 20th century. The car and phone were rapidly accepted and embraced throughout the world when these breakthroughs occurred. However, the automation of health care with use of computerized information

G. Daniel Martich; Carl S. Waldmann; Michael Imhoff

2004-01-01

217

Emerging Vaccine Informatics  

PubMed Central

Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

2010-01-01

218

Current trends in community-based clinical teaching programs in U.K.and Ireland dental schools.  

PubMed

Community-based clinical teaching/outreach programs using a variety of approaches have been established in many predoctoral dental schools around the world. The aim of this article is to report current trends in the teaching of community-based clinical teaching/outreach teaching in dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In late 2010-early 2011, a questionnaire was distributed by e-mail to deans of the eighteen established dental schools in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The questionnaire included both open and closed questions relating to current and anticipated trends in community-based clinical teaching. Fourteen responses were received (response rate=78 percent). All fourteen responding schools reported inclusion of a community-based clinical teaching program. Ten schools indicated that their program was based on total patient (comprehensive) care including the treatment of child patients. In nine schools, the program is directed by a senior clinical academic in restorative dentistry. As well as student dentists, ten schools and seven schools include teaching of student dental therapists and student dental hygienists, respectively. There is a varied experience within the schools surveyed in terms of the extent, nature, and content of these programs. Overall, however, community-based clinical teaching was seen as part of the future of dental school education in many schools as an ideal way of preparing graduates for Dental Foundation Training and subsequent independent practice. PMID:23658406

Lynch, Christopher D; Ash, Peter J; Chadwick, Barbara L

2013-05-01

219

A proposal for enhancing the quality of clinical teaching: results of a department of medicine's educational retreat.  

PubMed

New challenges for clinical teachers include incorporating a deeper appreciation of the use of the published literature in day-to-day practice and teaching, responding to the profusion of diagnostic tests and treatments, and dealing with changing practical difficulties. We report a summary of a retreat conducted by our Department of Medicine in which our faculty presented and refined strategies they had developed to deal with these challenges. Areas of discussion include developing an effective medical team managing time on a busy clinical service, teaching pathophysiology, teaching clinical skills, and teaching critical appraisal. Our observations are likely to be useful to clinicians involved in patient-centred teaching in wards and clinics, particularly those interacting with groups of undergraduate and post-graduate trainees. PMID:8246711

Guyatt, G; Nishikawa, J

1993-01-01

220

Imaging Informatics Resources  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program leverages a number of existing informatics resources.  These resources include numerous software tools, data archives, and organizations which set standards and policies useful for imaging research. Software Tools & Data Archives

221

Comparison between videotape and personal teaching as methods of communicating clinical skills to medical students.  

PubMed Central

The efficacy of video recording in transmitting clinical knowledge and skills to medical students was tested by recording on videotape demonstrations of physical examinations given by five clinicians to a randomly selected group of 12 students (personal group) from the first clinical year and then showing these recordings, under identical conditions, to 13 students from the same year (video group). The efficacy of both the personal and video mediums in terms of whether content was retained was tested by a questionnaire completed by all students at the end of the sessions and by a structured clinical assessment in which students were asked to demonstrate some of the same clinical tasks three weeks after the demonstration. In answering the questionnaire the video group obtained a mean (SD) score of 20.8 (7.0) (maximum possible score 40), which was not significantly different from the score achieved by the personal group (17.4 (7.7)). The video group was able to reproduce 44 (10)% of the total clinical steps demonstrated and the personal group 45 (14)%. Videotaped demonstrations can be as effective as personal teaching of clinical methods, and video should be developed as a medium for first line clinical teaching. PMID:6428655

Mir, M A; Marshall, R J; Evans, R W; Hall, R; Duthie, H L

1984-01-01

222

The experience of informatics nurses in taiwan.  

PubMed

Despite recent progress in information technology, health care institutions are constantly confronted with the need to adapt to the resulting new processes of information management and use. Facilitating an effective technology implementation requires dedication from informatics nurses (INs) to bridge the gap between clinical care and technology. The purpose of this study was to explore the working experiences of INs, and alternatives to assist the growth and development of the specialty. This qualitative study recruited 8 participants, and data were collected in 2009 by use of interview guides related to work roles, responsibilities, competencies, and challenges. The emerged themes included (a) diversified roles and functions, (b) vague job description, (c) no decision-making authority, (d) indispensable management support, and (e) searching resources for work fulfillment. Findings indicate that for organizations where nursing informatics development is ongoing, the IN role should be clearly defined as a specialist with identified support resources and decision-making authority. Nursing informatics interest groups should further develop training and certification programs to validate the professional image of the role. Concepts of nursing informatics should be included seamlessly throughout the educational curricula and informatics competency-based courses designed to strengthen student's technology use and data management capabilities. PMID:25839956

Liu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta

2015-01-01

223

NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2009-01-01

224

Informatics in Turkey  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the last twenty years the rapid change in the informatics sector has had economic and social impact on private and government activities. The Supreme Council for Science and Technology of Turkey assigned highest priority to the informatics in its meeting in February 1993. With this advice TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey) intends to give a strong impulse to development of a research policy in this field.

Cakir, Serhat

1994-01-01

225

Use of student clinical partner dyads as a teaching strategy to facilitate learning.  

PubMed

Collaborative learning has been used effectively in the classroom, but it is not well understood in the clinical setting. Student clinical partner (SCP) dyads were used as an intentional teaching method to foster teamwork, learning, and confidence. Students were assigned a patient and a student partner. SCP dyads were expected to provide complete care to their assigned patient, listen to report for their partner's patient, prioritize patient needs, participate in learning experiences for all assigned patients, and function as a team. Students (n = 26) compared their clinical rotation with SCP dyads to their clinical rotations without SCP dyads. The majority strongly agreed that SCP dyads had a positive impact on teamwork (74%), learning experiences (58%), and student clinical confidence (62%). Reflective journals stated that SCP dyads increased exposure to patient care activities, confidence in management, prioritization, teamwork, and time with the faculty. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(3):169-172.]. PMID:25692339

Ott, Lora K; Succheralli, Lauren

2015-03-01

226

Teachers' Perceptions of Their Mentoring Role in Three Different Clinical Settings: Student Teaching, Early Field Experiences, and Entry Year Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to determine the differences in mentoring across three different clinical settings: student teaching, early field experiences, and entry year teachers. Eighteen teachers with mentoring experience in all three clinical settings were selected and interviewed. The teachers' expectations for teacher development,…

Gut, Dianne M.; Beam, Pamela C.; Henning, John E.; Cochran, Deborah C.; Knight, Rhonda Talford

2014-01-01

227

Graduate Research Assistant Position in Health Informatics One Graduate Research Assistant position is available at Department of Health Management and  

E-print Network

of Health Management and Informatics University of Missouri School of Medicine CE728 Clinical Support Graduate Research Assistant Position in Health Informatics One Graduate Research Assistant position is available at Department of Health Management and Informatics (HMI) for full time resident

Noble, James S.

228

Clinical Nutrition and Foodservice Personnel in Teaching Hospitals have Different Perceptions of Total Quality Management Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To investigate the perceived total quality management (TQM) performance of their department by clinical nutrition managers and dietitians, and foodservice managers and supervisors, in hospital food and nutrition service departments.Design Using a 2-part questionnaire containing items about 3 constructs of TQM performance and demographic characteristics, participants rated their perceptions of TQM performance.Subjects Employees in 7 Council of Teaching Hospitals.

YUKYEONG CHONG; NAN UNKLESBAY; RICHARD DOWDY

2000-01-01

229

No relationship between measures of clinical efficiency and teaching effectiveness for emergency medicine faculty  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesEmergency medicine (EM) doctors affiliated with academic institutions experience professional tension between providing excellent, timely care for patients and high-quality bedside instruction for residents and medical students. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between measures of faculty clinical efficiency and teaching effectiveness.MethodsThis was a retrospective review of data from a single academic institution with an annual

Tomer Begaz; M Chris Decker; Robert Treat; Matthew Tews

2010-01-01

230

Do Expert Clinical Teachers Have a Shared Understanding of What Constitutes a Competent Reasoning Performance in Case-Based Teaching?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explore the assessment challenge related to case based learning we study how experienced clinical teachers--i.e., those who regularly teach and assess case-based learning--conceptualize the notion of competent reasoning performance for specific teaching cases. Through an in-depth qualitative case study of five expert teachers, we investigate…

Gauthier, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.

2014-01-01

231

Re-Visiting Health Informatics What is Health Informatics?  

E-print Network

Re-Visiting Health Informatics HINF1100 Fall 2008 #12;What is Health Informatics? · Health the effective organization, analysis, management and use of health information to improve the delivery and practice of healthcare · Health Informatics is the study of applying information and technology to improve

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

232

Cognitive informatics in biomedicine and healthcare.  

PubMed

Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a burgeoning interdisciplinary domain comprising of the cognitive and information sciences that focuses on human information processing, mechanisms and processes within the context of computing and computer applications. Based on a review of articles published in the Journal of Biomedical Informatics (JBI) between January 2001 and March 2014, we identified 57 articles that focused on topics related to cognitive informatics. We found that while the acceptance of CI into the mainstream informatics research literature is relatively recent, its impact has been significant - from characterizing the limits of clinician problem-solving and reasoning behavior, to describing coordination and communication patterns of distributed clinical teams, to developing sustainable and cognitively-plausible interventions for supporting clinician activities. Additionally, we found that most research contributions fell under the topics of decision-making, usability and distributed team activities with a focus on studying behavioral and cognitive aspects of clinical personnel, as they performed their activities or interacted with health information systems. We summarize our findings within the context of the current areas of CI research, future research directions and current and future challenges for CI researchers. PMID:25541081

Patel, Vimla L; Kannampallil, Thomas G

2015-02-01

233

A methodology for teaching ethics in the clinical setting: A clinical handbook for medical ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pluralism of methodologies and severe time constraints pose important challenges to pedagogy in clinical ethics. We designed a step-by-step student handbook to operate within such constraints and to respect the methodological pluralism of bioethics and clinical ethics. The handbook comprises six steps: Step 1: What are the facts of the case?; Step 2: What are your obligations to your

Laurence B. McCullough; Carol M. Ashton

1994-01-01

234

Gap Analysis of Biomedical Informatics Graduate Education Competencies  

PubMed Central

Graduate training in biomedical informatics (BMI) is evolving rapidly. BMI graduate programs differ in informatics domain, delivery method, degrees granted, as well as breadth and depth of curricular competencies. Using the current American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) definition of BMI core competencies as a framework, we identified and labeled course offerings within graduate programs. From our qualitative analysis, gaps between defined competencies and curricula emerged. Topics missing from existing graduate curricula include community health, translational and clinical research, knowledge representation, data mining, communication and evidence-based practice. PMID:24551403

Ritko, Anna L.; Odlum, Michelle

2013-01-01

235

New Position at the Integrative Biomedical Informatics Group Job description: A position is available for a highly motivated researcher in the  

E-print Network

New Position at the Integrative Biomedical Informatics Group Job description: A position is available for a highly motivated researcher in the Integrative Biomedical Informatics group leaded in a translational bioinformatic project aimed at exploiting clinical information for research

Pompeu Fabra, Universitat

236

international journal of medical informatics 7 9 ( 2 0 1 0 ) 422429 journal homepage: www.intl.elsevierhealth.com/journals/ijmi  

E-print Network

international journal of medical informatics 7 9 ( 2 0 1 0 ) 422­429 journal homepage: www the initial introduction Ping Yua, , Senthilkumar Gandhidasanb , Alexis A. Millerc a Health Informatics: Oncology information system Clinical information system Hospital information system implementation

Yu, Ping

237

Curricula in medical informatics.  

PubMed

Education in medical informatics is needed not only for those who want to become specialist in this area but also for health professionals. Since students, depending on the program they are enlisted in, require different types of knowledge and skills in medical informatics, curricula should be adapted to those needs. The curriculum structure also depends on the expert level the students want to attain. This contribution presents the knowledge and skills levels for different groups of students and presents two examples of curricula. PMID:15718674

Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold

2004-01-01

238

A simulation for teaching the basic and clinical science of fluid therapy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical cases that, by nature, are diverse, change over time, and respond in unique ways to therapeutic interventions. We developed a dynamic model using STELLA software that simulates normal and abnormal fluid and electrolyte balance in the dog. Students interact, not with the underlying model, but with a user interface that provides sufficient data (skin turgor, chemistry panel, etc.) for the clinical assessment of patients and an opportunity for treatment. Students administer fluids and supplements, and the model responds in "real time," requiring regular reassessment and, potentially, adaptation of the treatment strategy. The level of success is determined by clinical outcome, including improvement, deterioration, or death. We expected that the simulated cases could be used to teach both the clinical and basic science of fluid therapy. The simulation provides exposure to a realistic clinical environment, and students tend to focus on this aspect of the simulation while, for the most part, ignoring an exploration of the underlying physiological basis for patient responses. We discuss how the instructor's expertise can provide sufficient support, feedback, and scaffolding so that students can extract maximum understanding of the basic science in the context of assessing and treating at the clinical level.

Richard E. Rawson (Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Department of Biomedical Sciences)

2009-01-01

239

The experiences of faculty teaching in an innovative clinical immersion nursing curriculum.  

PubMed

A lack of research exists regarding the impact of substantive curriculum reform on faculty teaching and attitudes. This report of an interpretive phenomenological study of one group of baccalaureate nursing faculty undergoing implementation of an innovative curriculum revealed that the curricular structure and program philosophy offered multiple new challenges. These included the integration of multiple concurrent learning activities, expansion of simulation, and a renewed focus on student assessment. The study design used Heideggerian hermeneutics, a reflexive approach to text analysis of interviews of seven full-time faculty who had worked in the school's traditional curriculum prior to the implementation of the clinical immersion model. The research offers insights into faculty adaptation to curriculum change and its effect on teaching and instruction. The results of this study may assist other schools contemplating or in the process of similar overarching program reforms. PMID:22235697

Paulson, Carole

2011-01-01

240

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective  

PubMed Central

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V.; Aller, Raymond D.; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J.; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B.; Friedman, Bruce A.; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

241

The history of pathology informatics: A global perspective.  

PubMed

Pathology informatics has evolved to varying levels around the world. The history of pathology informatics in different countries is a tale with many dimensions. At first glance, it is the familiar story of individuals solving problems that arise in their clinical practice to enhance efficiency, better manage (e.g., digitize) laboratory information, as well as exploit emerging information technologies. Under the surface, however, lie powerful resource, regulatory, and societal forces that helped shape our discipline into what it is today. In this monograph, for the first time in the history of our discipline, we collectively perform a global review of the field of pathology informatics. In doing so, we illustrate how general far-reaching trends such as the advent of computers, the Internet and digital imaging have affected pathology informatics in the world at large. Major drivers in the field included the need for pathologists to comply with national standards for health information technology and telepathology applications to meet the scarcity of pathology services and trained people in certain countries. Following trials by a multitude of investigators, not all of them successful, it is apparent that innovation alone did not assure the success of many informatics tools and solutions. Common, ongoing barriers to the widespread adoption of informatics devices include poor information technology infrastructure in undeveloped areas, the cost of technology, and regulatory issues. This review offers a deeper understanding of how pathology informatics historically developed and provides insights into what the promising future might hold. PMID:23869286

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil V; Aller, Raymond D; Banach, Lech; Becich, Michael J; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Carter, Alexis B; Friedman, Bruce A; Rojo, Marcial Garcia; Georgiou, Andrew; Kayser, Gian; Kayser, Klaus; Legg, Michael; Naugler, Christopher; Sawai, Takashi; Weiner, Hal; Winsten, Dennis; Pantanowitz, Liron

2013-01-01

242

Introduction System Informatics  

E-print Network

Informatics at Kobe University. My research mainly focuses on computational robotics for rehabilitation the campus, I was surprised how clean and beautiful it was. In the lab, I saw many robots and pieces of high. The teachers were excellent and supportive. I was able to acquire some basic Japanese in the first few weeks

Banbara, Mutsunori

243

Cancer Imaging Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Informatics Workshop September 25-27, 2002 Ellen Feigal, M.D. Acting Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, NCI Imaging is Key to Cancer Research The ability to detect, through imaging, the molecular changes associated with a tumor cell will improve our ability to detect and stage tumors, select appropriate treatments, monitor the effectiveness of a treatment, and determine prognosis.

244

Challenges in Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early grand challenge papers in health informatics identified numerous challenges, many of which either remain as open questions or have been resolved within fairly narrow domains and generalized solutions have not been developed. These open questions and those resolved but not generalized remain so because underlying research issues have not been resolved. These research issues include the synthesis of information

Michael A. Shepherd

2007-01-01

245

Education and health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this contribution, the role of health informatics in the medical curriculum is discussed. Firstly, trends in healthcare are presented that may have an impact on the use of IT in healthcare and consequently on education. Then, the traditional educational system is discussed and it is argued that the educational system should be changed. The problem-based approach is presented as

A Hasman

1998-01-01

246

The art of effectively teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: a primer.  

PubMed

Time pressure on trainees and supervisors alike places a premium on efficiency in training students to master clinical skills. Through role-playing, a supervisor can create multiple iterations of the desired skill until competence is obtained. The skill training can be advanced in intensity and complexity until the trainer and trainee are confident that the interviewing skill is accessible on demand and that the trainee is comfortable with its use. This article focuses on practical methods of creating believable roles for role-playing and how to use them to teach specific interviewing skills strategically. PMID:17643829

Barney, Christine; Shea, Shawn Christopher

2007-06-01

247

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-01-01

248

Clinical diagnostic decision-making in real life contexts: A trans-theoretical approach for teaching: AMEE Guide No. 95.  

PubMed

Making an accurate clinical diagnosis is an essential skill for all medical students and doctors, with important implications for patient safety. Current approaches for teaching how to make a clinical diagnosis tend to lack the complexity that faces clinicians in real-life contexts. In this Guide, we propose a new trans-theoretical model for teaching how to make an appropriate clinical diagnosis that can be used by teachers as an additional technique to their current approach. This educational model integrates situativity theory, dual-information processing theory and socio-cognitive theory. Mapping and microanalysis help the teacher to identify the main processes involved in making an accurate clinical diagnosis, so that feedback can be provided that is focused on improving key aspects of the skill. An essential aspect of using the new educational model is the role of the experienced clinical teacher in making judgments about the appropriateness of the learner's attempts to make a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25391895

Patel, Rakesh; Sandars, John; Carr, Sue

2015-03-01

249

Video- or text-based e-learning when teaching clinical procedures? A randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background and aims This study investigated the effectiveness of two different levels of e-learning when teaching clinical skills to medical students. Materials and methods Sixty medical students were included and randomized into two comparable groups. The groups were given either a video- or text/picture-based e-learning module and subsequently underwent both theoretical and practical examination. A follow-up test was performed 1 month later. Results The students in the video group performed better than the illustrated text-based group in the practical examination, both in the primary test (P<0.001) and in the follow-up test (P<0.01). Regarding theoretical knowledge, no differences were found between the groups on the primary test, though the video group performed better on the follow-up test (P=0.04). Conclusion Video-based e-learning is superior to illustrated text-based e-learning when teaching certain practical clinical skills. PMID:25152638

Buch, Steen Vigh; Treschow, Frederik Philip; Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Worm, Bjarne Skjødt

2014-01-01

250

A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

1989-01-01

251

Mission — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) supports NCI research initiatives through sustaining a multidisciplinary community of biomedical researchers, informaticists, and developers dedicated to improving informatics practices in the study of cancer and the translation of that knowledge into improved clinical interventions.

