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1

Informatics in radiology: IHE teaching file and clinical trial export integration profile: functional examples.  

PubMed

The digital revolution in radiology introduced the need for electronic export of medical images. However, the current export process is complicated and time consuming. In response to this continued difficulty, the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative published the Teaching File and Clinical Trial Export (TCE) integration profile. The IHE TCE profile describes a method for using existing standards to simplify the export of key medical images for education, research, and publication. This article reviews the authors' experience in implementing the TCE profile in the following three processes: (a) the retrieval of images for a typical teaching file application within a TCE-compliant picture archiving and communication system (PACS); (b) the export of images, independent of TCE compliance of the PACS, to a typical teaching file application; and (c) the TCE-compliant transfer of images for publication. These examples demonstrate methods with which the TCE profile can be implemented to ease the burden of collecting key medical images from the PACS. PMID:18635622

Kamauu, Aaron W C; Whipple, Jeffrey J; DuVall, Scott L; Siddiqui, Khan M; Siegel, Eliot L; Avrin, David

2008-01-01

2

Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education  

Microsoft Academic Search

National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services

Heng-Shuen Chen; Fei-Ran Guo; Chien-Tsai Liu; Yue-Joe Lee; Jye-Horng Chen; Chia-Chin Lin; Sheng-Mou Hou; Bor-Shen Hsieh

1998-01-01

3

Clinical research informatics: a conceptual perspective  

PubMed Central

Clinical research informatics is the rapidly evolving sub-discipline within biomedical informatics that focuses on developing new informatics theories, tools, and solutions to accelerate the full translational continuum: basic research to clinical trials (T1), clinical trials to academic health center practice (T2), diffusion and implementation to community practice (T3), and ‘real world’ outcomes (T4). We present a conceptual model based on an informatics-enabled clinical research workflow, integration across heterogeneous data sources, and core informatics tools and platforms. We use this conceptual model to highlight 18 new articles in the JAMIA special issue on clinical research informatics. PMID:22523344

Weng, Chunhua

2012-01-01

4

Informatics and the Clinical Laboratory  

PubMed Central

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, ‘Informatics’ – the art and science of turning data into useful information – is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology – whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients – which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available – can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-01-01

5

Informatics and the clinical laboratory.  

PubMed

The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a need to rethink the architecture of pathology systems and in particular to address the changed environment in which electronic patient record systems are maturing rapidly. The opportunity for laboratory-based informaticians to work collaboratively with clinical systems developers to embed clinically intelligent decision support systems should not be missed. PMID:25336763

Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

2014-08-01

6

Schattauer 2012 392Applied Clinical Informatics  

E-print Network

: Chrononymization's Lack of Impact on Data Privacy of Laboratory Data Research Article The False Security of Blind Privacy of Laboratory Data Research Article 393Applied Clinical Informatics 1. Introduction When Dates Chrononymization's Lack of Impact on Data Privacy of Laboratory Data J.J. Cimino NIH Clinical

Cimino, James J.

7

Pathology informatics fellowship retreats: The use of interactive scenarios and case studies as pathology informatics teaching tools  

PubMed Central

Background: Last year, our pathology informatics fellowship added informatics-based interactive case studies to its existing educational platform of operational and research rotations, clinical conferences, a common core curriculum with an accompanying didactic course, and national meetings. Methods: The structure of the informatics case studies was based on the traditional business school case study format. Three different formats were used, varying in length from short, 15-minute scenarios to more formal multiple hour-long case studies. Case studies were presented over the course of three retreats (Fall 2011, Winter 2012, and Spring 2012) and involved both local and visiting faculty and fellows. Results: Both faculty and fellows found the case studies and the retreats educational, valuable, and enjoyable. From this positive feedback, we plan to incorporate the retreats in future academic years as an educational component of our fellowship program. Conclusions: Interactive case studies appear to be valuable in teaching several aspects of pathology informatics that are difficult to teach in more traditional venues (rotations and didactic class sessions). Case studies have become an important component of our fellowship's educational platform. PMID:23248762

Lee, Roy E.; McClintock, David S.; Balis, Ulysses J.; Baron, Jason M.; Becich, Michael J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Brodsky, Victor B.; Carter, Alexis B.; Dighe, Anand S.; Haghighi, Mehrvash; Hipp, Jason D.; Henricks, Walter H.; Kim, Jiyeon Y.; Klepseis, Veronica E.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lane, William J.; Levy, Bruce P.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Park, Seung L.; Sinard, John H.; Tuthill, Mark J.; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

8

Informatics Support for Tutors and Demonstrators Open to all teachers with current teaching positions in the School of Informatics  

E-print Network

Informatics Support for Tutors and Demonstrators Open to all teachers with current teaching positions in the School of Informatics YEAR 1 Support for new or relatively inexperienced tutors information. Semester One (Sept ­ Dec) Week 1 Session 1 Orientation to tutoring in Informatics Week 4 Session

Koehn, Philipp

9

The Teaching of Informatics for Business Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Informatics is a branch of computer science that concerns itself, in actuality, with the use of information systems. The objective of this paper is to focus on the business curriculum for graduate students and their gaining proficiency in informatics so that they can understand the concept of information, the access of information, the use of…

Sora, Sebastian A.

2008-01-01

10

How do rabbits help to integrate teaching of mathematics and informatics?  

E-print Network

28 How do rabbits help to integrate teaching of mathematics and informatics? Agnis Andzns, Dr of difficulties in exact education at schools: mathematics, informatics, physics etc. Various methods are proposed of discrete mathematics and informatics not reducing the high educational standards. The approach is based

Spagnolo, Filippo

11

Eight Years of Distance Teaching and Learning in Biomedical Informatics at OHSU  

E-print Network

order entry systems and medication errors. Journal of the American Medical Association, 294: 179 Professor and Chair Department of Medical Informatics & Clinical Epidemiology Oregon Health & Science Health Information Management Association and American Medical Informatics Association. http

Chapman, Michael S.

12

Informatics  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program (CIP) is a driver of imaging informatics research at NCI. The CIP Informatics Team provides critical services and infrastructure to both the intramural and extramural imaging research communities. Major ongoing initiatives include:

13

The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics.  

PubMed

The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular "learning laboratories". Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows' ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the pathology informatics asset in the network. Though the above approach has been in place less than a year, we are presenting it now as a technical note to allow for further discussion of evolving educational opportunities in pathology informatics and clinical informatics in general, and to highlight the importance of having a flexible fellowship with active participation from its fellows. PMID:25191621

Quinn, Andrew M; Klepeis, Veronica E; Mandelker, Diana L; Platt, Mia Y; Rao, Luigi K F; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E; Levy, Bruce P; McClintock, David S; Beckwith, Bruce A; Kuo, Frank C; Gilbertson, John R

2014-01-01

14

The ongoing evolution of the core curriculum of a clinical fellowship in pathology informatics  

PubMed Central

The Partners HealthCare system's Clinical Fellowship in Pathology Informatics (Boston, MA, USA) faces ongoing challenges to the delivery of its core curriculum in the forms of: (1) New classes of fellows annually with new and varying educational needs and increasingly fractured, enterprise-wide commitments; (2) taxing electronic health record (EHR) and laboratory information system (LIS) implementations; and (3) increasing interest in the subspecialty at the academic medical centers (AMCs) in what is a large health care network. In response to these challenges, the fellowship has modified its existing didactic sessions and piloted both a network-wide pathology informatics lecture series and regular “learning laboratories”. Didactic sessions, which had previously included more formal discussions of the four divisions of the core curriculum: Information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management, now focus on group discussions concerning the fellows’ ongoing projects, updates on the enterprise-wide EHR and LIS implementations, and directed questions about weekly readings. Lectures are given by the informatics faculty, guest informatics faculty, current and former fellows, and information systems members in the network, and are open to all professional members of the pathology departments at the AMCs. Learning laboratories consist of small-group exercises geared toward a variety of learning styles, and are driven by both the fellows and a member of the informatics faculty. The learning laboratories have created a forum for discussing real-time and real-world pathology informatics matters, and for incorporating awareness of and timely discussions about the latest pathology informatics literature. These changes have diversified the delivery of the fellowship's core curriculum, increased exposure of faculty, fellows and trainees to one another, and more equitably distributed teaching responsibilities among the entirety of the pathology informatics asset in the network. Though the above approach has been in place less than a year, we are presenting it now as a technical note to allow for further discussion of evolving educational opportunities in pathology informatics and clinical informatics in general, and to highlight the importance of having a flexible fellowship with active participation from its fellows. PMID:25191621

Quinn, Andrew M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mandelker, Diana L.; Platt, Mia Y.; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Baron, Jason M.; Brodsky, Victor; Kim, Ji Yeon; Lane, William; Lee, Roy E.; Levy, Bruce P.; McClintock, David S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank C.; Gilbertson, John R.

2014-01-01

15

Teaching Clinical Psychology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Teaching Clinical Psychology, created by Dr. John Suler of Rider University, is devoted to �sharing ideas and resources for teaching clinical psychology.� Helpful for students and educators in the fields of mental health and human services counseling, this site contains practical in-class exercises, such as an exercise which illustrates what it is like to share secrets with strangers, and syllabi for courses in the clinical psychology curriculum. There are also larger projects for students, including an in-depth analysis of a psychotherapy case study and a role-play project which has students administer, score, and interpret a series of psychological tests given to a classmate.

Suler, John R., 1955-

16

Building blocks for a clinical imaging informatics environment.  

PubMed

Over the past 20 years, imaging informatics has been driven by the widespread adoption of radiology information and picture archiving and communication and speech recognition systems. These three clinical information systems are commonplace and are intuitive to most radiologists as they replicate familiar paper and film workflow. So what is next? There is a surge of innovation in imaging informatics around advanced workflow, search, electronic medical record aggregation, dashboarding, and analytics tools for quality measures (Nance et al., AJR Am J Roentgenol 200:1064-1070, 2013). The challenge lies in not having to rebuild the technological wheel for each of these new applications but instead attempt to share common components through open standards and modern development techniques. The next generation of applications will be built with moving parts that work together to satisfy advanced use cases without replicating databases and without requiring fragile, intense synchronization from clinical systems. The purpose of this paper is to identify building blocks that can position a practice to be able to quickly innovate when addressing clinical, educational, and research-related problems. This paper is the result of identifying common components in the construction of over two dozen clinical informatics projects developed at the University of Maryland Radiology Informatics Research Laboratory. The systems outlined are intended as a mere foundation rather than an exhaustive list of possible extensions. PMID:24248276

Kohli, Marc D; Warnock, Max; Daly, Mark; Toland, Christopher; Meenan, Chris; Nagy, Paul G

2014-04-01

17

PearlTrees web-based interface for teaching informatics in the radiology residency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiology and imaging informatics education have rapidly evolved over the past few decades. With the increasing recognition that future growth and maintenance of radiology practices will rely heavily on radiologists with fundamentally sound informatics skills, the onus falls on radiology residency programs to properly implement and execute an informatics curriculum. In addition, the American Board of Radiology may choose to include even more informatics on the new board examinations. However, the resources available for didactic teaching and guidance most especially at the introductory level are widespread and varied. Given the breadth of informatics, a centralized web-based interface designed to serve as an adjunct to standardized informatics curriculums as well as a stand-alone for other interested audiences is desirable. We present the development of a curriculum using PearlTrees, an existing web-interface based on the concept of a visual interest graph that allows users to collect, organize, and share any URL they find online as well as to upload photos and other documents. For our purpose, the group of "pearls" includes informatics concepts linked by appropriate hierarchal relationships. The curriculum was developed using a combination of our institution's current informatics fellowship curriculum, the Practical Imaging Informatics textbook1 and other useful online resources. After development of the initial interface and curriculum has been publicized, we anticipate that involvement by the informatics community will help promote collaborations and foster mentorships at all career levels.

Licurse, Mindy Y.; Cook, Tessa S.

2014-03-01

18

Clinical Research Informatics and Electronic Health Record Data  

PubMed Central

Summary Objectives The goal of this survey is to discuss the impact of the growing availability of electronic health record (EHR) data on the evolving field of Clinical Research Informatics (CRI), which is the union of biomedical research and informatics. Results Major challenges for the use of EHR-derived data for research include the lack of standard methods for ensuring that data quality, completeness, and provenance are sufficient to assess the appropriateness of its use for research. Areas that need continued emphasis include methods for integrating data from heterogeneous sources, guidelines (including explicit phenotype definitions) for using these data in both pragmatic clinical trials and observational investigations, strong data governance to better understand and control quality of enterprise data, and promotion of national standards for representing and using clinical data. Conclusions The use of EHR data has become a priority in CRI. Awareness of underlying clinical data collection processes will be essential in order to leverage these data for clinical research and patient care, and will require multi-disciplinary teams representing clinical research, informatics, and healthcare operations. Considerations for the use of EHR data provide a starting point for practical applications and a CRI research agenda, which will be facilitated by CRI’s key role in the infrastructure of a learning healthcare system. PMID:25123746

Horvath, M. M.; Rusincovitch, S. A.

2014-01-01

19

A core curriculum for clinical fellowship training in pathology informatics  

PubMed Central

Background: In 2007, our healthcare system established a clinical fellowship program in Pathology Informatics. In 2010 a core didactic course was implemented to supplement the fellowship research and operational rotations. In 2011, the course was enhanced by a formal, structured core curriculum and reading list. We present and discuss our rationale and development process for the Core Curriculum and the role it plays in our Pathology Informatics Fellowship Training Program. Materials and Methods: The Core Curriculum for Pathology Informatics was developed, and is maintained, through the combined efforts of our Pathology Informatics Fellows and Faculty. The curriculum was created with a three-tiered structure, consisting of divisions, topics, and subtopics. Primary (required) and suggested readings were selected for each subtopic in the curriculum and incorporated into a curated reading list, which is reviewed and maintained on a regular basis. Results: Our Core Curriculum is composed of four major divisions, 22 topics, and 92 subtopics that cover the wide breadth of Pathology Informatics. The four major divisions include: (1) Information Fundamentals, (2) Information Systems, (3) Workflow and Process, and (4) Governance and Management. A detailed, comprehensive reading list for the curriculum is presented in the Appendix to the manuscript and contains 570 total readings (current as of March 2012). Discussion: The adoption of a formal, core curriculum in a Pathology Informatics fellowship has significant impacts on both fellowship training and the general field of Pathology Informatics itself. For a fellowship, a core curriculum defines a basic, common scope of knowledge that the fellowship expects all of its graduates will know, while at the same time enhancing and broadening the traditional fellowship experience of research and operational rotations. For the field of Pathology Informatics itself, a core curriculum defines to the outside world, including departments, companies, and health systems considering hiring a pathology informatician, the core knowledge set expected of a person trained in the field and, more fundamentally, it helps to define the scope of the field within Pathology and healthcare in general. PMID:23024890

McClintock, David S.; Levy, Bruce P.; Lane, William J.; Lee, Roy E.; Baron, Jason M.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Onozato, Maristela L.; Kim, JiYeon; Dighe, Anand S.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Kuo, Frank; Black-Schaffer, Stephen; Gilbertson, John R.

2012-01-01

20

Deconstruction of Socio-Technical Information Systems with Virtual Exploration Environments as a Method of Teaching Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The working group Didactics of Informatics at the University of Paderborn (Germany) develops and evaluates a multimedia exploration platform for information systems (MEPIS) to the needs of teaching and learning informatics at secondary schools. This paper describes the basic ideas within a system-oriented approach of didactics of informatics and…

Magenheim, Johann S.

21

Clinical communication - A new informatics paradigm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observational studies of clinical workers in a hospital setting suggest that communication problems are a significant source of inefficiency. The need to reduce interruptions, improve contactability, and the sharing of informal information suggests that a mobile communication system capable of supporting asynchronous messaging, role-based contact, and communication policies would be beneficial. A prototype of such a system is described.

Enrico Coiera; Stoke Gifford

1996-01-01

22

Leverage hadoop framework for large scale clinical informatics applications.  

PubMed

In this manuscript, we present our experiences using the Apache Hadoop framework for high data volume and computationally intensive applications, and discuss some best practice guidelines in a clinical informatics setting. There are three main aspects in our approach: (a) process and integrate diverse, heterogeneous data sources using standard Hadoop programming tools and customized MapReduce programs; (b) after fine-grained aggregate results are obtained, perform data analysis using the Mahout data mining library; (c) leverage the column oriented features in HBase for patient centric modeling and complex temporal reasoning. This framework provides a scalable solution to meet the rapidly increasing, imperative "Big Data" needs of clinical and translational research. The intrinsic advantage of fault tolerance, high availability and scalability of Hadoop platform makes these applications readily deployable at the enterprise level cluster environment. PMID:24303235

Dong, Xiao; Bahroos, Neil; Sadhu, Eugene; Jackson, Tommie; Chukhman, Morris; Johnson, Robert; Boyd, Andrew; Hynes, Denise

2013-01-01

23

Informatics Teaching from the Students' Point of View  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Branches of science and technical/engineering study have for a long time been the less favoured disciplines and students have not been interested in studying them. Informatics/computer education, based on its character, belongs to these disciplines, but on the contrary it belongs rather to the group of popular school subjects. The paper presents…

Zahorec, Jan; Haskova, Alena

2013-01-01

24

Perspectives on clinical informatics: integrating large-scale clinical, genomic, and health information for clinical care.  

PubMed

The advances in electronic medical records (EMRs) and bioinformatics (BI) represent two significant trends in healthcare. The widespread adoption of EMR systems and the completion of the Human Genome Project developed the technologies for data acquisition, analysis, and visualization in two different domains. The massive amount of data from both clinical and biology domains is expected to provide personalized, preventive, and predictive healthcare services in the near future. The integrated use of EMR and BI data needs to consider four key informatics areas: data modeling, analytics, standardization, and privacy. Bioclinical data warehouses integrating heterogeneous patient-related clinical or omics data should be considered. The representative standardization effort by the Clinical Bioinformatics Ontology (CBO) aims to provide uniquely identified concepts to include molecular pathology terminologies. Since individual genome data are easily used to predict current and future health status, different safeguards to ensure confidentiality should be considered. In this paper, we focused on the informatics aspects of integrating the EMR community and BI community by identifying opportunities, challenges, and approaches to provide the best possible care service for our patients and the population. PMID:24465229

Choi, In Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Kim, Myung Shin; Mun, Seong K; Chung, Yeun-Jun

2013-12-01

25

The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe): an informatics foundation for the science of clinical research.  

PubMed

To date, the scientific process for generating, interpreting, and applying knowledge has received less informatics attention than operational processes for conducting clinical studies. The activities of these scientific processes - the science of clinical research - are centered on the study protocol, which is the abstract representation of the scientific design of a clinical study. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) is an OWL 2 model of the entities and relationships of study design protocols for the purpose of computationally supporting the design and analysis of human studies. OCRe's modeling is independent of any specific study design or clinical domain. It includes a study design typology and a specialized module called ERGO Annotation for capturing the meaning of eligibility criteria. In this paper, we describe the key informatics use cases of each phase of a study's scientific lifecycle, present OCRe and the principles behind its modeling, and describe applications of OCRe and associated technologies to a range of clinical research use cases. OCRe captures the central semantics that underlies the scientific processes of clinical research and can serve as an informatics foundation for supporting the entire range of knowledge activities that constitute the science of clinical research. PMID:24239612

Sim, Ida; Tu, Samson W; Carini, Simona; Lehmann, Harold P; Pollock, Brad H; Peleg, Mor; Wittkowski, Knut M

2014-12-01

26

Viewpoint Paper: The Informatics Opportunities at the Intersection of Patient Safety and Clinical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health care providers have a basic responsibility to protect patients from accidental harm. At the institutional level, creating safe health care organizations necessitates a systematic approach. Effective use of informatics to enhance safety requires the establishment and use of standards for concept definitions and for data exchange, development of acceptable models for knowledge representation, incentives for adoption of electronic health

Peter M. Kilbridge; David C. Classen

2008-01-01

27

FAIRness and clinical teaching.  

PubMed

Reflection on my long experience in medical student education has led me to conclude that the standard model of the clinical placement is not fit for purpose. The encounters between teacher and student are generally brief, superficial, and teacher-centred. Assessment of student progress is a particular problem. The model has come under pressure from increasing numbers of medical students on each placement and shorter placements. I have proposed a new model of the clinical placement, emphasising generic skills over specialist knowledge, based on Harden's principles of Feedback, Activity, Relevance and Individualisation (FAIRness). The model's cardinal feature is review of students' own work to accurately assess their progress and to give meaningful and regular feedback. Every student receives individual feedback, as well as exploring common problems in whole class sessions, where students can compare their standard to others' work. This model emphasises improvement over time, rather than snapshots of student ability. PMID:23782052

Chan, Philip

2013-09-01

28

A clinical teaching project: examination of a clinical teaching model.  

PubMed

This project, started in 1985 by Dr Infante, is based on theory of the use of the clinical laboratory in nursing education. It fully recognizes the complementary roles of nursing education and nursing service by having practitioners participate as preceptors, role models, and mentors. Six clinical agencies participated in this innovative clinical teaching project with the goal of improving the effectiveness and efficiency of nursing education and nursing practice. It is hypothesized that the synchronization of clinical laboratory experiences with instruction in nursing theory and science and a closer collaboration among faculty, students, and nurse practitioners will give students an appropriate balance of academic and clinical practice perspectives and skills to prepare them effectively to meet the complex health care needs of patients. The subjects were 173 undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in an upper-division generic program. For the purpose of testing Infante's clinical model, the students were randomly assigned to a control or experimental group for two successive incoming classes of nursing students. Each student's academic and clinical progression was monitored. Data were gathered using grade point average, a standardized test for nursing knowledge (Mosby Assesstest; Mosby, St Louis), college laboratory practicum, and simulated testing for clinical application skills.2+ Data were analyzed using independent t tests. The findings indicate that the students in the experimental group, who used the experimental clinical model, achieved higher grade point averages, higher scores on the Mosby Assesstest, and higher college laboratory practicum scores than the students in the control group. The findings support the need for further investigation of innovative clinical teaching models. PMID:2732400

Infante, M S; Forbes, E J; Houldin, A D; Naylor, M D

1989-01-01

29

Foundational biomedical informatics research in the clinical and translational science era: a call to action.  

PubMed

Advances in clinical and translational science, along with related national-scale policy and funding mechanisms, have provided significant opportunities for the advancement of applied clinical research informatics (CRI) and translational bioinformatics (TBI). Such efforts are primarily oriented to application and infrastructure development and are critical to the conduct of clinical and translational research. However, they often come at the expense of the foundational CRI and TBI research needed to grow these important biomedical informatics subdisciplines and ensure future innovations. In light of this challenge, it is critical that a number of steps be taken, including the conduct of targeted advocacy campaigns, the development of community-accepted research agendas, and the continued creation of forums for collaboration and knowledge exchange. Such efforts are needed to ensure that the biomedical informatics community is able to advance CRI and TBI science in the context of the modern clinical and translational science era. PMID:20962120

Payne, Philip R O; Embi, Peter J; Niland, Joyce

2010-01-01

30

Kenneth J. Turner. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees, Biomedical Informatics, Copyright Elsevier, October 2008.  

E-print Network

Kenneth J. Turner. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees, Biomedical Informatics, Copyright Elsevier, October 2008. Abstraction and Analysis of Clinical Guidance Trees Kenneth J. Turner of this work were: to define an abstract notation for interactive de- cision trees; to formally analyse

Turner, Ken

31

Security Informatics Security Informatics  

E-print Network

Security Informatics Security Informatics Security Informatics is the study and design of information security technologies within social and economic contexts. Security Informatics builds upon strong of security and privacy. Security Informatics addresses both immediate problems of today, such as phishing

Camp, L. Jean

32

A centralized informatics infrastructure for the National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network  

PubMed Central

Background Clinical trial networks were created to provide a sustaining infrastructure for the conduct of multisite clinical trials. As such, they must withstand changes in membership. Centralization of infrastructure including knowledge management, portfolio management, information management, process automation, work policies, and procedures in clinical research networks facilitates consistency and ultimately research. Purpose In 2005, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) transitioned from a distributed data management model to a centralized informatics infrastructure to support the network’s trial activities and administration. We describe the centralized informatics infrastructure and discuss our challenges to inform others considering such an endeavor. Methods During the migration of a clinical trial network from a decentralized to a centralized data center model, descriptive data were captured and are presented here to assess the impact of centralization. Results We present the framework for the informatics infrastructure and evaluative metrics. The network has decreased the time from last patient-last visit to database lock from an average of 7.6 months to 2.8 months. The average database error rate decreased from 0.8% to 0.2%, with a corresponding decrease in the interquartile range from 0.04%–1.0% before centralization to 0.01%–0.27% after centralization. Centralization has provided the CTN with integrated trial status reporting and the first standards-based public data share. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis showed a 50% reduction in data management cost per study participant over the life of a trial. Limitations A single clinical trial network comprising addiction researchers and community treatment programs was assessed. The findings may not be applicable to other research settings. Conclusions The identified informatics components provide the information and infrastructure needed for our clinical trial network. Post centralization data management operations are more efficient and less costly, with higher data quality. PMID:19254937

Pan, Jeng-Jong; Nahm, Meredith; Wakim, Paul; Cushing, Carol; Poole, Lori; Tai, Betty; Pieper, Carl F.

2009-01-01

33

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education.  

PubMed

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

34

Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education  

PubMed Central

Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search) and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. PMID:25057246

Hersh, William R; Gorman, Paul N; Biagioli, Frances E; Mohan, Vishnu; Gold, Jeffrey A; Mejicano, George C

2014-01-01

35

Imaging-based observational databases for clinical problem solving: the role of informatics  

PubMed Central

Imaging has become a prevalent tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, providing a unique in vivo, multi-scale view of anatomic and physiologic processes. With the increased use of imaging and its progressive technical advances, the role of imaging informatics is now evolving—from one of managing images, to one of integrating the full scope of clinical information needed to contextualize and link observations across phenotypic and genotypic scales. Several challenges exist for imaging informatics, including the need for methods to transform clinical imaging studies and associated data into structured information that can be organized and analyzed. We examine some of these challenges in establishing imaging-based observational databases that can support the creation of comprehensive disease models. The development of these databases and ensuing models can aid in medical decision making and knowledge discovery and ultimately, transform the use of imaging to support individually-tailored patient care. PMID:23775172

Bui, Alex A T; Hsu, William; Arnold, Corey; El-Saden, Suzie; Aberle, Denise R; Taira, Ricky K

2013-01-01

36

Informatic nephrology.  

PubMed

Biomedical informatics in Health (BIH) is the discipline in charge of capturing, handling and using information in health and biomedicine in order to improve the processes involved with assistance and management. Informatic nephrology has appeared as a product of the combination between conventional nephrology with BIH and its development has been considerable in the assistance as well as in the academic field. Regarding the former, there is increasing evidence that informatics technology can make nephrological assistance be better in quality (effective, accessible, safe and satisfying), improve patient's adherence, optimize patient's and practitioner's time, improve physical space and achieve health cost reduction. Among its main elements, we find electronic medical and personal health records, clinical decision support system, tele-nephrology, and recording and monitoring devices. Additionally, regarding the academic field, informatics and Internet contribute to education and research in the nephrological field. In conclusion, informatics nephrology represents a new field which will influence the future of nephrology. PMID:23065430

Musso, Carlos; Aguilera, Jerónimo; Otero, Carlos; Vilas, Manuel; Luna, Daniel; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

2013-08-01

37

Cancer Clinical and Translational Informatics Goals — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

38

Variation in use of informatics tools among providers in a diabetes clinic.  

PubMed

A goal of health information technology (HIT) is to help eliminate variation when it may compromise safety, efficiency, or quality of care. This study utilized direct observation and semi-structured interviews to examine variability in HIT use among four nurse practitioners and four physicians in an ambulatory diabetes clinic and to assess the impact of this variability on patient care. While use of informatics tools for information access and communication was similar among all users, variability existed in patterns of data entry into the EMR. The study provides direction for developing new functionality that may be needed in HIT and suggests changes to existing functionality. By designing tools that meet user needs and workflows, adoption of informatics applications may be enhanced and patient safety and user satisfaction improved. PMID:18693938

Unertl, Kim M; Weinger, Matthew; Johnson, Kevin

2007-01-01

39

An academic-business partnership for advancing clinical informatics.  

PubMed

A jointly funded partnership between the school of nursing at a large midwestern university and a premier health care information technology supplier represents a pioneering event for education and for the health care information technology industry. The impetus for this partnership arose from Institute of Medicine reports published in late 1999 and early 2001 addressing the quality, error, and waste in the health care system in the United States. The Simulated E-hEalth Delivery System (SEEDS) provides opportunities based on best practices in education to learn and practice clinical skills in a state-of-the-art environment using a live-production, clinical information system designed for care delivery. A pilot project that began with a small cohort of baccalaureate nursing students has been implemented and extended. SEEDS will also be extended to other health professional programs. PMID:12483812

Connors, Helen R; Weaver, Charlotte; Warren, Judith; Miller, Karen L

2002-01-01

40

A Clinical Teaching Project: Examination of a Clinical Teaching Model.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A project synchronizing clinical laboratory experiences with instruction in nursing theory and science that featured a close collaboration between faculty, students, and nurse practitioners was evaluated. It was found that students in the clinic experiment had higher achievement gains than the control group. (MSE)

Infante, Mary Sue; And Others

1989-01-01

41

A domain analysis model for eIRB systems: addressing the weak link in clinical research informatics.  

PubMed

Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) are a critical component of clinical research and can become a significant bottleneck due to the dramatic increase, in both volume and complexity of clinical research. Despite the interest in developing clinical research informatics (CRI) systems and supporting data standards to increase clinical research efficiency and interoperability, informatics research in the IRB domain has not attracted much attention in the scientific community. The lack of standardized and structured application forms across different IRBs causes inefficient and inconsistent proposal reviews and cumbersome workflows. These issues are even more prominent in multi-institutional clinical research that is rapidly becoming the norm. This paper proposes and evaluates a domain analysis model for electronic IRB (eIRB) systems, paving the way for streamlined clinical research workflow via integration with other CRI systems and improved IRB application throughput via computer-assisted decision support. PMID:24929181

He, Shan; Narus, Scott P; Facelli, Julio C; Lau, Lee Min; Botkin, Jefferey R; Hurdle, John F

2014-12-01

42

Teaching Techniques in Clinical Chemistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This master's thesis presents several instructional methods and techniques developed for each of eleven topics or subject areas in clinical chemistry: carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, diagnostic enzymology, endocrinology, toxicology, quality control, electrolytes, acid base balance, hepatic function, nonprotein nitrogenous compounds, and…

Wilson, Diane

43

Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

2011-01-01

44

Teaching Health Informatics to the Net Generation: A New Baseline for Building Capability?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The current generation of medical students are the Net Generation. However there is a dearth of data on their Internet use to inform universities' approaches to using the Internet, especially Web 2.0, most effectively in medical education .In particular, we have little information on students' skills base to use in planning to build greater informatics capacity in the Australian

Kathleen Gray; Gregor Kennedy; Terry Judd

45

Informatics in radiology: RADTF: a semantic search-enabled, natural language processor-generated radiology teaching file.  

PubMed

Storing and retrieving radiology cases is an important activity for education and clinical research, but this process can be time-consuming. In the process of structuring reports and images into organized teaching files, incidental pathologic conditions not pertinent to the primary teaching point can be omitted, as when a user saves images of an aortic dissection case but disregards the incidental osteoid osteoma. An alternate strategy for identifying teaching cases is text search of reports in radiology information systems (RIS), but retrieved reports are unstructured, teaching-related content is not highlighted, and patient identifying information is not removed. Furthermore, searching unstructured reports requires sophisticated retrieval methods to achieve useful results. An open-source, RadLex(®)-compatible teaching file solution called RADTF, which uses natural language processing (NLP) methods to process radiology reports, was developed to create a searchable teaching resource from the RIS and the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The NLP system extracts and de-identifies teaching-relevant statements from full reports to generate a stand-alone database, thus converting existing RIS archives into an on-demand source of teaching material. Using RADTF, the authors generated a semantic search-enabled, Web-based radiology archive containing over 700,000 cases with millions of images. RADTF combines a compact representation of the teaching-relevant content in radiology reports and a versatile search engine with the scale of the entire RIS-PACS collection of case material. PMID:20801868

Do, Bao H; Wu, Andrew; Biswal, Sandip; Kamaya, Aya; Rubin, Daniel L

2010-11-01

46

Towards a web-based GIS for teaching geo-informatics at under-graduate level in developing countries: a case study of Iran  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In developing countries, the number of experts and students in geo-informatics domain are very limited compared to experts and students of sciences that could benefit from geo-informatics. In this research, we study the possibility of providing an online education system for teaching geo-informatics at under-graduate level. The hypothesis is that in developing countries, such as Iran, a web-based geo-education system can greatly improve the quantity and quality of knowledge of students in undergraduate level, which is an important step that has to be made in regard of the famous "Geo for all" motto. As a technology for conducting natural and social studies, geo-informatics offers new ways of viewing, representing and analysing information for transformative learning and teaching. Therefore, we design and present a conceptual framework of an education system and elaborate its components as well as the free and open source services and software packages that could be used in this framework for a specific case study: the Web GIS course. The goal of the proposed framework is to develop experimental GI-services in a service-oriented platform for education purposes. Finally, the paper ends with concluding remarks and some tips for future research direction.

Mobasheri, A.; Vahidi, H.; Guan, Q.

2014-04-01

47

Hand-Held Video for Clinical Skills Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In health care education a balance needs to be struck between theoretical and practical teaching. Undergraduates typically split their time between clinical placement and university-based teaching blocks. A proportion of the time spent in preparation for clinical practice placements will be spent in the classroom or in simulation suites. The…

Edwards, Mark; Jones, Steve; Murphy, Fiona

2007-01-01

48

Proposal for a Collaborative Approach to Clinical Teaching  

PubMed Central

Evidence suggests that inexperienced clinical teachers are often controlling and noninteractive. Adult learning theory states that mature students prefer shared and self-directed learning and that skillful teachers favor facilitating discussions over transmitting knowledge. Similarly, education research shows that effective clinical teachers invest in relationships with learners, ask questions to diagnose learners, communicate complex information clearly, and provide meaningful feedback. On the basis of these principles, we propose a collaborative approach to clinical teaching that has 4 essential components: (1) establish a relationship with the learner, (2) diagnose the learner, (3) use teaching frameworks that engage learners, and (4) develop teaching scripts and a personal philosophy. This article includes suggestions for creating a positive learning climate, asking higher-order questions, providing meaningful feedback, and developing teaching scripts. We believe that practicing this approach, which emphasizes respectful teacher-learner relationships, improves the quality of every clinical teaching encounter. PMID:19339652

Beckman, Thomas J.; Lee, Mark C.

2009-01-01

49

Connecting Science and Research to Clinical Care through Informatics — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

50

An informatics approach to medication adherence assessment and improvement using clinical, billing, and patient-entered data.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe an integrated informatics approach to aggregating and displaying clinically relevant data that can identify problems with medication adherence and facilitate patient-provider communication about strategies to improve medication use. We developed a clinical dashboard within an electronic health record (EHR) system that uses data from three sources: the medical record, pharmacy claims, and a personal health record. The data are integrated to inform clinician-patient discussions about medication adherence. Whereas prior research on assessing patterns of medication adherence focused on a single approach using the EHR, pharmacy data, or patient-entered data, we present an approach that integrates multiple electronic data sources increasingly found in practice. Medication adherence is a complex challenge that requires patient and provider team input, necessitating an integrated approach using advanced EHR, clinical decision support, and patient-controlled technologies. Future research should focus on integrated strategies to provide patients and providers with the right combination of informatics tools to help them adequately address the challenge of adherence to complex medication therapies. PMID:24076751

Dixon, Brian E; Jabour, Abdulrahman M; Phillips, Erin O'Kelly; Marrero, David G

2014-01-01

51

Ward-based clinical teaching in gynaecology: principles and practice.  

