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Sample records for temperature creep deformation

  1. Tantalum alloys resist creep deformation at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckman, R. W., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Dispersion-strengthened tantalum-base alloys possess high strength and good resistance to creep deformation at elevated temperatures in high vacuum environments. They also have ease of fabrication, good weldability, and corrosion resistance to molten alkali metals.

  2. Deformation mechanism for high temperature creep of a directionally solidified nickel-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C.; Guo, J.T.; Wang, S.H.; Yang, H.C.

    1998-09-04

    Modern nickel-base superalloys, which contain a high volume fraction of hard cubical {gamma}{prime} precipitates embedded coherently in a softer {gamma} matrix, are used as turbine blade material due to their good resistance to creep deformation at high temperature. In this present study, the authors will analyze the relationship between the steady-state creep rate and the applied stress of DZ17G, a modern DS cast nickel-base superalloy used for producing turbine blades and vanes for aeroengine applications. On the basis of TEM observations and calculations of the threshold stress for different deformation mechanism, the authors finally propose the deformation mechanism for creep of DZ17G superalloy at high temperature.

  3. Microstructures of beta silicon carbide after irradiation creep deformation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Kondo, Sosuke; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2008-01-01

    Microstructures of silicon carbide were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after creep deformation under neutron irradiation. Thin strip specimens of polycrystalline and monocrystalline, chemically vapor-deposited, beta-phase silicon carbide were irradiated in the high flux isotope reactor to 0.7-4.2 dpa at nominal temperatures of 640-1080 C in an elastically pre-strained bend stress relaxation configuration with the initial stress of {approx}100 MPa. Irradiation creep caused permanent strains of 0.6 to 2.3 x 10{sup -4}. Tensile-loaded near-surface portions of the crept specimens were examined by TEM. The main microstructural features observed were dislocation loops in all samples, and appeared similar to those observed in samples irradiated in non-stressed conditions. Slight but statistically significant anisotropy in dislocation loop microstructure was observed in one irradiation condition, and accounted for at least a fraction of the creep strain derived from the stress relaxation. The estimated total volume of loops accounted for 10-45% of the estimated total swelling. The results imply that the early irradiation creep deformation of SiC observed in this work was driven by anisotropic evolutions of extrinsic dislocation loops and matrix defects with undetectable sizes.

  4. Creep Deformation of B2 Alumindes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1991-01-01

    The creep resistance and elevated temperature deformation mechanisms in CoAl, FeAl, and NiAl are reviewed. The stress and temperature dependencies of the steady state creep rate, the primary creep behavior, the dislocation substructure, and the response during transient tests are used as the main indicators of the deformation processes. In single phase intermetallics, the influence of grain size, stoichiometry, and solid solution hardening have been examined. In addition, the effect of adding dispersoids, precipitates, and other types of reinforcements to improve creep strength are compared.

  5. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the low temperature creep deformation behavior of single phase titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberson, P. Gregory