252

Synergy between medical informatics and bioinformatics: facilitating genomic medicine for future health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we review the results of BIOINFOMED, a study funded by the European Commission (EC) with the purpose to analyse the different issues and challenges in the area where Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics meet. Traditionally, Medical Informatics has been focused on the intersection between computer science and clinical medicine, whereas Bioinformatics have been predominantly centered on the intersection

Fernando Martín-sánchez; Ilias Iakovidis; S. Nørager; Victor Maojo; Piet C. De Groen; Johan Van Der Lei; T. Jones; Klaus Abraham-fuchs; R. Apweiler; Ankica Babic; R Baud; V Breton; P Cinquin; P Doupi; M Dugas; R Eils; R Engelbrecht; P Ghazal; P Jehenson; C Kulikowski; K Lampe; G De Moor; S Orphanoudakis; N Rossing; B Sarachan; A Sousa; G Spekowius; G Thireos; G Zahlmann; J Zvárová; I Hermosilla; F. J Vicente

2004-01-01

253

Abstract Title: Image Informatics Tools for the Analysis of Retinal Images  

E-print Network

Abstract Title: Image Informatics Tools for the Analysis of Retinal Images Presentation Start for Bioimage Informatics, C Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1 University of California Santa/image analysis: non-clinical Purpose: To develop software tools that can be used for the enhancement

California at Santa Barbara, University of

254

9. Biomedical Imaging Informatics Daniel L. Rubin, Hayit Greenspan, and James F. Brinkley  

E-print Network

1 9. Biomedical Imaging Informatics Daniel L. Rubin, Hayit Greenspan, and James F. Brinkley After type of data to be processed by computers, as opposed to non-image clinical data? 2. Why are there many that must be considered in many biomedical informatics applications. Therefore, this chapter is devoted

Rubin, Daniel L.

255

PhD SCHOLARSHIPS in Computers, Systems and Health Centre for Health Informatics  

E-print Network

PhD SCHOLARSHIPS in Computers, Systems and Health Innovation Centre for Health Informatics We, Candidates may have a clinical or a technical background. We welcome applications from those with a technical/biomedical informatics; 3. Potential for completing a PhD; 4. Good organisational skills and demonstrated capacity

New South Wales, University of

256

Medical informatics and health care organizations.  

PubMed

A dialogue between upper management and operational elements over an organization's informatics policies and procedures could take place in an environment in which both parties could succeed. Excellent patient care practices can exist in organizational settings where upper management is not concerned with the specifics of the medical care process. But as the medical care process itself becomes costly, complex, and part of the purview of upper management, solutions to ambiguous informatics policies and practices need to be found. As the discussion of cost determination suggests, a comprehensive "top-down" solution may not be feasible. Allowing patient care expertise to drive the design and implementation of clinical computing modules without unduly restrictive specifications from above is probably the best way to proceed. But if the organization needs to know the specifics of a treatment episode, then the informatics definitions specific to treatment episodes need to be unambiguous and consistently applied. As the discussion of Social Security numbers suggests, communication of information across various parts of the organization not only requires unambiguous data structure definitions, but also suggests that the communication process not be dependent on the content of the messages. Both ideas--consistent data structure definitions for essential data and open system communication architectures--are current in the medical informatician's vocabulary. The same ideas are relevant to the management and operation of large and diffuse health care enterprises. The lessons we are learning about informatics policy and practice controls in clinical computing need to be applied to the enterprise as a whole. PMID:1921663

Holden, F M

1991-01-01

257

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Graduate Programs  

E-print Network

the world. Whether studying informatics, computer science, information science, or library science, students use · Master of Library Science (MLS), finding, organizing, and preserving information and helping and Computing The School's rare combination of programs ­ including informatics, computer science, library

Menczer, Filippo

258

Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Latvian Education Informatization System LIIS project covers the whole information grid: education content, management, information services, infrastructure and user training at several levels--schools, school boards and Ministry of Education and Science. Informatization is the maintained process of creating the technical, economical and…

Bicevskis, Janis; Andzans, Agnis; Ikaunieks, Evalds; Medvedis, Inga; Straujums, Uldis; Vezis, Viesturs

2004-01-01

259

INFORMATICS SYSTEMS IN MODERN MANAGEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informatics systems play an important role in modern organisations. Their existence may represent an important coercion for organisations. Appears a constant rise of interdependence between strategies, rules, procedures and the informatics systems consist of computer programmes, data bases and telecommunications equipment. A change in any of these components leads often to significant alteration of the others. This relation becomes critical

Daniela OBREJA

260

Training Residents in Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

Jerant, Anthony F.

1999-01-01

261

What are the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials: are they influenced by Jewish teachings?  

PubMed

In order to explore whether and how Jewish teachings influence the attitudes of strictly-orthodox Jews to clinical trials, 10 strictly-orthodox Jews were purposively selected and interviewed, using a semi-structured schedule. Relevant literature was searched for similar studies and for publications covering relevant Jewish teachings. Thematic analysis was used to analyse transcribed interviews and explore relationships between attitudes and Jewish teachings identified in the review. Participants' attitudes were influenced in a variety of ways: by Jewish teachings on the over-riding importance of preserving life--the need to avoid risks affecting life and health, while taking risks to preserve life--and the religious obligation to help others, as well as by previous experience. Attitudes mirrored those in the general population, enabling many participants to reach conclusions that did not differ materially from those of the general population or research ethics committees. PMID:23268364

Box Bayes, Joan

2013-10-01

262

Each program will adopt procedures in writing which provide for regular, timely, and confidential evaluation of residents, clinical fellows, teaching faculty, rotations, and programs.  

E-print Network

, and confidential evaluation of residents, clinical fellows, teaching faculty, rotations, and programs. Evaluation to the educational program, clinical knowledge, professionalism, and scholarly activities. The confidentiality for confidential comments that is provided only to the program director. If the program director is also a teaching

Soloveichik, David

263

Enhancing the Informatics Evaluation Toolkit with Remote Usability Testing  

PubMed Central

Developing functional clinical informatics products that are also usable remains a challenge. Despite evidence that usability testing should be incorporated into the lifecycle of health information technologies, rarely does this occur. Challenges include poor standards, a lack of knowledge around usability practices, and the expense involved in rigorous testing with a large number of users. Remote usability testing may be a solution for many of these challenges. Remotely testing an application can greatly enhance the number of users who can iteratively interact with a product, and it can reduce the costs associated with usability testing. A case study presents the experiences with remote usability testing when evaluating a Web site designed for health informatics knowledge dissemination. The lessons can inform others seeking to enhance their evaluation toolkits for clinical informatics products. PMID:20351839

Dixon, Brian E.

2009-01-01

264

Informatics applied to cytology  

PubMed Central

Automation and emerging information technologies are being adopted by cytology laboratories to augment Pap test screening and improve diagnostic accuracy. As a result, informatics, the application of computers and information systems to information management, has become essential for the successful operation of the cytopathology laboratory. This review describes how laboratory information management systems can be used to achieve an automated and seamless workflow process. The utilization of software, electronic databases and spreadsheets to perform necessary quality control measures are discussed, as well as a Lean production system and Six Sigma approach, to reduce errors in the cytopathology laboratory. PMID:19495402

Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

2008-01-01

265

Rehabilitation Counselor Educators' Perceptions of Importance, Student Preparedness, and Teaching Proficiency in Clinical Judgment Skill Domains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Given the importance of clinical judgment in rehabilitation counseling (Strohmer & Leierer, 2000), prevalence and consequences of rehabilitation counselor biases (Berven & Rosenthal, 1999), and the emerging trend to educate rehabilitation counselors in evidence-based practice (EBP) (Leahy & Arokiasamy, 2010), the explicit teaching of…

Austin, Bryan Scott

2012-01-01

266

Effect of community-based clinical teaching programs on student confidence: a view from the United kingdom.  

PubMed

Over the past few years, community-based clinical teaching programs have become established within many dental schools in the United Kingdom. One such primary care teaching unit was developed to support the dental undergraduate program at Cardiff University in 2002. Students visit this unit throughout their five-year dental school training-as assistants/observers initially, but gaining about twenty-eight days of clinical operating experience each within the unit during their final year of studies. The aim of this article is to report the effect of this teaching program on the confidence of students to perform a range of clinical treatments. The final-year dental class of 2007-08 (n=55) at Cardiff University were asked to rate their confidence in their ability to perform thirty-six selected clinical tasks on a five-point scale prior to commencing their clinical operating experience at the community-based clinical teaching program and again at completion of the one-year program. Completed responses were received from forty-seven students (response rate=85 percent). The same students completed the initial and the final surveys. After one year, there were significant increases (p<0.05) in student confidence in performing thirty of the thirty-six selected clinical tasks. The largest positive change was in the area of endodontics: on a five-point scale, there was an increase of one unit for incisor/canine endodontics, 1.04 units for premolar endodontics, and 1.17 units for molar endodontics. These increases were statistically significant (p<0.05). The next largest positive change was for the provision of bridgework: 0.98 unit increase in confidence for providing conventional bridgework (p<0.05) and 0.91 unit increase for resin-retained bridgework (p<0.05). We conclude that clinical experience within a community-based clinical teaching program can have positive effects on dental students' confidence to perform a wide range of clinical tasks. Further work is needed to identify the benefits of this training on the clinical and professional development of young and recently graduated dentists. PMID:20442428

Lynch, Christopher D; Ash, Peter J; Chadwick, Barbara L; Hannigan, Ailish

2010-05-01

267

Information Science for the Future: An Innovative Nursing Informatics Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A four-level informatics curriculum at Case Western Reserve University's nursing school integrates information, technology, and the clinical care process. A longitudinal study of 182 students who completed the curriculum showed that computer attitudes changed over time and students became more realistic about the use of information technology for…

Travis, Lucille; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

1998-01-01

268

Integrated approaches to health informatics research and development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper looks at a number of approaches to health informatics that support decision-making relevant to the integrated development and management of information systems with clinical and managerial practices in healthcare. Its main aim is to explore three such approaches for integrated development, the soft information systems and technologies methodology, participative simulation modelling and stakeholder analysis. A description of the

Chris Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2002-01-01

269

Investigating Integrated Socio-Technical Approaches to Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the socio-technical approaches being developed in the Center for Health Informatics and Computing (CHIC) for addressing issues within healthcare that necessitate the integration of information systems with clinical and managerial development. A brief description of the health provision in the UK is given as a background to understanding the need for integrated interventions and approaches in health

Christopher J. Atkinson; Tillal Eldabi; Ray J. Paul; Athanasia Pouloudi

2001-01-01

270

Medical Informatics in Croatia – a Historical Survey  

PubMed Central

A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

2014-01-01

271

Consumer Health Informatics--integrating patients, providers, and professionals online.  

PubMed

Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) means different things to patients, health professionals, and health care systems. A broader perspective on this new and rapidly developing field will enable us to understand and better apply its advances. This article provides an overview of CHI discussing its evolution and driving forces, along with advanced applications such as Personal Health Records, Internet transmission of personal health data, clinical e-mail, online pharmacies, and shared decision-making tools. Consumer Health Informatics will become integrated with medical care, electronic medical records, and patient education to impact the whole process and business of health care. PMID:12238015

Klein-Fedyshin, Michele S

2002-01-01

272

The effects of an undergraduate nursing informatics curriculum on students' knowledge and attitudes.  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the fourth stage of a process to design, implement and evaluate the nursing informatics courses incorporated into a baccalaureate nursing program. The challenge is to structure the nursing informatics curriculum so as to provide the nursing professional with the basis with which to impact health care delivery. The basic components of the framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. Students in the fourth course worked closely with agency personnel to design, implement and evaluate clinical application projects. PMID:7949960

Travis, L. L.; Youngblut, J.; Brennan, P. F.

1994-01-01

273

Research in nursing informatics 2014.  

PubMed

This article reflects the work done in the third year of the Nursing Informatics Year in Review project. This project seeks to search and analyze articles written by nurses as first author on the subject of nursing informatics, published August 2013-August 2014. Each year we also seek recommended articles from our American Medical Informatics Association-Nursing Informatics Work Group (AMIA-NIWG) members that meet the same criteria as the search and most influenced their thinking and scholarship. Twenty-seven articles emerged from the literature review, and our AMIA-NIWG members recommended 32 articles. We analyzed the articles by journal of publication, country of first author, source of funding, research method, research setting, and area of focus. The purpose of this article was to present the results of this project for 2014. PMID:25714959

Carrington, Jane M; Tiase, Victoria L; Estrada, Nicolette; Shea, Kimberly D

2015-01-01

274

Health Professionals' Views of Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Health care leaders emphasize the need to include information technology and informatics concepts in formal education programs, yet integration of informatics into health educational programs has progressed slowly. The AMIA 1999 Spring Congress was held to address informatics educational issues across health professions, including the educational needs in the various health professions, goals for health informatics education, and implementation strategies to achieve these goals. This paper presents the results from AMIA work groups focused on informatics education for non-informatics health professionals. In the categories of informatics needs, goals, and strategies, conference attendees suggested elements in these areas: educational responsibilities for faculty and students, organizational responsibilities, core computer skills and informatics knowledge, how to learn informatics skills, and resources required to implement educational strategies. PMID:11062228

Staggers, Nancy; Gassert, Carole A.; Skiba, Diane J.

2000-01-01

275

Web Intelligence Meets Brain Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we outline a vision of Web Intelligence (WI) research from the viewpoint of Brain Informatics (BI), a new\\u000a interdisciplinary field that systematically studies the mechanisms of human information processing from both the macro and\\u000a micro viewpoints by combining experimental cognitive neuroscience with advanced information technology. BI studies human brain\\u000a from the viewpoint of informatics (i.e., human brain

Ning Zhong; Jiming Liu; Yiyu Yao; Jing-long Wu; Shengfu Lu; Yulin Qin; Kuncheng Li; Benjamin W. Wah

2006-01-01

276

Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical governance (CG) is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED). Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation, the results of this study would contribute to the development of implementation science and be employed by boards and executives governing other clinical settings to facilitate CG implementation. PMID:22963589

2012-01-01

277

Clinical Setting Influences Off-Label and Unlicensed Prescribing in a Paediatric Teaching Hospital  

PubMed Central

Purpose To estimate the prevalence of off-label and unlicensed prescribing during 2008 at a major paediatric teaching hospital in Western Australia. Methods A 12-month retrospective study was conducted at Princess Margaret Hospital using medication chart records randomly selected from 145,550 patient encounters from the Emergency Department, Inpatient Wards and Outpatient Clinics. Patient and prescribing data were collected. Drugs were classified as off-label or unlicensed based on Australian registration data. A hierarchical system of age, indication, route of administration and dosage was used. Drugs were classified according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Code. Results A total of 1,037 paediatric patients were selected where 2,654 prescriptions for 330 different drugs were prescribed to 699 patients (67.4%). Most off-label drugs (n = 295; 43.3%) were from the nervous system; a majority of unlicensed drugs were systemic hormonal preparations excluding sex hormones (n = 22, 32.4%). Inpatients were prescribed more off-label drugs than outpatients or Emergency Department patients (p < 0.0001). Most off-label prescribing occurred in infants and children (31.7% and 35.9% respectively) and the highest percentage of unlicensed prescribing (7.2%) occurred in infants (p < 0.0001). There were 25.7% of off-label and 2.6% of unlicensed medications prescribed across all three settings. Common reasons for off-label prescribing were dosage (47.4%) and age (43.2%). Conclusion This study confirmed off-label and unlicensed use of drugs remains common. Further, that prevalence of both is influenced by the clinical setting, which has implications in regards to medication misadventure, and the need to have systems in place to minimise medication errors. Further, there remains a need for changes in the regulatory system in Australia to ensure that manufacturers incorporate, as it becomes available, evidence regarding efficacy and safety of their drugs in children in the official product information. PMID:25756896

Czarniak, Petra; Bint, Lewis; Favié, Laurent; Parsons, Richard; Hughes, Jeff; Sunderland, Bruce

2015-01-01

278

[Clinical and epidemiological aspects of burned patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital].  

PubMed

The objectives of this study were to characterize burned patients according to epidemiological and clinical variables and identify the treatments, invasive procedures and complications. This is a retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study. The sample consisted of 138 burned patients hospitalized in a teaching hospital from January 2003 to December 2007, in Uberaba-MG. Of the 138 hospitalized patients, 98 (71.0%) were male, and the average age was 26.1 years. The average length of stay was 16.2 days; 93 (67.4%) of the burns were caused by accidents and the main cause (68; 49.3%) was an open flame. The average burned body surface was 20.8% and most (122; 88.4%) had second degree burns. The most common topic treatment (93; 67.4%) was silver sulfadiazine. Forty-seven (34.0%) patients had indwelling catheters; 30 (21.7%) underwent tissue transplantation, and 28 (20.3%) underwent debridement; the lesions in 14 (10.1%) patients became infected. PMID:21655786

Montes, Samanta Flor; Barbosa, Maria Helena; de Sousa Neto, Adriana Lemos

2011-04-01

279

Informatics competencies for nursing and healthcare leaders.  

PubMed

Historically, educational preparation did not address informatics competencies; thus managers, administrators, or executives may not be prepared to use or lead change in the use of health information technologies. A number of resources for informatics competencies exist, however, a comprehensive list addressing the unique knowledge and skills required in the role of a manager or administrator was not found. The purpose of this study was to develop informatics competencies for nursing leaders. A synthesis of the literature and a Delphi approach using three rounds of surveys with an expert panel resulted in identification of informatics competencies for nursing leaders that address computer skills, informatics knowledge, and informatics skills. PMID:18998803

Westra, Bonnie L; Delaney, Connie W; Delaney, Connie

2008-01-01

280

Can we teach core clinical obstetrics and gynaecology skills using low fidelity simulation in an interprofessional setting?  

PubMed

Core clinical skills acquisition is an essential component of undergraduate medical and midwifery education. Although interprofessional education is an increasingly common format for learning efficient teamwork in clinical medicine, its value in undergraduate education is less clear. We present a collaborative effort from the medical and midwifery schools of Monash University, Melbourne, towards the development of an educational package centred around a core skills-based workshop using low fidelity simulation models in an interprofessional setting. Detailed feedback on the package was positive with respect to the relevance of the teaching content, whether the topic was well taught by task trainers and simulation models used, pitch of level of teaching and perception of confidence gained in performing the skill on a real patient after attending the workshop. Overall, interprofessional core skills training using low fidelity simulation models introduced at an undergraduate level in medicine and midwifery had a good acceptance. PMID:25308468

Kumar, Arunaz; Gilmour, Carole; Nestel, Debra; Aldridge, Robyn; McLelland, Gayle; Wallace, Euan

2014-12-01

281

ExaCT: automatic extraction of clinical trial characteristics from journal publications  

E-print Network

the Center for Clinical and Translational Informatics, UCSF.clinical trial characteristics from journal publications. BMC Medical Informaticsclinical trial reports. In Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics:

Kiritchenko, Svetlana; de Bruijn, Berry; Carini, Simona; Martin, Joel; Sim, Ida

2010-01-01

282

02 College of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School o  

E-print Network

of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of Informatics

Tanaka, Jiro

283

Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

2007-01-01

284

Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

2012-01-01

285

666 | VOL.9 NO.7 | JULY 2012 | nature methods commentary Focus on BIoImaGe InFormatIcs  

E-print Network

666 | VOL.9 NO.7 | JULY 2012 | nature methods commentary Focus on BIoImaGe InFormatIcs in image informatics on several fronts. New, sophisticated bioimag- ing techniques yield large as a research and clinical biomarker, where subtle changes are detectable by computational means but cannot

Cai, Long

286

Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2): A Translational Engine at the National Scale  

E-print Network

Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2): A Translational Engine at the National to crisply define phenotypes derived from clinical data, we have developed and hosted 6 International NLP the recruitment of talented undergraduate students into graduate study in the area of healthcare informatics

Rau, Don C.

