Sample records for teaching clinical informatics

  1. Clinical informatics in undergraduate teaching of health informatics.

    PubMed

    Pantazi, Stefan V; Pantazi, Felicia; Daly, Karen

    2011-01-01

    We are reporting on a recent experience with Health Informatics (HI) teaching at undergraduate degree level to an audience of HI and Pharmacy students. The important insight is that effective teaching of clinical informatics must involve highly interactive, applied components in addition to the traditional theoretical material. This is in agreement with general literature underlining the importance of simulations and role playing in teaching and is well supported by our student evaluation results. However, the viability and sustainability of such approaches to teaching hinges on significant course preparation efforts. These efforts consist of time-consuming investigations of informatics technologies, applications and systems followed by the implementation of workable solutions to a wide range of technical problems. In effect, this approach to course development is an involved process that relies on a special form of applied research whose technical complexity could explain the dearth of published reports on similar approaches in HI education. Despite its difficulties, we argue that this approach can be used to set a baseline for clinical informatics training at undergraduate level and that its implications for HI education in Canada are of importance. PMID:21335688

  2. Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Clinical Research Informatics Systems Project Final Report March 29, 2010 Rev. 8.30.2010 Report Submitted to: Dr. Joyce Mitchell Chair, Department of Medical Informatics Associate Vice President, Health Orientation Checklist (Draft)................................XII #12;Clinical Research Informatics Systems

  3. Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heng-Shuen Chen; Fei-Ran Guo; Chien-Tsai Liu; Yue-Joe Lee; Jye-Horng Chen; Chia-Chin Lin; Sheng-Mou Hou; Bor-Shen Hsieh

    1998-01-01

    National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services

  4. Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

  5. [Free sources for medical informatics teaching].

    PubMed

    Naidr, Jan P; Kasal, Pavel; Hladíková, Marie; Feberová, Jitka

    2004-01-01

    Important worldwide websites offering medical informatics have been searched through to find freely available web-based sources for teaching of medical informatics at faculties of medicine. The conclusion suggests that a complex system for teaching of the whole field of study does not exist. However, a sufficient offer of specialized articles, model programmes and presentations is available, which can be used for teaching. The author lists a brief characterization of the found sources and the programmes he uses. This computer-aided research is only rough. A more precisely defined searching strategy can help find other sources of specialized subjects useful for medical informatics. PMID:16106745

  6. Informatics in radiology: use of the MIRC DICOM service for clinical trials to automatically create teaching file cases from PACS.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Amilcare; Chung, Christine B; Hughes, Tudor

    2007-01-01

    The Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) software of the Radiological Society of North America is used to share teaching files and clinical trial data. By using the MIRC service for clinical trials, teaching file cases can be automatically generated directly from picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). The advantage of using the clinical trials service over the authoring service is the need for minimal user intervention, because data already present in the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) header can be automatically inserted into teaching file cases. When reading a case on the PACS workstation, the radiologist needs only to select the images for the teaching file case, write the diagnosis in the "Study Comments" box (usually used for "wet" readings), and send the case to the MIRC server directly from the workstation. The MIRC server automatically makes the images anonymous and fills in the modified teaching file template by using the data in the DICOM header (patient age, patient sex, clinical history, diagnosis, imaging modality, organ system), thus creating a simple teaching file. If desired, the teaching file case can be edited at a later time. By making minor modifications to the MIRC DICOM clinical trials service, it is possible to create teaching file cases with minimal effort. Supplemental material available at radiographics.rsnajnls.org/cgi/content/full/27/1/269/DC1. PMID:17235013

  7. Schattauer 2012 392Applied Clinical Informatics

    E-print Network

    Cimino, James J.

    © Schattauer 2012 392Applied Clinical Informatics J.J. Cimino. The False Security of Blind Dates: Chrononymization's Lack of Impact on Data Privacy of Laboratory Data Research Article The False Security of Blind adjustments, clinical research, clinical informatics, health policy, anonym- izatoin, de-identification, dates

  8. Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-01-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

  9. Teaching Social Informatics as a Knowledge Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Iver Jackewitz; Michael Janneck; Detlev Krause; Bernd Pape; Monique Strauss

    2002-01-01

    Teaching Social Informatics poses the challenge of portraying future scenarios of technology development and use as well as criticizing them. We envision meeting this challenge by offering students an authentic, interdisciplinary educational framework, providing real-life, hands-on experiences. In this paper, we will first develop the idea of \\

  10. Teaching Social Informatics for Engineering Students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laszio Z. Karvalics; Lilla Juhász

    Courses on Social Informatics at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics have been offered since 1992. After 25\\u000a semesters, with more than 1200 students (mainly electrical engineering majors) who have taken the courses, our views on the\\u000a subject, together with a comprehensive report on teaching experiences are now presented in a two volume handbook. We would\\u000a like to share

  11. The Recurrence Relations in Teaching Students of Informatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakoev, Valentin P.

    2010-01-01

    The topic "Recurrence relations" and its place in teaching students of Informatics is discussed in this paper. We represent many arguments about the importance, the necessity and the benefit of studying this subject by Informatics students. They are based on investigation of some fundamental books and textbooks on Discrete Mathematics,…

  12. Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Guo, F R; Liu, C T; Lee, Y J; Chen, J H; Lin, C C; Hou, S M; Hsieh, B S

    1998-06-01

    National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services including mail, netnews, bulletin board systems (BBS), world wide web (WWW), gopher, ftp and local file servers. To implement an interactive learning environment, the authors first tried mail lists, newsgroups and BBS. Next an integrated learning system prototype on the WWW was developed to provide functions including online syllabus, discussion boards simulated to BBS, online talk, interactive case studies, virtual classroom with video on demand (VOD) and Internet medical resources. The results showed that after the medical students completed the required course of medical informatics and had good network access using a network to communicate with each other became a daily practice. In the future, the system will extend to the tutoring of clinical practice and continuing medical education. The authors expect a national medical education network and more international cooperation and exchange. PMID:9726493

  13. [Medical informatics in research, teaching and patient management].

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, K P

    1995-01-01

    The field of medical informatics in its current understanding is defined and criteria distinguishing this field from similar areas are provided. Special consideration is given to its position at a School of Medicine - in particular to the University of Vienna Medical School with the Vienna General Hospital as its teaching hospital. Demands for medical informatics and electronic data processing (EDP) in this extended field of activity come from four different sources: (1) research in medical informatics, (2) teaching of medical informatics as well as EDP training, (3) EDP service for research and teaching, and (4) EDP hospital operations to assist patient care. (Purely administrative EDP demands are not considered here.) It is shown that the different demands can be fulfilled by the usually available institutions involved in medical informatics and EDP at a School of Medicine. At many places these institutions are as follows: (1) a department or division of medical informatics with a possibly attached computer center dedicated to provide assistance in the area of research and teaching, (2) the computer center of the respective university the School of Medicine belongs to, (3) the computer center of the hospital-owned institution responsible for all EDP activities connected to patient care, and (4) external software companies and EDP training centers. To succeed in the development of an exhaustive, school-wide system of medical informatics and EDP that considers the different demands in research, teaching, and EDP hospital operations equally, close and well-suited coordination between the institutions involved is necessary. PMID:7871786

  14. Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Roy E.; McClintock, David S.; Balis, Ulysses J.; Baron, Jason M.; Becich, Michael J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Brodsky, Victor B.; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D.; Henricks, Walter H.; Kim, Jiyeon Y.; Klepseis, Veronica E.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lane, William J.; Levy, Bruce P.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Park, Seung L.; Sinard, John H.; Tuthill, Mark J.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform. PMID:23248762

  15. Teaching Some Informatics Concepts Using Formal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Sojung; Park, Seongbin

    2014-01-01

    There are many important issues in informatics and many agree that algorithms and programming are most important issues that need to be included in informatics education (Dagiene and Jevsikova, 2012). In this paper, we propose how some of these issues can be easily taught using the notion of a formal system which consists of axioms and inference…

  16. Informatics Support for Tutors and Demonstrators Open to all teachers with current teaching positions in the School of Informatics

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    Informatics Support for Tutors and Demonstrators Open to all teachers with current teaching positions in the School of Informatics YEAR 1 Support for new or relatively inexperienced tutors information. Semester One (Sept ­ Dec) Week 1 Session 1 Orientation to tutoring in Informatics Week 4 Session

  17. Teaching-Learning Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Univ., Oshkosh.

    The Teaching-Learning Clinic, developed at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, provided on-campus clinical student teaching experience. The purposes of the clinic were to create a reliable system of describing cognitive change in student teachers so such data may assist in restructuring student teaching situations based on sound theoretical…

  18. Clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics: A program description

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, John R.; McClintock, David S.; Lee, Roy E.; Onozato, Maristela; Kuo, Frank C.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Yagi, Yukako; Dighe, Anand S.; Gudewicz, Tom M.; Le, Long P.; Wilbur, David C.; Kim, Ji Yeon; Brodsky, Victor B.; Black-Schaffer, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in pathology informatics. In 2011, the program benchmarked its structure and operations against a 2009 white paper “Program requirements for fellowship education in the subspecialty of clinical informatics”, endorsed by the Board of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) that described a proposal for a general clinical informatics fellowship program. Methods: A group of program faculty members and fellows compared each of the proposed requirements in the white paper with the fellowship program's written charter and operations. The majority of white paper proposals aligned closely with the rules and activities in our program and comparison was straightforward. In some proposals, however, differences in terminology, approach, and philosophy made comparison less direct, and in those cases, the thinking of the group was recorded. After the initial evaluation, the remainder of the faculty reviewed the results and any disagreements were resolved. Results: The most important finding of the study was how closely the white paper proposals for a general clinical informatics fellowship program aligned with the reality of our existing pathology informatics fellowship. The program charter and operations of the program were judged to be concordant with the great majority of specific white paper proposals. However, there were some areas of discrepancy and the reasons for the discrepancies are discussed in the manuscript. Conclusions: After the comparison, we conclude that the existing pathology informatics fellowship could easily meet all substantive proposals put forth in the 2009 clinical informatics program requirements white paper. There was also agreement on a number of philosophical issues, such as the advantages of multiple fellows, the need for core knowledge and skill sets, and the need to maintain clinical skills during informatics training. However, there were other issues, such as a requirement for a 2-year fellowship and for informatics fellowships to be done after primary board certification, that pathology should consider carefully as it moves toward a subspecialty status and board certification. PMID:22530179

  19. How do rabbits help to integrate teaching of mathematics and informatics?

    E-print Network

    Spagnolo, Filippo

    28 How do rabbits help to integrate teaching of mathematics and informatics? Agnis Andzns, Dr of difficulties in exact education at schools: mathematics, informatics, physics etc. Various methods are proposed of discrete mathematics and informatics not reducing the high educational standards. The approach is based

  20. A Clinical Informatics Network (CLINT) to support the practice of evidence-based health care.

    PubMed Central

    Langton, K. B.; Horsman, J.; Hayward, R. S.; Ross, S. A.

    1996-01-01

    CLINT, which stands for Clinical Informatics NeTwork, is one of the clinical informatics initiatives in development at McMaster University's Health Information Research Unit. CLINT is a microcomputer-based system of over 60 workstations providing 24 hour availability of a set of clinical information resources to clinicians throughout our teaching hospital. CLINT encompasses three domains: (1) a user adaptable clinician-computer interface, (2) unique evidence-based health care content, and (3) automated data collection and viewing tools. An objective of the CLINT project is to determine CLINT's impact on the practice of health care. Early analysis of our data has revealed that over the past year, there has been widespread use of CLINT by clinicians from all clinical domains. Our next task is to evaluate CLINT's usefulness. PMID:8947702

  1. Teaching Clinical Psychology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Suler, John R., 1955-

    Teaching Clinical Psychology, created by Dr. John Suler of Rider University, is devoted to �sharing ideas and resources for teaching clinical psychology.� Helpful for students and educators in the fields of mental health and human services counseling, this site contains practical in-class exercises, such as an exercise which illustrates what it is like to share secrets with strangers, and syllabi for courses in the clinical psychology curriculum. There are also larger projects for students, including an in-depth analysis of a psychotherapy case study and a role-play project which has students administer, score, and interpret a series of psychological tests given to a classmate.

  2. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the pathology informatics asset in the network. Though the above approach has been in place less than a year, we are presenting it now as a technical note to allow for further discussion of evolving educational opportunities in pathology informatics and clinical informatics in general, and to highlight the importance of having a flexible fellowship with active participation from its fellows. PMID:25191621

  3. The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Andrew M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mandelker, Diana L.; Platt, Mia Y.; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M.; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E.; Levy, Bruce P.; McClintock, David S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank C.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular “learning laboratories”. Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows’ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the pathology informatics asset in the network. Though the above approach has been in place less than a year, we are presenting it now as a technical note to allow for further discussion of evolving educational opportunities in pathology informatics and clinical informatics in general, and to highlight the importance of having a flexible fellowship with active participation from its fellows. PMID:25191621

  4. Informatics

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

  5. Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

  6. Clinical communication - A new informatics paradigm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrico Coiera; Stoke Gifford

    1996-01-01

    Observational studies of clinical workers in a hospital setting suggest that communication problems are a significant source of inefficiency. The need to reduce interruptions, improve contactability, and the sharing of informal information suggests that a mobile communication system capable of supporting asynchronous messaging, role-based contact, and communication policies would be beneficial. A prototype of such a system is described.

  7. Deconstruction of Socio-technical Information Systems with Virtual Explora- tion Environments as a Method of Teaching Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johann S. Magenheim

    The working group Didactics of Informatics at the University of Paderborn develops and evaluates a multimedia exploration platform for information systems (MEPIS) to the needs of teach- ing and learning informatics at secondary schools. The paper describes the basic ideas within a sys- tem-oriented approach of didactics of informatics and two of its most relevant ideas: the perception of a

  8. Program Requirements for Fellowship Education in the Subspecialty of Clinical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Charles; Shabot, M. Michael; Munger, Benson S.; Holmes, John H.; Steen, Elaine B.; Lumpkin, John R.; Detmer, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    The Program Requirements for Fellowship Education identify the knowledge and skills that physicians must master through the course of a training program to be certified in the subspecialty of clinical informatics. They also specify accreditation requirements for clinical informatics training programs. The AMIA Board of Directors approved this document in November 2008. PMID:19074295

  9. Leverage hadoop framework for large scale clinical informatics applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiao; Bahroos, Neil; Sadhu, Eugene; Jackson, Tommie; Chukhman, Morris; Johnson, Robert; Boyd, Andrew; Hynes, Denise

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present our experiences using the Apache Hadoop framework for high data volume and computationally intensive applications, and discuss some best practice guidelines in a clinical informatics setting. There are three main aspects in our approach: (a) process and integrate diverse, heterogeneous data sources using standard Hadoop programming tools and customized MapReduce programs; (b) after fine-grained aggregate results are obtained, perform data analysis using the Mahout data mining library; (c) leverage the column oriented features in HBase for patient centric modeling and complex temporal reasoning. This framework provides a scalable solution to meet the rapidly increasing, imperative "Big Data" needs of clinical and translational research. The intrinsic advantage of fault tolerance, high availability and scalability of Hadoop platform makes these applications readily deployable at the enterprise level cluster environment. PMID:24303235

  10. A review of analytics and clinical informatics in health care.

    PubMed

    Simpao, Allan F; Ahumada, Luis M; Gálvez, Jorge A; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Federal investment in health information technology has incentivized the adoption of electronic health record systems by physicians and health care organizations; the result has been a massive rise in the collection of patient data in electronic form (i.e. "Big Data"). Health care systems have leveraged Big Data for quality and performance improvements using analytics-the systematic use of data combined with quantitative as well as qualitative analysis to make decisions. Analytics have been utilized in various aspects of health care including predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, home health monitoring, finance, and resource allocation. Visual analytics is one example of an analytics technique with an array of health care and research applications that are well described in the literature. The proliferation of Big Data and analytics in health care has spawned a growing demand for clinical informatics professionals who can bridge the gap between the medical and information sciences. PMID:24696396

  11. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe): an informatics foundation for the science of clinical research.

    PubMed

    Sim, Ida; Tu, Samson W; Carini, Simona; Lehmann, Harold P; Pollock, Brad H; Peleg, Mor; Wittkowski, Knut M

    2014-12-01

    To date, the scientific process for generating, interpreting, and applying knowledge has received less informatics attention than operational processes for conducting clinical studies. The activities of these scientific processes - the science of clinical research - are centered on the study protocol, which is the abstract representation of the scientific design of a clinical study. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) is an OWL 2 model of the entities and relationships of study design protocols for the purpose of computationally supporting the design and analysis of human studies. OCRe's modeling is independent of any specific study design or clinical domain. It includes a study design typology and a specialized module called ERGO Annotation for capturing the meaning of eligibility criteria. In this paper, we describe the key informatics use cases of each phase of a study's scientific lifecycle, present OCRe and the principles behind its modeling, and describe applications of OCRe and associated technologies to a range of clinical research use cases. OCRe captures the central semantics that underlies the scientific processes of clinical research and can serve as an informatics foundation for supporting the entire range of knowledge activities that constitute the science of clinical research. PMID:24239612

  12. Adapting social media as a scaffolding tool for teaching health informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Day; Stewart Wells

    2009-01-01

    Health informatics is an applied hybrid discipline of health and life sciences, computer science and business. Teaching this subject to undergraduate students, presents the challenge of learning without the assistance of internship or work experience that enable placing the learning in context. We used the university's learning management software as a form of social medium to stimulate discussions in preparation

  13. Image Informatics for Clinical and Preclinical Biomedical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Chaum, Edward [ORNL; Gregor, Jens [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Wall, Jonathan [ORNL; Price, Jeffery R [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical informatics refers to the study of the application of computational and statistical algorithms, data structures, and methods to improve communication, understanding and management of biomedical information. Our objective through this chapter is to describe and demonstrate our research in the use of biomedical image databases - in both preclinical and clinical settings - to classify, predict, research, diagnose, and otherwise learn from the informational content encapsulated in historical image repositories. This will be accomplished by detailing our approach of describing image content in a Bayesian probabilistic framework to achieve learning from retrieved populations of similar images. We will use specific examples from two biomedical applications to describe anatomic segmentation, statistical feature generation and indexing, efficient retrieval architectures, and predictive results.

  14. Viewpoint Paper: The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

    2008-01-01

    Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

  15. Evaluating the informatics for integrating biology and the bedside system for clinical research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vikrant G Deshmukh; Stéphane M Meystre; Joyce A Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selecting patient cohorts is a critical, iterative, and often time-consuming aspect of studies involving human subjects; informatics tools for helping streamline the process have been identified as important infrastructure components for enabling clinical and translational research. We describe the evaluation of a free and open source cohort selection tool from the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2)

  16. Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association.

    PubMed

    Little, David R; Zapp, John A; Mullins, Henry C; Zuckerman, Alan E; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Kevin B

    2003-01-01

    The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG) of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI), to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper. PMID:14567875

  17. Comparison of mailed vs. Internet applications of the Delphi technique in clinical informatics research.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Halpern, R.; Thompson, C. B.; Schaffer, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Delphi technique provides a means of assessing the judgments of groups of experts without the necessity of having these experts meet together. The technique has been used in health care since the mid-1970s, and has just recently become more common in clinical informatics research. As informatics develops as a specialty, it is logical to consider information technology solutions to research as well as clinical practice problems. The overall purpose of this methodology presentation is to compare a mailed vs. Internet application of the Delphi technique for clinical informatics research. Specifically, this presentation will provide: 1) an overview of the Delphi technique, and 2) a methodological comparison of two research applications of the Delphi technique. Results of the studies will be presented elsewhere. PMID:11079996

  18. UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User Guide SOP No.: CI-002

    E-print Network

    George, Steven C.

    requirements Workstation requirements for Quest Analytics portal · Internet explorer 7.0 or higher Quest Analytics /Dashboards #12;UC Irvine Health Affairs Information Services, Clinical Informatics QA Portal User dashboards CI to assign appropriate user security according to access level 5 View dashboard by clicking

  19. Security Informatics Security Informatics

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    Security Informatics Security Informatics Security Informatics is the study and design of information security technologies within social and economic contexts. Security Informatics builds upon strong of security and privacy. Security Informatics addresses both immediate problems of today, such as phishing

  20. IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS POLICY FOR CLINICAL RANKS

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    of research." #12;ATTACHMENT A I. Use of Clinical Appointments Clinical appointments are appropriate for those who work primarily in the clinical setting. Clinical faculty may be involved in research that derives) in the professional-client service disciplines. Clinical faculty may contribute to the research efforts of a unit

  1. Exploring teacher methodology: using the example of sexual abuse of children as a way of teaching social informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Arne Godejord

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a unique, educational project that was implemented in the undergraduate study of Computer Science in 2002. Nesna University College has been using the example of sexual abuse of children in case study teaching in Social Informatics. The Computer Science education at Nesna University College is the only Computer Science education in the world which has sexual abuse

  2. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    PubMed

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics. PMID:21799332

  3. Information warehouse - a comprehensive informatics platform for business, clinical, and research applications.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Jyoti; Liu, Jianhua; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Dyta, Ravi; Rogers, Patrick; Mekhjian, Hagop S

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 1997, the IW (Information Warehouse) at the Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) has gradually transformed itself from a single purpose business decision support system to a comprehensive informatics platform supporting basic, clinical, and translational research. The IW today is the combination of four integrated components: a clinical data repository containing over a million patients; a research data repository housing various research specific data; an application development platform for building business and research enabling applications; a business intelligence environment assisting in reporting in all function areas. The IW is structured and encoded using standard terminologies such as SNOMED-CT, ICD, and CPT. The IW is an important component of OSUMC's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) informatics program. PMID:21347019

  4. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education.

    PubMed

    Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

    2014-01-01

    Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

  5. Epilepsy and seizure ontology: towards an epilepsy informatics infrastructure for clinical research and patient care

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S; Lhatoo, Samden D; Gupta, Deepak K; Cui, Licong; Zhao, Meng; Jayapandian, Catherine; Bozorgi, Alireza; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective Epilepsy encompasses an extensive array of clinical and research subdomains, many of which emphasize multi-modal physiological measurements such as electroencephalography and neuroimaging. The integration of structured, unstructured, and signal data into a coherent structure for patient care as well as clinical research requires an effective informatics infrastructure that is underpinned by a formal domain ontology. Methods We have developed an epilepsy and seizure ontology (EpSO) using a four-dimensional epilepsy classification system that integrates the latest International League Against Epilepsy terminology recommendations and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) common data elements. It imports concepts from existing ontologies, including the Neural ElectroMagnetic Ontologies, and uses formal concept analysis to create a taxonomy of epilepsy syndromes based on their seizure semiology and anatomical location. Results EpSO is used in a suite of informatics tools for (a) patient data entry, (b) epilepsy focused clinical free text processing, and (c) patient cohort identification as part of the multi-center NINDS-funded study on sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. EpSO is available for download at http://prism.case.edu/prism/index.php/EpilepsyOntology. Discussion An epilepsy ontology consortium is being created for community-driven extension, review, and adoption of EpSO. We are in the process of submitting EpSO to the BioPortal repository. Conclusions EpSO plays a critical role in informatics tools for epilepsy patient care and multi-center clinical research. PMID:23686934

  6. Clinical Teaching in Physicians Assistant Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Westberg, Jane

    1980-01-01

    A report on teaching in the clinical component of physician's assistant (PA) training programs is presented, based on information obtained through the authors' involvement in a PA faculty development project, and surveys of program directors and faculty. Topics include teacher qualifications, teaching methods and resources, and instructional…

  7. Evaluating informatics applications - clinical decision support systems literature review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie Kaplan

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews clinical decision support systems (CDSS) literature, with a focus on evaluation. The literature indicates a general consensus that clinical decision support systems are thought to have the potential to improve care. Evidence is more equivocal for guidelines and for systems to aid physicians with diagnosis. There also is general consensus that a variety of systems are little

  8. An Academic-Business Partnership for Advancing Clinical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Helen R.; Weaver, Charlotte; Warren, Judith; Miller, Karen L.

    2002-01-01

    A partnership between a university school of nursing and a health care information technology supplier resulted in the Simulated E-hEalth Delivery System (SEEDS). This program enables nursing students to learn clinical skills in a state-of-the-art environment using a live-production, clinical information system designed for care delivery. (JOW)

  9. Informatics tools to improve clinical research study implementation. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    In complex multisite clinical research trials, potential problems are compounded when multiple personnel at different sites are responsible for primary data collection, data entry, report form design, etc. This article describes how informatics tools can help identify and correct flawed procedures and data problems early, contributing to overall study success. For example, a value that is flagged as “bad” soon after data entry is more likely to be correctable because source documents and data originators are more readily available.

  10. The negotiated order of clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Paterson, B L

    1997-05-01

    The clinical teacher and students in traditional nursing education programs represent a temporary system within the permanent culture of the clinical area in which they teach. Temporary systems are a set of diversely skilled people working together on a complex task over a limited period of time. A member of a temporary system struggles to maintain a differentiated identity within the permanent system, while at the same time seeking a sense of collegiality and belonging. Clinical teachers experience a feeling of being somewhat akin to the nursing staff in the clinical area in which they teach because they are nurses. At the same time, clinical teachers are alienated from the nurses because the staff has developed a permanent structure that excludes clinical teachers from many aspects of nurses' working lives. The focus of research concerning clinical teaching has been the tasks assigned to the clinical teacher rather than the experience of teachers as members of a temporary system. This article presents one aspect of a year-long exploratory and descriptive qualitative research study designed to explore and describe what takes place in the realm of clinical teaching in nursing education. The discussion will focus on the experience of clinical teachers as temporary systems according to the sociological framework of negotiated order. PMID:9145337

  11. Informatic nephrology.

    PubMed

    Musso, Carlos; Aguilera, Jerónimo; Otero, Carlos; Vilas, Manuel; Luna, Daniel; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

    2013-08-01

    Biomedical informatics in Health (BIH) is the discipline in charge of capturing, handling and using information in health and biomedicine in order to improve the processes involved with assistance and management. Informatic nephrology has appeared as a product of the combination between conventional nephrology with BIH and its development has been considerable in the assistance as well as in the academic field. Regarding the former, there is increasing evidence that informatics technology can make nephrological assistance be better in quality (effective, accessible, safe and satisfying), improve patient's adherence, optimize patient's and practitioner's time, improve physical space and achieve health cost reduction. Among its main elements, we find electronic medical and personal health records, clinical decision support system, tele-nephrology, and recording and monitoring devices. Additionally, regarding the academic field, informatics and Internet contribute to education and research in the nephrological field. In conclusion, informatics nephrology represents a new field which will influence the future of nephrology. PMID:23065430

  12. Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Diane

    This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

  13. A domain analysis model for eIRB systems: addressing the weak link in clinical research informatics.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Narus, Scott P; Facelli, Julio C; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R; Hurdle, John F

    2014-12-01

    Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. PMID:24929181

  14. Report of Teaching Programme Review Informatics November 2008 The University of Edinburgh

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    in Computer Science & Electronics BEng in Electronics & Software Engineering · Course Guides · Programme BEng in Artificial Intelligence & Software Engineering BSc Computer Science BEng Computer Science Master of Informatics BEng Software Engineering Single Honours with a Subsidiary Subject: BEng

  15. winter 2015 Health Informatics

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    fall 2014/ winter 2015 Health Informatics Health Information Exchange Healthcare Analytics COntinUinG anD PrOfeSSiOnal eDUCatiOn HEALTH INFORMATICS ANd ANALYTICS #12;2 Advancing Health Care Through healthcare delivery and clinical effectiveness. UC Davis Extension, a leader in health informatics education

  16. Comparing the Efficiency of Different Approaches to Teach Informatics at Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steer, Christoph; Hubwieser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Each of the 16 federal states of Germany has its own school system and also its own policy to integrate informatics, computer science or ICT into this system. Till present there aren't any tests of students' knowledge on a nation-wide level. Therefore nation-wide or international contests currently offer the only opportunities to compare the…

  17. A survey of informatics platforms that enable distributed comparative effectiveness research using multi-institutional heterogeneous clinical data

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F.; Hazlehurst, Brian L.; Brown, Jeffrey; Murphy, Shawn; Rosenman, Marc; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Wilcox, Adam B.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) has the potential to transform the current healthcare delivery system by identifying the most effective medical and surgical treatments, diagnostic tests, disease prevention methods and ways to deliver care for specific clinical conditions. To be successful, such research requires the identification, capture, aggregation, integration, and analysis of disparate data sources held by different institutions with diverse representations of the relevant clinical events. In an effort to address these diverse demands, there have been multiple new designs and implementations of informatics platforms that provide access to electronic clinical data and the governance infrastructure required for inter-institutional CER. The goal of this manuscript is to help investigators understand why these informatics platforms are required and to compare and contrast six, large-scale, recently funded, CER-focused informatics platform development efforts. We utilized an 8-dimension, socio-technical model of health information technology use to help guide our work. We identified six generic steps that are necessary in any distributed, multi-institutional CER project: data identification, extraction, modeling, aggregation, analysis, and dissemination. We expect that over the next several years these projects will provide answers to many important, and heretofore unanswerable, clinical research questions. PMID:22692259

  18. A Survey of the Convergence Between Clinical Informatics and Clinical Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Hussein

    2006-01-01

    During the past fifty years, developments in science and technology have been achieving significant improvements in the diagnoses and treatment of illness. As a consequence of this development, the clinical engineering field was emerged to handle the increasing number of medical equipment used in today's hospital. At the beginning, the clinical engineering's role was to support and advance patient care

  19. How Does Gender Interact with Clinical Teachers' Perceptions of Clinical Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masunaga, Hiromi; Hitchcock, Maurice A.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed 816 medical professors' perceptions of clinical teaching, as measured with the online version of the Clinical Teaching Perception Inventory, and examined difficulties that female professors faced in becoming the ideal clinical teacher. While describing themselves as a clinical teacher, female professors rated themselves lower…

  20. People, organizational, and leadership factors impacting informatics support for clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, there have been numerous initiatives undertaken to describe critical information needs related to the collection, management, analysis, and dissemination of data in support of biomedical research (J Investig Med 54:327-333, 2006); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 16:316–327, 2009); (Physiol Genomics 39:131-140, 2009); (J Am Med Inform Assoc 18:354–357, 2011). A common theme spanning such reports has been the importance of understanding and optimizing people, organizational, and leadership factors in order to achieve the promise of efficient and timely research (J Am Med Inform Assoc 15:283–289, 2008). With the emergence of clinical and translational science (CTS) as a national priority in the United States, and the corresponding growth in the scale and scope of CTS research programs, the acuity of such information needs continues to increase (JAMA 289:1278–1287, 2003); (N Engl J Med 353:1621–1623, 2005); (Sci Transl Med 3:90, 2011). At the same time, systematic evaluations of optimal people, organizational, and leadership factors that influence the provision of data, information, and knowledge management technologies and methods are notably lacking. Methods In response to the preceding gap in knowledge, we have conducted both: 1) a structured survey of domain experts at Academic Health Centers (AHCs); and 2) a subsequent thematic analysis of public-domain documentation provided by those same organizations. The results of these approaches were then used to identify critical factors that may influence access to informatics expertise and resources relevant to the CTS domain. Results A total of 31 domain experts, spanning the Biomedical Informatics (BMI), Computer Science (CS), Information Science (IS), and Information Technology (IT) disciplines participated in a structured surveyprocess. At a high level, respondents identified notable differences in theaccess to BMI, CS, and IT expertise and services depending on the establishment of a formal BMI academic unit and the perceived relationship between BMI, CS, IS, and IT leaders. Subsequent thematic analysis of the aforementioned public domain documents demonstrated a discordance between perceived and reported integration across and between BMI, CS, IS, and IT programs and leaders with relevance to the CTS domain. Conclusion Differences in people, organization, and leadership factors do influence the effectiveness of CTS programs, particularly with regard to the ability to access and leverage BMI, CS, IS, and IT expertise and resources. Based on this finding, we believe that the development of a better understanding of how optimal BMI, CS, IS, and IT organizational structures and leadership models are designed and implemented is critical to both the advancement of CTS and ultimately, to improvements in the quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare. PMID:23388243

  1. Proposal for a Collaborative Approach to Clinical Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Thomas J.; Lee, Mark C.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that inexperienced clinical teachers are often controlling and noninteractive. Adult learning theory states that mature students prefer shared and self-directed learning and that skillful teachers favor facilitating discussions over transmitting knowledge. Similarly, education research shows that effective clinical teachers invest in relationships with learners, ask questions to diagnose learners, communicate complex information clearly, and provide meaningful feedback. On the basis of these principles, we propose a collaborative approach to clinical teaching that has 4 essential components: (1) establish a relationship with the learner, (2) diagnose the learner, (3) use teaching frameworks that engage learners, and (4) develop teaching scripts and a personal philosophy. This article includes suggestions for creating a positive learning climate, asking higher-order questions, providing meaningful feedback, and developing teaching scripts. We believe that practicing this approach, which emphasizes respectful teacher-learner relationships, improves the quality of every clinical teaching encounter. PMID:19339652

  2. Learning clinical teaching skills at the baccalaureate level.

    PubMed

    Byrne, C; McKnight, J; Roberts, J; Rankin, J

    1989-08-01

    Nurses returning to work after obtaining their baccalaureate degree in nursing find increased expectations to participate in student and staff clinical education. Often these nurses are not prepared for this role. This paper describes a project that involved final year post-diploma registered nurse students in the clinical teaching of second year basic degree students in a baccalaureate nursing programme. Results of a pilot study to determine if the perceptions of the students involved in the teaching project changed following the experience, show a more positive change in teacher behaviours in these student tutors compared to students doing a traditional clinical experience. Course evaluations indicate the experience increased knowledge and comfort in clinical teaching and point to positive changes in the perceptions of behaviours conducive to clinical teaching. PMID:2778204

  3. Teaching students in the classroom and clinical skills environment.

    PubMed

    Dix, Greg; Hughes, Suzanne

    This article demonstrates that careful planning and management can help to ensure effective learning for pre-registration students during theory and practical skills teaching. It highlights two lesson plans with intended learning outcomes, one for a didactic teaching session and the other for a psychomotor clinical skills session. The article identifies a variety of teaching and learning strategies that could be adopted. PMID:15915956

  4. The roles of biomedical maintenance branch, automation management & informatics departments throughout a clinical information systems's life cycle.