PubMed

Clinical teaching on the wards remains a prime method of educational instruction. Despite changes in modern educational climate and patient expectations, its value is still irrefutable. There is evidence to suggest that such teaching is beneficial to students and patients alike. This paper describes the planning and delivery steps of a ward-based teaching session with 'pregnancy of unknown location' as an example. The organisation, following-up and feedback after the session are also mentioned. We have discussed the models applicable to clinical teaching and explored ways how the 'microskill' technique could be potentially used in such a situation. The paper also focuses on the use of clinical reasoning processes. Finally, the six domains of knowledge necessary to become a good preceptor have been applied to the session. A good teaching exercise is moored to sound pedagogical principles. Its success relies on mutual trust and understanding between the teacher and the taught. PMID:20701497

Mukhopadhyay, S; Smith, S

2010-01-01

52

Use of a wiki as an interactive teaching tool in pathology residency education: Experience with a genomics, research, and informatics in pathology course  

PubMed Central

Background: The need for informatics and genomics training in pathology is critical, yet limited resources for such training are available. In this study we sought to critically test the hypothesis that the incorporation of a wiki (a collaborative writing and publication tool with roots in “Web 2.0”) in a combined informatics and genomics course could both (1) serve as an interactive, collaborative educational resource and reference and (2) actively engage trainees by requiring the creation and sharing of educational materials. Materials and Methods: A 2-week full-time course at our institution covering genomics, research, and pathology informatics (GRIP) was taught by 36 faculty to 18 second- and third-year pathology residents. The course content included didactic lectures and hands-on demonstrations of technology (e.g., whole-slide scanning, telepathology, and statistics software). Attendees were given pre- and posttests. Residents were trained to use wiki technology (MediaWiki) and requested to construct a wiki about the GRIP course by writing comprehensive online review articles on assigned lectures. To gauge effectiveness, pretest and posttest scores for our course were compared with scores from the previous 7 years from the predecessor course (limited to informatics) given at our institution that did not utilize wikis. Results: Residents constructed 59 peer-reviewed collaborative wiki articles. This group showed a 25% improvement (standard deviation 12%) in test scores, which was greater than the 16% delta recorded in the prior 7 years of our predecessor course (P = 0.006). Conclusions: Our use of wiki technology provided a wiki containing high-quality content that will form the basis of future pathology informatics and genomics courses and proved to be an effective teaching tool, as evidenced by the significant rise in our resident posttest scores. Data from this project provide support for the notion that active participation in content creation is an effective mechanism for mastery of content. Future residents taking this course will continue to build on this wiki, keeping content current, and thereby benefit from this collaborative teaching tool. PMID:23024891

Park, Seung; Parwani, Anil; MacPherson, Trevor; Pantanowitz, Liron

2012-01-01

53

Mastering the preceptor role: challenges of clinical teaching.  

PubMed

This article aims to help both experienced and new preceptors become more effective teachers while maintaining their clinical workloads. A variety of strategies is essential to increase teaching effectiveness and decrease stress for the busy preceptor who juggles the roles of teacher and clinician. The article will begin with a review of role expectations and role strain factors for student, faculty, and preceptor. Principles of clinical teaching will be identified, followed by some strategies for teaching on busy days and concluding with suggestions for dealing with difficult students. PMID:16675378

Burns, Catherine; Beauchesne, Michelle; Ryan-Krause, Patricia; Sawin, Kathleen

2006-01-01

54

What is biomedical informatics?  

PubMed Central

Biomedical informatics lacks a clear and theoretically grounded definition. Many proposed definitions focus on data, information, and knowledge, but do not provide an adequate definition of these terms. Leveraging insights from the philosophy of information, we define informatics as the science of information, where information is data plus meaning. Biomedical informatics is the science of information as applied to or studied in the context of biomedicine. Defining the object of study of informatics as data plus meaning clearly distinguishes the field from related fields, such as computer science, statistics and biomedicine, which have different objects of study. The emphasis on data plus meaning also suggests that biomedical informatics problems tend to be difficult when they deal with concepts that are hard to capture using formal, computational definitions. In other words, problems where meaning must be considered are more difficult than problems where manipulating data without regard for meaning is sufficient. Furthermore, the definition implies that informatics research, teaching, and service should focus on biomedical information as data plus meaning rather than only computer applications in biomedicine. PMID:19683067

Bernstam, Elmer V.; Smith, Jack W.; Johnson, Todd R.

2009-01-01

55

Toward an Ecological Perspective of Resident Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are…

Smith, C. Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-01-01

56

Evaluation of a teaching strategy based on integration of clinical subjects, virtual autopsy, pathology museum, and digital microscopy for medical students**  

PubMed Central

Background: Learning pathology is fundamental for a successful medical practice. In recent years, medical education has undergone a profound transformation toward the development of an integrated curriculum incorporating both basic science and clinical material. Simultaneously, there has been a shift from a magisterial teaching approach to one centered around problem-based learning. Now-a-days, informatics tools are expected to help better implement these strategies. Aim: We applied and evaluated a new teaching method based on an active combination of clinical problems, gross pathology, histopathology, and autopsy pathology, all given through informatics tools, to teach a group of medical students at the Universidad de Santander, Colombia. Design: Ninety-four medical students were followed in two consecutive semesters. Students were randomized to receive teaching either through traditional methodology or through the new integrated approach. Results: There was no significant difference between the intervention group and the control group at baseline. At the end of the study, the scores in the intervention group were significantly higher compared to the control group (3.91/5.0 vs. 3.33/5.0, P = 0.0008). Students and tutors endorsed the benefits of the integrated approach. Participants were very satisfied with this training approach and rated the program an 8.7 out of 10, on average. Conclusion: This study confirms that an integrated curriculum utilizing informatics systems provides an excellent opportunity to associate pathology with clinical medicine early in training of medical students. This can be possible with the use of virtual microscopy and digital imaging. PMID:25191624

Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Raju, Sharat; Echeverri, Jorge H.

2014-01-01

57

IU School of Informatics Expectations for Declared Area of Excellence for Promotion and Shorter version of complete document see  

E-print Network

1 IU School of Informatics Expectations for Declared Area of Excellence for Promotion and Tenure** Shorter version of complete document ­ see http://informatics School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure Guidelines define excellence in teaching: The evidence

Zhou, Yaoqi

58

Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics?  

E-print Network

#12;Informatics changes the world. What's Informatics? The field of informatics is widely expected foundations of information science and engineering, informatics represents a new, comprehensive and the social sciences. The Department of informatics established in the National Institute of Informatics (NII

Banbara, Mutsunori

59

Using Clinical Cases to Teach General Chemistry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A clinical study was designed and used to show the relationship of health and medicine, in a typical clinical scenario, where many chemical principles are involved and that an integrated knowledge of chemistry and biology is essential to the understanding, diagnosing and treating of illnesses. A case study would be a positive learning experience…

Dewprashad, Brahmadeo; Kosky, Charles; Vaz, Geraldine S.; Martin, Charlotte L.

2004-01-01

60

TEACHING BIOSTATISTICS TO CLINICAL RESEARCH GROUPS  

E-print Network

The aim is to present a teaching model in biostatistics that provides a link between biostatistical theory and medical science. The course is designed for multi-professional research groups, consisting of a supervisor, at least one doctoral student or post-doctoral scientist and other individuals working on the same project. The course is interactive and all participants have to apply the biostatistical theories to the project throughout the course. Experience gained from running such courses indicates that application of the skills learnt should improve the quality of future medical research and the publication of results.

unknown authors

61

Terminal Behavioral Objectives for Teaching Clinical Toxicology to Clinical Pharmacists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a first step in the development of a competency-based clinical toxicology clerkship, a set of terminal behavioral objectives were developed that reflect the anticipated role that clinical pharmacists should play as part of the clinical toxicology team. The evaluation approaches used at the University of Utah are presented. (LBH)

Veltri, Joseph C.; And Others

1976-01-01

62

Professional Storytelling in Clinical Dental Anatomy Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a study in a clinical dental anatomy course exploring the effects of storytelling and problem based learning on student satisfaction. The article explains potential reasons as to why this method demonstrated improved satisfaction among students.

2008-03-31

63

Toward an ecological perspective of resident teaching clinic.  

PubMed

Teaching clinic managers struggle to convert performance data into meaningful behavioral change in their trainees, and quality improvement measures in medicine have had modest results. This may be due to several factors including clinical performance being based more on team function than individual action, models of best practice that are over-simplified for real patients with multiple chronic diseases, and local features that influence behavior but are not aligned with core values. Many are looking for a new conceptual structure to guide them. In this paper we briefly review several theories of action from the social and complexity sciences, and synthesize these into a coherent 'ecological perspective'. This perspective focuses on stabilizing features and narrative, which select for behaviors in clinic much like organisms are selected for in an ecosystem. We have found this perspective to be a useful guide for design, measurement, and joint learning in the teaching clinic. PMID:18766451

Smith, C Scott; Francovich, Chris; Morris, Magdalena; Hill, William; Langlois-Winkle, Francine; Rupper, Randall; Roth, Craig; Wheeler, Stephanie; Vo, Anthony

2010-12-01

64

Clinical Trials Support -Research Associate II Animal Cancer Center Oncology Clinical Trials Program -Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Clinical Trials Support - Research Associate II Animal Cancer Center Oncology Clinical Trials Program - Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital Oncology Clinical Trials Program the daily schedule for the clinical trials rotation o Patient care including, obtaining owner history

Stephens, Graeme L.

65

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the introduction and evaluation of a range of body painting exercises in a medical school anatomy curriculum. The article suggests practical advice on the integration of the method into a curriculum as an additional learning opportunity with traditional lab practicums and clinical teaching skills.

Dr. Paul G McMenamin (University of Western Australia Anatomy and Human Biology)

2008-08-01

66

Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum  

PubMed Central

Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members’ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9). Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation. Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability) were employed (Guba and Lincoln). Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1) tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties) and (2) implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties). Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners. PMID:24627858

Haghani, Fariba; Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran Soltani; Bigdeli, Shoaleh; Alavi, Mousa; Omid, Athar

2014-01-01

67

Informatics Education in Italian Secondary Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the state of informatics education in the Italian secondary schools, highlighting how the learning objectives set up by the Ministry of Education are difficult to meet, due to the fact that the subject is often taught by teachers not holding an informatics degree, the lack of suitable teaching material and the expectations…

Bellettini, Carlo; Lonati, Violetta; Malchiodi, Dario; Monga, Mattia; Morpurgo, Anna; Torelli, Mauro; Zecca, Luisa

2014-01-01

68

Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 141150 141 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 141­150 141 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius SelMa ­ Self-guided Learning in Teaching Mathematics Wolfgang WEBER Department Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 3, No. 1 (2004) 141

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

Informatics: A Brief Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a brief survey of informatics, defined as the application of information technology to various fields, with respect to its historical background, disciplinary identity, fundamental aspects, applications, and challenges. Highlights include biological, clinical, dental, environmental, geomatics, health, legal, management, medical, museum,…

He, Shaoyi

2003-01-01

70

Medical informatics: reasoning methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

The progress of medical informatics has been characterized by the development of a wide range of reasoning methods. These reasoning methods are based on organizing principles that make use of the various relations existing in medical domains: associations, probabilities, causality, functional relationships, temporal relations, locality, similarity, and clinical practice. Some, such as those based on associations and probabilities have been

William J. Long

2001-01-01

71

Standards Enabling the Conduct of Clinical Research — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

72

Museum Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses museum informatics that studies how information science and technology affect the museum environment. Examines digital technology; information organization and access; digitization, personal computers, and the Internet; data sharing; standards; social impacts of new technologies; collaboration; consortia; multimedia exhibits; virtual…

Marty, Paul F.; Rayward, W. Boyd; Twidale, Michael B.

2003-01-01

73

Cancer Imaging Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Imaging Informatics encompasses the effort to consider the informatics of cancer imaging in the larger context of informatics. Reports and presentations from CIP workshops and meetings. Print This Page Cancer Imaging Informatics Programs & Resources

74

Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics  

PubMed Central

The Human Genome Project (HGP) provided the initial draft of mankind's DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized.[7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it's hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future. PMID:23248761

Gullapalli, Rama R.; Desai, Ketaki V.; Santana-Santos, Lucas; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Becich, Michael J.

2012-01-01

75

Health Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies current trends and issues in health informatics with examples of applications, particularly in English-speaking countries. Topics include health systems, professionals, and patients; consumer health information; electronic medical records; nursing; privacy and confidentiality; finding and using information; the Internet; e-mail;…

Russell, Marie; Brittain, J. Michael

2002-01-01

76

Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: nursing informatics competencies questionnaire.  

PubMed

Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal componentsanalysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings. PMID:25393832

Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

2014-12-01

77

Clinical Teaching Competence Inventory for Nursing Preceptors: Instrument Development and Testing.  

PubMed

Abstract The aim of the study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument which measures clinical teaching competencies of nursing preceptors. It is necessary to investigate what kinds of teaching competencies are required in modern, more student-centered higher education teaching contexts. Nurses need to possess teaching competence to perform the role of preceptor properly. However, empirical studies exploring teaching competence are rare. Psychometric testing was conducted on a sample of 389 clinical nursing preceptors from three hospitals in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability testing were conducted on the 53-item Clinical Teaching Competencies Scale. Results indicated that principal axis factoring extraction identified four factors through a promax rotation: student evaluation, goal setting and individual teaching, teaching strategies, and demonstration of organized knowledge. The Cronbach's ? values for the four factors ranged from .82 to .87. The Clinical Teaching Competence Inventory was found to have adequate construct validity and internal consistency of reliability for clinical nursing preceptors to assess clinical teaching behaviors in practice settings. PMID:23909460

Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Chiu, Hsiu-Win; Chen, Ya-Lin

2013-08-01

78

Clinical teaching competence inventory for nursing preceptors: instrument development and testing.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument which measures clinical teaching competencies of nursing preceptors. It is necessary to investigate what kinds of teaching competencies are required in modern, more student-centered higher education teaching contexts. Nurses need to possess teaching competence to perform the role of preceptor properly. However, empirical studies exploring teaching competence are rare. Psychometric testing was conducted on a sample of 389 clinical nursing preceptors from three hospitals in 2010. Exploratory factor analysis and reliability testing were conducted on the 53-item Clinical Teaching Competencies Scale. Results indicated that principal axis factoring extraction identified four factors through a promax rotation: Student evaluation, goal setting and individual teaching, teaching strategies, and demonstration of organized knowledge. The Cronbach's ? values for the four factors ranged from 0.82-0.87. The Clinical Teaching Competence Inventory was found to have adequate construct validity and internal consistency of reliability for clinical nursing preceptors to assess clinical teaching behaviors in practice settings. PMID:24787255

Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Chiu, Hsiu-Win; Chen, Ya-Lin

2014-02-01

79

Climate Informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The impacts of present and potential future climate change will be one of the most important scientific and societal challenges in the 21st century. Given observed changes in temperature, sea ice, and sea level, improving our understanding of the climate system is an international priority. This system is characterized by complex phenomena that are imperfectly observed and even more imperfectly simulated. But with an ever-growing supply of climate data from satellites and environmental sensors, the magnitude of data and climate model output is beginning to overwhelm the relatively simple tools currently used to analyze them. A computational approach will therefore be indispensable for these analysis challenges. This chapter introduces the fledgling research discipline climate informatics: collaborations between climate scientists and machine learning researchers in order to bridge this gap between data and understanding. We hope that the study of climate informatics will accelerate discovery in answering pressing questions in climate science.

Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Alexander, Francis J.; Niculescu-Mizil, Alexandru; Steinhaeuser, Karsten; Tippett, Michael; Banerjee, Arindam; Blumenthal, M. Benno; Ganguly, Auroop R.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Tedesco, Marco

2013-01-01

80

Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

Frisse, Mark E.

1992-01-01

81

Using the WWW to teach undergraduate nurses clinical communication.  

PubMed

On-line learning is increasingly being used in nursing education. Nevertheless, there is still insufficient evidence to demonstrate: whether students respond positively when this form of learning is used to teach relatively practical or clinical subjects; whether it is effective; and whether it is fair to students with less access to, or familiarity with, computers and the internet. In 2003, an on-line Unit on clinical communication was developed for Australian undergraduate nurses in partnership between an Australian School of Nursing and the Department of Clinical Psychology. Students were overwhelmingly positive in their evaluation of the Unit although some regretted the lack of face-to-face contact with tutors and peers. The best aspects of the Unit included the content and structure being perceived as interesting, fun and informative, the relevance of the material for them as nurses, flexibility to work independently, promotion of critical thinking and gaining an understanding of client issues. Neither their evaluation nor their final grades were related to students' age or whether they preferred on-line or traditional learning. Students who had readily available computer access, however, had better final grades. Also, students' grades were correlated with how often they accessed the Unit. PMID:16935394

Farrell, Gerald A; Cubit, Katrina A; Bobrowski, Christina L; Salmon, Peter

2007-07-01

82

Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS  

E-print Network

Informatics Methods to Enable Patient-centered Radiology1 Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Informatics by informatics. In particular, computer support can help referring physicians tailor their imaging requests to those procedures that would be most helpful for their pa- tients'clinical context. Informatics methods

Rubin, Daniel L.

83

Informatics Department of  

E-print Network

SHRP Biomedical Informatics Department of Health Informatics about it's all ChoiCes... exclusively. For additional information visit their website at: housing.newark.rutgers.edu Visit shrp.rutgers.edu/dept/informatics@shrp.rutgers.edu Professor & Chairman, Department of Health Informatics Director of Graduate Programs in Biomedical

Cheng, Mei-Fang

84

L. Jean Camp, PhD Informatics, Indiana University  

E-print Network

and Reliability in Internet Commerce Present Positions Associate Professor of Informatics, Indiana University is the author of "Trust and Risk in Internet Commerce", published by MIT Press; the editor the "Economics Cryptography, IFCA (2003). Teaching Economics of Security, Social Informatics of Security; Internet Privacy

Camp, L. Jean

85

THE ADAPTATION FOR GROUP CLASSROOM USE OF CLINICAL TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING BRAIN-INJURED CHILDREN.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS STUDY SOUGHT TO DEVELOP A PUBLIC SCHOOL PROGRAM FOR BRAIN-INJURED CHILDREN OF AVERAGE OR LOW AVERAGE INTELLECTUAL POTENTIAL. THE OBJECTIVES WERE--(1) TO COLLECT CLINICAL TUTORING TECHNIQUES BEING USED, (2) TO CLASSIFY CLINICAL TUTORIAL METHODS IN A FRAMEWORK USEFUL FOR DEVELOPING TECHNIQUES FOR GROUP TEACHING, (3) TO ADOPT CLINICAL TUTORIAL…

NOVACK, HARRY S.

86

Informatics and operations—let's get integrated  

PubMed Central

The widespread adoption of commercial electronic health records (EHRs) presents a significant challenge to the field of informatics. In their current form, EHRs function as a walled garden and prevent the integration of outside tools and services. This impedes the widespread adoption and diffusion of research interventions into the clinic. In most institutions, EHRs are supported by clinical operations staff who are largely separate from their informatics counterparts. This relationship needs to change. Research informatics and clinical operations need to work more closely on the implementation and configuration of EHRs to ensure that they are used to collect high-quality data for research and improvement at the point of care. At the same time, the informatics community needs to lobby commercial EHR vendors to open their systems and design new architectures that allow for the integration of external applications and services. PMID:22940670

Marsolo, Keith

2013-01-01

87

Crossing the Chasm: Information Technology to Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Accelerating the translation of new scientific discoveries to improve human health and disease management is the overall goal of a series of initiatives integrated in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) “Roadmap for Medical Research.” The Clinical and Translational Research Award (CTSA) program is, arguably, the most visible component of the NIH Roadmap providing resources to institutions to transform their clinical and translational research enterprises along the goals of the Roadmap. The CTSA program emphasizes biomedical informatics as a critical component for the accomplishment of the NIH’s translational objectives. To be optimally effective, emerging biomedical informatics programs must link with the information technology (IT) platforms of the enterprise clinical operations within academic health centers. This report details one academic health center’s transdisciplinary initiative to create an integrated academic discipline of biomedical informatics through the development of its infrastructure for clinical and translational science infrastructure and response to the CTSA mechanism. This approach required a detailed informatics strategy to accomplish these goals. This transdisciplinary initiative was the impetus for creation of a specialized biomedical informatics core, the Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBI). Development of the CBI codified the need to incorporate medical informatics including quality and safety informatics and enterprise clinical information systems within the CBI. This paper describes the steps taken to develop the biomedical informatics infrastructure, its integration with clinical systems at one academic health center, successes achieved, and barriers encountered during these efforts. PMID:21383632

Fahy, Brenda G.; Balke, C. William; Umberger, Gloria H.; Talbert, Jeffery; Canales, Denise Niles; Steltenkamp, Carol L.; Conigliaro, Joseph

2011-01-01

88

Ready, set, teach! How to transform the clinical nurse expert into the part-time clinical nurse instructor.  

PubMed

Many schools of nursing are hiring part-time clinical instructors with little or no teaching experience. Although they contribute greatly to student nurses' clinical experience, many do not realize the commitment they are making when they accept such a position. If key issues are addressed before new part-time clinical instructors begin teaching, the transition could be made more smoothly. An in-depth orientation, awareness of the need for preparation for clinical rotations, and strategies to assist students in achieving course objectives can guide new instructors as they begin this venture. Preparing new part-time clinical instructors from the beginning will give them a more accurate picture of clinical education, increasing their recruitment and retention and providing students with quality learning experiences. PMID:20506923

Hewitt, Peggy; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

2010-09-01

89

A Model for Interschool Teaching of Humanities during Clinical Training.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collaborative course was developed in 1980 for senior medical students and other professional school students by the faculties teaching ethics at the four medical schools in or near the District of Columbia. The course in bioethics is described. (MLW)

Glover, Jacqueline; And Others

1984-01-01

90

winter 2015 Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Health informatics sept. 24 142MHi216 $1,200 interoperability and Health information exchange sept. 24fall 2014/ winter 2015 Health Informatics Health Information Exchange Healthcare Analytics COntin: Health Informatics, Health Information Exchange and Healthcare Analytics. These programs are geared

California at Davis, University of

91

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Recruiter's  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING 2013-2014 Recruiter's Guide www.soic.indiana.edu/career #12;We introductory Computer Science or Informatics courses to help students learn more about your industry Senior Assistant hkidd@indiana.edu Informatics and Computing Career Services Staff #12;School

Indiana University

92

BioInformatics BioInformatics  

E-print Network

of Immunology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, The Netherlands Single cell tracing of hematopoiesis using with single cell resolution. We show that individual multipotent progenitors are generally not multiBigRoc The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open Club The BioInformatics and Genome Research Open

Shamir, Ron

93

Balancing Patient Care and Student Education: Learning to Deliver Bad News in an Optometry Teaching Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning to counsel patients in a teaching clinic or hospital occurs in the presence of the competing agendas of patient care and student education. We wondered about the challenges that these tensions create for clinical novices learning to deliver bad news to patients. In this preliminary study, we audio-taped and transcribed the interviews of…

Spafford, Marlee M.; Schryer, Catherine F.; Creutz, Stefan

2009-01-01

94

Teaching Skills to Promote Clinical Reasoning in Early Basic Science Courses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Basic and superior reasoning skills are woven into the clinical reasoning process just as they are used to solve any problem. As clinical reasoning is the central competence of medical education, development of these reasoning skills should occur throughout the undergraduate medical curriculum. The authors describe here a method of teaching…

Elizondo-Omana, Rodrigo Enrique; Morales-Gomez, Jesus Alberto; Morquecho-Espinoza, Orlando; Hinojosa-Amaya, Jose Miguel; Villarreal-Silva, Eliud Enrique; Garcia-Rodriguez, Maria de los Angeles; Guzman-Lopez, Santos

2010-01-01

95

Development of a Computer Program for Teaching Periodontal Diagnosis Based on Clinical Epidemiological Principles.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Development of an inexpensive but powerful computer program to teach clinical periodontal diagnosis using epidemiological principles is described. Using probabilistic thinking, the student is guided from application of raw research data to derivation of likelihood ratios and how they affect clinical decision making. Student response was found to…

Fung, Kelvin; And Others

1995-01-01

96

A model for preparing faculty to teach model C clinical nurse leader students.  

PubMed

Model C clinical nurse leader (CNL) programs are complex because they must meet the The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice and The Essentials of Master's Education in Nursing, as well as the graduate level competencies outlined in the white paper Competencies and Curricular Expectations for Clinical Nurse Leader Education and Practice. Faculty assigned to teach in these programs may be experts in education or areas of clinical specialty, but they may not have a clear understanding of the CNL role to teach and mentor CNL students. This article describes a faculty development model that includes an introduction to the CNL role, course mapping of the essentials, integration of CNL professional values into clinical evaluation, consultation with practicing model C graduates, and participation in a comprehensive CNL certification review course. The model was effective in preparing faculty to teach and mentor students in a model C CNL program. PMID:24971734

Webb, Sherry; McKeon, Leslie

2014-07-01

97

Body Painting as a Tool in Clinical Anatomy Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The teaching of human anatomy has had to respond to significant changes in medical curricula, and it behooves anatomists to devise alternative strategies to effectively facilitate learning of the discipline by medical students in an integrated, applied, relevant, and contextual framework. In many medical schools, the lack of cadaver dissection as…

McMenamin, Paul G.

2008-01-01

98

The Multiple Dimensions of Interoperability and Data Standards in the Clinical and Translational Research Domains — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

99

The origins of informatics.  

PubMed Central

This article summarizes the origins of informatics, which is based on the science, engineering, and technology of computer hardware, software, and communications. In just four decades, from the 1950s to the 1990s, computer technology has progressed from slow, first-generation vacuum tubes, through the invention of the transistor and its incorporation into microprocessor chips, and ultimately, to fast, fourth-generation very-large-scale-integrated silicon chips. Programming has undergone a parallel transformation, from cumbersome, first-generation, machine languages to efficient, fourth-generation application-oriented languages. Communication has evolved from simple copper wires to complex fiberoptic cables in computer-linked networks. The digital computer has profound implications for the development and practice of clinical medicine. PMID:7719803

Collen, M F

1994-01-01

100

Continued on Page 17 Issue 14, Fall 2013 Newsletter of the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology  

E-print Network

and Clinical Epidemiology Students Receive Degrees.......2 Evidence-based Practice Center Conducts Reviews transitional for us, as the third round of five-year funding for the Evidence- Based Practice Center came at Oregon Health & Science University. But as always, DMICE manages to move forward. The Evidence- based

Chapman, Michael S.

101

A survey of informatics approaches to whole-exome and whole-genome clinical reporting in the electronic health record  

PubMed Central

Purpose Genome-scale clinical sequencing is being adopted more broadly in medical practice. The National Institutes of Health developed the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) program to guide implementation and dissemination of best practices for the integration of sequencing into clinical care. This study describes and compares the state of the art of incorporating whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing results into the electronic health record, including approaches to decision support across the six current CSER sites. Methods The CSER Medical Record Working Group collaboratively developed and completed an in-depth survey to assess the communication of genome-scale data into the electronic health record. We summarized commonalities and divergent approaches. Results Despite common sequencing platform (Illumina) adoptions, there is a great diversity of approaches to annotation tools and workflow, as well as to report generation. At all sites, reports are human-readable structured documents available as passive decision support in the electronic health record. Active decision support is in early implementation at two sites. Conclusion The parallel efforts across CSER sites in the creation of systems for report generation and integration of reports into the electronic health record, as well as the lack of standardized approaches to interfacing with variant databases to create active clinical decision support, create opportunities for cross-site and vendor collaborations. PMID:24071794

Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Amendola, Laura; Aronson, Samuel J.; Garraway, Levi; Gray, Stacy; Grundmeier, Robert W.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Jarvik, Gail; Karavite, Dean; Lebo, Matthew; Plon, Sharon E.; Van Allen, Eliezer; Weck, Karen E.; White, Peter S.; Yang, Yaping

2014-01-01

102

A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?  

PubMed Central

Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

Lamy, J.-B.

2014-01-01

103

Service and Teaching Issues in an Inner-City University-Based Psychiatry Clinic  

PubMed Central

The provision of quality out-patient psychiatric care to a predominately black inner-city population, in a University setting such as ours, is a complex and challenging task. This paper addresses service and teaching issues related to the provision of that care in the Adult Unit of the Howard University Hospital Mental Health Clinic. In this setting there is a mandate for clinical teaching and research as well, two vital components in the delivery of quality psychiatric service by knowledgeable and skilled health care providers. Imagesp266-a PMID:702560

Snipe, Rosetta M.; Bullock, Samuel C.; Randall, Lawrence A.

1978-01-01

104

University teaching hospital and private clinic collaboration to enhance veterinary educational opportunities at Mississippi State University.  

PubMed

The College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University established a not-for-profit corporation (MSU-CVM-COS) to develop and manage private specialty clinics that would enhance teaching and student learning, increase caseload, and generate revenue. The corporation currently operates the Animal Emergency and Referral Center (AERC) and the Veterinary Specialty Center (VSC) as affiliates of Mississippi State University. These privately managed facilities provide access to advanced medical equipment, enhance clinical service and teaching, and promote the College's One Health initiative. PMID:24384387

Tyner, C Lee; Harkness, John; Hoblet, Kent; Zumwalt, Lauren; Templeton, Karen; McLaughlin, Ron

2014-01-01

105

An analysis of pre-service family planning teaching in clinical and nursing education in Tanzania  

PubMed Central

Background Promoting family planning (FP) is a key strategy for health, economic and population growth. Sub-Saharan Africa, with one of the lowest contraceptive prevalence and highest fertility rates globally, contributes half of the global maternal deaths. Improving the quality of FP services, including enhancing pre-service FP teaching, has the potential to improve contraceptive prevalence. In efforts to improve the quality of FP services in Tanzania, including provider skills, this study sought to identify gaps in pre-service FP teaching and suggest opportunities for strengthening the training. Methods Data were collected from all medical schools and a representative sample of pre-service nursing, Assistant Medical Officer (AMO), Clinical Officer (CO) and assistant CO schools in mainland Tanzania. Teachers responsible for FP teaching at the schools were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Observations on availability of teaching resources and other evidence of FP teaching and evaluation were documented. Relevant approved teaching documents were assessed for their suitability as competency-based FP teaching tools against predefined criteria. Quantitative data were analyzed using EPI Info 6 and qualitative data were manually analyzed using content analysis. Results A total of 35 pre-service schools were evaluated for FP teaching including 30 technical education and five degree offering schools. Of the assessed 11 pre-service curricula, only one met the criteria for suitability of FP teaching. FP teaching was typically theoretical with only 22.9% of all the schools having systems in place to produce graduates who could skillfully provide FP methods. Across schools, the target skills were the same level of competence and skewed toward short acting methods of contraception. Only 23.3% (n?=?7) of schools had skills laboratories, 76% (n?=?22) were either physically connected or linked to FP clinics. None of the degree providing schools practiced FP at its own teaching hospital. Teachers were concerned with poor practical exposure and lack of teaching material. Conclusions Pre-service FP teaching in Tanzania is theoretical, poorly guided, and skewed toward short acting methods; a majority of the schools are unable to produce competent FP service providers. Pre-service FP training should be strengthened with more focus on practical skills. PMID:25016391

2014-01-01

106

Teaching Softly in Hard Environments: Meanings of Small-Group Reflective Teaching to Clinical Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A vast literature exists on teaching reflection and reflective practice to trainees in small groups, yet with few exceptions the literature does not address the benefits of these interactions to faculty. Like multiculturalism or cultural competency, the literature assumes that faculty have themselves "achieved" these propensities and that trainees…

Whiting, Ellen; Wear, Delese; Aultman, Julie M.; Zupp, Laurie

2012-01-01

107

Informatics in radiology: improving clinical work flow through an AIM database: a sample web-based lesion tracking application.  

PubMed

Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web-based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. PMID:22745220

Abajian, Aaron C; Levy, Mia; Rubin, Daniel L

2012-01-01

108

Informatics in Radiology: Improving Clinical Work Flow through an AIM Database: A Sample Web-based Lesion Tracking Application  

PubMed Central

Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web–based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. © RSNA, 2012 PMID:22745220

Abajian, Aaron C.; Levy, Mia

2012-01-01

109

Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics: European Efforts to Facilitate Synergy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past decade there have been several attempts to rethink the basic strategies and scope of medical informatics. Meanwhile, bioinformatics has only recently experienced a similar debate about its scientific character. Both disciplines envision the development of novel diagnostic, therapeutic, and management tools, and products for patient care. A combination of the expertise of medical informatics in developing clinical

Victor Maojo; Ilias Iakovidis; Fernando Martín-sánchez; José Crespo; Casimir A. Kulikowski

2001-01-01

110

Using informatics and the electronic medical record to describe antimicrobial use in the clinical management of diarrhea cases at 12 companion animal practices.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial drugs may be used to treat diarrheal illness in companion animals. It is important to monitor antimicrobial use to better understand trends and patterns in antimicrobial resistance. There is no monitoring of antimicrobial use in companion animals in Canada. To explore how the use of electronic medical records could contribute to the ongoing, systematic collection of antimicrobial use data in companion animals, anonymized electronic medical records were extracted from 12 participating companion animal practices and warehoused at the University of Calgary. We used the pre-diagnostic, clinical features of diarrhea as the case definition in this study. Using text-mining technologies, cases of diarrhea were described by each of the following variables: diagnostic laboratory tests performed, the etiological diagnosis and antimicrobial therapies. The ability of the text miner to accurately describe the cases for each of the variables was evaluated. It could not reliably classify cases in terms of diagnostic tests or etiological diagnosis; a manual review of a random sample of 500 diarrhea cases determined that 88/500 (17.6%) of the target cases underwent diagnostic testing of which 36/88 (40.9%) had an etiological diagnosis. Text mining, compared to a human reviewer, could accurately identify cases that had been treated with antimicrobials with high sensitivity (92%, 95% confidence interval, 88.1%-95.4%) and specificity (85%, 95% confidence interval, 80.2%-89.1%). Overall, 7400/15,928 (46.5%) of pets presenting with diarrhea were treated with antimicrobials. Some temporal trends and patterns of the antimicrobial use are described. The results from this study suggest that informatics and the electronic medical records could be useful for monitoring trends in antimicrobial use. PMID:25057893

Anholt, R Michele; Berezowski, John; Ribble, Carl S; Russell, Margaret L; Stephen, Craig

2014-01-01

111

[Informatics support and teledialysis].  