287

Identifying at risk individuals for drug and alcohol dependence: teaching the competency to students in classroom and clinical settings.  

PubMed

Alcohol use and other drug use affect patient healthcare outcomes. This article describes a classroom-to-clinical approach teaching nursing students to utilize motivational interviewing techniques to support patient behavior change. Through the lens of a universal prevention method, nursing students learned about reward circuit activation leading to risky substance use and the difference between addiction and at-risk use. Specific assessment tools and motivational interviewing techniques were presented in the classroom. Students then applied their knowledge in simulation laboratories and clinical rotations. PMID:24743176

Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn R; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly; Fioravanti, Marie; Droppa, Mandy; Luongo, Peter F; Lindsay, Dawn

2014-01-01

288

Teaching a Child with Challenging Behaviour to Use the Toilet: A Clinical Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning to use the toilet is an important developmental step for a child's independence, health and dignity. It can be particularly difficult to teach continence skills to disabled children with aggressive or challenging behaviour. This study showed how Azrin & Foxx's (1971) basic toilet training procedure could be modified to teach a 13-year-old…

Brown, Freddy Jackson; Peace, Natalie

2011-01-01

289

Using informatics principles and tools to harness research evidence for patient care: evidence-based informatics.  

PubMed

With the huge worldwide investment in biomedical research during the past 50 years, there are many important advances in health care knowledge each year. Unfortunately, it commonly takes over 20 years for even the most important of these advances to be widely integrated into clinical practice. Many potentially remediable factors are responsible for this dilemma in research transfer, including defective continuing education for health professionals and patients; increasingly complex medical regimens; diminishing resources for health care; and inadequate evidence management. The principles and procedures of health informatics can help overcome some of these barriers to research transfer, particularly such evidence management tasks as retrieving, processing, summarizing, disseminating and applying evidence for clinical care. Evidence retrieval has been improved by better indexing and electronic search engines, by improved access from clinical and other settings, and by integration of evidence into clinical decision support systems. Evidence processing has been greatly accelerated by streamlined methods of critical appraisal of research and by centralization of these procedures for the development of current awareness publications and cumulative "best evidence" databases. The Cochrane Collaboration has revolutionized the summarization (systematic review) of evidence. The internet has provided access to patients, practitioners, and policy makers, alike. Direct-from-patient automated data collection promises to move the connection between evidence and practice to a higher level. In all of these innovations, health care practice is most likely to be enhanced by intertwining best evidence with best informatics techniques. PMID:10384550

Haynes, R B

1998-01-01

290

The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) informatics platform  

PubMed Central

Background The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative network of 27 epilepsy centers throughout the U.S., Australia, and Argentina, with the objective of collecting detailed phenotypic and genetic data on a large number of epilepsy participants. The goals of EPGP are (1) to perform detailed phenotyping on 3750 participants with specific forms of non-acquired epilepsy and 1500 parents without epilepsy, (2) to obtain DNA samples on these individuals, and (3) to ultimately genotype the samples in order to discover novel genes that cause epilepsy. To carry out the project, a reliable and robust informatics platform was needed for standardized electronic data collection and storage, data quality review, and phenotypic analysis involving cases from multiple sites. Methods EPGP developed its own suite of web-based informatics applications for participant tracking, electronic data collection (using electronic case report forms/surveys), data management, phenotypic data review and validation, specimen tracking, electroencephalograph and neuroimaging storage, and issue tracking. We implemented procedures to train and support end-users at each clinical site. Results Thus far, 3780 study participants have been enrolled and 20,957 web-based study activities have been completed using this informatics platform. Over 95% of respondents to an end-user satisfaction survey felt that the informatics platform was successful almost always or most of the time. Conclusions The EPGP informatics platform has successfully and effectively allowed study management and efficient and reliable collection of phenotypic data. Our novel informatics platform met the requirements of a large, multicenter research project. The platform has had a high level of end-user acceptance by principal investigators and study coordinators, and can serve as a model for new tools to support future large scale, collaborative research projects collecting extensive phenotypic data. PMID:22579394

Nesbitt, Gerry; McKenna, Kevin; Mays, Vickie; Carpenter, Alan; Miller, Kevin; Williams, Michael

2013-01-01

291

Panel: Alternative Careers for Biomedical Informatics PhDs.  

PubMed

The number of doctoral training programs in informatics increases every year, however not every doctoral candidate wishes to pursue a traditional career in academia. In addition, the knowledge and skills acquired through scientific training at the doctoral level can be valuable, even critical, for a number of career paths outside of academic research and teaching. This panel will present a diverse set of alternative career paths for which graduates of Informatics programs would be well suited, including patent law, research in industry, academic administration, and scientific journalism. Panelists will describe their own respective backgrounds and career paths, a day in the life in their current position, and how their training prepared them for their jobs. They will also touch on insights gained and lessons learned in exploring the professional landscape through non-traditional paths. PMID:24303329

Tenenbaum, Jessica D; Sorani, Marco; Maker, Monya; Torrance, Andrew; Horvitz, Eric

2013-01-01

292

Health informatics and modernisation: bridging the gap.  

PubMed

This pilot initiative uses an approach that focuses on improving the whole business of primary care, its processes and its people. The Health Informatics Programme for Coronary Heart Disease (HIP for CHD) addresses the two faces of clinical governance but has a prime focus on the development of learning organisations. The project has developed a methodology and an associated set of tools that it has tested and evaluated in a small number of pilot sites. The work of HIP for CHD is focused on coronary heart disease but the methodology is equally applicable to other clinical areas. In particular, HIP for CHD provides an approach that allows the diverse strands of all of the National Service Frameworks to be handled in a joined-up way in primary care. PMID:14980060

Cowley, Cheryl; Daws, Lynette; Ellis, Beverley

2003-01-01

293

[Surgical History Taking and Clinical Examination: Establishing a Standardised System by Means of a Nation-Wide Academic Teaching Project.  

PubMed

Background: History taking and systematic clinical examination are central techniques of physicians. Medicine in general and surgery in particular frequently require immediate decisions and start of therapies. So far, a standardised surgical system for history taking and clinical examination in teaching has been lacking at our faculty. A consensus of all medical faculties on a standardised system could be a tool to improve the medical teaching and education at our teaching institutions. Methods: The established Anglo-Saxonian system of history taking and clinical examination was adapted to our own clinical needs. Thereafter, this system was sent out to all chairmen of general and visceral surgery departments in German University Hospitals asking for evaluation and improvements. We adapted the system according to the chairmen's comments and suggestions. Since winter semester 2011 this system has been integrated into the clinical course of history taking and examination. It is compulsory for all 5th semester students (first clinical year/graduate course) at the Universitätsmedizin Greifswald. In addition, a video was produced demonstrating all major techniques of clinical examination. This video is available for all students on a password blocked site of the World Wide Web. Results: Altogether, 89?% of all contacted chairmen returned their comments and suggestions for improvements. After implementation of the new system, positive evaluations of students increased significantly from 63.5 to 77.0?% in general and abdominal surgery (p?clinical examination applicable for students as well as qualified surgeons in daily routine work. It has been approved by the majority of the departments of surgery of all German university hospitals. Furthermore, it can be applied by other medical specialties, in particular, internal medicine. Furthermore, the standardisation of history taking and clinical examination can contribute to improve patients' safety as well as medical documentation. Also, the standardisation will be a sound basis for expert medical opinions in legal actions. Finally, it has improved the value of medical education at our medical faculty and could form the basis for the development of national medical standards. PMID:25393734

von Bernstorff, W; Irmer, H; Menges, P; Peters, S; Heidecke, C-D; Busemann, A

2014-11-13

294

94 COLLEGE OF COMPUTING & INFORMATICS Computing and  

E-print Network

94 COLLEGE OF COMPUTING & INFORMATICS College of Computing and Informatics cci.uncc.edu Dean: Dr The University of North Carolina at Charlotte's College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) is part of a dynamic of multidisciplinary faculty, industry professionals, and students. The CCI was formed in 2000 as the College

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

295

Guest Editorial Introduction: International Medical Informatics Association  

E-print Network

Guest Editorial Introduction: International Medical Informatics Association Working Group 6 was organized by Working Group 6 of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) and co-sponsored by the European Federation for Medical Informatics, the Institute for Formal Ontolo- gy and Medical Information

Cimino, James J.

296

Grey evaluation model of rural informatization level  

Microsoft Academic Search

The comprehensive evaluation of rural informatization is a grey problem. This paper presents a grey relational analysis method to evaluate the rural informatization level.A grey relational evaluation model of rural informatization is set up, then studies it by AHP and grey relational analysis to obtain the weights of the indicators and counts grey evaluation coefficients. This analysis method is flexible

Du Jing; Daoliang Li; Hongwen Li; Liyong Liu

2010-01-01

297

PNNL-SA-45500 PNNL's Cognitive Informatics  

E-print Network

. Learning & Skill Development R&D PNNL's cognitive approach to learning and performance assessment hasPNNL-SA-45500 PNNL's Cognitive Informatics program focuses on two broad R&D areas: Information and Skill Development. Rich Interaction Environments: Cognitive Informatics Cognitive Informatics (CI

298

Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Usability and Accessibility in Consumer Health Informatics Current Trends and Future Challenges challenges in the usability and accessibility of consumer health informatics will be described. Consumer informatics (i.e., eHealth). Section 1 addresses the consumer expectations for eHealth. Section 2 discusses

Shneiderman, Ben

299

Nursing and the informatics revolution.  

PubMed

The Institute of Medicine's quality initiatives have collectively emphasized the importance of information technology to the transformation of health care. Not coincidentally, federal initiatives in 2004 have signaled the start of "the decade of health information technology." Building on those reports, this article describes the informatics revolution in process, and nursing's readiness to move in that direction. The promise of informatics in reshaping practice is sketched out in terms of seven aims for improvement, followed by a listing of some of the issues that must be addressed for nursing to realize those possibilities. In similar fashion, changes in academia are discussed both in terms of the promise of informatics applications and the barriers to achieving that preferred future. The article ends with some policy recommendations and reflections on opportunities at hand, particularly the growing emphasis on patient self-management support. PMID:16115510

McBride, Angela Barron

2005-01-01

300

Health informatics education for clinicians and managers - What's holding up progress?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports outcomes of a national survey of health informatics (HI) education and training carried out in the UK. A questionnaire to elicit details of HI and IT skills teaching was derived from a national consensus document (Learning to Manage Health Information, LtMHI). Forms were sent to all pre-qualification medical and nursing schools and to a stratified sample of

Jeannette Murphy; Katja Stramer; Susan Clamp; Penny Grubb; Julian Gosland; Sue Davis

2004-01-01

301

A knowledge-based imaging informatics approach to managing patients treated with proton beam therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Last year we presented work on an imaging informatics approach towards developing quantitative knowledge and tools based on standardized DICOM-RT objects for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy. In this paper, we have extended this methodology to perform knowledge-based medical imaging informatics research on specific clinical scenarios where brain tumor patients are treated with Proton Beam Therapy (PT). PT utilizes energized charged particles,

B. J. Liu; H. K. Huang; M. Law; Anh Le; Jorge Documet; Arek Gertych

2007-01-01

302

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Ophthalmology Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, Veterinary Ophthalmology Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss in clinical service and instruction of veterinary students and residents in Veterinary Ophthalmology service environment. Participate in the clinical training of Ophthalmology residents and interns

Stephens, Graeme L.

303

Progress with Formalization in Medical Informatics?  

PubMed Central

The prevailing view of medical informatics as a primarily subservient discipline in health care is challenged. Developments in both general informatics and medical informatics are described to identify desirable properties of modeling languages and tools needed to solve key problems in the application field. For progress in medical informatics, it is considered essential to develop far more formal modeling languages, modeling techniques, and tools. A major aim of this development should be to expel ambiguity from concepts essential to medicine, positioning medical informatics “at the heart of health care.” PMID:11230381

van der Maas, Arnoud A.F.; Ten Hoopen, A. Johannes; Ter Hofstede, Arthur H.M.

2001-01-01

304

Investigation on laser safety informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the aid of the detection on the multimedia messaging service (MMS) of the laser accidents, novel insecurity factors in laser safety informatics are investigated. By using continuously improved laser self-organization safety system, new concepts of laser safety are developed. Various kinds of accidents can be avoided when comprehensive protective measures are taken.

Chongwen Guan; Shizhan Lei; Yingjian Wang

2009-01-01

305

Medical Informatics Education at Medical Faculty of Sarajevo University - 15 Years Experience  

PubMed Central

CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED In Bosnia and Herzegovina, Medical informatics has been a separate subject for the last 15 years with regard to Medical curriculum at the biomedical faculties in the country (1,2). Education in the field of Medical informatics is based on the concept which is used in developed countries, according to the recommendations of the working groups EDU – Education of Medical Informatics, of the European Federation for Medical Informatics (EFMI) and International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA). Theoretical and practical teaching and training performance as a whole is performed by use of the computer equipment, and the final knowledge check of the students is also performed using the Data Base Management System MS Access specifically designed to cover full teaching and training material by using question sets in the data base which encircled nearly 1500 question combinations. The distance learning is logical step that can further improve this method of education. In this paper, authors present 15 years of experience of Medical informatics education at biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Medical Informatics, as an obligatory subject, was introduced to the biomedical faculties in Sarajevo (medical, dental and pharmaceutical as well as the High medical school) in 1992 and 1993. Students have practical computer exercises for a period of 7 weeks. Students had training in Excel, Word etc. During the semester, the students perform specific operation such as creation of data carrier for manipulation with medical information. The information was analyzed by statistical program such as Excel. From 2002 years Medical Informatics is divided in two parts in order to facilitate data processing and other procedure that are necessary to perform at time when student’s knowledge of medicine is sufficient for practicing specific tasks that include management the data about patient, anamnesis and similar parameters cause we noticed that students without such knowledge cannot figure out the whole picture without difficulties. The Theoretical part of examination is done using the multiple choice answer form provided by special software with randomly selected questions for each student. Such way of practical and theoretical path of final exam make possible to perform such procedures such as electronic registration for exam and distance testing. Possibilities of introduction of distance learning in medical curriculum are the title of project which has been realizing at Cathedra for medical Informatics, Medical faculty since year 2002. Our undergraduate and postgraduate students are satisfied with contents and organization of the teaching process. PMID:24109152

Masic, Izet

2008-01-01

306

The Performance Assessment on Universities' Informatics using Balanced Scorecard  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research was conducted with three objectives: 1) evaluated the effectiveness of informatics management or ICT management of public universities in Thailand which based on balanced scorecard (BSC), 2) created key performance indicators (KPIs) of informatics developing, and 3) developed a new informatics strategic model (or ICT strategic model) for informatics management. This was to confirm that informatics could give

Prasong Praneetpolgrang; Ubonsin Poprom; P. Kitratporn

2006-01-01

307

Biological information specialists for biological informatics  

PubMed Central

Data management and integration are complicated and ongoing problems that will require commitment of resources and expertise from the various biological science communities. Primary components of successful cross-scale integration are smooth information management and migration from one context to another. We call for a broadening of the definition of bioinformatics and bioinformatics training to span biological disciplines and biological scales. Training programs are needed that educate a new kind of informatics professional, Biological Information Specialists, to work in collaboration with various discipline-specific research personnel. Biological Information Specialists are an extension of the informationist movement that began within library and information science (LIS) over 30 years ago as a professional position to fill a gap in clinical medicine. These professionals will help advance science by improving access to scientific information and by freeing scientists who are not interested in data management to concentrate on their science. PMID:17295920

Heidorn, P Bryan; Palmer, Carole L; Wright, Dan

2007-01-01

308

Informatics Enabled Behavioral Medicine in Oncology  

PubMed Central

For the practicing physician, the behavioral implications of preventing, diagnosing, and treating cancer are many and varied. Fortunately, an enhanced capacity in informatics may help create a redesigned ecosystem in which applying evidence-based principles from behavioral medicine will become a routine part of care. Innovation to support this evolution will be spurred by the “meaningful use” criteria stipulated by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, and by focused research and development efforts within the broader health information ecosystem. The implications for how to better integrate evidence-based principles in behavioral medicine into oncology care through both spheres of development are discussed within the framework of the cancer control continuum. The promise of using the data collected through these tools to accelerate discovery in psycho-oncology is also discussed. If nurtured appropriately, these developments should help accelerate successes against cancer by altering the behavioral milieu. PMID:21799329

Hesse, Bradford W.; Suls, Jerry M.

2011-01-01

309

Modifying the Curriculum: Teaching Clinical Students about Caring for Patients with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines how the curricula of optometry programs can be modified to prepare graduates to meet the needs of patients from special populations. Addresses student attitudes and the clinical encounter, including the case history, clinical examination, clinical decision making and determination of patient management plans, and case discussion of the…

Ettinger, Ellen Richter

2002-01-01

310

How to encourage intrinsic motivation in the clinical teaching environment?: a systematic review from the self-determination theory  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Internalization of students’ motivation towards an intrinsic form is associated with increased interest, commitment, learning, and satisfaction with education. Self-Determination theory postulates that intrinsic motivation and autonomous forms of self-regulation are the desired type of motivation; as they have been associated with deep learning, better performance and well-being. It claims three basic psychological needs have to be satisfied in order to achieve intrinsic motivation. These are the needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness. This study aims to provide a review on how these basic psychological needs are encouraged in undergraduate students so they can be transferred to the clinical teaching environment. Methods: Electronic searches were performed across four databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and ERIC), relevant journals, and retrieved bibliography of selected articles. In total, searches produced 4,869 references, from which 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Main themes were coded in three categories: The support of autonomy, competence and relatedness. The research-based evidence appears to be of reasonable quality, and indicates that teachers should work to satisfy students’ basic psychological needs to foster internalization of self-regulation. Our findings suggest that teachers should interact with students in a more ‘human centred’ teaching style, as these actions predict motivational internalization. Several themes emerged from different contexts and further investigation should expand them. Conclusion: This review identified actions that clinical teachers could implement in their daily work to support students’ self-determination. Autonomy supportive teaching in health professions educations would benefit students and may actually result in more effective health care delivery. PMID:25855386

2015-01-01

311

Practice Guidelines and Clinical Risk Assessment models: is it time to reform?  