    Titanium alloys are used for many applications due to their desirable properties, including its high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys are used extensively for aerospace, chemical, nuclear, industrial, biomedical, and consumer applications. In many applications, titanium components may be subject to stresses for extended periods of time. It has long been known that single-phase hexagonally close-packed (HCP) alpha and body-centered cubic (BCC) beta titanium alloys deform over time, or creep, at low temperatures (<0.25*Tm). As such, creep is an important factor to consider when assessing the structural reliability of titanium components. However, the factors that affect creep behavior such as grain size and alloy chemistry and the deformation mechanisms associated with creep such as slip and twinning are not well understood. The aim of this investigation is to experimentally and theoretically study the creep deformation behavior of single-phase alpha and beta titanium alloys. The first part of the investigation concerns alpha-Ti alloys. The low temperature creep behavior was studied experimentally, using alpha-Ti-1.6wt.%V as the model alloy. Creep testing was performed at a range of temperatures and slip and twinning were identified as creep deformation mechanisms by optical, SEM and TEM microscopy. The activation energy for creep was measured for the first time for an alpha-Ti than deforms by twinning. The activation energy was found to increase as a function of creep strain, suggesting that there is a change in the predominant deformation mechanism from slip at low strain to twinning at high strain. The reason for this change is explained by a model for twin nucleation caused by dislocation pileups. The theoretical aspect of the study of alpha-Ti, concerns the phenomenon of slow twin growth (time-dependent twinning) during low temperature creep. This phenomenon is unusual and poorly understood as twins in bulk, polycrystalline metals are expected to grow very fast. It was suggested that interstitial atoms, particularly oxygen could be responsible for time-dependent twinning but there were no models to explain this. As such, crystallographic models were developed for the HCP-lattice of alpha-Ti to show how the octahedral interstitial sites where atoms such as oxygen can reside are eliminated by the atomic movements associated with twinning. As such, the rate of twin growth, and in turn the creep strain rate is controlled by the diffusion of oxygen away from these eliminated sites. The second part of the investigation builds on experimental work from a previous investigation to extend the theoretical model for time-dependent twinning to the BCC lattice of beta-Ti. Similar to the case for alpha-Ti alloys, twin growth is rate limited by the diffusion of oxygen atoms away from eliminated interstitial sites. The results of these findings are very valuable when designing Ti alloys for improved creep resistance and mechanical reliability. This is critical because creep can directly alter dimensional tolerances and creep deformation products can contribute to crack nucleation leading to catastrophic failure. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number DMR-0513751.

  6. Dislocation creep accommodated Grain Boundary Sliding: A high strain rate/low temperature deformation mechanism in calcite ultramylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Anna; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Grain boundary sliding (GBS) is an important grain size sensitive deformation mechanism that is often associated with extreme strain localization and superplasticity. Another mechanism has to operate simultaneously to GBS in order to prevent overlaps and voids between sliding grains. One of the most common accommodating mechanisms is diffusional creep but, recently, dislocation creep has been reported to operate simultaneous to GBS. Due to the formation of a flanking structure in nearly pure calcite marble on Syros (Cyclades, Greece) at lower greenschist facies conditions, an extremely fine grained ultramylonite developed. The microstructure of the layer is characterized by (1) calcite grains with an average grain size of 3.6 m (developed by low temperature/high strain rate grain boundary migration recrystallization, BLG), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120 angles and (3) small cavities preferentially located at triple junctions and at grain boundaries in extension. These features suggest that the dominant deformation mechanism was GBS. In order to get more information on the accommodation mechanism detailed microstructural and textural analyses have been performed on a FEI Quanta 3D FEG instrument equipped with an EDAX Digiview IV EBSD camera. The misorientation distribution curves for correlated and uncorrelated grains follow almost perfect the calculated theoretical curve for a random distribution, which is typical for polycrystalline material deformed by GBS. However, the crystallographic preferred orientation indicates that dislocation creep might have operated simultaneously. We also report Zener-Stroh cracks resulting from dislocation pile up, indicating that dislocation movement was active. We, therefore, conclude that the dominant deformation mechanism was dislocation creep accommodated grain boundary sliding. This is consistent with the observed grain size range that plots at the field boundary between grain size insensitive and grain size sensitive creep, in a deformation mechanism map for calcite.

  7. Creep deformation of TD-nickel chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was conducted of the mechanical behavioral characteristics of thoria-dispersed (TD) NiCr materials at elevated temperatures. The experimental procedure used is discussed along with the significance of the obtained results. Attention is given to basic creep behavior and creep thermal activation parameter measurements. It is found that the overall creep behavior of TD-NiCr can be explained on the basis of the relative contributions of two parallel-concurrent deformation mechanisms, including diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding and dislocation motion.

  8. Elevated Temperature Creep Deformation in Solid Solution <001> NiAL-3.6Ti Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Noebe, Ronald D.; Darolia, Ram

    2003-01-01

    The 1100 to 1500 K slow plastic strain rate compressive properties of <001> oriented NiAl-3.6Ti single crystals have been measured, and the results suggests that two deformation processes exist. While the intermediate temperature/faster strain rate mechanism is uncertain, plastic flow at elevated temperature/slower strain rates in NiAl-3.6Ti appears to be controlled by solute drag as described by the Cottrell-Jaswon solute drag model for gliding b = a(sub 0)<101> dislocations. While the calculated activation energy of deformation is much higher (approximately 480 kJ/mol) than the activation energy for diffusion (approximately 290 kJ/mol) used in the Cottrell-Jaswon creep model, a forced temperature compensated - power law fit using the activation energy for diffusion was able to adequately (greater than 90%) predict the observed creep properties. Thus we conclude that the rejection of a diffusion controlled mechanism can not be simply based on a large numerical difference between the activation energies for deformation and diffusion.