    PubMed

    Williams, D; Beebe, M E; Levin, B L

    1994-01-01

    The introduction of new technology, such as a Clinical Information System (CIS), requires hospitals to re-evaluate the roles of the Biomedical Maintenance Branch, Automation Management, and Informatics departments. This paper describes the process a 400-bed hospital underwent to resolve role ambiguity among the three activities. The institution's goal was to reach an optimal solution to using the resources offered by each activity through redrawing lines of responsibilities. This experience demonstrated that relationships among departments are dynamic and vary depending on the stage of the CIS life cycle. PMID:10137109

  5. An informatics approach to medication adherence assessment and improvement using clinical, billing, and patient-entered data

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Brian E; Jabour, Abdulrahman M; Phillips, Erin O'Kelly; Marrero, David G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe an integrated informatics approach to aggregating and displaying clinically relevant data that can identify problems with medication adherence and facilitate patient–provider communication about strategies to improve medication use. We developed a clinical dashboard within an electronic health record (EHR) system that uses data from three sources: the medical record, pharmacy claims, and a personal health record. The data are integrated to inform clinician–patient discussions about medication adherence. Whereas prior research on assessing patterns of medication adherence focused on a single approach using the EHR, pharmacy data, or patient-entered data, we present an approach that integrates multiple electronic data sources increasingly found in practice. Medication adherence is a complex challenge that requires patient and provider team input, necessitating an integrated approach using advanced EHR, clinical decision support, and patient-controlled technologies. Future research should focus on integrated strategies to provide patients and providers with the right combination of informatics tools to help them adequately address the challenge of adherence to complex medication therapies. PMID:24076751

  6. Mastering the preceptor role: challenges of clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Burns, Catherine; Beauchesne, Michelle; Ryan-Krause, Patricia; Sawin, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to help both experienced and new preceptors become more effective teachers while maintaining their clinical workloads. A variety of strategies is essential to increase teaching effectiveness and decrease stress for the busy preceptor who juggles the roles of teacher and clinician. The article will begin with a review of role expectations and role strain factors for student, faculty, and preceptor. Principles of clinical teaching will be identified, followed by some strategies for teaching on busy days and concluding with suggestions for dealing with difficult students. PMID:16675378

  7. Teaching the Teachers of Clinical Psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Carl; Glick, Ira D

    2015-08-01

    This commentary focuses on psychopharmacology teachers and their teaching. The authors offer broadly based pedagogic suggestions on how to deliver evidence-based and neurobiologically informed prescribing information to clinicians at all levels of experience. They argue that teaching essential psychopharmacology knowledge and practice must be up-to-date, accurate, and consistent with the reality of an individual patient's life experience and beliefs. They stress that educators must teach that nonpsychopharmacological factors in a patient's life may be as relevant to the treatment setting as the actual pharmacological basis of psychotropic drug therapeutics. PMID:25472420

  8. Expanding classroom time: teaching clinical intravenous skills in campus laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandra J. Jones; Sharon A. Staib; Sally Fusner

    2009-01-01

    Too much content to cover and not enough time to teach are persistent themes in nursing education. One nursing program utilized clinical time in the campus laboratory as a way to expand didactic time and increase skills practice before taking students to off-site clinical settings. After numerous student concerns about lack of intravenous skills preparation, faculty developed a multifaceted approach

  9. Integrating informatics in undergraduate nursing curricula: using the QSEN framework as a guide.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Julie A

    2012-12-01

    Informatics education must prepare today's nurses to manage a deluge of information and use technology effectively. In addition, U.S. health care is being redesigned with technology that improves patient safety and quality of care. The Institute of Medicine's recommendations for health care safety and professional education prompted initiatives by the National League for Nursing, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and others to make informatics a fundamental part of nursing education. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project outlines specific competency goals for informatics knowledge, skills, and attitudes. However, progress toward integration of informatics in nursing curricula has been slow, and additional strategies need further exploration and discussion in the nursing literature. This article uses the QSEN framework to present strategies for teaching multiple facets of informatics in the classroom, simulation laboratory, and clinical settings in a baccalaureate nursing curriculum. PMID:23061435

  10. tranSMART: An Open Source and Community-Driven Informatics and Data Sharing Platform for Clinical and Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Athey, Brian D; Braxenthaler, Michael; Haas, Magali; Guo, Yike

    2013-01-01

    tranSMART is an emerging global open source public private partnership community developing a comprehensive informatics-based analysis and data-sharing cloud platform for clinical and translational research. The tranSMART consortium includes pharmaceutical and other companies, not-for-profits, academic entities, patient advocacy groups, and government stakeholders. The tranSMART value proposition relies on the concept that the global community of users, developers, and stakeholders are the best source of innovation for applications and for useful data. Continued development and use of the tranSMART platform will create a means to enable "pre-competitive" data sharing broadly, saving money and, potentially accelerating research translation to cures. Significant transformative effects of tranSMART includes 1) allowing for all its user community to benefit from experts globally, 2) capturing the best of innovation in analytic tools, 3) a growing 'big data' resource, 4) convergent standards, and 5) new informatics-enabled translational science in the pharma, academic, and not-for-profit sectors. PMID:24303286

  11. On experiences of i2b2 (Informatics for integrating biology and the bedside) database with Japanese clinical patients’ data

    PubMed Central

    Takai-Igarashi, Takako; Akasaka, Ryo; Suzuki, Kenji; Furukawa, Takahisa; Yoshida, Makiko; Inoue, Keisuke; Maruyama, Tomohisa; Maejima, Toshimasa; Bando, Masahiro; Takasaki, Masakazu; Sakota, Miki; Eguchi, Maki; Konagaya, Akihiko; Matsuura, Hiroya; Suzumura, Toyotaro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is a database system to facilitate sharing and reuse of clinical patients' data collected in individual hospitals. The i2b2 provides an ontology based object-oriented database system with highly simple and flexible database schema which enables us to integrate clinical patients' data from different laboratories and different hospitals. 392 patients' data including carcinoma and non-carcinoma specimens from cancer patients are transported from the Integrated Clinical Omics Database (iCOD) to the i2b2 database for a feasibility study to check applicability of i2b2 ontology and database schema on Japanese clinical patients’ data. No modification is required for the i2b2 data model to deal with Japanese characters. Some modification of ontology is required to integrate biomedical information extracted from the cancer patients’ data. We believe that the i2b2 system will be practical infrastructure to integrate Japanese clinical databases if appropriate disease ontology for Japanese patients is provided. PMID:21544172

  12. Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; MacPherson, Trevor; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2012-01-01

    Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in “Web 2.0”) in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1) serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2) actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP) was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software). Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki) and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics) given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12%) in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation is an effective mechanism for mastery of content. Future residents taking this course will continue to build on this wiki, keeping content current, and thereby benefit from this collaborative teaching tool. PMID:23024891

  13. Integrated Case Learning: Teaching Clinical Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radomski, Natalie; Russell, John

    2010-01-01

    Learning how to "think like doctors" can be difficult for undergraduate medical students in their early clinical years. Our model of collaborative Integrated Case Learning (ICL) and simulated clinical reasoning aims to address these issues. Taking a socio-cultural perspective, this study investigates the reflective learning interactions and…

  14. Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-03-31

    This article describes a study in a clinical dental anatomy course exploring the effects of storytelling and problem based learning on student satisfaction. The article explains potential reasons as to why this method demonstrated improved satisfaction among students.

  15. Toward an ecological perspective of resident teaching clinic.

    PubMed

    Smith, C Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

    2010-12-01

    Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are over-simplified for real patients with multiple chronic diseases, and local features that influence behavior but are not aligned with core values. Many are looking for a new conceptual structure to guide them. In this paper we briefly review several theories of action from the social and complexity sciences, and synthesize these into a coherent 'ecological perspective'. This perspective focuses on stabilizing features and narrative, which select for behaviors in clinic much like organisms are selected for in an ecosystem. We have found this perspective to be a useful guide for design, measurement, and joint learning in the teaching clinic. PMID:18766451

  16. Effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate model to improve clinical learning outcomes: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Parchebafieh, Samaneh; Gholizadeh, Leila; Lakdizaji, Sima; Ghiasvandiyan, Shahrzad; Davoodi, Arefeh

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the clinical teaching associate (CTA) model to improve clinical learning outcomes in nursing students. Students were randomly allocated to either the CTA (n = 28) or traditional training group (n = 32), and their clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction with the learning experience were assessed and compared. The results showed that the CTA model was equally effective in improving clinical knowledge, skills, and satisfaction of nursing students. PMID:24937302

  17. Clinician and student evaluation of a collaborative clinical teaching model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Wotton; Judith Gonda

    2004-01-01

    Dedicated Education Units (DEU) are, existing health care units collaboratively developed by clinicians and academics as clinical teaching and learning environments dedicated to students from Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Throughout each semester students from all year levels work together as peer teachers and learners supported by academics and clinicians. The School of Nursing and Midwifery first introduced the Dedication Education

  18. Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Paul G McMenamin (University of Western Australia Anatomy and Human Biology)

    2008-08-01

    This article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical school anatomy curriculum. The article suggests practical advice on the integration of the method into a curriculum as an additional learning opportunity with traditional lab practicums and clinical teaching skills.

  19. Teaching of clinical anatomy in rheumatology: a review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Torralba, Karina D; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo; Evelyn, Christine M; Koolaee, R Michelle; Kalish, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Clinical anatomy may be defined as anatomy that is applied to the care of the patient. It is the foundation of a well-informed physical examination that is so important in rheumatologic practice. Unfortunately, there is both documented and observed evidence of a significant deficiency in the teaching and performance of a competent musculoskeletal examination at multiple levels of medical education including in rheumatology trainees. At the Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston, MA, that took place in November 2014, a Clinical Anatomy Study Group met to share techniques of teaching clinical anatomy to rheumatology fellows, residents, and students. Techniques that were reviewed included traditional anatomic diagrams, hands-on cross-examination, cadaver study, and musculoskeletal ultrasound. The proceedings of the Study Group section are described in this review. PMID:26037454

  20. Electronic medical records in clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Warboys, Ina; Mok, Wai Yin; Frith, Karen H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to provide students with experiences to develop their technology competency and examine student perceptions about an academic electronic medical record (EMR) as a learning tool. Nurse educators need to integrate EMRs into their curricula to give students practice in the use of electronic documentation and retrieval of clinical information. The findings of this study indicated that students' use of EMRs at least 5 times resulted in the development of positive perceptions about their EMR experience. PMID:25073041

  1. Teaching about substance abuse with objective structured clinical exams

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon J. Parish; Megha Ramaswamy; Melissa R. Stein; Elizabeth K. Kachur; Julia H. Arnsten

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although residents commonly manage substance abuse disorders, optimal approaches to teaching these specialized interviewing\\u000a and intervention skills are unknown.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a OBJECTIVE: We developed a Substance Abuse Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) to teach addiction medicine competencies using immediate\\u000a feedback. In this study we evaluated OSCE performance, examined associations between performance and self-assessed interest\\u000a and competence in substance abuse, and assessed

  2. Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics?

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    #12;Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics? The field of informatics is widely expected foundations of information science and engineering, informatics represents a new, comprehensive and the social sciences. The Department of informatics established in the National Institute of Informatics (NII

  3. IU School of Informatics Expectations for Declared Area of Excellence for Promotion and Shorter version of complete document see

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    1 IU School of Informatics Expectations for Declared Area of Excellence for Promotion and Tenure** Shorter version of complete document ­ see http://informatics School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure Guidelines define excellence in teaching: The evidence

  4. Area of Concentration in Translational Informatics The Committee on Clinical & Translational Science

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Matthew

    the efficiency of biological and clinical data analysis and integration, allowing for better translation Professor of Pediatrics Interests: Evidence-based medicine, pediatric oncology, computational methods Andrey Professor of Hematology/ oncology Interests: data warehousing, data exchange architecture Kevin White, Phd

  5. Informatics: A Brief Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Shaoyi

    2003-01-01

    Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

  6. Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics

    PubMed Central

    Gullapalli, Rama R.; Desai, Ketaki V.; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) provided the initial draft of mankind's DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized.[7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it's hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future. PMID:23248761

  7. L. Jean Camp, PhD Informatics, Indiana University

    E-print Network

    Camp, L. Jean

    Cryptography, IFCA (2003). Teaching Economics of Security, Social Informatics of Security; Internet PrivacyL. Jean Camp, PhD Informatics, Indiana University Bloomington, IN 47408 (v) 812 856 1865 (email and Reliability in Internet Commerce Present Positions Associate Professor of Informatics, Indiana University

  8. Museum Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

  9. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Undergraduate Teaching Clinics: A Systematic Review and Recommendations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sara B. Werb; David W. Matear

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project was to identify an effective methodology of approaching and implementing evidence- based principles in undergraduate teaching clinics to promote evidence-based dentistry in future clinical practice. A systematic review was undertaken to examine evidence-based clinical teaching and faculty continuing education. Research published from 1996 to 2002 was retrieved by searching several databases and the Internet, along

  10. Small Group Teaching: Clinical Correlation with a Human Patient Simulator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Tammy Y. Euliano (University of Florida College of Medicine Dept. of Anesthesiology)

    2001-03-01

    The popularity of the problem-based learning paradigm has stimulated new interest in small group, interactive teaching techniques. Medical educators of physiology have long recognized the value of such methods, using animal-based laboratories to demonstrate difficult physiological principles. Due to ethical and other concerns, a replacement of this teaching tool has been sought. Here, the author describes the use of a full-scale human patient simulator for such a workshop. The simulator is a life-size mannequin with physical findings (palpable pulses, breath/heart sounds, blinking eyes, etc.) and sophisticated mechanical and software models of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. It can be connected to standard physiological monitors to reproduce a realistic clinical environment. In groups of 10, first-year medical students explore StarlingÂ?s law of the heart, the physiology of the Valsalva maneuver, and the function of the baroreceptor in a clinically realistic context using the simulator. With the use of a novel pre-/postworkshop assessment instrument that included student confidence in their answers, student confidence improved for all questions and survey items following the simulator session (P 85% of the students rating the workshop "very good" or "excellent."

  11. [Current issues of medical informatics].

    PubMed

    Pokrovski?, V I; Lishchuk, V A; Shevchenko, G V

    2004-01-01

    Due to the modern high standards of information technologies it is only natural to promote our medical care and to ensure a new quality of clinical services. Information technologies should be introduced into the medical field with due respect to clearly predetermined principles. Analyzed in the paper are the key reasons for a huge number of problems occurring in the sphere of medical informatics; optimal methods of medical-informatics introduction are defined. PMID:15101199

  12. Entrepreneurial Learning (Not Teaching) And Informatics (Not Computer) Support: Using Appropriate Learning Styles and Tools to Support the Entrepreneurial Community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Browne; Rich Harms

    2004-01-01

    Increasing dissatisfaction with the standard university model of teaching business courses has led to watershed articles in academic journals, increased experimentation in learning models, and an overall atmosphere of revolution in business learning. The leaders in this revolution, as teachers, students, and key advisors, are practicing and aspiring entrepreneurs. Their contributions are moving us toward models of experiential learning, nontraditional

  13. The Influence of Computers and Informatics on Mathematics and Its Teaching. Science and Technology Education Series, 44.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornu, Bernard, Ed.; Ralston, Anthony, Ed.

    In 1985 the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI) published the first edition of a book of studies on the topic of the influence of computers on mathematics and the teaching of mathematics. This document is an updated version of that book and includes five articles from the 1985 ICMI conference at Strasbourg, France; reports…

  14. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    PubMed

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation. PMID:25928758

  15. Teaching nonauthoritarian clinical ethics: using an inventory of bioethical positions.

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2015-03-01

    One area of bioethics education with direct impact on the lives of patients, families, and providers is the training of clinical ethics consultants who practice in hospital-based settings. There is a universal call for increased skills and knowledge among practicing consultants, broad recognition that many are woefully undertrained, and a clear consensus that CECs must avoid an "authoritarian approach" to consultation-an approach, that is, in which the consultant imposes his or her values, ethical priorities, or religious convictions on the stakeholders in an ethics conflict. Yet little work has been done on how to teach CECs not to impose their values in an ethics consultation, or even on the dimensions of this problem. In this essay, I propose a tool for bioethical instruction that targets this question: how can CECs be taught a nonauthoritarian mode of ethical analysis and consultation that can avert the problem of values imposition? PMID:25739778

  16. Assessing the current state of dental informatics in saudi arabia: the new frontier.

    PubMed

    Al-Nasser, Lubna; Al-Ehaideb, Ali; Househ, Mowafa

    2014-01-01

    Dental informatics is an emerging field that has the potential to transform the dental profession. This study aims to summarize the current applications of dental informatics in Saudi Arabia and to identify the challenges facing expansion of dental informatics in the Saudi context. Search for published articles and specialized forum entries was conducted, as well as interviews with dental professionals familiar with the topic. Results indicated that digital radiography/analysis and administrative management of dental practice are the commonest applications used. Applications in Saudi dental education included: web-based learning systems, computer-based assessments and virtual technology for clinical skills' teaching. Patients' education software, electronic dental/oral health records and the potential of dental research output from electronic databases are yet to be achieved in Saudi Arabia. Challenges facing Saudi dental informatics include: lack of IT infrastructure/support, social acceptability and financial cost. Several initiatives are taken towards the research in dental informatics. Still, more investments are needed to fully achieve the potential of various application of informatics in dental education, practice and research. PMID:25000042

  17. Work Informatics — An Operationalisation of Social Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Markku I. Nurminen

    A new approach to informatics and Social Informatics is introduced called Work Informatics. It is compared with Social Informatics,\\u000a and it turns out that there is a high resemblance between their scopes and objectives. Work Informatics is more operational\\u000a and therefore, we can use it more easily for practical purposes. Social, technical, and socio-technical aspects of both are\\u000a analysed. The

  18. Climate Informatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

  19. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  20. Business, Economics & Informatics

    E-print Network

    Cocea, Mihaela

    Master School of Law School of Science School of Business, Economics & Informatics School of Social, Mathematics and Statistics Department of Management Department of Computer Science and Informatics Department

  1. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT Instructional Model to Teach Clinically Relevant Medicinal Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naser Z. Alsharif; Kimberly A. Galt; Ahmed Mehanna; Alaba M. Ogunbadeniyi

    The relevance of medicinal chemistry to pharmacy practice has been questioned by many pharmacy educators as more emphasis has been placed on linking clinical knowledge and practice to pharmacy student educational outcomes. Faculty teaching in medicinal chemistry and other biomedical and pharmaceutical science courses have embraced this challenge. Various teaching methods and ap- proaches within medicinal chemistry that emphasize application

  2. The effect of alternative clinical teaching experience on preservice science teachers' self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klett, Mitchell Dean

    The purpose of this study was to compare different methods of alternative clinical experience; family science nights and Saturday science (authentic teaching) against micro-teaching (peer teaching) in terms of self-efficacy in science teaching and teaching self-efficacy. The independent variable, or cause, is teaching experiences (clinical vs. peer teaching); the dependent variable, or effect, is two levels of self-efficacy. This study was conducted at the University of Idaho's main campus in Moscow and extension campus in Coeur d'Alene. Four sections of science methods were exposed to the same science methods curriculum and will have opportunities to teach. However, each of the four sections were exposed to different levels or types of clinical experience. One section of preservice teachers worked with students in a Saturday science program. Another section worked with students during family science nights. The third worked with children at both the Saturday science program and family science nights. The last section did not have a clinical experience with children, instead they taught in their peer groups and acted as a control group. A pre-test was given at the beginning of the semester to measure their content knowledge, teaching self-efficacy and self-efficacy in science teaching. A post-test was given at the end of the semester to see if there was any change in self-efficacy or science teaching self-efficacy. Throughout the semester participants kept journals about their experiences and were interviewed after their alternative clinical teaching experiences. These responses were categorized into three groups; gains in efficacy, no change in efficacy, and drop in efficacy. There was a rise in teaching efficacy for all groups. The mean scores for personal teaching efficacy dropped for the Monday-Wednesday and Tuesday-Thursday group while the both Coeur D'Alene groups remained nearly unchanged. There was no significant change in the overall means for science teaching efficacy for any of the groups. Finally, the mean scores for all groups dropped for personal science teaching efficacy.

  3. Assistant Professor, Veterinary Ophthalmology Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital

    E-print Network

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Assistant Professor, Veterinary Ophthalmology Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Colorado State University. Qualifications DVM or equivalent veterinary professional degree. Diplomate status in the ACVO or completion

  4. Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Radiology1 Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Informatics by informatics. In particular, computer support can help referring physicians tailor their imaging requests to those procedures that would be most helpful for their pa- tients'clinical context. Informatics methods

  5. August 2009 INFORMATICS TOOLS

    E-print Network

    McShea, Daniel W.

    1 August 2009 INFORMATICS TOOLS FOR FOOD SAFETY AND DEFENSE Project Leads Noel Greis, Ph. Further, most of the public health and food safety informatics work1 in the 1 While many use the terms informatics and information science interchangeably, we use the term informatics to refer specifically

  6. Informatics Department of

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Mei-Fang

    SHRP Biomedical Informatics Department of Health Informatics about it's all ChoiCes... exclusively. For additional information visit their website at: housing.newark.rutgers.edu Visit shrp.rutgers.edu/dept/informatics@shrp.rutgers.edu Professor & Chairman, Department of Health Informatics Director of Graduate Programs in Biomedical

  7. Student Preferences Regarding Teaching Methods in a Drug-Induced Diseases and Clinical Toxicology Course

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Suzanna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To determine which teaching method in a drug-induced diseases and clinical toxicology course was preferred by students and whether their preference correlated with their learning of drug-induced diseases. Design. Three teaching methods incorporating active-learning exercises were implemented. A survey instrument was developed to analyze students’ perceptions of the active-learning methods used and how they compared to the traditional teaching method (lecture). Examination performance was then correlated to students’ perceptions of various teaching methods. Assessment. The majority of the 107 students who responded to the survey found traditional lecture significantly more helpful than active-learning methods (p=0.01 for all comparisons). None of the 3 active-learning methods were preferred over the others. No significant correlations were found between students’ survey responses and examination performance. Conclusions. Students preferred traditional lecture to other instructional methods. Learning was not influenced by the teaching method or by preference for a teaching method. PMID:23966726

  8. Biomedical Informatics Distance Education Programs

    E-print Network

    Bejerano, Gill

    point average or better. 2. One year of computer programming or soft- ware engineering coursework Three courses are required for the Clinical Re- search Informatics Certificate. (This certificate education MS pro- gram. It is offered through SCPD under the Hon- ors Cooperative Program, or Professional

  9. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Bahia; Irani, Jihad; Sailian, Silva Dakessian; Gebran, Vicky George; Rizk, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students’ performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties’ expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students’ skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in medical school. PMID:25419165

  10. A Concentrated Teaching Exercise for Introducing Clinical Dermatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Robert T.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    At Cornell University Medical College one 3-hour session in dermatology is required during the second year. A teaching exercise has been developed that combines a lecture, laboratory exercises, and presentations of patients. (Author)

  11. Informatics for Infectious Disease Research and Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vitali Sintchenko

    \\u000a The goal of infectious disease informatics is to optimize the clinical and public health management of infectious diseases\\u000a through improvements in the development and use of antimicrobials, the design of more effective vaccines, the identification\\u000a of biomarkers for life-threatening infections, a better understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and biosurveillance and\\u000a clinical decision support. Infectious disease informatics can lead to more targeted

  12. Integrating Teaching Skills and Clinical Content in a Faculty Development Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael L; Gross, Cary P; Kernan, Walter N; Wong, Jeffrey G; Holmboe, Eric S

    2003-01-01

    Incorporating clinical content into medical education faculty development programs has been proposed as a strategy to consolidate faculty continuing medical education time and enhance learning. We developed a faculty development program for ambulatory internal medicine preceptors that integrated primary care genetics with ambulatory precepting. The instructional strategies addressed both areas simultaneously and included facilitated discussions, mini-lectures, trigger tapes, and role plays. To evaluate the program, we conducted a pre-post trial. Skills were measured by retrospective pre-post self-reported ratings and behaviors by self-reported implementation of commitment to change (CTC) statements. Participants' (N = 26) ambulatory precepting and primary care genetics skill ratings improved after the intervention. They listed an average of 2.4 clinical teaching CTC statements and 2.0 clinical practice CTC statements. By 3 months after the workshop, preceptors, as a group, fully implemented 32 (38%), partially implemented 35 (41%), and failed to implement 18 (21%) CTC statements. The most common barrier to clinical teaching change was insufficient skills (8 of 25; 32%) and to clinical practice change was lack of a suitable patient (15 of 25; 60%). Integrating clinical content with clinical teaching in a faculty development workshop is feasible, can improve clinical and teaching skills, and can facilitate behavior change. PMID:12823654

  13. A NEW APPROACH TO CLINICAL PHARMACY PRACTICE TEACHING IN THE FOUR-YEAR DEGREE COURSE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lyn Hanning; Justine Scanlan; Jennifer Silverthorne; Judy Cantrill; Richard Hey; Stephen Freeborn; Jonathan Cooke

    This article describes a new approach to clinical pharmacy practice teaching for undergraduate students using a clinical tutor model at the school of pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Manchester. The results of an evaluation of the first year of the course are also reported T he Government's continuing aim to modernise the National Health Service suggests that

  14. Clinically Oriented Physiology Teaching: Strategy for Developing Critical-Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Upadhya, Subramanya; Torke, Sharmila; Ramnarayan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Medicine is an applied science, interpreting evidence and applying it to real life by using clinical reasoning skills and experience. COPT (clinically oriented physiology teaching) was incorporated in physiology instruction aiming to relate the study of physiology to real-life problems, to generate enthusiasm and motivation for learning, and to…

  15. Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

    2010-01-01

    Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching

  16. Developing and Validating a Conceptual Model of Recurring Problems in Teaching Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Scott; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Francovich, Chris; Christiano, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Recurrent problems in medical teaching clinic are common and difficult to address because of complex interpersonal dynamics. To minimize this difficulty, we developed a conceptual model that simplifies problems and identifies the root cause of tension between groups in clinic. We used recursive analysis and modeling of the data from a larger…

  17. A Survey of Rorschach Teaching in APA-Approved Clinical Graduate Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Gaudio, Andrew C.; Ritzler, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    This survey of APA-approved doctoral programs in clinical psychology provides a status assessment of the Rorschach technique. Eighty-one percent emphasized the technique; a quarter offered the course for a full year; respondents with more experience rated the technique higher; and its was rated highly as a clinical tool and teaching aid, but low…

  18. Development of a Computer Program for Teaching Periodontal Diagnosis Based on Clinical Epidemiological Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Kelvin; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Development of an inexpensive but powerful computer program to teach clinical periodontal diagnosis using epidemiological principles is described. Using probabilistic thinking, the student is guided from application of raw research data to derivation of likelihood ratios and how they affect clinical decision making. Student response was found to…

  19. A survey of teaching and the use of clinical guidelines in accident and emergency departments.

    PubMed Central

    Hormbrey, P; Todd, B S; Mansfield, C D; Skinner, D V

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate organised teaching in accident and emergency (A&E) departments in England and Wales. METHODS--A survey was carried out by postal questionnaire. Directed to senior house officers (SHOs), the questionnaire examined the nature and extent of departmental teaching, and measured the availability, suitability, and actual use made of guidelines. Of 231 questionnaires sent, 164 were returned (response rate 71%). RESULTS--The results show that most SHOs attended A&E induction courses at the beginning of their attachments, although the scope of these coursed varied widely. Most SHOs also received regular teaching, although the programmes were generally of less than 3 h in duration. The majority of respondents were well supported with written documentation in a variety of formats. However, a significant minority (29%) of SHOs requested more detailed clinical guidance, and these tended to be the respondents who received the most departmental teaching. CONCLUSIONS--More time could be allocated to structured teaching than at present, and greater use made of complementary educational methods such as practical skill teaching, case presentation, clinical audit, and involvement in journal clubs. More extensive departmental teaching should also be supported by making available more detailed and comprehensive clinical guidelines. PMID:8653238

  20. Cognitive Informatics and Denotational Mathematical Means for Brain Informatics

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yingxu

    1 Cognitive Informatics and Denotational Mathematical Means for Brain Informatics Yingxu Wang Director, International Institute of Cognitive Informatics and Cognitive Computing (IICICC) Director: yingxu@ucalgary.ca Abstract. Cognitive informatics studies the natural intelligence and the brain from

  1. Challenges of the ward round teaching based on the experiences of medical clinical teachers

    PubMed Central

    Arabshahi, Kamran Soltani; Haghani, Fariba; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Omid, Athar; Adibi, Peyman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Holding educational sessions in a clinical environment is a major concern for faculty members because of its special difficulties and restrictions. This study attempts to recognize the challenges of the ward round teaching through investigating the experiences of clinical teachers in 2011. Materials and Methods: This qualitative research is carried out through purposive sampling with maximum variation from among the clinical teachers of major departments in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (9 persons). The sampling continued until data saturation. Data were collected through semi-structured interview and analyzed through Collaizzi method. Data reliability and validity was confirmed through the four aspects of Lincoln and Guba method (credibility, conformability, transferability, and dependability). Results: Three major themes and their related sub-themes (minor themes) were found out including the factors related to the triad of clinical teaching (patient, learner, and clinical teacher) (concern about patient's welfare, poor preparation, lack of motivation, ethical problems), factors related to the educational environment (stressful environment, humiliating environment and poor communication) and the factors related to the educational system of the clinical environment (poor organizing and arrangement of resources, poor system's monitoring, bad planning and inadequate resource). Conclusion: Ward round teaching has many concerns for teachers, and this should be recognized and resolved by authorities and teachers. If these problems are not resolved, it would affect the quality of clinical teaching.