E-print Network

was discussed. Clinical informatics and electronic healthclinical risk assessment models: is it time to reform? BMC Medical InformaticsInformatics and Decision Making 2011, 11:63 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/11/63 DEBATE Open Access Practice guidelines and clinical

Sepehrvand, Nariman; Pakdel, Firouz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad; Moosavi-Toomatari, Babak; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad

2011-01-01

312

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

Mæland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

313

The Scope and Direction of Health Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based upon the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain is can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art" , and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information utilized in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2001-01-01

314

The scope and direction of health informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

315

A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics…

Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

1997-01-01

316

Teaching evidence-based medicine literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Constructing an answerable question and effectively searching the medical literature are key steps in practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM). This study aimed to identify the effectiveness of delivering a single workshop in EBM literature searching skills to medical students entering their first clinical years of study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with third-year undergraduate medical students. Participants were randomized to participate in a formal workshop in EBM literature searching skills, with EBM literature searching skills and perceived competency in EBM measured at one-week post-intervention via the Fresno tool and Clinical Effectiveness and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Results: A total of 121 participants were enrolled in the study, with 97 followed-up post-intervention. There was no statistical mean difference in EBM literature searching skills between the 2 groups (mean difference?=?0.007 (P?=?0.99)). Students attending the EBM workshop were significantly more confident in their ability to construct clinical questions and had greater perceived awareness of information resources. Conclusions: A single EBM workshop did not result in statistically significant changes in literature searching skills. Teaching and reinforcing EBM literature searching skills during both preclinical and clinical years may result in increased student confidence, which may facilitate student use of EBM skills as future clinicians. PMID:22879808

Tepper, Katrina; Misso, Marie

2012-01-01

317

Informatics in compound library management.  

PubMed

The ability to accurately and efficiently manage inventory is critical to ensure cost-effectiveness and guarantee integrity of samples in drug discovery. While many large companies utilise both customised and off-the-shelf automated systems for compound library management, these systems do not come cheaply. Without doubt, for large pharma the return on investment for one of these systems can be justified; however, the upfront cost is typically prohibitive for smaller businesses looking to stretch their limited cash reserves as far as possible. At Exelgen we have shown that for any business with the combination of fit-for-purpose informatics, relatively inexpensive laboratory hardware and well-constructed SOPs (standard operating procedures), it is possible to undertake cost-effective, large-scale compound library management in a small business environment. The informatics and hardware environment deployed at Exelgen are described in detail. PMID:19551357

Warne, Mark; Pemberton, Louise

2009-01-01

318

134 | College of Computing and Informatics 2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Computing and Informatics  

E-print Network

and Informatics | 135 College of Computing and Informatics http://cci.uncc.edu The University of North Carolina at Charlotte's College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) is part of a dynamic and exciting, educational professionals, and students. The CCI was formed in 2000 as the College of Information Technology

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

319

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me?  

E-print Network

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me? Geo Science and Mathematics in order to analyse and present geo-spatial information. The skills you will develop from a degree in Geography with Geo-Informatics are wide-ranging and include excellent time

Harman, Neal.A.

320

Nursing informatics: state of the science.  

PubMed

The phenomena of interest in nursing informatics are nursing data, nursing information and nursing knowledge. The current state of knowledge related to these phenomena suggests four implications for the development of systems to support nursing. First, research has provided evidence that knowledge and experience is related to the quality of nursing assessment, diagnosis or clinical inference, and planning of nursing care, and also that knowledge is task-specific. Information technology can provide access to a variety of information resources, such as knowledge bases and decision support systems, to increase the level of knowledge of the nurse decision-maker. Second, structured patient assessment forms with linkages to knowledge bases of diagnoses have the potential to improve the quality of the patient assessment and the accuracy of the diagnosis or clinical inference. Third, studies on planning care have demonstrated the complexity of the task when a number of options are potentially appropriate. Model-based decision support applications such as decision analysis and multi-attribute utility theory can assist the clinicians and patients to analyse and compare the treatment alternatives in a systematic manner. Fourth, there is modest support for demonstrating the relationship between the process and outcomes of clinical decision making. Large databases built upon nursing data are needed to further examine this relationship. PMID:8675874

Henry, S B

1995-12-01

321

A Simulation for Teaching the Basic and Clinical Science of Fluid Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical…

Rawson, Richard E.; Dispensa, Marilyn E.; Goldstein, Richard E.; Nicholson, Kimberley W.; Vidal, Noni Korf

2009-01-01

322

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss and expertise in clinical service and instruction of veterinary students in small animal dentistry is desirable instruction for the PVM curriculum on topics related to veterinary dentistry. The successful candidate would

Stephens, Graeme L.

323

Two h-Index Benchmarks for Evaluating the Publication Performance of Medical Informatics Researchers  

PubMed Central

Background The h-index is a commonly used metric for evaluating the publication performance of researchers. However, in a multidisciplinary field such as medical informatics, interpreting the h-index is a challenge because researchers tend to have diverse home disciplines, ranging from clinical areas to computer science, basic science, and the social sciences, each with different publication performance profiles. Objective To construct a reference standard for interpreting the h-index of medical informatics researchers based on the performance of their peers. Methods Using a sample of authors with articles published over the 5-year period 2006–2011 in the 2 top journals in medical informatics (as determined by impact factor), we computed their h-index using the Scopus database. Percentiles were computed to create a 6-level benchmark, similar in scheme to one used by the US National Science Foundation, and a 10-level benchmark. Results The 2 benchmarks can be used to place medical informatics researchers in an ordered category based on the performance of their peers. A validation exercise mapped the benchmark levels to the ranks of medical informatics academic faculty in the United States. The 10-level benchmark tracked academic rank better (with no ties) and is therefore more suitable for practical use. Conclusions Our 10-level benchmark provides an objective basis to evaluate and compare the publication performance of medical informatics researchers with that of their peers using the h-index. PMID:23079075

Arbuckle, Luk; Jonker, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kevin

2012-01-01

324

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository. PMID:25422725

Zaïane, Osmar R.

2014-01-01

325

Clinical audit teaching in record-keeping for dental undergraduates at International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  

PubMed

This study investigated the impact of clinical audit training on record-keeping behavior of dental students and students' perceptions of the clinical audit training. The training was delivered to Year 4 and Year 5 undergraduates at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It included a practical audit exercise on patient records. The results were presented by the undergraduates, and guidelines were framed from the recommendations proposed. Following this, an audit of Year 4 and Year 5 students' patient records before and after the audit training was carried out. A total of 100 records were audited against a predetermined set of criteria by two examiners. An email survey of the students was also conducted to explore their views of the audit training. Results showed statistically significant improvements in record-keeping following audit training. Responses to the email survey were analyzed qualitatively. Respondents reported that the audit training helped them to identify deficiencies in their record-keeping practice, increased their knowledge in record-keeping, and improved their record-keeping skills. Improvements in clinical audit teaching were also proposed. PMID:24489028

Chong, Jun A; Chew, Jamie K Y; Ravindranath, Sneha; Pau, Allan

2014-02-01

326

Rural Logistics System Based on Rural Informatization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current status of rural informatization construction in China is analyzed, that is the relatively weak rural informatization, asymmetric market information, low level of information sharing, dispersedly allocated resources and no cross point among each other. The importance of information in rural logistic system is introduced: firstly, decision making of logistics system plan is based on information. Secondly, improvement of the

Cui-hong Hu

2010-01-01

327

Legal Informatics and Management of Legislative Documents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report aims at providing an overview of the state of the art and of the prospects of the application of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the legislative domain, in particular concerning the management of legislative documents. After a brief introduction on legal informatics, we focus on legislative informatics and identify the challenges it faces nowadays, in the framework

Mariangela Biasiotti; Monica Palmirani; Fabio Vitali; Giovanni Sartor

328

Informatization and Restructuring of Soviet Society  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper analyzes the essence of informatization as the crucial factor of an all-round scientific and technological change, and determines ways of the USSR's development in new conditions and especially reforms of social relations and national economic management system. Informatization is viewed as development of an informational infrastructure of society providing for the use of information as a national resource.

Dimitry Chereshkin; Mikhail Tsalenko

1990-01-01

329

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN?  

E-print Network

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN? MY COURSES HAVE INCLUDED: Software Design I I designed. I chose to become an Informatics major because I wanted to focus on human interaction with computer has been Project Management, in which I studied how a software team manages the lifecycle

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

330

The Research on Enterprise Informatization Capability  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is some important value and practical meaning in the research of enterprise informatization mechanism, using informatization successively and deeply. This article on the basic of enterprise resource-based view and enterprise capability-based view, analyzes enterprise resource character, redefine the concept of resource and capability, constructs enterprise moving rules and capability system. In further, the article points out four periods of

Hongyu Shao; Wei Guo

2009-01-01

331

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics  

E-print Network

Handbook of Research on Urban Informatics: The Practice and Promise of the Real-Time City Marcus Foth Queensland University of Technology, Australia Hershey · New York InformatIon scIence reference #12;Director of Editorial Content: Kristin Klinger Director of Production: Jennifer Neidig Managing

Paulos, Eric

332

Wairoa Model Community Informatics in Tourism  

E-print Network

a community informatics project aimed at encouraging regional development by introducing small scale tourism of a community owned and developed regional tourism product, a trail through Maori owned community landWairoa Model Community Informatics in Tourism David Mason Victoria University of Wellington Ulrich

333

Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

Morris, Theodore Allan

2002-01-01

334

Informatics and the Human Genome Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Information technology is transforming biology, and the relentless effects of Moore's Law are transforming that transformation. Nowhere are these changes more apparent than in the international collaboration known as the Human Genome Project (HGP). The authors consider the relationship of informatics to genomic research. Topics discussed include: the nature of information technology; Moore's Law; informatics as an enabling technology; agency

Robert J. Robbins; David Benton; Jay Snoddy

1995-01-01

335

Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211223  

E-print Network

was presented at the Proceedings of the 14th International Symposium for Health Information Management ResearchArticle Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211­223 © The Author(s) 2010 Reprints and permission, may result in identity theft, incorrect diagnosis and treatment, #12;212 Health Informatics Journal 16

Austin, Mark

336

International Master Classes in health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Master Classes arose within the performing arts and are now being offered in system sciences. The I?E group of faculty from six universities in Europe and the United States has offered Master Classes in health informatics to provide an integrative forum for honors students. Featured are international views of health systems, varied opportunities for student interaction and promotion of informatics

L. C. Gatewood; M. Limburg; R. M. Gardner; Reinhold Haux; Monique W. M. Jaspers; Diana Schmidt; Thomas Wetter

2004-01-01

337

Better informed: an overview of health informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Healthcare informatics is increasing in importance both for healthcare administrators and medical and dental practitioners. Governments across the developed world are initiating major national health IT programmes. At the same time, future best medical and dental practice will increasingly depend on computer-based support tools, although disagreement remains about the effectiveness of current support tools. Over the longer term, future informatics

J. Harper; A. M Jenner; S. Dunne; P. A. Reynolds

2008-01-01

338

The Impact of Medical Informatics on Librarianship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The thesis of this paper is that the growth of the field of medical informatics, while seemingly a potential threat to medical librarianship, is in fact an opportunity for librarianship to both extend its reach and also to further define its unique characteristics in contrast to those of medical informatics. Furthermore, because medical…

Dalrymple, Prudence W.

339

Health informatics: current issues and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health informatics concerns the use of information and information and communication technologies within healthcare. Health informatics and information science need to take account of the unique aspects of health and medicine. The development of information systems and electronic records within health needs to consider the information needs and behaviour of all users. The sensitivity of personal health data raises ethical

Peter A. Bath

2008-01-01

340

Traditional eye medicine use by newly presenting ophthalmic patients to a teaching hospital in south-eastern Nigeria: socio-demographic and clinical correlates  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: This study set out to determine the incidence, socio-demographic, and clinical correlates of Traditional Eye Medicine (TEM) use in a population of newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients attending a tertiary eye care centre in south-eastern Nigeria. METHODS: In a comparative cross-sectional survey at the eye clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, between August 2004 - July

Boniface Ikenna Eze; Chimdi Memnofu Chuka-Okosa; Judith Nkechi Uche

2009-01-01

341

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Simulation-Based Teaching versus Traditional Instruction in Medicine: A Pilot Study among Clinical Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare simulator-based teaching with traditional instruction among clinical medical students. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with written pre-post testing. Third-year medical students (n = 38) received either a myocardial infarction (MI) simulation followed by a reactive airways disease (RAD) lecture, or a RAD simulation…

Gordon, James A.; Shaffer, David W.; Raemer, Daniel B.; Pawlowski, John; Hurford, William E.; Cooper, Jeffrey B.

2006-01-01

342

A Detailed Study of the Relationships between Teaching, Support, Supervision and Role Modelling in Clinical Areas, within the Context of the Project 2000 Courses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study examined the relationships between teaching, support, supervision, and role modeling in clinical areas in nursing education courses within the context of Britain's Project 2000, an educational reform initiative. The main data sources were semistructured interviews with a total of 53 students, 37 practitioners, and 15 tutors in 3 nurse…

White, Edward; And Others

343

IU School of Informatics Expectations for Declared Area of Excellence for Promotion and Shorter version of complete document see  

E-print Network

** Shorter version of complete document ­ see http://informatics.iupui.edu/faculty/allinformatics.php from assistant to associate professor is based on excellence in the quality of teaching is based on (1) a national or international reputation as a first- classproductive scholarand/or(2

Zhou, Yaoqi

344

Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

345

Clinical Semantics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a We discuss the challenge of efficient and flexible clinical informatics and provide initial results on how to tackle the computerized\\u000a management of the complex and diverse information space of clinical medicine through an approach coined as open information\\u000a management. The approach builds on natural language as the core information management tool in place of formal, structured\\u000a representation. The chapter discusses

Jari Yli-Hietanen; Samuli Niiranen

346

The Current Status of Health Informatics Higher Education in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are likely to be many opportunities and challenges for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China following her acceptance as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The purpose of the article is to review the current status and consider future directions for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China. Today, China’s educators are

M. X. Wu; P Yu; J Soar

2003-01-01

347

HINF 1100: Introduction to Health Informatics Assignment 1  

E-print Network

HINF 1100: Introduction to Health Informatics Fall 2008 Assignment 1 Assignment Date: Sept 29 2008 is health informatics? (5%) 1b. Identify the role of health informatics in the healthcare process? (5%) 1c. Justify the need for health informatics in the healthcare process? (5 %) Question 2: Provide answers

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

348

PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name MSc Health Informatics  

E-print Network

1 PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION ­ POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES KEY FACTS Programme name MSc Health Informatics Award MSc School School of Informatics Department or equivalent Centre for Health Informatics Programme of the fundamental principles of the areas of health Informatics and cognate subjects contained within the chosen

Weyde, Tillman

349

Methodical Aspects of Informatization of Physical Education at a Higher Education Institution  

E-print Network

The article considers the methodical aspects of informatization of physical education at a higher education institution. Besides, the article discloses the conception of the information educational environment and information technologies oriented at realizing psychological and pedagogical objectives of teaching and educating at a higher education institution. Information technologies in a higher education institution are oriented at realizing psychological and pedagogical objectives of teaching and educating. The authors of the article show the importance and possibilities of applying information technology media to the system of higher education training of specialists in the sphere of Physics. The authors consider developing the content of methodical training of future Physics teachers to be one of ways of solving the problem of informatization of education.

Kerimbayev, Nurassyl; Sharmuhanbet, Saltanat

2015-01-01

350

The role of the clinical psychologist on a burn unit in a general teaching hospital  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the core skills that a clinical psychologist brings to a burn unit and suggests a model for optimal psychological management of burn patients, families, and staff. Recovery from a burn injury involves three stages that comprise (a) acute treatment of severe medical complications, (b) adjustment to hospitalization, and (c) long-term rehabilitation. Each stage contains numerous issues that

Richard A. Bryant; Stephen W. Touyz

1996-01-01

351

A New Conceptual Approach to Teaching the Interpretation of Clinical Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Courses in clinical epidemiology usually include acquainting students with a single 2X2 table. All diagnostic test characteristics are explained using this table. This pedagogic approach may be misleading. A new didactic approach is hereby proposed, using two tables, each with specific analogous notations (uppercase and lowercase) and derived…

Linn, Shai

2004-01-01

352

Sharing the Diagnostic Process in the Clinical Teaching Environment: A Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Revealing or visualizing the thinking involved in making clinical decisions is a challenge. A case study is presented with a visual implement for sharing the diagnostic process. This technique adapts the Bayesian approach to the case presentation. Pretest probabilities and likelihood ratios are gathered to obtain post-test probabilities of every…

Cuello-Garcia; Carlos

2005-01-01

353

Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Teaching for Third-Year Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2-month program for third-year students at Yeshiva's Albert Einstein College of Medicine that provides a model for integrating basic sciences and clinical training is described. It demonstrates the importance of lifelong learning in a field that constantly changes. (Author/MLW)

Croen, Lila G.; And Others

1986-01-01

354

Outbreak!: Teaching Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology Methodologies with an Interactive Online Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outbreak! is an online, interactive educational game that helps students and teachers learn and evaluate clinical microbiology skills. When the game was used in introductory microbiology laboratories, qualitative evaluation by students showed very positive responses and increased learning. Outbreak! allows students to design diagnostic tests and…

Clark, Sherri; Smith, Geoffrey Battle

2004-01-01

355

A Comprehensive, Simulation-Based Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: The Medical Students’ Perspective  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

Evans, Leigh V.; Crimmins, Ashley C.; Bonz, James W.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D.; Dodge, Kelly L.

2014-01-01

356

The First Clinical Skill: Students Teach Students to Take Vital Signs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordinating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of thc techniques to the entire class by a single practitioner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The fonner

R. Gregg Dwyer; Linda A. Deloney; Mary J. Cantrell; C. James Graham

2002-01-01

357

Data Analysis and Data Mining: Current Issues in Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Medicine and biomedical sciences have become data-intensive fields, which, at the same time, enable the application of data-driven approaches and require sophisticated data analysis and data mining methods. Biomedical informatics provides a proper interdisciplinary context to integrate data and knowledge when processing available information, with the aim of giving effective decision-making support in clinics and translational research. Objectives To reflect on different perspectives related to the role of data analysis and data mining in biomedical informatics. Methods On the occasion of the 50th year of Methods of Information in Medicine a symposium was organized, that reflected on opportunities, challenges and priorities of organizing, representing and analysing data, information and knowledge in biomedicine and health care. The contributions of experts with a variety of backgrounds in the area of biomedical data analysis have been collected as one outcome of this symposium, in order to provide a broad, though coherent, overview of some of the most interesting aspects of the field. Results The paper presents sections on data accumulation and data-driven approaches in medical informatics, data and knowledge integration, statistical issues for the evaluation of data mining models, translational bioinformatics and bioinformatics aspects of genetic epidemiology. Conclusions Biomedical informatics represents a natural framework to properly and effectively apply data analysis and data mining methods in a decision-making context. In the future, it will be necessary to preserve the inclusive nature of the field and to foster an increasing sharing of data and methods between researchers. PMID:22146916

Bellazzi, Riccardo; Diomidous, Marianna; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko; Ziegler, Andreas; McCray, Alexa T.