PubMed

Computer-assisted medical activity is increasing in several fields, with wide perspectives in nephrology and dialysis accounting for the peculiar characteristics of this population such as number, complexity, follow-up length and economic costs. Since 1980 we have been studying a computerized organization of our Region's departments in order to achieve 3 main results: 1) a registry of all patients undergoing dialysis in the area, with a one- a-year complete clinical update; 2) a computerized medical chart, which could gather all the clinical, technical and managerial aspects of the treatment; 3) a teledialysis program, to follow every session in local and remote stations. The first aim has been reached with useful information for the dialytic policy in the area. The second objective is ongoing with straight evidence of easy, speedy procedures, and accurate data collection. The third goal is on a preliminary phase looking at the safety, reliability and precision of the treatments. Informatic procedures seem to be quite advisable in improving as clinical surveillance of the patients, as technical and managerial aspects of dialysis units. PMID:8036545

Formica, M; Quarello, F; Stramignoni, E; Pozzato, M; Forneris, G; Iadarola, G M; Maffei, S; Basolo, B; Martina, G; Boero, R

1994-03-01

112

Towards a better understanding of patient perspectives of clinical teaching in ophthalmology  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo investigate of the perspectives of ophthalmology patients involved in clinical teaching.MethodsIn all, 26 patients attending a revision course for postgraduate Membership of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists examination were recruited. Every patient was examined by each of 36 residents who were present on this course making a total of 936 clinical examinations. Patient perspectives on their experience were investigated

D G Ezra; T Salam; P M Sullivan; N Okhravi

2009-01-01

113

Massive Open Online Course for Health Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Objectives This paper outlines a new method of teaching health informatics to large numbers of students from around the world through a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). Methods The Health Informatics Forum is one of examples of MOOCs through a social networking site for educating health informatics students and professionals. It is running a MOOC for students from around the world that uses creative commons licenced content funded by the US government and developed by five US universities. The content is delivered through narrated lectures with slides that can be viewed online with discussion threads on the forum for class interactions. Students can maintain a professional profile, upload photos and files, write their own blog posts and post discussion threads on the forum. Results The Health Informatics Forum MOOC has been accessed by 11,316 unique users from 127 countries from August 2, 2012 to January 24, 2014. Most users accessed the MOOC via a desktop computer, followed by tablets and mobile devices and 55% of users were female. Over 400,000 unique users have now accessed the wider Health Informatics Forum since it was established in 2008. Conclusions Advances in health informatics and educational technology have both created a demand for online learning material in health informatics and a solution for providing it. By using a MOOC delivered through a social networking platform it is hoped that high quality health informatics education will be able to be delivered to a large global audience of future health informaticians without cost. PMID:24872906

2014-01-01

114

Teaching Faculty about Substance Abuse: Evaluating Clinical Competence and Professional Development  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes the evaluation of a faculty development program implemented to address the deficit in physicians' clinical and teaching competence regarding substance abuse. Participants in the university hospital program included faculty fellows from five departments. Annual, random chart audits assessed changes in rates of substance use documentation by residents supervised and not supervised by the fellows. Paired t tests

Antonnette V. Graham; Mary Altpeter; Stephanie Emmitt-Myers; Theodore V. Parran Jr; Stephen Zyzanski

1996-01-01

115

The Teaching Alliance Inventory: Evaluating the student-instructor relationship in clinical and counselling psychology training  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Teaching Alliance Inventory (TAI) was developed to measure the quality of the student-instructor relationship in graduate clinical and counselling psychology classrooms. Based on Bordin's (1983) original concept of the alliance as fundamental to the change process in psychotherapy, we developed the TAI to measure aspects of the classroom relationship that may be fundamental to learning essential skills of counselling

Rebecca A. Jones; Hamid Mirsalimi; Jennifer S. Conroy; H. Lynn Horne-Moyer; Cecelia Burrill

2008-01-01

116

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Professor. Description Summary The Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service at the James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital is looking for a veterinary dentist to join the dentistry team consisting of 2 faculty

117

An Explorative Learning Approach to Teaching Clinical Anatomy Using Student Generated Content  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes a novel approach to teaching gross anatomy to medical students. The article explains an explorative learning approach that builds students analytical, reasoning and communication (written and oral). The methods used require students to develop a patient case based on clinical outcomes.

Dr. Christo T Philip (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine); Dr. Kenneth P Unruh (Mayo Clinic College of Medicine)

2008-05-01

118

Computer-Simulated Psychotherapy as an Aid in Teaching Clinical Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes how Elisa, a widely known computer program which simulates the responses of a psychotherapist, can be used as a teaching aid in undergraduate clinical psychology classes. Provides information on conducting the exercise, integrating it into the course syllabus, and evaluating its impact on students. (JDH)

Suler, John R.

1987-01-01

119

Health Informatics: An Overview.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews literature related to health informatics and health information management. Provides examples covering types of information, library and information services outcomes, training of informatics professionals, areas of application, the impact of evidence based medicine, professional issues, integrated information systems, and the needs of the…

MacDougall, Jennifer; And Others

1996-01-01

120

On Cognitive Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supplementary to matter and energy, information is the third essence for modeling the natural world. An emerging discipline known as cognitive informatics (CI) is developed recently that forms a profound interdisciplinary study of cognitive and information sciences, and tackles the common root problems sharing by informatics, computing, software engineering, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, neuropsychology, philosophy, linguistics, and life science. CI

Yingxu Wang

2003-01-01

121

What Is Nursing Informatics?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology has developed to the point of providing a means to manage nursing and related health-care data effectively for nursing administrators, educators, practitioners, and researchers. Therefore, the newly recognized area of nursing informatics is important to the nursing profession as a whole. Nursing informatics is defined as the…

McGonigle, D.; And Others

122

Trials and tribulations of clinical research teaching and training  

PubMed Central

Clinical research institutions have mushroomed in the country, though there is a generalized lack of experienced faculty. These institutes mostly confine themselves to theoretical aspects of clinical research, since there is lack of facilities for practical training. Students passing out of these institutes often find it difficult to get decent jobs and salaries at the entry level in the industry are poor. Poor placements of graduating students become major barriers for attracting quality students to the courses. This in turn affects the quality of people that the industry requires, in order to ensure a high growth rate of the industry. The industry, in addition to facing a severe crunch of high quality professionals, is also suffering from attrition that is a common feature. This attrition stems from, inter alia the industry’s demand for experienced people at the entry level. To improve overall standards of professionals entering clinical research, institutes and the industry need to get together and work in close co-operation. The industry and the institutes need to take positive steps if recent trends have to be reversed and clinical research as a whole has to move to a higher level. This article is based on the perceptions of the author, about the problems faced and offers some suggestions. Though these perceptions represent the reality, it is difficult to provide hard evidence that they do so. PMID:21350729

Ghooi, Ravindra B.

2010-01-01

123

Problematising Teaching through a "Critical" Perspective on Clinical Supervision.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper takes as its starting point the well-known and extensively used process of clinical supervision and shows how what started over 30 years ago as a collaborative process has been harnessed into a sophisticated mechanism of teacher inspection and surveillance. It shows how this co-option has occurred historically through the progressive…

Smyth, John

124

Indiana University Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

Indiana University Department of Informatics Graduate Student Orientation Week August 25-29, 2008 contracts, papers, etc. (for AIs, RAs) 8:45 ­ 12:00 Introductions · Welcome from Informatics Department Chair Geoffrey Fox · Introduction of Informatics staff · Informatics Packets and Picnic Sign-Up Linda

Dalkilic, Mehmet

125

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Strongly chordal and chordal bipartite graphs are sandwich Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2009-383.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Papadopoulos, Charis

126

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 A complete characterisation of the linear clique of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2009-381.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Papadopoulos, Charis

127

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Characterizing and computing minimal cograph completions AS Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2008-352.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Papadopoulos, Charis

128

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Graphs of small bounded linear clique-width P. Heggernes, D. Meister, Ch. Papadopoulos REPORT NO 362 October 2007 Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway, is available at http

Papadopoulos, Charis

129

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Cutwidth of split graphs, threshold graphs, and proper 2008 Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2008-372.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Papadopoulos, Charis

130

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 Interval Completion is Fixed Parameter Tractable Pinar of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/ps/2006-336.ps Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590  

E-print Network

REPORTS IN INFORMATICS ISSN 0333-3590 A new representation of proper interval graphs Department of Informatics UNIVERSITY OF BERGEN Bergen, Norway #12;This report has URL http://www.ii.uib.no/publikasjoner/texrap/pdf/2007-354.pdf Reports in Informatics from Department of Informatics, University of Bergen, Norway

Papadopoulos, Charis

132

Teaching clinical communication: a mainstream activity or just a minority sport?  

PubMed

This plenary presentation from the EACH International Conference on Communication in Healthcare in Oslo 2008, takes an honest look at the present state of communication teaching and considers how to take the next steps to move communication into the very centre of medical education. Although clinical communication teaching has become increasingly accepted as a formal component of the medical curriculum, there is still a problem to be faced. Communication still often appears in medical education to be a peripheral element rather than a mainstream activity truly perceived by schools and learners as central to all clinical interactions. This presentation explores why clinical communication often appears to be a minority sport in medical education, considers how to overcome this via integration throughout the curriculum, looks at five specific examples of integration in action, presents a new UK consensus statement which helps integrate communication into the mainstream, and finally explores the progression to maturity in communication curricula. PMID:19647971

Silverman, Jonathan

2009-09-01

133

Informatics Resource Library Open to all members of Informatics and research centres associated with Informatics  

E-print Network

Informatics Resource Library Open to all members of Informatics and research centres associated with Informatics (COGS, CCNR, Sackler), the Resource Library has extensive holdings of textbooks, research for Informatics. Most of these are in the Cognitive Science Research Paper series, of which there are at present

Sussex, University of

134

CHALLENGES FOR BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS AND PHARMACOGENOMICS  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Pharmacogenomics requires the integration and analysis of genomic, molecular, cellular, and clinical data, and it thus offers a remarkable set of challenges to biomedical informatics. These include infrastructural challenges such as the creation of data models and databases for storing these data, the integration of these data with external databases, the extraction of information from natural language text,

Russ B. Altman; Teri E. Klein

2002-01-01

135

Origins of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics is a new knowledge domain of computer and information science, engineering and technology in all fields of health and medicine, including research, education and practice. Medical informatics has evolved over the past 30 years as medicine learned to exploit the extraordinary capabilities of the electronic digital computer to better meet its complex information needs. The first articles on this subject appeared in the 1950s, the number of publications rapidly increased in the 1960s and medical informatics was identified as a new specialty in the 1970s. PMID:3544507

Collen, Morris F.

1986-01-01

136

Emerging Vaccine Informatics  

PubMed Central

Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

2010-01-01

137

NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2009-01-01

138

The value of intelligent multimedia simulation for teaching clinical decision-making skills  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the value of using intelligent multimedia simulation for the teaching of nursing clinical decision-making skills. The possibilities of multimedia-based educational resources are examined and the rapid growth and questionable effectiveness of current multimedia computer-based learning applications for nursing students are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of this technology and the problems developing intelligent agent-based systems are examined.

Bernard M. Garrett; David Callear

2001-01-01

139

Design and Development of a New Facility for Teaching and Research in Clinical Anatomy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article discusses factors in the design, commissioning, project management, and intellectual property protection of developments within a new clinical anatomy facility. The project was aimed at creating cost-effective facilities that would address widespread concerns over anatomy teaching, and support research and community interaction. Discussed are the considerations made to develop a facility that comprises an engaging learning environment, modes to support a range of pedagogies appropriate to the needs of healthcare professionals at different stages of their careers.

2009-02-01

140

Imaging Informatics Resources  

Cancer.gov

The Cancer Imaging Program leverages a number of existing informatics resources.  These resources include numerous software tools, data archives, and organizations which set standards and policies useful for imaging research. Software Tools & Data Archives

141

Informatics Resources Supporting the Research Enterprise  

E-print Network

3/27/2013 1 Informatics Resources Supporting the Research Enterprise Paul A. Harris, PhD Director, Office of Research Informatics Associate Professor, Biomedical Informatics & Biomedical Engineering Office of Research Informatics Enterprise Management, Tracking, and Evaluation PI interface (Process

Bordenstein, Seth

142

Do Expert Clinical Teachers Have a Shared Understanding of What Constitutes a Competent Reasoning Performance in Case-Based Teaching?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To explore the assessment challenge related to case based learning we study how experienced clinical teachers--i.e., those who regularly teach and assess case-based learning--conceptualize the notion of competent reasoning performance for specific teaching cases. Through an in-depth qualitative case study of five expert teachers, we investigate…

Gauthier, Geneviève; Lajoie, Susanne P.

2014-01-01

143

A methodology for teaching ethics in the clinical setting: A clinical handbook for medical ethics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pluralism of methodologies and severe time constraints pose important challenges to pedagogy in clinical ethics. We designed a step-by-step student handbook to operate within such constraints and to respect the methodological pluralism of bioethics and clinical ethics. The handbook comprises six steps: Step 1: What are the facts of the case?; Step 2: What are your obligations to your

Laurence B. McCullough; Carol M. Ashton

1994-01-01

144

Gap Analysis of Biomedical Informatics Graduate Education Competencies  

PubMed Central

Graduate training in biomedical informatics (BMI) is evolving rapidly. BMI graduate programs differ in informatics domain, delivery method, degrees granted, as well as breadth and depth of curricular competencies. Using the current American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) definition of BMI core competencies as a framework, we identified and labeled course offerings within graduate programs. From our qualitative analysis, gaps between defined competencies and curricula emerged. Topics missing from existing graduate curricula include community health, translational and clinical research, knowledge representation, data mining, communication and evidence-based practice. PMID:24551403

Ritko, Anna L.; Odlum, Michelle

2013-01-01

145

Informatics Everywhere Information and Computation  

E-print Network

Informatics Everywhere Information and Computation in Society, Science, and Technology Presented. Verhoeff @ TUE.NL 1/6 Informatics Everywhere #12;The Broader Context Society : humans acting as a group : putting `the world' to our use, twisting it c 2013, T. Verhoeff @ TUE.NL 2/6 Informatics Everywhere #12;A

Verhoeff, Tom

146

Page 1 of 10 Informatics  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Signals & Spectrum Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve McLaughlin Steve McLaughlin · Signals and Spectrum ­ Cross-layer optimisation issues #12;Page 3 of 10 Informatics University of Edinburgh, Nov 26, 2008 Steve

Edinburgh, University of

147

Postgraduate Prospectus SchoolofInformatics  

E-print Network

, the Informatics Forum. Our courses As a postgraduate student at the School of Informatics you can chose to study students in the world and be taught by award winning staff. More information on courses can be foundPostgraduate Prospectus #12;2 SchoolofInformatics PostgraduateProspectus The

Edinburgh, University of

148

National Institute of Informatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Informatics is a field that is gaining importance around the globe, and the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Japan seeks "to advance integrated research and development activities in information-related fields, including networking, software, and content." First-time visitors should note that most of the materials in the site can be located in sections such as "Research & Project" and "Services". Before delving into these areas, visitors may wish to take a look at the most recent issue of "NII Today" via the homepage. Afterwards, visitors should look over the "Research" area. Here they will find summaries of research projects, working papers, and information about their international partnerships. The "Services" area is well worth a look as it contains links to additional informatics databases that will be of use to scholars and students within the field.

149

Informatics in the Doctor of Nursing Practice Curriculum  

PubMed Central

In 2006, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing approved a new doctoral degree for clinical leaders, the Doctor of Nursing Practice. These new advanced practice leaders will need sophisticated skills in informatics to acquire and use data, information, and knowledge in their roles. This paper proposes a foundational course for all Doctor of Nursing Practice students and some strategies for integrating informatics throughout the curriculum. PMID:18693859

Jenkins, Melinda; Wilson, Marisa; Ozbolt, Judy

2007-01-01

150

Curricula in medical informatics.  

PubMed

Education in medical informatics is needed not only for those who want to become specialist in this area but also for health professionals. Since students, depending on the program they are enlisted in, require different types of knowledge and skills in medical informatics, curricula should be adapted to those needs. The curriculum structure also depends on the expert level the students want to attain. This contribution presents the knowledge and skills levels for different groups of students and presents two examples of curricula. PMID:15718674

Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold

2004-01-01

151

Informatics in radiology: integration of the medical imaging resource center into a teaching hospital network to allow single sign-on access.  

PubMed

The RSNA Medical Imaging Resource Center (MIRC) software is an open-source program that allows users to identify, index, and retrieve images, teaching files, and other radiologic data that share a common underlying structure. The software is being continually improved as new challenges and different needs become apparent. Although version T30 is easily installed on a stand-alone computer, its implementation at healthcare enterprises with complex network architecture may be challenging with respect to security because users cannot log on by using a standard enterprise-wide authentication protocol. Instead, authentication takes place through the local MIRC database, creating security concerns and potential organizational problems. In this setting, the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) can be used to provide a single sign-on environment and increase authentication security. A commercial directory service using LDAP has been successfully integrated with MIRC in a large multifacility enterprise to provide single sign-on capability compatible with the institutional networking policies for password security. PMID:19605651

Prevedello, Luciano M; Andriole, Katherine P; Khorasani, Ryan Roobian Ramin

2009-01-01

152

WHAT IS INFORMATICS? Informatics is the study of the structure, behaviour, and interactions  

E-print Network

WHAT IS INFORMATICS? Informatics is the study of the structure, behaviour, and interactions of natural and engineered computational systems. Informatics studies the representation, processing. The science of information and the engineering of information systems develop hand-in-hand. Informatics

Koehn, Philipp

153

Everyday ethics in internal medicine resident clinic: an opportunity to teach  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Being a good doctor requires competency in ethics. Accordingly, ethics education during residency training is important. We studied the everyday ethics-related issues (i.e. ordinary ethics issues commonly faced) that internal medical residents encounter in their out-patient clinic and determined whether teaching about these issues occurred during faculty preceptor–resident interactions. METHODS This study involved a multi-method qualitative research design combining observation of preceptor-resident discussions with preceptor interviews. The study was conducted in two different internal medicine training programme clinics over a 2-week period in June 2007. Fifty-three residents and 19 preceptors were observed, and 10 preceptors were interviewed. Transcripts of observer field notes and faculty interviews were carefully analysed. The analysis identified several themes of everyday ethics issues and determined whether preceptors identified and taught about these issues. RESULTS Everyday ethics content was considered present in 109 (81%) of the 135 observed case presentations. Three major thematic domains and associated sub-themes related to everyday ethics issues were identified, concerning: (i) the Doctor–Patient Interaction (relationships; communication; shared decision making); (ii) the Resident as Learner (developmental issues; challenges and conflicts associated with training; relationships with colleagues and mentors; interactions with the preceptor), and; (iii) the Doctor–System Interaction (financial issues; doctor–system issues; external influences; doctor frustration related to system issues). Everyday ethics issues were explicitly identified by preceptors (without teaching) in 18 of 109 cases (17%); explicit identification and teaching occurred in only 13 cases (12%). CONCLUSIONS In this study a variety of everyday ethics issues were frequently encountered as residents cared for patients. Yet, faculty preceptors infrequently explicitly identified or taught these issues during their interactions with residents. Ethics education is important and residents may regard teaching about the ethics-related issues they actually encounter to be highly relevant. A better understanding of the barriers to teaching is needed in order to promote education about everyday ethics in the out-patient setting. PMID:21649704

Carrese, Joseph A; McDonald, Erin L; Moon, Margaret; Taylor, Holly A; Khaira, Kiran; Beach, Mary Catherine; Hughes, Mark T

2011-01-01

154

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A.; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-01-01

155

Patient characteristics upon initial presentation to chiropractic teaching clinics: A descriptive study conducted at one university.  

PubMed

Objective : The purpose of this study was to compare demographics and chief complaints of the new patient population at our institution's fee-for-service clinics to the patient population of practicing chiropractors in the United States. We also compared the prevalence of obesity and hypertension to reference standards for the adult population. Methods : Patient data were obtained from the electronic health records. All records identified as new patients during October 2013 were included. Variables of interest were clinic site, patient demographics, blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), chief complaint, and ICD-9 codes. Descriptive statistics were computed and compared to reference standards from previous reports. Results : During October 2013, there were 224 new patients that entered the clinics. The average patient was a 31- to 50-year-old white male. Our clinic patients differed from those seen by US chiropractors in the distribution of all demographic variables. For adult patients, 31.4% were overweight, 29% were obese, and 8% stage 1 or 2 hypertension. Conclusion : New patients in the fee-for-service teaching clinics appear to be dissimilar to those of US practicing chiropractors in several important demographics, characteristics, and types of complaints. The new patients had lower levels of overweight, obesity, and hypertension compared to US reference standards. PMID:25162982

Kaeser, Martha A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle

2014-10-01

156

Informatics at UC Irvine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer Science, as a single discipline, can no longer speak to the broad relevance of digital technologies in society. The Department of Informatics in the Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Irvine, serves as the institutional home for research on relationships between technological, organizational, and social aspects of information technology. Here, we describe

Paul Dourish; Gillian R. Hayes; Lilly Irani; Charlotte P. Lee; Silvia Lindtner; Bonnie A. Nardi; Donald J. Patterson; Bill Tomlinson

2008-01-01

157

On Cognitive Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Cognitive informatics (CI) is a new discipline that studies the natural intelligence and internal information processing mechanisms of the brain, as well as the processes involved in perception and cognition. CI provides a coherent set of fundamental theories, and contemporary mathematics, which form the foundation for most information and knowledge based science and engineering disciplines such as computer science,

Yingxu Wang

2002-01-01

158

Cancer Imaging Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Informatics Workshop September 25-27, 2002 Ellen Feigal, M.D. Acting Director, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, NCI Imaging is Key to Cancer Research The ability to detect, through imaging, the molecular changes associated with a tumor cell will improve our ability to detect and stage tumors, select appropriate treatments, monitor the effectiveness of a treatment, and determine prognosis.

159

The teaching of basic clinical skills at School of Medicine, University of São Paulo.  

PubMed

This article describes how is the teaching of basic clinical skills given to the 3rd in the undergraduate program, at the School of Medicine, University of São Paulo. This course has been implementing some techniques of teaching-learning for last years in order to become it more dynamic and interesting. Small group teaching is the main feature of the course "Basic Clinical Skills" given at the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine. This technique is improved by keeping each group with a teacher for a long time to allow better integration between them and to facilitate a better acquisition of attitudes towards the patient and all the team involved in the care of patient. All the classes are practical with early contact with real cases. Medical students learn how to take down the medical history, how to perform an adequate physical examination and make diagnoses under supervision of their teachers. Discussion cases, recognition of medical patterns and hypothetic-deductive strategy are used to develop an efficient medical reasoning. The authors show the results obtained through questionnaires filled in by the students at the end of the course and the analysis of which demonstrates that the students are highly satisfied with these kind of strategies and profit better from them. In 1996 and 1997, respectively, the course's satisfaction was 93.13% and 88.08% (excellent + good). The students' capacity to perform their objectives is situated in their majority between 6 and 8, these values represent a good and sufficient to very good performance. PMID:10413951

Kira, C M; Atta, J A

1998-01-01

160

Video- or text-based e-learning when teaching clinical procedures? A randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background and aims This study investigated the effectiveness of two different levels of e-learning when teaching clinical skills to medical students. Materials and methods Sixty medical students were included and randomized into two comparable groups. The groups were given either a video- or text/picture-based e-learning module and subsequently underwent both theoretical and practical examination. A follow-up test was performed 1 month later. Results The students in the video group performed better than the illustrated text-based group in the practical examination, both in the primary test (P<0.001) and in the follow-up test (P<0.01). Regarding theoretical knowledge, no differences were found between the groups on the primary test, though the video group performed better on the follow-up test (P=0.04). Conclusion Video-based e-learning is superior to illustrated text-based e-learning when teaching certain practical clinical skills. PMID:25152638

Buch, Steen Vigh; Treschow, Frederik Philip; Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Worm, Bjarne Skjødt

2014-01-01

161

Nursing education focus of nursing informatics research in 2013.  

PubMed

The Nursing Informatics Year in Review 2013 revealed an increase in publications associated with nursing education. Specifically, the articles addressed technology in nursing curricula, use of technology to teach nursing education, and use of technology to form collaborative relationships. In this article we present questions such as: how do these programs assist student nurses to transition to nurse providers where technology is infused into their work and workflow and what is the influence of the collaborative relationships with nurse educators, administrators, and informatics specialists increase patient safety and quality. PMID:24569767

Carrington, Jane M; Tiase, Victoria L; Estrada, Nicolette; Shea, Kimberly D

2014-01-01

162

Social Informatics Last updated: April 2014  

E-print Network

Social Informatics Last updated: April 2014 Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics Departmental URL: rkcsi.indiana.edu/ Curriculum Ph.D. Minor in Social Informatics Social Informatics (SI) refers) that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts. Social Informatics

Menczer, Filippo

163

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me?  

E-print Network

Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me? Geo-Informatics will develop from a degree in Geography with Geo-Informatics are wide-ranging and include excellent time with Geo-Informatics degrees the same? Geo-Informatics includes a variety of different subject themes

Harman, Neal.A.

164

Does clinical teacher training always improve teaching effectiveness as opposed to no teacher training? A randomized controlled study  

PubMed Central

Background Teacher training may improve teaching effectiveness, but it might also have paradoxical effects. Research on expertise development suggests that the integration of new strategies may result in a temporary deterioration of performance until higher levels of competence are reached. In this study, the impact of a clinical teacher training on teaching effectiveness was assessed in an intensive course in emergency medicine. As primary study outcome students’ practical skills at the end of their course were chosen. Methods The authors matched 18 clinical teachers according to clinical experience and teaching experience and then randomly assigned them to a two-day-teacher training, or no training. After 14 days, both groups taught within a 12-hour intensive course in emergency medicine for undergraduate students. The course followed a clearly defined curriculum. After the course students were assessed by structured clinical examination (SCE) and MCQ. The teaching quality was rated by students using a questionnaire. Results Data for 96 students with trained teachers, and 97 students with untrained teachers were included. Students taught by untrained teachers performed better in the SCE domains ‘alarm call’ (p?teaching quality was rated significantly better by students of untrained teachers (p?=?0.05). Conclusions At the end of a structured intensive course in emergency medicine, students of trained clinical teachers performed worse in 2 of 4 practical SCE domains compared to students of untrained teachers. In addition, subjective evaluations of teaching quality were worse in the group of trained teachers. Difficulties in integrating new strategies in their teaching styles might be a possible explanation. PMID:24400838

2014-01-01

165

Next generation neonatal health informatics with Artemis.  

PubMed

This paper describes the deployment of a platform to enable processing of currently uncharted high frequency, high fidelity, synchronous data from medical devices. Such a platform would support the next generation of informatics solutions for neonatal intensive care. We present Artemis, a platform for real-time enactment of clinical knowledge as it relates to multidimensional data analysis and clinical research. Through specific deployment examples at two different neonatal intensive care units, we demonstrate that Artemis supports: 1) instantiation of clinical rules; 2) multidimensional analysis; 3) distribution of services for critical care via cloud computing; and 4) accomplishing 1 through 3 using current technology without a negative impact on patient care. PMID:21893725

McGregor, Carolyn; Catley, Christina; James, Andrew; Padbury, James

2011-01-01

166

Clinical teaching models: a review of the role of preceptor in the undergraduate nursing program.  

PubMed

The relatively recent transition of nursing education in Australia from a hospital-based apprenticeship, into the higher education sector has been marked by an acknowledgement that the clinical knowledge of undergraduate student nurses is at risk of becoming separated from their theoretical knowledge. The length of time which student nurses spend on clinical placements experiencing the complexities of the clinical world is diminishing, partly in response to economic constraints on universities and health care agencies. This contrasts with an expectation that students will be safe and competent practitioners immediately on graduation. The preceptor model is being increasingly used in the final semester of the undergraduate-nursing course to facilitate the development of critically thinking, reflective practitioners. This paper examines some of the assumptions that have been made about preceptorship in its adoption into the Australian nursing education context. It is concluded that further research into the experiences of registered nurses in the preceptor role may increase our understanding of the potential of preceptorship as a clinical teaching model which can meet the future needs of both nursing education and nursing service. PMID:9729980

Beattie, H

1998-01-01

167

Teaching Trauma-Focused Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Critical Clinical Lessons for Novice Exposure Therapists  

PubMed Central

Over the past 10 years, our experiences delivering exposure therapy and teaching clinicians to deliver exposure therapy for PTSD have taught us some important lessons. We will focus on lessons learned as we have attended to clinicians’ experiences as they begin to implement and apply the therapy. Specifically, we highlight common therapist expectations including the beliefs that the exposure therapy requires a new set of clinical skills, therapists themselves will experience a high level of distress hearing about traumatic events, and clients will become overly distressed. We then discuss common clinical challenges in the delivery of exposure therapy and illustrate them with case examples. The challenges addressed include finding the appropriate level of therapist involvement in session, handling client distress during treatment, targeting in-session covert avoidance, and helping the client shift from being trauma-focused to being more present and future oriented. Clinicians training exposure therapists and therapists new to the implementation of exposure therapy for PTSD should find this practical discussion of common expectations and initial clinical challenges reassuring and clinically useful. PMID:21984956

Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.; Bittinger, Joyce N.; Bedard-Gilligan, Michele A.; Slagle, David M.; Post, Loren M.; Chen, Jessica A.

2011-01-01

168

GRADUATE STUDENT Department of Health Informatics and  

E-print Network

1 GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Department of Health Informatics and Information Management College.............................................................................. 4 In order to meet the minimum qualification for the Master's in Health Informatics, all applicants ................................................................................................................. 14 Department of Health Informatics and Information Management

Selmic, Sandra

169

A Review of Medical Education and Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Information technology may help physicians to manage information more effectively through more accessible clinical indexes, databases of diagnostic test characteristics, computerized audits of clinical activities, on-line access to medical literature, etc. Medical informatics, a new discipline dedicated to the solution of information problems in…

Haynes, R. Brian; And Others

1989-01-01

170

From Information Technology to Informatics: The Information Revolution in Dental Education  

PubMed Central

The capabilities of information technology (IT) have advanced precipitously in the last fifty years. Many of these advances have enabled new and beneficial applications of IT in dental education. However, conceptually, IT use in dental schools is only in its infancy. Challenges and opportunities abound for improving how we support clinical care, education, and research with IT. In clinical care, we need to move electronic dental records beyond replicating paper, connect information on oral health to that on systemic health, facilitate collaborative care through teledentistry, and help clinicians apply evidence-based dentistry and preventive management strategies. With respect to education, we should adopt an evidence-based approach to IT use for teaching and learning, share effective educational content and methods, leverage technology-mediated changes in the balance of power between faculty and students, improve technology support for clinical teaching, and build an information infrastructure centered on learners and organizations. In research, opportunities include reusing clinical care data for research studies, helping advance computational methods for research, applying generalizable research tools in dentistry, and reusing research data and scientific workflows. In the process, we transition from a focus on IT—the mere technical aspects of applying computer technology—to one on informatics: the what, how, and why of managing information. PMID:22262557

Schleyer, Titus K.; Thyvalikakath, Thankam P.; Spallek, Heiko; Dziabiak, Michael P.; Johnson, Lynn A.

2014-01-01

171

Synergy between medical informatics and bioinformatics: facilitating genomic medicine for future health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, we review the results of BIOINFOMED, a study funded by the European Commission (EC) with the purpose to analyse the different issues and challenges in the area where Medical Informatics and Bioinformatics meet. Traditionally, Medical Informatics has been focused on the intersection between computer science and clinical medicine, whereas Bioinformatics have been predominantly centered on the intersection

Fernando Martín-sánchez; Ilias Iakovidis; S. Nørager; Victor Maojo; Piet C. De Groen; Johan Van Der Lei; T. Jones; Klaus Abraham-fuchs; R. Apweiler; Ankica Babic; R Baud; V Breton; P Cinquin; P Doupi; M Dugas; R Eils; R Engelbrecht; P Ghazal; P Jehenson; C Kulikowski; K Lampe; G De Moor; S Orphanoudakis; N Rossing; B Sarachan; A Sousa; G Spekowius; G Thireos; G Zahlmann; J Zvárová; I Hermosilla; F. J Vicente

2004-01-01

172

Mission — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

The National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) supports NCI research initiatives through sustaining a multidisciplinary community of biomedical researchers, informaticists, and developers dedicated to improving informatics practices in the study of cancer and the translation of that knowledge into improved clinical interventions.

173

Meeting highlights: genome informatics.  

PubMed

We bring you the highlights of the second Joint Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Wellcome Trust 'Genome Informatics' Conference, organized by Ewan Birney, Suzanna Lewis and Lincoln Stein. There were sessions on in silico data discovery, comparative genomics, annotation pipelines, functional genomics and integrative biology. The conference included a keynote address by Sydney Brenner, who was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (jointly with John Sulston and H. Robert Horvitz) a month later. PMID:18629014

Wixon, Jo; Ashurst, Jennifer

2003-01-01

174

Clinical pharmacy services in an Iranian teaching hospital: Type, severity, resolution, and accuracy  

PubMed Central

Objective: Clinical pharmacy services are improving in hospitals. For assessing the impact of these services, first it is important to exactly describe them by categorizing into types, severity, resolution, and accuracy. The objective of this study is to provide a detailed analysis of the clinical pharmacists’ services performed on in-patients in a teaching hospital during 28 months. Setting: Masih Daneshvari hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: This is a descriptive study. The authors retrospectively reviewed the notes of all services and entered them in a designed SPSS sheet. Documentation was carried out based on the “findings, assessment, resolution, and monitoring” method. The data were descriptively analyzed. Main outcome measure: Types, subtypes, severities, resolutions, and accuracies of services were defined, documented, and analyzed. Findings: In total 3152 records (2227 interventions and 925 visits with no intervention) were classified and analyzed in this study. Among all types of interventions, “improper medication use” (36.2%) was the most frequent intervention and among categories (subgroups) of “improper medication use,” “untreated indication” was the most frequent (23.7%). From the aspect of severity, 75.4% of interventions were estimated as of minor potential inconvenience to the patient (severity degree 1). Most interventions (78%) were finally recommended to the prescriber and 97.6% of interventions were considered accurate on further evaluation. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacists’ interventions are highly demanded in the hospitals. Based on the results of this study, conditions needing medication to prevent later complications in the course of therapy are sometimes ignored, which emphasizes the positive role of the clinical pharmacists’ involvements in clinical teams to improve outcome. PMID:24991598

Allameh, Zahra; Mehrpooya, Maryam; Baniasadi, Shadi; Fahimi, Fanak

2013-01-01

175

Informatics confronts drug–drug interactions  

PubMed Central

Drug–drug interactions (DDIs) are an emerging threat to public health. Recent estimates indicate that DDIs cause nearly 74 000 emergency room visits and 195 000 hospitalizations each year in the USA. Current approaches to DDI discovery, which include Phase IV clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance, are insufficient for detecting many DDIs and do not alert the public to potentially dangerous DDIs before a drug enters the market. Recent work has applied state-of-the-art computational and statistical methods to the problem of DDIs. Here we review recent developments that encompass a range of informatics approaches in this domain, from the construction of databases for efficient searching of known DDIs to the prediction of novel DDIs based on data from electronic medical records, adverse event reports, scientific abstracts, and other sources. We also explore why DDIs are so difficult to detect and what the future holds for informatics-based approaches to DDI discovery. PMID:23414686

Percha, Bethany; Altman, Russ B.

2013-01-01

176

A new curriculum framework for clinical prevention and population health, with a review of clinical caries prevention teaching in U.S. and Canadian dental schools.  

PubMed

To fulfill the Healthy People 2010 Objective 1.7, "Increase the proportion of . . . health professional training schools whose basic curriculum for health care providers includes the core competencies in health promotion and disease prevention," the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force has developed a curriculum framework for clinical prevention and population health for all the health professions. This framework has four components: 1) evidence base for practice; 2) clinical preventive services, including health promotion; 3) health systems and health policy; and 4) community aspects of practice. Within these four common components are nineteen domains, for which each health profession is identifying its own educational objectives. An inventory of knowledge and skills is being developed. A prerequisite to promoting change in the teaching of dental prevention and population oral health is to better understand the current status. Sixty-six of sixty-eight U.S. and Canadian dental schools provided input on the teaching of one important aspect of this wider topic--dental caries prevention--before a December 2002 Clinical Preventive Dentistry Leadership Conference in Cincinnati, OH. In clinical teaching, 68 percent of dental schools included caries risk assessment and also reevaluated preventive outcomes, but while 65 percent included remineralization procedures, only 38 percent specifically reevaluated this outcome. Faculty members have commonalities in attitudes about the advantages and problems in improving teaching in clinical prevention, yet dental schools act individually in curricular design and implementation. The conference introduced a method of conceptualizing change, so that dental schools might address organizational barriers in clinical curriculum development. Even with the new common curriculum framework, other barriers to improved dental prevention and population oral health exist: these include organizational change in dental schools, dental practices, and dental clinics; reimbursement issues and incentives; and lack of accepted and explicit standards in dental care. PMID:17493965

Brown, John P

2007-05-01

177

Training Residents in Medical Informatics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes an eight-step process for developing or refining a family-medicine informatics curriculum: needs assessment, review of expert recommendations, enlisting faculty and local institutional support, espousal of a human-centered approach, integrating informatics into the larger curriculum, easy access to computers, practical training, and…

Jerant, Anthony F.