  9. On The Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms Found in an Advanced Polycrystalline Nickel-Base Superalloy at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutchman, Hallee Zox

    Polycrystalline Ni-base superalloys are used as turbine disks in the hot section in jet engines, placing them in a high temperature and stress environment. As operating temperatures increase in search of better fuel efficiency, it becomes important to understand how these higher temperatures are affecting mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms in the substructure. Not only are operating temperatures increasing, but there is a drive to design next generation alloys in shorter time periods using predictive modeling capabilities. This dissertation focuses on mechanical behavior and active deformation mechanisms found in two different advanced polycrystalline alloy systems, information which will then be used to build advanced predictive models to design the next generation of alloys. The first part of this dissertation discusses the creep behavior and identifying active deformation mechanisms in an advanced polycrystalline Ni-based superalloy (ME3) that is currently in operation, but at higher temperatures and stresses than are experienced in current engines. Monotonic creep tests were run at 700C and between 655-793MPa at 34MPa increments, on two microstructures (called M1 and M2) produced by different heat treatments. All tests were crept to 0.5% plastic strain. Transient temperature and transient stress tests were used determine activation energy and stress exponents of the M1 microstructure. Constant strain rate tests (at 10-4s-1) were performed on both microstructures as well. Following creep testing, both M1 and M2 microstructures were fully characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for basic microstructure information, and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) to determine active deformation mechanism. It was found that in the M1 microstructure, reorder mediated activity (such as discontinuous faulting and microtwinning) is dominant at low stresses (655-724 MPa). Dislocations in the gamma matrix, and overall planar dislocation activity were also present. At higher stresses (758-793MPa), there is still planar activity present, but now non-planar "wavy" slip appears. Wavy slip was also present in the constant strain rate sample of the M1 microstructure. M2 showed much of the same activity as M1, but wavy slip was not present in either the high stress creep conditions or the constant strain rate conditions. The second part of this dissertation focused on Alloy X, which is a next generation alloy system. Three variants were examined (decreased levels of Cr and Co, decreased levels of Cr and Co with added Hf, and decreased levels of Cr and Co with added Hf and a faster cooling rate). The variants were all tested at 700C/690MPa, 760C/490MPa, and 815C/345MPa, to various strains. In Alloy X, the dominant mechanisms that appear throughout all strains, stresses, and temperatures are unpaired dislocations and discontinuous stacking faults. In the Hf bearing variants, , unpaired dislocations appear to start at grain boundaries and move in to the grains with increasing strain and temperature. Through 3D stereo imaging using STEM images, it appears that the dislocations are able to climb over precipitates at larger strains. It is postulated that the decreasing levels of Cr and Co have changed the stacking fault energy so it is unfavorable to form microtwins anymore. This was discussed in terms of the Dislocation Activity Diagram (DAD).

  10. The high temperature creep deformation of Si3N4-6Y2O3-2Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, J. A.; Xu, Zhi-Yue

    1988-01-01

    The creep properties of silicon nitride containing 6 wt percent yttria and 2 wt percent alumina have been determined in the temperature range 1573 to 1673 K. The stress exponent, n, in the equation epsilon dot varies as sigma sup n, was determined to be 2.00 + or - 0.15 and the true activation energy was found to be 692 + or - 25 kJ/mol. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed that deformation occurred in the grain boundary glassy phase accompanied by microcrack formation and cavitation. The steady state creep results are consistent with a diffusion controlled creep mechanism involving nitrogen diffusion through the grain boundary glassy phase.