2011-01-01

358

Informing web-based communication curricula in veterinary education: a systematic review of web-based methods used for teaching and assessing clinical communication in medical education.  

PubMed

We determined the Web-based configurations that are applied to teach medical and veterinary communication skills, evaluated their effectiveness, and suggested future educational directions for Web-based communication teaching in veterinary education. We performed a systematic search of CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ERIC limited to articles published in English between 2000 and 2012. The review focused on medical or veterinary undergraduate to clinical- or residency-level students. We selected studies for which the study population was randomized to the Web-based learning (WBL) intervention with a post-test comparison with another WBL or non-WBL method and that reported at least one empirical outcome. Two independent reviewers completed relevancy screening, data extraction, and synthesis of results using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's framework. The search retrieved 1,583 articles, and 10 met the final inclusion criteria. We identified no published articles on Web based communication platforms in veterinary medicine; however, publications summarized from human medicine demonstrated that WBL provides a potentially reliable and valid approach for teaching and assessing communication skills. Student feedback on the use of virtual patients for teaching clinical communication skills has been positive,though evidence has suggested that practice with virtual patients prompted lower relation-building responses.Empirical outcomes indicate that WBL is a viable method for expanding the approach to teaching history taking and possibly to additional tasks of the veterinary medical interview. PMID:24418922

Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Toews, Lorraine; Violato, Claudio; Coe, Jason B

2014-01-01

359

Translational informatics: enabling high-throughput research paradigms  

PubMed Central

A common thread throughout the clinical and translational research domains is the need to collect, manage, integrate, analyze, and disseminate large-scale, heterogeneous biomedical data sets. However, well-established and broadly adopted theoretical and practical frameworks and models intended to address such needs are conspicuously absent in the published literature or other reputable knowledge sources. Instead, the development and execution of multidisciplinary, clinical, or translational studies are significantly limited by the propagation of “silos” of both data and expertise. Motivated by this fundamental challenge, we report upon the current state and evolution of biomedical informatics as it pertains to the conduct of high-throughput clinical and translational research and will present both a conceptual and practical framework for the design and execution of informatics-enabled studies. The objective of presenting such findings and constructs is to provide the clinical and translational research community with a common frame of reference for discussing and expanding upon such models and methodologies. PMID:19737991

Embi, Peter J.; Sen, Chandan K.

2009-01-01

360

Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching  

PubMed Central

Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor') on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC). Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students reported that their views of teachers and teaching had changed as a result of participation, this did not translate into significant changes in responses to questions that explored their views of the roles and qualities required of a good clinical teacher. Conclusion Findings affirm the benefits to volunteer tutors of cross-year peer tutoring, particularly in terms of skills enhancement and reinforcement of positive attitudes towards future teaching responsibilities, and have implications for the design and organisation of such programmes. PMID:17598885

Buckley, Sharon; Zamora, Javier

2007-01-01

361

Clinical profile of carpal tunnel syndrome in a teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to review the clinical characteristics and demography of Carpel Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) cases presented to a university hospital. Methodology: A retrospective study was done for 336 consecutive patients (290 females and 46 males), referred with a clinical diagnosis of CTS to the Neuro-diagnostic laboratory at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, between January 2007 and December 2010. All subjects had clinical evaluation and standardized nerve conduction studies (672 hands) performed by the same examiner. Results: Carpal tunnel syndrome was confirmed in 640 hands (95.23%) with female predominance (86.3%). The mean age was 52.4 in females and 54.4 years in males with overall highest occurrence among the age group 45- < 55 years. Bilateral CTS was confirmed in the majority of the patients, i.e., 304(90.5%), and remaining were unilateral. Among unilateral pattern, 22 (68.8%) had right CTS and others had left CTS. Most of the patients were treated conservatively 85.4% while the rest had surgical decompression 14.6%. Conclusion: Overall predominant age group was 45-<55 years with female dominancy. Majority of subjects had bilateral CTS as well as conservative treatment was frequent. PMID:24353521

Malibary, Hussein Mohammed; Al-Najjar, Afnan Tawfeeg; Mohammed Yassen, Dina; Almarzouki Abuhussain, Hamad Abdullah; Radhwi, Osman Omer; Ridha Alfares, Zainab

2013-01-01

362

Practical Informatics: Training the Next Generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A commonly discussed yet infrequently addressed problem in the scientific community is the inadequate training our students receive in dealing with large data, a subject more popularly known as informatics. Yet as presented by the late Jim Gray, we now have a fourth paradigm for scientific research, namely data intensive science. Over the last few years, I have tried to address this educational deficiency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Initially, I added relevant informatics content into the standard Astronomy curricula in order to increase the student's exposure to this new paradigm. Realizing that this was merely a band-aid solution, I next created and offered a new course, entitled Practical Informatics for the Physical Sciences that was warmly received by undergraduate and graduate students in several science and engineering disciplines. More recently, I have been tasked by the University with expanding this material into an online course to introduce informatics concepts and techniques to a wider audience. In this paper, I present my initial motivation for adopting informatics material into the Astronomy curricula, my thoughts and experiences in developing the Practical Informatics course, lessons learned from the entire process, and my progress in developing a new, online informatics course. I hope that others can make use of these lessons to more broadly improve the training of the next generation of scientists.

Brunner, R. J.

2013-10-01

363

Teaching first-year medical students in basic clinical and procedural skills ? A novel course concept at a medical school in Austria  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Clerkships are still the main source for undergraduate medical students to acquire necessary skills. However, these educational experiences may not be sufficient, as there are significant deficiencies in the clinical experience and practical expertise of medical students. Project description: An innovative course teaching basic clinical and procedural skills to first-year medical students has been implemented at the Medical University of Graz, aiming at preparing students for clerkships and clinical electives. The course is based on several didactic elements: standardized and clinically relevant contents, dual (theoretical and virtual) pre-course preparation, student peer-teaching, small teaching groups, hands-on training, and the use of medical simulation. This is the first course of its kind at a medical school in Austria, and its conceptual design as well as the implementation process into the curriculum shall be described. Evaluation: Between November 2011 and January 2013, 418 students have successfully completed the course. Four online surveys among participating students have been performed, with 132 returned questionnaires. Students’ satisfaction with all four practical course parts was high, as well as the assessment of clinical relevance of contents. Most students (88.6%) strongly agreed/agreed that they had learned a lot throughout the course. Two thirds of the students were motivated by the course to train the acquired skills regularly at our skills laboratory. Narrative feedbacks revealed elements contributing most to course success. Conclusions: First-year medical students highly appreciate practical skills training. Hands-on practice, peer-teaching, clinically relevant contents, and the use of medical simulation are valued most. PMID:24575157

Mileder, Lukas; Wegscheider, Thomas; Dimai, Hans Peter

2014-01-01

364

Michigan Informatics: Informatics for the Public Health Workforce  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As health care job opportunities continue to expand, a number of institutions have been developing online training materials to help support academic public health programs. One such program is the Michigan Informatics (MI-INFO) website, which contains a variety of tutorials that deal with health information and computer skills. All told, the site contains nine tutorials which include titles like "Evidence Based Public Health", "Finding Health Statistics Online", and "Searching the Public Health Literature". Each of the tutorials features key concept overviews, exercises, and case studies. Near the bottom of the site, visitors can find a user manual for the tutorials, and a place where they can offer their own feedback. The site is rounded out by the "Other Resources" area, which contains links to other relevant sites, such as the Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

2007-01-01

365

An informatics strategy for cancer care  

PubMed Central

Whether transitioning from paper to electronic records or attempting to leverage data from existing systems for outcome studies, oncology practices face many challenges in defining and executing an informatics strategy. With the increasing costs of oncology treatments and expected changes in reimbursement rules, including requirements for evidence that supports physician decisions, it will become essential to collect data on treatment decisions and treatment efficacy to run a successful program. This study evaluates the current state of informatics systems available for use in oncology programs and focuses on developing an informatics strategy to meet the challenges introduced by expected changes in reimbursement rules and in medical and information technologies. PMID:21611003

Wright, J; Shogan, A; McCune, J; Stevens, S

2008-01-01

366

Russian Educational Standards of Informatics and Informatics Technologies (ICT): Aims, Content, Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Educational standards fixes three main parameters in informatics and informatics’ technology: the goals for every step of\\u000a education (primary step, intermediate step and pre-professional step), the obligatory component of the content, and the level\\u000a of it’s acquaintance. The basic course is the course of 8-9 classes. Informatics’ technology of solving tasks is in the focus\\u000a of the basic course. There

Aleksandr A. Kuznetsov; Sergey A. Beshenkov

2005-01-01

367

Pathology imaging informatics for quantitative analysis of whole-slide images  

PubMed Central

Objectives With the objective of bringing clinical decision support systems to reality, this article reviews histopathological whole-slide imaging informatics methods, associated challenges, and future research opportunities. Target audience This review targets pathologists and informaticians who have a limited understanding of the key aspects of whole-slide image (WSI) analysis and/or a limited knowledge of state-of-the-art technologies and analysis methods. Scope First, we discuss the importance of imaging informatics in pathology and highlight the challenges posed by histopathological WSI. Next, we provide a thorough review of current methods for: quality control of histopathological images; feature extraction that captures image properties at the pixel, object, and semantic levels; predictive modeling that utilizes image features for diagnostic or prognostic applications; and data and information visualization that explores WSI for de novo discovery. In addition, we highlight future research directions and discuss the impact of large public repositories of histopathological data, such as the Cancer Genome Atlas, on the field of pathology informatics. Following the review, we present a case study to illustrate a clinical decision support system that begins with quality control and ends with predictive modeling for several cancer endpoints. Currently, state-of-the-art software tools only provide limited image processing capabilities instead of complete data analysis for clinical decision-making. We aim to inspire researchers to conduct more research in pathology imaging informatics so that clinical decision support can become a reality. PMID:23959844

Kothari, Sonal; Phan, John H; Stokes, Todd H; Wang, May D

2013-01-01

368

Football Informatic Technology Robert Winkelman, Tejank Shah, Catherine Rudnick, and Roma Luthra  

E-print Network

of Market References Future Plans Concussions are a major concern in contact sports, particularly of sustaining a concussion. Our company, Football Informatic Technology or FIT, has developed a solution a concussion has been sustained Clinical Problem · Every year, 160,000 to 200,000 football players nationwide

McGaughey, Alan

369

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future  

E-print Network

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future Hamed and their surrounding environment (e.g., by monitoring their CO2 level [13]). Mental health care has seen less. Electronic records are relatively recent in mental health care and tend to be poorly integrated in clinical

Purver, Matthew

370

The informatics core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative  

PubMed Central

The Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative project has brought together geographically distributed investigators, each collecting data on the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The quantity and diversity of the imaging, clinical, cognitive, biochemical, and genetic data acquired and generated throughout the study necessitated sophisticated informatics systems to organize, manage, and disseminate data and results. We describe, here, a successful and comprehensive system that provides powerful mechanisms for processing, integrating, and disseminating these data not only to support the research needs of the investigators who make up the Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative cores, but also to provide widespread data access to the greater scientific community for the study of Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20451873

Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

2010-01-01

371

Case-based medical informatics  

PubMed Central

Background The "applied" nature distinguishes applied sciences from theoretical sciences. To emphasize this distinction, we begin with a general, meta-level overview of the scientific endeavor. We introduce the knowledge spectrum and four interconnected modalities of knowledge. In addition to the traditional differentiation between implicit and explicit knowledge we outline the concepts of general and individual knowledge. We connect general knowledge with the "frame problem," a fundamental issue of artificial intelligence, and individual knowledge with another important paradigm of artificial intelligence, case-based reasoning, a method of individual knowledge processing that aims at solving new problems based on the solutions to similar past problems. We outline the fundamental differences between Medical Informatics and theoretical sciences and propose that Medical Informatics research should advance individual knowledge processing (case-based reasoning) and that natural language processing research is an important step towards this goal that may have ethical implications for patient-centered health medicine. Discussion We focus on fundamental aspects of decision-making, which connect human expertise with individual knowledge processing. We continue with a knowledge spectrum perspective on biomedical knowledge and conclude that case-based reasoning is the paradigm that can advance towards personalized healthcare and that can enable the education of patients and providers. We center the discussion on formal methods of knowledge representation around the frame problem. We propose a context-dependent view on the notion of "meaning" and advocate the need for case-based reasoning research and natural language processing. In the context of memory based knowledge processing, pattern recognition, comparison and analogy-making, we conclude that while humans seem to naturally support the case-based reasoning paradigm (memory of past experiences of problem-solving and powerful case matching mechanisms), technical solutions are challenging. Finally, we discuss the major challenges for a technical solution: case record comprehensiveness, organization of information on similarity principles, development of pattern recognition and solving ethical issues. Summary Medical Informatics is an applied science that should be committed to advancing patient-centered medicine through individual knowledge processing. Case-based reasoning is the technical solution that enables a continuous individual knowledge processing and could be applied providing that challenges and ethical issues arising are addressed appropriately. PMID:15533257

Pantazi, Stefan V; Arocha, José F; Moehr, Jochen R

2004-01-01

372

77 FR 41188 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory...the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated...addressing activities of the Clinical Laboratory Integration into...Initiative; the Communication in Informatics Workgroup; and the...

2012-07-12

373

AMIA Board white paper: definition of biomedical informatics and specification of core competencies for graduate education in the discipline  

PubMed Central

The AMIA biomedical informatics (BMI) core competencies have been designed to support and guide graduate education in BMI, the core scientific discipline underlying the breadth of the field's research, practice, and education. The core definition of BMI adopted by AMIA specifies that BMI is ‘the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health.’ Application areas range from bioinformatics to clinical and public health informatics and span the spectrum from the molecular to population levels of health and biomedicine. The shared core informatics competencies of BMI draw on the practical experience of many specific informatics sub-disciplines. The AMIA BMI analysis highlights the central shared set of competencies that should guide curriculum design and that graduate students should be expected to master. PMID:22683918

Kulikowski, Casimir A; Shortliffe, Edward H; Currie, Leanne M; Elkin, Peter L; Hunter, Lawrence E; Johnson, Todd R; Kalet, Ira J; Lenert, Leslie A; Musen, Mark A; Ozbolt, Judy G; Smith, Jack W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter Z

2012-01-01

374

Genome informatics: Requirements and challenges  

SciTech Connect

Informatics of some kind will play a role in every aspect of the Human Genome Project (HGP); data acquisition, data analysis, data exchange, data publication, and data visualization. What are the real requirements and challenges? The primary requirement is clear thinking and the main challenge is design. If good design is lacking, the price will be failure of genome informatics and ultimately failure of the genome project itself. Scientists need good designs to deliver the tools necessary for acquiring and analyzing DNA sequences. As these tools become more efficient, they will need new tools for comparative genomic analyses. To make the tools work, the scientists will need to address and solve nomenclature issues that are essential, if also tedious. They must devise systems that will scale gracefully with the increasing flow of data. The scientists must be able to move data easily from one system to another, with no loss of content. As scientists, they will have failed in their responsibility to share results, should repeating experiments ever become preferable to searching the literature. Their databases must become a new kind of scientific literature and the scientists must develop ways to make electronic data publishing as routine as traditional journal publishing. Ultimately, they must build systems so advanced that they are virtually invisible. In summary, the HGP can be considered the most ambitious, most audacious information-management project ever undertaken. In the HGP, computers will not merely serve as tools for cataloging existing knowledge. Rather, they will serve as instruments, helping to create new knowledge by changing the way the scientists see the biological world. Computers will allow them to see genomes, just as radio telescopes let them see quasars and electron microscopes let them see viruses.

Robbins, R.J. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Applied Research Lab.

1993-12-31

375

BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making  

PubMed Central

Contributing reviewers The editors of BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed their time to the journal in Volume 13 (2013). PMID:25540033

2014-01-01

376

Use of interactive teaching methods in tobacco cessation program and examine it by using objective structured clinical exam  

PubMed Central

Background: Tobacco addiction is an important public health issue. It is important for health professional to counsel the tobacco users for cessation. Aim: To enhance communication skills of MBBS (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) students in counseling of tobacco users by using interactive teaching methods and examine it by using OSCE. Materials and Methods: It was a before and after comparison study. Communication skills of students were examined by standardized patients (investigators) by objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) method before and after intervention. All the students were trained to enhance the communication skills by role play, interactive session, anecdotes. Statistical analysis was done by using Paired t-test. Results: The difference in scores at all the 3 stations before and after the intervention and also global scores before and after the intervention was statistically highly significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusion and Recommendation: Communication skills of students in counseling tobacco users improved after they were given role play, interactive session, anecdotes. Similar model can be used to improve the communication/counseling skills in other important health hazards. PMID:24083278

Fernandez, Kevin; Pandve, Harshal T.; Debnath, Dhrubajyoti J.

2013-01-01

377

A Method for Probing Disease Relatedness Using Common Clinical Eligibility Criteria Mary Regina Boland,a  

E-print Network

of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA b The Irving Institute for Clinical clinical trial eligibility criteria through reuse. Keywords: Medical informatics, clinical trials, dataA Method for Probing Disease Relatedness Using Common Clinical Eligibility Criteria Mary Regina

Miotto, Riccardo

378

Seeing the wood for the trees: approaches to teaching and assessing clinical pharmacology and therapeutics in a problem-based learning course.  

PubMed

For about 50 years, clinical pharmacology and therapeutics have been taught in the medical schools via traditional lectures and practical classes. During this time, significant changes have occurred in our understanding of medicine and basic sciences. Also the needs for our community have changed dramatically. The explosion of scientific discoveries, the use of new technologies in disease diagnosis, the availability of a wide range of therapeutic options, and the availability of knowledge to everyone via the Internet have necessitated new approaches for teaching medical and other health professional students. Finding information related to a topic has not become a priority in teaching, what has become more important is to teach undergraduate students how to think in addition to what to think. Applying information learnt and assessing its significance in real life situations has become mandatory. The aims of this paper were: (i) to discuss the model we used in introducing clinical pharmacology and therapeutics teaching in the undergraduate course at the University of Melbourne and the educational principles behind the model, and (ii) to discuss the new tools of assessment used in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. PMID:18392299

Azer, Samy A; Frauman, Albert G

2008-03-01

379

Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

Wright, Theodore

2014-01-01

380

Evolution of Trends in European Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

This presentation attempts to analyze the trends in Medical Informatics along half a century, in the European socio-political and technological development context. Based on the major characteristics which seem dominant in some periods, a staging is proposed, with a description of each period – the context, major ideas, views and events. A summary of major features of each period is also added. This paper has an original presentation of the evolution of major trends in medical informatics. PMID:24648618

I. Mihalas, George

2014-01-01

381

The value of mindfulness-based methods in teaching at a clinical field placement.  