1999-01-01

178

The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

Clark, David

2006-01-01

179

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING Graduate Programs  

E-print Network

the world. Whether studying informatics, computer science, information science, or library science, students use · Master of Library Science (MLS), finding, organizing, and preserving information and helping and Computing The School's rare combination of programs ­ including informatics, computer science, library

Menczer, Filippo

180

Infusion Pump Informatics IMPACT STATEMENT  

E-print Network

Infusion Pump Informatics NEED IMPACT STATEMENT INITIATIVE Working with Purdue's Rosen Center for Advanced Computing, RCHE developed the Infusion Pump Informatics (IPI) System. IPI member hospitals upload their infusion pump alert data to the system each month. The system is web-based and highly interactive. Drawing

Ginzel, Matthew

181

"Patient informatics": creating new partnerships in medical decision making.  

PubMed

The amassing of health information on the Internet and World Wide Web continues unabated. Patients anxious to participate in decisions about their own treatment have turned to the Internet to confirm diagnoses, validate physician-recommended treatment, or seek alternative therapies. While increased information for patients has been linked to improved outcomes, there are inherent dangers associated with the kind of unauthenticated information available on the Web. The authors discuss the nature of these dangers as well as review the advantages for patients of "information therapy" (improved access to health information). They also examine how the Internet has begun to affect the physician-patient relationship, and describe how the Internet and information technology can be effectively used by physicians in patient care. They recommend that the academic health sciences community seize the opportunity to take the lead in ensuring that patients have access to reliable health information, and suggest that "patient informatics" be integrated by academic physicians and educators into the teaching of clinical skills. PMID:9580718

Bader, S A; Braude, R M

1998-04-01

182

Enhancing the Informatics Evaluation Toolkit with Remote Usability Testing  

PubMed Central

Developing functional clinical informatics products that are also usable remains a challenge. Despite evidence that usability testing should be incorporated into the lifecycle of health information technologies, rarely does this occur. Challenges include poor standards, a lack of knowledge around usability practices, and the expense involved in rigorous testing with a large number of users. Remote usability testing may be a solution for many of these challenges. Remotely testing an application can greatly enhance the number of users who can iteratively interact with a product, and it can reduce the costs associated with usability testing. A case study presents the experiences with remote usability testing when evaluating a Web site designed for health informatics knowledge dissemination. The lessons can inform others seeking to enhance their evaluation toolkits for clinical informatics products. PMID:20351839

Dixon, Brian E.

2009-01-01

183

NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ?  

E-print Network

NIDCR Supported Oral Health Informatics Postdoctoral Fellowship WHAT IS DENTAL INFORMATICS ? Dental informatics is a sub-discipline of biomedical informatics which focuses on the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education and management. ORAL HEALTH INFORMATICS

Senes, Alessandro

184

The Effects of Early Clinical Teaching Experiences on Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In-service teachers are often lack sufficient teaching experience (Block et al., 2010) that leads to being psychologically unprepared to confront many challenges in teaching. Providing ample experiences for Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) students in a pedagogical setting parallel to that which they will one day teach (Kirk &…

Androzzi, Jared

2011-01-01

185

Emergence of carbapenem-resistant clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates from a teaching hospital in Shanghai, China.  

PubMed

Carbapenems such as imipenem and meropenem are first-line agents for the treatment of serious nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae. However, resistance to carbapenems has increased dramatically among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae isolated from a teaching hospital in Shanghai, China. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence and molecular characteristics of carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae. None of the 77 clinical isolates collected from 2002 to 2009 were susceptible to ertapenem and only 6.5 % and 1.3 % of isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Colistin and tigecycline were found to be the most active agents against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates, inhibiting 90 % of isolates at a concentration of 1 µg ml(-1) and 4 µg ml(-1), respectively. The results of PFGE analysis suggested that many of the KPC-2-producing isolates of Citrobacter freundii and Klebsiella pneumoniae were clonally related. Most of these isolates were isolated from the same ward, namely the neurosurgical ward, suggesting horizontal transfer of the KPC-2-encoding gene in these isolates. Of the 77 isolates, 84.4 % were found, by PCR, to be capable of carbapenemase production. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that 75.3 % (58/77) of the isolates had lost at least one porin protein. Our results suggested that the prompt detection of carbapenemase-producing strains is critical for the containment of nosocomial transmission. As no novel antimicrobials have been identified for use in the treatment of these pan-drug-resistant isolates, further studies should focus on the rational use of available antibiotics, the implementation of active antibiotic resistance surveillance and the strict implementation of infection control measures to avoid the rapid spread or outbreak of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in health-care facilities. PMID:21903823

Hu, Fupin; Chen, Shudan; Xu, Xiaogang; Guo, Yan; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Demei; Zhang, Yingyuan

2012-01-01

186

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT  

E-print Network

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, IUPUI #12;INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI BYLAWS OF THE FACULTY COUNCIL OF THE SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS, IUPUI ARTICLE I: NAME The name of this organization shall be the Faculty Council

Zhou, Yaoqi

187

A Method of City Informatization Level Evaluation  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to the characteristics and trends of city informatization this paper established a set of evaluation index system of city informatization based on the essence of city informatization. Furthermore, the evaluation model, which is to provide feasible method for the appraisal of city informatization level, is brought out with the application of entropy-weight coefficient method.

Li Xiaoqing; Liu Binghui

2010-01-01

188

Information Science for the Future: An Innovative Nursing Informatics Curriculum.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A four-level informatics curriculum at Case Western Reserve University's nursing school integrates information, technology, and the clinical care process. A longitudinal study of 182 students who completed the curriculum showed that computer attitudes changed over time and students became more realistic about the use of information technology for…

Travis, Lucille; Brennan, Patricia Flatley

1998-01-01

189

Medical Informatics in Croatia – a Historical Survey  

PubMed Central

A historical survey of medical informatics (MI) in Croatia is presented from the beginnings in the late sixties of the 20th century to the present time. Described are MI projects, applications in clinical medicine and public health, start and development of MI research and education, beginnings of international cooperation, establishment of the Croatian Society for MI and its membership to EFMI and IMIA. The current status of computerization of the Croatian healthcare system is sketched as well as the present graduate and postgraduate study MI curricula. The information contained in the paper shows that MI in Croatia developed and still develops along with its advancement elsewhere. PMID:24648620

Dezelic, Gjuro; Kern, Josipa; Petrovecki, Mladen; Ilakovac, Vesna; Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira

2014-01-01

190

The effects of an undergraduate nursing informatics curriculum on students' knowledge and attitudes.  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the fourth stage of a process to design, implement and evaluate the nursing informatics courses incorporated into a baccalaureate nursing program. The challenge is to structure the nursing informatics curriculum so as to provide the nursing professional with the basis with which to impact health care delivery. The basic components of the framework are information, technology, and clinical care process. Students in the fourth course worked closely with agency personnel to design, implement and evaluate clinical application projects. PMID:7949960

Travis, L. L.; Youngblut, J.; Brennan, P. F.

1994-01-01

191

Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

2012-01-01

192

Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2014) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2014) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html  

E-print Network

Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2014) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html 1 #12;Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2014) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS BMI PROGRAM

Bejerano, Gill

193

Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html  

E-print Network

Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html 1 #12;Biomedical Informatics (Rev. 5/2013) http://bmi.stanford.edu/biomedical-informatics-students/handbook.html 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS BMI PROGRAM

Puglisi, Joseph

194

The School of Informatics and Computing 2013 Summer Camp  

E-print Network

The School of Informatics and Computing 2013 Summer Camp June 16, School of Informatics and Computing, 919 E. Tenth Street, Informatics East, Room _________________ Please attach a 100 word essay describing your interests in the Informatics

Indiana University

195

Identifying at risk individuals for drug and alcohol dependence: teaching the competency to students in classroom and clinical settings.  

PubMed

Alcohol use and other drug use affect patient healthcare outcomes. This article describes a classroom-to-clinical approach teaching nursing students to utilize motivational interviewing techniques to support patient behavior change. Through the lens of a universal prevention method, nursing students learned about reward circuit activation leading to risky substance use and the difference between addiction and at-risk use. Specific assessment tools and motivational interviewing techniques were presented in the classroom. Students then applied their knowledge in simulation laboratories and clinical rotations. PMID:24743176

Kane, Irene; Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn R; Hagle, Holly; Talcott, Kimberly; Fioravanti, Marie; Droppa, Mandy; Luongo, Peter F; Lindsay, Dawn

2014-01-01

196

Web Intelligence Meets Brain Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we outline a vision of Web Intelligence (WI) research from the viewpoint of Brain Informatics (BI), a new\\u000a interdisciplinary field that systematically studies the mechanisms of human information processing from both the macro and\\u000a micro viewpoints by combining experimental cognitive neuroscience with advanced information technology. BI studies human brain\\u000a from the viewpoint of informatics (i.e., human brain

Ning Zhong; Jiming Liu; Yiyu Yao; Jing-long Wu; Shengfu Lu; Yulin Qin; Kuncheng Li; Benjamin W. Wah

2006-01-01

197

Teaching a Child with Challenging Behaviour to Use the Toilet: A Clinical Case Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Learning to use the toilet is an important developmental step for a child's independence, health and dignity. It can be particularly difficult to teach continence skills to disabled children with aggressive or challenging behaviour. This study showed how Azrin & Foxx's (1971) basic toilet training procedure could be modified to teach a 13-year-old…

Brown, Freddy Jackson; Peace, Natalie

2011-01-01

198

02 College of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School o  

E-print Network

of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of InformaticsCollege of Information Science, School of Informatics

Tanaka, Jiro

199

Graduate Research Assistant Position in Health Informatics One Graduate Research Assistant position is available at Department of Health Management and  

E-print Network

position is available at Department of Health Management and Informatics (HMI) for full time resident assessment utilizing diverse quantitative and qualitative research methods. Applicants must have strong of Health Management and Informatics University of Missouri School of Medicine CE728 Clinical Support

Noble, James S.

200

Translational Research from an Informatics Perspective  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Clinical and translational research (CTR) is an essential part of a sustainable global health system. Informatics is now recognized as an important en-abler of CTR and informaticians are increasingly called upon to help CTR efforts. The US National Institutes of Health mandated biomedical informatics activity as part of its new national CTR grant initiative, the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). Traditionally, translational re-search was defined as the translation of laboratory discoveries to patient care (bench to bedside). We argue, however, that there are many other kinds of translational research. Indeed, translational re-search requires the translation of knowledge dis-covered in one domain to another domain and is therefore an information-based activity. In this panel, we will expand upon this view of translational research and present three different examples of translation to illustrate the point: 1) bench to bedside, 2) Earth to space and 3) academia to community. We will conclude with a discussion of our local translational research efforts that draw on each of the three examples.

Bernstam, Elmer; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Turley, James P.; Smith, Jack W.

2007-01-01

201

[Surgical History Taking and Clinical Examination: Establishing a Standardised System by Means of a Nation-Wide Academic Teaching Project.  

PubMed

Background: History taking and systematic clinical examination are central techniques of physicians. Medicine in general and surgery in particular frequently require immediate decisions and start of therapies. So far, a standardised surgical system for history taking and clinical examination in teaching has been lacking at our faculty. A consensus of all medical faculties on a standardised system could be a tool to improve the medical teaching and education at our teaching institutions. Methods: The established Anglo-Saxonian system of history taking and clinical examination was adapted to our own clinical needs. Thereafter, this system was sent out to all chairmen of general and visceral surgery departments in German University Hospitals asking for evaluation and improvements. We adapted the system according to the chairmen's comments and suggestions. Since winter semester 2011 this system has been integrated into the clinical course of history taking and examination. It is compulsory for all 5th semester students (first clinical year/graduate course) at the Universitätsmedizin Greifswald. In addition, a video was produced demonstrating all major techniques of clinical examination. This video is available for all students on a password blocked site of the World Wide Web. Results: Altogether, 89?% of all contacted chairmen returned their comments and suggestions for improvements. After implementation of the new system, positive evaluations of students increased significantly from 63.5 to 77.0?% in general and abdominal surgery (p?clinical examination applicable for students as well as qualified surgeons in daily routine work. It has been approved by the majority of the departments of surgery of all German university hospitals. Furthermore, it can be applied by other medical specialties, in particular, internal medicine. Furthermore, the standardisation of history taking and clinical examination can contribute to improve patients' safety as well as medical documentation. Also, the standardisation will be a sound basis for expert medical opinions in legal actions. Finally, it has improved the value of medical education at our medical faculty and could form the basis for the development of national medical standards. PMID:25393734

von Bernstorff, W; Irmer, H; Menges, P; Peters, S; Heidecke, C-D; Busemann, A

2014-11-13

202

INFORMATICS CORE The Research Informatics Core (RIC) is funded by the Health Center Research  

E-print Network

RESEARCH INFORMATICS CORE Who We Are The Research Informatics Core (RIC) is funded by the Health Center Research Advisory Council (HCRAC) and provides informatics (computer hardware, software, data and software technical support Consultation services on data management, data sharing plan, and informatics

Kim, Duck O.

203

134 | College of Computing and Informatics 2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG Computing and Informatics  

E-print Network

134 | College of Computing and Informatics 2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Computing and Informatics #12;2013-2014 UNC CHARLOTTE UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG College of Computing and Informatics | 135 College of Computing and Informatics http://cci.uncc.edu The University of North Carolina

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

204

New Summer Pilot Course 2013 Biodiversity Informatics  

E-print Network

New Summer Pilot Course ­ 2013 Biodiversity Informatics (BIO 494 / BIO 598 ­ 2 Credits) June 17 informatics is the discipline of managing information about the diversity of Life. This is an emerging

Franz, Nico M.

205

Panel: Alternative Careers for Biomedical Informatics PhDs  

PubMed Central

The number of doctoral training programs in informatics increases every year, however not every doctoral candidate wishes to pursue a traditional career in academia. In addition, the knowledge and skills acquired through scientific training at the doctoral level can be valuable, even critical, for a number of career paths outside of academic research and teaching. This panel will present a diverse set of alternative career paths for which graduates of Informatics programs would be well suited, including patent law, research in industry, academic administration, and scientific journalism. Panelists will describe their own respective backgrounds and career paths, a day in the life in their current position, and how their training prepared them for their jobs. They will also touch on insights gained and lessons learned in exploring the professional landscape through non-traditional paths. PMID:24303329

Tenenbaum, Jessica D.; Sorani, Marco; Maker, Monya; Torrance, Andrew; Horvitz, Eric

2013-01-01

206

The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) informatics platform  

PubMed Central

Background The Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP) is a large-scale, multi-institutional, collaborative network of 27 epilepsy centers throughout the U.S., Australia, and Argentina, with the objective of collecting detailed phenotypic and genetic data on a large number of epilepsy participants. The goals of EPGP are (1) to perform detailed phenotyping on 3750 participants with specific forms of non-acquired epilepsy and 1500 parents without epilepsy, (2) to obtain DNA samples on these individuals, and (3) to ultimately genotype the samples in order to discover novel genes that cause epilepsy. To carry out the project, a reliable and robust informatics platform was needed for standardized electronic data collection and storage, data quality review, and phenotypic analysis involving cases from multiple sites. Methods EPGP developed its own suite of web-based informatics applications for participant tracking, electronic data collection (using electronic case report forms/surveys), data management, phenotypic data review and validation, specimen tracking, electroencephalograph and neuroimaging storage, and issue tracking. We implemented procedures to train and support end-users at each clinical site. Results Thus far, 3780 study participants have been enrolled and 20,957 web-based study activities have been completed using this informatics platform. Over 95% of respondents to an end-user satisfaction survey felt that the informatics platform was successful almost always or most of the time. Conclusions The EPGP informatics platform has successfully and effectively allowed study management and efficient and reliable collection of phenotypic data. Our novel informatics platform met the requirements of a large, multicenter research project. The platform has had a high level of end-user acceptance by principal investigators and study coordinators, and can serve as a model for new tools to support future large scale, collaborative research projects collecting extensive phenotypic data. PMID:22579394

Nesbitt, Gerry; McKenna, Kevin; Mays, Vickie; Carpenter, Alan; Miller, Kevin; Williams, Michael

2013-01-01

207

The Professionalism Assessment of Clinical Teachers (PACT): the reliability and validity of a novel tool to evaluate professional and clinical teaching behaviors.  

PubMed

Physicians function as clinicians, teachers, and role models within the clinical environment. Negative learning environments have been shown to be due to many factors, including the presence of unprofessional behaviors among clinical teachers. Reliable and valid assessments of clinical teacher performance, including professional behaviors, may provide a foundation for evidence-based feedback to clinical teachers, enable targeted remediation or recognition, and help to improve the learning environment. However, few tools exist for the evaluation of clinical teachers that include a focus on both professional and clinical teaching behaviors. The Professionalism Assessment of Clinical Teachers (PACT) was developed and implemented at one Canadian institution and was assessed for evidence of reliability and validity. Following each clerkship rotation, students in the 2009-2010 third-year undergraduate clerkship cohort (n = 178) anonymously evaluated a minimum of two clinical teachers using the PACT. 4,715 forms on 567 faculty members were completed. Reliability, validity, and free text comments (present in 45 % of the forms) were examined. An average of 8.6 PACT forms were completed per faculty (range 1-60), with a reliability of 0.31 for 2.9 forms (harmonic mean); 12 forms were necessary for a reliability of 0.65. Global evaluations of teachers aligned with ratings of free-text comments (r = 0.77, p < 0.001). Comment length related negatively with overall rating (r = -0.19, p < 0.001). Mean performance related negatively with variability of performance (r = -0.72, p < 0.001), although this may be related to a ceiling effect. Most faculty members were rated highly; however 'provided constructive feedback' was the least well-rated item. Respectful interactions with students appeared to be the most influential item in the global rating of faculty performance. The PACT is a moderately reliable tool for the assessment of professional behaviors of clinical teachers, with evidence supporting its validity. PMID:23754583

Young, Meredith E; Cruess, Sylvia R; Cruess, Richard L; Steinert, Yvonne

2014-03-01

208

Medical Informatics: Searching for Underlying Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

abstractions also are attractive for defining the core contributions of basic research in informatics We can understand many central activities within informatics in terms defining, refining, applying, and evaluating domain ontologies and problem - solving methods Conclusion: Construing work in medical informatics in terms of actions involving ontologies and problem - solving methods may move us closer to a theoretical

Mark A. Musen

2002-01-01

209

A systematic view on medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatics is defined as the scientific discipline concerned with the systematic processing of data, information and knowledge in medicine and health care. The domain of medical informatics (including health informatics), its aim, methods and tools, and its relevance to other disciplines in medicine and health sciences are outlined. It is recognized that one of the major tasks of medical

A. Hasman; R. Haux; A. Albert

1996-01-01

210

MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY  

E-print Network

MEDICAL INFORMATICS AND BIOINFORMATICS: A BIBLIOMETRIC STUDY Authors: Bansard J.Y (1,2), Rebholz, Cambridge, CB10 1SD, U.K. 4 Erasmus University Medical Center, Dept of Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical #12;Abstract This paper reports on an analysis of the bioinformatics and medical informatics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

211

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN?  

E-print Network

INFORMATICS @ UCI >>> WHAT DID YOU LEARN? MY COURSES HAVE INCLUDED: Software Design I I designed. I chose to become an Informatics major because I wanted to focus on human interaction with computer, and I'm also involved in the Informatics student Association (INsA). Last summer I interned with Direct

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

212

Department of Computer Science college of informatics  

E-print Network

Data Science Department of Computer Science college of informatics datascience.nku.edu www.nku.edu NKU College of Informatics offers a Bachelor's of Science degree in Data Science with two informatics, and communication to innovate and create. ·Understand the business, scientific, technological

Boyce, Richard L.

213

INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu  

E-print Network

BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS www.cs.pdx.edu Undergraduate Degrees Offered: Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Informatics from Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) After completion of the five of Biomedical Informatics degree from OHSU. Both degrees will be awarded simultaneously after completion

214

Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics  

E-print Network

Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics Undergraduate Degree Programmes Entry 2015 www.cs.cardiff.ac.uk #12;World leading research Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics "One of the best Contents The Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics offers a range of flexible and diverse degree

Davies, Christopher

215

THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum,  

E-print Network

THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH, Informatics Forum, Central Area, A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES, Address Informatics Forum. University Of Edinburgh. 10 Crichton Street. Edinburgh. E,H,8, 9,A,B. Telephone. 0,1,3,1, 6,5,1, 5,6,6,1, Map Link. http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps/?building=informatics-forum #12;Page 1

Edinburgh, University of

216

Informatics olympiads: Approaching mathematics through code  

E-print Network

Informatics olympiads: Approaching mathematics through code Benjamin A. Burton Author's self we introduce its cousin in computer science, the International Olympiad in Informatics (IOI). The International Olympiad in Informatics is one of the newer Science Olympiads, beginning in 1989 in Bulgaria under

Burton, Benjamin

217

ICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I  

E-print Network

and Biomedical Informatics (Ch. 4), System Design and Engineering in Health Care (Ch. 6), Imaging and StructuralICS 614 Spring 2013 Biomedical Informatics I Tues: 3:00 - 5:40pm Location: TBD Biomedical Informatics, an emerging interdisciplinary field, deals with biomedical information, data, and knowledge

Reed, Nancy E.

218

A knowledge-based imaging informatics approach to managing patients treated with proton beam therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Last year we presented work on an imaging informatics approach towards developing quantitative knowledge and tools based on standardized DICOM-RT objects for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy. In this paper, we have extended this methodology to perform knowledge-based medical imaging informatics research on specific clinical scenarios where brain tumor patients are treated with Proton Beam Therapy (PT). PT utilizes energized charged particles,

B. J. Liu; H. K. Huang; M. Law; Anh Le; Jorge Documet; Arek Gertych

2007-01-01

219

Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics.  

PubMed

The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V; Raval, Jay S; Triulzi, Darrell J; Benjamin, Richard J; Pantanowitz, Liron

2011-01-01

220

Cognitive Informatics and Denotational Mathematical Means for Brain Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cognitive informatics studies the natural intelligence and the brain from a theoretical and a computational approach, which rigorously explains the mechanisms of the brain by a fundamental theory known as abstract intelligence, and formally models the brain by contemporary denotational mathematics. This paper, as an extended summary of the invited keynote presented in AMT-BI 2010, describes the interplay of cognitive

Yingxu Wang

2010-01-01

221

What retail clinic growth can teach us about patient demand. Threat or opportunity: retail clinic popularity is about convenience.  

PubMed

Access: It's one word that may ultimately reignite the expansion of retail medicine in 2014 and beyond. CVS Caremark has added 200 new clinics since 2011, with another 850 planned by 2017. While it's still too soon to predict a large-scale national expansion in clinic numbers, some experts believe their calling card--convenience--should be a consideration for every medical practice in the United States. PMID:25211840

Zamosky, Lisa

2014-01-10

222

Validation of the SETOC Instrument--Student Evaluation of Teaching in Outpatient Clinics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: There is a paucity of evaluation forms specifically developed and validated for outpatient settings. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an instrument specifically for evaluating outpatient teaching, to provide reliable and valid ratings for individual and group feedback to faculty, and to identify outstanding teachers…

Zuberi, Rukhsana W.; Bordage, Georges; Norman, Geoffrey R.

2007-01-01

223

Modifying the Curriculum: Teaching Clinical Students about Caring for Patients with Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines how the curricula of optometry programs can be modified to prepare graduates to meet the needs of patients from special populations. Addresses student attitudes and the clinical encounter, including the case history, clinical examination, clinical decision making and determination of patient management plans, and case discussion of the…

Ettinger, Ellen Richter

2002-01-01

224

INFORMATICS 4TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE  

E-print Network

and Publishing Michael N. Minear Chief Information Officer UC Davis Health System Sacramento, California, MD, MPH Deputy Director Health Information and Strategic Planning California Department of Public Interoperability: A Status Report Michael N. Minear 11:50 Q & A 12:00 pm UC Davis Health Informatics Minute Michael

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

225

Policy Implications of Education Informatics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background/Context: This concluding article identifies the policy implications of education informatics and explores impacts of current copyright laws, legislative structures, publishing practices, and education organizations. Synthesizing the discussions in the preceding articles, this article highlights the importance of designing information…

Carr, Jo Ann; O'Brien, Nancy P.

2010-01-01

226

Graph kernels for chemical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased availability of large repositories of chemical compounds is creating new challenges and opportunities for the application of machine learning methods to problems in computational chemistry and chemical informatics. Because chemical compounds are often represented by the graph of their covalent bonds, machine learning methods in this domain must be capable of processing graphical structures with variable size. Here we

Liva Ralaivola; Sanjay Joshua Swamidass; Hiroto Saigo; Pierre Baldi

2005-01-01

227

Towards informatic analysis of Syslogs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity and cost of isolating the root cause of system problems in large parallel computers generally scales with the size of the system. Syslog messages provide a primary source of system feedback, but manual review is tedious and error prone. Informatic analysis can be used to detect subtle anomalies in the syslog message stream, thereby increasing the availability of

John Stearley

2004-01-01

228

The dental informatics online community.  

PubMed

Dental Informatics (DI) is the application of computer and information science to improve dental practice, research, education, and program administration. To support the growth of this emerging discipline, we created the Dental Informatics Online Community (DIOC). The DIOC provides a dedicated professional home for DI researchers and serves as an open, common, and worldwide forum for all individuals interested in the field. It was created and is maintained by the Center for Dental Informatics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, independent from any professional association, corporate interest or funding source. The DIOC's Website provides many useful features, such as a learning center, publication archive, member and project directories, and the Current Awareness Service (CAS). The CAS automatically notifies members about new information added to the Community. Notifications are individualized according to a member's profile and activities on the site. The DIOC is a research-oriented online community which provides resources in the dental informatics and dental technology field, as well as a way to establish social connections to share ideas, problems and research opportunities. Member and activity growth since the community's inception in 2005 have been steady, but future sustainability of the community depends on many factors. PMID:21364841

Irwin, Jeannie; Schleyer, Titus; Spallek, Heiko

2010-01-01

229

Teaching ethics in psychiatry: a one-day workshop for clinical students.  

PubMed Central

In this paper we describe the objectives of teaching medical ethics to undergraduates and the teaching methods used. We describe a workshop used in the University of Liverpool Department of Psychiatry, designed to enhance ethical sensitivity in psychiatry. The workshop reviews significant historical and current errors in the ethical practice of psychiatry and doctors' defence mechanisms against accepting responsibility for deficiencies in ethical practice. The workshop explores the student doctors' own group ethos in response to ethical dilemmas, and demonstrates how the individual contributes to and is responsible for the group ethos through participation and also through nonparticipation. The student feedback about the workshop is reviewed. The Toronto Ethical Sensitivity Instrument was used to assess whether or not the workshop altered sensitivity. Compared to a control group the attenders' sensitivity was significantly increased (on Student's t-test p equals or is less than 0.002). PMID:7473644

Green, B; Miller, P D; Routh, C P

1995-01-01

230

Teaching evidence-based medicine literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Constructing an answerable question and effectively searching the medical literature are key steps in practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM). This study aimed to identify the effectiveness of delivering a single workshop in EBM literature searching skills to medical students entering their first clinical years of study. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with third-year undergraduate medical students. Participants were randomized to participate in a formal workshop in EBM literature searching skills, with EBM literature searching skills and perceived competency in EBM measured at one-week post-intervention via the Fresno tool and Clinical Effectiveness and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. Results: A total of 121 participants were enrolled in the study, with 97 followed-up post-intervention. There was no statistical mean difference in EBM literature searching skills between the 2 groups (mean difference?=?0.007 (P?=?0.99)). Students attending the EBM workshop were significantly more confident in their ability to construct clinical questions and had greater perceived awareness of information resources. Conclusions: A single EBM workshop did not result in statistically significant changes in literature searching skills. Teaching and reinforcing EBM literature searching skills during both preclinical and clinical years may result in increased student confidence, which may facilitate student use of EBM skills as future clinicians. PMID:22879808

Tepper, Katrina; Misso, Marie

2012-01-01

231

Draft Constitution, School of Informatics Page 1 12/6/2010 Constitution of the School of Informatics  

E-print Network

Draft Constitution, School of Informatics Page 1 12/6/2010 Constitution of the School of Informatics Indiana University Preamble The Faculty of the School of Informatics at Indiana University of the Schoolof Informatics The Dean of the School of Informatics is the primary administrative officer and chief

Zhou, Yaoqi

232

The Biodiversity Informatics Potential Index  

PubMed Central

Background Biodiversity informatics is a relatively new discipline extending computer science in the context of biodiversity data, and its development to date has not been uniform throughout the world. Digitizing effort and capacity building are costly, and ways should be found to prioritize them rationally. The proposed 'Biodiversity Informatics Potential (BIP) Index' seeks to fulfill such a prioritization role. We propose that the potential for biodiversity informatics be assessed through three concepts: (a) the intrinsic biodiversity potential (the biological richness or ecological diversity) of a country; (b) the capacity of the country to generate biodiversity data records; and (c) the availability of technical infrastructure in a country for managing and publishing such records. Methods Broadly, the techniques used to construct the BIP Index were rank correlation, multiple regression analysis, principal components analysis and optimization by linear programming. We built the BIP Index by finding a parsimonious set of country-level human, economic and environmental variables that best predicted the availability of primary biodiversity data accessible through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) network, and constructing an optimized model with these variables. The model was then applied to all countries for which sufficient data existed, to obtain a score for each country. Countries were ranked according to that score. Results Many of the current GBIF participants ranked highly in the BIP Index, although some of them seemed not to have realized their biodiversity informatics potential. The BIP Index attributed low ranking to most non-participant countries; however, a few of them scored highly, suggesting that these would be high-return new participants if encouraged to contribute towards the GBIF mission of free and open access to biodiversity data. Conclusions The BIP Index could potentially help in (a) identifying countries most likely to contribute to filling gaps in digitized biodiversity data; (b) assisting countries potentially in need (for example mega-diverse) to mobilize resources and collect data that could be used in decision-making; and (c) allowing identification of which biodiversity informatics-resourced countries could afford to assist countries lacking in biodiversity informatics capacity, and which data-rich countries should benefit most from such help. PMID:22373233

2011-01-01

233

Environmental Informatics James E. Frew and Jeff Dozier  

E-print Network

Environmental Informatics James E. Frew and Jeff Dozier Bren School of Environmental Science Environmental informatics uses large multidimensional, complex datasets to study environmental problems, which articles · Top downloaded articles · Our comprehensive search FurtherANNUAL REVIEWS #12;Informatics

Dozier, Jeff

234

STATEMENT OF SALARY POLICY Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI  

E-print Network

STATEMENT OF SALARY POLICY Indiana University School of Informatics, IUPUI Revised ­ 9 of Informatics are important factors in rewarding and retaining productive faculty members. Written guidelines PERFORMANCE EVALUATION, School of Informatics, IUPUI. Salary increases will reflect a faculty member

Zhou, Yaoqi

235

A Simulation for Teaching the Basic and Clinical Science of Fluid Therapy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The course "Management of Fluid and Electrolyte Disorders" is an applied physiology course taught using lectures and paper-based cases. The course approaches fluid therapy from both basic science and clinical perspectives. While paper cases provide a basis for application of basic science concepts, they lack key components of genuine clinical…

Rawson, Richard E.; Dispensa, Marilyn E.; Goldstein, Richard E.; Nicholson, Kimberley W.; Vidal, Noni Korf

2009-01-01

236

A Comparison of In-service Teaching Methods on Clinical Aspesis for Dental Personnel.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a study with dental assistants and hygienists, clinic clerks, supply and sterilization personnel, receptionists, and housekeeping and secretarial staff (n=80) suggest that inservice training programs on infection control and clinical asepsis procedures may be better accomplished by practical demonstration than by lecture or seminar.…

Fotos, Pete G.; And Others

1990-01-01

237

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss Veterinary Teaching Hospital  

E-print Network

Assistant Professor, Dentistry and Oral Surgery Department of Clinical Sciences, James L. Voss and expertise in clinical service and instruction of veterinary students in small animal dentistry is desirable instruction for the PVM curriculum on topics related to veterinary dentistry. The successful candidate would

Stephens, Graeme L.

238

Measuring Contributions to the Clinical Mission of Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the final report of a panel convened by the Association of American Medical College's Mission-based Management Program to examine use of metrics (i.e., measures) in assessing faculty and departmental contributions to clinical mission. Discusses methods of measuring and comparing clinical effort, commonly used metrics, development of…

D'Alessandri, Robert M.; Albertsen, Peter; Atkinson, Barbara F.; Dickler, Robert M.; Jones, Robert F.; Kirch, Darrell G.; Longnecker, David E.; McAnarney, Elizabeth R.; Parisi, Valerie M.; Selby, Stephen E.; Stapczynski, J. Stephen; Thompson, Jerome W.; Wasserman, Alan G.; Zuza, Karen L.

2000-01-01

239

Nursing Informatics: Decades of Contribution to Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

Objectives In this paper we present a contemporary understanding of "nursing informatics" and relate it to applications in three specific contexts, hospitals, community health, and home dwelling, to illustrate achievements that contribute to the overall schema of health informatics. Methods We identified literature through database searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. Database searching was complemented by one author search and hand searches in six relevant journals. The literature review helped in conceptual clarification and elaborate on use that are supported by applications in different settings. Results Conceptual clarification of nursing data, information and knowledge has been expanded to include wisdom. Information systems and support for nursing practice benefits from conceptual clarification of nursing data, information, knowledge, and wisdom. We introduce three examples of information systems and point out core issues for information integration and practice development. Conclusions Exploring interplays of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom, nursing informatics takes a practice turn, accommodating to processes of application design and deployment for purposeful use by nurses in different settings. Collaborative efforts will be key to further achievements that support task shifting, mobility, and ubiquitous health care. PMID:23882413

Mæland Knudsen, Lina Merete

2013-01-01

240

The scope and direction of health informatics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Health Informatics (HI) is a dynamic discipline based on the medical sciences, information sciences, and cognitive sciences. Its domain can broadly be defined as medical information management. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of this domain, discuss the current "state of the art," and indicate the likely growth areas for health informatics. The sources of information used in this paper are selected publications from the literature of Health Informatics, HI 5300: Introduction to Health Informatics, which is a course from the Department of Health Informatics at the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center, and the author's personal experience in practicing telemedicine and implementing an electronic medical record at the NASA-Johnson Space Center. The conclusion is that the direction of Health Informatics is in the direction of data management, transfer, and representation via electronic medical records and the Internet.

McGinnis, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

241

A Human-Centered Approach to Medical Informatics for Medical Students, Residents, and Practicing Clinicians.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes development of a curriculum in medical information science that focuses on practical problems in clinical medicine rather than details of information technology. Design was guided by identification of six key clinical challenges that must be addressed by practitioners in the near future and by examination of past failures of informatics…

Stahlhut, Richard W.; Gosbee, John W.; Gardner-Bonneau, Daryle J.

1997-01-01

242

Cognitive hacking and intelligence and security informatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes research on cognitive and semantic attacks on computer systems and their users. Several countermeasures against such attacks are described, including a description of a prototype News Verifier system. It is argued that because misinformation and deception play a much more significant role in intelligence and security informatics than in other informatics disciplines such as science, medicine, and the law, a new science of intelligence and security informatics must concern itself with semantic attacks and countermeasures.