  2. The Learning Lab: A Clinical Diagnostic Teaching Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapir, Selma

    The theoretical base and practical operation of the Learning Lab, a diagnostic teaching approach with learning disabled students, are described. The program's philosophy is said to be based on child developmental-interactional principles in an integrated intervention approach. The program is explained to feature one-to-one tutorial work, training…

  3. Orientation for new teachers. Workshop on clinical teaching skills.

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Y.; Lawn, N.; Handfield-Jones, R.; Nasmith, L.; Lussier, D.; Levitt, C.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1987, McGill University's Department of Family Medicine has invited new faculty to an orientation workshop. Workshop topics cover learning agreements and principles of adult learning, effective teaching methods, and feedback and evaluation. Workshop methods aim to promote active participation and experiential learning. PMID:7894284

  4. Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 1, 5364 53 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Numbers of students are increasing, some students pay for studies and require more flexible teaching, more the teaching of infor- matics subjects. Namely: · increasing number of students; · increasing number and Informatics, Vilnius Virtual Learning Environments as a Supplement to Traditional Teaching Joana LIPEIKIENE

  5. Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

  6. Crossing the chasm: information technology to biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Brenda G; Balke, C William; Umberger, Gloria H; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L; Conigliaro, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap for Medical Research." The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH's translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers.This report details one academic health center's transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This article describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

  7. Qualitative analysis of end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hou, I-Ching; Chang, Polun; Wang, Tsen-Yung

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse end user computing strategy and experiences in promoting nursing informatics in Taiwan. In February 2004, an 8-day NI technology training campaign was held in Taipei for 60 clinical nurses. Excel VBA was used as the tool to teach the clinical nurses, who had never written any programs, but were very interested in informatics. Three projects were determined after detailed discussion and evaluation of clinical needs and technical feasibility between the nurses and the technical support team, which was composed of one experienced informatics professor and one clinical NI assistant. A qualitative analysis was used to interview the three pairs of programming clinical nurses and their direct supervisors with a structured but open questionnaire. Representative concepts were categorized from the data until all were categorized. The concepts were organized under three categories: the purposes, the benefits and the challenges of system development. According to this study, end user computing strategy with Excel VBA was successful so far. PMID:17102334

  8. Supervised near-peer clinical teaching in the ambulatory clinic: an exploratory study of family medicine residents' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ince-Cushman, Daniel; Rudkin, Teresa; Rosenberg, Ellen

    2015-02-01

    Near-peer teaching is used extensively in hospital-based rotations but its use in ambulatory care is less well studied. The objective of this study was to verify the benefits of near-peer teaching found in other contexts and to explore the benefits and challenges of near-peer clinical supervision unique to primary care. A qualitative descriptive design using semi-structured interviews was chosen to accomplish this. A faculty preceptor supervised senior family medicine residents as they supervised a junior resident. We then elicited residents' perceptions of the experience. The study took place at a family medicine teaching unit in Canada. Six first-year and three second-year family medicine residents participated. Both junior and senior residents agreed that near-peer clinical supervision should be an option during family medicine residency training. The senior resident was perceived to benefit the most. Near-peer teaching was found to promote self-reflection and confidence in the supervising resident. Residents felt that observation by a faculty preceptor was required. In conclusion, the benefits of near-peer teaching previously described in hospital settings can be extended to ambulatory care training programmes. However, the perceived need for direct observation in a primary care context may make it more challenging to implement. PMID:25601040

  9. Engineering Polymer Informatics

    E-print Network

    Adams, Nico; Ryder, Jennifer; Jessop, David M; Corbett, Peter; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2007-12-17

    Engineering Polymer Informatics Nico Adams, Jen Ryder, Nicholas England, David Jessop, Peter Corbett, Peter Murray-Rust Our mission is to develop an informatics toolbox, which will take into account the special computational needs of polymers...

  10. INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Recruiter's

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING 2013-2014 Recruiter's Guide www.soic.indiana.edu/career #12;We introductory Computer Science or Informatics courses to help students learn more about your industry Senior Assistant hkidd@indiana.edu Informatics and Computing Career Services Staff #12;School

  11. THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School -SISS

    E-print Network

    Doran, Simon J.

    THE FACULTY OF BUSINESS, ECONOMICS AND LAW Surrey Informatics Summer School - SISS Building and specialists - Data analysts: In health care providers or commissioners - Social sciences and social care to introducing multilevel models Clinical INFORMATICS & HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH GROUP ­ www

  12. Teaching Softly in Hard Environments: Meanings of Small-Group Reflective Teaching to Clinical Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Ellen; Wear, Delese; Aultman, Julie M.; Zupp, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    A vast literature exists on teaching reflection and reflective practice to trainees in small groups, yet with few exceptions the literature does not address the benefits of these interactions to faculty. Like multiculturalism or cultural competency, the literature assumes that faculty have themselves "achieved" these propensities and that trainees…

  13. A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, J.-B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

  14. Application of ``VITALS'': Visual Indicators of Teaching and Learning Success in Reporting Student Evaluations of Clinical Teachers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HOSSAM HAMDY; REED WILLIAMS; ARA TEKIAN; STEVE BENJAMIN; HAFIZ EL SHAZALI; RAJA BANDARANAYAKE

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT Context: At the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain, a system has been introduced in which clerkship students evaluate clinical faculty using Visual Indicators of Teaching and Learning Success ( VITALS ). Objective: To describe the use of VITALS in reporting student feedback on teaching and learning effectiveness of clinical faculty in the clerkship. Design:

  15. Learning Clinical Skills during Bedside Teaching Encounters in General Practice: A Video-Observational Study with Insights from Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajjawi, Rola; Rees, Charlotte; Monrouxe, Lynn V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore how opportunities for learning clinical skills are negotiated within bedside teaching encounters (BTEs). Bedside teaching, within the medical workplace, is considered essential for helping students develop their clinical skills. Design/methodology/approach: An audio and/or video observational study examining…

  16. Implementation of clinical budgeting in a public teaching hospital--first steps.

    PubMed

    Keegan, C J

    1990-01-01

    An action research project commenced the process of introducing a clinical budgeting system into the clinical areas in a large public teaching hospital. Focused interviews were used as the initial activity aimed at involving Heads in using the system. The process underlined a number of issues which need to be managed in this type of process and pointed to a number of factors which should be present to assist its introduction. PMID:10109116

  17. Information science for the future: an innovative nursing informatics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Travis, L; Flatley Brennan, P

    1998-04-01

    Health care is increasingly driven by information, and consequently, patient care will demand effective management of information. The report of the Priority Expert Panel E: Nursing Informatics and Enhancing Clinical Care Through Nursing Informatics challenges faculty to produce baccalaureate graduates who use information technologies to improve the patient care process and change health care. The challenge is to construct an evolving nursing informatics curriculum to provide nursing professionals with the foundation for affecting health care delivery. This article discusses the design, implementation, and evaluation of an innovative nursing informatics curriculum incorporated into a baccalaureate nursing program. The basic components of the curriculum framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. The presented integrated curriculum is effective in familiarizing students with informatics and encouraging them to think critically about using informatics in practice. The two groups of students who completed the four-course sequence will be discussed. PMID:9570415

  18. Teaching as a Clinical Practice Profession: Implications for Teacher Preparation and State Policy. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Jamie; Coggshall, Jane G.

    2009-01-01

    This Issue Brief, written through a collaboration between two federally funded technical assistance and research dissemination centers, the New York Comprehensive Center (NYCC) and the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality (TQ Center), describes what "teaching as a clinical practice profession" means to those in the field of teacher…

  19. An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Christo T.; Unruh, Kenneth P.; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Translating basic sciences into a clinical framework has been approached through the implementation of various teaching techniques aimed at using a patient case scenario to facilitate learning. These techniques present students with a specific patient case and lead the students to discuss physiological processes through analysis of provided data…

  20. An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Christo T Philip (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)

    2008-05-01

    This article describes a novel approach to teaching gross anatomy to medical students. The article explains an explorative learning approach that builds students analytical, reasoning and communication (written and oral). The methods used require students to develop a patient case based on clinical outcomes.

  1. Computer-Simulated Psychotherapy as an Aid in Teaching Clinical Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suler, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes how Elisa, a widely known computer program which simulates the responses of a psychotherapist, can be used as a teaching aid in undergraduate clinical psychology classes. Provides information on conducting the exercise, integrating it into the course syllabus, and evaluating its impact on students. (JDH)

  2. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elie A Akl; Reem Mustafa; Thomas Slomka; Alia Alawneh; Abhishek Vedavalli; Holger J Schünemann

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. METHODS: We developed the Guide-O-Game© in

  3. Evaluating implementation of quality management systems in a teaching hospital's clinical departments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    PATRICE FRANCOIS; JEAN-CLAUDE PEYRIN; MURIEL TOUBOUL; THOMAS REVERDY; DOMINIQUE VINCK

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated a strategy for implementing continuous quality improvement based on a decentralized quality management system in the clinical departments of a hospital. Setting. The institution is a 2000-bed teaching hospital of tertiary health care employing 8000 people. Methods. The quality management intervention was tested in six volunteer departments. This intervention comprised an instructional seminar, methodological assistance, and

  4. The origins of informatics.

    PubMed Central

    Collen, M F

    1994-01-01

    This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

  5. Combining interdisciplinary and International Medical Graduate perspectives to teach clinical and ethical communication using multimedia.

    PubMed

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Flynn, Eleanor; Delany, Clare

    2011-01-01

    In Australia, international medical graduates (IMGs) play a crucial role in addressing workforce shortages in healthcare. Their ability to deliver safe and effective healthcare in an unfamiliar cultural setting is intrinsically tied to effective communication. Hospital-based medical clinical educators, who play an important role in providing communication training to IMGs, would benefit from practical resources and an understanding of the relevant pedagogies to address these issues in their teaching. This paper examines the nature of an interdisciplinary collaboration to develop multimedia resources for teaching clinical and ethical communication to IMGs. We describe the processes and dynamics of the collaboration, and outline the methodologies from applied linguistics, medical education, and health ethics that we drew upon. The multimedia consist of three video clips of challenging communication scenarios as well as experienced IMGs talking about communication and ethics. The multimedia are supported by teaching guidelines that address relevant disciplinary concerns of the three areas of collaboration. In the paper's discussion we point out the pre-conditions that facilitated the interdisciplinary collaboration. We propose that such collaborative approaches between the disciplines and participants can provide new perspectives to address the multifaceted challenges of clinical teaching and practice. PMID:22616355

  6. Comparison between videotape and personal teaching as methods of communicating clinical skills to medical students.

    PubMed Central

    Mir, M A; Marshall, R J; Evans, R W; Hall, R; Duthie, H L

    1984-01-01

    The efficacy of video recording in transmitting clinical knowledge and skills to medical students was tested by recording on videotape demonstrations of physical examinations given by five clinicians to a randomly selected group of 12 students (personal group) from the first clinical year and then showing these recordings, under identical conditions, to 13 students from the same year (video group). The efficacy of both the personal and video mediums in terms of whether content was retained was tested by a questionnaire completed by all students at the end of the sessions and by a structured clinical assessment in which students were asked to demonstrate some of the same clinical tasks three weeks after the demonstration. In answering the questionnaire the video group obtained a mean (SD) score of 20.8 (7.0) (maximum possible score 40), which was not significantly different from the score achieved by the personal group (17.4 (7.7)). The video group was able to reproduce 44 (10)% of the total clinical steps demonstrated and the personal group 45 (14)%. Videotaped demonstrations can be as effective as personal teaching of clinical methods, and video should be developed as a medium for first line clinical teaching. PMID:6428655

  7. Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Current and Future Trends in Imaging Informatics for Oncology Mia A. Levy, MD, PhD* and Daniel L on the special needs of oncologic imaging, yet gaps still remain. We review the current state, limitations, and future trends in imaging informatics for oncology care including clinical and clini- cal research systems

  8. A review of medical imaging informatics.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Usha; Bui, Alex; Taira, Ricky; Dionisio, John; Morioka, Craig; Johnson, David; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    2002-12-01

    This review of medical imaging informatics is a survey of current developments in an exciting field. The focus is on informatics issues rather than traditional data processing and information systems, such as picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) and image processing and analysis systems. In this review, we address imaging informatics issues within the requirements of an informatics system defined by the American Medical Informatics Association. With these requirements as a framework, we review, in four sections: (1) Methods to present imaging and associated data without causing an overload, including image study summarization, content-based medical image retrieval, and natural language processing of text data. (2) Data modeling techniques to represent clinical data with focus on an image data model, including general-purpose time-based multimedia data models, health-care-specific data models, knowledge models, and problem-centric data models. (3) Methods to integrate medical data information from heterogeneous clinical data sources. Advances in centralized databases and mediated architectures are reviewed along with a discussion on our efforts at data integration based on peer-to-peer networking and shared file systems. (4) Visualization schemas to present imaging and clinical data: the large volume of medical data presents a daunting challenge for an efficient visualization paradigm. In this section we review current multimedia visualization methods including temporal modeling, problem-specific data organization, including our problem-centric, context and user-specific visualization interface. PMID:12594089

  9. Teaching and assessing clinical skills: a competency-based programme in China.

    PubMed

    Stillman, P L; Wang, Y; Ouyang, Q; Zhang, S; Yang, Y; Sawyer, W D

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a competency-based clinical skills teaching and assessment programme in China utilizing modern teaching techniques. Medical teachers from three schools agreed on items for inclusion in the complete physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, an outline for an adult and paediatric history, and important interviewing skills. Lesson plans, performance checklists, and written and videotape training materials were developed. Standardized patients were trained at one school to assist with the teaching at that school and with the assessment at all three schools. A national, a provincial, and a local medical school in China were used. Before beginning the new curriculum for students in their first year of clinical training, baseline data were collected on skills of students at various levels of training in the previous curriculum at all three schools. Although in the previous curriculum there was some improvement in clinical skills among advanced compared to more junior students, performance was lower than expected by staff. One year after implementation of the new curriculum, students were evaluated. These students significantly outperformed their counterparts as well as the more senior level students tested the previous year. This project has established a competency-based teaching and assessment programme in China that allows for rapid improvement in the clinical skills of students. Within a short time, a sophisticated group of medical educators has been formed, who now function as consultants to other educators in their own country. Many aspects of this programme are being adapted throughout China and are applicable to medical schools throughout the world. PMID:9231122

  10. An immodest proposal: pay equity for nursing faculty who do clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Boughn, S

    1992-05-01

    Pay equity, the concept of equal pay for equal or comparable work, will continue to be of paramount importance to women as the 20th century draws to a close. While it might have been anticipated that women in academic settings would enjoy pay equity, clinical teaching in nursing education provides a model for gender discrimination as related to women's work. Elements of proposal development and a case study for contesting pay inequity are presented. PMID:1318966

  11. Do Expert Clinical Teachers Have a Shared Understanding of What Constitutes a Competent Reasoning Performance in Case-Based Teaching?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauthier, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2014-01-01

    To explore the assessment challenge related to case based learning we study how experienced clinical teachers--i.e., those who regularly teach and assess case-based learning--conceptualize the notion of competent reasoning performance for specific teaching cases. Through an in-depth qualitative case study of five expert teachers, we investigate…

  12. On Cognitive Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    2003-01-01

    Supplementary to matter and energy, information is the third essence for modeling the natural world. An emerging discipline known as cognitive informatics (CI) is developed recently that forms a profound interdisciplinary study of cognitive and information sciences, and tackles the common root problems sharing by informatics, computing, software engineering, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, neuropsychology, philosophy, linguistics, and life science. CI

  13. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 A complete characterisation of the linear clique of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2009-381.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  14. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 A new representation of proper interval graphs Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2007-354.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  15. Indiana University Department of Informatics

    E-print Network

    Dalkilic, Mehmet

    Indiana University Department of Informatics Graduate Student Orientation Week August 25-29, 2008 contracts, papers, etc. (for AIs, RAs) 8:45 ­ 12:00 Introductions · Welcome from Informatics Department Chair Geoffrey Fox · Introduction of Informatics staff · Informatics Packets and Picnic Sign-Up Linda

  16. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Characterizing and computing minimal cograph completions AS Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2008-352.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  17. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Cutwidth of split graphs, threshold graphs, and proper 2008 Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2008-372.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  18. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Strongly chordal and chordal bipartite graphs are sandwich Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2009-383.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  19. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Interval Completion is Fixed Parameter Tractable Pinar of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/ps/2006-336.ps Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

  20. INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590

    E-print Network

    Papadopoulos, Charis

    REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Graphs of small bounded linear clique-width P. Heggernes, D. Meister, Ch. Papadopoulos REPORT NO 362 October 2007 Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway, is available at http

  1. A simulation for teaching the basic and clinical science of fluid therapy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard E. Rawson (Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine Department of Biomedical Sciences)

    2009-01-01

    The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical cases that, by nature, are diverse, change over time, and respond in unique ways to therapeutic interventions. We developed a dynamic model using STELLA software that simulates normal and abnormal fluid and electrolyte balance in the dog. Students interact, not with the underlying model, but with a user interface that provides sufficient data (skin turgor, chemistry panel, etc.) for the clinical assessment of patients and an opportunity for treatment. Students administer fluids and supplements, and the model responds in "real time," requiring regular reassessment and, potentially, adaptation of the treatment strategy. The level of success is determined by clinical outcome, including improvement, deterioration, or death. We expected that the simulated cases could be used to teach both the clinical and basic science of fluid therapy. The simulation provides exposure to a realistic clinical environment, and students tend to focus on this aspect of the simulation while, for the most part, ignoring an exploration of the underlying physiological basis for patient responses. We discuss how the instructor's expertise can provide sufficient support, feedback, and scaffolding so that students can extract maximum understanding of the basic science in the context of assessing and treating at the clinical level.

  2. CHALLENGES FOR BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS AND PHARMACOGENOMICS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russ B. Altman; Teri E. Klein

    2002-01-01

    ? Abstract Pharmacogenomics requires the integration and analysis of genomic, molecular, cellular, and clinical data, and it thus offers a remarkable set of challenges to biomedical informatics. These include infrastructural challenges such as the creation of data models and databases for storing these data, the integration of these data with external databases, the extraction of information from natural language text,

  3. Page 1 of 3 Medical Informatics

    E-print Network

    Sartipi, Kamran

    healthcare information systems require fundamental re-engineering to new network-centric environments of Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics (IJHSI) vol 5(1), 2010, pages 37-60 Due to reliance on human assist healthcare personnel to improve the quality of clinical practice. Currently, the decision

  4. Informatics Resource Library Open to all members of Informatics and research centres associated with Informatics

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    Informatics Resource Library Open to all members of Informatics and research centres associated with Informatics (COGS, CCNR, Sackler), the Resource Library has extensive holdings of textbooks, research for Informatics. Most of these are in the Cognitive Science Research Paper series, of which there are at present

  5. Neonatal Informatics: Transforming Neonatal Care Through Translational Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jonathan P.; Benitz, William E.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Butte, Atul J.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The future of neonatal informatics will be driven by the availability of increasingly vast amounts of clinical and genetic data. The field of translational bioinformatics is concerned with linking and learning from these data and applying new findings to clinical care to transform the data into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. As a result of advances in translational informatics, the care of neonates will become more data driven, evidence based, and personalized. PMID:22924023

  6. The experience of informatics nurses in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ting-Ting; Mills, Mary Etta

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent progress in information technology, health care institutions are constantly confronted with the need to adapt to the resulting new processes of information management and use. Facilitating an effective technology implementation requires dedication from informatics nurses (INs) to bridge the gap between clinical care and technology. The purpose of this study was to explore the working experiences of INs, and alternatives to assist the growth and development of the specialty. This qualitative study recruited 8 participants, and data were collected in 2009 by use of interview guides related to work roles, responsibilities, competencies, and challenges. The emerged themes included (a) diversified roles and functions, (b) vague job description, (c) no decision-making authority, (d) indispensable management support, and (e) searching resources for work fulfillment. Findings indicate that for organizations where nursing informatics development is ongoing, the IN role should be clearly defined as a specialist with identified support resources and decision-making authority. Nursing informatics interest groups should further develop training and certification programs to validate the professional image of the role. Concepts of nursing informatics should be included seamlessly throughout the educational curricula and informatics competency-based courses designed to strengthen student's technology use and data management capabilities. PMID:25839956

  7. Military Research Needs in Biomedical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Reifman, Jaques; Gilbert, Gary R.; Fagan, Lawrence; Satava, Richard

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC) Biomedical Informatics Roadmap Meeting was devoted to developing a strategic plan in four focus areas: Hospital and Clinical Informatics, E-Health, Combat Health Informatics, and Bioinformatics and Biomedical Computation. The driving force of this Roadmap Meeting was the recent accelerated pace of change in biomedical informatics in which emerging technologies have the potential to affect significantly the Army research portfolio and investment strategy in these focus areas. The meeting was structured so that the first two days were devoted to presentations from experts in the field, including representatives from the three services, other government agencies, academia, and the private sector, and the morning of the last day was devoted to capturing specific biomedical informatics research needs in the four focus areas. This white paper summarizes the key findings and recommendations and should be a powerful tool for the crafting of future requests for proposals to help align USAMRMC new strategic research investments with new developments and emerging technologies. PMID:12223503

  8. Informatics in Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cakir, Serhat

    1994-01-01

    In the last twenty years the rapid change in the informatics sector has had economic and social impact on private and government activities. The Supreme Council for Science and Technology of Turkey assigned highest priority to the informatics in its meeting in February 1993. With this advice TUBITAK (The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey) intends to give a strong impulse to development of a research policy in this field.

  9. Clinical diagnostic decision-making in real life contexts: A trans-theoretical approach for teaching: AMEE Guide No. 95.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh; Sandars, John; Carr, Sue

    2015-03-01

    Making an accurate clinical diagnosis is an essential skill for all medical students and doctors, with important implications for patient safety. Current approaches for teaching how to make a clinical diagnosis tend to lack the complexity that faces clinicians in real-life contexts. In this Guide, we propose a new trans-theoretical model for teaching how to make an appropriate clinical diagnosis that can be used by teachers as an additional technique to their current approach. This educational model integrates situativity theory, dual-information processing theory and socio-cognitive theory. Mapping and microanalysis help the teacher to identify the main processes involved in making an accurate clinical diagnosis, so that feedback can be provided that is focused on improving key aspects of the skill. An essential aspect of using the new educational model is the role of the experienced clinical teacher in making judgments about the appropriateness of the learner's attempts to make a clinical diagnosis. PMID:25391895

  10. Informatics Resources Supporting the Research Enterprise

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    3/27/2013 1 Informatics Resources Supporting the Research Enterprise Paul A. Harris, PhD Director, Office of Research Informatics Associate Professor, Biomedical Informatics & Biomedical Engineering Office of Research Informatics Enterprise Management, Tracking, and Evaluation PI interface (Process

  11. The promise of computer-assisted auscultation in screening for structural heart disease and clinical teaching.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, L; Myer, L; Mayosi, B M

    2012-08-01

    Cardiac auscultation has been the central clinical tool for the diagnosis of valvular and other structural heart diseases for over a century. Physicians acquire competence in this technique through considerable training and experience. In Africa, however, we face a shortage of physicians and have the lowest health personnel-to-population ratio in the world. One of the proposed solutions for tackling this crisis is the adoption of health technologies and product innovations to support different cadres of health workers as part of task shifting. Computer-assisted auscultation (CAA) uses a digital stethoscope combined with acoustic neural networking to provide a visual display of heart sounds and murmurs, and analyses the recordings to distinguish between innocent and pathological murmurs. In so doing, CAA may serve as an objective tool for the screening of structural heart disease and facilitate the teaching of cardiac auscultation. This article reviews potential clinical applications of CAA. PMID:22358127

  12. Page 1 of 10 Informatics

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    Page 1 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Signals & Spectrum Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Steve McLaughlin · Signals and Spectrum ­ Cross-layer optimisation issues #12;Page 3 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve

  13. Informatics Everywhere Information and Computation

    E-print Network

    Verhoeff, Tom

    Informatics Everywhere Information and Computation in Society, Science, and Technology Presented. Verhoeff @ TUE.NL 1/6 Informatics Everywhere #12;The Broader Context Society : humans acting as a group : putting `the world' to our use, twisting it c 2013, T. Verhoeff @ TUE.NL 2/6 Informatics Everywhere #12;A

  14. Multi-Sensory Informatics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katai, Zoltan; Toth, Laszlo; Adorjani, Alpar Karoly

    2014-01-01

    A recent report by the joint Informatics Europe & ACM Europe Working Group on Informatics Education emphasizes that: (1) computational thinking is an important ability that all people should possess; (2) informatics-based concepts, abilities and skills are teachable, and must be included in the primary and particularly in the secondary school…

  15. Health informatics 3.0.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Dipak

    2011-01-01

    Web 3.0 promises us smart computer services that will interact with each other and leverage knowledge about us and our immediate context to deliver prioritised and relevant information to support decisions and actions. Healthcare must take advantage of such new knowledge-integrating services, in particular to support better co-operation between professionals of different disciplines working in different locations, and to enable well-informed co-operation between clinicians and patients. To grasp the potential of Web 3.0 we will need well-harmonised semantic resources that can richly connect virtual teams and link their strategies to real-time and tailored evidence. Facts, decision logic, care pathway steps, alerts, education need to be embedded within components that can interact with multiple EHR systems and services consistently. Using Health Informatics 3.0 a patient's current situation could be compared with the outcomes of very similar patients (from across millions) to deliver personalised care recommendations. The integration of EHRs with biomedical sciences ('omics) research results and predictive models such as the Virtual Physiological Human could help speed up the translation of new knowledge into clinical practice. The mission, and challenge, for Health Informatics 3.0 is to enable healthy citizens, patients and professionals to collaborate within a knowledge-empowered social network in which patient specific information and personalised real-time evidence are seamlessly interwoven. PMID:21938318

  16. An educational game for teaching clinical practice guidelines to Internal Medicine residents: development, feasibility and acceptability

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Slomka, Thomas; Alawneh, Alia; Vedavalli, Abhishek; Schünemann, Holger J

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence to Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) remains suboptimal among internal medicine trainees. Educational games are of growing interest and have the potential to improve adherence to CPGs. The objectives of this study were to develop an educational game to teach CPGs in Internal Medicine residency programs and to evaluate its feasibility and acceptability. Methods We developed the Guide-O-Game© in the format of a TV game show with questions based on recommendations of CPGs. The development of the Guide-O-Game© consisted of the creation of a multimedia interactive tool, the development of recommendation-based questions, and the definition of the game's rules. We evaluated its feasibility through pilot testing and its acceptability through a qualitative process. Results The multimedia interactive tool uses a Macromedia Flash web application and consists of a manager interface and a user interface. The user interface allows the choice of two game styles. We created so far 16 sets of questions relating to 9 CPGs. The pilot testing proved that the game was feasible. The qualitative evaluation showed that residents considered the game to be acceptable. Conclusion We developed an educational game to teach CPGs to Internal Medicine residents that is both feasible and acceptable. Future work should evaluate its impact on educational outcomes. PMID:19017400

  17. "Could I add something?": Teaching communication by intervening in real time during a clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Tulsky, James A; Baile, Walter F; Edwards, Kelly

    2010-06-01

    Supervising learners as they communicate often places faculty preceptors in a classic educational dilemma. What should a preceptor do when the learner is not communicating well and is not asking for help? What usually happens, in the authors' experiences, is that the preceptor decides at some point that she or he cannot stand the situation anymore-then interrupts the learner and takes over the conversation. Interrupting in this way, however, comes at the cost of undermining the learner. Thus, the authors have developed an alternative teaching strategy designed for communication tasks such as giving serious or bad news. In the strategy recommended here, the preceptor sets up the possibility that he or she may intervene in the encounter. If the preceptor does intervene, he or she explicitly hands the conversation back to the learner and afterwards debriefs with the learner. The authors designed this strategy to decrease the risk to the patient while maximizing learning for the learner. This strategy offers preceptors a way to teach communication skills more effectively in clinical settings using intentional goal setting with learners, careful observation of the encounter, intervention when the conversation is not going well, and reflective feedback for the learner based on the learner's goals. PMID:20505408

  18. Rehabilitation Counselor Educators' Perceptions of Importance, Student Preparedness, and Teaching Proficiency in Clinical Judgment Skill Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bryan Scott

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of clinical judgment in rehabilitation counseling (Strohmer & Leierer, 2000), prevalence and consequences of rehabilitation counselor biases (Berven & Rosenthal, 1999), and the emerging trend to educate rehabilitation counselors in evidence-based practice (EBP) (Leahy & Arokiasamy, 2010), the explicit teaching of…

  19. On Cognitive Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cognitive informatics (CI) is a new discipline that studies the natural intelligence and internal information processing mechanisms of the brain, as well as the processes involved in perception and cognition. CI provides a coherent set of fundamental theories, and contemporary mathematics, which form the foundation for most information and knowledge based science and engineering disciplines such as computer science,

  20. Social Informatics Data Grid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bennett Bertenthal; Robert Grossman; David Hanley; Mark Hereld; Sarah Kenny; Gina-Anne Levow; Michael E. Papka; Stephen W. Porges; Kavithaa Rajavenkateshwaran; Rick Stevens; Thomas D. Uram; Wenjun Wu

    The Social Informatics Data Grid is a new infrastructure designed to transform how social and behavioral scientists collect and annotate data, collaborate and share data, and analyze and mine large data repositories. An important goal of the project is to be compatible with existing databases and tools that support the sharing, storage and retrieval of archival data sets. It is

  1. Italian Olympiads in Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giorgio CASADEI; Bruno FADINI; Marta Genoviè De VITA

    2007-01-01

    We describe our 6-years long experience in training and selection of the Italian team for the IOI. Based on this experience, we outline our proposals and how we intend to proceed to improve the effectiveness of these processes. 1. The Beginning During the year 2000, the Italian Ministry of Education and the Italian Association for Informatics (AICA) came to an

  2. \\NeuroImage" Informatics

    E-print Network

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    in the documents. The individual words in the title were found excluding stop words (common words such as: \\the Nielsen and Lars Kai Hansen Informatics and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark for one scienti#12;c article (a document) including the citations (to other scienti#12;c documents

  3. WHAT IS INFORMATICS? Informatics is the study of the structure, behaviour, and interactions

    E-print Network

    Koehn, Philipp

    WHAT IS INFORMATICS? Informatics is the study of the structure, behaviour, and interactions of natural and engineered computational systems. Informatics studies the representation, processing. The science of information and the engineering of information systems develop hand-in-hand. Informatics

  4. Social Informatics Last updated: April 2014

    E-print Network

    Menczer, Filippo

    Social Informatics Last updated: April 2014 Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics Departmental URL: rkcsi.indiana.edu/ Curriculum Ph.D. Minor in Social Informatics Social Informatics (SI) refers) that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts. Social Informatics

  5. Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me?

    E-print Network

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me? Geo-Informatics will develop from a degree in Geography with Geo-Informatics are wide-ranging and include excellent time with Geo-Informatics degrees the same? Geo-Informatics includes a variety of different subject themes

  6. From Information Technology to Informatics: The Information Revolution in Dental Education

    PubMed Central

    Schleyer, Titus K.; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P.; Spallek, Heiko; Dziabiak, Michael P.; Johnson, Lynn A.