PubMed

The value of mindfulness-based methods in an undergraduate field placement was investigated in relation to the acquisition of self-care and other basic clinical competencies. The participants were 22 students in an applied behavioral analysis course, which included a mindfulness-based training module, and 20 students enrolled in an experimental psychology course without mindfulness training. The Mindfulness Attention and Awareness Scale, the Freiberg Mindfulness Inventory, and the Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness Skills were used as measurements before and after intervention. Mindfulness-trained participants kept records and were asked to share their personal experiences during supervision and an exit interview. Results demonstrated that training significantly increased mindfulness. Qualitative data indicated enhanced self-care, attention to well-being, self-awareness, active involvement acquiring skills, and empathy and compassion. The need to expand the utility of mindfulness to the realm of education and the importance of including comparison groups with other self-care modules for future studies were discussed. PMID:20524546

Gökhan, Nurper; Meehan, Edward F; Peters, Kevin

2010-04-01

382

Genome Informatics 13: 589590 (2002) 589 Design of ITS and 23S rDNA-Targeted Probes and Its  

E-print Network

Genome Informatics 13: 589­590 (2002) 589 Design of ITS and 23S rDNA-Targeted Probes and Its and ubiquitous distribution make it one of the most commonly isolated organisms in the clinical laboratory. Even though the appearance of S. epidermidis in clinical material could be dismissed as a contamination at one

383

[A new vision of nursing: the evolution and development of nursing informatics].  

PubMed

Technology development trends in the 21st century are increasingly focused on the development of interdisciplinary applications. Advanced information technology may be applied to integrate nursing care information, simplify nursing processes, and reduce the time spent on work tasks, thereby increasing the amount of time that clinical personnel are available to care for patients and ensuring that patients are provided with high-quality and personalized care services. The development of nursing information began in Taiwan in 2003 and has since expanded and thrived. The ability of nursing information to connect formerly insular national nursing communities promotes the international visibility of Taiwan. The rapid development of nursing information in Taiwan, resulting in the production of informative and outstanding results, has received worldwide attention. The Taiwan Nursing Informatics Association was established in 2006 to nurture nursing information professionals, develop and apply information technology in the health care domain, and facilitate international nursing information exchanges. The association actively promotes nursing information in the areas of administration, education, research, and clinical practice, thereby integrating nursing with empirical applications to enhance the service quality and management of nursing and increase the benefits of nursing teaching and research. To convert information into knowledge, the association develops individualized strategies for managing mobile care and employs an interagency network to exchange and reintegrate resources, establishing active, intelligent nursing based on network characteristics and an empirical foundation. The mid- and long-term objectives of the association involve introducing cloud computing and facilitating the meaningful use of nursing information in both public and government settings, thereby creating a milestone of developing and expanding nursing information unique to Taiwan. PMID:25125162

Feng, Rung-Chuang; Yeh, Yu-Ting

2014-08-01

384

Biomedical Informatics Resources — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

A central focus of the NCIP mission is the provision of a wide array of informatics resources — applications, data collections, analytical algorithms, standards, and infrastructure components, to name only the most obvious — needed to sustain the broad cancer-research and biomedical-informatics community.

385

Incoporating Data Mining Applications into Clinical Guildelines Reza Sherafat Kazemzadeh and Kamran Sartipi  

E-print Network

Informatics; Clinical Decision Support; Clinical Guideline; GLIF. 1. Introduction Today's HealthcareIncoporating Data Mining Applications into Clinical Guildelines Reza Sherafat Kazemzadeh and Kamran, Canada {sherafr, sartipi}@mcmaster.ca Abstract Computer based clinical guidelines have been developed

Sartipi, Kamran

386

X-Informatics: Practical Semantic Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discipline of data science is merging with multiple science disciplines to form new X-informatics research disciplines. They are almost too numerous to name, but they include geoinformatics, bioinformatics, cheminformatics, biodiversity informatics, ecoinformatics, materials informatics, and the emerging discipline of astroinformatics. Within any X-informatics discipline, the information granules are unique to that discipline -- e.g., gene sequences in bio, the sky object in astro, and the spatial object in geo (such as points, lines, and polygons in the vector model, and pixels in the raster model). Nevertheless the goals are similar: transparent data re-use across subdisciplines and within education settings, information and data integration and fusion, personalization of user interactions with the data collection, semantic search and retrieval, and knowledge discovery. The implementation of an X-informatics framework enables these semantic e-science research goals. We describe the concepts, challenges, and new developments associated with the new discipline of astroinformatics, and how geoinformatics provides valuable lessons learned and a model for practical semantic science within a traditional science discipline through the accretion of data science methodologies (such as formal metadata creation, data models, data mining, information retrieval, knowledge engineering, provenance, taxonomies, and ontologies). The emerging concept of data-as-a-service (DaaS) builds upon the concept of smart data (or data DNA) for intelligent data management, automated workflows, and intelligent processing. Smart data, defined through X-informatics, enables several practical semantic science use cases, including self-discovery, data intelligence, automatic recommendations, relevance analysis, dimension reduction, feature selection, constraint-based mining, interdisciplinary data re-use, knowledge-sharing, data use in education, and more. We describe these concepts within the context of very large data-producing science projects, such as the petascale LSST (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), and we describe how an X-informatics research approach is essential for data-intensive science frameworks, including sensor networks, virtual observatories, and volunteer (citizen) science.

Borne, K. D.

2009-12-01

387

Clinical, Microbiological, and Genetic Characteristics of Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in a Teaching Hospital.  

PubMed

The emergence of vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous VISA (hVISA) is of major concern worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence, phenotypic and molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to determine the clinical significance of the hVISA phenotype in patients with bacteremia. A total of 104 S. aureus blood isolates were collected from a teaching hospital of Argentina between August 2009 and November 2010. No VISA isolate was recovered, and 3 out of 92 patients (3.3%) were infected with hVISA, 2 of them methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (4.5% of MRSA). Macro Etest and prediffusion method detected 3/3 and 2/3 hVISA respectively. Considering the type of bacteremia, the three cases were distributed as follows: two patients had suffered multiple episodes of bacteremia (both hVISA strains recovered in the second episode), while only one patient had suffered a single episode of bacteremia with hVISA infection. MRSA bloodstream isolates exhibiting the hVISA phenotype were related to HA-MRSA Cordobes clone (ST5-SCCmec I-spa t149) and MRSA Argentinean pediatric clone (ST100-SCCmec IVNV-spa t002), but not to CA-MRSA-ST30-SCCmec IV-spa t019 clone that was one of the most frequent in our country. Although still relatively infrequent in our hospital, hVISA strains were significantly associated with multiple episodes of bacteremia (p=0.037) and genetically unrelated. PMID:25535825

Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Ordoñez, Andrea Martinez; De Gregorio, Stella; Foccoli, Monica; Lasala, María Beatriz; García, Susana; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela; Mollerach, Marta

2015-02-01

388

Age-appropriate feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending child welfare clinic at a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background: Appropriate infant feeding is the key to optimum infant and child development and survival. This study investigates age-appropriate infant feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending the immunization and child welfare clinic at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional descriptive design, a sample of 300 sets of infants (age ?12 months) and caregivers was systematically selected and studied. The data were analyzed using the MINITAB® 12.21 (USA) statistical software. Results: All the infants studied were still on breast milk. Most of the mothers demonstrated correct body positioning (89.9) and attachment (78.7%) during breastfeeding, and effective suckling was demonstrated in 77.0%. Interestingly, none of the infants was either exclusively breastfed for 6 months or currently on exclusive breastfeeding. Furthermore, only 64 (58.2%) of the 110 infants that were more than 6 months of age had appropriately been started on complementary feeding from 6 months of age. Overall, most caregivers (88.7%) had “fair” to “good” infant feeding practices. The practices were significantly associated with their level of education, and their relationship with the infants. Up to 40.0% and 73.7% of the infants had varying degrees of wasting and stunting respectively. Infant feeding practices and the age of the infants emerged as the only factors significantly associated with stunting, while both the caregivers’ practices and age of the infants emerged as significant predictors of wasting in the infants. Conclusion and Recommendations: Barely 3 years to the 2015 target of the millennium development goals (MDGs), infant feeding and nutritional status still poses a serious threat to the dream of realizing the MDG-4. The Ministry of Health and relevant developing partners in this region should as a matter of urgency, formulate and implement a strong community-based public health intervention program to improve the knowledge and practices of mothers on infant feeding. PMID:24696628

Lawan, Umar M.; Amole, Gboluwaga T.; Jahum, Mahmud G.; Sani, Abdullahi

2014-01-01

389

Teaching evidence based medicine literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years - a protocol for a randomised controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background Two of the key steps in evidence based medicine (EBM) are being able to construct a clinical question and effectively search the literature to source relevant information. No evidence currently exists that informs whether such skills should be taught to medical students during their pre-clinical years, or delivered to include both the pre-clinical and clinical years of study. This is an important component of curriculum design as the level of clinical maturity of students can affect their perception of the importance and uptake of EBM principles in practice. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to identify the effectiveness of delivering a formal workshop in EBM literature searching skills to third year medical students entering their clinical years of study. The primary outcome of EBM competency in literature searching skills will be evaluated using the Fresno tool. Discussion This trial will provide novel information on the effectiveness of delivering a formal education workshop in evidence based medicine literature searching skills during the clinical years of study. The result of this study will also identify the impact of teaching EBM literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years of study. PMID:21794173

2011-01-01

390

Comenius University Faculty of mathematics, physics and informatics  

E-print Network

Comenius University Faculty of mathematics, physics and informatics ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Evolution;Comenius University Faculty of mathematics, physics and informatics ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Evolution) is still young promising field already with multiple achievements. This work contains overview

Petrovic, Pavel

391

An investigation into health informatics and related standards in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo describe the current status of and future plans for health informatics and related standards in China and analyze the problems raised in the process of standardization for health informatics.

Yuhai Zhang; Yongyong Xu; Lei Shang; Keqin Rao

2007-01-01

392

[Informatics in the Croatian health care system].  

PubMed

Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), and the Croatian Society of Medical Informatics (CSMI) has translated it into Croatian and published it on its website. Based on a survey of medical staff attitudes toward health care system informatization, the Croatian health system appears to be ready for informatization. The only requirement is that the present and future health care providers have appropriate medical informatics education, proper computer equipment at their workplace, and an opportunity to participate in the development and/or improvement of the health information system. One of the EU health strategy priorities is the improvement of health information and knowledge. It means that integrated health information systems are required, i.e. systems able to provide key information on health and health care system to the politicians, health professionals and public in general. PMID:16095187

Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

2005-01-01

393

Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

2014-06-01

394

Chapter 17: Bioimage Informatics for Systems Pharmacology  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies. PMID:23633943

Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

2013-01-01

395

COLLEGE OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATICS 139 Computing and  

E-print Network

COLLEGE OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATICS 139 College of Computing and Informatics www.cci.uncc.edu Dean of North Carolina at Charlotte's College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) is part of a dynamic of multidisciplinary faculty, industry professionals, and students. The CCI was formed in 2000 as the College

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

396

Eco-informatics and decision making managing our natural resources  

Microsoft Academic Search

This panel responds to the December 2004 workshop on Eco-Informatics and Decision Making [1], which addressed how informatics tools can help with better management of natural resources and policy making. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the NSF, NBII, NASA, and EPA. Workshop participants recommended that informatics research in four IT areas be funded: modeling and simulation, data quality, information

Judith Bayard Cushing; Tyrone Wilson; Fred Martin; John L. Schnase; Sylvia Spengler; Larry Sugarbaker; Theresa A. Pardo

2006-01-01

397

Research of Training Mode of Informatization Talent in Our Country  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thanks to the constant improvement of technology, modern information technology has gotten rapid development as well as enterprise Informatization, management Informatization and Informatization, and the three can't be separated from each other, and each one of the three interacting with and promoting the others; Thus if we want better future and faster development speed of the three, we should pay

Shen Xiang-chen; Yang Hui-na

2010-01-01

398

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computers are Becoming a Necessary  

E-print Network

www.informatics.uiuc.edu 1 Computers are Becoming a Necessary Extension of our Brain Extend our physical capabilities And it has just started #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computing & Information Science & Engineering Order, Family or Genus? 2 SE CE CS IS IT MIS LIS X-Informatics X= astro, bio, business, chem

Snir, Marc

399

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2010; Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446

Yu, Ping

400

MEDINFO 2007 Studies in Health Technology and Informatics  

E-print Network

MEDINFO 2007 #12;Studies in Health Technology and Informatics This book series was started in 1990 of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics Building Sustainable Health Systems Part 2 Edited to promote research conducted under the auspices of the EC programmes' Advanced Informatics in Medicine (AIM

Hansen, René Rydhof

401

Health Management and Informatics Alumni Organization An Affiliate of  

E-print Network

BYLAWS of the Health Management and Informatics Alumni Organization An Affiliate of The University The name of the organization shall be the Health Management and Informatics Organization hereinafter referred to as the Organization. ARTICLE II: PURPOSE The Health Management and Informatics Organization

Missouri-Columbia, University of

402

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2009; Vol 4(1): e The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence and dedicated to the advancement of Health Informatics and information technology in healthcare. ISSN: 1446-4381 © Copyright

Grundy, John

403

PILOT GRANT OPPORTUNITY IN HEALTH PRACTICE RESEARCH Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research  

E-print Network

clinical researchers the opportunity to do an informatics-based project in an operational clinical settingPILOT GRANT OPPORTUNITY IN HEALTH PRACTICE RESEARCH Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and The Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) June 8, 2012 Health Practice Research

Grishok, Alla

404

Industry Insights -A Focus onIndustry Insights A Focus on Healthcare IT, Advanced Clinical  

E-print Network

and Clinical Informatics, Philips Healthcare May 11th, 2010 #12;Introduction of the speakerp · Dr Tibor. Product Manager, Patient Care and Clinical Informatics, Philips Healthcare · 4100 E Third Avenue Suite 101Industry Insights - A Focus onIndustry Insights A Focus on Healthcare IT, Advanced Clinical

Puglisi, Joseph

405

PILOT GRANT OPPORTUNITY IN HEALTH PRACTICE RESEARCH Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research  

E-print Network

clinical researchers the opportunity to do an informatics-based project in an operational clinical settingPILOT GRANT OPPORTUNITY IN HEALTH PRACTICE RESEARCH Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research and The Department of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI) July 17, 2013 Health Practice Research

Grishok, Alla

406

Earth Science Informatics Comes of Age  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The volume and complexity of Earth science data have steadily increased, placing ever-greater demands on researchers, software developers and data managers tasked with handling such data. Additional demands arise from requirements being levied by funding agencies and governments to better manage, preserve and provide open access to data. Fortunately, over the past 10-15 years significant advances in information technology, such as increased processing power, advanced programming languages, more sophisticated and practical standards, and near-ubiquitous internet access have made the jobs of those acquiring, processing, distributing and archiving data easier. These advances have also led to an increasing number of individuals entering the field of informatics as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also encompasses the use of computers and computational methods to support decisionmaking and other applications for societal benefits.

Jodha, Siri; Khalsa, S.; Ramachandran, Rahul

2014-01-01

407

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to  

E-print Network

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Cancer Informatics Supplementary Issue: Network and Pathway Analysis of Cancer Susceptibility (A) Introduction Cellular signaling generates a chain of protein

Geman, Donald

408

Informatics and Quantitative Analysis in Biological Imaging  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Biological imaging is now a quantitative technique for probing cellular structure and dynamics and is increasingly used for cell-based screens. However, the bioinformatics tools required for hypothesis-driven analysis of digital images are still immature. We are developing the Open Microscopy Environment (OME) as an informatics solution for the storage and analysis of optical microscope image data. OME aims to automate image analysis, modeling, and mining of large sets of images and specifies a flexible data model, a relational database, and an XML-encoded file standard that is usable by potentially any software tool. With this design, OME provides a first step toward biological image informatics.

Jason Swedlow (University of Dundee; )

2003-04-04

409

MRSQ informatics education columns: passing the baton.  

PubMed

This is the last Informatics Education column under the current editors. The outgoing co-editor identifies several key themes that describe the column during her tenure. The main theme discovered while reviewing the columns published over the last five years is technology. Technological changes and advances have affected the way in which librarians conduct instruction, such as incorporating e-learning with traditional workshops and in-class sessions. Technology plays a key role in all of the themes that emerged. The incoming editors imagine what the future themes will be for the Informatics Education column. PMID:23092421

Hasman, Linda; Hoberecht, Toni; Pullen, Kimberly

2012-01-01

410

Twelve Tips to Improve Bedside Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasizes the benefits of bedside teaching in medical education. Presents 12 tips to simplify key strategies and describe them in greater depth in order to promote bedside teaching which is an essential method of clinical teaching. (SOE)

Ramani, Subha

2003-01-01

411

Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical InformaticsInformatics  

E-print Network

ICS 313 1 Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical Informatics Systems Outline and Objectives Describe basic concepts in artificial intelligence Understand is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Goals of AI systems fall into four categories: Thinking humanly Thinking

Reed, Nancy E.

412

An alternative path to improving university Earth science teaching and developing the geoscience workforce: Postdoctoral research faculty involvement in clinical teacher preparation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is estimated that by the year 2020 relative to 2009, there will be 28% more Earth Science jobs paying ? $75,000/year1 in the U.S.A. These jobs will require advanced degrees, but compared to all arts and science advanced degrees, the number of physical science M.S. and Ph.D. awarded per year decreased from 2.5% in 1980 to 1.5% in 20092. This decline is reflected on a smaller scale and at a younger age: in the New York City school system only 36% of all 8th graders have basic proficiency in science 3. These figures indicate that the lack achievement in science starts at a young age and then extends into higher education. Research has shown that students in grades 7 - 12 4,5 and in university level courses 6 both respond positively to high quality science teaching. However, much attention is focused on improving science teaching in grades 7- 12, whereas at many universities lower level science courses are taught by junior research and contingent faculty who typically lack formal training, and sometimes interest, in effective teaching. The danger here is that students might enter university intending to pursue geoscience degrees, but then encounter ineffective instructors, causing them to lose interest in geoscience and thus pursue other disciplines. The crux of the matter becomes how to improve the quality of university-level geoscience teaching, without losing sight of the major benchmark of success for research faculty - scholarly publications reporting innovative research results. In most cases, it would not be feasible to sidetrack the research goals of early career scientists by placing them into a formal teacher preparation program. But what happens when postdoctoral research scientists take an active role in clinical teacher preparation as part of their research appointments? The American Museum of Natural History's Masters of Arts in Teaching (AMNH-MAT) urban residency pilot program utilizes a unique approach to grade 7 - 12 Earth Science teacher preparation in that postdoctoral research scientists are directly involved in the clinical preparation of the teacher candidates7. In this program, professional educators and senior scientists guide and work closely with the postdoctoral scientists in developing lessons and field experiences for the teacher candidates. This exposes the postdoctoral scientists to pedagogical techniques. Furthermore, postdoctoral scientists make regular visits to partner schools and share their research interests with high school science students8. Regular assessments about the quality of the postdoctoral scientist's teaching, in the form of course evaluations and informal discussions with the teacher candidates and professional educators, further augments the postdoctoral scientists teaching skills. These experiences can ultimately improve university level science teaching, should the postdoctoral scientists find positions within a university setting. Here, five postdoctoral researchers present self-studies of changing instructional practice born of their involvement in clinical teacher preparation in the AMNH-MAT program.

Zirakparvar, N. A.; Sessa, J.; Ustunisik, G. K.; Nadeau, P. A.; Flores, K. E.; Ebel, D. S.