  11. The high temperature creep deformation of Si3N4-6Y2O3-2Al2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, J. A.; Xu, Zhi-Yue

    1989-01-01

    The creep properties of silicon nitride containing 6 wt percent yttria and 2 wt percent alumina have been determined in the temperature range 1573 to 1673 K. The stress exponent, n, in the equation epsilon dot varies as sigma sup n, was determined to be 2.00 + or - 0.15 and the true activation energy was found to be 692 + or - 25 kJ/mol. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed that deformation occurred in the grain boundary glassy phase accompanied by microcrack formation and cavitation. The steady state creep results are consistent with a diffusion controlled creep mechanism involving nitrogen diffusion through the grain boundary glassy phase.

  12. Estimating creep deformation of glass-fiber-reinforced polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takenobu; Somiya, Satoshi

    2006-09-01

    Thermoplastic resin and fiber-reinforced thermo-plastics (FRTPs) were used without post-cure treatment as molded material. For such materials, creep behavior and physical aging occur simultaneously. This study examined the creep behavior of polycarbonate (PC) and glass-fiber-reinforced polycarbonate (GFRPC) injection moldings, including the effect of physical aging and fiber content, and determined that the time temperature superposition principle could be applied to the creep behavior for different fiber contents. The effects of physical aging on creep behavior were evaluated quantitatively on pure resin and with various fiber contents without heat treatment. We found that the effect of physical aging could be evaluated with the proposed factor, aging shift rate. To discuss the linearity of viscoelasticity in FRTPs, this study used two shift factors: time and modulus shift factors. The fiber content affected creep behavior by both retarding and restraining it through changing the elastic modulus. This was shown by generating a grand master curve of creep compliance, which included the effects of time, temperature, and fiber content. Using the grand master curve of creep compliance and shift factors, it was possible to estimate the creep deformation of molded materials under varying conditions and fiber contents. The estimated creep deformation gave a very good fit to the experimental creep deformation.

  13. Creep fracture during solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Taleff, E.M.; Lesuer, D.R.; Syn, C.K.; Henshall, G.A.

    1996-10-01

    Creep fracture behavior has been studied in Al-Mg and Al-Mg-Mn alloys undergoing solute-drag creep and in microduplex stainless steel undergoing both solute-drag creep and superplastic deformation. Failure in these materials is found to be controlled by two mechanisms, neck formation and cavitation. The mechanism of creep fracture during solute-drag creep in Al-Mg is found to change from necking-controlled fracture to cavitation-controlled fracture as Mn content is increased. Binary Al-Mg material fails by neck formation during solute-drag creep, and cavities are formed primarily in the neck region due to high hydrostatic stresses. Ternary alloys of Al-Mg- Mn containing 0.25 and 0.50 wt % Mn exhibit more uniform cavitation, with the 0.50 Mn alloy clearly failing by cavity interlinkage. Failure in the microduplex stainless steel is dominated by neck formation during solute-drag creep deformation but is controlled by cavity growth and interlinkage during superplastic deformation. Cavitation was measured at several strains, and found to increase as an exponential function of strain. An important aspect of cavity growth in the stainless steel is the long latency time before significant cavitation occurs. For a short latency period, cavitation acts to significantly reduce ductility below that allowed by neck growth alone. This effect is most pronounced in materials with a high strain-rate sensitivity, for which neck growth occurs very slowly.

  14. Deformation Microstructures and Creep Mechanisms in Advanced ZR-Based Cladding Under Biazal Loading

    SciTech Connect

    K. Linga Murty

    2008-08-11

    Investigate creep behavior of Zr-based cladding tubes with attention to basic creep mechanisms and transitions in them at low stresses and/or temperatures and study the dislocation microstructures of deformed samples for correlation with the underlying micromechanism of creep

  15. Creep deformation of a soft magnetic iron-cobalt alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingers, R. T.; Coate, J. E.; Dowling, N. E.