Thompson, Paul

2004-08-01

243

Description logics in medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Description logics and related formalisms are being applied in at least v e applica- tions in medical informatics|terminology, intelligent user interfaces, decision sup- port and semantic indexing, language technology, and systems integration. Impor- tant issues include size, complexity, connectivity, and the wide range of granularity required|medical terminologies require on the order of 250,000 concepts, some in- volving a dozen or

Alan Rector

2003-01-01

244

Perspectives from Nurse Managers on Informatics Competencies  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose. Nurse managers are in an excellent position for providing leadership and support within the institutions they serve and are often responsible for accessing information that is vital to the improvement of health facility processes and patients' outcomes. Therefore, competency in informatics is essential. The purposes of this study are to examine current informatics competency levels of nurse managers and to identify the variables that influence these competencies. Methods. A questionnaire designed to assess demographic information and nursing informatics competency was completed by 68 nurse managers. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted to analyze the factors influencing informatics competency. Results. Descriptive analysis of the data revealed that informatics competency of these nurse managers was in the moderate range (77.65 ± 8.14). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that level of education, nursing administration experience, and informatics education/training were significant factors affecting competency levels. Conclusion. The factors identified in this study can serve as a reference for nurse managers who were wishing to improve their informatics competency, hospital administrators seeking to provide appropriate training, and nursing educators who were making decisions about nursing informatics curricula. These findings suggest that efforts to enhance the informatics competency of nurse managers have marked potential benefits. PMID:24790565

Cui, Dan; Zhu, Xuemei; Zhao, Qiuli; Xiao, Ningning; Shen, Xiaoying

2014-01-01

245

Comenius University Bratislava, Slovakia Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics  

E-print Network

Comenius University Bratislava, Slovakia Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics Department of Applied Informatics Michal Valko Evolving Neural Networks for Statistical Decision Theory Advisor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

Scientific horizons in cancer control: genomes, informatics and personalized medicine.  

PubMed

The goals of cancer control are to reduce cancer risk, detect cancers earlier, improve treatments and enhance the health of cancer survivors. Personalized medicine aims to customize health care by tailoring care to the individual patient using genetic and other information. This review considers the traditional strengths of Connecticut's cancer control program as well as trends in emerging science, primarily under development through the auspices of the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences. It focuses on resources for cancer control offered by the Connecticut Tumor Registry in addition to opportunities for improving cancer control through developments in informatics and cancer genomics. It provides an overview of the use of informatic tools, electronic health records, health information exchange, integration of genotyping into risk models, and genomic analyses of clinical tumor specimens, demonstrating how the common theme in these advances will lead toward more personalized cancer control. PMID:22856022

Everson, Richard B

2012-01-01

247

Two h-Index Benchmarks for Evaluating the Publication Performance of Medical Informatics Researchers  

PubMed Central

Background The h-index is a commonly used metric for evaluating the publication performance of researchers. However, in a multidisciplinary field such as medical informatics, interpreting the h-index is a challenge because researchers tend to have diverse home disciplines, ranging from clinical areas to computer science, basic science, and the social sciences, each with different publication performance profiles. Objective To construct a reference standard for interpreting the h-index of medical informatics researchers based on the performance of their peers. Methods Using a sample of authors with articles published over the 5-year period 2006–2011 in the 2 top journals in medical informatics (as determined by impact factor), we computed their h-index using the Scopus database. Percentiles were computed to create a 6-level benchmark, similar in scheme to one used by the US National Science Foundation, and a 10-level benchmark. Results The 2 benchmarks can be used to place medical informatics researchers in an ordered category based on the performance of their peers. A validation exercise mapped the benchmark levels to the ranks of medical informatics academic faculty in the United States. The 10-level benchmark tracked academic rank better (with no ties) and is therefore more suitable for practical use. Conclusions Our 10-level benchmark provides an objective basis to evaluate and compare the publication performance of medical informatics researchers with that of their peers using the h-index. PMID:23079075

Arbuckle, Luk; Jonker, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kevin

2012-01-01

248

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Simulation-Based Teaching versus Traditional Instruction in Medicine: A Pilot Study among Clinical Medical Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To compare simulator-based teaching with traditional instruction among clinical medical students. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with written pre-post testing. Third-year medical students (n = 38) received either a myocardial infarction (MI) simulation followed by a reactive airways disease (RAD) lecture, or a RAD simulation…

Gordon, James A.; Shaffer, David W.; Raemer, Daniel B.; Pawlowski, John; Hurford, William E.; Cooper, Jeffrey B.

2006-01-01

249

A Repository of Codes of Ethics and Technical Standards in Health Informatics  

PubMed Central

We present a searchable repository of codes of ethics and standards in health informatics. It is built using state-of-the-art search algorithms and technologies. The repository will be potentially beneficial for public health practitioners, researchers, and software developers in finding and comparing ethics topics of interest. Public health clinics, clinicians, and researchers can use the repository platform as a one-stop reference for various ethics codes and standards. In addition, the repository interface is built for easy navigation, fast search, and side-by-side comparative reading of documents. Our selection criteria for codes and standards are two-fold; firstly, to maintain intellectual property rights, we index only codes and standards freely available on the internet. Secondly, major international, regional, and national health informatics bodies across the globe are surveyed with the aim of understanding the landscape in this domain. We also look at prevalent technical standards in health informatics from major bodies such as the International Standards Organization (ISO) and the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Our repository contains codes of ethics from the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA), the iHealth Coalition (iHC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), the Australasian College of Health Informatics (ACHI), the British Computer Society (BCS), and the UK Council for Health Informatics Professions (UKCHIP), with room for adding more in the future. Our major contribution is enhancing the findability of codes and standards related to health informatics ethics by compilation and unified access through the health informatics ethics repository. PMID:25422725

Zaïane, Osmar R.

2014-01-01

250

A New Conceptual Approach to Teaching the Interpretation of Clinical Tests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Courses in clinical epidemiology usually include acquainting students with a single 2X2 table. All diagnostic test characteristics are explained using this table. This pedagogic approach may be misleading. A new didactic approach is hereby proposed, using two tables, each with specific analogous notations (uppercase and lowercase) and derived…

Linn, Shai

2004-01-01

251

Results of a Survey on the Use of Standardized Patients to Teach and Evaluate Clinical Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical schools (N=136) were surveyed concerning their use of standardized patients (lay persons trained to replicate a clinical encounter consistently and realistically). Among 16 specific topics covered are breast and pelvic examination, male genitourinary examination, interviewing skills, administration of program, start-up concerns, and…

Stillman, Paula L.; And Others

1990-01-01

252

Teaching reflective practice in practice settings: students' perceptions of their clinical educators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, self-assessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice potential not being realised. This study explored final year physiotherapy students' perceptions of clinical educators as

Franziska Trede; Megan Smith

2012-01-01

253

Outbreak!: Teaching Clinical and Diagnostic Microbiology Methodologies with an Interactive Online Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outbreak! is an online, interactive educational game that helps students and teachers learn and evaluate clinical microbiology skills. When the game was used in introductory microbiology laboratories, qualitative evaluation by students showed very positive responses and increased learning. Outbreak! allows students to design diagnostic tests and…

Clark, Sherri; Smith, Geoffrey Battle

2004-01-01

254

Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Teaching for Third-Year Medical Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A 2-month program for third-year students at Yeshiva's Albert Einstein College of Medicine that provides a model for integrating basic sciences and clinical training is described. It demonstrates the importance of lifelong learning in a field that constantly changes. (Author/MLW)

Croen, Lila G.; And Others

1986-01-01

255

A Comprehensive, Simulation-Based Approach to Teaching Clinical Skills: The Medical Students’ Perspective  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

Evans, Leigh V.; Crimmins, Ashley C.; Bonz, James W.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D.; Dodge, Kelly L.

2014-01-01

256

A comprehensive, simulation-based approach to teaching clinical skills: the medical students' perspective.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine if third-year medical students participating in a mandatory 12-week simulation course perceived improvement in decision-making, communication, and teamwork skills. Students participated in or observed 24 acute emergency scenarios. At 4-week intervals, students completed 0-10 point Likert scale questionnaires evaluating the curriculum and role of team leader. Linear contrasts were used to examine changes in outcomes. P-values were Bonferroni-corrected for multiple pairwise comparisons. Student evaluations (n = 96) demonstrated increases from week 4 to 12 in educational value (p = 0.006), decision-making (p < 0.001), communication (p = 0.02), teamwork (p = 0.01), confidence in management (p < 0.001), and translation to clinical experience (p < 0.001). Regarding the team leader role, students reported a decrease in stress (p = 0.001) and increase in ability to facilitate team function (p < 0.001) and awareness of team building (p = <0.001). Ratings demonstrate a positive impact of simulation on both clinical management skills and team leadership skills. A simulation curriculum can enhance the ability to manage acute clinical problems and translates well to the clinical experience. These positive perceptions increase as the exposure to simulation increases. PMID:25506290

Evans, Leigh V; Crimmins, Ashley C; Bonz, James W; Gusberg, Richard J; Tsyrulnik, Alina; Dziura, James D; Dodge, Kelly L

2014-12-01

257

Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.  

PubMed

Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd. (Konica-Minolta), Japan, in the 1980-1990s. Major support from the US National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies and private medical imaging industry are appreciated. The NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) Advanced Study Institute (ASI) sponsored the International PACS Conference at Evian, France, in 1990, the contents and presentations of which convinced a half dozen high-level US military healthcare personnel, including surgeons and radiologists, that PACS was feasible and would greatly streamline the current military healthcare services. The impact of the post-conference summary by these individuals to their superiors opened the doors for long-term support of PACS development by the US Military Healthcare Services. PACS and imaging informatics have thus emerged as a daily clinical necessity. PMID:24311236

Huang, H K

2014-01-01

258

Medical Informatics: Market for IS/IT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses co-occurrence analysis of INSPEC classification codes and thesaurus terms assigned to medical informatics (biomedical information) journal articles and proceedings papers to reveal a more complete perspective of how information science and information technology (IS/IT) authors view medical informatics. Discusses results of cluster analysis…

Morris, Theodore Allan

2002-01-01

259

Aims and tasks of medical informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ten major long-term aims and tasks, so to speak ‘grand challenges’, for research in the field of medical informatics, including health informatics, are proposed and described. These are the further development of methods and tools of information processing for: (1) diagnostics (‘the visible body’); (2) therapy (‘medical intervention with as little strain on the patient as possible’); (3) therapy simulation;

Reinhold Haux

1997-01-01

260

The Impact of Medical Informatics on Librarianship.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The thesis of this paper is that the growth of the field of medical informatics, while seemingly a potential threat to medical librarianship, is in fact an opportunity for librarianship to both extend its reach and also to further define its unique characteristics in contrast to those of medical informatics. Furthermore, because medical…

Dalrymple, Prudence W.

261

Social Informatics: Perspectives, Examples, and Trends.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problems, methods, and domains that help define social informatics and considers how it relates to information science. Topics include the relationship between uses of information and communication technologies (ICT) and organizational effects; the role of the social context; methodological pluralism; and trends in social informatics…

Sawyer, Steve; Eschenfelder, Kristin R.

2002-01-01

262

Department of Electronic and informatics Doctoral Dissertation  

E-print Network

Terminals and Multiband or UWB Antennas Department of Electronic and informatics Doctoral DissertationDepartment of Electronic and informatics Doctoral Dissertation Presented by: Muhammad Amir Yousuf Examiner Serge Bories Examiner Parametric Modeling of Small Terminals and Multiband or UWB Antennas pastel

Boyer, Edmond

263

Five Periods in Development of Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Medical informatics, as scientific discipline, has to do with all aspects of understanding and promoting the effective organization, analysis, management, and use of information in health care. While the field of Medical informatics shares the general scope of these interests with some other health care specialities and disciplines, Medical (Health) informatics has developed its own areas of emphasis and approaches that have set it apart from other disciplines and specialities. For the last fifties of 20th century and some more years of 21st century, Medical informatics had the five time periods of characteristic development. In this paper author shortly described main scientific innovations and inventors who created development of Medical informatics. PMID:24648619

Masic, Izet

2014-01-01

264

Five-year experience of clinical ethics consultations in a pediatric teaching hospital.  

PubMed

Our retrospective study presents and evaluates clinical ethics consultations (CECs) in pediatrics as a structure for implementing hospital-wide ethics. We performed a descriptive and statistical analysis of clinical ethics decision making and its implementation in pediatric CECs at Zurich University Children's Hospital. Ninety-five CECs were held over 5 years for 80 patients. The care team reached a consensus treatment recommendation after one session in 75 consultations (89 %) and on 82 of 84 ethical issues (98 %) after two or more sessions (11 repeats). Fifty-seven CECs recommended limited treatment and 23 maximal treatment. Team recommendations were agreed outright by parents and/or patient in 59 of 73 consultations (81 %). Initial dissensus yielded to explanatory discussion or repeat CEC in seven consultations (10 %). In a further seven families (10 %), no solution was found within the CEC framework: five (7 %) required involvement of the child protection service, and in two families, the parents took their child elsewhere. Eventual team-parent/patient consensus was reached in 66 of 73 families (90 %) with documented parental/patient decisions (missing data, n?=?11). Patient preference was assessable in ten CECs. Patient autonomy was part of the ethical dilemma in only three CECs. The Zurich clinical ethics structure produced a 98 % intra-team consensus rate in 95 CECs and reduced initial team-parent dissensus from 21 to 10 %. Success depends closely on a standardized CEC protocol and an underlying institutional clinical ethics framework embodying a comprehensive set of transparently articulated values and opinions, with regular evaluation of decisions and their consequences for care teams and families. PMID:24323344

Streuli, Jürg C; Staubli, Georg; Pfändler-Poletti, Marlis; Baumann-Hölzle, Ruth; Ersch, Jörg

2014-05-01

265

How should teaching of undergraduates in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics be delivered and assessed?  

PubMed Central

Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics is the academic discipline that informs rational prescribing of medicines. There is accumulating evidence that a significant minority of prescriptions in the UK National Health Service contain errors. This comes at a time when the approach to and success of undergraduate education in this area has been called into question. Various stakeholders are now in agreement that this challenging area of undergraduate education needs to be strengthened. The principles that should form the basis of future educational strategy include greater visibility of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics in the curriculum, clear learning outcomes that are consistent with national guidance, strong and enthusiastic leadership, a student formulary, opportunities to practice prescribing, a robust assessment of prescribing competencies and external quality control. Important new developments in the UK are Prescribe, a repository of e-learning materials to support education in clinical pharmacology and prescribing, and the Prescribing Skills Assessment, a national online assessment designed to allow medical students to demonstrate that they have achieved the core competencies required to begin postgraduate training. PMID:22360965

Maxwell, Simon R J

2012-01-01

266

Model for teaching population health and community-based care across diverse clinical experiences.  

PubMed

The pillars constructivist model is designed to offer a unifying clinical paradigm to support consistent learning opportunities across diverse configurations of community and public health clinical sites. Thirty-six students and six faculty members participated in a mixed methods evaluation to assess the model after its inaugural semester of implementation. The evaluation methods included a rating scale that measures the model's ability to provide consistent learning opportunities at both population health and direct care sites, a case study to measure student growth within the five conceptual pillars, and a faculty focus group. Results revealed that the model served as an effective means of clinical education to support the use of multiple, small-scale public health sites. Although measurements of student growth within the pillars are inconclusive, the findings suggest efficacy. The authors recommend the continued use of the pillars constructivist model in baccalaureate programs, with further study of the author-designed evaluation tools. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(2):97-101.]. PMID:25602586

Van Dyk, Elizabeth J; Valentine-Maher, Sarah K; Tracy, Janet P

2015-02-01

267

Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Laboratory of Applied Informatics Research (LAIR ) at Indiana University, Bloomington (IUB) conducts research on information retrieval, machine learning, and human-computer interaction. The website provides links to information on various projects that address topics such as "agent-based information management, agent-user interaction, concept discovery and analysis, and information customization for effective online information delivery." Project descriptions, technical reports, and related resources are posted for each of the 10 projects currently supported through this laboratory. Some course syllabi and course materials are also posted in the Courses section of the website.

268

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Opportunities for XXL Datamining  

E-print Network

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Opportunities for XXL Datamining Marc Snir #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu 2 can help supercomputing #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu 3 Large NSF Funded Supercomputers beyond 2010 One it takes to mine data at such scale Your job: Think big #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu 4 The Uniprocessor

Snir, Marc

269

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Programming Models for  

E-print Network

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Programming Models for Supercomputing in the Era of Multicore Marc Snir #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu MULTI-CORE CHALLENGES 1 #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu 2 Moore's Law+OpenMP). #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Memory Wall: a Persistent Problem Chip CPU performance increases ~60

Snir, Marc

270

Informatics Systems and Modelling Case Studies of Expert Interviews  

E-print Network

Informatics Systems and Modelling ­ Case Studies of Expert Interviews Leopold Lehner1, Johannes interviews were conducted in order to identify relevant compe- tencies empirically concerning informatics conducted with different expert groups (experts of informatics, experts of didac- tics of informatics

Boyer, Edmond

271

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM  

E-print Network

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM 2011-2012 Academic Year 30, 2011, to: IU School of Informatics Informatics Complex 535 W. Michigan St. IT 493 Indianapolis School of Informatics Freshman Scholarship Dean's Advisory Council Senior Scholarship Health Information

Zhou, Yaoqi

272

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM  

E-print Network

IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AT IUPUI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION FORM 2010-2011 Academic Year applicable signatures and attachments NO LATER THAN MARCH 30, 2010, to: IU School of Informatics Informatics Scholarship David M. Ratts Scholarship School of Informatics Freshman Scholarship 4. Community Involvement

Zhou, Yaoqi

273

Data Analysis and Data Mining: Current Issues in Biomedical Informatics  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Medicine and biomedical sciences have become data-intensive fields, which, at the same time, enable the application of data-driven approaches and require sophisticated data analysis and data mining methods. Biomedical informatics provides a proper interdisciplinary context to integrate data and knowledge when processing available information, with the aim of giving effective decision-making support in clinics and translational research. Objectives To reflect on different perspectives related to the role of data analysis and data mining in biomedical informatics. Methods On the occasion of the 50th year of Methods of Information in Medicine a symposium was organized, that reflected on opportunities, challenges and priorities of organizing, representing and analysing data, information and knowledge in biomedicine and health care. The contributions of experts with a variety of backgrounds in the area of biomedical data analysis have been collected as one outcome of this symposium, in order to provide a broad, though coherent, overview of some of the most interesting aspects of the field. Results The paper presents sections on data accumulation and data-driven approaches in medical informatics, data and knowledge integration, statistical issues for the evaluation of data mining models, translational bioinformatics and bioinformatics aspects of genetic epidemiology. Conclusions Biomedical informatics represents a natural framework to properly and effectively apply data analysis and data mining methods in a decision-making context. In the future, it will be necessary to preserve the inclusive nature of the field and to foster an increasing sharing of data and methods between researchers. PMID:22146916

Bellazzi, Riccardo; Diomidous, Marianna; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko; Ziegler, Andreas; McCray, Alexa T.

2011-01-01

274

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 5574 55 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 55­74 55 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius The First Decade of Informatics in Dutch High Schools Natasa GRGURINA University. Informatics is currently being taught in high schools all over the world. In the Nether- lands, where all

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

275

zentrum Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie ABTEIlUNG MEDIZINISCHE INFORMATIK centre Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS  

E-print Network

Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAl INFORMATICS Robert-Koch-Str. 40 D-37075-Resources for Health Development of Curricula for Biomedical Informatics #12;30 Zentrum Informatik, Statistik und Epidemiologie ABteilunG mediziniscHe informAtik Centre Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology dep

Gollisch, Tim

276

Teaching practice from the perspective of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education, Charles University  

E-print Network

Teaching practice from the perspective of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education, Charles of teaching practice of ICT student teachers at the Faculty of Education in Prague. In her paper she their teaching practice on subjects related to Computer Science, Informatics and ICT Education in Czech Basic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

277

Antibody informatics for drug discovery.  

PubMed

More and more antibody therapeutics are being approved every year, mainly due to their high efficacy and antigen selectivity. However, it is still difficult to identify the antigen, and thereby the function, of an antibody if no other information is available. There are obstacles inherent to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii) antibody numbering and IMGT. Here, we review "antibody informatics," which may integrate the above three fields so that bridging the gaps between industrial needs and academic solutions can be accelerated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:25110827

Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi; Marcatili, Paolo; Popovic, Bojana; Xu, Jianqing; Overington, John P; Hirayama, Kazunori; Soga, Shinji; Tsunoyama, Kazuhisa; Clark, Dominic; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi

2014-11-01

278

Practical Informatics: Training the Next Generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A commonly discussed yet infrequently addressed problem in the scientific community is the inadequate training our students receive in dealing with large data, a subject more popularly known as informatics. Yet as presented by the late Jim Gray, we now have a fourth paradigm for scientific research, namely data intensive science. Over the last few years, I have tried to address this educational deficiency at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Initially, I added relevant informatics content into the standard Astronomy curricula in order to increase the student's exposure to this new paradigm. Realizing that this was merely a band-aid solution, I next created and offered a new course, entitled Practical Informatics for the Physical Sciences that was warmly received by undergraduate and graduate students in several science and engineering disciplines. More recently, I have been tasked by the University with expanding this material into an online course to introduce informatics concepts and techniques to a wider audience. In this paper, I present my initial motivation for adopting informatics material into the Astronomy curricula, my thoughts and experiences in developing the Practical Informatics course, lessons learned from the entire process, and my progress in developing a new, online informatics course. I hope that others can make use of these lessons to more broadly improve the training of the next generation of scientists.

Brunner, R. J.

2013-10-01

279

Goitre prevalence in pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in a teaching hospital.  

PubMed

This study aimed to determine goitre prevalence in pregnant women. Seven hundred pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at Wesley Guild Hospital, Ilesa, were interviewed and examined. The mean age of the subjects was 27.8 years, with mean parity of 2.65. Mean gestation was 28.5 weeks. A total of 97.4% were resident in Ilesa and surrounding towns and villages. Well or stream was the main water supply for nearly all the subjects. Only 7.3% of the subjects showed no thyroid enlargement. Early enlargement (1(a) and 1(b)) occurred in 441 (63%) patients, Grade 2 enlargement in 166 (23.2%) and a grossly enlarged goitre in 40 (5.7%). The goitre rate was correlated with the age and parity of the patients. PMID:12745559

Adesunkanmi, A R K; Makinde, O N

2003-03-01

280

Teaching communication skills in clinical settings: comparing two applications of a comprehensive program with standardized and real patients  

PubMed Central

Background Communication is important for the quality of clinical practice, and programs have been implemented to improve healthcare providers’ communication skills. However, the consistency of programs teaching communication skills has received little attention, and debate exists about the application of acquired skills to real patients. This study inspects whether (1) results from a communication program are replicated with different samples, and (2) results with standardized patients apply to interviews with real patients. Methods A structured, nine-month communication program was applied in two consecutive years to two different samples of healthcare professionals (25 in the first year, 20 in the second year). Results were assessed at four different points in time, each year, regarding participants’ confidence levels (self-rated), basic communication skills in interviews with standardized patients, and basic communication skills in interviews with real patients. Data were analyzed using GLM Repeated-Measures procedures. Results Improvements were statistically significant in both years in all measures except in simulated patients’ assessment of the 2008 group. Differences between the two samples were non-significant. Differences between interviews with standardized and with real patients were also non-significant. Conclusions The program’s positive outcomes were replicated in different samples, and acquired skills were successfully applied to real-patient interviews. This reinforces this type of program structure as a valuable training tool, with results translating into real situations. It also adds to the reliability of the assessment instruments employed, though these may need adaptation in the case of real patients. PMID:24886341

2014-01-01

281

What is done, what is needed and what is realistic to expect from medical informatics standards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medical informatic experts have made considerable progress in the development of standards for orders and clinical results (CEN, HL7, ASTM), EKG tracings (CEN), diagnostic images (DICOM), claims processing (X12 and EDIFAC) and in vocabulary and codes (SNOMED, Read Codes, the MED, LOINC). Considerable work still remains to be carried out. Abstract models of health care information have to be created,

Clement J. McDonald; J. Marc Overhage; Paul Dexter; Blaine Takesue; Jeffrey G. Suico

1998-01-01

282

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future  

E-print Network

Healthcare Informatics for Mental Health Recent Advances and the Outlook for the Future Hamed and their surrounding environment (e.g., by monitoring their CO2 level [13]). Mental health care has seen less. Electronic records are relatively recent in mental health care and tend to be poorly integrated in clinical

Purver, Matthew

283

CSE5810 Introduction to Biomedical Informatics Design/Research Project Indepth Exploration of BMI Topic  

E-print Network

CSE5810 Introduction to Biomedical Informatics Design/Research Project ­ Indepth Exploration of BMI Visualization to Conceptualize BMI/BI Data Algorithms for BMI/Clinical Data Analysis Mobile Computing Source EMR and Health Information Exchange. Other national or international BMI initiatives

Demurjian, Steven A.

284

International Journal of Medical Informatics (2004) 73, 631--638 Approach to mobile information and  

E-print Network

of nurses and physicians in the practice of in-patient care, we extended an ex- isting Web-based clinicalInternational Journal of Medical Informatics (2004) 73, 631--638 Approach to mobile information Evidence suggests that inadequate access to information and ineffective communication are proximal causes

Cimino, James J.

285

Materials Informatics: Fast Track to New Materials  

SciTech Connect

Current methods for new materials development focus on either deeper fundamental-level studies or generation of large quantities of data. The data challenge in materials science is not only the volume of data being generated by many independent investigators, but its heterogeneity and also its complexity that must be transformed, analyzed, correlated and communicated. Materials informatics addresses these issues. Materials informatics is an emerging information-based field combining computational, statistical, and mathematical approaches with materials sciences for accelerating discovery and development of new materials. Within the informatic framework, the various different forms of information form a system architecture, an iterative cycle for transforming data into knowledge.

Ferris, Kim F.; Peurrung, Loni M.; Marder, James M.

2007-01-01

286

Four Models of On-Line Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four models of online teaching are currently being used within the Faculty of Informatics and Communications at Central Queensland University in Australia. The naive model, which is the most widely used, may be characterized as "putting lecture notes on the World Wide Web" with no opportunities for interaction or feedback. The standard model…

Roberts, Tim S.; Jones, David Thomas

287

Michigan Informatics: Informatics for the Public Health Workforce  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As health care job opportunities continue to expand, a number of institutions have been developing online training materials to help support academic public health programs. One such program is the Michigan Informatics (MI-INFO) website, which contains a variety of tutorials that deal with health information and computer skills. All told, the site contains nine tutorials which include titles like "Evidence Based Public Health", "Finding Health Statistics Online", and "Searching the Public Health Literature". Each of the tutorials features key concept overviews, exercises, and case studies. Near the bottom of the site, visitors can find a user manual for the tutorials, and a place where they can offer their own feedback. The site is rounded out by the "Other Resources" area, which contains links to other relevant sites, such as the Michigan Public Health Training Center and the Greater Midwest Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.

2007-01-01

288

Evidence-based practice for mere mortals: the role of informatics and health services research.  

PubMed

The poor translation of evidence into practice is a well-known problem. Hopes are high that information technology can help make evidence-based practice feasible for mere mortal physicians. In this paper, we draw upon the methods and perspectives of clinical practice, medical informatics, and health services research to analyze the gap between evidence and action, and to argue that computing systems for bridging this gap should incorporate both informatics and health services research expertise. We discuss 2 illustrative systems--trial banks and a web-based system to develop and disseminate evidence-based guidelines (alchemist)--and conclude with a research and training agenda. PMID:11972727

Sim, Ida; Sanders, Gillian D; McDonald, Kathryn M

2002-04-01

289

AMIA Board white paper: definition of biomedical informatics and specification of core competencies for graduate education in the discipline.  

PubMed

The AMIA biomedical informatics (BMI) core competencies have been designed to support and guide graduate education in BMI, the core scientific discipline underlying the breadth of the field's research, practice, and education. The core definition of BMI adopted by AMIA specifies that BMI is 'the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health.' Application areas range from bioinformatics to clinical and public health informatics and span the spectrum from the molecular to population levels of health and biomedicine. The shared core informatics competencies of BMI draw on the practical experience of many specific informatics sub-disciplines. The AMIA BMI analysis highlights the central shared set of competencies that should guide curriculum design and that graduate students should be expected to master. PMID:22683918

Kulikowski, Casimir A; Shortliffe, Edward H; Currie, Leanne M; Elkin, Peter L; Hunter, Lawrence E; Johnson, Todd R; Kalet, Ira J; Lenert, Leslie A; Musen, Mark A; Ozbolt, Judy G; Smith, Jack W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter Z; Williamson, Jeffrey J

2012-01-01

290

Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Universal or “broad-range” PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27\\/30 (90%) of total

Yuriko Nagano; Jim Walker; Anne Loughrey; Cherie Millar; Colin Goldsmith; Paul Rooney; Stuart Elborn; John Moore

2009-01-01

291

Commentary: Informatics in biomedicine and health care.  

PubMed

During the last two decades, biomedical informatics (BMI) has become a critical component in biomedical research and health care delivery, as evidenced by two recent phenomena. One, as discussed in the article by Bernstam and colleagues in this issue, has been the introduction of Clinical and Translational Science Awards. Perhaps even more important has been the recent, arguably long overdue, emphasis on deployment of health information technology (IT) nationally. BMI utilizes IT and computer science as tools and methods for improving data acquisition, data management, data analysis, and knowledge generation, but it is driven by a focus on applications based in deep understanding of the science and practice, problems, interactions, culture, and milieu of biomedicine and health. Building from Bernstam and colleagues' distinction between BMI and other IT disciplines, the authors discuss the evolving role of BMI professionals as individuals uniquely positioned to work within the human and organizational context and culture in which the IT is being applied. The focus is not on the IT but on the combination--the interactions of IT systems, human beings, and organizations aimed at achieving a particular purpose. There has never been a time when the need for individuals well trained in BMI--those who understand the complexities of the human, social, and organizational milieu of biomedicine and health--has been more critical than it is now, as the nation seeks to develop a national infrastructure for biomedicine and health care, and as these fields seek to broadly deploy IT wisely and appropriately. PMID:19550167

Greenes, Robert A; Shortliffe, Edward H

2009-07-01

292

Health Informatics for Pediatric Disaster Preparedness Planning  

PubMed Central

Objective 1. To conduct a review of the role of informatics in pediatric disaster preparedness using all medical databases. 2. To provide recommendations to improve pediatric disaster preparedness by the application of informatics. Methods A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINHL and the Cochrane Library using the key words “children” AND “disaster preparedness and disaster” AND “informatics”. Results A total of 314 papers were initially produced by the search and eight that met the selection criteria were included in the review. Four themes emerged: tools for disaster preparedness, education, reunification and planning and response. Conclusion The literature pertaining to informatics and pediatric disaster preparedness is sparse and many gaps still persist. Current disaster preparedness tools focus on the general population and do not specifically address children. The most progress has been achieved in family reunification; however, the recommendations delineated are yet to be completed. PMID:23616840

Burke, R.V.; Ryutov, T.; Neches, R.; Upperman, J.S.

2010-01-01

293

BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making  

PubMed Central

Contributing reviewers The editors of BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making would like to thank all our reviewers who have contributed their time to the journal in Volume 13 (2013). PMID:25540033

2014-01-01

294

Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit Informatics Software Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This is a description of the software design for the 2013 edition of the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Informatics computer assembly. The Informatics system is an optional part of the space suit assembly. It adds a graphical interface for displaying suit status, timelines, procedures, and caution and warning information. In the future it will display maps with GPS position data, and video and still images captured by the astronaut.

Wright, Theodore

2014-01-01

295

Evolution of Trends in European Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

This presentation attempts to analyze the trends in Medical Informatics along half a century, in the European socio-political and technological development context. Based on the major characteristics which seem dominant in some periods, a staging is proposed, with a description of each period – the context, major ideas, views and events. A summary of major features of each period is also added. This paper has an original presentation of the evolution of major trends in medical informatics. PMID:24648618

I. Mihalas, George

2014-01-01

296

[A new vision of nursing: the evolution and development of nursing informatics].  

PubMed

Technology development trends in the 21st century are increasingly focused on the development of interdisciplinary applications. Advanced information technology may be applied to integrate nursing care information, simplify nursing processes, and reduce the time spent on work tasks, thereby increasing the amount of time that clinical personnel are available to care for patients and ensuring that patients are provided with high-quality and personalized care services. The development of nursing information began in Taiwan in 2003 and has since expanded and thrived. The ability of nursing information to connect formerly insular national nursing communities promotes the international visibility of Taiwan. The rapid development of nursing information in Taiwan, resulting in the production of informative and outstanding results, has received worldwide attention. The Taiwan Nursing Informatics Association was established in 2006 to nurture nursing information professionals, develop and apply information technology in the health care domain, and facilitate international nursing information exchanges. The association actively promotes nursing information in the areas of administration, education, research, and clinical practice, thereby integrating nursing with empirical applications to enhance the service quality and management of nursing and increase the benefits of nursing teaching and research. To convert information into knowledge, the association develops individualized strategies for managing mobile care and employs an interagency network to exchange and reintegrate resources, establishing active, intelligent nursing based on network characteristics and an empirical foundation. The mid- and long-term objectives of the association involve introducing cloud computing and facilitating the meaningful use of nursing information in both public and government settings, thereby creating a milestone of developing and expanding nursing information unique to Taiwan. PMID:25125162

Feng, Rung-Chuang; Yeh, Yu-Ting

2014-08-01

297

Evolution of medical informatics in bibliographic databases.  

PubMed

Medical informatics became a medical specialty during the last years and this is evidenced by a great amount of journal articles regarding the subject published worldwide. We compared the presentation of Medical Informatics in two different bibliographic databases: MEDLINE and LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on the Health Sciences). Previous studies described how Medical Informatics was represented in MEDLINE, but we wanted to compare it to a regional database as LILACS. We search both databases completely (MEDLINE 1966 -2002 and LILACS 1982-2002) using the keyword "Medical Informatics" as MeSH term in MEDLINE and as DeCS term in LILACS, and we added "medical informatics" as text word and analyzed the references obtained as results. We found that MEDLINE properly represents the impact of Medical Informatics in non-Latin-American international journals, but lacks of a considerable amount of articles from this region, while LILACS, although in comparison it is smaller in size, has more articles regarding the subject. So we think that LILACS properly represents the specialty in Latin America and the Caribbean Region. PMID:15360823

Otero, Paula; Pedernera, Federico; Montenegro, Sergio; Borbolla, Damian; Garcia Marti, Sebastián; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

2004-01-01

298

Criterion-referenced evaluation of day one clinical competencies of veterinary students: VOLES-the VMTH (Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital) Online Evaluation System.  

PubMed

This article describes an extensive online criterion-referenced evaluation system for the assessment of veterinary students' achievement during their final year's Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (or equivalent) clinical education. Data are reported for the 2001 to 2009 University of California at Davis veterinary graduates, for a total of more than 1,100 students. These criterion-referenced evaluations extensively document the level of clinical skills attained and demonstrated during the individual clinical rotations that comprise the fourth-year curriculum. On average, in each of the 17,500 clinical rotations undertaken during this time period, student performance was assessed in at least 11 separate areas of skills, knowledge, and professional attributes. This provided more than 200,000 criterion-referenced judgments of the individual clinical attributes of graduates over nine years. The system is based on a previously detailed and validated definition of the skills, knowledge, and professional attributes that students should have demonstrated before graduation. The extensive database that this system has provided has established that this system, termed VOLES (VMTH [Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital] On-Line Evaluation System), is an effective tool to assess the clinical capabilities of veterinary students and their achievement of the "Day One" skills required for entering clinical practice. These expected proficiencies are balanced according to the differing expectations that each area of veterinary clinical practice demands. PMID:22430080

Zeck, Steven; Wall, Judy A; Smith, Bradford P; Wilson, W David; Walsh, Donal A

2012-01-01

299

Biomedical Informatics Resources — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

A central focus of the NCIP mission is the provision of a wide array of informatics resources — applications, data collections, analytical algorithms, standards, and infrastructure components, to name only the most obvious — needed to sustain the broad cancer-research and biomedical-informatics community.