2013-12-01

413

The Professionalism Assessment of Clinical Teachers (PACT): The Reliability and Validity of a Novel Tool to Evaluate Professional and Clinical Teaching Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Physicians function as clinicians, teachers, and role models within the clinical environment. Negative learning environments have been shown to be due to many factors, including the presence of unprofessional behaviors among clinical teachers. Reliable and valid assessments of clinical teacher performance, including professional behaviors, may…

Young, Meredith E.; Cruess, Sylvia R.; Cruess, Richard L.; Steinert, Yvonne

2014-01-01

414

The Mercer Clinic Holiday Pet Basket program was started in 1995 by Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital staff members of the "VOICE" staff newsletter. It has grown due to need over the years from only 25 baskets to 130  

E-print Network

The Mercer Clinic Holiday Pet Basket program was started in 1995 by Veterinary Medical Teaching that every year we rely on the kindness of others to help these very special pets who are more than a pet this wonderful tradition alive by contributing any time of year to the Mercer Veterinary Clinic Holiday Pet

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

415

The informatics nurse specialist role in electronic health record usability evaluation.  

PubMed

Health information technology is revolutionizing the way we interact with health-related data. One example of this can be seen in the rising adoption rates of electronic health records by healthcare providers. Nursing plays a vital role in electronic health record adoption, not only because of their numbers but also their intimate understanding of workflow. The success of an electronic health record also relies on how usable the software is for clinicians, and a thorough usability evaluation is needed before implementing a system within an organization. Not all nurses have the knowledge and skills to perform extensive usability testing; therefore, the informatics nurse specialist plays a critical role in the process. This article will discuss core usability principles, provide a framework for applying these concepts, and explore the role of the informatics nurse specialist in electronic health record evaluation. Health information technology is fundamentally changing the clinical practice environment, and many nurses are seeking leadership positions in the field of informatics. As technology and software become more sophisticated, usability principles must be used under theguidance of the informatics nurse specialist to provide a relevant, robust, and well-designed electronic health record to address the needs of the busy clinician. PMID:24473121

Rojas, Crystal L; Seckman, Charlotte A

2014-05-01

416

77 FR 69632 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...data management centers, clinical investigators, and others...source data in FDA- regulated clinical investigations. The revised...Fitzmartin, Office of Planning and Informatics, Center for Drug Evaluation...Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.''...

2012-11-20

417

MEDICAL DECISION MAKING LIBRARY NUMERIC CATEGORIES 1 Teaching MDM  

E-print Network

Decision Making (general) 4 Clinical Decision Making "Rounds" · NEJM "CLinical Problem Solving" 5 Clinical Clinical Prediction Rules 9 Algorithms · Guidelines 10 Calculating Posttest Probability 11 Test Performance · Informatics 26 Pros and Cons of MDM 27 Uncertainty 28 Critical Appraisal · Evidence-based Medicine 29 Outcomes

Ford, James

418

Image informatics at a national research center  

Microsoft Academic Search

Image informatics at the Communications Engineering Branch of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications (LHNCBC), an R&D division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), includes document and biomedical images. In both domains, research into computer-assisted methods for information extraction, and the implementation of prototype systems incorporating such methods, is central to our mission. Current document image research

L. Rodney Long; Sameer K. Antani; George R. Thoma

2005-01-01

419

Qualitative Evaluation in Consumer Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approaches to qualitative evaluation for consumer health informatics are much like qualitative research for any purpose. Data collection and data analysis methods are similar for all projects. This chapter provides a general overview of these methods. But because qualitative research depends heavily on the research participants and contextual setting, each project is different. Examples throughout the chapter illustrate ways in

Bonnie Kaplan

420

Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology  

PubMed Central

There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

2011-01-01

421

Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM)  

Cancer.gov

May 15, 2008 12:00 AM - May 18, 2008 12:00 AM Washington State Convention and Trade Center Seattle, WA + Add to Outlook Calendar 2008 Annual Meeting Print This Page Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) News & Events

422

Eco-informatics and natural resource management  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project highlight reports on the 2004 workshop [1], as well as follow-up activities in 2005 and 2006, regarding how informatics tools can help manage natural resources and decide policy. The workshop was sponsored jointly by sponsored by the NSF, NBII, NASA, and EPA, and attended by practitioners from government and non-government agencies, and university researchers from the computer, social,

Judith Bayard Cushing; Tyrone Wilson; Alan Borning; Lois M. L. Delcambre; Geoffrey C. Bowker; Mike Frame; John L. Schnase; William Sonntag; Janos Fulop; Carol A. Hert; Eduard H. Hovy; Julia Jones; Eric Landis; Charles M. Schweik; Lawrence Brandt; Valerie Gregg; Sylvia Spengler

2006-01-01

423

Geospatial Informatics Applications for Disaster Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geospatial Informatics and its application to terrain understanding and situational awareness with particular focus on disaster management are addressed in this paper. The opportunities for information systems leveraging geospatial and other data sources are presented. Remote sensing imaging and non-imaging sources of information are explored. Coordination and sharing of in information is explored to improve the ability of multiple organizations

William E. Roper

424

Discovery Informatics: AI Opportunities in Scientific Discovery  

E-print Network

and that continues to expand so rapidly (e.g., [Science 2011]). The volume, variety, and velocity of the data already of Discovery Informatics for two important current topics in science: "big data" and "the long tail" of science high-end instruments, data management services, and support for virtual organizations

Gil, Yolanda

425

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics Components, Objects, and Contracts Research Report No for distributed services. 1 #12;Whence the central role of interfaces as an abstraction mechanism for hiding internal details. The interface description is the basis for composition both from a theoretical point

Steffen, Martin

426

Medical informatics and telemedicine: A vision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of medical informatics is to improve care. This requires the commitment and harmonious collaboration between the computer scientists and clinicians and an integrated database. The vision described is how medical information systems are going to impact the way medical care is delivered in the future.

Clemmer, Terry P.

1991-01-01

427

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine is dependent on using the power of the computerized database to not only feed patient specific information to the health care providers, but to use the epidemiological and statistical information in the data base to improve decision making and ultimately care. The computer is also a powerful tool to facilitate standardizing and monitoring

Terry P. Clemmer

1995-01-01

428

Medical informatics and bioinformatics: a bibliometric study.  

PubMed

This paper reports on an analysis of the bioinformatics and medical informatics literature with the objective to identify upcoming trends that are shared among both research fields to derive benefits from potential collaborative initiatives for their future. Our results present the main characteristics of the two fields and show that these domains are still relatively separated. PMID:17521073

Bansard, J Y; Rebholz-Schuhmann, D; Cameron, G; Clark, D; van Mulligen, E; Beltrame, E; Barbolla, E; Martin-Sanchez, F Del Hoyo; Milanesi, L; Tollis, I; van der Lei, J; Coatrieux, J L

2007-05-01

429

Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)  

SciTech Connect

The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

2003-03-06

430

Evaluation in health informatics: social network analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social network analysis comprises a set of research methods that can be used to analyze the relationships among entities such as people, departments, and organizations. The purpose of the analysis is to discover patterns of relationships that affect both individual and organizational attitudes and behavior such as the adoption, diffusion, and use of new medical informatics applications. This paper presents

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

431

Evaluation in health informatics: computer simulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evaluation of complex medical informatics applications involves not only the information system, but also its impact on the organizational environment in which it is implemented. In instances where these applications cannot be evaluated with traditional experimental methods, computer simulation provides a flexible approach to evaluation. The construction of a computer simulation model involves the development of a model that

James G. Anderson

2002-01-01

432

Standardization in health informatics in Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Around the world, informatics has been cited as a key enabler of health sector reform. Recent reform programs in Canada, reflecting this global consensus, have emphasized the importance of quality information and information technology in meeting their goals. Standards are an important building block for achieving the required comprehensive and integrated health information infrastructure. This paper describes the current status

Richard C. Alvarez; Jennifer Zelmer

1998-01-01

433

Use of Clinical Alerting to Improve the Collection of Clinical Research Data Krystl Haerian, MD, 1  

E-print Network

Use of Clinical Alerting to Improve the Collection of Clinical Research Data Krystl Haerian, MD, 1 Development 2 Department of Clinical Research Informatics National Institutes of Health Clinical Center the potential to adversely impact the conclusions drawn from clinical research. We prospectively studied

Cimino, James J.

434

Area of Concentration in Clinical Research The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science  

E-print Network

CCTS 42000 introduction to Clinical Research informatics hSTD 38000 health Status AssessmentArea of Concentration in Clinical Research The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science CliniCAl of clinical research include epidemiological and behavioral studies; outcomes and health services research

Mateo, Jill M.

435

Utilization of medical imaging informatics and biometrics technologies in healthcare delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  With the large amount of image data accumulated daily from medical imaging modalities and picture archiving and communication\\u000a systems (PACS) in hospitals and from healthcare biometrics related databases, we can take advantage of these data resources\\u000a to investigate innovative clinical service, research and education using the concept of imaging informatics. In this paper\\u000a we present five independent concepts and technologies

H. K. Huang

2008-01-01

436

Facilitating informatics knowledge dissemination: targeted implementation resources for health care providers.  

PubMed

The AHRQ National Resource Center for Health IT (NRC) maintains a public Web site with a large repository of diverse informatics knowledge resources. The NRC recently added a new tool -- the Health IT Bibliography -- to better disseminate key resources to health care organizations. The bibliography filters resources from the NRC's larger online knowledge library, providing quicker access for those who desire to learn more about implementing clinical IT applications. PMID:18998794

Dixon, Brian E; Zafar, Atif; Whipple, Elizabeth C; Cravens, Gary D; McGowan, Julie J

2008-01-01

437

Embedded librarian within an online health informatics graduate research course: a case study.  

PubMed

The Health Sciences Library and the Department of Health Informatics & Information Management at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis piloted an embedded librarian project in summer 2012. The value and effectiveness of the pilot project was evaluated by analyzing the content of e-mail questions received from the students and the students' answers to the pre- and post-class surveys. The project received positive feedback from the students and course faculty. Librarians collaborating with teaching faculty and interacting one-on-one with students in health information-intensive courses proved to be helpful for student learning. PMID:24528264

Kumar, Sajeesh; Wu, Lin; Reynolds, Rebecca

2014-01-01

438

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has shown the benefits of additional anatomical learning and dissection beyond the first year of medical school human gross anatomy, all the way through postgraduate medical training. We have developed an interactive method for teaching eye and orbit anatomy to medical students in their ophthalmology rotation at Duke University…

Kivell, Tracy L.; Doyle, Sara K.; Madden, Richard H.; Mitchell, Terry L.; Sims, Ershela L.

2009-01-01

439

Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

DeSantis, Kimberly L.

2012-01-01

440

Back to the basic sciences: an innovative approach to teaching senior medical students how best to integrate basic science and clinical medicine.  

PubMed

Abraham Flexner persuaded the medical establishment of his time that teaching the sciences, from basic to clinical, should be a critical component of the medical student curriculum, thus giving rise to the "preclinical curriculum." However, students' retention of basic science material after the preclinical years is generally poor. The authors believe that revisiting the basic sciences in the fourth year can enhance understanding of clinical medicine and further students' understanding of how the two fields integrate. With this in mind, a return to the basic sciences during the fourth year of medical school may be highly beneficial. The purpose of this article is to (1) discuss efforts to integrate basic science into the clinical years of medical student education throughout the United States and Canada, and (2) describe the highly developed fourth-year basic science integration program at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. In their critical review of medical school curricula of 126 U.S. and 17 Canadian medical schools, the authors found that only 19% of U.S. medical schools and 24% of Canadian medical schools require basic science courses or experiences during the clinical years, a minor increase compared with 1985. Curricular methods ranged from simple lectures to integrated case studies with hands-on laboratory experience. The authors hope to advance the national discussion about the need to more fully integrate basic science teaching throughout all four years of the medical student curriculum by placing a curricular innovation in the context of similar efforts by other U.S. and Canadian medical schools. PMID:18580085

Spencer, Abby L; Brosenitsch, Teresa; Levine, Arthur S; Kanter, Steven L

2008-07-01

441

To Compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate in Teaching Information Mastery to Clinical Residents: A Crossover Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare PubMed Clinical Queries and UpToDate regarding the amount and speed of information retrieval and users' satisfaction. Method A cross-over randomized trial was conducted in February 2009 in Tehran University of Medical Sciences that included 44 year-one or two residents who participated in an information mastery workshop. A one-hour lecture on the principles of information mastery was organized followed by self learning slide shows before using each database. Subsequently, participants were randomly assigned to answer 2 clinical scenarios using either UpToDate or PubMed Clinical Queries then crossed to use the other database to answer 2 different clinical scenarios. The proportion of relevantly answered clinical scenarios, time to answer retrieval, and users' satisfaction were measured in each database. Results Based on intention-to-treat analysis, participants retrieved the answer of 67 (76%) questions using UpToDate and 38 (43%) questions using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001). The median time to answer retrieval was 17 min (95% CI: 16 to 18) using UpToDate compared to 29 min (95% CI: 26 to 32) using PubMed Clinical Queries (P<0.001). The satisfaction with the accuracy of retrieved answers, interaction with UpToDate and also overall satisfaction were higher among UpToDate users compared to PubMed Clinical Queries users (P<0.001). Conclusions For first time users, using UpToDate compared to Pubmed Clinical Querries can lead to not only a higher proportion of relevant answer retrieval within a shorter time, but also a higher users' satisfaction. So, addition of tutoring pre-appraised sources such as UpToDate to the information mastery curricula seems to be highly efficient. PMID:21858142

Sayyah Ensan, Ladan; Faghankhani, Masoomeh; Javanbakht, Anna; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

2011-01-01

442

NIH Clinical Center Organizational Chart  

E-print Network

NIH Clinical Center Organizational Chart May 2014 DIRECTOR John I. Gallin, MD Chief Operating Officer Deputy Director for Educational Chief, Laboratory for Informatics Chief, Radiology and Imaging Chief Nurse Officer Chief Financial Officer Chief, Department of Bioethics Deputy Director for Clinical

443

DISCIPLINARY DIFFERENCES OF UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTING PROGRAMS AT IUPUI INDIANA UNIVERSITY -SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING  

E-print Network

DISCIPLINARY DIFFERENCES OF UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTING PROGRAMS AT IUPUI INDIANA UNIVERSITY - SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Informatics The undergraduate program in Informatics, combining principles from information systems, computer science, psychology, and sociology, prepares students to tackle current

Zhou, Yaoqi

444

Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program  

PubMed Central

Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful iPad users. To facilitate collection of information through the iPad, the design of electronic data-input forms should consider the participants’ reported negative perceptions towards typing data through mobile devices. Technology deployment projects should gather sufficient evidence from pilot studies in order to guide efforts to adapt resources and infrastructure to relevant needs of Family Medicine teachers and learners. PMID:25138307

2014-01-01

445

Revised March 2011 Faculty of Graduate Studies Website  

E-print Network

OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND MEDICINE -- GRADUATE PROGRAM MASTEROFHEALTHINFORMATICSHealth informatics training is Health Informatics? Health Informatics studies and uses computing and information techniques and information technology to support clinical care, health service administra- tion, research, and teaching so

Lotze, Heike K.

446

Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

Reinhold Haux

2004-01-01

447

From Terrorism Informatics to Dark Web Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this paper, we provide an overview of “Terrorism Informatics,” a new discipline that aims to study the terrorism phenomena\\u000a with a data-driven, quantitative, and computational approach. We first summarize several critical books that lay the foundation\\u000a for studying terrorism in the new Internet era. We then review important terrorism research centers and resources that are\\u000a of relevance to our

Hsinchun Chen

448

Pharmacy Education Reaction to Presentations on Bridging the Gap Between the Basic Sciences and Clinical Practice: Teaching, Research, and Service.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Issues in the conflict between clinical practice and basic research in pharmacy are reviewed: professional associations' role, curriculum needs and traditions, internal strains and diversity in the profession, computer use, scholarly work of faculty, using the medical profession as a model, and misperceptions of what clinical and basic sciences…

Doluisio, James T.

1980-01-01

449

Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Additionally, we suggest core source materials and specific learning activities to support pharmacy informatics education. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging changes in the practice model. These changes are facilitated by pharmacy informatics and will inevitably become commonplace in our graduates’ practice environment. PMID:21829267

Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

2011-01-01

450

The State of Human Anatomy Teaching in the Medical Schools of Gulf Cooperation Council Countries  

PubMed Central

Available literature on medical education charts an emerging trend in the field of anatomy. In the past decade, assisted by innovations in informatics and the paradigm shift in medical education, the hands-on experience of cadaver dissection has progressively become a relic of the past. Within the context of the situation in Gulf Cooperation Council countries, this paper compares the traditional teaching approach with the modern one that tends to emphasise technical gadgetry, virtual reality and plastic models rather than hands-on-experience to impart knowledge and skill. However, cadaver-based learning is an important building block for the future physician and surgeon since clinical astuteness is likely to rely on skills gained from hands-on experience rather than the tendency to learning through virtual reality found in modern curricula. PMID:21509271

Habbal, Omar

2009-01-01

451

TeachingTeaching Interactive  

E-print Network

of these departments include: The College of Nursing, The College of Education, The College of Food, Agriculture educational goals otherwise out of reach due to their location. Teaching a multi-site class can facilitateTeachingTeaching with Interactive Video: A Faculty Orientation Presented by OSU Extension and OSU

Jones, Michelle

452

Big Data and Biomedical Informatics: A Challenging Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Summary Big data are receiving an increasing attention in biomedicine and healthcare. It is therefore important to understand the reason why big data are assuming a crucial role for the biomedical informatics community. The capability of handling big data is becoming an enabler to carry out unprecedented research studies and to implement new models of healthcare delivery. Therefore, it is first necessary to deeply understand the four elements that constitute big data, namely Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity, and their meaning in practice. Then, it is mandatory to understand where big data are present, and where they can be beneficially collected. There are research fields, such as translational bioinformatics, which need to rely on big data technologies to withstand the shock wave of data that is generated every day. Other areas, ranging from epidemiology to clinical care, can benefit from the exploitation of the large amounts of data that are nowadays available, from personal monitoring to primary care. However, building big data-enabled systems carries on relevant implications in terms of reproducibility of research studies and management of privacy and data access; proper actions should be taken to deal with these issues. An interesting consequence of the big data scenario is the availability of new software, methods, and tools, such as map-reduce, cloud computing, and concept drift machine learning algorithms, which will not only contribute to big data research, but may be beneficial in many biomedical informatics applications. The way forward with the big data opportunity will require properly applied engineering principles to design studies and applications, to avoid preconceptions or over-enthusiasms, to fully exploit the available technologies, and to improve data processing and data management regulations. PMID:24853034

2014-01-01

453

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the inclusion and advantage of dissection in clinical rotations during medical school. Specifically, this study demonstrates the benefits of eye dissection in an ophthalmology rotation in post graduate medical training.

2009-07-27

454

Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics  

PubMed Central

This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics will be critical to assuring their success as leaders in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:24860688

Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T.; Becich, Michael J.