    1999-04-01

    The U.S. Air Force is in the process of developing magnetic bearings, as well as an aircraft integrated power unit and an internal starter/generator for main propulsion engines. These developments are the driving force for the new emphasis on the development of high saturation, low loss magnets capable of maintaining structural integrity in high stress and high temperature environments. It is this combination of desired material characteristics that is the motivation of this effort to measure, model, and predict the creep behavior of such advanced magnetic materials. Hiperco Alloy 50HS, manufactured by Carpenter Technology Corporation, is one of the leading candidates for these applications. Material specimens were subjected to a battery of mechanical tests in order to study and characterize their behaviors. Tensile tests provided stress versus strain behaviors that clearly indicated: a yield point, a heterogeneous deformation described as Lders elongation, the Portevin-LeChatelier effect at elevated temperatures, and most often a section of homogeneous deformation that concluded with necking and fracture. Creep testing indicated three distinct types of behavior. Two types resembled a traditional response with primary, secondary, and tertiary stages; while the third type can be characterized by an abrupt increase in strain rate that acts as a transition from one steady-state behavior to another. The relationships between the tensile and creep responses are discussed. Analyses of the mechanical behavior include double linear regression of empirically modeled data, and constant strain rate testing to bridge the tensile and creep test parameters.

  16. Analysis of Slip Activity and Deformation Modes in Tension and Tension-Creep Tests of Cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (Wt Pct) at Elevated Temperatures Using In Situ SEM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Boehlert, Carl J.; Wang, Qudong; Yin, Dongdi; Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-03-01

    The tension and tension-creep deformation behavior at elevated temperatures of a cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (wt pct, GW103) alloy was investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 598 K (200 °C to 325 °C). The active slip systems were identified using an EBSD-based slip trace analysis methodology. The results showed that for all of the tests, basal slip was the most likely system to be activated, and non-basal slip was activated to some extent depending on the temperature. No twinning was observed. For the tension tests, non-basal slip consisted of ~35 pct of the deformation modes at low temperatures (473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C)), while non-basal slip accounted for 12 and 7 pct of the deformation modes at high temperatures (573 K and 598 K (300 °C and 325 °C)), respectively. For the tension-creep tests, non-basal slip accounted for 31 pct of the total slip systems at low temperatures, while this value decreased to 10 to 16 pct at high temperatures. For a given temperature, the relative activity for prismatic slip in the tension-creep tests was slightly greater than that for the tension tests, while the activity for pyramidal slip was lower. Slip-transfer in neighboring grains was observed for the low-temperature tests. Intergranular cracking was the main cracking mode, while some intragranular cracks were observed for the tension-creep tests at high temperature and low stress. Grain boundary ledges were prevalently observed for both the tension and tension-creep tests at high temperatures, which suggests that besides dislocation slip, grain boundary sliding also contributed to the deformation.

  17. High-temperature creep of Nb-Al-V alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, T.S.; Aindow, M.

    1999-07-01

    Nb-15Al-20V alloys with about 45% by volume of an A15 phase in a B2 matrix have been subjected to creep deformation at temperatures between 1,000 C and 1,200 C and stresses from 80 MPa to 240 MPa in vacuum. The creep curves show a rapid transition from primary to steady-state creep with a well-defined activation energy. Microstructural observations show that the creep deformation occurs mainly in the B2 matrix and is controlled by dislocation mechanisms. Samples which had been cold-rolled and annealed to reduce the size of A15 precipitates and increase the yield strength were found to have lower creep resistance than those with unrefined microstructures. The significance of these observations for the creep mechanisms is discussed.

  18. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Julian K.; Carroll, Laura J.; Wright, Jill K.; Wright, Richard N.; Lillo, Thomas M.

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 C to 1000 C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 C to 1000 C). Creep at 1023 K (750 C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent ?' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 C)temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of ?' precipitates, respectively. The ?' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for ?' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the ?' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the ?' precipitates.

  19. Modelling of anisotropic creep deformation and damage in single crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Smith, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    Previous studies on the creep behavior of single crystal nickel base superalloys reveal that both creep deformation behavior and stress rupture properties of single crystal alloys are strongly dependent on crystal orientation and temperature. A physical model of creep deformation in single crystal superalloys has been proposed by Ghosh et al. This model accounts for the anisotropy and asymmetry of creep by viscous glide on specific crystallographic slip systems and for the tertiary creep behavior through a damage parameter that is related to the accumulation of mobile dislocations in each slip system. The model has been applied to analyze the creep curves of the single crystal nickel base superalloy SRR99, with particular reference to [001] and [111] orientations. The model also attempts to predict the change in the anisotropy of creep behavior with stress and temperature, and the changes in the orientation and specimen cross-section with creep strain. The creep model proposed by Ghosh et al has been modified and extended to describe the anisotropic creep behavior of single crystal superalloys for multiaxial stress states. The equations must be used with a general transformation procedure to relate the crystallographic deformation to the global loading directions. Three creep rupture criteria based on material damage in single crystal superalloys have been suggested. The creep damage criterion that takes into account of the different effects of damage on octahedral and cubic slip system and includes interaction effects between the two types of slip provided the best predictions of creep rupture life for the single crystal nickel base superalloy SRR99.