    2014-01-01

    The capabilities of information technology (IT) have advanced precipitously in the last fifty years. Many of these advances have enabled new and beneficial applications of IT in dental education. However, conceptually, IT use in dental schools is only in its infancy. Challenges and opportunities abound for improving how we support clinical care, education, and research with IT. In clinical care, we need to move electronic dental records beyond replicating paper, connect information on oral health to that on systemic health, facilitate collaborative care through teledentistry, and help clinicians apply evidence-based dentistry and preventive management strategies. With respect to education, we should adopt an evidence-based approach to IT use for teaching and learning, share effective educational content and methods, leverage technology-mediated changes in the balance of power between faculty and students, improve technology support for clinical teaching, and build an information infrastructure centered on learners and organizations. In research, opportunities include reusing clinical care data for research studies, helping advance computational methods for research, applying generalizable research tools in dentistry, and reusing research data and scientific workflows. In the process, we transition from a focus on IT—the mere technical aspects of applying computer technology—to one on informatics: the what, how, and why of managing information. PMID:22262557

  7. From information technology to informatics: the information revolution in dental education.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Titus K; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Spallek, Heiko; Dziabiak, Michael P; Johnson, Lynn A

    2012-01-01

    The capabilities of information technology (IT) have advanced precipitously in the last fifty years. Many of these advances have enabled new and beneficial applications of IT in dental education. However, conceptually, IT use in dental schools is only in its infancy. Challenges and opportunities abound for improving how we support clinical care, education, and research with IT. In clinical care, we need to move electronic dental records beyond replicating paper, connect information on oral health to that on systemic health, facilitate collaborative care through teledentistry, and help clinicians apply evidence-based dentistry and preventive management strategies. With respect to education, we should adopt an evidence-based approach to IT use for teaching and learning, share effective educational content and methods, leverage technology-mediated changes in the balance of power between faculty and students, improve technology support for clinical teaching, and build an information infrastructure centered on learners and organizations. In research, opportunities include reusing clinical care data for research studies, helping advance computational methods for research, applying generalizable research tools in dentistry, and reusing research data and scientific workflows. In the process, we transition from a focus on IT-the mere technical aspects of applying computer technology-to one on informatics: the what, how, and why of managing information. PMID:22262557

  8. GRADUATE STUDENT Department of Health Informatics and

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    1 GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Department of Health Informatics and Information Management College.............................................................................. 4 In order to meet the minimum qualification for the Master's in Health Informatics, all applicants ................................................................................................................. 14 Department of Health Informatics and Information Management

  9. Meeting Highlights: Genome Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Ashurst, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    We bring you the highlights of the second Joint Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Wellcome Trust ‘Genome Informatics’ Conference, organized by Ewan Birney, Suzanna Lewis and Lincoln Stein. There were sessions on in silico data discovery, comparative genomics, annotation pipelines, functional genomics and integrative biology. The conference included a keynote address by Sydney Brenner, who was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (jointly with John Sulston and H. Robert Horvitz) a month later. PMID:18629014

  10. Mission — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) supports NCI research initiatives through sustaining a multidisciplinary community of biomedical researchers, informaticists, and developers dedicated to improving informatics practices in the study of cancer and the translation of that knowledge into improved clinical interventions.

  11. Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance (CG) is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED). Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation, the results of this study would contribute to the development of implementation science and be employed by boards and executives governing other clinical settings to facilitate CG implementation. PMID:22963589

  12. Theoretical Informatics and Applications Theoret. Informatics Appl. 37 (2003) 315336

    E-print Network

    Uustalu, Tarmo

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical Informatics and Applications Theoret. Informatics Appl. 37 (2003) 315­336 DOI: 10 as the extension operation (the free monad induced by the functor H). Moss [17] and Aczel, Ad´amek, Milius trees. This work was supported by the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology un- der grant No

  13. Undergraduate CS Programs with Informatics

    E-print Network

    Kay, David G.

    Extending Undergraduate CS Programs with Informatics: Emphasizingsoftwareandsystemdesignincontext David G. Kay, André van der Hoek, Debra J. Richardson Department of Informatics Donald Bren School Project HCI 104 105 SE 121 102, 122, 123 125, 127 Social Impact 131 132, 134 135 PL/Systems 141, 142, 143

  14. Using Robots as Teaching Aids in Early Secondary In formatics Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernhard Wiesner; Torsten Brinda

    In secondary informatics education methods for teaching the basic ideas of informat- ics have changed in recent years. Because programming in high-level languages is no longer focussed, there is a need for tools that can be used as applications to demonstrate some of the basic concepts of informatics. Educational robotic systems not only meet these requirements, they also proofed to

  15. Health informatics: linking investment to value.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Lorenzi, N M

    1999-01-01

    Informatics and information technology do not appear to be valued by the health industry to the degree that they are in other industries. The agenda for health informatics should be presented so that value to the health system is linked directly to required investment. The agenda should acknowledge the foundation provided by the current health system and the role of financial issues, system impediments, policy, and knowledge in effecting change. The desired outcomes should be compelling, such as improved public health, improved quality as perceived by consumers, and lower costs. Strategies to achieve these outcomes should derive from the differentia of health, opportunities to leverage other efforts, and lessons from successes inside and outside the health industry. Examples might include using logistics to improve quality, mass customization to adapt to individual values, and system thinking to change the game to one that can be won. The justification for the informatics infrastructure of a virtual health care data bank, a national health care knowledge base, and a personal clinical health record flows naturally from these strategies. PMID:10495093

  16. Informatics applied to cytology

    PubMed Central

    Hornish, Maryanne; Goulart, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Automation and emerging information technologies are being adopted by cytology laboratories to augment Pap test screening and improve diagnostic accuracy. As a result, informatics, the application of computers and information systems to information management, has become essential for the successful operation of the cytopathology laboratory. This review describes how laboratory information management systems can be used to achieve an automated and seamless workflow process. The utilization of software, electronic databases and spreadsheets to perform necessary quality control measures are discussed, as well as a Lean production system and Six Sigma approach, to reduce errors in the cytopathology laboratory. PMID:19495402

  17. NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ?

    E-print Network

    Senes, Alessandro

    NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ? Dental informatics is a sub-discipline of biomedical informatics which focuses on the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education and management. ORAL HEALTH INFORMATICS

  18. 94 COLLEGE OF COMPUTING & INFORMATICS Computing and

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    94 COLLEGE OF COMPUTING & INFORMATICS College of Computing and Informatics cci.uncc.edu Dean: Dr The University of North Carolina at Charlotte's College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) is part of a dynamic and the University. It was renamed the College of Computing and Informatics in 2006 in an effort to reflect

  19. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Programme name MSc Health Informatics

    E-print Network

    Weyde, Tillman

    and undertake research in health informatics. Use computers and models to develop knowledge-based systems of the influences of information and communication technology standards in the context of clinical and heath systems classification, and how there concepts may realised in computerised health systems. Transform complex health

  20. Medical Informatics in Croatia – a Historical Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

    2014-01-01

    A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

  1. Center for Data and Search Informatics School of Informatics Indiana University

    E-print Network

    Plale, Beth

    Center for Data and Search Informatics School of Informatics Indiana University Research a population that must balance rich information, energy conservation, and bandwidth utilization (scale of Informatics is uniquely po

  2. The effects of an undergraduate nursing informatics curriculum on students' knowledge and attitudes.

    PubMed Central

    Travis, L. L.; Youngblut, J.; Brennan, P. F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the fourth stage of a process to design, implement and evaluate the nursing informatics courses incorporated into a baccalaureate nursing program. The challenge is to structure the nursing informatics curriculum so as to provide the nursing professional with the basis with which to impact health care delivery. The basic components of the framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. Students in the fourth course worked closely with agency personnel to design, implement and evaluate clinical application projects. PMID:7949960

  3. Business, Economics & Informatics

    E-print Network

    Crawford, Ian

    and Communication College Secretary Registry Services External Relations Finance Planning & Business Systems Estates and Facilities Human Resources Vice Master IT Services Pro Vice Masters Learning and Teaching Research Academic Partnerships Enterprise and innovation Strategic Engagement and Recruitment Postgraduate Study International

  4. Evidence-based supervision: Tracking outcome and teaching principles of change in clinical supervision to bring science to integrative practice.

    PubMed

    Holt, Hannah; Beutler, Larry E; Kimpara, Satoko; Macias, Sandra; Haug, Nancy A; Shiloff, Nicole; Goldblum, Peter; Temkin, Rainey Sealey; Stein, Mickey

    2015-06-01

    Supervision is the primary way in which psychotherapy trainees develop the skills of applying interventions, conceptualizing cases, and practicing self-reflection. Although critical to professional development, the nature and objectives of supervision can vary widely among supervisors, depending on idiosyncratic differences and the orientation used. As clinical psychology moves toward integrating science and practice, the need to teach students evidence-based principles of therapeutic change and how to use outcome measures to enhance progress is paramount. Furthermore, with hundreds of "evidence-based" interventions and widely diverse supervisors, the fact that cross-cutting interventions and common factors carry the burden of most therapeutic change is frequently lost. In this article, we outline an experimental training system that is being tested as a means to teach student-therapists to use empirically established moderators (treatment factors) and mediators of change to tailor their interventions to client differences. This experimental approach is derived from Systematic Treatment Selection (Beutler, Clarkin, & Bongar, 2000), a cross-cutting system that can be used to aid individualized treatment planning as well as to track and use client outcomes in clinical supervision within a graduate-level training clinic. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25985042

  5. Medical informatics vocabulary.

    PubMed

    Rada, R; Russell, J

    1993-01-01

    In order that medical informaticians can create Open Systems for health care, they need to have a common language. Efforts in the 1980s at the National Library of Medicine to create a Medical Informatics Vocabulary (MIVoc) have been useful for document indexing purposes, but need to be continued and extended. The Committee of European Normalization Technical Committee 251 has created a project team for MIVoc, and that team has used both automatic and manual methods and referenced many sources in producing a vocabulary that has support from numerous experts in Europe. MIVoc has both a glossary and a tree structure. The glossary has about 250 terms with detailed definitions that include various explanations and pointers. One critical pointer is the semantic link to other terms in MIVoc from a which a tree-structure is inferred. The success of MIVoc clearly depends on its being used, which in the long run depends also on the vocabulary being maintained. PMID:10163824

  6. PlanAlyzer, an Interactive Computer-Assisted Program to Teach Clinical Problem-Solving in Diagnosing Anemia and Coronary Artery Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Harold C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The computer-based PlanAlyzer program was designed to teach clinical diagnosis to medical students, taking into account several characteristics common to the clinical problem solver: limited capacity for short-term memory; use of heuristic strategies; sequential information seeking; and problem conceptualization. Six years of development and…

  7. Spreading Informatics in Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Zoltan; Kis-Toth, Lajos

    1995-01-01

    Examines developments in information dissemination and educational technology. Highlights include telecommunications, audiovisual media and programmed education, pedagogical technology, advantages of computer-based learning, instructional materials, applied informatics, teacher training, and future perspectives. (AEF)

  8. English language proficiency and the accommodations for language non-concordance amongst patients utilizing chiropractic college teaching clinics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of households in the United States that are not proficient in the English language is growing and presenting a challenge to the health care system. Over nineteen percent of the US population speak a language other than English in the home. This increase in language discordance generates a greater need to find and implement accommodations in the clinical setting to insure accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment as well as provide for patient safety. Aim: The purpose of this study is to determine the percentage of patients accessing the chiropractic college teaching clinics who are not proficient in the English language and to what extent the colleges provide accommodations for that language disparity. Methods The clinic directors and deans of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges were surveyed via an on-line survey engine. The survey queried the percentage of the patient population that is not English language proficient, the accommodations the college currently has in place, if the college has a language specific consent to treat document and if the college has a written policy concerning patients without English proficiency. Results Fifty percent of the contacted chiropractic colleges responded to the survey. In the respondent college clinics 16.5% of the patient population is not proficient in English, with over 75% speaking Spanish. All but one of the respondents provide some level of accommodation for the language non-concordance. Forty five percent of the responding colleges employ a language specific consent to treat form. The implementation of accommodations and the use of a language specific consent to treat form is more prevalent at colleges with a higher percentage of non-English speaking patients. Conclusions The percentage of patients with limited English proficiency accessing services at the teaching clinics of the chiropractic colleges mirrors the numbers in the general population. There is a wide disparity in the accommodations that the individual colleges make to address this language discordance. There is a need to further develop accurate and meaningful accommodations to address language disparity in the chiropractic teaching clinics. PMID:23369245

  9. Informatics Systems and Modelling Case Studies of Expert Interviews

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Informatics Systems and Modelling ­ Case Studies of Expert Interviews Leopold Lehner1, Johannes interviews were conducted in order to identify relevant compe- tencies empirically concerning informatics conducted with different expert groups (experts of informatics, experts of didac- tics of informatics

  10. The School of Informatics and Computing 2013 Summer Camp

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    The School of Informatics and Computing 2013 Summer Camp June 16, School of Informatics and Computing, 919 E. Tenth Street, Informatics East, Room _________________ Please attach a 100 word essay describing your interests in the Informatics

  11. Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

  12. Multimodality monitoring: informatics, integration data display and analysis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J Michael; De Georgia, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The goal of multimodality neuromonitoring is to provide continuous, real-time assessment of brain physiology to prevent, detect, and attenuate secondary brain injury. Clinical informatics deals with biomedical data, information, and knowledge including their acquisition, storage, retrieval, and optimal use for clinical decision-making. An electronic literature search was conducted for English language articles describing the use of informatics in the intensive care unit setting from January 1990 to August 2013. A total of 64 studies were included in this review. Clinical informatics infrastructure should be adopted that enables a wide range of linear and nonlinear analytical methods be applied to patient data. Specific time epochs of clinical interest should be reviewable. Analysis strategies of monitor alarms may help address alarm fatigue. Ergonomic data display that present results from analyses with clinical information in a sensible uncomplicated manner improve clinical decision-making. Collecting and archiving the highest resolution physiologic and phenotypic data in a comprehensive open format data warehouse is a crucial first step toward information management and two-way translational research for multimodality monitoring. The infrastructure required is largely the same as that needed for telemedicine intensive care applications, which under the right circumstances improves care quality while reducing cost. PMID:25208675

  13. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Egbe, Chinyere Nnenne; Fiebai, Bassey; Awoyesuku, Elizabeth Akon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. Exclusion criteria included medical charts with incomplete data. Data was analyzed using Epi-info Version 6.04D. Statistical significance was indicated by P < 0.05. Results: Twenty-four patients had cranial nerve palsies. There were 11 males and 13 females with a mean age of 34.50 ± 18.41 years. Four patients (26.6%) had exotropia while three patients (20%) had esotropia. Complete ophthalmoplegia was noted in two patients (13.3%). The 3rd and 6th cranial nerves were affected in seven patients each (29.2%) and five patients (20.8%) had 7th cranial nerve palsy. Approximately 38% of patients with cranial nerve palsies had systemic disorders (16.7% systemic hypertension; 12.5% DM). The relationship between cranial nerve palsy and systemic disorder was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6th cranial nerve palsy. PMID:24791110

  14. Reading Clinic: Use Brand-Name Products to Teach Basic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Presents phonic activities based on brand names for teaching primary students basic reading. The first uses familiar brand-name products with rhyming elements in their names. The second has teachers write longer words that rhyme with and have similar spelling patterns to product names. Both activities help students use patterns in familiar words…

  15. Graphical and Normative Analysis of Binocular Vision by Mini Computer: A Teaching Aid and Clinical Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kees, Martin; Schor, Clifton

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive computer graphics systems (Commodore PET), used as a video aid for teaching students advanced case analysis, is described. The course provides students with the analytical tools for evaluating with graphical and statistical techniques and treating with lenses, prisms, and orthoptics various anomalies of binocular vision. (MLW)

  16. Subarachnoid block with Taylor's approach for surgery of lower half of the body and lower limbs: A clinical teaching study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Rastogi, Bhawna; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Avinash; Jain, Manish; Singh, V. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid anesthesia is used as the sole anesthetic technique for below umbilical surgeries, but patients with deformed spine represent technical difficulty for its establishment. This study was aimed to find out whether training of Taylor's approach to residents on normal spine is beneficial for establishing subarachnoid block in patients with deformed spine. Materials and Methods: The total of 174 patients of ASA I-III with normal and deformed spine of both genders scheduled for below umbilical surgeries under the subarachnoid block and met the inclusion criteria, were enrolled for this two-phased clinical teaching study. All participating residents have performed more than 100 subarachnoid block with the median and paramedian approach. Residents were randomized into two equal groups. During the first phase program, Group I was taught Taylor's approach by hands on method for the subarachnoid block while Group II kept on observation for the technique. During the second phase of program, Group II was also taught Taylor's approach for establishing the subarachnoid block. Block success was defined according to clinical efficacy. Results: The results of teaching of Taylor's approach were encouraging. Initially, the residents faced difficulty for establishing the subarachnoid block in deformed spine but after learning by observation and practical hands on, both groups had successfully performed the subarachnoid block by Taylor's approach in one or more attempts in patient with deformed spine with the acceptable failure rate of 15%. Conclusion: Taylor's approach for establishing subarachnoid block in deformed spine should be taught to residents on normal spine. PMID:25885500

  17. How to encourage intrinsic motivation in the clinical teaching environment?: a systematic review from the self-determination theory

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Internalization of students’ motivation towards an intrinsic form is associated with increased interest, commitment, learning, and satisfaction with education. Self-Determination theory postulates that intrinsic motivation and autonomous forms of self-regulation are the desired type of motivation; as they have been associated with deep learning, better performance and well-being. It claims three basic psychological needs have to be satisfied in order to achieve intrinsic motivation. These are the needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness. This study aims to provide a review on how these basic psychological needs are encouraged in undergraduate students so they can be transferred to the clinical teaching environment. Methods: Electronic searches were performed across four databases (Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and ERIC), relevant journals, and retrieved bibliography of selected articles. In total, searches produced 4,869 references, from which 16 studies met the inclusion criteria. Results: Main themes were coded in three categories: The support of autonomy, competence and relatedness. The research-based evidence appears to be of reasonable quality, and indicates that teachers should work to satisfy students’ basic psychological needs to foster internalization of self-regulation. Our findings suggest that teachers should interact with students in a more ‘human centred’ teaching style, as these actions predict motivational internalization. Several themes emerged from different contexts and further investigation should expand them. Conclusion: This review identified actions that clinical teachers could implement in their daily work to support students’ self-determination. Autonomy supportive teaching in health professions educations would benefit students and may actually result in more effective health care delivery. PMID:25855386

  18. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Elie A; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Rosenthal, Thomas; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schünemann, Holger J

    2009-01-01

    Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%), 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%). The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76%) and journal clubs (64%). Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%), although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54%) while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%). Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence. PMID:19772570

  19. Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Open Rank Tenure Track Faculty Position in Health Informatics The Indiana University School of Informatics (SoI) at Indiana University Purdue University. For information on the Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI, please see http

  20. 134 | College of Computing and Informatics 2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Computing and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    134 | College of Computing and Informatics 2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Computing and Informatics #12;2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Computing and Informatics | 135 College of Computing and Informatics http://cci.uncc.edu The University of North Carolina

  1. Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics 2013 Handbook Page 1 Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics ­ 2013 Handbook Page 1 Doctor of Philosophy in Informatics 2013 Handbook Indiana University established the School of Informatics and Computing as a place of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program in Informatics beginning in the fall of 2005 and offered on the Bloomington

  2. INFORMATICS CORE The Research Informatics Core (RIC) is funded by the Health Center Research

    E-print Network

    Kim, Duck O.

    RESEARCH INFORMATICS CORE Who We Are The Research Informatics Core (RIC) is funded by the Health Center Research Advisory Council (HCRAC) and provides informatics (computer hardware, software, data and software technical support Consultation services on data management, data sharing plan, and informatics

  3. Preparing clinical preceptors to teach master's-level students in oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, G A; Ferszt, G G; Jacobs, L A; McCorkle, R

    1992-01-01

    This article reports the development of a structured program for clinical nurse specialists who served as clinical preceptors for graduate students in an oncology nursing program. A needs assessment of clinical preceptors was completed, and a program for the preceptors was developed based on the learning needs identified. In addition to the program, a Manual for Clinical Preceptors was developed. The benefits of this program include networking; positive working relationships among the preceptors, faculty, and students; potential job opportunities for students; potential applicants from the clinical agencies; and, ultimately, improved care for patients with cancer and their families. The authors conclude that administrators should support efforts to nurture and recognize the personnel in the clinical agencies. PMID:1401567

  4. The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) informatics platform

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Gerry; McKenna, Kevin; Mays, Vickie; Carpenter, Alan; Miller, Kevin; Williams, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative network of 27 epilepsy centers throughout the U.S., Australia, and Argentina, with the objective of collecting detailed phenotypic and genetic data on a large number of epilepsy participants. The goals of EPGP are (1) to perform detailed phenotyping on 3750 participants with specific forms of non-acquired epilepsy and 1500 parents without epilepsy, (2) to obtain DNA samples on these individuals, and (3) to ultimately genotype the samples in order to discover novel genes that cause epilepsy. To carry out the project, a reliable and robust informatics platform was needed for standardized electronic data collection and storage, data quality review, and phenotypic analysis involving cases from multiple sites. Methods EPGP developed its own suite of web-based informatics applications for participant tracking, electronic data collection (using electronic case report forms/surveys), data management, phenotypic data review and validation, specimen tracking, electroencephalograph and neuroimaging storage, and issue tracking. We implemented procedures to train and support end-users at each clinical site. Results Thus far, 3780 study participants have been enrolled and 20,957 web-based study activities have been completed using this informatics platform. Over 95% of respondents to an end-user satisfaction survey felt that the informatics platform was successful almost always or most of the time. Conclusions The EPGP informatics platform has successfully and effectively allowed study management and efficient and reliable collection of phenotypic data. Our novel informatics platform met the requirements of a large, multicenter research project. The platform has had a high level of end-user acceptance by principal investigators and study coordinators, and can serve as a model for new tools to support future large scale, collaborative research projects collecting extensive phenotypic data. PMID:22579394

  5. [Two years' experience teaching medical ethics in a hospital clinic course].

    PubMed

    Mantz, J M; Bastian, B

    1991-11-01

    Ethics problems arise from conflict of values: a physician has to take charge of his patients, but advances of sciences and technics make such conflicts more and more frequent. Their solution cannot be left to a mere improvization. Medical ethics have to be taught. In Strasbourg, we have elected to teach compulsory medical ethics in the course of compulsory hospital training, for five mornings running, to groups of ten fifth-year medical students, the place being different each day. Fifteen departments including five specialties, internal medicine, intensive care, pediatrics, gynecology-obstetrics, geriatrics, are involved in this experience. The training takes place near the patient bed in the presence of a medical teacher. Communication and multi-disciplinarity are the characteristics. The teaching is done with the purpose of bringing about reflection in the students, of proposing methods for the discovering and the approach of ethics problems, of leading the students up to the enlightenment of their own scale of evaluation. A few previous lectures about history of ethics through different philosophical systems, about social, economical and cultural implications, are given for basic formation of the students. This teaching experience interests students and teachers greatly. The first ones have the opportunity to perceive a new dimension of medical responsibility, the second ones appreciate this form of recovered fellowship. PMID:1809494

  6. INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, IUPUI #12;INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL of the university and campus faculties.* *Constitution of the Indiana University Faculty, Article 2, Section 2.4(A

  7. Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics Undergraduate Degree Programmes Entry 2015 www.cs.cardiff.ac.uk #12;World leading research Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics "One of the best Contents The Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics offers a range of flexible and diverse degree

  8. Medical Informatics: Searching for Underlying Components

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Musen

    2002-01-01

    abstractions also are attractive for defining the core contributions of basic research in informatics We can understand many central activities within informatics in terms defining, refining, applying, and evaluating domain ontologies and problem - solving methods Conclusion: Construing work in medical informatics in terms of actions involving ontologies and problem - solving methods may move us closer to a theoretical

  9. Informatics olympiads: Approaching mathematics through code

    E-print Network

    Burton, Benjamin

    Informatics olympiads: Approaching mathematics through code Benjamin A. Burton Author's self we introduce its cousin in computer science, the International Olympiad in Informatics (IOI). The International Olympiad in Informatics is one of the newer Science Olympiads, beginning in 1989 in Bulgaria under

  10. Department of Computer Science college of informatics

    E-print Network

    Boyce, Richard L.

    Data Science Department of Computer Science college of informatics datascience.nku.edu www.nku.edu NKU College of Informatics offers a Bachelor's of Science degree in Data Science with two informatics, and communication to innovate and create. ·Understand the business, scientific, technological

  11. A systematic view on medical informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Hasman; R. Haux; A. Albert

    1996-01-01

    Medical informatics is defined as the scientific discipline concerned with the systematic processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care. The domain of medical informatics (including health informatics), its aim, methods and tools, and its relevance to other disciplines in medicine and health sciences are outlined. It is recognized that one of the major tasks of medical

  12. THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS, INFORMATICS & MECHANICS

    E-print Network

    Bechler, Pawel

    THE FACULTY OF MATHEMATICS, INFORMATICS & MECHANICS (University of Warsaw) #12;RESEARCH OVERVIEW The Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics (MIM), with 192 faculty members and researchers and theoretical computer science, to applied research in applied mathematics and applied areas of informatics

  13. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum,

    E-print Network

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum, Central Area, A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES, Address Informatics Forum. University Of Edinburgh. 10 Crichton Street. Edinburgh. E,H,8, 9,A,B. Telephone. 0,1,3,1, 6,5,1, 5,6,6,1, Map Link. http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/?building=informatics-forum #12;Page 1

  14. MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY Authors: Bansard J.Y (1,2), Rebholz, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, U.K. 4 Erasmus University Medical Center, Dept of Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical #12;Abstract This paper reports on an analysis of the bioinformatics and medical informatics

  15. KAYA Nobuyuki Lawrence Wong System Informatics

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    KAYA Nobuyuki Lawrence Wong System Informatics The Graduate School of System Informatics (which) was established on April 1, 2010. System Informatics strives to contribute to the development, processing organisms, social activities, artificial products, space, and The Master's program is geared toward

  16. INFORMATICS Undergraduate Induction Programme 2013 Welcome Weekend

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    will be told which room to meet in at Subject Introduction) 16.30-18.00 Informatics Social Event ResidentialINFORMATICS Undergraduate Induction Programme 2013 Welcome Weekend Saturday 14 th September Repeated Repeated Repeated Repeated 12:00-14:00 ­ Engineering & Informatics School Welcome 14.00pm ­ 14

  17. From Findings to Theories: Institutionalizing Social Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Sawyer; Andrea Tapia

    2007-01-01

    We focus here on the history, status and future of social informatics. In doing this we build on the visionary work of the late Rob Kling. Social informatics research contributes insights and perspectives to the study of computing in our society that other approaches do not. We make the case that social informatics is on its way to becoming a

  18. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology

    PubMed Central

    Swedlow, Jason R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multi-dimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition are reportedly frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remains largely unsolved. Like the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solution. PMID:19416072

  19. Welcome! ...from all the staff in the Department of Informatics Welcome to the Department of Informatics, to the School of Engineering and Informatics, and to

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    Welcome! ...from all the staff in the Department of Informatics Welcome to the Department of Informatics, to the School of Engineering and Informatics, and to the University of Sussex. Informatics runs Informatics. Choosing a degree subject and a place to study are important decisions, and we are pleased

  20. Clinical audit teaching in record-keeping for dental undergraduates at International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jun A; Chew, Jamie K Y; Ravindranath, Sneha; Pau, Allan

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the impact of clinical audit training on record-keeping behavior of dental students and students' perceptions of the clinical audit training. The training was delivered to Year 4 and Year 5 undergraduates at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It included a practical audit exercise on patient records. The results were presented by the undergraduates, and guidelines were framed from the recommendations proposed. Following this, an audit of Year 4 and Year 5 students' patient records before and after the audit training was carried out. A total of 100 records were audited against a predetermined set of criteria by two examiners. An email survey of the students was also conducted to explore their views of the audit training. Results showed statistically significant improvements in record-keeping following audit training. Responses to the email survey were analyzed qualitatively. Respondents reported that the audit training helped them to identify deficiencies in their record-keeping practice, increased their knowledge in record-keeping, and improved their record-keeping skills. Improvements in clinical audit teaching were also proposed. PMID:24489028

  1. Profile of patients seen at a psychosexual clinic in a gynaecological teaching hospital--the Singapore experience.

    PubMed

    Yeong, C T; Atputharajah, V

    1999-03-01

    Ignorance is not bliss when it comes to sexuality. Psychosexual problems lead to shame, fumbling, needless fears, low-self esteem and even subfertility. The demands for help appears to be increasing; as the general population become more aware of its presence and the treatment options available through the mass media and better health education. Sex therapy has traditionally been the realm of the psychiatrist but with the gynaecologist as the first contact for most women, the number of women seeking advice directly from their doctors will only increase with time. A total of 243 new cases of sexual dysfunction were treated at the sexual problem clinic in Kandang Kerbau Hospital between January 1994 and November 1996; majority of which were self-referrals (48.5%). The patient pool consisted of more males than females although the clinical setting is in an obstetrics and gynaecology teaching institute. Vaginismus and erectile problems constituted the main complaints. Erectile problems are more common in the patients above 40 years old (p < 0.001). We report here our experience of such a sexual problem clinic and hope to provide insight into this area of medicine from the perspective of a practising gynaecologist. PMID:10972009

  2. Cognitive Informatics and Denotational Mathematical Means for Brain Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive informatics studies the natural intelligence and the brain from a theoretical and a computational approach, which rigorously explains the mechanisms of the brain by a fundamental theory known as abstract intelligence, and formally models the brain by contemporary denotational mathematics. This paper, as an extended summary of the invited keynote presented in AMT-BI 2010, describes the interplay of cognitive

  3. Patience, Persistence and Pragmatism: Experiences and Lessons Learnt from the Implementation of Clinically Integrated Teaching and Learning of Evidence-Based Health Care – A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Young, Taryn; Rohwer, Anke; van Schalkwyk, Susan; Volmink, Jimmy; Clarke, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinically integrated teaching and learning are regarded as the best options for improving evidence-based healthcare (EBHC) knowledge, skills and attitudes. To inform implementation of such strategies, we assessed experiences and opinions on lessons learnt of those involved in such programmes. Methods and Findings We conducted semi-structured interviews with 24 EBHC programme coordinators from around the world, selected through purposive sampling. Following data transcription, a multidisciplinary group of investigators carried out analysis and data interpretation, using thematic content analysis. Successful implementation of clinically integrated teaching and learning of EBHC takes much time. Student learning needs to start in pre-clinical years with consolidation, application and assessment following in clinical years. Learning is supported through partnerships between various types of staff including the core EBHC team, clinical lecturers and clinicians working in the clinical setting. While full integration of EBHC learning into all clinical rotations is considered necessary, this was not always achieved. Critical success factors were pragmatism and readiness to use opportunities for engagement and including EBHC learning in the curriculum; patience; and a critical mass of the right teachers who have EBHC knowledge and skills and are confident in facilitating learning. Role modelling of EBHC within the clinical setting emerged as an important facilitator. The institutional context exerts an important influence; with faculty buy-in, endorsement by institutional leaders, and an EBHC-friendly culture, together with a supportive community of practice, all acting as key enablers. The most common challenges identified were lack of teaching time within the clinical curriculum, misconceptions about EBHC, resistance of staff, lack of confidence of tutors, lack of time, and negative role modelling. Conclusions Implementing clinically integrated EBHC curricula requires institutional support, a critical mass of the right teachers and role models in the clinical setting combined with patience, persistence and pragmatism on the part of teachers. PMID:26110641

  4. Emerging medical informatics research trends detection based on MeSH terms.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Peng-Hui; Yao, Qiang; Mao, Jin; Zhang, Shi-Jing