300

Populations, Patients, Germs and Genes: Ethics Of Genomics and Informatics in Communicable Disease Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter will explore the ways in which genomics (and the informatics tools needed to analyze and interpret them) could,\\u000a potentially, transform our understanding of infectious disease epidemiology, improve disease management and prevention and\\u000a save lives. The integration of microbiological, clinical and environmental data into personalized clinical decision support\\u000a and risk assessment tools will improve both the care of patients

Gwendolyn L. Gilbert; Michael Selgelid

301

10 years experience with pioneering open access publishing in health informatics: the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR).  

PubMed

Peer-reviewed journals remain important vehicles for knowledge transfer and dissemination in health informatics, yet, their format, processes and business models are changing only slowly. Up to the end of last century, it was common for individual researchers and scientific organizations to leave the business of knowledge transfer to professional publishers, signing away their rights to the works in the process, which in turn impeded wider dissemination. Traditional medical informatics journals are poorly cited and the visibility and uptake of articles beyond the medical informatics community remain limited. In 1999, the Journal of Medical Internet Research (JMIR; http://www.jmir.org) was launched, featuring several innovations including 1) ownership and copyright retained by the authors, 2) electronic-only, "lean" non-for-profit publishing, 3) openly accessible articles with a reversed business model (author pays instead of reader pays), 4) technological innovations such as automatic XML tagging and reference checking, on-the-fly PDF generation from XML, etc., enabling wide distribution in various bibliographic and full-text databases. In the past 10 years, despite limited resources, the journal has emerged as a leading journal in health informatics, and is presently ranked the top journal in the medical informatics and health services research categories by impact factor. The paper summarizes some of the features of the Journal, and uses bibliometric and access data to compare the influence of the Journal on the discipline of medical informatics and other disciplines. While traditional medical informatics journals are primarily cited by other Medical Informatics journals (33%-46% of citations), JMIR papers are to a more often cited by "end-users" (policy, public health, clinical journals), which may be partly attributable to the "open access advantage". PMID:20841900

Eysenbach, Gunther

2010-01-01

302

Twelve Tips to Improve Bedside Teaching.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Emphasizes the benefits of bedside teaching in medical education. Presents 12 tips to simplify key strategies and describe them in greater depth in order to promote bedside teaching which is an essential method of clinical teaching. (SOE)

Ramani, Subha

2003-01-01

303

Conference on Detection of Intrusions and Malware & Vulnerability SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society  

E-print Network

SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society #12;2 Security SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR of the German Informatics Society #12;3 Security!See you in Berlin! Thierry Noir, CC-BY-SA-3.0 SIG SIDAR of the German Informatics SocietySIG SIDAR

Wichmann, Felix

304

Chapter 17: bioimage informatics for systems pharmacology.  

PubMed

Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies. PMID:23633943

Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T C

2013-04-01

305

Teaching Language, Teaching Culture.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Essays and research reports on the relationship between teaching second languages and teaching culture include: "Teaching Culture as an Integrated Part of Language Teaching: An Introduction" (Chantal Crozet, Anthony J. Liddicoat); "Primary Socialization and Cultural Factors in Second Language Learning: Wending Our Way through Semi-Charted…

Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

1997-01-01

306

Beyond the Superhighway : Exploiting the Internet with Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

As in other areas of society, the Internet and the World Wide Web are becoming important topics in medical informatics. This is evident from the recent American Medical Informatics Association's 1996 Annual Fall Symposium, where the theme was “Beyond the Superhighway: Exploiting the Internet with Medical Informatics.” Of the over 330 papers and abstracts published in the Proceedings, one third

James J Cimino

1997-01-01

307

Imaging informatics for personalised medicine: applications and challenges  

PubMed Central

Imaging informatics has emerged as a major research theme in biomedicine in the last few decades. Currently, personalised, predictive and preventive patient care is believed to be one of the top priorities in biomedical research and practice. Imaging informatics plays a major role in biomedicine studies. This paper reviews main applications and challenges of imaging informatics in biomedicine. PMID:19862353

Peng, Hanchuan; Zhou, Xiaobo

2009-01-01

308

IU School of Informatics Policy on Joint Appointments  

E-print Network

IU School of Informatics Policy on Joint Appointments Revised ­ 11/11/02 There may be times when joint appointments for faculty are made between IU School of Informatics and other schools or units within Indiana University. This policy summarizes the expectations of the IU School of Informatics

Zhou, Yaoqi

309

Vol. 2, No. 2 Summer 2004 Community Informatics  

E-print Network

Vol. 2, No. 2 · Summer 2004 Community Informatics HCI grad builds bridges to technology in Malaysia Association, in cooperation with the School of Informatics, and is mailed to all alumni of the School of Informatics. For information about IUAA membership or activities, call (800) 824-3044 or e-mail iualumni

Zhou, Yaoqi

310

INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING www.soic.indiana.edu/career  

E-print Network

SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING www.soic.indiana.edu/career 2014-15 Employer Guide #12;The breadth of programs in the School of Informatics and Computing results in talented students with a range: informatics, computer science 9graduate degrees and 18tracks and specializations Master's degrees

Indiana University

311

IU School of Informatics Statement of Salary Policy  

E-print Network

IU School of Informatics Statement of Salary Policy Revised ­ 9/16/02 Salary and subsequent salary increases within the IU School of Informatics are important factors in rewarding and retaining productive and endorsed at least annually by the IU School of Informatics faculty council. #12;

Zhou, Yaoqi

312

Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services  

E-print Network

Imaging Informatics: Essential Tools for the Delivery of Imaging Services David S. Mendelson, MD informatics tools and developments can help the radiologist respond to the drive for safety, quality and imaging technologies. Our future as a specialty is dependent on integrating these informatics solutions

Rubin, Daniel L.

313

Department of Informatics at the Technische Universitt Mnchen  

E-print Network

Department of Informatics at the Technische Universität München Technische Universität München #12 of Rome). Thus the symbol of the Munich Department of Informatics points to the earliest history of civiliza- tion. It shows the number 1967, the year in which the informatics was founded at the Technische

Cengarle, María Victoria

314

Major Map: Informatics Bachelor of Science (B.S.)  

E-print Network

Major Map: Informatics ­ Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering | Catalog up to Term 1, or any deficiency courses can be added) # CPI 101: Intro to Informatics (CS) 3 Grade of C # CPI 200: Mathematical Foundations of Informatics (MA) 3 Grade of C ENG 101 or 102: First

Reisslein, Martin

315

Creating Informatics Olympiad Tasks: Exploring the Black Art  

E-print Network

Creating Informatics Olympiad Tasks: Exploring the Black Art Benjamin A. BURTON Department-archived version Available from http://www.maths.uq.edu.au/~bab/papers/ Abstract. Each year a wealth of informatics can use to find new ideas for tasks and refine these ideas into problems suitable for an informatics

Burton, Benjamin

316

Informatics Olympiads: Challenges in Programming and Algorithm Design  

E-print Network

Informatics Olympiads: Challenges in Programming and Algorithm Design Benjamin A. Burton Department in Informatics is a world- wide contest for high school students, with a strong focus on creativity and ingenuity involved. 1 Introduction The International Olympiad in Informatics (IOI) is a prestigious international

Burton, Benjamin

317

"Intersecting Informatics, Data Intensive Science and Networks of  

E-print Network

"Intersecting Informatics, Data Intensive Science and Networks of S i " Frontiers in Computational. There are many familiar informatics functions that enable the conduct of science (by specialists or non is an increasingly 'networked' aspect to scientific research. Even with current informatics infrastructure

Li, Dongsheng

318

Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics  

E-print Network

1 1 Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics Using multiple alignment as a tool-BLAST to identify domain boundaries #12;2 3 Bioe 144/244 Introduction to Protein Informatics Reading · Thompson of individual positions in molecules. Foundational material for all aspects of protein informatics. · Geoffrey

Sjölander, Kimmen

319

www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computers are Becoming a Necessary  

E-print Network

www.informatics.uiuc.edu 1 Computers are Becoming a Necessary Extension of our Brain Extend our physical capabilities And it has just started #12;www.informatics.uiuc.edu Computing & Information Science & Engineering Order, Family or Genus? 2 SE CE CS IS IT MIS LIS X-Informatics X= astro, bio, business, chem

Snir, Marc

320

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair Medical Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics Schulich School of Medicine intensive universities, seeks applicants for a Tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Medical Health Informatics, and the potential to achieve international recognition in the field of medical health informatics within the next

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

321

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen  

E-print Network

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen LSA ­ Algorithms Ph.D.-student Lasse Lohilahti Mølgaard #12;Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent interpretation ­ Results in retrieval Demos ­ Castsearch ­ Wikipedia #12;Informatics and Mathematical Modelling

322

IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy  

E-print Network

IU School of Informatics Third Year Review Policy Revised ­ 9/16/02 Tenure-track candidates in the IU School of Informatics shall undergo a more comprehensive annual review process in the third year reviews to these materials and forward the packet to the IU School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure

Zhou, Yaoqi

323

Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics  

E-print Network

Capstone Project and Graduation Requirements Master of Health Informatics A Capstone Project is one of the requirements of the MS in Health Informatics degree at IUPUI. By the end of the first year the student in the School of Informatics. The student may select to have a partner/sponsor from outside of the department

Zhou, Yaoqi

324

Informatics: The Driving Force for Economy and Science  

E-print Network

Informatics: The Driving Force for Economy and Science In the era of information society, none. Therefore, qualified experts are urgently needed. The Master's program in Informatics is research, further information: www.in.tum.de/Application_MSc_Informatics Costs per Semester (currently): 42

Cengarle, María Victoria

325

A mathematician reflecting on the International Olympiad in Informatics  

E-print Network

A mathematician reflecting on the International Olympiad in Informatics Benjamin A. Burton Author in Informatics (IOI). On the surface the IOI is a computer programming competition, but in fact it involves Olympiad in Informatics (IOI) is one of the five broad-brush Science Olympiads for high school students

Burton, Benjamin

326

Informatics software for the ecologist's toolbox: A basic example  

E-print Network

Informatics software for the ecologist's toolbox: A basic example J.B. Williams, N.L. Poff March 2006 Machine learning techniques for ecological applications or "eco-informatics" are becoming advanced, so has analytical technology. Informatics approaches, such as Artificial Neural Networks

Poff, N. LeRoy

327

Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001  

E-print Network

Review Paper 83Yearbook of Medical Informatics 2001 Review What is bioinformatics? An introduction,particularlywithreferencetotranscription regulatory systems. (Molecular) bio ­ informatics: bioinformatics is conceptualising biology in terms of molecules (in the sense of physical chemistry) and applying "informatics techniques" (derived from

Gerstein, Mark

328

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

Journal of Health Informatics Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 2 scientific evidence for this perception is lacking1 electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net 2010; Vol 6, No 1 (2011): e4 The electronic Journal of Health Informatics is an international journal committed to scholarly excellence

Yu, Ping

329

85CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to  

E-print Network

85CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Cancer Informatics Supplementary Issue: Network and Pathway Analysis sets. Cancer Informatics 2014:13(s5) 85­88 doi: 10.4137/CIn.s14064. RECEIvED: June 29, 2014. RESUb

Yu, Haiyuan

330

Earth Science Informatics Comes of Age  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The volume and complexity of Earth science data have steadily increased, placing ever-greater demands on researchers, software developers and data managers tasked with handling such data. Additional demands arise from requirements being levied by funding agencies and governments to better manage, preserve and provide open access to data. Fortunately, over the past 10-15 years significant advances in information technology, such as increased processing power, advanced programming languages, more sophisticated and practical standards, and near-ubiquitous internet access have made the jobs of those acquiring, processing, distributing and archiving data easier. These advances have also led to an increasing number of individuals entering the field of informatics as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also encompasses the use of computers and computational methods to support decisionmaking and other applications for societal benefits.

Jodha, Siri; Khalsa, S.; Ramachandran, Rahul

2014-01-01

331

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 359372 359 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 359­372 359 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Turtle's Navigation and Manipulation of Geometrical Figures Constructed by Variable Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 359

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

332

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 373384 373 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 373­384 373 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Student-Centered Support Systems to Sustain Logo-Like Learning Sylvia MARTINEZ Generation professional development. hal-00588793,version1-26Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

333

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 255268 255 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 255­268 255 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Investigation of Q-Learning in the Context of a Virtual Learning Environment Dalia manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 6, No. 2 (2007) 255-268" #12;256 D

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

334

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 316 3 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 3­16 3 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Future Quality in the Emergent European Higher Education Area Involves the Use of Informatics Javier BILBAO, Eugenio BRAVO, Olatz GARCÍA, Concepción VARELA, Miguel RODRÍGUEZ, Purificación

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 269282 269 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2007, Vol. 6, No. 2, 269­282 269 © 2007 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Design and Implementation of a Logo-based Computer Graphics Course Pavel BOYTCHEV Dept. of Information Technologies, Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics, Sofia University 5, James Bouchier, Sofia

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 241256 241 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 241­256 241 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius The Cognitive Transfer and the Tutor's Role in a CBL Environment Athanasis KAROULIS, Andreas POMBORTSIS Dept. of Informatics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki PO Box 888, 54006

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

337

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 7590 75 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 75­90 75 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Mathematical Logic and Deduction in Computer Science Education Hashim HABIBALLA in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 7, No. 1 (2008) 75-90" #12;76 H. Habiballa, T. Kmet

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 105126 105 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 105­126 105 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Exploring Individual and Collaborative Dimensions of Knowledge Building in an Online, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 7, No. 1 (2008) 105-126" #12;106 L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 127140 127 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2004, Vol. 3, No. 1, 127­140 127 2004 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Towards Building an Open Digital Library for Instructional Design that Facilitates Reflective e-Instruction Mihaela-Monica VLADOIU Department of Informatics, Petroleum-Gas University

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 207218 207 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 207­218 207 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Promoting Different Kinds of Learners towards Active Learning in the Web hal-00588801,version1-26Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 161180 161 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 161­180 161 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Intelligent Agents for Distance Learning Analía AMANDI, Marcelo CAMPO , Marcelo ARMENTANO, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 2, No. 2 (2003) 161-180" #12;162 A. Amandi, M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 223240 223 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 223­240 223 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius An Experience Applying Reinforcement Learning in a Web-Based Adaptive and Intelligent the student with most suitable hal-00588795,version1-26Apr2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 91104 91 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 91­104 91 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Information Technologies for Biology Education: Computerized Electrophysiology of Plant but application of computational and analytical methods of informatics in it is still a prob- lem for many

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 127142 127 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2008, Vol. 7, No. 1, 127­142 127 © 2008 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Students Learning Experience in the Integrated Information Literacy Course Constructed-00588773,version1-10May2011 Author manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

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Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 291316 291 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2003, Vol. 2, No. 2, 291­316 291 2003 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius Learning Objects Need Badly Instructional Digital Libraries Support Mihaela-Monica VLADOIU Department of Informatics, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiesti Bd. Bucuresti 39, Ploiesti

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 255264 255 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius  

E-print Network

Informatics in Education, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 2, 255­264 255 2006 Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Vilnius JeCo: Combining Program Visualization and Story Weaving Niko MYLLER Jussi NUUTINEN manuscript, published in "Informatics in Education - International Journal 5, No. 2 (2006) 267-276" #12;256 N

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

347

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to  

E-print Network

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Cancer Informatics Supplementary Issue: Network and Pathway Analysis of Cancer Susceptibility (A) Introduction Cellular signaling generates a chain of protein

Geman, Donald

348

Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical InformaticsInformatics  

E-print Network

ICS 313 1 Artificial Intelligence in BiomedicalArtificial Intelligence in Biomedical Informatics Systems Outline and Objectives Describe basic concepts in artificial intelligence Understand is Artificial Intelligence (AI)? Goals of AI systems fall into four categories: Thinking humanly Thinking

Reed, Nancy E.

349

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much research has shown the benefits of additional anatomical learning and dissection beyond the first year of medical school human gross anatomy, all the way through postgraduate medical training. We have developed an interactive method for teaching eye and orbit anatomy to medical students in their ophthalmology rotation at Duke University…

Kivell, Tracy L.; Doyle, Sara K.; Madden, Richard H.; Mitchell, Terry L.; Sims, Ershela L.

2009-01-01

350

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of medical informatics in telemedicine is dependent on using the power of the computerized database to not only feed patient specific information to the health care providers, but to use the epidemiological and statistical information in the data base to improve decision making and ultimately care. The computer is also a powerful tool to facilitate standardizing and monitoring

Terry P. Clemmer

1995-01-01

351

Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging

Vimla L Patel; David R Kaufman

1998-01-01

352

Informatics challenges of high-throughput microscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we discussed the emerging informatics issues of high-throughput screening (HTS) using automated fluorescence microscopy technology, otherwise known as high-content screening (HCS) in the pharmaceutical industry. Optimal methods of scoring biomarkers and identifying candidate hits have been actively studied in academia and industry, with the exception of data modeling topics. To find candidate hits, we need to score

Xiaobo Zhou; Stephen T. C. Wong

2006-01-01

353

Medical informatics and telemedicine: A vision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of medical informatics is to improve care. This requires the commitment and harmonious collaboration between the computer scientists and clinicians and an integrated database. The vision described is how medical information systems are going to impact the way medical care is delivered in the future.

Clemmer, Terry P.

1991-01-01

354

Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM)  

Cancer.gov

May 15, 2008 12:00 AM - May 18, 2008 12:00 AM Washington State Convention and Trade Center Seattle, WA + Add to Outlook Calendar 2008 Annual Meeting Print This Page Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) News & Events

355

Page 1 of 3 Medical Informatics  

E-print Network

approach. Standard-based Data and Service Interoperability in eHealth Systems K. Sartipi and M.H. Yarmand in standard-based interoperability provision among legacy healthcare information systems, while adheringPage 1 of 3 Medical Informatics A Framework for Data and Mined Knowledge Interoperability

Sartipi, Kamran

356

Rey Koslowski Political Science and Informatics  

E-print Network

Rey Koslowski Political Science and Informatics Sponsor: John D. and Catherine T. Mac of Immigration Reform: U.S., Mexico and Beyond The proposed policy research project examines the politics play in political and policymaking processes as well as the interaction effects of reform movements

Linsley, Braddock K.

357

Bioimage Informatics Cellular and Systems Modeling  

E-print Network

· Research program combining the strengths of the internationally renowned computational and biomedical, and related areas · A seminar series, journal club, and research ethics COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY www· Bioimage Informatics · Cellular and Systems Modeling · Computational Genomics · Computational

Benos, Takis

358

Informatics and Standards for Nanomedicine Technology  

PubMed Central

There are several issues to be addressed concerning the management and effective use of information (or data), generated from nanotechnology studies in biomedical research and medicine. These data are large in volume, diverse in content, and are beset with gaps and ambiguities in the description and characterization of nanomaterials. In this work, we have reviewed three areas of nanomedicine informatics: information resources; taxonomies, controlled vocabularies, and ontologies; and information standards. Informatics methods and standards in each of these areas are critical for enabling collaboration, data sharing, unambiguous representation and interpretation of data, semantic (meaningful) search and integration of data; and for ensuring data quality, reliability, and reproducibility. In particular, we have considered four types of information standards in this review, which are standard characterization protocols, common terminology standards, minimum information standards, and standard data communication (exchange) formats. Currently, due to gaps and ambiguities in the data, it is also difficult to apply computational methods and machine learning techniques to analyze, interpret and recognize patterns in data that are high dimensional in nature, and also to relate variations in nanomaterial properties to variations in their chemical composition, synthesis, characterization protocols, etc. Progress towards resolving the issues of information management in nanomedicine using informatics methods and standards discussed in this review will be essential to the rapidly growing field of nanomedicine informatics. PMID:21721140

Thomas, Dennis G.; Klaessig, Fred; Harper, Stacey L.; Fritts, Martin; Hoover, Mark D.; Gaheen, Sharon; Stokes, Todd H.; Reznik-Zellen, Rebecca; Freund, Elaine T.; Klemm, Juli D.; Paik, David S.; Baker, Nathan A.

2011-01-01

359

Bachelor of InformatIon technology (BIt)  

E-print Network

Bachelor of InformatIon technology (BIt) InteractIve multImedIa and desIgn Portfolio requirements When you apply to the Interactive Multimedia and Design Program, you will be required to submit Technology (IMD) Carleton University 230 Azrieli Pavilion 1125 Colonel By Drive Ottawa ON K1S 5B6 Canada

Dawson, Jeff W.

360

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF OSLO Department of Informatics Components, Objects, and Contracts Research Report No for distributed services. 1 #12;Whence the central role of interfaces as an abstraction mechanism for hiding internal details. The interface description is the basis for composition both from a theoretical point

Steffen, Martin

361

Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)  

SciTech Connect

The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

2003-03-06

362

On the Informatics Laws of Software  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fundamental finding in computer science is that software, as an artifact of human creativity, is not constrained by the laws and principles discovered in the physical world. Thus, a natural question we have to ask is: What are the constraints that software obeys? This paper attempts to demonstrate that software obeys the laws of informatics, because software is a

Yingxu Wang

2002-01-01

363

The Theoretical Framework of Cognitive Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Cognitive Informatics (CI) is a transdisciplinary enquiry of the internal information processing mechanisms and processes of the brain and natural intelligence shared by almost all science and engineering disciplines. This article presents an intensive review of the new field of CI. The structure of the theoretical framework of CI is described encompassing the Layered Reference Model of the Brain

Yingxu Wang

2007-01-01

364

Cognitive informatics models of the brain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The human brain is the most complicated organ in the universe and a new frontier yet to be explored by an interdisciplinary approach. This paper attempts to develop logical and cognitive models of the brain by using cognitive informatics and formal methodologies. This paper adopts a memory-based approach to explore the brain and to demonstrate that memory is the foundation

Yingxu Wang; Ying Wang

2006-01-01

365

The Future of Informatics Tom Davenport  

E-print Network

Informatics/Analytics on Small and Big Data It works for: · Old companies (GE, P&G, Marriott, Bank of America is this happening?" "What actions are needed?" "What exactly is the problem?" "How many, how often, where?" "What Google -- Page rank, advertising, HR Ebay-- How customers buy 7 #12;The Rise of "Big Data" What is it

Raja, Anita

366

Sofia University Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics  

E-print Network

Recognition and Morphological Classification of Unknown Words for German Preslav Nakov, fn42408, Informatics for Parallel Processing, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences Sofia July 2001 #12;2 Abstract A system for recognition and morphological classification of unknown words for German is described. The System takes raw text as input

Hearst, Marti

367

RemoteSensingandGIS Forest Informatics  

E-print Network

21 RemoteSensingandGIS Forest Informatics Remote Sensing Spatial Analysis New Forest Inventory. Soft- ware developed by the department is updated to include all forestry vehi- cles and systems and additional data regarding timber quality. The first project is an ongoing development of hardware

Geldenhuys, Jaco

368

Cardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics  

E-print Network

­ Computing and Computing with IT Management 16 Professional Placement 18 Postgraduate Student Support for learning resources and environment and we are seeing increasing international interest from studentsCardiff School of Computer Science & Informatics Postgraduate Programmes www.cs.cardiff.ac.uk #12

Martin, Ralph R.

369

Center for Molecular and Biomolecular Informatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Centre for Molecular and Biomolecular Informatics is the Dutch national centre for computational molecular sciences. The CMBI is strongly committed to a series of educational projects, ranging from high school to postgraduate courses and from local university student courses to international workshops.

370

Point-of-care clinical documentation: assessment of a bladder cancer informatics tool (eCancerCareBladder): a randomized controlled study of efficacy, efficiency and user friendliness compared with standard electronic medical records  

PubMed Central

Objective To compare the use of structured reporting software and the standard electronic medical records (EMR) in the management of patients with bladder cancer. The use of a human factors laboratory to study management of disease using simulated clinical scenarios was also assessed. Design eCancerCareBladder and the EMR were used to retrieve data and produce clinical reports. Twelve participants (four attending staff, four fellows, and four residents) used either eCancerCareBladder or the EMR in two clinical scenarios simulating cystoscopy surveillance visits for bladder cancer follow-up. Measurements Time to retrieve and quality of review of the patient history; time to produce and completeness of a cystoscopy report. Finally, participants provided a global assessment of their computer literacy, familiarity with the two systems, and system preference. Results eCancerCareBladder was faster for data retrieval (scenario 1: 146?s vs 245?s, p=0.019; scenario 2: 306 vs 415?s, NS), but non-significantly slower to generate a clinical report. The quality of the report was better in the eCancerCareBladder system (scenario 1: p<0.001; scenario 2: p=0.11). User satisfaction was higher with the eCancerCareBladder system, and 11/12 participants preferred to use this system. Limitations The small sample size affected the power of our study to detect differences. Conclusions Use of a specific data management tool does not appear to significantly reduce user time, but the results suggest improvement in the level of care and documentation and preference by users. Also, the use of simulated scenarios in a laboratory setting appears to be a valid method for comparing the usability of clinical software. PMID:21816957

Bostrom, Peter J; Toren, Paul J; Xi, Hao; Chow, Raymond; Truong, Tran; Liu, Justin; Lane, Kelly; Legere, Laura; Chagpar, Anjum; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E; Grober, Ethan D

2011-01-01

371

Teaching Languages, Teaching Cultures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of papers examines what it means to teach culture as an integrated part of language from both the language learner's and the language teacher's perspectives. The 11 papers include the following: "Teaching Cultures as an Integrated Part of Language: Implications for the Aims, Approaches and Pedagogies of Language Teaching" (Chantal…

Liddicoat, Anthony J., Ed.; Crozet, Chantal, Ed.

372

The role of informatics and decision support in utilization management.  

PubMed

Information systems provide a critical link between clinical laboratories and the clinicians and patients they serve. Strategic deployment of informatics resources can enable a wide array of utilization initiatives and can substantially improve the appropriateness of test selection and results interpretation. In this article, we review information systems including computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, laboratory information systems (LISs), electronic health records (EHRs), laboratory middleware, knowledge management systems and systems for data extraction and analysis, and describe the role that each can play in utilization management. We also discuss specific utilization strategies that laboratories can employ within these systems, citing examples both from our own institution and from the literature. Finally, we review how emerging applications of decision support technologies may help to further refine test utilization, "personalize" laboratory diagnosis, and enhance the diagnostic value of laboratory testing. PMID:24084507

Baron, Jason M; Dighe, Anand S

2014-01-01

373

In vitro antibacterial activity of ceftobiprole against clinical isolates from French teaching hospitals: proposition of zone diameter breakpoints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of this study were to determine the in vitro activity profile of ceftobiprole, a pyrrolidinone cephalosporin, against a large number of bacterial pathogens and to propose zone diameter breakpoints for clinical categorisation according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints. MICs of ceftobiprole were determined by broth microdilution against 1548 clinical

C. Lascols; P. Legrand; A. Mérens; R. Leclercq; C. Muller-Serieys; H. B. Drugeon; M. D. Kitzis; M. E. Reverdy; M. Roussel-Delvallez; C. Moubareck; S. Brémont; A. Miara; M. Gjoklaj; C.-J. Soussy

2011-01-01

374

Translational bioinformatics and healthcare informatics: computational and ethical challenges.  

PubMed

Exponentially growing biological and bioinformatics data sets present a challenge and an opportunity for researchers to contribute to the understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypes. Due to breakthroughs in microarray technology, it is possible to simultaneously monitor the expressions of thousands of genes, and it is imperative that researchers have access to the clinical data to understand the genetics and proteomics of the diseased tissue. This technology could be a landmark in personalized medicine, which will provide storage for clinical and genetic data in electronic health records (EHRs). In this paper, we explore the computational and ethical challenges that emanate from the intersection of bioinformatics and healthcare informatics research. We describe the current situation of the EHR and its capabilities to store clinical and genetic data and then discuss the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. Finally, we posit that the synergy obtained from the collaborative efforts between the genomics, clinical, and healthcare disciplines has potential to enhance and promote faster and more advanced breakthroughs in healthcare. PMID:20169020

Sethi, Prerna; Theodos, Kimberly

2009-01-01

375

VISION FOR THE IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS Informatics studies the application of Information Technology to the arts,sciences and professions. The Indiana  

E-print Network

VISION FOR THE IU SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS DRAFT Informatics studies the application of Information Technology to the arts,sciences and professions. The Indiana University School of Informatics has set as its in Informatics programs, including undergraduate and graduate education, research, placement and outreach. Our

Zhou, Yaoqi

376

From classroom teaching to clinical practice: experiences of senior dental students regarding the shortened dental arch concept.  

PubMed

This study explored the barriers to a meaningful translation of didactic classroom instruction to clinical practice, using the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept as a case study. A combination of survey and individual and group interviews (a mixed-methods approach) was used to collect data related to the SDA. The cohort consisted of senior dental students and their clinical teachers at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa. The response rates were 100 percent for the students (n=73) and 78 percent for the clinical teachers (n=16). Triangulation was employed to eliminate bias and strengthen the reliability of the research. In the quantitative analysis, most students (81 percent) reported having heard about the SDA concept at the university, but their responses revealed an absence of clinical implementation. The students agreed that patients can function adequately with an SDA and agreed with presenting it as a treatment option to patients. In the qualitative analysis, a "change in the clinical requirements," "being empowered by exposing them to SDA literature," and "change in health policies" were recommended measures to increase implementation of the SDA approach clinically. The students were positive about the SDA as a treatment option, but the lack of adequate knowledge and encouragement in clinical implementation was a hindrance to its use. PMID:24882776

Khan, Saadika B; Chikte, Usuf M E; Omar, Ridwaan

2014-06-01

377

Biomedical and health informatics education at UMIT - approaches and strategies at a newly founded university  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA, http:\\/\\/www.IMIA.org) on education in health and medical informatics and on experiences in founding a new school, the University for Health Informatics and Technology Tyrol (UMIT, http:\\/\\/www.UMIT.at), at Innsbruck, Austria, questions on education in health informatics, medical informatics, and biomedical informatics are discussed.Suggestions are made on (1) appropriate approaches for

Reinhold Haux

2004-01-01

378

Chief nurse executives need contemporary informatics competencies.  

PubMed

Using the Informatics Organizing Research Model (Effken, 2003) to add context to the information gleaned from ethnographic interviews of seven chief nurse executives (CNEs) currently leading integrated delivery systems, the author concluded nurse executives can no longer depend exclusively on American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE) competencies as they outsource their responsibility for information technology knowledge to nurse informaticians, chief information officers, and physicians. Although AONE sets out a specific list of recommended information technology competencies for system CNEs, innovative nursing practice demands a more strategic, broader level of knowledge. This broader competency centers on the reality of CNEs being charged with creating and implementing a patient-centered vision that drives health care organizations' investment in technology. A new study identifies and validates the gaps between selected CNEs' self-identified informatics competencies and those set out by AONE (Simpson, 2012). PMID:24592532

Simpson, Roy L

2013-01-01

379

Open source bioimage informatics for cell biology  

PubMed Central

Significant technical advances in imaging, molecular biology and genomics have fueled a revolution in cell biology, in that the molecular and structural processes of the cell are now visualized and measured routinely. Driving much of this recent development has been the advent of computational tools for the acquisition, visualization, analysis and dissemination of these datasets. These tools collectively make up a new subfield of computational biology called bioimage informatics, which is facilitated by open source approaches. We discuss why open source tools for image informatics in cell biology are needed, some of the key general attributes of what make an open source imaging application successful, and point to opportunities for further operability that should greatly accelerate future cell biology discovery. PMID:19833518

Swedlow, Jason R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

2009-01-01

380

An Interactive Method for Teaching Anatomy of the Human Eye for Medical Students in Ophthalmology Clinical Rotations  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the inclusion and advantage of dissection in clinical rotations during medical school. Specifically, this study demonstrates the benefits of eye dissection in an ophthalmology rotation in post graduate medical training.

2009-07-27

381

Evaluation: salvation or nemesis of medical informatics?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The currently prevailing paradigms of evaluation in medical\\/health informatics are reviewed. Some problems with application of the objectivist approach to the evaluation of real—rather than simulated—(health) information systems are identified. The rigorous application of the objectivist approach, which was developed for laboratory experiments, is difficult to adapt to the evaluation of information systems in a practical real-world environment because such

Jochen R. Moehr

2002-01-01

382

GIMI: Generic Infrastructure for Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breakthroughs in medical informatics have yielded a wealth of data across all aspects of patient care. One of the fundamental goals of e-Science should be facilitate the appropriate use of such data to improve patient care: both in the short-term and the long-term. Developments in Grid technology have brought about the promise of such data being used to, for example,

Andrew C. Simpson; David J. Power; Mark Slaymaker; Eugenia A. Politou

2005-01-01

383

From Terrorism Informatics to Dark Web Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this paper, we provide an overview of “Terrorism Informatics,” a new discipline that aims to study the terrorism phenomena\\u000a with a data-driven, quantitative, and computational approach. We first summarize several critical books that lay the foundation\\u000a for studying terrorism in the new Internet era. We then review important terrorism research centers and resources that are\\u000a of relevance to our

Hsinchun Chen

384

Knowledge, Skills, and Resources for Pharmacy Informatics Education  

PubMed Central

Pharmacy has an established history of technology use to support business processes. Pharmacy informatics education within doctor of pharmacy programs, however, is inconsistent, despite its inclusion as a requirement in the 2007 Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education Standards and Guidelines. This manuscript describes pharmacy informatics knowledge and skills that all graduating pharmacy students should possess, conceptualized within the framework of the medication use process. Additionally, we suggest core source materials and specific learning activities to support pharmacy informatics education. We conclude with a brief discussion of emerging changes in the practice model. These changes are facilitated by pharmacy informatics and will inevitably become commonplace in our graduates’ practice environment. PMID:21829267

Fox, Brent I.; Flynn, Allen J.; Fortier, Christopher R.; Clauson, Kevin A.

2011-01-01

385

ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in  

E-print Network

://amiil.engineering.asu.edu/ 4 #12;Imagenomics for Characterizing Invading Cancer Cell Genomic Diversity 5 Collaborative · Understand genetic basis of invasive behavior · New biomarkers correlated with invasive severity texture analysis extracts spatial information from image pixels at fine-to-coarse scales and quantifies

Li, Jing

386

Developing entry-to-practice nursing informatics competencies for registered nurses.  

PubMed

Information and communication technologies (ICT) have brought about significant changes to the processes of health care delivery and changed how nurses perform in clinical, administrative, academic, and research settings. Because the potential benefits of ICT are significant, it is critical that new nurses have the knowledge and skills in informatics to provide safe and effective care. Despite the prevalence of technology in our day to day lives, and the potential significant benefits to patients, new nurses may not be prepared to work in this evolving reality. An important step in addressing this need for ICT preparation is to ensure that new graduates are entering the work force ready for technology-enabled care environments. In this paper, we describe the process and outcomes of developing informatics entry-to-practice competencies for adoption by Canadian Schools of Nursing. PMID:24943567

Nagle, Lynn M; Crosby, Kristine; Frisch, Noreen; Borycki, Elizabeth; Donelle, Lorie; Hannah, Kathryn; Harris, Alexandra; Jetté, Sylvie; Shaben, Tracy

2014-01-01

387

Big Data and Biomedical Informatics: A Challenging Opportunity  

PubMed Central

Summary Big data are receiving an increasing attention in biomedicine and healthcare. It is therefore important to understand the reason why big data are assuming a crucial role for the biomedical informatics community. The capability of handling big data is becoming an enabler to carry out unprecedented research studies and to implement new models of healthcare delivery. Therefore, it is first necessary to deeply understand the four elements that constitute big data, namely Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity, and their meaning in practice. Then, it is mandatory to understand where big data are present, and where they can be beneficially collected. There are research fields, such as translational bioinformatics, which need to rely on big data technologies to withstand the shock wave of data that is generated every day. Other areas, ranging from epidemiology to clinical care, can benefit from the exploitation of the large amounts of data that are nowadays available, from personal monitoring to primary care. However, building big data-enabled systems carries on relevant implications in terms of reproducibility of research studies and management of privacy and data access; proper actions should be taken to deal with these issues. An interesting consequence of the big data scenario is the availability of new software, methods, and tools, such as map-reduce, cloud computing, and concept drift machine learning algorithms, which will not only contribute to big data research, but may be beneficial in many biomedical informatics applications. The way forward with the big data opportunity will require properly applied engineering principles to design studies and applications, to avoid preconceptions or over-enthusiasms, to fully exploit the available technologies, and to improve data processing and data management regulations. PMID:24853034

2014-01-01

388

Big data and biomedical informatics: a challenging opportunity.  