2014-01-01

455

WHAT IS INFORMATICS? Informatics is the study of the structure, behaviour, and interactions  

E-print Network

of existing academic disciplines - Artificial Intelligence, Cognitive Science and Computer Science. Each takes is the emerging discipline that combines the two. In natural and artificial systems, information is carried of these levels is the proper object of study for some discipline of science or engineering. Informatics aims

Koehn, Philipp

456

Building health informatics skills for health professionals: results from the Australian Health Informatics Skill Needs Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To ascertain health professionals' per- ceptions of health informatics skills required in their roles. Design: A paper-based survey with a stratified random sample of Australian health professionals and a web-based survey open to all Australian health professionals were conducted. Measurement: A questionnaire on the health pro- fessionals' perceived degree of competency required for a total of 69 specific skills

Sebastian Garde; David Harrison; Mohammed Huque; Evelyn JS Hovenga

2006-01-01

457

77 FR 76049 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Correction  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Industry on Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations; Correction AGENCY...entitled ``Electronic Source Data in Clinical Investigations.'' The document was...Ron Fitzmartin, Office of Planning & Informatics, Center for Drug Evaluation and...

2012-12-26

458

Acquisition Data Card Simulator for Industrial Informatics Projects  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the objectives of the Industrial Informatics subject at second course of Technical Industrial Engineers in Electronic, is to instruct the student in the development of Industrial Informatics projects, integrating the knowledge acquired from different subjects of the course. This work is performed in the framework of an educational Project at Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería del Diseño in

Juan Vicente Capella Hernández; Juan Miguel Martínez Rubio; Carlos Domínguez Montagud; José Albaladejo Meroño

459

Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology  

PubMed Central

Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

2014-01-01

460

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics and Dentistry and Faculty of Science Western University Western University, one of Canada's leading research

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

461

Child welfare informatics: A proposed subspecialty for social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Informatics is a term that has been used and applied to data collection, analysis, and information and communication technologies across many disciplines including public health, nursing, medicine, and, more recently, to social work. To date, no collective discussion involving policy makers, practitioners, and researchers in the social work field defining child welfare informatics and its implications to the discipline, including

Toni Naccarato

2010-01-01

462

Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09  

E-print Network

1 HINF 1100 Introduction to Health Informatics FALL 2008/09 Course Outline Instructor: Raza Abidi, theory, applications and organizational perspectives of health informatics. HINF 1100 is designed Technology in the field of Health Care. The main focus of this course is to enable students to understand

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

463

Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

U.S. Geological Survey

1998-01-01

464

From Personal Health Informatics to Health Self-management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our research team is developing Salud!, an open and free infrastructure for developing and deploying personal health informatics applications. In addition, we are investigating and designing interaction techniques that support individuals engaged in health self- management. These interaction techniques make use of personal informatics applications' potential to guide

Yevgeniy Medynskiy; Elizabeth D. Mynatt

2010-01-01

465

Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich  

E-print Network

Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

466

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

Yu, Ping

467

Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The track entitled “Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality” at the AMIA Spring 2000 Congress was devoted to examining the new field of consumer health informatics. This area is developing rapidly, as worldwide changes are occurring in the organization and delivery of health care and in the traditional roles of patient and provider. This paper describes the key

Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan

2001-01-01

468

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

469

Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

1989-01-01

470

Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the  

E-print Network

. Answers to health-related problems are buried in the data, and the computer techniques of informatics canPage 0 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the National Institutes of Health under the NIH Roadmap Molecular Libraries Initiative for Exploratory Centers (P20

471

The Development of Model Curricula for Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT We have developed model Health Informatics (HI) curricula for the education of three categories of pro- fessionals: Applied Health Informaticians, the profes- sionals that deploy information technologies, Re- search and Development Health Informaticians, those that develop new concepts, techniques, and solutions, and what we termed Clinicians with Health Informat- ics capabilities, providers who use HI capabilities to support their

H. Dominic Covvey; David Zitner; Robert Bernstein; Janice E. Macneill

472

An international health and nursing informatics module for distance education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes why a module about health and nursing informatics is a necessary component for nursing education. Several developments in society and health care force health providers to manage the large amount of health data adequately. A module about health and nursing informatics was developed in international cooperation by three schools of nursing from Germany, The Netherlands and the

William Goossen; Stephen Timmons; Martin Mol

1998-01-01

473

Prevalence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and its impact on clinical outcomes at a teaching hospital in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Among 15,174 non-duplicated Enterobacteriaceae isolates, the prevalence of carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CNSE) was about 2.5% at a teaching hospital in Taiwan during 2010. Among 117 available isolates of CNSE, 8.6% carried genes encoding carbapenemases. Tigecycline and colistin were the most active agents against carbapenemase-producing and non-producing isolates. Patients infected with CNSE had an all-cause in-hospital mortality of 37.3%, and mortality was similar for infections from carbapenemase producers and non-producers (14-day mortality rates: 22.2% and 21.5%; 30-day mortality rates: 22.2% and 32.3%, respectively). Continuous surveillance of CNSE is recommended in Taiwan. PMID:24016614

Lai, Chung-Chih; Wu, Un-In; Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen

2013-08-01

474

Conceptions of how a learning or teaching curriculum, workplace culture and agency of individuals shape medical student learning and supervisory practices in the clinical workplace.  

PubMed

The role of workplace supervisors in the clinical education of medical students is currently under debate. However, few studies have addressed how supervisors conceptualize workplace learning and how conceptions relate to current sociocultural workplace learning theory. We explored physician conceptions of: (a) medical student learning in the clinical workplace and (b) how they contribute to student learning. The methodology included a combination of a qualitative, inductive (conventional) and deductive (directed) content analysis approach. The study triangulated two types of interview data from 4 focus group interviews and 34 individual interviews. A total of 55 physicians participated. Three overarching themes emerged from the data: learning as membership, learning as partnership and learning as ownership. The themes described how physician conceptions of learning and supervision were guided by the notions of learning-as-participation and learning-as-acquisition. The clinical workplace was either conceptualized as a context in which student learning is based on a learning curriculum, continuity of participation and partnerships with supervisors, or as a temporary source of knowledge within a teaching curriculum. The process of learning was shaped through the reciprocity between different factors in the workplace context and the agency of students and supervising physicians. A systems-thinking approach merged with the "co-participation" conceptual framework advocated by Billet proved to be useful for analyzing variations in conceptions. The findings suggest that mapping workplace supervisor conceptions of learning can be a valuable starting point for medical schools and educational developers working with changes in clinical educational and faculty development practices. PMID:25160816

Strand, Pia; Edgren, Gudrun; Borna, Petter; Lindgren, Stefan; Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Stalmeijer, Renée E

2014-08-27

475

Teaching evidence-based medicine to undergraduate medical students: a course integrating ethics, audit, management and clinical epidemiology.  

PubMed

A six-week full time course for third-year undergraduate medical students at Imperial College uniquely links evidence-based medicine (EBM) with ethics and the management of change in health services. It is mounted jointly by the Medical and Business Schools and features an experiential approach. Small teams of students use a problem-based strategy to address practical issues identified from a range of clinical placements in primary and secondary care settings. The majority of these junior clinical students achieve important objectives for learning about teamwork, critical appraisal, applied ethics and health care organisations. Their work often influences the care received by patients in the host clinical units. We discuss the strengths of the course in relation to other accounts of programmes in EBM. We give examples of recurring experiences from successive cohorts and discuss assessment issues and how our multi-phasic evaluation informs evolution of the course and the potential for future developments. PMID:16807168

Rhodes, Martin; Ashcroft, Richard; Atun, Rifat A; Freeman, George K; Jamrozik, Konrad

2006-06-01

476

Kick-Starting Health Informatics Careers – A Canadian Approach  

PubMed Central

We introduce the Applied Health Informatics Bootcamp. This is an intense, interactive on-site program, augmented by approximately 80 hours of online material. The Bootcamp is intended to introduce those with little or no knowledge of Health Informatics (HI) to the nature, key concepts, and applications of this discipline to addressing challenges in the health field. The focus of the program is on Applied Health Informatics (AHI), the discipline addressing the preparation for, and the procurement, deployment, implementation, resourcing, effective usage, and evaluation of informatics solutions in the health system. Although no program of this duration can cover all topics, we target the high profile areas of Health Informatics and point the participants in the direction of broader and deeper explorations. PMID:18693833

Fenton, Shirley; Covvey, H. Dominic

2007-01-01

477

A Step Forward in Teaching Addiction Counselors How to Supervise Motivational Interviewing Using a Clinical Trials Training Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A clinical trials training approach to supervision is a promising and empirically supported method for preparing addiction counselors to implement evidence-based behavioral treatments in community treatment programs. This supervision approach has three main components: (1) direct observation of treatment sessions; (2) structured performance…

Martino, Steve; Gallon, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

2007-01-01

478

Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics: Improving Dental Research, Education, and Treatment  

PubMed Central

Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come. PMID:20930236

Stark, Paul C.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R.; Willis, George P.; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J.

2011-01-01

479

Integrating Governance of Research Informatics and Health Care IT Across an Enterprise: Experiences from the Trenches  

PubMed Central

Advances in health information technology and biomedical informatics have laid the groundwork for significant improvements in healthcare and biomedical research. For instance, Electronic Health Records can help improve the delivery of evidence-based care, enhance quality, and contribute to discoveries and evidence generation. Despite this promise, there are many challenges to achieving the vision and missions of our healthcare and research enterprises. Given the challenges inherent in doing so, institutions are increasingly moving to establish dedicated leadership and governance models charged with designing, deploying and leveraging various information resources to advance research and advanced care activities at AHCs. Some institutions have even created a new leadership position to oversee such activities, such as the Chief Research Information Officer. This panel will include research informatics leaders discussing their experiences from the proverbial trenches as they work to operationalize such cross-mission governance models. Panelists will start by providing an overview their respective positions and environments, discuss their experiences, and share lessons learned through their work at the intersection of clinical and translational research informatics and Health IT. PMID:24303236

Embi, Peter J.; Tachinardi, Umberto; Lussier, Yves; Starren, Justin; Silverstein, Jonathan

480

Clinical Informatics to Diagnose Cardiac Diseases Based on Data Mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The Emergency Department (ED) has been frustrated by the problems of overcrowding, long waiting times, and high costs over\\u000a decades. With the development of computer techniques, various kinds of information systems have appeared and made people work\\u000a more effectively. The Emergency Department Information System (EDIS) has been heralded as a “must” for the modern ED, which\\u000a can enhance patients care,

Sung Ho Ha; Zhenyu Zhang

2010-01-01

481

Editorial Comments: Defining the Medical Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the professional home for biomedical and health informaticians, AMIA is actively working to support high quality relevant professional education and research opportunities. This issue of JAMIA presents two key documents that provide tangible evidence of progress on this front. In this editorial, we describe the context and specific purpose of the two documents, how they were developed, and AMIA's

Don E. Detmer; John R. Lumpkin; Jeffrey J. Williamson

2009-01-01

482

2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU  

E-print Network

1/19/2012 1 2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Outline · · · , 2Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU PART1. 3Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Central Dogma in Biology Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU 4 http

Yeom, Heon Young

483

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca  

E-print Network

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www at the level of Assistant Professor. Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine was established in 1996 in the Medical Informatics Program, program development in the Faculty of Medicine and in the Health Informatics

Adl, Sina

484

2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU  

E-print Network

1/19/2012 1 2012. 1. 30 CS4HS 1Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Outline · · · , 2Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU PART1. 3Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU Central Dogma in Biology Bio & Health Informatics Lab, SNU 4 http

Yeom, Heon Young

485

On bridging the digital gap of informatization construction of academic affairs management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on an investigation into the current situation of constructing informatization of university academic affairs management, this paper, from the perspective of social informatics, analyzes the digital gap of current informatization construction of academic affairs management, and discusses the problem of how to promote continuous and steady development of informatization construction of university academic affairs management.

Guo Fang Ming; Song hua

2008-01-01

486

Introduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Introduction to the Special Issue on Data Mining for Health Informatics Raymond T. Ng Department on health informatics. The ob- jectives shown above serve to distinguish health informatics from community. To promote real problems and challenges in health informatics to data mining community, we

Ng, Raymond T.

487

Competencies for graduate curricula in health, medical and biomedical informatics: a framework  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rapid emergence of programmes in health informatics, medical informatics and biomedical informatics implies a need for core curricula in these diverse disciplines. This study investigated the recommended competencies for health and medical informatics, aiming to develop a framework for use in curricular development. Current health and medical programmes around the world were analysed to assess how these competencies are

Qi Rong Huang

2007-01-01

488

Clinical Examination of Three Methods of Teaching Reading Comprehension to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: From Research to Classroom Applications.  

PubMed

This study shows how to integrate research-based teaching methods in reading comprehension with real classroom teaching activities. The performance of 30 male (n = 13; mean age = 11.51 years) and female (n = 17; mean age = 12.11 years) deaf and hard-of-hearing students from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was examined under three teaching conditions: the key word strategy, modified reciprocal teaching, and the basic reading approach. Analyses showed that the key word strategy and modified reciprocal teaching significantly enhanced students' overall performance in reading comprehension scores. Results revealed that any one of these three methods would be adequate for teaching factual information. However, results indicated that the key word strategy and modified reciprocal teaching would be better for teaching factual information, comprehension, and memorization skills than the basic reading approach. PMID:15448064

Al-Hilawani, Yasser A

2003-01-01

489

Predictors of Student Success in Graduate Biomedical Informatics Training: Introductory Course and Program Success  

PubMed Central

Objective To predict student performance in an introductory graduate-level biomedical informatics course from application data. Design A predictive model built through retrospective review of student records using hierarchical binary logistic regression with half of the sample held back for cross-validation. The model was also validated against student data from a similar course at a second institution. Measurements Earning an A grade (Mastery) or a C grade (Failure) in an introductory informatics course. Results The authors analyzed 129 student records at the University of Texas School of Health Information Sciences at Houston (SHIS) and 106 at Oregon Health and Science University Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology (DMICE). In the SHIS cross-validation sample, the Graduate Record Exam verbal score (GRE-V) correctly predicted Mastery in 69.4%. Undergraduate grade point average (UGPA) and underrepresented minority status (URMS) predicted 81.6% of Failures. At DMICE, GRE-V, UGPA, and prior graduate degree significantly correlated with Mastery. Only GRE-V was a significant independent predictor of Mastery at both institutions. There were too few URMS students and Failures at DMICE to analyze. Course Mastery strongly predicted program performance defined as final cumulative GPA at SHIS (n = 19, r = 0.634, r 2 = 0.40, p = 0.0036) and DMICE (n = 106, r = 0.603, r 2 = 0.36, p < 0.001). Conclusions The authors identified predictors of performance in an introductory informatics course including GRE-V, UGPA and URMS. Course performance was a very strong predictor of overall program performance. Findings may be useful for selecting students for admission and identifying students at risk for Failure as early as possible. PMID:19717804

Willcockson, Irmgard U.; Johnson, Craig W.; Hersh, William; Bernstam, Elmer V.

2009-01-01

490

Clinical Examination of Three Methods of Teaching Reading Comprehension to Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students: From Research to Classroom Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The reading comprehension performance of 30 third-graders with hearing impairments from the United Arab Emirates was examined under three teaching conditions, the key word strategy, modified reciprocal teaching, and the basic reading approach. Key word strategy and modified reciprocal teaching significantly enhanced performance in reading…

Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

2003-01-01

491

Food safety informatics: a public health imperative.  

PubMed

To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish "near-in-time" or "just-in-time" electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in "real time" can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

Tucker, Cynthia A; Larkin, Stephanie N; Akers, Timothy A

2011-01-01

492

Multimethod teaching strategies to integrate selected QSEN competencies in a Doctor of Nursing Practice distance education program.  

PubMed

The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) initiative identified 6 competencies for the education of nurses (patient-centered care, teamwork and collaboration, evidence-based practice, quality improvement, safety, and informatics) and the related knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) for each competency. The initial QSEN focus was on competency development during prelicensure nursing education, with subsequent attention on adapting the KSAs for graduate programs that prepare advanced practice nurses for clinical roles. Description of successful QSEN competency integration in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs is limited. Although the ultimate goal is executing DNP programs where quality and safety is thoroughly integrated throughout the curricula, the focus of this article is on multimethod teaching strategies to integrate selected QSEN KSAs into an existing online post-master's DNP quality and safety course. PMID:21507440

Manning, Mary Lou; Frisby, Anthony J

2011-01-01

493

Proposed Design of a Clinical Information System for the Management of Bronchial Asthma  

PubMed Central

This poster categorizes the various applications to aid the management of Pediatric Bronchial Asthma. An attempt is made at classifying the various informatics approaches in this domain. Later, the approach of the proposed Asthma CAMS (Computer Aided Management System) project, being developed by the Child Health Institute and Clinical Informatics Research Group www.cirg.washington.edu at the University of Washington, is discussed.

Huq, S; Karras, BT; Wright, J; Lober, WB; Lozano, P; Zimmerman, FJ

2002-01-01

494

High prevalence of plasmid-mediated 16S rRNA methylase gene rmtB among Escherichia coli clinical isolates from a Chinese teaching hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Recently, production of 16S rRNA methylases by Gram-negative bacilli has emerged as a novel mechanism for high-level resistance to aminoglycosides by these organisms in a variety of geographic locations. Therefore, the spread of high-level aminoglycoside resistance determinants has become a great concern. Methods Between January 2006 and July 2008, 680 distinct Escherichia coli clinical isolates were collected from a teaching hospital in Wenzhou, China. PCR and DNA sequencing were used to identify 16S rRNA methylase and extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) genes, including armA and rmtB, and in situ hybridization was performed to determine the location of 16S rRNA methylase genes. Conjugation experiments were subsequently performed to determine whether aminoglycoside resistance was transferable from the E. coli isolates via 16S rRNA methylase-bearing plasmids. Homology of the isolates harboring 16S rRNA methylase genes was determined using pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Among the 680 E. coli isolates, 357 (52.5%), 346 (50.9%) and 44 (6.5%) isolates were resistant to gentamicin, tobramycin and amikacin, respectively. Thirty-seven of 44 amikacin-resistant isolates harbored 16S rRNA methylase genes, with 36 of 37 harboring the rmtB gene and only one harboring armA. The positive rates of 16S rRNA methylase genes among all isolates and amikacin-resistant isolates were 5.4% (37/680) and 84.1% (37/44), respectively. Thirty-one isolates harboring 16S rRNA methylase genes also produced ESBLs. In addition, high-level aminoglycoside resistance could be transferred by conjugation from four rmtB-positive donors. The plasmids of incompatibility groups IncF, IncK and IncN were detected in 34, 3 and 3 isolates, respectively. Upstream regions of the armA gene contained ISCR1 and tnpU, the latter a putative transposase gene,. Another putative transposase gene, tnpD, was located within a region downstream of armA. Moreover, a transposon, Tn3, was located upstream of the rmtB. Nineteen clonal patterns were obtained by PFGE, with type H representing the prevailing pattern. Conclusion A high prevalence of plasmid-mediated rmtB gene was found among clinical E. coli isolates from a Chinese teaching hospital. Both horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread were responsible for the dissemination of the rmtB gene. PMID:20573216

2010-01-01

495

The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp CounselorCamp Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students the chance to interact with IU faculty  

E-print Network

Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students2013 The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp CounselorCamp technology, the internet and Web design, networking, new media, databases, gaming, and more. Camp counselors

Indiana University