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the research trends of medical informatics over the last 12 years. A new method based on MeSH terms was proposed to identify emerging topics and trends of medical informatics research. Informetric methods and visualization technologies were applied to investigate research trends of medical informatics. The metric of perspective factor (PF) embedding MeSH terms was appropriately employed to assess the perspective quality for journals. The emerging MeSH terms have changed dramatically over the last 12 years, identifying two stages of medical informatics: the "medical imaging stage" and the "medical informatics stage". The focus of medical informatics has shifted from acquisition and storage of healthcare data by integrating computational, informational, cognitive and organizational sciences to semantic analysis for problem solving and clinical decision-making. About 30 core journals were determined by Bradford's Law in the last 3 years in this area. These journals, with high PF values, have relative high perspective quality and lead the trend of medical informatics. PMID:25188551

  5. A stimulus to define informatics and health information technology

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the growing interest by leaders, policy makers, and others, the terminology of health information technology as well as biomedical and health informatics is poorly understood and not even agreed upon by academics and professionals in the field. Discussion The paper, presented as a Debate to encourage further discussion and disagreement, provides definitions of the major terminology used in biomedical and health informatics and health information technology. For informatics, it focuses on the words that modify the term as well as individuals who practice the discipline. Other categories of related terms are covered as well, from the associated disciplines of computer science, information technolog and health information management to the major application categories of applications used. The discussion closes with a classification of individuals who work in the largest segment of the field, namely clinical informatics. Summary The goal of presenting in Debate format is to provide a starting point for discussion to reach a documented consensus on the definition and use of these terms. PMID:19445665

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Simulation-Based Teaching versus Traditional Instruction in Medicine: A Pilot Study among Clinical Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James A.; Shaffer, David W.; Raemer, Daniel B.; Pawlowski, John; Hurford, William E.; Cooper, Jeffrey B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare simulator-based teaching with traditional instruction among clinical medical students. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with written pre-post testing. Third-year medical students (n = 38) received either a myocardial infarction (MI) simulation followed by a reactive airways disease (RAD) lecture, or a RAD simulation…

  7. Graph kernels for chemical informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liva Ralaivola; Sanjay Joshua Swamidass; Hiroto Saigo; Pierre Baldi

    2005-01-01

    Increased availability of large repositories of chemical compounds is creating new challenges and opportunities for the application of machine learning methods to problems in computational chemistry and chemical informatics. Because chemical compounds are often represented by the graph of their covalent bonds, machine learning methods in this domain must be capable of processing graphical structures with variable size. Here we

  8. Towards informatic analysis of Syslogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Stearley

    2004-01-01

    The complexity and cost of isolating the root cause of system problems in large parallel computers generally scales with the size of the system. Syslog messages provide a primary source of system feedback, but manual review is tedious and error prone. Informatic analysis can be used to detect subtle anomalies in the syslog message stream, thereby increasing the availability of

  9. The dental informatics online community.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Jeannie; Schleyer, Titus; Spallek, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. To support the growth of this emerging discipline, we created the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The DIOC provides a dedicated professional home for DI researchers and serves as an open, common, and worldwide forum for all individuals interested in the field. It was created and is maintained by the Center for Dental Informatics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, independent from any professional association, corporate interest or funding source. The DIOC's Website provides many useful features, such as a learning center, publication archive, member and project directories, and the Current Awareness Service (CAS). The CAS automatically notifies members about new information added to the Community. Notifications are individualized according to a member's profile and activities on the site. The DIOC is a research-oriented online community which provides resources in the dental informatics and dental technology field, as well as a way to establish social connections to share ideas, problems and research opportunities. Member and activity growth since the community's inception in 2005 have been steady, but future sustainability of the community depends on many factors. PMID:21364841

  10. Informatics, evidence-based care, and research; implications for national policy: a report of an American Medical Informatics Association health policy conference

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased level of activity in the biomedical and health informatics world (e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records) that, in the near future, will yield a wealth of available data that we can exploit meaningfully to strengthen knowledge building and evidence creation, and ultimately improve clinical and preventive care. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2008 Health Policy Conference was convened to focus and propel discussions about informatics-enabled evidence-based care, clinical research, and knowledge management. Conference participants explored the potential of informatics tools and technologies to improve the evidence base on which providers and patients can draw to diagnose and treat health problems. The paper presents a model of an evidence continuum that is dynamic, collaborative, and powered by health informatics technologies. The conference's findings are described, and recommendations on terminology harmonization, facilitation of the evidence continuum in a “wired” world, development and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines and other knowledge support strategies, and the role of diverse stakeholders in the generation and adoption of evidence are presented. PMID:20190052

  11. The First Clinical Skill: Students Teach Students to Take Vital Signs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Gregg Dwyer; Linda A. Deloney; Mary J. Cantrell; C. James Graham

    2002-01-01

    Transition from the role of passive student to medical practitioner begins with learning the first clinical skill. This transition can be stressful for those experiencing it and to some extent by those coordinating it. Logistically, it requires demonstration of thc techniques to the entire class by a single practitioner or to smaller groups of students by multiple practitioners. The fonner

  12. Teaching reflective practice in practice settings: students' perceptions of their clinical educators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franziska Trede; Megan Smith

    2012-01-01

    Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice potential not being realised. This study explored final year physiotherapy students' perceptions of clinical educators as

  13. A Comprehensive, Simulation-Based Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: The Medical Students’ Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Leigh V.; Crimmins, Ashley C.; Bonz, James W.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D.; Dodge, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

  14. A New Conceptual Approach to Teaching the Interpretation of Clinical Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Shai

    2004-01-01

    Courses in clinical epidemiology usually include acquainting students with a single 2X2 table. All diagnostic test characteristics are explained using this table. This pedagogic approach may be misleading. A new didactic approach is hereby proposed, using two tables, each with specific analogous notations (uppercase and lowercase) and derived…

  15. A comprehensive, simulation-based approach to teaching clinical skills: the medical students' perspective.

    PubMed

    Evans, Leigh V; Crimmins, Ashley C; Bonz, James W; Gusberg, Richard J; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D; Dodge, Kelly L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

  16. Sharing the Diagnostic Process in the Clinical Teaching Environment: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuello-Garcia; Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Revealing or visualizing the thinking involved in making clinical decisions is a challenge. A case study is presented with a visual implement for sharing the diagnostic process. This technique adapts the Bayesian approach to the case presentation. Pretest probabilities and likelihood ratios are gathered to obtain post-test probabilities of every…

  17. Outbreak!: Teaching Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology Methodologies with an Interactive Online Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sherri; Smith, Geoffrey Battle

    2004-01-01

    Outbreak! is an online, interactive educational game that helps students and teachers learn and evaluate clinical microbiology skills. When the game was used in introductory microbiology laboratories, qualitative evaluation by students showed very positive responses and increased learning. Outbreak! allows students to design diagnostic tests and…

  18. Teaching Advanced Psychopathology: A Method that Promotes Basic Undergraduate Clinical and Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balsis, Steve; Eaton, Nicholas R.; Zona, Denise Martin; Oltmanns, Thomas F.

    2006-01-01

    Students in advanced psychopathology courses can learn key concepts by administering semistructured interviews designed to identify specific mental disorders. Such an active learning approach potentially can help students gain fundamental knowledge about psychopathology and begin to develop clinical and research skills. To explore the value of…

  19. Informing web-based communication curricula in veterinary education: a systematic review of web-based methods used for teaching and assessing clinical communication in medical education.

    PubMed

    Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Toews, Lorraine; Violato, Claudio; Coe, Jason B

    2014-01-01

    We determined the Web-based configurations that are applied to teach medical and veterinary communication skills, evaluated their effectiveness, and suggested future educational directions for Web-based communication teaching in veterinary education. We performed a systematic search of CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ERIC limited to articles published in English between 2000 and 2012. The review focused on medical or veterinary undergraduate to clinical- or residency-level students. We selected studies for which the study population was randomized to the Web-based learning (WBL) intervention with a post-test comparison with another WBL or non-WBL method and that reported at least one empirical outcome. Two independent reviewers completed relevancy screening, data extraction, and synthesis of results using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's framework. The search retrieved 1,583 articles, and 10 met the final inclusion criteria. We identified no published articles on Web based communication platforms in veterinary medicine; however, publications summarized from human medicine demonstrated that WBL provides a potentially reliable and valid approach for teaching and assessing communication skills. Student feedback on the use of virtual patients for teaching clinical communication skills has been positive,though evidence has suggested that practice with virtual patients prompted lower relation-building responses.Empirical outcomes indicate that WBL is a viable method for expanding the approach to teaching history taking and possibly to additional tasks of the veterinary medical interview. PMID:24418922

  20. Sexually transmitted diseases in northern Nigeria. Five years' experience in a university teaching hospital clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Bello, C S; Elegba, O Y; Dada, J D

    1983-01-01

    Between 1977 and 1981, 3089 patients attended the sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic in Zaria, northern Nigeria. The male-to-female ratio of attenders was 6:1. Postpubertal gonorrhoea accounted for 28.1% of cases, non-specific genital infections for 22.4%, and syphilis for 1.2%. Illiteracy, polygamy, the purdah system, widespread prostitution, and inadequate facilities are factors aiding the spread of these diseases in northern Nigeria. PMID:6687822

  1. Five-year experience of clinical ethics consultations in a pediatric teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Streuli, Jürg C; Staubli, Georg; Pfändler-Poletti, Marlis; Baumann-Hölzle, Ruth; Ersch, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    Our retrospective study presents and evaluates clinical ethics consultations (CECs) in pediatrics as a structure for implementing hospital-wide ethics. We performed a descriptive and statistical analysis of clinical ethics decision making and its implementation in pediatric CECs at Zurich University Children's Hospital. Ninety-five CECs were held over 5 years for 80 patients. The care team reached a consensus treatment recommendation after one session in 75 consultations (89 %) and on 82 of 84 ethical issues (98 %) after two or more sessions (11 repeats). Fifty-seven CECs recommended limited treatment and 23 maximal treatment. Team recommendations were agreed outright by parents and/or patient in 59 of 73 consultations (81 %). Initial dissensus yielded to explanatory discussion or repeat CEC in seven consultations (10 %). In a further seven families (10 %), no solution was found within the CEC framework: five (7 %) required involvement of the child protection service, and in two families, the parents took their child elsewhere. Eventual team-parent/patient consensus was reached in 66 of 73 families (90 %) with documented parental/patient decisions (missing data, n?=?11). Patient preference was assessable in ten CECs. Patient autonomy was part of the ethical dilemma in only three CECs. The Zurich clinical ethics structure produced a 98 % intra-team consensus rate in 95 CECs and reduced initial team-parent dissensus from 21 to 10 %. Success depends closely on a standardized CEC protocol and an underlying institutional clinical ethics framework embodying a comprehensive set of transparently articulated values and opinions, with regular evaluation of decisions and their consequences for care teams and families. PMID:24323344

  2. Biomedical Informatics Applications for Asthma Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, David L.; Aronsky, Dominik

    2006-01-01

    Asthma is a common condition associated with significant patient morbidity and health care costs. Although widely accepted evidence-based guidelines for asthma management exist, unnecessary variation in patient care remains. Application of biomedical informatics techniques is one potential way to improve care for asthmatic patients. We performed a systematic literature review to identify computerized applications for clinical asthma care. Studies were evaluated for their clinical domain, developmental stage and study design. Additionally, prospective trials were identified and analyzed for potential study biases, study effects, and clinical study characteristics. Sixty-four papers were selected for review. Publications described asthma detection or diagnosis (18 papers), asthma monitoring or prevention (13 papers), patient education (13 papers), and asthma guidelines or therapy (20 papers). The majority of publications described projects in early stages of development or with non-prospective study designs. Twenty-one prospective trials were identified, which evaluated both clinical and non-clinical impacts on patient care. Most studies took place in the outpatient clinic environment, with minimal study of the emergency department or inpatient settings. Few studies demonstrated evidence of computerized applications improving clinical outcomes. Further research is needed to prospectively evaluate the impact of using biomedical informatics to improve care of asthmatic patients. PMID:16622164

  3. Socio-economic characteristics and personal attitudes of patients attending a French prosthodontic teaching clinic.

    PubMed

    Fromentin, O; Boy-Lefèvre, M L

    2000-11-01

    The aims of the study were to define the socio-economic characteristics of patients attending a Teaching Hospital Prosthetics Department and to determine the attitudes and aspirations of such patients. The study was performed on 162 patients who requested prosthetic treatment in a French university dental hospital department. They were asked to complete a questionnaire at the beginning of their treatment. The questionnaire was composed of 2 parts, covering respectively: firstly, social, economic, and demographic data concerning the patients, the source of referral and the primary motivation for their decision to request treatment, and secondly comments concerning their prosthetic treatment. The results show the socio-professional and socio-economic diversity of this population. In most cases, the patients were recommended to the university hospital service by their relatives or friends. Among the criteria proposed, they indicate that cost and quality of treatment were their major motivation. Analysis of the patients' comments identifies some factors responsible for the lack of efficiency associated with care and dental education. PMID:11168483

  4. Effects of participation in a cross year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills on volunteer tutors' skills and attitudes towards teachers and teaching

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Sharon; Zamora, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background Development of students' teaching skills is increasingly recognised as an important component of UK undergraduate medical curricula and, in consequence, there is renewed interest in the potential benefits of cross-year peer tutoring. Whilst several studies have described the use of cross-year peer tutoring in undergraduate medical courses, its use in the clinical setting is less well reported, particularly the effects of peer tutoring on volunteer tutors' views of teachers and teaching. This study explored the effects of participation in a cross-year peer tutoring programme in clinical examination skills ('OSCE tutor') on volunteer tutors' own skills and on their attitudes towards teachers and teaching. Methods Volunteer tutors were final year MBChB students who took part in the programme as part of a Student Selected Component (SSC). Tutees were year 3 MBChB students preparing for their end of year 'OSCE' examination. Pre and post participation questionnaires, including both Likert-type and open response questions, were used. Paired data was compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. All tests were two-tailed with 5% significance level. Results Tutors reflected their cohort in terms of gender but were drawn from among the more academically successful final year students. Most had previous teaching experience. They were influenced to participate in 'OSCE tutor' by a desire to improve their own teaching and associated generic skills and by contextual factors relating to the organisation or previous experience of the OSCE tutor programme. Issues relating to longer term career aspirations were less important. After the event, tutors felt that participation had enhanced their skills in various areas, including practical teaching skills, confidence in speaking to groups and communication skills; and that as a result of taking part, they were now more likely to undertake further teacher training and to make teaching a major part of their career. However, whilst a number of students reported that their views of teachers and teaching had changed as a result of participation, this did not translate into significant changes in responses to questions that explored their views of the roles and qualities required of a good clinical teacher. Conclusion Findings affirm the benefits to volunteer tutors of cross-year peer tutoring, particularly in terms of skills enhancement and reinforcement of positive attitudes towards future teaching responsibilities, and have implications for the design and organisation of such programmes. PMID:17598885

  5. Biomedical Informatics and Security Informatics Research in Digital Library

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsinchun Chen

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a The Internet is changing the way we live and do business. It offers a tremendous opportunity for libraries, governments, and\\u000a businesses to better deliver its contents and services and interact with its many constituents. After ten years of active\\u000a research, there appears to be a need towards advancing the science of “informatics” in digital library, especially in several\\u000a non-traditional but

  6. The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to contribute to filling gaps in digitized biodiversity data; (b) assisting countries potentially in need (for example mega-diverse) to mobilize resources and collect data that could be used in decision-making; and (c) allowing identification of which biodiversity informatics-resourced countries could afford to assist countries lacking in biodiversity informatics capacity, and which data-rich countries should benefit most from such help. PMID:22373233

  7. Teaching and Assessing Residents’ Skills in Managing Heroin Addiction with Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs)

    PubMed Central

    Parish, Sharon J.; Stein, Melissa R.; Hahn, Steven R.; Goldberg, Uri; Arnsten, Julia H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heroin abusing patients present a significant challenge. Objective Structured Clinical Exams (OSCEs) allow evaluation of residents’ clinical skills. The objective of our study was to examine resident OSCE performance assessing and managing heroin abuse. Methods Evaluation and comparison of heroin-specific communication, assessment and management skills in a five-station PGY3 substance abuse OSCE. Faculty used a four-point Likert scale to assess residents’ skills; standardized patients provided written comments. Results 265 internal and family medicine residents in an urban university hospital participated over five years. In the heroin station, residents’ skills were better (p<0.001 for both comparisons) in communication (mean overall score 3.16±0.51) than in either assessment (mean overall score 2.66±0.60) or management (mean overall score 2.50±0.73). The mean score for assessing specific high risk behaviors was lower than the mean overall assessment score (2.22±1.01 vs. 2.74±.59, p < 0.0001), and the mean score for recommending appropriate harm reduction management strategies was lower than the mean overall management score (2.39±.89 vs. 2.54±.74, p < 0.005). Standardized patients’ comments reflected similar weaknessess in residents’ skills. Conclusions Assessment and management of heroin abuse were more challenging for residents than general communication. Additional training is required for residents to assess and counsel patients about high risk behaviors. PMID:24159905

  8. [Supervising students according to the STAMPPOT method: efficient integration of patient care and clinical teaching].

    PubMed

    Brand, Paul L P; Boendermaker, Peter M; Venekamp, Ruud; Snoek, Jos W

    2011-01-01

    During the supervision of a registrar or house officer who has taken the history from a patient and has performed a physical examination, optimal patient care and education should be integrated. The 'One-Minute Preceptor Method' has already been described as a method that is suitable for this task. We have expanded on this method. The new method is comprised of the following steps: summarizing ('Samenvatten') the medical history, narrowing ('Toespitsen') and analyzing ('Analyseren') the differential diagnosis, based on medical ('Medische') questions: providing pearls ('Pareltjes') of wisdom to the student, establishing a patient plan ('Plan'), giving an assignment ('Opdracht') for further study and testing ('Toetsen') this new insight at a later point in time. These steps form the acronym 'STAMPPOT' in Dutch (which is a common mashed potato and vegetable dish in the Netherlands). Clinical supervisors find the STAMPPOT method easy to learn; it is also highly appreciated by registrars and house officers as it helps them to better understand and improve their clinical diagnostic skills. PMID:21429257

  9. Environmental Informatics James E. Frew and Jeff Dozier

    E-print Network

    Dozier, Jeff

    Environmental Informatics James E. Frew and Jeff Dozier Bren School of Environmental Science Environmental informatics uses large multidimensional, complex datasets to study environmental problems, which articles · Top downloaded articles · Our comprehensive search FurtherANNUAL REVIEWS #12;Informatics

  10. BNHM Informatics Projects (relating museums, field stations, genomic data,

    E-print Network

    BNHM Informatics Projects (relating museums, field stations, genomic data, and environmental;Systematists Evolutionary Research Museum Research Tools Lucid Field Guides Genetic Analysis Museum Informatics -validate user designed forms Form Reading -finish EML -validate data -export Informatics Software conforms

  11. Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen

    E-print Network

    Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen LSA ­ Algorithms Ph.D.-student Lasse Lohilahti Mølgaard #12;Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent interpretation ­ Results in retrieval Demos ­ Castsearch ­ Wikipedia #12;Informatics and Mathematical Modelling

  12. STATEMENT OF SALARY POLICY Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    STATEMENT OF SALARY POLICY Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Revised ­ 9 of Informatics are important factors in rewarding and retaining productive faculty members. Written guidelines PERFORMANCE EVALUATION, School of Informatics, IUPUI. Salary increases will reflect a faculty member

  13. October 2010 Admissions Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University

    E-print Network

    Takada, Shoji

    in Social Informatics and International Course in Communications and Computer Engineering can be completed to each Course International Course in Social Informatics International Course in Communications2010 10 October 2010 Admissions Graduate School of Informatics, Kyoto University Guidelines

  14. Entry Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Entry ­ Level Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Post-Graduate Masters of Health Informatics and Information Management Certificate in Health Informatics and Information of Management 3 Personnel Administration/ Human Resources 3 English Composition and Literature 12 Social Science

  15. Postdoctoral Associate Postdoctoral Research Position in Philanthropic Informatics

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    in Philanthropic Informatics The Indiana University School of Informatics will have expertise applying a variety of qualitative research and/or social network is filled. The School of Informatics and Computing is eager to consider

  16. Description logics in medical informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan Rector

    2003-01-01

    Description logics and related formalisms are being applied in at least v e applica- tions in medical informatics|terminology, intelligent user interfaces, decision sup- port and semantic indexing, language technology, and systems integration. Impor- tant issues include size, complexity, connectivity, and the wide range of granularity required|medical terminologies require on the order of 250,000 concepts, some in- volving a dozen or

  17. Social Informatics:An Emerging Discipline?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vasja Vehovar

    The concept of Social Informatics emerged along with the growing role of information and communication technologies (‘ICT’)\\u000a in the 1970s and was articulated in Rob Kling’s work in the 1980s and 1990s. In recent years, the notion of Social Informatics\\u000a has been rapidly expanding in various contexts. Following an overview of related activities on the University of Ljubljana\\u000a website (http:\\/\\/social-informatics.org)

  18. Core Competencies in Public Health Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janise Richards

    The challenge facing public health informatics is educating the public health workforce in the knowledge domains that are\\u000a the framework for public health informatics. This chapter is an initial step. It sets forth baseline, or broad, informatics\\u000a competencies that public health practitioners and public health informaticians, respectively, need to possess. Efforts to\\u000a further test and improve these competencies need to

  19. Cognitive hacking and intelligence and security informatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Paul

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes research on cognitive and semantic attacks on computer systems and their users. Several countermeasures against such attacks are described, including a description of a prototype News Verifier system. It is argued that because misinformation and deception play a much more significant role in intelligence and security informatics than in other informatics disciplines such as science, medicine, and the law, a new science of intelligence and security informatics must concern itself with semantic attacks and countermeasures.

  20. Teaching Resident Physicians Chronic Disease Management: Simulating a 10-Year Longitudinal Clinical Experience With a Standardized Dementia Patient and Caregiver

    PubMed Central

    Schlaudecker, Jeffrey D.; Lewis, Timothy J.; Moore, Irene; Pallerla, Harini; Stecher, Anna M.; Wiebracht, Nathan D.; Warshaw, Gregg A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Education for all physicians should include specialty-specific geriatrics-related and chronic disease-related topics. Objective We describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a chronic disease/geriatric medicine curriculum designed to teach Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies and geriatric medicine competencies to residents by using longitudinal encounters with a standardized dementia patient and her caregiver daughter. Intervention Over 3 half-day sessions, the unfolding standardized patient (SP) case portrays the progressive course of dementia and simulates a 10-year longitudinal clinical experience between residents and a patient with dementia and her daughter. A total of 134 residents participated in the University of Cincinnati-based curriculum during 2007–2010, 72% of whom were from internal medicine (79) or family medicine (17) residency programs. Seventy-five percent of participants (100) said they intended to provide primary care to older adults in future practice, yet 54% (73) had little or no experience providing medical care to older adults with dementia. Results Significant improvements in resident proficiency were observed for all self-reported skill items. SPs' evaluations revealed that residents' use of patient-centered language and professionalism significantly improved over the 3 weekly visits. Nearly all participants agreed that the experience enhanced clinical competency in the care of older adults and rated the program as “excellent” or “above average” compared to other learning activities. Conclusions Residents found this SP-based curriculum using a longitudinal dementia case realistic and valuable. Residents improved in both self-perceived knowledge of dementia and the use of patient-centered language and professionalism. PMID:24404312

  1. Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

  2. Phenotypic Detection of Genitourinary Candidiasis among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Attendees in Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obisesan, Oluranti J.; Olowe, Olugbenga A.; Taiwo, Samuel S.

    2015-01-01

    The management of genitourinary candidiasis (GC) is fraught with challenges, especially, in an era of increasing antifungal resistance. This descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between May 2013 and January 2014 determined the prevalence and characteristics of GC and the species of Candida among 369 attendees of a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) clinic of Ladoke Akintola University Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Nigeria. Appropriate urogenital specimen collected from each attendee was examined by microscopy and culture for Candida, with preliminary species identification by CHROMAgar Candida and confirmation by Analytical Profile Index (API) 20C AUX. The age range of attendees was 1-80 years, mean age was 36.32 ± 11.34 years, and male to female ratio was 1 to 3. The prevalence of genitourinary candidiasis was 47.4%, with 4.9% in males and 42.5% in females (p < 0.0001). The age groups 31–45 and 16–30 have the highest prevalence of 23.3% and 16.8%, respectively. The species of Candida recovered include Candida glabrata 46.9%, Candida albicans 33.7%, Candida dubliniensis 9.7%, Candida tropicalis 5.7%, Candida krusei 1.7%, Candida lusitaniae 1.7%, and Candida utilis 0.6%. This study reported non-C. albicans Candida, especially C. glabrata, as the most frequently isolated species in GC, contrary to previous studies in this environment and elsewhere.

  3. Comenius University Bratislava, Slovakia Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Comenius University Bratislava, Slovakia Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Department of Applied Informatics Michal Valko Evolving Neural Networks for Statistical Decision Theory Advisor

  4. Two h-Index Benchmarks for Evaluating the Publication Performance of Medical Informatics Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Luk; Jonker, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Background The h-index is a commonly used metric for evaluating the publication performance of researchers. However, in a multidisciplinary field such as medical informatics, interpreting the h-index is a challenge because researchers tend to have diverse home disciplines, ranging from clinical areas to computer science, basic science, and the social sciences, each with different publication performance profiles. Objective To construct a reference standard for interpreting the h-index of medical informatics researchers based on the performance of their peers. Methods Using a sample of authors with articles published over the 5-year period 2006–2011 in the 2 top journals in medical informatics (as determined by impact factor), we computed their h-index using the Scopus database. Percentiles were computed to create a 6-level benchmark, similar in scheme to one used by the US National Science Foundation, and a 10-level benchmark. Results The 2 benchmarks can be used to place medical informatics researchers in an ordered category based on the performance of their peers. A validation exercise mapped the benchmark levels to the ranks of medical informatics academic faculty in the United States. The 10-level benchmark tracked academic rank better (with no ties) and is therefore more suitable for practical use. Conclusions Our 10-level benchmark provides an objective basis to evaluate and compare the publication performance of medical informatics researchers with that of their peers using the h-index. PMID:23079075

  5. Too little time to teach? Try the One Minute Preceptor! The One Minute Preceptor is a five step technique which can be used in a variety of clinical settings. This

    E-print Network

    model of clinical teaching. J Am Board Fam Prac. 1992;5:419-24 From the desks of Bonnie Desselle, MD technique which can be used in a variety of clinical settings. This technique encourages critical thinking by the learner and can help the teacher assess where the learner is in the clinical reasoning process. It also

  6. Computer and internet use by first year clinical and nursing students in a Nigerian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ajuwon, Grace Ada

    2003-01-01

    Background The internet is an important source of up-to-date medical information. Although several studies in different countries have explored the extent to which health science students use the computer and the internet, few researches are available on this subject in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to assess the uptake of computer and internet by health science students studying in the country. Methods One hundred and eighty three first year medical and nursing students of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, completed a-25 item questionnaire during routine Library Orientation Program in the medical library. The EPI-Info software was used for data analysis. Results The mean ages for medical students and the student nurses were 22 and 24.6 years respectively. Overall, 42.6% of the entire sample could use the computer, 57.4% could not. While more than half (58%) of the medical students are computer literate, majority (75.9%) of the student nurses are not. Slightly more than two thirds (60.7%) of the entire students had ever used the internet, 33. 9% had not. E-mail was the most popular of internet services used by the students (76.4%) and the cyber café was the common place where students had accessed these services. The students' mean scores on a 15-point perceived self-efficacy scale for internet-related tasks was 3.8 for medical and 0.7 for nursing students (p = 0.00). Students who are computer literate had superior mean scores (4.8) than those without (0.6) (p = 0.000). Conclusion First year clinical and nursing students in Ibadan Nigeria have not fully utilised the opportunity that the use of computer and internet offer for medical education. Improved efforts such as inclusion of computer education in medical and nursing curricular and establishment of computer laboratories are required to increase the student's access to computers and internet. PMID:14498997

  7. Department of Electronic and informatics Doctoral Dissertation

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Terminals and Multiband or UWB Antennas Department of Electronic and informatics Doctoral DissertationDepartment of Electronic and informatics Doctoral Dissertation Presented by: Muhammad Amir Yousuf Examiner Serge Bories Examiner Parametric Modeling of Small Terminals and Multiband or UWB Antennas pastel

  8. Aims and tasks of medical informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhold Haux

    1997-01-01

    Ten major long-term aims and tasks, so to speak ‘grand challenges’, for research in the field of medical informatics, including health informatics, are proposed and described. These are the further development of methods and tools of information processing for: (1) diagnostics (‘the visible body’); (2) therapy (‘medical intervention with as little strain on the patient as possible’); (3) therapy simulation;

  9. Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211223

    E-print Network

    Austin, Mark

    Article Health Informatics Journal 16(3) 211­223 © The Author(s) 2010 Reprints and permission, may result in identity theft, incorrect diagnosis and treatment, #12;212 Health Informatics Journal 16 in energy-constrained and computationally limited systems. An interesting architecture and implementation

  10. Informatics and the Human Genome Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Robbins; David Benton; Jay Snoddy

    1995-01-01

    Information technology is transforming biology, and the relentless effects of Moore's Law are transforming that transformation. Nowhere are these changes more apparent than in the international collaboration known as the Human Genome Project (HGP). The authors consider the relationship of informatics to genomic research. Topics discussed include: the nature of information technology; Moore's Law; informatics as an enabling technology; agency

  11. Cognitive hacking and intelligence and security informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Thompson

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes research on cognitive and semantic attacks on computer systems and their users. Several countermeasures against such attacks are described, including a description of a prototype News Verifier system. It is argued that because misinformation and deception play a much more significant role in intelligence and security informatics than in other informatics disciplines such as science, medicine, and

  12. Guest Editorial Introduction: International Medical Informatics Association

    E-print Network

    Cimino, James J.