PubMed

Big data are receiving an increasing attention in biomedicine and healthcare. It is therefore important to understand the reason why big data are assuming a crucial role for the biomedical informatics community. The capability of handling big data is becoming an enabler to carry out unprecedented research studies and to implement new models of healthcare delivery. Therefore, it is first necessary to deeply understand the four elements that constitute big data, namely Volume, Variety, Velocity, and Veracity, and their meaning in practice. Then, it is mandatory to understand where big data are present, and where they can be beneficially collected. There are research fields, such as translational bioinformatics, which need to rely on big data technologies to withstand the shock wave of data that is generated every day. Other areas, ranging from epidemiology to clinical care, can benefit from the exploitation of the large amounts of data that are nowadays available, from personal monitoring to primary care. However, building big data-enabled systems carries on relevant implications in terms of reproducibility of research studies and management of privacy and data access; proper actions should be taken to deal with these issues. An interesting consequence of the big data scenario is the availability of new software, methods, and tools, such as map-reduce, cloud computing, and concept drift machine learning algorithms, which will not only contribute to big data research, but may be beneficial in many biomedical informatics applications. The way forward with the big data opportunity will require properly applied engineering principles to design studies and applications, to avoid preconceptions or over-enthusiasms, to fully exploit the available technologies, and to improve data processing and data management regulations. PMID:24853034

Bellazzi, R

2014-01-01

389

A Step Forward in Teaching Addiction Counselors How to Supervise Motivational Interviewing Using a Clinical Trials Training Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A clinical trials training approach to supervision is a promising and empirically supported method for preparing addiction counselors to implement evidence-based behavioral treatments in community treatment programs. This supervision approach has three main components: (1) direct observation of treatment sessions; (2) structured performance…

Martino, Steve; Gallon, Steve; Ball, Samuel A.; Carroll, Kathleen M.

2007-01-01

390

Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics.  

PubMed

This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics will be critical to assuring their success as leaders in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:24860688

Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T; Becich, Michael J

2014-01-01

391

Creating a pipeline of talent for informatics: STEM initiative for high school students in computer science, biology, and biomedical informatics  

PubMed Central

This editorial provides insights into how informatics can attract highly trained students by involving them in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) training at the high school level and continuing to provide mentorship and research opportunities through the formative years of their education. Our central premise is that the trajectory necessary to be expert in the emergent fields in front of them requires acceleration at an early time point. Both pathology (and biomedical) informatics are new disciplines which would benefit from involvement by students at an early stage of their education. In 2009, Michael T Lotze MD, Kirsten Livesey (then a medical student, now a medical resident at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)), Richard Hersheberger, PhD (Currently, Dean at Roswell Park), and Megan Seippel, MS (the administrator) launched the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI) Summer Academy to bring high school students for an 8 week summer academy focused on Cancer Biology. Initially, pathology and biomedical informatics were involved only in the classroom component of the UPCI Summer Academy. In 2011, due to popular interest, an informatics track called Computer Science, Biology and Biomedical Informatics (CoSBBI) was launched. CoSBBI currently acts as a feeder program for the undergraduate degree program in bioinformatics at the University of Pittsburgh, which is a joint degree offered by the Departments of Biology and Computer Science. We believe training in bioinformatics is the best foundation for students interested in future careers in pathology informatics or biomedical informatics. We describe our approach to the recruitment, training and research mentoring of high school students to create a pipeline of exceptionally well-trained applicants for both the disciplines of pathology informatics and biomedical informatics. We emphasize here how mentoring of high school students in pathology informatics and biomedical informatics will be critical to assuring their success as leaders in the era of big data and personalized medicine. PMID:24860688

Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Lotze, Michael T.; Becich, Michael J.

2014-01-01

392

Perspectives on Information Science and Health Informatics Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theoretical discussion of what information science can contribute to the health professions addresses questions of definition and describes application and knowledge models for the emerging profession of informatics. A review of existing programs includes curriculum models and provides details on informatics programs emphasizing information…

Lunin, Lois F., Ed.; Ball, Marion J., Ed.

1989-01-01

393

Consumer Health Informatics: Health Information Technology for Consumers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains consumer health informatics and describes the technology advances, the computer programs that are currently available, and the basic research that addresses both the effectiveness of computer health informatics and its impact on the future direction of health care. Highlights include commercial computer products for consumers and…

Jimison, Holly Brugge; Sher, Paul Phillip

1995-01-01

394

Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach geospatial technology activities  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Biological Informatics and Outreach (OBIO) in Reston, Virginia, and its Center for Biological Informatics (CBI) in Denver, Colorado, provide leadership in the development and use of geospatial technologies to advance the Nation's biological science activities.

U.S. Geological Survey

1998-01-01

395

Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich  

E-print Network

Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

396

A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract The Collaboratory for Multi - scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics - based approach to synthesizing multi - scale information to support a systems - based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research An open source multi - scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to

James D. Myers; Thomas C. Allison; Sandra Bittner; Brett T. Didier; Michael Frenklach; William H. Green Jr.; Yen-ling Ho; John C. Hewson; Wendy S. Koegler; Carina S. Lansing; David Leahy; Michael Lee; Renata Mccoy; Michael Minkoff; Sandeep Nijsure; Gregor Von Laszewski; David W. Montoya; Carmen M. Pancerella; Reinhardt Pinzon; William Pitz; Larry A. Rahn; Branko Ruscic; Karen L. Schuchardt; Eric G. Stephan; Albert F. Wagner; Theresa L. Windus; Christine L. Yang

2004-01-01

397

Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality  

Microsoft Academic Search

The track entitled “Consumer Informatics Supporting Patients as Co-Producers of Quality” at the AMIA Spring 2000 Congress was devoted to examining the new field of consumer health informatics. This area is developing rapidly, as worldwide changes are occurring in the organization and delivery of health care and in the traditional roles of patient and provider. This paper describes the key

Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan

2001-01-01

398

electronic Journal of Health Informatics http://www.ejhi.net  

E-print Network

in Australian Aged Care Homes Ning Wang1 , Ping Yu1 , David Hailey1 , Deborah Oxlade2 1 Health Informatics Research Laboratory, Faculty of Informatics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia 2 RSL Care, Australia documentation in residential aged care homes. Methods: Three information sources were reviewed to explore

Yu, Ping

399

Pathology informatics fellowship training: Focus on molecular pathology  

PubMed Central

Background: Pathology informatics is both emerging as a distinct subspecialty and simultaneously becoming deeply integrated within the breadth of pathology practice. As specialists, pathology informaticians need a broad skill set, including aptitude with information fundamentals, information systems, workflow and process, and governance and management. Currently, many of those seeking training in pathology informatics additionally choose training in a second subspecialty. Combining pathology informatics training with molecular pathology is a natural extension, as molecular pathology is a subspecialty with high potential for application of modern biomedical informatics techniques. Methods and Results: Pathology informatics and molecular pathology fellows and faculty evaluated the current fellowship program's core curriculum topics and subtopics for relevance to molecular pathology. By focusing on the overlap between the two disciplines, a structured curriculum consisting of didactics, operational rotations, and research projects was developed for those fellows interested in both pathology informatics and molecular pathology. Conclusions: The scope of molecular diagnostics is expanding dramatically as technology advances and our understanding of disease extends to the genetic level. Here, we highlight many of the informatics challenges facing molecular pathology today, and outline specific informatics principles necessary for the training of future molecular pathologists. PMID:24843823

Mandelker, Diana; Lee, Roy E.; Platt, Mia Y.; Riedlinger, Gregory; Quinn, Andrew; Rao, Luigi K. F.; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Mahowald, Michael; Lane, William J.; Beckwith, Bruce A.; Baron, Jason M.; McClintock, David S.; Kuo, Frank C.; Lebo, Matthew S.; Gilbertson, John R.

2014-01-01

400

On the fuzzy use of basic terms in informatics  

E-print Network

"Gundstbegriffe" -most basic terms of informatics For the "Grundstbegriffe" ("Grundst-" is the artificial german computer science and informatics) have hitherto failed not only in German but also worldwide, has surely processing · Running of programs · Processing of customers · Sending to classes · Everything is an object

Weske, Mathias

401

Four "E"pochs: The Story of Informatization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Informatization is a term of Japanese provenance denoting major systemic change from the application of information technology. Proposes a theory of post-war informatization focusing on information services in libraries, specifically computerized information retrieval. Describes four electronic epochs: offline, online, CD-ROM, and Internet, and…

Duff, Alistair S.

2003-01-01

402

Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the  

E-print Network

Page 0 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A project funded by the National, 2005 ­ September 30, 2007 #12;Page 1 Chemical Informatics and Cyberinfrastructure Collaboratory A. Executive Summary Chemical and life science research is capable of generating terabytes of data each day

403

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen  

E-print Network

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing 1Jan Larsen Statistical framework for decision making in mine action Jan Larsen Intelligent Signal Processing Group Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Technical University of Denmark jl@imm.dtu.dk, www.imm.dtu.dk/~jl #12;Jan Larsen 2

404

In vitro antibacterial activity of doripenem against clinical isolates from French teaching hospitals: proposition of zone diameter breakpoints  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the study were to determine the in vitro activity of doripenem, a new carbapenem, against a large number of bacterial pathogens and to propose zone diameter breakpoints\\u000a for clinical categorization in France according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST)\\u000a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) breakpoints. The MICs of doripenem were determined by the broth microdilution

C. Lascols; P. Legrand; A. Mérens; R. Leclercq; L. Armand-Lefevre; H. B. Drugeon; M. D. Kitzis; C. Muller-Serieys; M. E. Reverdy; M. Roussel-Delvallez; C. Moubareck; A. Lemire; A. Miara; M. Gjoklaj; C.-J. Soussy

2011-01-01

405

Kick-Starting Health Informatics Careers – A Canadian Approach  

PubMed Central

We introduce the Applied Health Informatics Bootcamp. This is an intense, interactive on-site program, augmented by approximately 80 hours of online material. The Bootcamp is intended to introduce those with little or no knowledge of Health Informatics (HI) to the nature, key concepts, and applications of this discipline to addressing challenges in the health field. The focus of the program is on Applied Health Informatics (AHI), the discipline addressing the preparation for, and the procurement, deployment, implementation, resourcing, effective usage, and evaluation of informatics solutions in the health system. Although no program of this duration can cover all topics, we target the high profile areas of Health Informatics and point the participants in the direction of broader and deeper explorations. PMID:18693833

Fenton, Shirley; Covvey, H. Dominic

2007-01-01

406

A Postgraduate Program in Nursing Informatics  

PubMed Central

This paper describes the outline of a new one year postgraduate program in nursing informatics which started at the Hogeschool Midden Nederland in August 1989. The program is unique for Europe in its contents and duration. The rationale to start this program can be found in the issues of quality of care and cost containment and its effect on the professionalization of the nurse. Essential for this program is the desire for international cooperation with universities and colleges within the EEC and with American institutions.

Aarts, Jos

1989-01-01

407

Division of Informatics, University of Edinburgh Institute of Perception, Action and Behaviour  

E-print Network

TH E U N I V E R S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H Division of Informatics, University of Edinburgh Data by Euclidean Fitting by Petko Faber, Robert Fisher Informatics Research Report EDI-INF-RR-0146 Division of Informatics August 2002 http://www.informatics.ed.ac.uk/ #12;Estimation of General Curves

Fisher, Bob

408

Vol. 4, No. 1 Winter 200506Vol. 4, No. 1 Winter 200506 Informatics  

E-print Network

Vol. 4, No. 1 · Winter 2005­06Vol. 4, No. 1 · Winter 2005­06 LEAD Informatics Researchers Take the in Hurricane Prediction LEAD Informatics Researchers Take the in Hurricane Prediction #12;Vol. 4, No. 1 WINTER with the School of Informatics, and is mailed to all alumni of the School of Informatics. For information about

Zhou, Yaoqi

409

Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi)  

E-print Network

Juris Doctor/Master of science in HealtH inforMatics (JD/MHi) Our unique program combining legal education and health science informatics will give you a powerful advantage in the competitive environment Outcomes and People's Lives NKU CHase Law + INfOrMaTICs INsTITUTe NKU COLLege Of INfOrMaTICs Northern

Acosta, Charles A.

410

Introducing informatics concepts through a contest Valentina Dagiene, dagiene@ktl.mii.lt  

E-print Network

1 Introducing informatics concepts through a contest Valentina Dagiene, dagiene@ktl.mii.lt Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, Akademijos str. 4, LT-08663 Vilnius, Lithuania Gerald Futschek Concepts of informatics play a central role in all curricula and standards for informatics education

411

Breastfeeding policy and practices at the general paediatric outpatient clinic of a teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Hospitals have a role to play in supporting, protecting and promoting breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to describe hospital breastfeeding policy and practices and breastfeeding rates among mothers attending General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic at a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional study involving paediatric nurses and doctors, as well as the mothers who brought their child to the General Paediatric Outpatient Clinic. Two sets of questionnaires, different in content, were administered to doctors and nurses, and to mothers of children aged 6-24 months, to assess hospital policy and breastfeeding rates, respectively. Stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with duration of breastfeeding. Results Although the hospital had a written breastfeeding policy copies of the policy were not clearly displayed in any of the units in the Paediatric department. Almost half the staff (48%; 60/125) were not aware of the policy. The hospital had no breastfeeding support group. Nearly three quarters (92/125) of the staff had received lactation management training. 36% (112/311) of mothers exclusively breastfed for six months, 42% (129/311) had stopped breastfeeding at the time of the survey. 67% (207/311) of babies were given infant formula, 85% (175/207) before 6 months. Women who had antenatal care in private hospitals and were Christian were more likely to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months. Low maternal education was the only factor associated with breastfeeding longer than 12 months. Conclusion Breastfeeding practices and policy implementation at this outpatient clinic were suboptimal. We have identified a need for interventions to increase knowledge of the benefits of breastfeeding and to provide support for its longer term duration. We suggest that BFHI be considered across all facilities concerned with infant and early child health to disseminate appropriate information and promote an increase in exclusive breastfeeding for six months as well as the duration of breastfeeding. PMID:25018776

2014-01-01

412

Infusing informatics into interprofessional education: the iTEAM (Interprofessional Technology Enhanced Advanced practice Model) project.  

PubMed

The iTEAM goal is to prepare advanced practice nurses, physicians and pharmacists with the interprofessional (IP) core competencies (informatics, patient centric, quality-focused, evidence based care) to provide technology enhanced collaborative care by: offering technology enhanced learning opportunities through a required informatics course, advanced practice courses (team based experiences with both standardized and virtual patients) and team based clinical experiences including e-health experiences. The innovative features of iTEAM project will be achieved through use of social media strategies, a web accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs) system, a Virtual Clinic/Hospital in Second Life, various e-health applications including traditional telehealth tools and consumer oriented tools such as patient portals, social media consumer groups and mobile health (m-health) applications for health and wellness functions. It builds upon the schools' rich history of IP education and includes clinical partners, such as the VA and other clinical sites focused on care for underserved patient populations. PMID:24943525

Skiba, Diane J; Barton, Amy J; Knapfel, Sarah; Moore, Gina; Trinkley, Katy

2014-01-01

413

Challenges and opportunities in cardiovascular health informatics.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular health informatics is a rapidly evolving interdisciplinary field concerning the processing, integration/interpretation, storage, transmission, acquisition, and retrieval of information from cardiovascular systems for the early detection, early prediction, early prevention, early diagnosis, and early treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Based on the first author's presentation at the first IEEE Life Sciences Grand Challenges Conference, held on October 4-5, 2012, at the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, USA, this paper, focusing on coronary arteriosclerotic disease, will discuss three significant challenges of cardiovascular health informatics, including: 1) to invent unobtrusive and wearable multiparameter sensors with higher sensitivity for the real-time monitoring of physiological states; 2) to develop fast multimodal imaging technologies with higher resolution for the quantification and better understanding of structure, function, metabolism of cardiovascular systems at the different levels; and 3) to develop novel multiscale information fusion models and strategies with higher accuracy for the personalized predication of the CVDs. At the end of this paper, a summary is given to suggest open discussions on these three and more challenges that face the scientific community in this field in the future. PMID:23380853

Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Zheng, Ya-Li; Lin, Wan-Hua; Zhang, He-Ye; Zhou, Xiao-Lin

2013-03-01

414

Food safety informatics: a public health imperative.  

PubMed

To date, little has been written about the implementation of utilizing food safety informatics as a technological tool to protect consumers, in real-time, against foodborne illnesses. Food safety outbreaks have become a major public health problem, causing an estimated 48 million illnesses, 128,000 hospitalizations, and 3,000 deaths in the U.S. each year. Yet, government inspectors/regulators that monitor foodservice operations struggle with how to collect, organize, and analyze data; implement, monitor, and enforce safe food systems. Currently, standardized technologies have not been implemented to efficiently establish "near-in-time" or "just-in-time" electronic awareness to enhance early detection of public health threats regarding food safety. To address the potential impact of collection, organization and analyses of data in a foodservice operation, a wireless food safety informatics (FSI) tool was pilot tested at a university student foodservice center. The technological platform in this test collected data every six minutes over a 24 hour period, across two primary domains: time and temperatures within freezers, walk-in refrigerators and dry storage areas. The results of this pilot study briefly illustrated how technology can assist in food safety surveillance and monitoring by efficiently detecting food safety abnormalities related to time and temperatures so that efficient and proper response in "real time" can be addressed to prevent potential foodborne illnesses. PMID:23569605

Tucker, Cynthia A; Larkin, Stephanie N; Akers, Timothy A

2011-01-01

415

Informatics for multi-disciplinary ocean sciences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions at the time and space scales that are relevant to our state of the art research needs. This presentation will address three areas of the informatics of the end-to-end process: sensors and information extraction in the sensing environment; using diverse data for understanding selected ocean processes; and supporting open data initiatives. A National Science Foundation funded Ocean Observations Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing these areas from the perspective of improving interdisciplinary research. The work includes an assessment of Open Data Access with a paper in preparation. Interoperability and sensors is a new activity that couples with European projects, COOPEUS and NeXOS, in looking at sensors and related information systems for a new generation of measurement capability. A working group on synergies of in-situ and satellite remote sensing is analyzing approaches for more effective use of these measurements. This presentation will examine the steps forward for data exchange and for addressing gaps in communication and informatics.

Pearlman, Jay; Delory, Eric; Pissierssens, Peter; Raymond, Lisa; Simpson, Pauline; Waldmann, Christoph; Williams 3rd, Albert; Yoder, Jim

2014-05-01

416

Medical Informatics and the Science of Cognition  

PubMed Central

Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging disciplines to enable clinicians to benefit from rapid technologic advances. This in turn necessitates a broadening of disciplinary boundaries to consider cognitive and social factors pertaining to the design and use of technology. The authors argue for a place of prominence for cognitive science. Cognitive science provides a framework for the analysis and modeling of complex human performance and has considerable applicability to a range of issues in informatics. Its methods have been employed to illuminate different facets of design and implementation. This approach has also yielded insights into the mechanisms and processes involved in collaborative design. Cognitive scientific methods and theories are illustrated in the context of two examples that examine human-computer interaction in medical contexts and computer-mediated collaborative processes. The framework outlined in this paper can be used to refine the process of iterative design, end-user training, and productive practice. PMID:9824797

Patel, Vimla L.; Kaufman, David R.

1998-01-01

417

Medical informatics and the science of cognition.  

PubMed

Recent developments in medical informatics research have afforded possibilities for great advances in health care delivery. These exciting opportunities also present formidable challenges to the implementation and integration of technologies in the workplace. As in most domains, there is a gulf between technologic artifacts and end users. Since medical practice is a human endeavor, there is a need for bridging disciplines to enable clinicians to benefit from rapid technologic advances. This is turn necessitates a broadening of disciplinary boundaries to consider cognitive and social factors pertaining to the design and use of technology. The authors argue for a place of prominence for cognitive science. Cognitive science provides a framework for the analysis and modeling of complex human performance and has considerable applicability to a range of issues in informatics. Its methods have been employed to illuminate different facets of design and implementation. This approach has also yielded insights into the mechanisms and processes involved in collaborative design. Cognitive scientific methods and theories are illustrated in the context of two examples that examine human-computer interaction in medical contexts and computer-mediated collaborative processes. The framework outlined in this paper can be used to refine the process of iterative design, end-user training, and productive practice. PMID:9824797

Patel, V L; Kaufman, D R

1998-01-01

418

A Six-Year Study of the Clinical Presentation of Cervical Cancer and the Management Challenges Encountered at a State Teaching Hospital in Southeast Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is still a major contributor to cancer-related mortality amongst women living in poor, rural communities of developing countries. The objective of this study is to establish the clinical presentation of cervical cancer and the management challenges encountered in Abakaliki, southeast Nigeria, with a view to finding intervention strategies. This study is a retrospective descriptive assessment of cases of clinically diagnosed cervical cancer managed at a state teaching hospital over six years. Of 76 cases managed, 61 (80.3%) cases notes were available for study. The mean age and parity of patients were 53.8 years and 6.8 years, respectively. The majority (75.4%) were illiterate. All had been married, but 42.6% were widowed. The main occupations were farming or petty trading. One patient (1.6%) had had a single Pap smear in her life. The major presenting complaints were abnormal vaginal bleeding (86.9%), offensive vaginal discharge (41.0%), and weight loss. Twenty patients (32.8%) were lost to follow-up prior to staging. Of the remaining 41 patients, 16 (39.0%) had stage III disease and 17.1% stage IV. Fifteen patients (24.6%) with late stage disease accepted referral, and were referred for radiotherapy. Those who declined were discharged home on request, though 4 (9.8%) died in the hospital. There was no feedback from referred patients confirming that they went and benefitted from the referral. The presentation followed known trends. Illiteracy, poverty, early marriages, high parity, widowhood, non-use of screening methods, late presentation, non-acceptance of referral, and lack of communication after referral were some of the major challenges encountered. These underscore the needs for health education and awareness creation, women educational and economic empowerment, legislation against early marriages and in protection of widows, and creation of a well-staffed and well-equipped dedicated gynecologic oncology unit to forestall further referral. PMID:23843724

Eze, Justus N.; Emeka-Irem, Esther N.; Edegbe, Felix O.

2013-01-01

419

Identification of airborne bacterial and fungal species in the clinical microbiology laboratory of a university teaching hospital employing ribosomal DNA (rDNA) PCR and gene sequencing techniques.  

PubMed

Universal or "broad-range" PCR-based ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was performed on a collection of 58 isolates (n = 30 bacteria + 28 fungi), originating from environmental air from several locations within a busy clinical microbiology laboratory, supporting a university teaching hospital. A total of 10 bacterial genera were identified including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative genera. Gram-positive organisms accounted for 27/30 (90%) of total bacterial species, consisting of seven genera and included (in descending order of frequency) Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Corynebacterium, Paenibacillus, Arthrobacter, Janibacter and Rothia. Gram-negative organisms were less frequently isolated 3/30 (10%) and comprised three genera, including Moraxella, Psychrobacter and Haloanella. Eight fungal genera were identified among the 28 fungal organisms isolated, including (in descending order of frequency) Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, Thanatephorus, Absidia, Eurotium, Paraphaeosphaeria and Tritirachium, with Cladosporium accounting for 10/28 (35.7%) of the total fungal isolates. In conclusion, this study identified the presence of 10 bacterial and eight fungal genera in the air within the laboratory sampled. Although this reflected diversity of the microorganisms present, none of these organisms have been described previously as having an inhalational route of laboratory-acquired infection. Therefore, we believe that the species of organisms identified and the concentration levels of these airborne contaminants determined, do not pose a significant health and safety threat for immunocompotent laboratory personnel and visitors. PMID:20183192

Nagano, Yuriko; Walker, Jim; Loughrey, Anne; Millar, Cherie; Goldsmith, Colin; Rooney, Paul; Elborn, Stuart; Moore, John

2009-06-01

420

Abnormal Blood Glucose as a Prognostic Factor for Adverse Clinical Outcome in Children Admitted to the Paediatric Emergency Unit at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana  

PubMed Central

Dysglycaemia (hyper- or hypoglycaemia) in critically ill children has been associated with poor outcome. We compared the clinical outcomes in children admitted to Pediatric Emergency Unit (PEU) at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) for acute medical conditions and presenting with euglycaemia or dysglycaemia. This is a prospective case matching cohort study. Eight hundred subjects aged between 3 and 144 months were screened out of whom 430 (215 with euglycaemia and 215 with dysglycaemia) were enrolled. The median age was 24 months (range: 3–144 months). In the dysglycaemia group, 28 (13%) subjects had hypoglycemia and 187 (87%) had hyperglycemia. Overall, there were 128 complications in 116 subjects. The number of subjects with complications was significantly higher in dysglycaemia group (n = 99, 46%) compared to euglycaemia group (n = 17, 8%) (P < 0.001). Forty subjects died out of whom 30 had dysglycaemia (P = 0.001). Subjects with dysglycaemia were 3 times (95% CI: 1.5–6.0) more likely to die and 4.8 times (95% CI: 3.1–7.5) more likely to develop complications (P = 0.001). Dysglycaemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in children with acute medical conditions and should lead to intensive management of the underlying condition. PMID:25614747

Amponsah-Achiano, Kwame; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre

2014-01-01

421

Framework design and development of an informatics architecture for a systems biology approach to traumatic brain injury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a problem of major medical and socioeconomic significance, although the pathogenesis of its sequelae is not completely understood. As part of a large, multi-center project to study mild and moderate TBI, a database and informatics system to integrate a wide-range of clinical, biological, and imaging data is being developed. This database constitutes a systems-based approach to TBI with the goals of developing and validating biomarker panels that might be used to diagnose brain injury, predict clinical outcome, and eventually develop improved therapeutics. This paper presents the architecture for an informatics system that stores the disparate data types and permits easy access to the data for analysis.

Alaoui, Adil; Kim, Dongkyu; Levine, Betty; Cleary, Kevin; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy

2010-03-01

422

The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp CounselorCamp Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students the chance to interact with IU faculty  

E-print Network

Camp Counselor ApplicationApplication The Informatics Summer Camp is designed to give high school students: Fr So Jr Sr MS PhD Major/Minor: ____________________________ High School: __________________ Hometown2013 The School of InformaticsThe School of Informatics & Computing& Computing Camp Counselor

Indiana University

423

Using clinical nurses as preceptors to teach leadership and management to senior nursing students: a qualitative descriptive study.  

PubMed

The preceptor model of clinical education uses nurses to fulfill the role of 'teacher' in a one-on-one relationship with students. The current nursing shortage, however, places increased demands on nurses and threatens their continuation in this role. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to gain a better understanding of the nurse preceptor's experience. Five themes evolved during data analysis: (1) making it worthwhile for the nurse, (2) making a difference, (3) engaging in the process, (4) "I love being a preceptor, but..., and (5) accepting the role, taking responsibility. Making it worthwhile for the nurse included how nurses saw personal and professional rewards and benefits in precepting. Making a difference described how nurses felt they made a difference in student learning. Engaging in the process described how nurses created learning opportunities for students by being a good role model and protecting students from negative experiences. "I love being a preceptor, but..." identified aspects of the precepting role that were difficult. Accepting the role, taking responsibility identified the different people involved in the complex precepting experience; the preceptor, nursing faculty, students, and the nurse manager that all had to work together if students were to have a good experience. Findings can be used to develop better support for preceptors as well as more structured and consistent orientation to the role. PMID:17689423

Lillibridge, Jennifer

2007-01-01

424

Changes in sexual practices and responses among ante-natal clinic attendees in a Nigerian teaching hospital.  

PubMed

A cross-sectional study was carried out among 134 antenatal clinic attendees in a Nigerian tertiary hospital to assess pregnancy-related sexual beliefs and changes in sexual frequency and response. Information was collected through a semi-structured questionnaire, and analysed by SPSS. Only 15% of women believed that religious, social or cultural reasons prevented sexual intercourse in pregnancy. Frequency of sexual intercourse decreased in pregnancy in 37.4% of the respondents, remained unaltered in 46.1% and increased in 16.5%. Age, marriage duration and gestational age were not associated with change in the pattern of coital frequency in pregnancy, but education was significantly associated. Sexual responsiveness diminished in approximately half of our respondents in terms of arousal (54.5%), orgasm (48.5%), pleasure (43.7%) and satisfaction (51.4%). The changes were not associated with pregnancy duration. We concluded that sex in pregnancy is well accepted in our environment, and health workers should promote sexual health and well-being in pregnancy. PMID:16368588

Adeyemi, A B; Fatusi, A O; Makinde, O N; Omojuwa, I; Asa, S; Onwudiegwu, U

2005-11-01

425

The X-caliber architecture for informatics supercomputers.  

SciTech Connect

This talk discusses the unique demands that informatics applications, particularly graph-theoretic applications, place on computer systems. These applications tend to pose significant data movement challenges for conventional systems. Worse, underlying technology trends are moving computers to cost-driven optimization points that exacerbate the problem. The X-caliber architecture is an economically viable counter-example to conventional architectures based on the integration of innovative technologies that support the data movement requirements of large-scale informatics applications. This talk will discuss the technology drivers and architectural features of the platform, and present analysis showing the benefits for informatics applications, as well as our traditional science and engineering HPC applications.

Murphy, Richard C.

2010-04-01

426

About the Beginnings of Medical Informatics in Europe  

PubMed Central

The term “Informatics” was created in 1962 from two words, information and automatic, and covers all techniques, information concepts and applications of computers. Among them, medicine is the field where we will describe some factors of development in Europe since the late sixties. It took some time for obtaining the acceptance of this new terminology worldwide, but today medical informatics is a well defined discipline which had a tremendous development last decades. This paper tries to recall the context and events from the beginning of medical informatics in Europe. PMID:24648614

Roger France, Francis

2014-01-01

427

The role of informatics in health care reform.  

PubMed

Improving health care quality while simultaneously reducing cost has become a high priority of health care reform. Informatics is crucial in tackling this challenge. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 mandates adaptation and "meaningful use " of health information technology. In this review, we will highlight several areas in which informatics can make significant contributions, with a focus on radiology. We also discuss informatics related to the increasing imperatives of state and local regulations (such as radiation dose tracking) and quality initiatives. PMID:22771052

Liu, Yueyi I; Rubin, Daniel L

2012-09-01

428

Research management in healthcare informatics - experiences from Norway.  

PubMed

This paper reports on the experiences with establishing a multidisciplinary healthcare informatics research community at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway. A multidisciplinary research group in healthcare informatics must maintain strong connections to computer science, social science, biomedicine and healthcare researchers. Those organizing the research must create a milieu that fosters true collaboration across disciplines. The researchers must have good access to healthcare institutions, to healthcare professionals as well as to patients. A healthcare informatics laboratory creates an arena for experiments as well as for validation of health-it technologies. PMID:21893892

Faxvaag, Arild; Toussaint, Pieter; Johansen, Trond S

2011-01-01

429

About the beginnings of medical informatics in europe.  

PubMed

The term "Informatics" was created in 1962 from two words, information and automatic, and covers all techniques, information concepts and applications of computers. Among them, medicine is the field where we will describe some factors of development in Europe since the late sixties. It took some time for obtaining the acceptance of this new terminology worldwide, but today medical informatics is a well defined discipline which had a tremendous development last decades. This paper tries to recall the context and events from the beginning of medical informatics in Europe. PMID:24648614

Roger France, Francis

2014-02-01

430

Consumer health informatics: a consensus description and commentary from American Medical Informatics Association members.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Although interest in Consumer Health Informatics (CHI) has increased, a consensus definition of CHI does not yet exist. PURPOSE: To conduct a hypothesis-generating survey of AMIA members regarding definition and research agenda for CHI. METHODS: We solicited participation among AMIA members in an Internet-based survey focusing on issues related to a definition of CHI. RESULTS: One hundred thirty-five AMIA members responded. Participants indicated a broad spectrum of topics important to CHI including "self-help for disease management" and "patient access to their own medical records." CHI research was felt to rely heavily on public health methods such as epidemiology and outcomes research, a paradigm shift from traditional medical informatics. Responses indicated a perceived lack of funding and need for further research in CHI. CONCLUSIONS: A working definition should emphasize the multidisciplinary nature of CHI, include consumer input into CHI design, and focus on public health approaches to evaluation. PMID:11825193

Houston, T. K.; Chang, B. L.; Brown, S.; Kukafka, R.

2001-01-01

431

Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

ScienceCinema

Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI

2013-01-22

432

Introduction to Metagenomics at DOE JGI: Program Overview and Program Informatics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

SciTech Connect

Susannah Tringe of the DOE Joint Genome Institute talks about the Program Overview and Program Informatics at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011

Tringe, Susannah [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

2011-10-12

433

Evaluation of an automatic multiple sclerosis lesion quantification tool in an informatics-based MS e-folder system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The chronic nature of MS necessitates multiple MRI studies to track disease progression. We have presented an imaging informatics decision-support system, called MS eFolder, designed to integrate patient clinical data with MR images and a computer-aided detection (CAD) component for automatic white matter lesion quantification. The purpose of

Kevin Ma; James Fernandez; Lilyana Amezcua; Alex Lerner; Brent Liu

2011-01-01

434

HCFA's health care quality improvement program: the medical informatics challenge.  

PubMed Central

The peer-review organizations (PROs) were created by Congress in 1984 to monitor the cost and quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. In order to do this, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) contracted with the PROs through a series of contracts referred to as "Scopes of Work." Under the Fourth Scope of Work, the HCFA initiated the Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) in 1990, as an application of the principles of continuous quality improvement. Since then, the PROs have participated with health care providers in cooperative projects to improve the quality of primarily inpatient care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Through HCFA-supplied administrative data and clinical data abstracted from patient records, the PROs have been able to identify opportunities for improvements in patient care. In May 1995, the HCFA proposed a new Fifth Scope of Work, which will shift the focus of HCQIP from inpatient care projects to projects in outpatient and managed care settings. This article describes the HCQIP process, the types of data used by the PROs to conduct cooperative projects with health care providers, and the informatics challenges in improving the quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:8750387

Grant, J B; Hayes, R P; Pates, R D; Elward, K S; Ballard, D J

1996-01-01

435

Psycho-informatics: Big Data shaping modern psychometrics.  