    Guest Editorial Introduction: International Medical Informatics Association Working Group 6 and the 2005 Rome Conference This issue of the Journal of Biomedical Informatics is devoted to the topic of an international conference on this topic, which was held in Rome from 29 April to 2 May 2005. The conference

  13. Wairoa Model Community Informatics in Tourism

    E-print Network

    Wairoa Model Community Informatics in Tourism David Mason Victoria University of Wellington Ulrich a community informatics project aimed at encouraging regional development by introducing small scale tourism of a community owned and developed regional tourism product, a trail through Maori owned community land

  14. A web-based Alcohol Clinical Training (ACT) curriculum: Is in-person faculty development necessary to affect teaching?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel P Alford; Jessica M Richardson; Sheila E Chapman; Catherine E Dubé; Robert W Schadt; Richard Saitz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physicians receive little education about unhealthy alcohol use and as a result patients often do not receive efficacious interventions. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether a free web-based alcohol curriculum would be used by physician educators and whether in-person faculty development would increase its use, confidence in teaching and teaching itself. METHODS: Subjects were physician educators

  15. Age-appropriate feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending child welfare clinic at a Teaching Hospital in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lawan, Umar M.; Amole, Gboluwaga T.; Jahum, Mahmud G.; Sani, Abdullahi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Appropriate infant feeding is the key to optimum infant and child development and survival. This study investigates age-appropriate infant feeding practices and nutritional status of infants attending the immunization and child welfare clinic at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: Using a cross-sectional descriptive design, a sample of 300 sets of infants (age ?12 months) and caregivers was systematically selected and studied. The data were analyzed using the MINITAB® 12.21 (USA) statistical software. Results: All the infants studied were still on breast milk. Most of the mothers demonstrated correct body positioning (89.9) and attachment (78.7%) during breastfeeding, and effective suckling was demonstrated in 77.0%. Interestingly, none of the infants was either exclusively breastfed for 6 months or currently on exclusive breastfeeding. Furthermore, only 64 (58.2%) of the 110 infants that were more than 6 months of age had appropriately been started on complementary feeding from 6 months of age. Overall, most caregivers (88.7%) had “fair” to “good” infant feeding practices. The practices were significantly associated with their level of education, and their relationship with the infants. Up to 40.0% and 73.7% of the infants had varying degrees of wasting and stunting respectively. Infant feeding practices and the age of the infants emerged as the only factors significantly associated with stunting, while both the caregivers’ practices and age of the infants emerged as significant predictors of wasting in the infants. Conclusion and Recommendations: Barely 3 years to the 2015 target of the millennium development goals (MDGs), infant feeding and nutritional status still poses a serious threat to the dream of realizing the MDG-4. The Ministry of Health and relevant developing partners in this region should as a matter of urgency, formulate and implement a strong community-based public health intervention program to improve the knowledge and practices of mothers on infant feeding. PMID:24696628

  16. Translational informatics: enabling high-throughput research paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Embi, Peter J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    A common thread throughout the clinical and translational research domains is the need to collect, manage, integrate, analyze, and disseminate large-scale, heterogeneous biomedical data sets. However, well-established and broadly adopted theoretical and practical frameworks and models intended to address such needs are conspicuously absent in the published literature or other reputable knowledge sources. Instead, the development and execution of multidisciplinary, clinical, or translational studies are significantly limited by the propagation of “silos” of both data and expertise. Motivated by this fundamental challenge, we report upon the current state and evolution of biomedical informatics as it pertains to the conduct of high-throughput clinical and translational research and will present both a conceptual and practical framework for the design and execution of informatics-enabled studies. The objective of presenting such findings and constructs is to provide the clinical and translational research community with a common frame of reference for discussing and expanding upon such models and methodologies. PMID:19737991

  17. www.informatics.uiuc.edu Programming Models for

    E-print Network

    Snir, Marc

    www.informatics.uiuc.edu Programming Models for Supercomputing in the Era of Multicore Marc Snir #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu MULTI-CORE CHALLENGES 1 #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu 2 Moore's Law+OpenMP). #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Memory Wall: a Persistent Problem Chip CPU performance increases ~60

  18. IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM 2010-2011 Academic Year applicable signatures and attachments NO LATER THAN MARCH 30, 2010, to: IU School of Informatics Informatics Scholarship David M. Ratts Scholarship School of Informatics Freshman Scholarship 4. Community Involvement

  19. IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM 2011-2012 Academic Year 30, 2011, to: IU School of Informatics Informatics Complex 535 W. Michigan St. IT 493 Indianapolis School of Informatics Freshman Scholarship Dean's Advisory Council Senior Scholarship Health Information

  20. The Current Status of Health Informatics Higher Education in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. X. Wu; P Yu; J Soar

    2003-01-01

    There are likely to be many opportunities and challenges for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China following her acceptance as a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The purpose of the article is to review the current status and consider future directions for health informatics and health informatics higher education in China. Today, China’s educators are

  1. COLLEGE OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATICS 139 Computing and

    E-print Network

    Xie,Jiang (Linda)

    COLLEGE OF COMPUTING AND INFORMATICS 139 College of Computing and Informatics www.cci.uncc.edu Dean of North Carolina at Charlotte's College of Computing and Informatics (CCI) is part of a dynamic and the University. It was renamed the College of Computing and Informatics in 2006 in an effort to reflect

  2. zentrum Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie ABTEIlUNG MEDIZINISCHE INFORMATIK centre Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS

    E-print Network

    Gollisch, Tim

    Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS Robert-Koch-Str. 40 D-37075-Resources for Health Development of Curricula for Biomedical Informatics #12;30 Zentrum Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie ABteilunG mediziniscHe informAtik Centre Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology dep

  3. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 5574 55 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 55­74 55 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius The First Decade of Informatics in Dutch High Schools Natasa GRGURINA University. Informatics is currently being taught in high schools all over the world. In the Nether- lands, where all

  4. The informatics core of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    The Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative project has brought together geographically distributed investigators, each collecting data on the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The quantity and diversity of the imaging, clinical, cognitive, biochemical, and genetic data acquired and generated throughout the study necessitated sophisticated informatics systems to organize, manage, and disseminate data and results. We describe, here, a successful and comprehensive system that provides powerful mechanisms for processing, integrating, and disseminating these data not only to support the research needs of the investigators who make up the Alzheimer's Diseases Neuroimaging Initiative cores, but also to provide widespread data access to the greater scientific community for the study of Alzheimer's Disease. PMID:20451873

  5. Commentary: Informatics in biomedicine and health care.

    PubMed

    Greenes, Robert A; Shortliffe, Edward H

    2009-07-01

    During the last two decades, biomedical informatics (BMI) has become a critical component in biomedical research and health care delivery, as evidenced by two recent phenomena. One, as discussed in the article by Bernstam and colleagues in this issue, has been the introduction of Clinical and Translational Science Awards. Perhaps even more important has been the recent, arguably long overdue, emphasis on deployment of health information technology (IT) nationally. BMI utilizes IT and computer science as tools and methods for improving data acquisition, data management, data analysis, and knowledge generation, but it is driven by a focus on applications based in deep understanding of the science and practice, problems, interactions, culture, and milieu of biomedicine and health. Building from Bernstam and colleagues' distinction between BMI and other IT disciplines, the authors discuss the evolving role of BMI professionals as individuals uniquely positioned to work within the human and organizational context and culture in which the IT is being applied. The focus is not on the IT but on the combination--the interactions of IT systems, human beings, and organizations aimed at achieving a particular purpose. There has never been a time when the need for individuals well trained in BMI--those who understand the complexities of the human, social, and organizational milieu of biomedicine and health--has been more critical than it is now, as the nation seeks to develop a national infrastructure for biomedicine and health care, and as these fields seek to broadly deploy IT wisely and appropriately. PMID:19550167

  6. A National Agenda for Public Health Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Yasnoff, William A.; Overhage, J. Marc; Humphreys, Betsy L.; LaVenture, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The AMIA 2001 Spring Congress brought together members of the the public health and informatics communities to develop a national agenda for public health informatics. Discussions of funding and governance; architecture and infrastructure; standards and vocabulary; research, evaluation, and best practices; privacy, confidentiality, and security; and training and workforce resulted in 74 recommendations with two key themes—that all stakeholders need to be engaged in coordinated activities related to public health information architecture, standards, confidentiality, best practices, and research; and that informatics training is needed throughout the public health workforce. Implementation of this consensus agenda will help promote progress in the application of information technology to improve public health. PMID:11687561

  7. Perspectives on project based teaching and \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Arne Godejord

    Summary This paper describes a unique educational project that is being implemented in the undergraduate study of Computer Science and Teacher Education. Since 2002, Norway's Nesna University College has been using the example of sexual abuse of children in the teaching of Social Informatics, and in the distance education course \\

  8. AMIA Board white paper: definition of biomedical informatics and specification of core competencies for graduate education in the discipline

    PubMed Central

    Kulikowski, Casimir A; Shortliffe, Edward H; Currie, Leanne M; Elkin, Peter L; Hunter, Lawrence E; Johnson, Todd R; Kalet, Ira J; Lenert, Leslie A; Musen, Mark A; Ozbolt, Judy G; Smith, Jack W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter Z

    2012-01-01

    The AMIA biomedical informatics (BMI) core competencies have been designed to support and guide graduate education in BMI, the core scientific discipline underlying the breadth of the field's research, practice, and education. The core definition of BMI adopted by AMIA specifies that BMI is ‘the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health.’ Application areas range from bioinformatics to clinical and public health informatics and span the spectrum from the molecular to population levels of health and biomedicine. The shared core informatics competencies of BMI draw on the practical experience of many specific informatics sub-disciplines. The AMIA BMI analysis highlights the central shared set of competencies that should guide curriculum design and that graduate students should be expected to master. PMID:22683918

  9. [A new vision of nursing: the evolution and development of nursing informatics].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Yeh, Yu-Ting

    2014-08-01

    Technology development trends in the 21st century are increasingly focused on the development of interdisciplinary applications. Advanced information technology may be applied to integrate nursing care information, simplify nursing processes, and reduce the time spent on work tasks, thereby increasing the amount of time that clinical personnel are available to care for patients and ensuring that patients are provided with high-quality and personalized care services. The development of nursing information began in Taiwan in 2003 and has since expanded and thrived. The ability of nursing information to connect formerly insular national nursing communities promotes the international visibility of Taiwan. The rapid development of nursing information in Taiwan, resulting in the production of informative and outstanding results, has received worldwide attention. The Taiwan Nursing Informatics Association was established in 2006 to nurture nursing information professionals, develop and apply information technology in the health care domain, and facilitate international nursing information exchanges. The association actively promotes nursing information in the areas of administration, education, research, and clinical practice, thereby integrating nursing with empirical applications to enhance the service quality and management of nursing and increase the benefits of nursing teaching and research. To convert information into knowledge, the association develops individualized strategies for managing mobile care and employs an interagency network to exchange and reintegrate resources, establishing active, intelligent nursing based on network characteristics and an empirical foundation. The mid- and long-term objectives of the association involve introducing cloud computing and facilitating the meaningful use of nursing information in both public and government settings, thereby creating a milestone of developing and expanding nursing information unique to Taiwan. PMID:25125162

  10. Informatics to support the IOM social and behavioral domains and measures.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, George; Forrest, Christopher B; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Stead, William W

    2015-07-01

    Consistent collection and use of social and behavioral determinants of health can improve clinical care, prevention and general health, patient satisfaction, research, and public health. A recent Institute of Medicine committee defined a panel of 11 domains and 12 measures to be included in electronic health records. Incorporating the panel into practice creates a number of informatics research opportunities as well as challenges. The informatics issues revolve around standardization, efficient collection and review, decision support, and support for research. The informatics community can aid the effort by simultaneously optimizing the collection of the selected measures while also partnering with social science researchers to develop and validate new sources of information about social and behavioral determinants of health. PMID:25914098

  11. Shoestring Budgets, Band-Aids, and Team Work: Challenges and Motivators in the Development of a Web-Based Resource for Undergraduate Clinical Skills Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Collan; Nyhof-Young, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Background Learning how to conduct a medical interview and perform a physical examination is fundamental to the practice of medicine; however, when this project began, the methods used to teach these skills to medical students at the University of Toronto (U of T) had not changed significantly since the early 1990s despite increasing outpatient care, shorter hospital stays, and heavy preceptor workloads. In response, a Web-based clinical skills resource was developed for the first-year undergraduate medical course—The Art and Science of Clinical Medicine I (ASCM I). Objectives This paper examines our experiences with the development of the ASCM I website and details the challenges and motivators inherent in the production of a Web-based, multimedia medical education tool at a large Canadian medical school. Methods Interviews and a focus group were conducted with the development team to discover the factors that positively and negatively affected the development process. Results Motivating factors included team attributes such as strong leadership and judicious use of medical students and faculty volunteers as developers. Other motivators included a growing lack of instructional equivalency across diverse clinical teaching sites and financial and resource support by the Faculty of Medicine. Barriers to development included an administrative environment that did not yet fully incorporate information technology into its teaching vision and framework, a lack of academic incentive for faculty participation, and inadequate technical support, space, and equipment. Conclusions The success of electronic educational resources such as the ASCM I website has caused a significant cultural shift within the Faculty of Medicine, resulting in the provision of more space, resources, and support for IT endeavours in the undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:15914461

  12. Health Informatics for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Planning

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R.V.; Ryutov, T.; Neches, R.; Upperman, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective 1. To conduct a review of the role of informatics in pediatric disaster preparedness using all medical databases. 2. To provide recommendations to improve pediatric disaster preparedness by the application of informatics. Methods A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINHL and the Cochrane Library using the key words “children” AND “disaster preparedness and disaster” AND “informatics”. Results A total of 314 papers were initially produced by the search and eight that met the selection criteria were included in the review. Four themes emerged: tools for disaster preparedness, education, reunification and planning and response. Conclusion The literature pertaining to informatics and pediatric disaster preparedness is sparse and many gaps still persist. Current disaster preparedness tools focus on the general population and do not specifically address children. The most progress has been achieved in family reunification; however, the recommendations delineated are yet to be completed. PMID:23616840

  13. The Big Questions For Biodiversity Informatics

    E-print Network

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Knapp, Sandra; Guralnick, Robert P.; Soberó n, Jorge; Holder, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    of biodiversity information. This emerging field of biodiversity informatics has been growing quickly, but without overarching scientific questions to guide its development; the result has been developments that have no connection to genuine insight and forward...

  14. Social Informatics: Principles, Theory, and Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve Sawyer; Michael Tyworth

    Through this paper we make two contributions to social informatics: the interdisciplinary study of the design, development,\\u000a uses and consequences of information and communication technologies that takes into account their interaction with institutional\\u000a and cultural contexts. Our first contribution is to make a connection from social informatics to general principles of socio-technical\\u000a theories. We do this to both connect social

  15. Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

  16. UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics

    E-print Network

    Stølen, Ketil

    a Notion of Security Risk Gyrd Brændeland1,2 and Ketil Stølen1,2 1 Department of Informatics, UniversityUNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics A semantic paradigm for component-based specification integrating a notion of security risk Research report 341 Gyrd Brændeland Ketil Stølen ISBN 82-7368-297-8 ISSN

  17. Populations, Patients, Germs and Genes: Ethics Of Genomics and Informatics in Communicable Disease Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gwendolyn L. Gilbert; Michael Selgelid

    \\u000a This chapter will explore the ways in which genomics (and the informatics tools needed to analyze and interpret them) could,\\u000a potentially, transform our understanding of infectious disease epidemiology, improve disease management and prevention and\\u000a save lives. The integration of microbiological, clinical and environmental data into personalized clinical decision support\\u000a and risk assessment tools will improve both the care of patients

  18. [Evidence based medicine (EBM) in health care system and treatment of individual patient. Part iii. Teaching of epidemiological methodology and statistics].

    PubMed

    Borkowski, W?odzimierz

    2009-01-01

    The question arises--what role the doctor will meet in the web society. Is it going to be a creative person in the assessment of knowledge and application at the bedside of the patient, disciplined executor of he clinical guidelines, or a loyal client of pharmaceutical companies. Medical theories are usually at the high degree of complexity, so the evaluation of the validity of the research questions, the adequacy ot models, appraisal of clinical trials, and the use of statistical analysis requires new teaching. Teaching epidemiology and statistics for EBM is designed to prepare doctors for applyinig scientific advances in clinical practice, skills in appraisal and use of the publicated results. Effects of teaching on courses organised by CMKP shows that the barrier in learning of statistical concepts are caused by defective curricula and their faulty implementation, and not by narrow perception of physicians. According to the author, such teaching should also be applied during graduated medical studies, as optional. After co-ordination with the physiology, genetics, biochemistry, informatics EBM oriented teaching would be particularly attractive for students who have a view on the work of research and research careers. Bearing in mind the time needed for implementation, it is urgent need to start this work as soon as possible. PMID:19899602

  19. Biomedical Informatics Resources — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology

    Cancer.gov

    A central focus of the NCIP mission is the provision of a wide array of informatics resources — applications, data collections, analytical algorithms, standards, and infrastructure components, to name only the most obvious — needed to sustain the broad cancer-research and biomedical-informatics community.

  20. Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness of Part-Time and Full-Time Clinical Nursing Faculty of BSN Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Kimberly L.

    2012-01-01

    The United States faces a critical shortage of full-time registered nurses, which is . directly affected by the shortage of nurse educators. Many schools of nursing are already seeing the impact as qualified program applicants are being turned away due to the lack of qualified educators available to teach them. The trend has become to employ…

  1. Efficacy of Individualized Clinical Coaching in a Virtual Reality Classroom for Increasing Teachers' Fidelity of Implementation of Discrete Trial Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Krista Vince; Vasquez, Eleazar, III; Pearl, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Discrete-trials teaching (DTT) is an evidence-based practice used in educational programs for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Although there is strong demand for preparing teachers to effectively implement DTT, there is a scarcity of published research on such studies. A multiple baseline across participants design was utilized to…

  2. Graphical neuroimaging informatics: application to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, John Darrell; Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H; Greer, Vaughan

    2014-06-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer's Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN's ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  3. Effective use of real-life events as tools for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology in a problem-based learning curriculum

    PubMed Central

    James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A.; Sequeira, Reginald P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This paper describes how in a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum, having identified the learning outcomes, problems can be developed from real-life events for teaching-learning clinical pharmacology topics for which PBL cases might be inadequate. Such problems can be very interesting and educational. Methodology: Using the story of the development and withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx®), we developed a problem for undergraduate medical students to address important issues related to clinical pharmacology and therapeutics such as new drug development, preclinical testing, clinical trials, adverse drug reactions, professionalism, and critical appraisal of literature. These topics would otherwise be difficult to address in patient-based problems. Results: The evaluation of the problem based on pooled feedback from 57 tutorial groups, each comprising 8–10 students, collected over 5 years, supported the effectiveness of the problem. Conclusion: A systematic approach described in this paper can be used for the development and validation of educational material for introducing focal topics of pharmacology/clinical pharmacology integrated with other disciplines in innovative medical (and other health profession) curricula.

  4. Social informatics and service learning as teaching models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William J. McIver; Traxon Rachell

    2002-01-01

    We have proposed a framework to integrate social and ethical issues into science and engineering curricula. We have also shown how such a framework might be implemented across a curriculum, and how it might be applied to the study of a specific scientific problem. Our framework is based on basic foundations of applied engineering ethics, adaptation of the structure of

  5. [Informatics in the Croatian health care system].

    PubMed

    Kern, Josipa; Strnad, Marija

    2005-01-01

    Informatization process of the Croatian health care system started relatively early. Computer processing of data of persons not covered by health insurance started in 1968 in Zagreb. Remetinec Health Center served as a model of computer data processing (CDP) in primary health care and Sveti Duh General Hospital in inpatient CDP, whereas hospital administration and health service were first introduced to Zagreb University Hospital Center and Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital. At Varazdin Medical Center CDP for health care services started in 1970. Several registries of chronic diseases have been established: cancer, psychosis, alcoholism, and hospital registries as well as pilot registries of lung tuberculosis patients and diabetics. Health statistics reports on healthcare services, work accidents and sick-leaves as well as on hospital mortality started to be produced by CDP in 1977. Besides alphanumeric data, the modern information technology (IT) can give digital images and signals. Communication in health care system demands a standardized format of all information, especially for telemedicine. In 2000, Technical Committee for Standardization in Medical Informatics was founded in Croatia, in order to monitor the activities of the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and Comite Européen de Normalisation (CEN), and to implement their international standards in the Croatian standardization procedure. The HL7 Croatia has also been founded to monitor developments in the communication standard HL7. So far, the Republic of Croatia has a number of acts regulating informatization in general and consequently the informatization of the health care system (Act on Personal Data Confidentiality, Act on Digital Signature, Act of Standardization) enacted. The ethical aspect of data security and data protection has been covered by the Code of Ethics for medical informaticians. It has been established by the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), and the Croatian Society of Medical Informatics (CSMI) has translated it into Croatian and published it on its website. Based on a survey of medical staff attitudes toward health care system informatization, the Croatian health system appears to be ready for informatization. The only requirement is that the present and future health care providers have appropriate medical informatics education, proper computer equipment at their workplace, and an opportunity to participate in the development and/or improvement of the health information system. One of the EU health strategy priorities is the improvement of health information and knowledge. It means that integrated health information systems are required, i.e. systems able to provide key information on health and health care system to the politicians, health professionals and public in general. PMID:16095187

  6. Application of biomedical informatics to chronic pediatric diseases: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases affect millions of children worldwide leading to substantial disease burden to the children and their families as well as escalating health care costs. The increasing trend in the prevalence of complex pediatric chronic diseases requires innovative and optimal delivery of care. Biomedical informatics applications play an important role in improving health outcomes while being cost-effective. However, their utility in pediatric chronic diseases has not been studied in a comprehensive and systematic way. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the effects of biomedical informatics applications in pediatric chronic diseases. Methods A comprehensive literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE databases from inception of each database to September 2008. We included studies of any methodological type and any language that applied biomedical informatics to chronic conditions in children and adolescents 18 years of age or younger. Two independent reviewers carried out study selection and data extraction. Quality assessment was performed using a study design evaluation instrument to appraise the strength of the studies and their methodological adequacy. Because of heterogeneity in the conditions and outcomes we studied, a formal meta-analysis was not performed. Results Based on our search strategy, 655 titles and abstracts were reviewed. From this set we identified 27 relevant articles that met our inclusion criteria. The results from these studies indicated that biomedical informatics applications have favourable clinical and patient outcomes including, but not limited to, reduced number of emergency room visits, improved knowledge on disease management, and enhanced satisfaction. Seventy percent of reviewed papers were published after year 2000, 89% of users were patients and 11% were either providers or caregivers. The majority (96%) of the selected studies reported improved outcomes. Conclusion Published studies suggested positive impacts of informatics predominantly in pediatric asthma. As electronic tools become more widely adopted, there will be opportunities to improve patient care in a wide range of chronic illnesses through informatics solutions. PMID:19416540

  7. Residents’ and preceptors’ perceptions of the use of the iPad for clinical teaching in a family medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As Family Medicine programs across Canada are transitioning into a competency-based curriculum, medical students and clinical teachers are increasingly incorporating tablet computers in their work and educational activities. The purpose of this pilot study was to identify how preceptors and residents use tablet computers to implement and adopt a new family medicine curriculum and to evaluate how they access applications (apps) through their tablet in an effort to support and enhance effective teaching and learning. Methods Residents and preceptors (n = 25) from the Family Medicine program working at the Pembroke Regional Hospital in Ontario, Canada, were given iPads and training on how to use the device in clinical teaching and learning activities and how to access the online curriculum. Data regarding the use and perceived contribution of the iPads were collected through surveys and focus groups. This mixed methods research used analysis of survey responses to support the selection of questions for focus groups. Results Reported results were categorized into: curriculum and assessment; ease of use; portability; apps and resources; and perceptions about the use of the iPad in teaching/learning setting. Most participants agreed on the importance of accessing curriculum resources through the iPad but recognized that these required enhancements to facilitate use. The iPad was considered to be more useful for activities involving output of information than for input. Participants’ responses regarding the ease of use of mobile technology were heterogeneous due to the diversity of computer proficiency across users. Residents had a slightly more favorable opinion regarding the iPad’s contribution to teaching/learning compared to preceptors. Conclusions iPad’s interface should be fully enhanced to allow easy access to online curriculum and its built-in resources. The differences in computer proficiency level among users should be reduced by sharing knowledge through workshops led by more skillful iPad users. To facilitate collection of information through the iPad, the design of electronic data-input forms should consider the participants’ reported negative perceptions towards typing data through mobile devices. Technology deployment projects should gather sufficient evidence from pilot studies in order to guide efforts to adapt resources and infrastructure to relevant needs of Family Medicine teachers and learners. PMID:25138307

  8. Conference on Detection of Intrusions and Malware & Vulnerability SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society

    E-print Network

    Wichmann, Felix

    SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society #12;2 Security SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society #12;3 Security!See you in Berlin! Thierry Noir, CC-BY-SA-3.0 SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR

  9. Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics

    E-print Network

    Sjölander, Kimmen

    1 1 Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics Using multiple alignment as a tool-BLAST to identify domain boundaries #12;2 3 Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics Reading · Thompson of individual positions in molecules. Foundational material for all aspects of protein informatics. · Geoffrey

  10. Informatics software for the ecologist's toolbox: A basic example

    E-print Network

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Informatics software for the ecologist's toolbox: A basic example J.B. Williams, N.L. Poff March 2006 Machine learning techniques for ecological applications or "eco-informatics" are becoming advanced, so has analytical technology. Informatics approaches, such as Artificial Neural Networks

  11. Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics

    E-print Network

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics, and the potential to achieve international recognition in the field of medical health informatics within the next

  12. Informatics: The Driving Force for Economy and Science

    E-print Network

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Informatics: The Driving Force for Economy and Science In the era of information society, none. Therefore, qualified experts are urgently needed. The Master's program in Informatics is research, further information: www.in.tum.de/Application_MSc_Informatics Costs per Semester (currently): 42

  13. The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    The Role of Informatics in Health Care Reform Yueyi I. Liu, MD, PhD, Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology

  14. C h a p t e r 4 Climate Informatics

    E-print Network

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    81 C h a p t e r 4 Climate Informatics Claire Monteleoni, Gavin A. Schmidt, Francis Alexander in Climate Informatics 88 4.4.1 Parameterization Development 89 4.4.2 Using Multimodel Ensembles of Climate in Polar Regions 110 4.10 Toward a Climate Informatics Toolbox 112 4.11 Data Challenges and Opportunities

  15. Department of Informatics at the Technische Universitt Mnchen

    E-print Network

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Department of Informatics at the Technische Universität München Technische Universität München #12 of Rome). Thus the symbol of the Munich Department of Informatics points to the earliest history of civiliza- tion. It shows the number 1967, the year in which the informatics was founded at the Technische

  16. A mathematician reflecting on the International Olympiad in Informatics

    E-print Network

    Burton, Benjamin

    A mathematician reflecting on the International Olympiad in Informatics Benjamin A. Burton Author in Informatics (IOI). On the surface the IOI is a computer programming competition, but in fact it involves Olympiad in Informatics (IOI) is one of the five broad-brush Science Olympiads for high school students

  17. Informatics and Secondary Education in the Netherlands Karl de Leeuw

    E-print Network

    Ponse, Alban

    1 Informatics and Secondary Education in the Netherlands Karl de Leeuw Amsterdam Professional School of Science University of Amsterdam (karl.de.leeuw@xs4all.nl) Alban Ponse Informatics Institute describe three aspects of secondary education in informatics in the Netherlands: the general requirements

  18. Major Map: Informatics Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

    E-print Network

    Reisslein, Martin

    Major Map: Informatics ­ Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering | Catalog up to Term 1, or any deficiency courses can be added) # CPI 101: Intro to Informatics (CS) 3 Grade of C # CPI 200: Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (MA) 3 Grade of C ENG 101 or 102: First

  19. SCHOOL OF Informatics and Computing January 2011On the Move

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    SCHOOL OF Informatics and Computing January 2011On the Move Undergraduate Programs Show Dramatic Increases The Indiana University Bloomington School of Informatics and Computing (SoIC) has bachelor's degree programs in computer science and informatics. Both are showing dramatic increases of total and new

  20. Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001

    E-print Network

    Gerstein, Mark

    Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001 Review What is bioinformatics? An introduction,particularlywithreferencetotranscription regulatory systems. (Molecular) bio ­ informatics: bioinformatics is conceptualising biology in terms of molecules (in the sense of physical chemistry) and applying "informatics techniques" (derived from

  1. INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING www.soic.indiana.edu/career

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING www.soic.indiana.edu/career 2014-15 Employer Guide #12;The breadth of programs in the School of Informatics and Computing results in talented students with a range: informatics, computer science 9graduate degrees and 18tracks and specializations Master's degrees

  2. Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics A Capstone Project is one of the requirements of the MS in Health Informatics degree at IUPUI. By the end of the first year the student in the School of Informatics. The student may select to have a partner/sponsor from outside of the department

  3. IU School of Informatics Statement of Salary Policy

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IU School of Informatics Statement of Salary Policy Revised ­ 9/16/02 Salary and subsequent salary increases within the IU School of Informatics are important factors in rewarding and retaining productive and endorsed at least annually by the IU School of Informatics faculty council. #12;

  4. Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the

    E-print Network

    Page 0 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the National, 2005 ­ September 30, 2007 #12;Page 1 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A. Answers to health-related problems are buried in the data, and the computer techniques of informatics can

  5. www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computers are Becoming a Necessary

    E-print Network

    Snir, Marc

    www.informatics.uiuc.edu 1 Computers are Becoming a Necessary Extension of our Brain Extend our physical capabilities And it has just started #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computing & Information Science & Engineering Order, Family or Genus? 2 SE CE CS IS IT MIS LIS X-Informatics X= astro, bio, business, chem

  6. IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy Revised ­ 9/16/02 Tenure-track candidates in the IU School of Informatics shall undergo a more comprehensive annual review process in the third year reviews to these materials and forward the packet to the IU School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure

  7. Creating Informatics Olympiad Tasks: Exploring the Black Art

    E-print Network

    Burton, Benjamin

    Creating Informatics Olympiad Tasks: Exploring the Black Art Benjamin A. BURTON Department-archived version Available from http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~bab/papers/ Abstract. Each year a wealth of informatics can use to find new ideas for tasks and refine these ideas into problems suitable for an informatics

  8. Vol. 2, No. 2 Summer 2004 Community Informatics

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Vol. 2, No. 2 · Summer 2004 Community Informatics HCI grad builds bridges to technology in Malaysia Association, in cooperation with the School of Informatics, and is mailed to all alumni of the School of Informatics. For information about IUAA membership or activities, call (800) 824-3044 or e-mail iualumni

  9. Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services David S. Mendelson, MD informatics tools and developments can help the radiologist respond to the drive for safety, quality and imaging technologies. Our future as a specialty is dependent on integrating these informatics solutions

  10. Informatics Olympiads: Challenges in Programming and Algorithm Design

    E-print Network

    Burton, Benjamin

    Informatics Olympiads: Challenges in Programming and Algorithm Design Benjamin A. Burton Department in Informatics is a world- wide contest for high school students, with a strong focus on creativity and ingenuity involved. 1 Introduction The International Olympiad in Informatics (IOI) is a prestigious international

  11. IU School of Informatics Policy on Joint Appointments

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IU School of Informatics Policy on Joint Appointments Revised ­ 11/11/02 There may be times when joint appointments for faculty are made between IU School of Informatics and other schools or units within Indiana University. This policy summarizes the expectations of the IU School of Informatics

  12. Mediated interaction: Social Informatics in the era of ubiquitous computing

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    Mediated interaction: Social Informatics in the era of ubiquitous computing Hamid R. Ekbia School of Library and Information Science Indiana University hekbia@indiana.edu Abstract Social Informatics (SI of the theoretical issues involved in this shift. Keywords: social informatics, ubiquitous computing, interaction

  13. SensibleJournal: A Mobile Personal Informatics System for

    E-print Network

    SensibleJournal: A Mobile Personal Informatics System for Visualizing Mobility and Social I describe SensibleJournal, a mobile personal informatics system for visualizing mobility and social informatics system til at visualisere mobilitet og social interaction. I SensibleJournal fores- lås en ny

  14. Social Informatics of Digital Library Use and Infrastructure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Ann Peterson; Star, Susan Leigh

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature on digital libraries (DLs) by examining its conceptions; concepts related to social informatics; researchers exploring DL social informatics; methods of DL design; social aspects of DL infrastructure and use; and research approaches to DL social informatics. Presents questions for further research and discusses social and…

  15. Beyond the Superhighway : Exploiting the Internet with Medical Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J Cimino

    1997-01-01

    As in other areas of society, the Internet and the World Wide Web are becoming important topics in medical informatics. This is evident from the recent American Medical Informatics Association's 1996 Annual Fall Symposium, where the theme was “Beyond the Superhighway: Exploiting the Internet with Medical Informatics.” Of the over 330 papers and abstracts published in the Proceedings, one third

  16. An Informatics Infrastructure Is Essential for Evidence-based Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Bakken

    2001-01-01

    The contention of the author is that an informatics infrastructure is essential for evidenced-based practice. Five building blocks of an informatics infrastructure for evidence-based practice are proposed: 1) standardized terminologies and structures, 2) digital sources of evidence, 3) standards that facilitate health care data exchange among heterogeneous systems, 4) informatics processes that support the acquisition and application of evidence to

  17. Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html 1 #12;Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical Tuition Adjustment (AGR),Terminal Graduate Registration (TGR), Faculty Designations in Study Lists 5

  18. Serving the enterprise and beyond with informatics for integrating biology and the bedside (i2b2)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shawn N. Murphy; Griffin Weber; Michael Mendis; Vivian Gainer; Henry C. Chueh; Susanne Churchill; Isaac S. Kohane

    2010-01-01

    Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is one of seven projects sponsored by the NIH Roadmap National Centers for Biomedical Computing (http:\\/\\/www.ncbcs.org). Its mission is to provide clinical investigators with the tools necessary to integrate medical record and clinical research data in the genomics age, a software suite to construct and integrate the modern clinical research chart. i2b2

  19. Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 291316 291 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 291­316 291 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Learning Objects Need Badly Instructional Digital Libraries Support Mihaela-Monica VLADOIU Department of Informatics, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiesti Bd. Bucuresti 39, Ploiesti

  20. Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 255268 255 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 255­268 255 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Investigation of Q-Learning in the Context of a Virtual Learning Environment Dalia manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 255-268" #12;256 D

  1. Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 223240 223 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 223­240 223 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius An Experience Applying Reinforcement Learning in a Web-Based Adaptive and Intelligent the student with most suitable hal-00588795,version1-26Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics

  2. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 7590 75 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 75­90 75 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Mathematical Logic and Deduction in Computer Science Education Hashim HABIBALLA in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 7, No. 1 (2008) 75-90" #12;76 H. Habiballa, T. Kmet

  3. Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 359372 359 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 359­372 359 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Turtle's Navigation and Manipulation of Geometrical Figures Constructed by Variable Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 359

  4. Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 207218 207 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 207­218 207 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Promoting Different Kinds of Learners towards Active Learning in the Web hal-00588801,version1-26Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education

  5. Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 397410 397 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 397­410 397 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Would-Be Teachers' Competence in Applying ICT: Exposition and Preconditions on the impact of studying informatics in forms 11 and 12 on the development of the latter competence. Research

  6. Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 241256 241 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 241­256 241 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius The Cognitive Transfer and the Tutor's Role in a CBL Environment Athanasis KAROULIS, Andreas POMBORTSIS Dept. of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki PO Box 888, 54006

  7. Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 127140 127 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 127­140 127 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Towards Building an Open Digital Library for Instructional Design that Facilitates Reflective e-Instruction Mihaela-Monica VLADOIU Department of Informatics, Petroleum-Gas University

  8. Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 335358 335 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 335­358 335 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Half-Baked Logo Microworlds as Boundary Objects in Integrated Design Chronis KYNIGOS in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 335-358" #12;336 C. Kynigos of interaction

  9. Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 269282 269 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 269­282 269 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Design and Implementation of a Logo-based Computer Graphics Course Pavel BOYTCHEV Dept. of Information Technologies, Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Sofia University 5, James Bouchier, Sofia

  10. Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 255264 255 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 255­264 255 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius JeCo: Combining Program Visualization and Story Weaving Niko MYLLER Jussi NUUTINEN manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 5, No. 2 (2006) 267-276" #12;256 N

  11. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 105126 105 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 105­126 105 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Exploring Individual and Collaborative Dimensions of Knowledge Building in an Online, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 7, No. 1 (2008) 105-126" #12;106 L

  12. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 3154 31 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 31­54 31 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Data Mining Application in Higher Learning Institutions Naeimeh DELAVARI, Somnuk PHON guideline of hal-00588765,version1-10May2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education

  13. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 127142 127 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 127­142 127 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Students Learning Experience in the Integrated Information Literacy Course Constructed-00588773,version1-10May2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International

  14. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 91104 91 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 91­104 91 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Information Technologies for Biology Education: Computerized Electrophysiology of Plant but application of computational and analytical methods of informatics in it is still a prob- lem for many

  15. Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 161180 161 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 161­180 161 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Intelligent Agents for Distance Learning Analía AMANDI, Marcelo CAMPO , Marcelo ARMENTANO, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 2, No. 2 (2003) 161-180" #12;162 A. Amandi, M

  16. Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 316 3 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 3­16 3 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Future Quality in the Emergent European Higher Education Area Involves the Use of Informatics Javier BILBAO, Eugenio BRAVO, Olatz GARCÍA, Concepción VARELA, Miguel RODRÍGUEZ, Purificación

  17. Achieving Holistic Health for the Individual through Person-Centered Collaborative Care Supported by Informatics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This article seeks to describe the current state of informatics supported collaborative care and to point out areas of future research in this highly interdisciplinary field. Methods In this article, person-centered collaborative care is seen as a concept addressing both the provision of care over organizational borders between health and social care, and within care teams as well as the changed patient/client-care provider relationship characterized by increased patient/client involvement. Results From a health systems perspective, there are several attempts to describe the conceptual and theoretical basis for collaborative care indicating that agreement on core concepts and terminology is difficult. From an informatics perspective, focus is on standardization of clinical content models and terminology to achieve interoperability of information technology systems and to support standardized care pathways. Few examples look into how ad-hoc collaborative care processes can be supported using information technology and informatics standards. Nevertheless, promising examples do exist showing that integrational Information Communication Technology services can be supportive for collaborative care developments. However, the current landscape consists of many fragmented, often technology-driven eHealth solutions targeting specific diagnostic groups in geographically and/or organizationally restricted settings. Conclusions A systematic approach incorporating organizational, clinical, informatics and social science knowledge is needed to perform further research in areas such as virtual team partnerships, new paradigms of care delivery, data and knowledge management as well as its secure sharing. Also organizational and legal aspects need to be further researched in order to facilitate the coordinated provision of health and social care to citizens including self-management, utilizing informatics support in a societal context. PMID:23626912

  18. Peer Review of Teaching

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Charles E.; Yu, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview and description of peer review of teaching for faculty members and administrators who would like to implement a peer review program. This may include classroom and clinical settings. A brief overview, procedure, and a teaching competence evaluation rubric are provided PMID:18483580

  19. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  20. On the Informatics Laws of Software

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental finding in computer science is that software, as an artifact of human creativity, is not constrained by the laws and principles discovered in the physical world. Thus, a natural question we have to ask is: What are the constraints that software obeys? This paper attempts to demonstrate that software obeys the laws of informatics, because software is a

  1. Cognitive informatics models of the brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang; Ying Wang

    2006-01-01

    The human brain is the most complicated organ in the universe and a new frontier yet to be explored by an interdisciplinary approach. This paper attempts to develop logical and cognitive models of the brain by using cognitive informatics and formal methodologies. This paper adopts a memory-based approach to explore the brain and to demonstrate that memory is the foundation

  2. Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vimla L Patel; David R Kaufman

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging

  3. The Theoretical Framework of Cognitive Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a transdisciplinary enquiry of the internal information processing mechanisms and processes of the brain and natural intelligence shared by almost all science and engineering disciplines. This article presents an intensive review of the new field of CI. The structure of the theoretical framework of CI is described encompassing the Layered Reference Model of the Brain

  4. Informatics challenges of high-throughput microscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaobo Zhou; Stephen T. C. Wong

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we discussed the emerging informatics issues of high-throughput screening (HTS) using automated fluorescence microscopy technology, otherwise known as high-content screening (HCS) in the pharmaceutical industry. Optimal methods of scoring biomarkers and identifying candidate hits have been actively studied in academia and industry, with the exception of data modeling topics. To find candidate hits, we need to score

  5. Informatics and Small Computers in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Jose; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This paper highlights potential benefits and more pressing social and legal problems facing Latin American nations in the area of informatics and small computers. Discussion covers potential uses (education, office applications, agriculture, national planning); role of central governments; implications for economic development; and transborder…

  6. Social Informatics Education in I-Schools

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alice Robbin; Noriko Hara; Ron Day

    This essay focuses on the philosophical and conceptual underpinnings of a program of study in Social Informatics. We examine foundational concepts and analytical tools, ideas worked out by Rob Kling and others about the key components of an ICT- oriented education (even when the intent of their discussion was not pedagogical). Our intention is to assay Kling's program of critical

  7. CSIRO COMPUTATIONAL INFORMATICS Graduate Fellow Program

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xiangyun "Sean"

    CSIRO COMPUTATIONAL INFORMATICS Graduate Fellow Program #12;About the Graduate Fellow Program under the direct supervision of a CSIRO scientist. At the end of the two-year period, it is envisaged. In addition, Graduates will leave CSIRO having developed key research and people skills to support them

  8. MSN PROGRAM NURSING INFORMATICS CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Pei

    as Scholar II: Evidence-based Practice 3 N582 Population Health in a Global Society 3 N583 Professional in Healthcare: Design, Management and Connectivity 3 N716 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 N717 Health Seminar (2 semesters @ 1 credit each) 2 N720 Health Information Technology Leadership 1 N721 System Design

  9. Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Constitution

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    1 Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Constitution 3/4/05 Preamble The field imposed by the faculty constitution of the IUPUI campus, this Constitution confirms and establishes of Trustees, the laws of the state and other provisions of the Constitution. Section 3. Executive Associate

  10. Medical informatics and telemedicine: A vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmer, Terry P.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of medical informatics is to improve care. This requires the commitment and harmonious collaboration between the computer scientists and clinicians and an integrated database. The vision described is how medical information systems are going to impact the way medical care is delivered in the future.

  11. Image informatics at a national research center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Rodney Long; Sameer K. Antani; George R. Thoma

    2005-01-01

    Image informatics at the Communications Engineering Branch of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications (LHNCBC), an R&D division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), includes document and biomedical images. In both domains, research into computer-assisted methods for information extraction, and the implementation of prototype systems incorporating such methods, is central to our mission. Current document image research

  12. Charlotte Informatics Opportunities and Challenges for

    E-print Network

    Raja, Anita

    Charlotte Informatics Forum 2012 Opportunities and Challenges for Big Data Analytics May 15, 2012 in the Analog World #12;The Problem: "Big Data" In 2002, recorded media and electronic information flows VACCINE & CCICADA PIE ACI Transition The Formation and Growth of Visualization and Data Analytics RVACs

  13. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Doveton; W. Lynn Watney

    2003-01-01

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  14. Cognitive and learning sciences in biomedical and health instructional design: A review with lessons for biomedical informatics education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vimla L. Patel; Nicole A. Yoskowitz; José F. Arocha; Edward H. Shortliffe

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical and methodological advances in the cognitive and learning sciences can greatly inform curriculum and instruction in biomedicine and also educational programs in biomedical informatics. It does so by addressing issues such as the processes related to comprehension of medical information, clinical problem-solving and decision-making, and the role of technology. This paper reviews these theories and methods from the cognitive

  15. Epilepsy informatics and an ontology-driven infrastructure for large database research and patient care in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The epilepsy community increasingly recognizes the need for a modern classification system that can also be easily integrated with effective informatics tools. The 2010 reports by the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) identified informatics as a critical resource to improve quality of patient care, drive clinical research, and reduce the cost of health services. An effective informatics infrastructure for epilepsy, which is underpinned by a formal knowledge model or ontology, can leverage an ever increasing amount of multimodal data to improve (1) clinical decision support, (2) access to information for patients and their families, (3) easier data sharing, and (4) accelerate secondary use of clinical data. Modeling the recommendations of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) classification system in the form of an epilepsy domain ontology is essential for consistent use of terminology in a variety of applications, including electronic health records systems and clinical applications. In this review, we discuss the data management issues in epilepsy and explore the benefits of an ontology-driven informatics infrastructure and its role in adoption of a “data-driven” paradigm in epilepsy research. PMID:23647220

  16. Utilization of medical imaging informatics and biometrics technologies in healthcare delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. K. Huang

    2008-01-01

    Purpose  With the large amount of image data accumulated daily from medical imaging modalities and picture archiving and communication\\u000a systems (PACS) in hospitals and from healthcare biometrics related databases, we can take advantage of these data resources\\u000a to investigate innovative clinical service, research and education using the concept of imaging informatics. In this paper\\u000a we present five independent concepts and technologies

  17. Teaching evidence-based medicine to undergraduate medical students: a course integrating ethics, audit, management and clinical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Martin; Ashcroft, Richard; Atun, Rifat A; Freeman, George K; Jamrozik, Konrad

    2006-06-01

    A six-week full time course for third-year undergraduate medical students at Imperial College uniquely links evidence-based medicine (EBM) with ethics and the management of change in health services. It is mounted jointly by the Medical and Business Schools and features an experiential approach. Small teams of students use a problem-based strategy to address practical issues identified from a range of clinical placements in primary and secondary care settings. The majority of these junior clinical students achieve important objectives for learning about teamwork, critical appraisal, applied ethics and health care organisations. Their work often influences the care received by patients in the host clinical units. We discuss the strengths of the course in relation to other accounts of programmes in EBM. We give examples of recurring experiences from successive cohorts and discuss assessment issues and how our multi-phasic evaluation informs evolution of the course and the potential for future developments. PMID:16807168

  18. Courting the Rockefeller Foundation and other attempts to integrate clinical teaching, medical practice, and research in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Westmore, Ann; Penington, David

    2009-01-01

    Courtesy of the cashed-up Rockefeller Foundation (RF), opportunity knocked in the 1920s for university medical schools committed to closer integration with teaching hospitals. The University of Melbourne Medical School, recognising the opportunity to win RF funds to help with rebuilding, sought government support for an audacious plan consistent with the university-hospital-research triads designed to advance medical science, that had strong RF support. Using a range of local archival sources, this paper details the back story to the development of the plan in the mid-1920s and its presentation to the RF by a high-powered delegation from Victoria in 1927. Although a change of government undermined the attempt and the RF money went to Sydney, sufficient momentum survived to implement the plan in several forms over the following decades, contributing to Victoria's subsequent leadership role in medical science. PMID:20481117

  19. An Informatics Blueprint for Healthcare Quality Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    Niland, Joyce C.; Rouse, Layla; Stahl, Douglas C.

    2006-01-01

    There is a critical gap in our nation's ability to accurately measure and manage the quality of medical care. A robust healthcare quality information system (HQIS) has the potential to address this deficiency through the capture, codification, and analysis of information about patient treatments and related outcomes. Because non-technical issues often present the greatest challenges, this paper provides an overview of these socio-technical issues in building a successful HQIS, including the human, organizational, and knowledge management (KM) perspectives. Through an extensive literature review and direct experience in building a practical HQIS (the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Outcomes Research Database system), we have formulated an “informatics blueprint” to guide the development of such systems. While the blueprint was developed to facilitate healthcare quality information collection, management, analysis, and reporting, the concepts and advice provided may be extensible to the development of other types of clinical research information systems. PMID:16622161

  20. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs

    PubMed Central

    Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this does not always mean that the program is of an international level. The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) has expertise in the field of education. The IMIA Recommendations on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics guide curricula development. The goal of this article is to show that IMIA can also play the role of accreditation agency and to present the IMIA accreditation protocol and experiences obtained with it. Methods The accreditation procedure used in the Netherlands and Belgium was taken as a template for the design of the IMIA accreditation protocol. In a trial period of one and a half year the protocol is tested out on six health informatics programs. Results An accreditation protocol was designed. For judging the curriculum of a program the IMIA Recommendations are used. The institution has to write a self-assessment report and a site visit committee visits the program and judges its quality, supported by the self-assessment report and discussions with all stakeholders of the program. Conclusions After having visited three programs it appears that the IMIA accreditation procedure works well. Only a few changes had to be introduced. Writing the self-assessment report already appears to be beneficial for the management of the program to obtain a better insight in the quality of their program. PMID:24175114

  1. An innovative model for teaching complex clinical procedures: Integration of standardised patients into ward round training for final year students

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Nikendei; B. Kraus; H. Lauber; M. Schrauth; P. Weyrich; S. Zipfel; J. Jünger; S. Briem

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Ward rounds are an essential activity for doctors in hospital settings and represent complex tasks requiring not only medical knowledge but also communication skills, clinical technical skills, patient management skills and team-work skills. However, although the need for ward round training is emphasized in the published literature, there are currently no reports of ward round training in a simulated

  2. Radiologic Pulmonary Findings, Clinical Manifestations and Serious Complications in Scrub Typhus: Experiences From A Teaching Hospital in Eastern Taiwan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kun-Ming Wu; Zhe-Wei Wu; Guo-Quan Peng; Jian Liang Wu; Shih-Yi Lee

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Background: Scrub typhus (tsutsugamushi disease) is an endemic infectious disease in eastern Taiwan caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Methods: A total of 136 cases of scrub typhus were diagnosed from patients' blood samples. Medical records were reviewed and clinical manifestations and chest X-rays were analyzed. Results: Scrub typhus was diagnosed in 136 patients, with a mean age of 40.7 ±

  3. Objectives: Participants are introduced to several clinical cases of teaching and learning derived from the practices of

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    ;Practice based small grOuP-educatiOn (Pbsg-ed) (Foundation for medical Practice education) This special education in a case-based format that makes judicious use of the most recent and best evidence available with the challenges of maximizing educational opportunities for learners while providing effective clinical care

  4. The State of Human Anatomy Teaching in the Medical Schools of Gulf Cooperation Council Countries

    PubMed Central

    Habbal, Omar

    2009-01-01

    Available literature on medical education charts an emerging trend in the field of anatomy. In the past decade, assisted by innovations in informatics and the paradigm shift in medical education, the hands-on experience of cadaver dissection has progressively become a relic of the past. Within the context of the situation in Gulf Cooperation Council countries, this paper compares the traditional teaching approach with the modern one that tends to emphasise technical gadgetry, virtual reality and plastic models rather than hands-on-experience to impart knowledge and skill. However, cadaver-based learning is an important building block for the future physician and surgeon since clinical astuteness is likely to rely on skills gained from hands-on experience rather than the tendency to learning through virtual reality found in modern curricula. PMID:21509271

  5. SYSTEMS THINKING AND COMMUNITY OPERATIONS RESEARCH NEEDED FOR BETTER WORK IN COMMUNITY INFORMATICS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Petkova; D Petkov; M D'Onofrio

    The paper shows that systems thinking is needed in research efforts in Community Informatics. It analyses briefly Virtual Community Informatics, Community Informatics and the broader field of (Virtual) Community Informatics as suggested by Bieber and Gurstein. The links between Community Informatics and Community Operations Research and indirectly in that way with systems thinking, are explored as well as the potential

  6. ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    -scanner medical records · Real-time query and alarming Software system architecture Real-time query/reporting Real-time Pathologists Medical geneticists Radiologists Health Systems Engineers Focus Area I: Imaging centered data analytics for better diagnosis and treatment of cancer Focus Area II: Operational excellence, work flow

  7. Informatics infrastructure of CAD system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ewa Pietka; Arkadiusz Gertych; Krzysztof Witko

    2005-01-01

    A computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system requires several components which influence its effectiveness. An image processing methodology is responsible for the analysis, database structure archives and distributes the patient demographics, clinical information, and image data. A graphical user interface is applied in order to enter the data and present it to the user. By designing dynamic Web pages a remote

  8. DCCPS: BRP: HCIRB: Behavioral Informatics

    Cancer.gov

    The growing collection of consumer and clinical-facing devices and technologies has created unprecedented opportunities to impact the health of individuals and populations. Consumer and patient-centric information sharing, technology-mediated communication, care coordination, and behavior change are examples of health-related outcomes for which technologies play a role in health and wellbeing.

  9. An approach to policy analysis and development of medical informatics.

    PubMed

    Power, M

    1999-12-01

    There are three grand challenges for medical informatics policy: (1) What is it? (2) What should it be? (3) How can we influence its development? To address these challenges requires: (1) an historical analysis of medical informatics policies in a representative sample of countries. This should include an account of major events, the roles of technology, individuals, culture and social settings. Pioneers have been led by visions of what medical informatics should achieve. The role of these visions and the reactions to unmet expectations thus also need to be analysed; (2) a generally applicable medical informatics policy that places the needs of its stakeholders and clients first. Top priorities are to support quality health care delivery and quality management of health care facilities; (3) an explanation of how policies in medical informatics are created and implemented together with a strategy to guide medical informatics professionals in their lobbying efforts. PMID:10805010

  10. Chief nurse executives need contemporary informatics competencies.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Roy L

    2013-01-01

    Using the Informatics Organizing Research Model (Effken, 2003) to add context to the information gleaned from ethnographic interviews of seven chief nurse executives (CNEs) currently leading integrated delivery systems, the author concluded nurse executives can no longer depend exclusively on American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) competencies as they outsource their responsibility for information technology knowledge to nurse informaticians, chief information officers, and physicians. Although AONE sets out a specific list of recommended information technology competencies for system CNEs, innovative nursing practice demands a more strategic, broader level of knowledge. This broader competency centers on the reality of CNEs being charged with creating and implementing a patient-centered vision that drives health care organizations' investment in technology. A new study identifies and validates the gaps between selected CNEs' self-identified informatics competencies and those set out by AONE (Simpson, 2012). PMID:24592532

  11. Launching: university partnership for health informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. Jacko; Terrence Adam; Bonnie L. Westra; Marty Witrak; Ron Berkeland; Andrew F. Nelson; Adel L. Ali; Layne Johnson; Rui Kuang; Kathy LaTour; Sandra Potthoff; Amy Watters

    2010-01-01

    The University Partnership for Health Informatics (UP-HI) is a private-public partnership between the University of Minnesota and the College of St. Scholastica that builds on 11 existing health information technology (HIT) certificates and degrees. It is a newly funded University-Based Training Program enabled by the ARRA HITECH Act. The overall goals and objectives of this partnership are to: 1) rapidly

  12. From Terrorism Informatics to Dark Web Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hsinchun Chen

    \\u000a In this paper, we provide an overview of “Terrorism Informatics,” a new discipline that aims to study the terrorism phenomena\\u000a with a data-driven, quantitative, and computational approach. We first summarize several critical books that lay the foundation\\u000a for studying terrorism in the new Internet era. We then review important terrorism research centers and resources that are\\u000a of relevance to our

  13. VISION FOR THE IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS Informatics studies the application of Information Technology to the arts,sciences and professions. The Indiana

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    VISION FOR THE IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS DRAFT Informatics studies the application of Information Technology to the arts,sciences and professions. The Indiana University School of Informatics has set as its in Informatics programs, including undergraduate and graduate education, research, placement and outreach. Our

  14. Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Reinhold Haux

    2004-01-01

    Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

  15. COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Veres, Peter

    COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Subject Information Sheet Code. Gauss's constant and masses of planets. Energy integral and limits of velocities. Elliptical, parabolic

  16. COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Veres, Peter

    COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Subject Information Sheet Code of the subject: Introduction, properties of matter, energy transport in stars, static stellar structure, nuclear

  17. Cultivating informatics competencies in a community of practice.

    PubMed

    Barton, Amy J

    2005-01-01

    To move the healthcare industry into the 21st century, nurses must become savvy in the use of informatics to provide optimal care to their patients. However, the relatively few formal nursing informatics programs that exist across the country are simply not adequate to meet the demands of both new and existing nurses. Informatics competencies must be incorporated into nursing curricula at entry-level and via staff development to provide a ready workforce. Creative faculty development strategies that capitalize on the concept of faculty as a community of practice are required to incorporate informatics competencies into nursing curricula. PMID:16260996

  18. Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Additionally, we suggest core source materials and specific learning activities to support pharmacy informatics education. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging changes in the practice model. These changes are facilitated by pharmacy informatics and will inevitably become commonplace in our graduates’ practice environment. PMID:21829267

  19. Abnormal Blood Glucose as a Prognostic Factor for Adverse Clinical Outcome in Children Admitted to the Paediatric Emergency Unit at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Amponsah-Achiano, Kwame; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dysglycaemia (hyper- or hypoglycaemia) in critically ill children has been associated with poor outcome. We compared the clinical outcomes in children admitted to Pediatric Emergency Unit (PEU) at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) for acute medical conditions and presenting with euglycaemia or dysglycaemia. This is a prospective case matching cohort study. Eight hundred subjects aged between 3 and 144 months were screened out of whom 430 (215 with euglycaemia and 215 with dysglycaemia) were enrolled. The median age was 24 months (range: 3–144 months). In the dysglycaemia group, 28 (13%) subjects had hypoglycemia and 187 (87%) had hyperglycemia. Overall, there were 128 complications in 116 subjects. The number of subjects with complications was significantly higher in dysglycaemia group (n = 99, 46%) compared to euglycaemia group (n = 17, 8%) (P < 0.001). Forty subjects died out of whom 30 had dysglycaemia (P = 0.001). Subjects with dysglycaemia were 3 times (95% CI: 1.5–6.0) more likely to die and 4.8 times (95% CI: 3.1–7.5) more likely to develop complications (P = 0.001). Dysglycaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in children with acute medical conditions and should lead to intensive management of the underlying condition. PMID:25614747

  20. Changes in sexual practices and responses among ante-natal clinic attendees in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, A B; Fatusi, A O; Makinde, O N; Omojuwa, I; Asa, S; Onwudiegwu, U

    2005-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out among 134 antenatal clinic attendees in a Nigerian tertiary hospital to assess pregnancy-related sexual beliefs and changes in sexual frequency and response. Information was collected through a semi-structured questionnaire, and analysed by SPSS. Only 15% of women believed that religious, social or cultural reasons prevented sexual intercourse in pregnancy. Frequency of sexual intercourse decreased in pregnancy in 37.4% of the respondents, remained unaltered in 46.1% and increased in 16.5%. Age, marriage duration and gestational age were not associated with change in the pattern of coital frequency in pregnancy, but education was significantly associated. Sexual responsiveness diminished in approximately half of our respondents in terms of arousal (54.5%), orgasm (48.5%), pleasure (43.7%) and satisfaction (51.4%). The changes were not associated with pregnancy duration. We concluded that sex in pregnancy is well accepted in our environment, and health workers should promote sexual health and well-being in pregnancy. PMID:16368588

  1. [Midwifery clinical practicum education].

    PubMed

    Kao, Chien-Huei; Gau, Meei-Ling

    2013-06-01

    Midwifery is a practical facet of the health sciences that emphasizes professional competence-oriented teaching and learning. Cognitive and practical processes integrate and build midwifery student professional knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Clinical education is a teaching method and strategy used to prepare midwifery students for professional practice. Midwifery clinical teaching plans are designed using literature review, expert opinions, and student comments and determine total required hours and caseloads. Midwifery clinical teaching activities and methods promote self-reflection, childbirth education fundamentals, learning by role model observation, and learning role function through overseas observership programs. This paper discusses midwifery education dilemmas and coping methods in Taiwan. PMID:23729338

  2. Traditional eye medicine use by newly presenting ophthalmic patients to a teaching hospital in south-eastern Nigeria: socio-demographic and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Eze, Boniface Ikenna; Chuka-Okosa, Chimdi Memnofu; Uche, Judith Nkechi

    2009-01-01

    Background This study set out to determine the incidence, socio-demographic, and clinical correlates of Traditional Eye Medicine (TEM) use in a population of newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients attending a tertiary eye care centre in south-eastern Nigeria. Methods In a comparative cross-sectional survey at the eye clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH), Enugu, between August 2004 - July 2006, all newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients were recruited. Participants' socio-demographic and clinical data and profile of TEM use were obtained from history and examination of each participant and entered into a pretested questionnaire and proforma. Participants were subsequently categorized into TEM- users and non-users; intra-group analysis yielded proportions, frequencies, and percentages while chi-square test was used for inter-group comparisons at P = 0.01, df = 1. Results Of the 2,542 (males, 48.1%; females, 51.9%) participants, 149 (5.9%) (males, 45%; females, 55%) used TEM for their current eye disease. The TEMs used were chemical substances (57.7%), plant products (37.7%), and animal products (4.7%). They were more often prescribed by non-traditional (66.4%) than traditional (36.9%) medicine practitioners. TEMs were used on account of vision loss (58.5%), ocular itching (25.4%) and eye discharge (3.8%). Reported efficacy from previous users (67.1%) and belief in potency (28.2%) were the main reasons for using TEM. Civil servants (20.1%), farmers (17.7%), and traders (14.1%) were the leading users of TEM. TEM use was significantly associated with younger age (p < 0.01), being married (p < 0.01), rural residence (p < 0.01), ocular anterior segment disease (p < 0.01), delayed presentation (p < 0.01), low presenting visual acuity (p < 0.01), and co-morbid chronic medical disease (p < 0.01), but not with gender (p = 0.157), and educational status (p = 0.115). Conclusion The incidence of TEM use among new ophthalmic outpatients at UNTH is low. The reasons for TEM use are amenable to positive change through enhanced delivery of promotive, preventive, and curative public eye care services. This has implications for eye care planners and implementers. To reverse the trend, we suggest strengthening of eye care programmes, even distribution of eye care resources, active collaboration with orthodox eye care providers and traditional medical practitioners, and intensification of research efforts into the pharmacology of TEMs. PMID:19852826

  3. Cognitive Informatics: Exploring the Theoretical Foundations for Natural Intelligence, Neural Informatics, Autonomic Computing, and Agent Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yingxu Wang

    Cognitive informatics (CI) is a new discipline that studies the natural intelligence and internal information processing mechanisms of the brain, as well as the processes involved in perception and cognition. CI provides a coherent set of fundamental theories, and contemporary mathematics, which form the foundation for most information and knowledge based science and engineering dis- ciplines such as computer science,

  4. The Departments of Population Health Sciences (PHS) and of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics (BMI) at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine & Public Health seek applicants for a joint faculty

    E-print Network

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    The Departments of Population Health Sciences (PHS) and of Biostatistics & Medical Informatics (BMI completing their PhD or currently working as post-docs are encouraged to apply. Appointments at the rank faculty member will teach one to two biostatistics courses per year in the biostatistics sequence shared

  5. Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T; Becich, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics will be critical to assuring their success as leaders in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:24860688

  6. A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Myers; Thomas C. Allison; Sandra Bittner; Brett T. Didier; Michael Frenklach; William H. Green Jr.; Yen-ling Ho; John C. Hewson; Wendy S. Koegler; Carina S. Lansing; David Leahy; Michael Lee; Renata Mccoy; Michael Minkoff; Sandeep Nijsure; Gregor Von Laszewski; David W. Montoya; Carmen M. Pancerella; Reinhardt Pinzon; William Pitz; Larry A. Rahn; Branko Ruscic; Karen L. Schuchardt; Eric G. Stephan; Albert F. Wagner; Theresa L. Windus; Christine L. Yang

    2004-01-01

    Abstract The Collaboratory for Multi - scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics - based approach to synthesizing multi - scale information to support a systems - based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research An open source multi - scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to

  7. Characteristics of Information Systems and Business Informatics Study Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfert, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade there is an intensive discussion within the Information Systems (IS) and Informatics community about the characteristics and identity of the discipline. Simultaneously with the discussion, there is an ongoing debate on essential skills and capabilities of IS and Business Informatics graduates as well as the profile of IS…

  8. Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan

    2001-01-01

    The track entitled “Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality” at the AMIA Spring 2000 Congress was devoted to examining the new field of consumer health informatics. This area is developing rapidly, as worldwide changes are occurring in the organization and delivery of health care and in the traditional roles of patient and provider. This paper describes the key

  9. Name: Intended quarter of entry: Academic Planning Worksheet for Informatics

    E-print Network

    Queitsch, Christine

    Name: Intended quarter of entry: Academic Planning Worksheet for Informatics This worksheet as courses that provide exposure to a variety of social science fields such as psychology, sociology INFO 200 - Intellectual Foundations of Informatics CSE 142 NW QSR ­ Computer Programming I English

  10. Social Care Informatics - The Missing Partner in eHealth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Rigby; Penny Hill; Sabine Koch; Jarmo Kärki

    2009-01-01

    To the individual, social care can be an es sential part of maintaining health, as is reflected by the WHO definition of health as being one of wellbeing. However, health informatics currently narrowly restricts itself to health organizations' activities. Digital records in social care are increasing, raising the need to recognize the area of social care informatics. This new domain

  11. Informatics Education in Italian High Schools Maria Carla Calzarossa1

    E-print Network

    Massari, Luisa

    Informatics Education in Italian High Schools Maria Carla Calzarossa1 , Paolo Ciancarini2 , Luisa of an extensive mon- itoring exercise aimed at assessing the role of informatics education in Italian high schools should then take the responsibility to fill this gap by implementing some specific learning processes

  12. [The Role Development of Informatics Nurse Specialists in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rung-Chuang; Lee, Ying-Li; Lee, Tso-Ying

    2015-06-01

    The development of information technology has changed the world and allowed the innovation of nursing-care services. In recent years, the development of nursing informatics in Taiwan has been catching up with international trends and has been regarded positively by the international medical informatics community. The integration of information technology into medical care system has created the new nursing role of "informatics nurse." Although the certification system and job descriptions for these nurses have become increasingly comprehensive in many nations, Taiwan remains in the early development stage in these regards. Taiwan informatics nurses continue to face unclear and inadequately stated role responsibilities and job titles, undefined training requirements, and a lack of a clear qualification / certification system. This paper introduces the role functions and professional growth of informatics nurses and introduces the framework for a certification system in order to give to various medical and paramedical staffs a better understanding of informatics nursing and to recognize the important role played by informatics nurses in the process of healthcare informatics development. PMID:26073953

  13. electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net

    E-print Network

    Yu, Ping

    in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

  14. Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology

    PubMed Central

    Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

  15. BING: Biomedical informatics pipeline for Next Generation Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Kriseman; Christopher Busick; Szabolcs Szelinger; Valentin Dinu

    2010-01-01

    High throughput parallel genomic sequencing (Next Generation Sequencing, NGS) shifts the bottleneck in sequencing processes from experimental data production to computationally intensive informatics-based data analysis. This manuscript introduces a biomedical informatics pipeline (BING) for the analysis of NGS data that offers several novel computational approaches to 1. image alignment, 2. signal correlation, compensation, separation, and pixel-based cluster registration, 3. signal

  16. Community Informatics and Information Systems: Can They Be Better Connected?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry Stillman; Henry Linger

    2009-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate in Community Informatics about the need for a stronger conceptual and theoretical base in order to give the field disciplinary cohesion and direction. By investigating the body of reflective thinking in Information Systems, researchers in Community Informatics can develop a more rigorous theoretical context for their work. Information Systems can be considered as a fragmented

  17. A hypergraphic model of medical informatics: curriculum development guide.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, X.; Pavilcek, K.