PubMed

For the first time in history, it is possible to study human behavior on great scale and in fine detail simultaneously. Online services and ubiquitous computational devices, such as smartphones and modern cars, record our everyday activity. The resulting Big Data offers unprecedented opportunities for tracking and analyzing behavior. This paper hypothesizes the applicability and impact of Big Data technologies in the context of psychometrics both for research and clinical applications. It first outlines the state of the art, including the severe shortcomings with respect to quality and quantity of the resulting data. It then presents a technological vision, comprised of (i) numerous data sources such as mobile devices and sensors, (ii) a central data store, and (iii) an analytical platform, employing techniques from data mining and machine learning. To further illustrate the dramatic benefits of the proposed methodologies, the paper then outlines two current projects, logging and analyzing smartphone usage. One such study attempts to thereby quantify severity of major depression dynamically; the other investigates (mobile) Internet Addiction. Finally, the paper addresses some of the ethical issues inherent to Big Data technologies. In summary, the proposed approach is about to induce the single biggest methodological shift since the beginning of psychology or psychiatry. The resulting range of applications will dramatically shape the daily routines of researches and medical practitioners alike. Indeed, transferring techniques from computer science to psychiatry and psychology is about to establish Psycho-Informatics, an entire research direction of its own. PMID:24529915

Markowetz, Alexander; B?aszkiewicz, Konrad; Montag, Christian; Switala, Christina; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

2014-04-01

436

A multimedia comprehensive informatics system with decision support tools for a multi-site collaboration research of stroke rehabilitation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stroke is a major cause of adult disability. The Interdisciplinary Comprehensive Arm Rehabilitation Evaluation (I-CARE) clinical trial aims to evaluate a therapy for arm rehabilitation after stroke. A primary outcome measure is correlative analysis between stroke lesion characteristics and standard measures of rehabilitation progress, from data collected at seven research facilities across the country. Sharing and communication of brain imaging and behavioral data is thus a challenge for collaboration. A solution is proposed as a web-based system with tools supporting imaging and informatics related data. In this system, users may upload anonymized brain images through a secure internet connection and the system will sort the imaging data for storage in a centralized database. Users may utilize an annotation tool to mark up images. In addition to imaging informatics, electronic data forms, for example, clinical data forms, are also integrated. Clinical information is processed and stored in the database to enable future data mining related development. Tele-consultation is facilitated through the development of a thin-client image viewing application. For convenience, the system supports access through desktop PC, laptops, and iPAD. Thus, clinicians may enter data directly into the system via iPAD while working with participants in the study. Overall, this comprehensive imaging informatics system enables users to collect, organize and analyze stroke cases efficiently.

Wang, Ximing; Documet, Jorge; Garrison, Kathleen A.; Winstein, Carolee J.; Liu, Brent

2012-02-01

437

Preservice Teachers' Reflections on Their Home-School Clinical Teaching Experience: Evidence to Support an Alternative Field Experience for Teacher Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teacher education programs continue to search for alternative field experiences for preservice teachers. Whether the public schools are overloaded with interns or a break from certain schools is recommended for various reasons, it is important to identify appropriate alternative practice teaching opportunities prior to student teaching. With the…

Everhart, Brett; McKethan, Robert

2004-01-01

438

EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROGRAMED TEXT IN TEACHING GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, A SOURCE BOOK ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS FOR USE IN A CLINICAL DISCIPLINE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS REPORT DESCRIBES A STUDY TO DETERMINE WHETHER PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION COULD BE USED TO IMPROVE THE TEACHING OF THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH GYNECOLOGIC NEOPLASMS TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. TWO PROGRAMED TEXTS WERE PREPARED--(1) A "CONTENT" TEXT, AN 830-FRAME LINEARLY PROGRAMED TEXT DESIGNED TO REPLACE CONVENTIONAL CLASSROOM TEACHING OF…

WILDS, PRESTON L.; ZACHERT, VIRGINIA

439

Informatics derived materials databases for multifunctional properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this review, we provide an overview of the development of quantitative structure–property relationships incorporating the impact of data uncertainty from small, limited knowledge data sets from which we rapidly develop new and larger databases. Unlike traditional database development, this informatics based approach is concurrent with the identification and discovery of the key metrics controlling structure–property relationships; and even more importantly we are now in a position to build materials databases based on design ‘intent’ and not just design parameters. This permits for example to establish materials databases that can be used for targeted multifunctional properties and not just one characteristic at a time as is presently done. This review provides a summary of the computational logic of building such virtual databases and gives some examples in the field of complex inorganic solids for scintillator applications.

Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna

2015-02-01

440

Economics of health informatics in developing countries.  

PubMed

Health Informatics (HI) has become a world wide issue since 2005 when the WHO Health Metrics Network (HMN) was formed to encourage all of the developing countries (151) to get started in eHealth. Prior to this HMN initiative the only countries with HI in place were the developed countries (40) and a few developing countries (Jamaica, Malaysia, etc.) that were just getting started in HI with a very limited number of applications compared to the developed countries. This paper suggests that much of the experience in HI gained in the developed countries can be shared with the developing countries as 'lessons learnt' - as long as the issue of economics is kept front and foremost in the planning. PMID:21335705

Hébert, Ronald J

2011-01-01

441

The Big Questions For Biodiversity Informatics  

E-print Network

., COLWELL, R.K., CONNOLLY, S.R., CURRIE, D.J., DUNN, R.R., GRAVES, G.R., GREEN, J.L., GRYTNES, J.-A., JIANG, Y.-H., JETZ, W., LYONS, K., MCCAIN, C.M., MAGURRAN, A.E., RAHBEK, C., RANGEL, T.F.L.V.B., SOBERO´N, J., WEBB, C.O. & WILLIG, M.R. 2009. Patterns....H., FERRIER, S., HUETTMAN, F., MORITZ, C. & PETERSON, A.T. 2004. New developments in museum-based informatics and applications in biodiversity analysis. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 19, 497–503. GRAYMAN, W.M., MALES, R.M., GATES, W.E. & HADDER, A.W. 1975...

Peterson, A. Townsend; Knapp, Sandra; Guralnick, Robert P.; Soberó n, Jorge; Holder, Mark T.

2010-01-01

442

Towards creating an informatics infrastructure in home health care.  

PubMed

Although information technology is utilized successfully in many industries, its use in health care-and home health care in particular--continues to lag. This column summarizes a recent article by Bakken and Hripcsak (2004) examining the potential for informatics to improve patient care quality in home health care by supporting evidence-based practices and patient safety. The authors provide definitions of the basic components of an informatics infrastructure e.g., data mining, digital sources of evidence, etc.--and recommend how to make an informatics infrastructure for the home health care industry a reality. Suggestions include: (1) integrating informatics into education and training; (2) creating public/private partnerships among government agencies, vendors, and industry associations; and (3) performing cost-effective analyses to determine the optimal uses of specific technologies. PMID:15715070

King, Lori; Ahrens, Joann

2005-01-01

443

98 College of Computing & Informatics College of Computing  

E-print Network

and Detection, Intelligent Systems, Intrusion Prevention and Detection, Knowledge Based Systems, Knowledge technology changes rapidly, and the UNC Charlotte College of Computing and Informatics advances the field, Provably Secure Systems, Robotics, Scientific and Information Visualization, Secure Electronic Commerce

Xie,Jiang (Linda)

444

A short history of medical informatics in bosnia and herzegovina.  

PubMed

The health informatics profession in Bosnia and Herzegovina has relatively long history. Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data, thirty years from the establishment of Society for Medical Informatics BiH, twenty years from the establishment of the Scientific journal "Acta Informatica Medica (Acta Inform Med", indexed in PubMed, PubMed Central Scopus, Embase, etc.), twenty years on from the establishment of the first Cathedra for Medical Informatics on Biomedical Faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, ten years on from the introduction of the method of "Distance learning" in medical curriculum. The author of this article is eager to mark the importance of the above mentioned Anniversaries in the development of Health informatics in Bosnia and Herzegovina and have attempted, very briefly, to present the most significant events and persons with essential roles throughout this period. PMID:24648621

Masic, Izet

2014-02-01

445

Climate Informatics: Accelerating Discovering in Climate Science with Machine Learning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The goal of climate informatics, an emerging discipline, is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the field's remaining challenges. Given the impact of climate change, understanding the climate system is an international priority. The goal of climate informatics is to inspire collaboration between climate scientists and data scientists, in order to develop tools to analyze complex and ever-growing amounts of observed and simulated climate data, and thereby bridge the gap between data and understanding. Here, recent climate informatics work is presented, along with details of some of the remaining challenges.

Monteleoni, Claire; Schmidt, Gavin A.; McQuade, Scott

2014-01-01

446

New study program: Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics.  

PubMed

Paper presents an overview of the EU funded Project of Curriculum Development for Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Specialist Study in Medical Informatics named MEDINFO to be introduced in Croatia. The target group for the program is formed by professionals in any of the areas of medicine, IT professionals working on applications of IT for health and researchers and teachers in medical informatics. In addition to Croatian students, the program will also provide opportunity for enrolling students from a wider region of Southeast Europe. Project partners are two faculties of the University of Zagreb - Faculty of Organization and Informatics from Varaždin and School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health from Zagreb with the Croatian Society for Medical Informatics, Croatian Chamber of Economy, and Ericsson Nikola Tesla Company as associates. PMID:24743088

Hercigonja-Szekeres, Mira; Simi?, Diana; Božikov, Jadranka; Vondra, Petra

2014-01-01

447

Developing a capstone course within a health informatics program.  

PubMed

This article discusses the ongoing development of a health informatics capstone program in a Midwest university from the hiring of a program coordinator to the development of a capstone course, through initial student results. University health informatics programs require a strong academic program to be successful but also require a spirited program coordinator to manage resources and organize an effective capstone course. This is particularly true of health informatics master's programs that support health industry career fields, whereby employers can locate and work with a pool of qualified applicants. The analysis of students' logs confirms that students' areas of focus and concern are consistent with course objectives and company work requirements during the work-study portion of the student capstone project. The article further discusses lessons learned and future improvements to be made in the health informatics capstone course. PMID:22783150

Hackbarth, Gary; Cata, Teuta; Cole, Laura

2012-01-01

448

[Midwifery clinical practicum education].  

PubMed

Midwifery is a practical facet of the health sciences that emphasizes professional competence-oriented teaching and learning. Cognitive and practical processes integrate and build midwifery student professional knowledge, attitudes, and skills. Clinical education is a teaching method and strategy used to prepare midwifery students for professional practice. Midwifery clinical teaching plans are designed using literature review, expert opinions, and student comments and determine total required hours and caseloads. Midwifery clinical teaching activities and methods promote self-reflection, childbirth education fundamentals, learning by role model observation, and learning role function through overseas observership programs. This paper discusses midwifery education dilemmas and coping methods in Taiwan. PMID:23729338

Kao, Chien-Huei; Gau, Meei-Ling

2013-06-01

449

A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-Scale Science  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaboratory for Multi-scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics- based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information to support a systems-based research approach and is applying it in support of combustion research. An open source multi-scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to the emerging concept of knowledge grids including provenance tracking and

James D. Myers; Thomas C. Allison; Sandra J. Bittner; Brett T. Didier; Michael Frenklach; William H. Green Jr.; Yen-ling Ho; John C. Hewson; Wendy S. Koegler; Carina S. Lansing; David Leahy; Michael Lee; Renata Mccoy; Michael Minkoff; Sandeep Nijsure; Gregor Von Laszewski; David Montoya; Luwi Oluwole; Carmen M. Pancerella; Reinhardt Pinzon; William Pitz; Larry A. Rahn; Branko Ruscic; Karen L. Schuchardt; Eric G. Stephan; Al Wagner; Theresa L. Windus; Christine L. Yang

2005-01-01

450

Seroprevalence of human papillomavirus immunoglobulin G antibodies among women presenting at the reproductive health clinic of a university teaching hospital in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the cause of 90%–95% of squamous cell cancers. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV can lead to development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in 5%–10% of infected women, and can progress to invasive cervical cancer 15–20 years later. This study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence of HPV immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies among women of reproductive age attending a reproductive health clinic at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria. Methods The study was descriptive, cross-sectional, and experimental, combining the use of a structured questionnaire and analysis of serum samples obtained from 350 consecutive consenting women. The serum samples were analyzed for IgG antibodies to HPV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results We found a seroprevalence of 42.9% (150/350) for IgG antibodies to HPV in these women. Women aged 45–49 years and those who had their sexual debut aged 20–23 years had the highest HPV seroprevalence, ie, 50% (57/114) and 51.1% (46/90), respectively. Presence of antibodies varied according to sociodemographic factors, but was significantly associated with educational status, tribe, and religion (P<0.05). Human papillomavirus infection was not significantly associated with the reproductive characteristics and sexual behavior of the women. Antibodies to HPV were detected in 50.0% (9/18) of women with a family history of cervical cancer and in 30.8% (4/13) of those with a history or signs of WHIM (warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, myelokathexis) syndrome as a genetic disorder (P>0.05). Conclusion Further studies are needed to determine the HPV serotypes and evaluate the risk of natural development of HPV-related malignancies among women in the study area. PMID:24868172

Aminu, M; Gwafan, JZ; Inabo, HI; Oguntayo, AO; Ella, EE; Koledade, AK

2014-01-01

451

Desirable Features of a National Cancer Informatics Program — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

452

The 4th Decade of Cancer Informatics — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation Personal tools Search Site only in current section Advanced Search… Sections Home About Mission Serving Researchers Staff Directory Contact CBIIT National Cancer Informatics Program About NCIP Mission Areas

453

Using the Omaha System to describe health problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care in Istanbul, Turkey: a student informatics research experience.  

PubMed

Preparing nursing students to achieve informatics competencies is essential in today's information-intensive healthcare delivery systems. This study aimed to provide hands-on informatics experience to nursing students and to identify the frequency and type of home care clients' health problems, nursing interventions, and outcomes using a standardized nursing terminology, the Omaha System. Data were collected by 159 nursing students on home visits to 598 clients, who received 8657 interventions from students and faculty for 2267 problems, in addition to the services provided by the home care centers. Skin, neuromusculoskelatal function, personal care, nutrition, and urinary function were the most common problems. The most common intervention category was teaching, guidance, and counseling (47%), followed by treatments and procedures (22%), surveillance (22%), and case management (9%). Outcomes evaluation showed significant improvement in 97.5% of the identified problems. Students gained informatics experience in the use of a standardized nursing language in electronic health records, data management, and use of nursing data at the basic practice level. This study demonstrated that the Omaha System was a useful data collection tool for evaluating problems, interventions, and outcomes in home care and a positive teaching and learning tool for baccalaureate nursing education. PMID:23438865

Erdogan, Semra; Secginli, Selda; Cosansu, Gülhan; Nahcivan, Nursen O; Esin, M Nihal; Aktas, Emine; Monsen, Karen A

2013-06-01

454

Teaching Heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Subtitled "a professional development Website for teachers," Teaching Heritage is an impressive collection of information and resources for teaching Australian history and culture. There are eight main sections to the site: four offer teaching resources and four provide teaching units. The resource sections include an examination of different ways of defining heritage, an Australian heritage timeline, discussions of different approaches to teaching heritage through media, and outcomes-based approaches in teaching and assessing heritage coursework. The teaching units deal in depth with issues of citizenship, nationalism, Australian identities, and new cultural values. A Heritage Gallery features images of various culturally significant or representative places in Australia, such as New Italy, the Dundullimal Homestead, Australian Hall, Kelly's Bush, and many more. Obviously, teachers of Civics on the southern continent will find this site extremely useful, but the teaching units -- rich with texts and images -- also offer fascinating introductions for anyone interested in the issues of Australian nation-making.

455

Teaching Writing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors of "Teaching Writing" draw on their years of teaching and their knowledge of theory and research to present major concepts in teaching L2 writing. These concepts encompass how cultural differences affect the writing class, planning instruction, text-based writing, writing strategies, modeling, and responding to student…

Tomas, Z.; Kostka, I.; Mott-Smith, J. A.

2013-01-01

456

IUB Doctoral Thesis Proposal Bioinformatics Track of IUB School of Informatics  

E-print Network

IUB Doctoral Thesis Proposal Bioinformatics Track of IUB School of Informatics December 1, 2008 for the thesis proposal is approved and set. The exam date should be coordinated with the School of Informatics

Indiana University

457

National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 162nd NCAB/BSA Meeting  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Informatics Program (NCIP) Briefing to the 1st Joint NCAB/BSA Meeting George A. Komatsoulis, Ph.D. Director (interim) NCIP and the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology (CBIIT) • Activities encompassed

458

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Cognitive Component AnalysisCognitive Component Analysis  

E-print Network

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Cognitive Component AnalysisCognitive / Intelligent Signal Processing OutlineOutline Introduction ofIntroduction of COgnitiveCOgnitive Component Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Cognitive Component AnalysisCognitive

459

76 FR 7867 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid® (caBIG®) Support...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid[supreg...data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes...approval. Proposed Collection: Title: cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid...

2011-02-11

460

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Mikkel Schmidt, Jan Larsen  

E-print Network

Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Mikkel Schmidt, Jan Larsen Wind Noise Reduction Using Non-negative Sparse Coding Mikkel N. Schmidt, Jan Larsen, Technical, Jan Larsen Informatics and Mathematical Modelling / Intelligent Signal Processing Wind Noise Reduction

461

Principles for Analyzing and Communicating Student Ratings of Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students' rating of teaching is widely used by university administrators to manage and evaluate teaching in China today. However, it is worthwhile to discuss and rethink carefully how to use this tool. Fifty students majoring in seven-year clinical medicine were asked to rate the class teaching of an integrated course for which the teaching…

Cui, Ying-Yu; Li, Si-Guang

2014-01-01

462

Effects of Location Errors in Pattern Informatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of location errors in the performance of seismicity-based forecasting methods was studied here using one particular binary forecast technique, the Pattern Informatics (PI) technique (R undle et al., Proc Nat Acad Sci USA 99, 2514-2521, 2002; T iampo et al., Pure Appl Geophys 159, 2429-2467, 2002). The Southern Californian dataset was used to generate a series of perturbed catalogs by adding different levels of noise to epicenter locations. The PI technique was applied to these perturbed datasets to perform retrospective forecasts that were evaluated by means of skill scores, commonly used in atmospheric sciences. These results were then compared to the effectiveness obtained from the original dataset. Isolated instances of decline of the PI performance were observed due to the nature of the skill scores themselves, but no clear trend of degradation was identified. Dependence on the total number of events in a catalog also was studied, with no systematic degradation in the performance of the PI for catalogs with events in the cases studied. These results suggest that the stability of the PI method is due to the invariance of the clustering patterns identified by the TM metric (T hirumalai and M ountain, Phys Rev A 39, 3563-3573, 1989) when applied to seismicity.

Cho, N. F.; Tiampo, K. F.

2013-01-01

463

Cardiovascular health informatics: risk screening and intervention.  

PubMed

Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient. PMID:22997187

Hartley, Craig J; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

2012-09-01

464

Shared Resources Reported at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers in 2013 Informatics  

Cancer.gov

Cancer Center Institution Resource Name Director(s) Shared Resources Reported at NCI-Designated Cancer Centers in 2013 Informatics University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Michigan Cancer Informatics Manion, Frank Tumor Imaging Francis, Isaac Galban, Craig University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Cancer Informatics Services (CIS) Becich, Michael Chandran, Uma USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Southern California Cancer Research Informatics Core (CRIC) Vaishnav, Aarti UW Paul P.

465

Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

2013-01-01

466

Medical informatics. An emerging academic discipline and institutional priority.  

PubMed

Information management constitutes a major activity of the health care professional. Currently, a number of forces are focusing attention on this function. After many years of development of information systems to support the infrastructure of medicine, greater focus on the needs of physicians and other health care managers and professionals is occurring--to support education, decision making, communication, and many other aspects of professional activity. Medical informatics is the field that concerns itself with the cognitive, information processing, and communication tasks of medical practice, education, and research, including the information science and the technology to support these tasks. An intrinsically interdisciplinary field, medical informatics has a highly applied focus, but also addresses a number of fundamental research problems as well as planning and policy issues. Medical informatics is now emerging as a distinct academic entity. Health care institutions are considering, and a few are making, large-scale commitments to information systems and services that will affect every aspect of their organizations' function. While academic units of medical informatics are presently established at only a few medical institutions in the United States, increasing numbers of schools are considering this activity and many traditional departments are seeking and attracting individuals with medical informatics skills. PMID:2405204

Greenes, R A; Shortliffe, E H

1990-02-23

467

Informatics at UC Irvine Computer Science, as a single discipline, can no longer  

E-print Network

Informatics at UC Irvine Abstract Computer Science, as a single discipline, can no longer speak-1-60558-012-8/08/04. Paul Dourish Department of Informatics UC Irvine Irvine, CA 92697-3440 USA jpd@ics.uci.edu Gillian R. Hayes Department of Informatics UC Irvine Irvine, CA 92697-3440 USA gillianrh@ics.uci.edu Lilly Irani

Hayes, Gillian R.

468

Juris Doctor/Master of science in Business inforMatics (JD/MBi)  

E-print Network

Juris Doctor/Master of science in Business inforMatics (JD/MBi) Using Technology to Promote Innovation and Improve People's Lives Our unique program combining legal education and business informatics and business law, whether in law firms, business, or government settings. NKU Chase Law + INfOrMaTICs INs

Acosta, Charles A.

469

Foundations of Informatics: a Bridging Course Week 3: Formal Languages and Semantics  

E-print Network

Foundations of Informatics: a Bridging Course Week 3: Formal Languages and Semantics Part A on Monday, 10 March 2014, 14:00, b-it Please ask questions! Foundations of Informatics, Part A Winter 2013 Foundations of Informatics, Part A Winter 2013/14 3 #12;Literature J.E. Hopcroft, R. Motwani, J.D. Ullmann

Ábrahám, Erika

470

IU School of Informatics, IUPUI, Policy on Cash Bonuses for Academic Appointees  

E-print Network

IU School of Informatics, IUPUI, Policy on Cash Bonuses for Academic Appointees Approved 11. Bonuses will be based on excellence, as defined in the documents Indiana University School of Informatics Promotion and Tenure Guidelines and the IU School of Informatics Statement of Salary Policy. Excellence

Zhou, Yaoqi

471

Applying informatics to optimize scheduling for Nippon Pro Baseball Richard HOSHINO Ken-ichi KAWARABAYASHI  

E-print Network

Applying informatics to optimize scheduling for Nippon Pro Baseball Richard HOSHINO Ken) (Contact): (Ken-ichi KAWARABAYASHI), (Principles of Informatics Research Division) TEL : 03.6% Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 #12;, Applying informatics to optimize scheduling for Nippon Pro Baseball

Shimizu, Akira

472

Programmatic Role of Education Libraries in Informatics to Support Preservice Teacher Preparation Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background/Context: The management, processing, and transformation of information constitute central tasks in education. Education informatics intersects the theories and practices of both informatics and education. In particular, informatics aids in the systematic incorporation of technology as educational stakeholders represent, process, and…

Farmer, Lesley S. J.

2010-01-01

473

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2  

E-print Network

Combat Medical Informatics: Present and Future Reed W. Hoyt, PhD1,2 , Jaques Reifman, PhD1,3 Trinka. INTRODUCTION Historic advances in medicine and dramatic progress in medical informatics over the last decade of automated monitoring and medical informatics tools. The health care of the soldier of the future, however

474

IN4MATX Degree Academic Plan March 2009 Sample four-year program for Informatics  

E-print Network

IN4MATX Degree Academic Plan ­ March 2009 Sample four-year program for Informatics (180 units) FALL) Elective (4 units) #12;IN4MATX Degree Academic Plan ­ March 2009 Suggested Curriculum for the Informatics major Freshman Informatics Core I and II Fundamental Data Structures or Patterns of Software

van Dyk, David

475

EDUCATION IN INFORMATICS AT SOFIA UNIVERSITY -CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PLANS  

E-print Network

65 EDUCATION IN INFORMATICS AT SOFIA UNIVERSITY - CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PLANS Roumen Nikolov and lessons learnt based on the case of Sofia University - Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics (FMI education. The Faculty of Mathematics and Informatics (FMI) at Sofia University is a leading educational

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

476

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca  

E-print Network

http://informatics.medicine.dal.ca http://dme.medicine.dal.ca www.medicine.dal.ca www.dal.ca Dalhousie University, Division of Medical Education Faculty Position, Tenure Stream, Medical Informatics Program The Division invites applications for a tenure-stream faculty position in Medical Informatics

Adl, Sina

477

School of Informatics at IUPUI Release of Student Information Consent Form  

E-print Network

School of Informatics at IUPUI Release of Student Information Consent Form The Family Educational of Informatics to release information to specific individual(s), the following form must be completed. Instructions: Complete the form below and return it to your academic advisor in the School of Informatics

Zhou, Yaoqi

478

Informatics School COMSC This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental  

E-print Network

Informatics School COMSC This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts and techniques associated with informatics and its practical applications. We will focus of the School and will include a number of in-depth case studies involving: geoinformatics, health informatics

Martin, Ralph R.

479

The School of Informatics and Computing's Accelerator Corporate Giving Program is a  

E-print Network

The School of Informatics and Computing's Accelerator Corporate Giving Program is a relationship leaders. www.soic.indiana.edu Accelerator Corporate Giving Program SCHOOL OF INFORMATICS AND COMPUTING #12;School of Informatics and Computing Office of Development 919 E. 10th Street Bloomington, IN 47408

Indiana University

480

A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science James D. Myers,2  

E-print Network

A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-scale Science James D. Myers,2 Thomas C) is developing a powerful informatics- based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information to support-scale informatics toolkit is being developed that addresses a number of issues core to the emerging concept

481

Governance — CBIIT: Welcome to the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology  

Cancer.gov

Established in mid-2011 by the NCAB, the IWG is charged with providing strategic guidance and direction on NCI informatics investments that support the Institute’s scientific goals. The IWG provides a venue for identifying high-priority biomedical informatics needs, harmonizing ongoing and proposed informatics projects across NCI programs, both intramural and extramural, and reducing redundancies wherever possible.

482

Informatics as Semiotics Engineering: Lessons learned from Design, Development and Evaluation of Ambient  

E-print Network

Informatics as Semiotics Engineering: Lessons learned from Design, Development and Evaluation of appropriate knowledge on semiotics and we demonstrate how we can emphasize universal access by thinking of informatics as semiotics engineering. Keywords: Semiotic engineering, Informatics, Elderly #12;1 Introduction

Hammerton, James

483

Music Informatics Research Group http://mi.soi.city.ac.uk/  

E-print Network

Music Informatics Research Group (MIRG) http://mi.soi.city.ac.uk/ #12;Music Informatics Research (Research student) ­ Olivier Ruello (Intern) ­ Antoine Winckels (Intern) #12;Music Informatics Research Group (MIRG) · Research Activities: ­ Music information retrieval ­ Music signal analysis

Weyde, Tillman

484

9. Biomedical Imaging Informatics Daniel L. Rubin, Hayit Greenspan, and James F. Brinkley  

E-print Network

1 9. Biomedical Imaging Informatics Daniel L. Rubin, Hayit Greenspan, and James F. Brinkley After of non-image biomedical data? 4. What sort of applications can be developed to make use of the semantic discipline of biomedical imaging informatics (Kulikowski 1997), a subfield of biomedical informatics that has

Rubin, Daniel L.

485

Updated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3  

E-print Network

Updated Topics in Healthcare Informatics Hiroshi Takeda, MD, PhD1,2,3 1 Professsor Emeritus, Osaka Center of Healthcare Management, 1-2-8 Miyahara, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka, 532-0003, Japan 3 Vice President the role of IMIA, scope of healthcare informatics and some topics in healthcare informatics. Among updated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

486

Enhancing "Mathematics for Informatics" and its Correlation with Student Pass Rates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, changes in "Mathematics for Informatics" at the Faculty of Organisation and Informatics in the University of Zagreb are described, and correlated with students pass rates. Students at the Faculty work in an interdisciplinary field, studying Informatics within a business context. The main reason for introducing the changes in the…

Divjak, B.; Erjavec, Z.

2008-01-01

487

Mapping the Materials Genome through Combinatorial Informatics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recently announced White House Materials Genome Initiative provides an exciting challenge to the materials science community. To meet that challenge one needs to address a critical question, namely what is the materials genome? Some guide on how to the answer this question can be gained by recognizing that a ``gene'' is a carrier of information. In the biological sciences, discovering how to manipulate these genes has generated exciting discoveries in fundamental molecular biology as well as significant advances in biotechnology. Scaling that up to molecular, cellular length scales and beyond, has spawned from genomics, fields such as proteomics, metabolomics and essentially systems biology. The ``omics'' approach requires that one needs to discover and track these ``carriers of information'' and then correlate that information to predict behavior. A similar challenge lies in materials science, where there is a diverse array of modalities of materials ``discovery'' ranging from new materials chemistries and molecular arrangements with novel properties, to the development and design of new micro- and mesoscale structures. Hence to meaningfully adapt the spirit of ``genomics'' style research in materials science, we need to first identify and map the ``genes'' across different materials science applications On the experimental side, combinatorial experiments have opened a new approach to generate data in a high throughput manner, but without a clear way to link that to models, the full value of that data is not realized. Hence along with experimental and computational materials science, we need to add a ``third leg'' to our toolkit to make the ``Materials Genome'' a reality, the science of Materials Informatics. In this presentation we provide an overview of how information science coupled to materials science can in fact achieve the goal of mapping the ``Materials Genome''.

Rajan, Krishna

2012-02-01

488

72 Genome Informatics 17(1): 72{79 (2006) Why Do Cells Cycle with a 24 Hour Period?  

E-print Network

72 Genome Informatics 17(1): 72{79 (2006) Why Do Cells Cycle with a 24 Hour Period? Samuel Bernard, Greece hal-00371755,version1-2Apr2009 Author manuscript, published in "Genome informatics series : proceedings of the ... Workshop on Genome Informatics. Workshop on Genome Informatics. 17, 1 (2006) 72

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

489

A Primer on Aspects of Cognition for Medical Informatics  

PubMed Central

As a multidisciplinary field, medical informatics draws on a range of disciplines, such as computer science, information science, and the social and cognitive sciences. The cognitive sciences can provide important insights into the nature of the processes involved in human– computer interaction and help improve the design of medical information systems by providing insight into the roles that knowledge, memory, and strategies play in a variety of cognitive activities. In this paper, the authors survey literature on aspects of medical cognition and provide a set of claims that they consider to be important in medical informatics. PMID:11418539

Patel, Vimla L.; Arocha, José F.; Kaufman, David R.

2001-01-01

490

Geospatial resources for supporting data standards, guidance and best practice in health informatics  

PubMed Central

Background The 1980s marked the occasion when Geographical Information System (GIS) technology was broadly introduced into the geo-spatial community through the establishment of a strong GIS industry. This technology quickly disseminated across many countries, and has now become established as an important research, planning and commercial tool for a wider community that includes organisations in the public and private health sectors. The broad acceptance of GIS technology and the nature of its functionality have meant that numerous datasets have been created over the past three decades. Most of these datasets have been created independently, and without any structured documentation systems in place. However, search and retrieval systems can only work if there is a mechanism for datasets existence to be discovered and this is where proper metadata creation and management can greatly help. This situation must be addressed through support mechanisms such as Web-based portal technologies, metadata editor tools, automation, metadata standards and guidelines and collaborative efforts with relevant individuals and organisations. Engagement with data developers or administrators should also include a strategy of identifying the benefits associated with metadata creation and publication. Findings The establishment of numerous Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs), and other Internet resources, is a testament to the recognition of the importance of supporting good data management and sharing practices across the geographic information community. These resources extend to health informatics in support of research, public services and teaching and learning. This paper identifies many of these resources available to the UK academic health informatics community. It also reveals the reluctance of many spatial data creators across the wider UK academic community to use these resources to create and publish metadata, or deposit their data in repositories for sharing. The Go-Geo! service is introduced as an SDI developed to provide UK academia with the necessary resources to address the concerns surrounding metadata creation and data sharing. The Go-Geo! portal, Geodoc metadata editor tool, ShareGeo spatial data repository, and a range of other support resources, are described in detail. Conclusions This paper describes a variety of resources available for the health research and public health sector to use for managing and sharing their data. The Go-Geo! service is one resource which offers an SDI for the eclectic range of disciplines using GIS in UK academia, including health informatics. The benefits of data management and sharing are immense, and in these times of cost restraints, these resources can be seen as solutions to find cost savings which can be reinvested in more research. PMID:21269487

2011-01-01

491

Engineering knowledge exchange for translational research informatics.  

E-print Network

??Engineering effective knowledge exchange pathways between scientists and clinicians will accelerate the development and improvement of clinical treatments extracted from lab bench experiments. Many standards… (more)

Mason-Blakley, F.

2010-01-01

492

Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions  

PubMed Central

Objective: The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to “Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics,” a 2004 survey of informatics programs. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Results: Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Conclusions: Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Implications: Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself. PMID:25552939

King, Samuel B.; Lapidus, Mariana

2015-01-01

493

Patterns and Correlates of Public Health Informatics Capacity Among Local Health Departments: An Empirical Typology  

PubMed Central

Objective: Little is known about the nationwide patterns in the use of public health informatics systems by local health departments (LHDs) and whether LHDs tend to possess informatics capacity across a broad range of information functionalities or for a narrower range. This study examined patterns and correlates of the presence of public health informatics functionalities within LHDs through the creation of a typology of LHD informatics capacities. Methods: Data were available for 459 LHDs from the 2013 National Association of County and City Health Officials Profile survey. An empirical typology was created through cluster analysis of six public health informatics functionalities: immunization registry, electronic disease registry, electronic lab reporting, electronic health records, health information exchange, and electronic syndromic surveillance system. Three-categories of usage emerged (Low, Mid, High). LHD financial, workforce, organization, governance, and leadership characteristics, and types of services provided were explored across categories. Results: Low-informatics capacity LHDs had lower levels of use of each informatics functionality than high-informatics capacity LHDs. Mid-informatics capacity LHDs had usage levels equivalent to high-capacity LHDs for the three most common functionalities and equivalent to low-capacity LHDs for the three least common functionalities. Informatics capacity was positively associated with service provision, especially for population-focused services. Conclusion: Informatics capacity is clustered within LHDs. Increasing LHD informatics capacity may require LHDs with low levels of informatics capacity to expand capacity across a range of functionalities, taking into account their narrower service portfolio. LHDs with mid-level informatics capacity may need specialized support in enhancing capacity for less common technologies.

Mac McCullough, J.; Goodin, Kate

2014-01-01

494

Multidimensional Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Multidimensional mathematics teaching, as discussed in this article encourages the use of context in mathematics teaching and learning to help teachers better recognize and build upon the cultural and social resources students bring to the classroom. Such efforts can impact students' performance and can help students make sense of decisions…

Berry, Robert Q., III; Ellis, Mark W.

2013-01-01

495

Teaching Ideas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ideas to aid the classroom teacher include integration of emphasis on reading into health education; definitions pertinent to contemporary health education; teaching students to read food labels; identification of implications of scientific advances such as test tube reproduction; and a card game to teach food groups to middle school children.…

Middleton, Kathleen, Ed.

1979-01-01

496

Teaching Reading  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Teaching Reading" uncovers the interactive processes that happen when people learn to read and translates them into a comprehensive easy-to-follow guide on how to teach reading. Richard Day's revelations on the nature of reading, reading strategies, reading fluency, reading comprehension, and reading objectives make fascinating…

Day, Richard R.

2013-01-01

497

Teaching Grammar  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Grammar is a component in all language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers need to know rules of grammar (teacher knowledge) as well as techniques that help students use grammar effectively and effortlessly (teaching knowledge). Using reflective practice to help teachers become comfortable with teaching grammar, this…

Crawford, William J.

2013-01-01

498

Toward an Informatics Research Agenda : Key People and Organizational Issues  

Microsoft Academic Search

As we have advanced in medical informatics and created many impressive innovations, we also have learned that technologic developments are not sufficient to bring the value of computer and information technologies to health care systems. This paper proposes a model for improving how we develop and deploy information technology. The authors focus on trends in people, organizational, and social issues

Bonnie Kaplan; Patricia Flatley Brennan; Alan F Dowling; Charles P Friedman; Victor Peel

2001-01-01

499

A Primer on Aspects of Cognition for Medical Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a multidisciplinary field, medical informatics draws on a range of disciplines, such as computer science, information science, and the social and cognitive sciences. The cognitive sciences can provide important insights into the nature of the processes involved in human– computer interaction and help improve the design of medical information systems by providing insight into the roles that knowledge, memory,

VIMLA L. PATEL; José F Arocha; DAVID R. KAUFMAN

2001-01-01

500

Informatics and Telematics in Health. Present and Potential Uses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report focuses on technical issues associated with informatics--a term covering all aspects of the development and operations of information systems, the supporting computer methodology and technology, and the supporting telecommunications links. The first of six chapters discusses the purpose of the report together with basic assumptions…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).