    1999-01-01

    Medical informatics, as a descriptive, scientific study, must be mathematically or theoretically described. Is it important to define a model for medical informatics? The answer is worth pursuing. The medical informatics profession stands to benefit three-fold: first, by clarifying the vagueness of the definition of medical informatics, secondly, by identifying the scope and content for educational programs, and, thirdly, by defining career opportunities for its graduates. Existing medical informatics curricula are not comparable. Consequently, the knowledge and skills of graduates from these programs are difficult to assess. The challenge is to promote academics that develops graduates for prospective employers to fulfill the criteria of the health care industry and, simultaneously, compete with computer science programs that produce information technology graduates. In order to meet this challenge, medical informatics programs must have unique curricula that distinguishes its graduates. The solution is to educate students in a comparable manner across the domain of medical informatics. This paper discusses a theoretical model for medical informatics. Images Figure PMID:10566316

  18. Interpreting Concept Learning in Cognitive Informatics and Granular Computing

    E-print Network

    Yao, Yiyu

    interpretations of existing theories of this age-old problem have appeared time and again. Cognitive informatics processing problems by using cognitive science and neuropsychology theories, and studies the cognitive in1 Interpreting Concept Learning in Cognitive Informatics and Granular Computing Yiyu Yao IEEE

  19. Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics: Improving Dental Research, Education, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Paul C.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; White, Joel M.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kimmes, Nicole; Meng, Thomas R.; Willis, George P.; DeVries, Ted; Chapman, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in informatics, particularly the implementation of electronic health records (EHR), in dentistry have facilitated the exchange of information. The majority of dental schools in North America use the same EHR system, providing an unprecedented opportunity to integrate these data into a repository that can be used for oral health education and research. In 2007, fourteen dental schools formed the Consortium for Oral Health-Related Informatics (COHRI). Since its inception, COHRI has established structural and operational processes, governance and bylaws, and a number of work groups organized in two divisions: one focused on research (data standardization, integration, and analysis), and one focused on education (performance evaluations, virtual standardized patients, and objective structured clinical examinations). To date, COHRI (which now includes twenty dental schools) has been successful in developing a data repository, pilot-testing data integration, and sharing EHR enhancements among the group. This consortium has collaborated on standardizing medical and dental histories, developing diagnostic terminology, and promoting the utilization of informatics in dental education. The consortium is in the process of assembling the largest oral health database ever created. This will be an invaluable resource for research and provide a foundation for evidence-based dentistry for years to come. PMID:20930236

  20. Methodologic Issues in Health Informatics Trials: The Complexities of Complex Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbatykh, Ivan; Holbrook, Anne; Thabane, Lehana; Dolovich, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Objective All electronic health (e-health) interventions require validation as health information technologies, ideally in randomized controlled trial settings. However, as with other types of complex interventions involving various active components and multiple targets, health informatics trials often experience problems of design, methodology, or analysis that can influence the results and acceptance of the research. Our objective was to review selected key methodologic issues in conducting and reporting randomized controlled trials in health informatics, provide examples from a recent study, and present practical recommendations. Design For illustration, we use the COMPETE III study, a large randomized controlled clinical trial investigating the impact of a shared decision-support system on the quality of vascular disease management in Ontario, Canada. Results We describe a set of methodologic, logistic, and statistical issues that should be considered when planning and implementing trials of complex e-health interventions, and provide practical recommendations for health informatics trialists. Conclusions Our recommendations emphasize validity and pragmatic considerations and would be useful for health informaticians conducting or evaluating e-health studies. PMID:18579839

  1. Preservice Teachers' Reflections on Their Home-School Clinical Teaching Experience: Evidence to Support an Alternative Field Experience for Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhart, Brett; McKethan, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Teacher education programs continue to search for alternative field experiences for preservice teachers. Whether the public schools are overloaded with interns or a break from certain schools is recommended for various reasons, it is important to identify appropriate alternative practice teaching opportunities prior to student teaching. With the…

  2. EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROGRAMED TEXT IN TEACHING GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, A SOURCE BOOK ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS FOR USE IN A CLINICAL DISCIPLINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILDS, PRESTON L.; ZACHERT, VIRGINIA

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES A STUDY TO DETERMINE WHETHER PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION COULD BE USED TO IMPROVE THE TEACHING OF THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH GYNECOLOGIC NEOPLASMS TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. TWO PROGRAMED TEXTS WERE PREPARED--(1) A "CONTENT" TEXT, AN 830-FRAME LINEARLY PROGRAMED TEXT DESIGNED TO REPLACE CONVENTIONAL CLASSROOM TEACHING OF…

  3. Pilot and Collaborative Translational and Clinical Studies The objective of the Pilot and Collaborative Translational and Clinical Studies is to provide

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    the development of Clinical and Translational research at UB. Support is intended for Pilot and Collaborative clinical, translational and behavioral research projects that 1) allow clinical and translational trainees clinical design, biostatistics, clinical research ethics, informatics, or regulatory pathways; or 3) others

  4. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  5. Division of Informatics, University of Edinburgh Institute of Perception, Action and Behaviour

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Bob

    TH E U N I V E R S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H Division of Informatics, University of Edinburgh Data by Euclidean Fitting by Petko Faber, Robert Fisher Informatics Research Report EDI-INF-RR-0146 Division of Informatics August 2002 http://www.informatics.ed.ac.uk/ #12;Estimation of General Curves

  6. Informatics and Biology: What Do They Have in Common Viera K. Proulx, Associate Professor

    E-print Network

    Proulx, Viera K.

    Informatics and Biology: What Do They Have in Common Viera K. Proulx, Associate Professor College By comparing informatics with biology we make an argument for including the study of informatics in a standard of informatics affect profoundly how we live, work, communicate, and play. By learning to understand

  7. Introducing informatics concepts through a contest Valentina Dagiene, dagiene@ktl.mii.lt

    E-print Network

    1 Introducing informatics concepts through a contest Valentina Dagiene, dagiene@ktl.mii.lt Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Akademijos str. 4, LT-08663 Vilnius, Lithuania Gerald Futschek Concepts of informatics play a central role in all curricula and standards for informatics education

  8. Vol. 4, No. 1 Winter 200506Vol. 4, No. 1 Winter 200506 Informatics

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Vol. 4, No. 1 · Winter 2005­06Vol. 4, No. 1 · Winter 2005­06 LEAD Informatics Researchers Take the in Hurricane Prediction LEAD Informatics Researchers Take the in Hurricane Prediction #12;Vol. 4, No. 1 WINTER with the School of Informatics, and is mailed to all alumni of the School of Informatics. For information about

  9. Welcome to all new MSc students! ...from the staff in the Department of Informatics

    E-print Network

    Sussex, University of

    Welcome to all new MSc students! ...from the staff in the Department of Informatics Welcome to the Department of Informatics, to the School of Engineering and Informatics, and to the University of Sussex. Informatics runs master's degrees in Advanced Computer Science, Computing with Digital Media, Evolutionary

  10. Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi)

    E-print Network

    Acosta, Charles A.

    Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi) Our unique program combining legal education and health science informatics will give you a powerful advantage in the competitive environment Outcomes and People's Lives NKU CHase Law + INfOrMaTICs INsTITUTe NKU COLLege Of INfOrMaTICs Northern

  11. DISCIPLINARY DIFFERENCES OF UNDERGRADUATE COMPUTING PROGRAMS AT IUPUI INDIANA UNIVERSITY -SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Informatics The undergraduate program in Informatics, combining principles from and social aspects of information and technology. Students also complete a concentration, which involves the application of informatics to a field of study of their choice. Popular choices include business, human

  12. http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca

    E-print Network

    Adl, Sina

    http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www at the level of Assistant Professor. Medical Informatics in the Faculty of Medicine was established in 1996 in the Medical Informatics Program, program development in the Faculty of Medicine and in the Health Informatics

  13. Teaching Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, James E., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This issue of "Focus: Teaching English in Southeastern Ohio" contains articles about teaching Shakespeare, student summaries of a Shakespeare conference held at Ohio University-Zanesville in April 1976, and suggested projects for teaching poetry writing. It also contains lists of materials and articles related to the teaching of Shakespeare, and…

  14. Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vimla L.; Kaufman, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging disciplines to enable clinicians to benefit from rapid technologic advances. This in turn necessitates a broadening of disciplinary boundaries to consider cognitive and social factors pertaining to the design and use of technology. The authors argue for a place of prominence for cognitive science. Cognitive science provides a framework for the analysis and modeling of complex human performance and has considerable applicability to a range of issues in informatics. Its methods have been employed to illuminate different facets of design and implementation. This approach has also yielded insights into the mechanisms and processes involved in collaborative design. Cognitive scientific methods and theories are illustrated in the context of two examples that examine human-computer interaction in medical contexts and computer-mediated collaborative processes. The framework outlined in this paper can be used to refine the process of iterative design, end-user training, and productive practice. PMID:9824797

  15. Challenges and opportunities in cardiovascular health informatics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Zheng, Ya-Li; Lin, Wan-Hua; Zhang, He-Ye; Zhou, Xiao-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Cardiovascular health informatics is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field concerning the processing, integration/interpretation, storage, transmission, acquisition, and retrieval of information from cardiovascular systems for the early detection, early prediction, early prevention, early diagnosis, and early treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Based on the first author's presentation at the first IEEE Life Sciences Grand Challenges Conference, held on October 4-5, 2012, at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, USA, this paper, focusing on coronary arteriosclerotic disease, will discuss three significant challenges of cardiovascular health informatics, including: 1) to invent unobtrusive and wearable multiparameter sensors with higher sensitivity for the real-time monitoring of physiological states; 2) to develop fast multimodal imaging technologies with higher resolution for the quantification and better understanding of structure, function, metabolism of cardiovascular systems at the different levels; and 3) to develop novel multiscale information fusion models and strategies with higher accuracy for the personalized predication of the CVDs. At the end of this paper, a summary is given to suggest open discussions on these three and more challenges that face the scientific community in this field in the future. PMID:23380853

  16. Food Safety Informatics: A Public Health Imperative

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Cynthia A.; Larkin, Stephanie N.; Akers, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish “near-in-time” or “just-in-time” electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in “real time” can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

  17. Use of statistical analysis in the biomedical informatics literature

    PubMed Central

    Duggal, Mona; Brandt, Cynthia; Lin, Zhenqui; Shiffman, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Statistics is an essential aspect of biomedical informatics. To examine the use of statistics in informatics research, a literature review of recent articles in two high-impact factor biomedical informatics journals, the Journal of American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) and the International Journal of Medical Informatics was conducted. The use of statistical methods in each paper was examined. Articles of original investigations from 2000 to 2007 were reviewed. For each journal, the results by statistical methods were analyzed as: descriptive, elementary, multivariable, other regression, machine learning, and other statistics. For both journals, descriptive statistics were most often used. Elementary statistics such as t tests, ?2, and Wilcoxon tests were much more frequent in JAMIA, while machine learning approaches such as decision trees and support vector machines were similar in occurrence across the journals. Also, the use of diagnostic statistics such as sensitivity, specificity, precision, and recall, was more frequent in JAMIA. These results highlight the use of statistics in informatics and the need for biomedical informatics scientists to have, as a minimum, proficiency in descriptive and elementary statistics. PMID:20064794

  18. Pitfalls in radiology informatics when deploying an enterprise solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsköld, L.; Wintell, M.; Lundberg, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the Region Vastra Gotaland (VGR), Sweden, sharing of data from 4 PACS system has been done through the Radiology Information Infrastructure that where deployed in 2007, and during 2008 and 2009 also including the information obtained from three different RIS systems installed in the region. The RIS information stored in the Radiology Information Infrastructure is Structured Reports (SR) objects that derivatives from the regional information model. In practice, the Enterprise solution now offers new ways of social collaboration through information sharing within a region. Interoperability was developed according to the IHE mission, i.e. applying standards such as digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and Health Level 7 (HL7) to address specific clinical communication needs and support optimal patient care. Applying standards and information has shown to be suitable for interoperability, but not appropriate for implementing social collaboration i.e. first and second opinion, as there is no user services related to the standards. The need for social interaction leads to a common negotiated interface and in contrary with interoperability the approach will be a common defined semantic model. Radiology informatics is the glue between the technical standards, information models,semantics, social ruleworks and regulations used within radiology and their customers to share information and services.

  19. Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    Objective With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. Methods The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. Results and discussion The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. Conclusions Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

  20. HCFA's health care quality improvement program: the medical informatics challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J B; Hayes, R P; Pates, R D; Elward, K S; Ballard, D J

    1996-01-01

    The peer-review organizations (PROs) were created by Congress in 1984 to monitor the cost and quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. In order to do this, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) contracted with the PROs through a series of contracts referred to as "Scopes of Work." Under the Fourth Scope of Work, the HCFA initiated the Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) in 1990, as an application of the principles of continuous quality improvement. Since then, the PROs have participated with health care providers in cooperative projects to improve the quality of primarily inpatient care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Through HCFA-supplied administrative data and clinical data abstracted from patient records, the PROs have been able to identify opportunities for improvements in patient care. In May 1995, the HCFA proposed a new Fifth Scope of Work, which will shift the focus of HCQIP from inpatient care projects to projects in outpatient and managed care settings. This article describes the HCQIP process, the types of data used by the PROs to conduct cooperative projects with health care providers, and the informatics challenges in improving the quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:8750387

  1. The X-caliber architecture for informatics supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Richard C.

    2010-04-01

    This talk discusses the unique demands that informatics applications, particularly graph-theoretic applications, place on computer systems. These applications tend to pose significant data movement challenges for conventional systems. Worse, underlying technology trends are moving computers to cost-driven optimization points that exacerbate the problem. The X-caliber architecture is an economically viable counter-example to conventional architectures based on the integration of innovative technologies that support the data movement requirements of large-scale informatics applications. This talk will discuss the technology drivers and architectural features of the platform, and present analysis showing the benefits for informatics applications, as well as our traditional science and engineering HPC applications.

  2. A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

  3. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

    2011-10-12

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  4. Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema

    Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

    2013-01-22

    Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

  5. Faculty for Mathematics, Informatics and Sciences Fachbereich Physik

    E-print Network

    The Faculty for Mathematics, Informatics and Sciences Fachbereich Physik Institute of Experimental- physics), astro-particle physics, accelerator R&D, and research with photons. Members of the high energy

  6. Accepted for publication in1 Journal of Environmental Informatics2

    E-print Network

    1 Accepted for publication in1 Journal of Environmental Informatics2 3 Reconstruction of snow water energy Branch, Alberta Environment,12 Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T5G 1G413 14 *Corresponding author: E

  7. University of Warsaw Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Bechler, Pawel

    University of Warsaw Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics Sªawomir Kolasi«ski Integral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 1.6 Voluminous simplices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 1.7 The p-energy Ahlfors regularity 41 2.1 Bounded energy and atness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

  8. COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Veres, Peter

    COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Subject Information Sheet Code perturbations. Gravitational potential of an extended body. Brief curriculum of the subject: General integrals Mechanics, London, 1961. Herrick, S.: Astrodynamics 2, New York 1972. Kovalevsky, J.: Introduction

  9. COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Veres, Peter

    COMENIUS UNIVERSITY Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Subject Information Sheet Code mechanics, planetary system. Brief curriculum of the subject: Object of astronomy; coordinate systems. Springer, Berlin, New York Siroký, J., Siroká, M.: 1965, Základy astronomie v píkladech, SPN, Praha

  10. MEDINFO 2007 Studies in Health Technology and Informatics

    E-print Network

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    - Informatics ­ Proceedings of MIE2005 Vol. 115. N. Saranummi, D. Piggott, D.G. Katehakis, M. Tsiknakis and K by Klaus A. Kuhn University Medical Center, Technische Universität München, Germany James R. Warren

  11. Climate Informatics: Accelerating Discovering in Climate Science with Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; McQuade, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The goal of climate informatics, an emerging discipline, is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the field's remaining challenges. Given the impact of climate change, understanding the climate system is an international priority. The goal of climate informatics is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the remaining challenges.

  12. Informatics Methods to Enable Sharing of Quantitative Imaging Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mia A.; Freymann, John B.; Kirby, Justin S.; Fedorov, Andriy; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Berglund, Anders E.; Fenstermacher, David A.; Tan, Yongqiang; Guo, Xiaotao; Casavant, Thomas L.; Brown, Bartley J.; Braun, Terry A.; Dekker, Andre; Roelofs, Erik; Mountz, James M.; Boada, Fernando; Laymon, Charles; Oborski, Matt; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Quantitative Research Network (QIN) is a collaborative research network whose goal is to share data, algorithms and research tools to accelerate quantitative imaging research. A challenge is the variability in tools and analysis platforms used in quantitative imaging. Our goal was to understand the extent of this variation and to develop an approach to enable sharing data and to promote reuse of quantitative imaging data in the community. Methods We performed a survey of the current tools in use by the QIN member sites for representation and storage of their QIN research data including images, image meta-data and clinical data. We identified existing systems and standards for data sharing and their gaps for the QIN use case. We then proposed a system architecture to enable data sharing and collaborative experimentation within the QIN. Results There area variety of tools currently used by each QIN institution. We developed a general information system architecture to support the QIN goals. We also describe the remaining architecture gaps we are developing to enable members to share research images and image meta-data across the network. Conclusions As a research network, the QIN will stimulate quantitative imaging research by pooling data, algorithms and research tools. However, there are gaps in current functional requirements that will need to be met by future informatics development. Special attention must be given to the technical requirements needed to translate these methods into the clinical research workflow to enable validation and qualification of these novel imaging biomarkers. PMID:22770688

  13. Teaching and Learning Recovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John N. Chappel

    1995-01-01

    Teaching recovery is recommended for inclusion in the curriculum and clinical experiences of all health professionals. Recovery is a continuum which starts with intervention and detoxification. It extends, over years, to stable, secure, or serene sobriety. Vaillant has described the necessary conditions for this process as abstinence, substitute dependencies, behavioral and medical consequences, enhanced hope and self-esteem, and social support

  14. Teaching Cultural Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    It is impossible to teach students all characteristics of the myriad cultures present in the United States. Providing students with a framework to assess the cultural traits of any client and to understand how those traits may influence the helping relationship gives them a tool to use in any clinical setting. This article presents a systematic…

  15. Assistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Assistant to Full Professor, Department of BioHealth Informatics Join the faculty of an exciting and growing academic Department of BioHealth Informatics (BHI) at the new Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing (SoIC) at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)! The So

  16. The CLEF Corpus: Semantic Annotation of Clinical Text Angus Roberts, MSc', Robert Gaizauskas, DPhil', Mark Hepple, PhD',

    E-print Network

    Gaizauskas, Rob

    'Natural Language Processing Group, University of Sheffield, UK; 2Bio-HealthInformatics Group, University Abstract The Clinical E-Science Framework (CLEF)project is building aframeworkfor the capture, integration-phenotype informatics. A signiycantportion of the information required by such a framework originates as text, even

  17. A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-Scale Science

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James D. Myers; Thomas C. Allison; Sandra J. Bittner; Brett T. Didier; Michael Frenklach; William H. Green Jr.; Yen-ling Ho; John C. Hewson; Wendy S. Koegler; Carina S. Lansing; David Leahy; Michael Lee; Renata Mccoy; Michael Minkoff; Sandeep Nijsure; Gregor Von Laszewski; David Montoya; Luwi Oluwole; Carmen M. Pancerella; Reinhardt Pinzon; William Pitz; Larry A. Rahn; Branko Ruscic; Karen L. Schuchardt; Eric G. Stephan; Al Wagner; Theresa L. Windus; Christine L. Yang

    2005-01-01

    The Collaboratory for Multi-scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics- based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information to support a systems-based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research. An open source multi-scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to the emerging concept of knowledge grids including provenance tracking and

  18. Photovoltaics Informatics: Harnessing Energy Science via Data-Driven Approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Suh; K. Munch; D. Biagioni; S. Glynn; J. Scharf; M. A. Contreras; J. D. Perkins; B. P. Nelson; W. B. Jones

    2011-01-01

    We discuss our current research focus on photovoltaic (PV) informatics, which is dedicated to functionality enhancement of solar materials through data management and data mining-aided, integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) for rapid screening and identification of multi-scale processing\\/structure\\/property\\/performance relationships. Our current PV informatics research ranges from transparent conducting oxides (TCO) to solar absorber materials. As a test bed, we report

  19. Teaching Heritage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Subtitled "a professional development Website for teachers," Teaching Heritage is an impressive collection of information and resources for teaching Australian history and culture. There are eight main sections to the site: four offer teaching resources and four provide teaching units. The resource sections include an examination of different ways of defining heritage, an Australian heritage timeline, discussions of different approaches to teaching heritage through media, and outcomes-based approaches in teaching and assessing heritage coursework. The teaching units deal in depth with issues of citizenship, nationalism, Australian identities, and new cultural values. A Heritage Gallery features images of various culturally significant or representative places in Australia, such as New Italy, the Dundullimal Homestead, Australian Hall, Kelly's Bush, and many more. Obviously, teachers of Civics on the southern continent will find this site extremely useful, but the teaching units -- rich with texts and images -- also offer fascinating introductions for anyone interested in the issues of Australian nation-making.

  20. Teaching practice from the perspective of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education, Charles University

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    teacher, information education, Informatics, computer technology, teacher education, lesson plan, Primary or stand-by teachers in classrooms. During this period they design their own lesson plans and teach of Education. For each lesson ICT student teachers design their lesson plans while using an identical template

  1. Health informatics and the delivery of care to older people.

    PubMed

    Koch, Sabine; Hägglund, Maria

    2009-07-20

    In the light of an aging society, effective delivery of healthcare will be more dependent on different technological solutions supporting the decentralization of healthcare, higher patient involvement and increased societal demands. The aim of this article is therefore, to describe the role of health informatics in the care of elderly people and to give an overview of the state of the art in this field. Based on a review of the existing scientific literature, 29 review articles from the last 15 years and 119 original articles from the last 5 years were selected and further analysed. Results show that review articles cover the fields of information technology in the home environment, integrated health information systems, public health systems, consumer health informatics and non-technology oriented topics such as nutrition, physical behaviour, medication and the aging process in general. Articles presenting original data can be divided into 5 major clusters: information systems and decision support, consumer health informatics, emerging technologies, home telehealth, and informatics methods. Results show that health informatics in elderly care is an expanding field of interest but we still do lack knowledge about the elderly person's needs of technology and how it should best be designed. Surprisingly, few studies cover gender differences related to technology use. Further cross-disciplinary research is needed that relates informatics and technology to different stages of the aging process and that evaluates the effects of technical solutions. PMID:19487092

  2. The 4th Decade of Cancer Informatics — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

  3. Teaching Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Z.; Kostka, I.; Mott-Smith, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors of "Teaching Writing" draw on their years of teaching and their knowledge of theory and research to present major concepts in teaching L2 writing. These concepts encompass how cultural differences affect the writing class, planning instruction, text-based writing, writing strategies, modeling, and responding to student…

  4. Teaching Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  5. Teaching Artistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The profession of teaching artist is an increasingly accepted career path. Teaching artists have generated plentiful testimonials to support what was once only backed up by anecdote and is now increasingly supported by objective data. They are finding that very definite and specific benefits await the artist who teaches. While the impacts are not…

  6. Virtual Worlds as a Support to Engineering Teaching

    E-print Network

    Muñoz, Roberto; Rusu, Cristian

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Worlds (VWs) are an emerging technology used by a growing number of educational institutions around the world. It is an environment, a way of learning and an educational tool that allows different levels of online interaction. In the course "Programming I", of the career Informatics Engineering at Universidad de Valpara\\'iso, we conducted a pilot experience with the VW of Second Life, in order to evaluate the potential of using VWs in the teaching practice.

  7. Teaching evidence based medicine literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years - a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dragan Ilic; Katrina Tepper; Marie Misso

    2011-01-01

    Background  Two of the key steps in evidence based medicine (EBM) are being able to construct a clinical question and effectively search\\u000a the literature to source relevant information. No evidence currently exists that informs whether such skills should be taught\\u000a to medical students during their pre-clinical years, or delivered to include both the pre-clinical and clinical years of study.\\u000a This is

  8. Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

  9. Comparison of clinical outcome of periapical surgery in endodontic and oral surgery units of a teaching dental hospital: A retrospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shahrzad Rahbaran; Mark S. Gilthorpe; Sheelah D. Harrison; Kishor Gulabivala

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. The aims of this retrospective study were (1) to compare the outcome of periapical surgery performed in endodontic and in oral surgery units of a teaching dental hospital and (2) to evaluate the influence of factors affecting outcome. Study design. A total of 176 teeth (endodontic unit, 83; oral surgery unit, 93) surgically treated more than 4 years previously

  10. The Evaluation of Teaching the Nursing Process Using Traditional Lecture, Campus Laboratory, Clinical, and the Addition of High Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Unfolding Scenarios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    It is not sufficient to just make changes in a nursing curriculum without a plan to evaluate the impact on program outcomes. This study sought to determine the outcomes of teaching the nursing process to Foundation of Nursing students in an Associate Degree Nursing program using a factorial design study. Four groups of students were taught the…

  11. NEUROPATHOLOGIST -CLINICAL ASSISTANT OR CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY The Department of Pathology at Stanford University School of Medicine seeks an academically-oriented diagnostic

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    's research, teaching and clinical missions. #12;NEUROPATHOLOGIST - CLINICAL ASSISTANT OR CLINICAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PATHOLOGY The Department neuropathologist for appointment at the rank of Clinical Assistant or Clinical Associate Professor in the Clinical

  12. Evolution of a Mature Clinical Informationist Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NUNZIA B. GIUSE; TANEYA Y. KOONCE; REBECCA N. JEROME; M LIS; NILA A. SATHE; ANNETTE WILLIAMS

    2010-01-01

    Achieving evidence-based practice will require new approaches to providing information during health care delivery and to integrating evidence and informatics at the point of care. To support evidence-based practice, Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Eskind Biomedical Library (EBL) introduced the role of clinical informationist, an information specialist with sufficient knowledge and insight to function as a true partner in the health

  13. Composite Patient Reports: A Laboratory Informatics Perspective and Pilot Project for Personalized Medicine and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Gundlapalli, Adi V.; Delgado, Julio C.; Jackson, Brian R.; Tricot, Guido J.; Hill, Harry R.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are a strong and integral partner in personalized health care. Laboratory information systems hold a vast amount of data representing human phenotypes, genotypes, biomarkers, progression of disease and response to therapy. These structured and unstructured free text data are critical for patient care and a resource for personalized medicine and translational research. Laboratory data are integrated into many electronic medical records that provide “summary reports” and “trending” to visualize longitudinal patient data. However, these generic reports are not sufficient to manage complex sub-specialty patients. There is an urgent need for end-user driven composite reports for the care of such patients. Using multiple myeloma as a model, this pilot was performed to assess the needs of stakeholders and create a customized report. This laboratory informatics solution is delivered at the point of care through the hospital EMR. Future work will involve further integration with hospital systems to promote clinical decision support and translational research. PMID:21347168

  14. Cardiovascular health informatics: risk screening and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Craig J; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2012-09-01

    Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient. PMID:22997187

  15. Cardiovascular Health Informatics: Risk Screening and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Craig J.; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S.; Poon, Carmen C. Y.; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient. PMID:22997187

  16. Graphical Neuroimaging Informatics: Application to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Ian; Joshi, Shantanu H.; Greer, Vaughan

    2013-01-01

    The Informatics Visualization for Neuroimaging (INVIZIAN) framework allows one to graphically display image and meta-data information from sizeable collections of neuroimaging data as a whole using a dynamic and compelling user interface. Users can fluidly interact with an entire collection of cortical surfaces using only their mouse. In addition, users can cluster and group brains according in multiple ways for subsequent comparison using graphical data mining tools. In this article, we illustrate the utility of INVIZIAN for simultaneous exploration and mining a large collection of extracted cortical surface data arising in clinical neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer’s Disease, mild cognitive impairment, as well as healthy control subjects. Alzheimer’s Disease is particularly interesting due to the wide-spread effects on cortical architecture and alterations of volume in specific brain areas associated with memory. We demonstrate INVIZIAN’s ability to render multiple brain surfaces from multiple diagnostic groups of subjects, showcase the interactivity of the system, and showcase how INVIZIAN can be employed to generate hypotheses about the collection of data which would be suitable for direct access to the underlying raw data and subsequent formal statistical analysis. Specifically, we use INVIZIAN show how cortical thickness and hippocampal volume differences between group are evident even in the absence of more formal hypothesis testing. In the context of neurological diseases linked to brain aging such as AD, INVIZIAN provides a unique means for considering the entirety of whole brain datasets, look for interesting relationships among them, and thereby derive new ideas for further research and study. PMID:24203652

  17. National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 162nd NCAB/BSA Meeting

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 1st Joint NCAB/BSA Meeting George A. Komatsoulis, Ph.D. Director (interim) NCIP and the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) • Activities encompassed

  18. IUB Doctoral Thesis Proposal Bioinformatics Track of IUB School of Informatics

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    IUB Doctoral Thesis Proposal Bioinformatics Track of IUB School of Informatics December 1, 2008 for the thesis proposal is approved and set. The exam date should be coordinated with the School of Informatics

  19. Preprint -Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics -Preprint Pratt, et al. -Incorporating ... 1

    E-print Network

    McDonald, David W.

    Preprint - Please cite version in Journal of Biomedical Informatics - Preprint Pratt, et al. Biomedical & Health Informatics, University of Washington 2. School of Management and Information Systems Interface, Cooperative Behavior, Social Environment I. Medical Software Systems The design

  20. Mission — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology provides and advocates for the appropriate use of data science, informatics, and information technology (IT) to support and accelerate the NCI mission to prevent and cure cancer.