  20. On the creep deformation mechanisms of an advanced disk nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unocic, Raymond R.

    The main objective of this research was aimed at investigating the fundamental relationship between microstructure and creep deformation mechanisms using a variety of electron microscopy characterization techniques. The alloy used in this research, Rene 104, is a newer generation powder metallurgy Ni-base superalloy that was developed specifically for aircraft gas turbine disk applications with extended service durability at temperatures exceeding 650C. The influence of stress and temperature was studied first and it was found that during creep deformation at temperatures between 677--815C and stresses between 345--724MPa a variety of distinctly different creep deformation mechanisms were operative. In addition to identifying the creep deformation mechanisms an attempt was made to determine the creep rate limiting process so that an improved understanding of the fundamental processes that control deformation can be better understood. Microtwinning was found to the dominant deformation mechanism following creep at 677C/690MPa and 704C/724MPa. Microtwins form by the motion of paired a/6<112> Shockley partial dislocations that shear both the gamma matrix and gamma' precipitates. The rate limiting process in this mechanism is diffusion mediated atomic reordering that occurs in the wake of the shearing, twinning partial dislocations in order to maintain the ordered L12 structure of the gamma' precipitates. This reordering process helps to fundamentally explain the temperature and rate dependence of microtwinning under creep conditions within this temperature and stress regime. At a slightly higher temperature but lower stress (760C and 345MPa), a stacking fault related shearing mechanism, which typically spanned only a few micrometers in length, was the principle deformation mode. The faults left behind in the gamma' precipitates determined to be extrinsic in nature. During creep at the highest temperature and lowest stress (815C and 345MPa) a thermally activated climb/bypass mechanism of a/2<110> dislocations were found to be the dominant deformation mechanism. In this mechanism, the gamma' precipitates were not sheared but instead were bypassed by a/2<110> matrix dislocations. In addition to the identification of creep deformation mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature, characterization of the post creep gamma' precipitate microstructure revealed that microstructural evolution of the gamma' precipitates has occurred during creep at the higher test temperatures where the secondary gamma' precipitates have coarsened and the tertiary gamma' precipitates have dissolved. In combination with creep at low stress and high temperature, the microstructural evolution may have contributed to the transition from one deformation mode to another. In an attempt to link the influence of microstructure (gamma' precipitate size scale, distribution, volume fraction, and gamma channel width spacing) on creep deformation behavior and creep deformation mechanisms, specimens with different size scaled microstructural features were crept at the same temperature and stress (677C and 724MPa) in order to provide a direct comparison between differences in microstructure. It was found that a microstructure consisting of a bimodal distribution of gamma' precipitates with coarse secondary gamma' precipitates, a high volume fraction of tertiary gamma' precipitates and a wide gamma channel width spacing results in a less creep resistance microstructure that deformed primary by a/2<110> dislocation activity in the gamma matrix at small strain and secondary gamma' shearing via superlattice intrinsic stacking faults at higher strains. The more creep resistant microstructure consisted of a bimodal distribution of gamma' precipitates with a finer secondary gamma' precipitate size, low volume fraction of gamma' and narrow gamma channel width spacing. The combination of these microstructural features promoted a/2<110> dislocation dissociation and decorrelation of a/6<112> Shockley partial di

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Plastic Deformation During Impression Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveena; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Mathew, M. D.

    2015-04-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis of plastic deformation associated with impression creep deformation of 316LN stainless steel was carried out. An axisymmetric FE model of 10 10 10 mm specimen with 1-mm-diameter rigid cylindrical flat punch was developed. FE simulation of impression creep deformation was performed by assuming elastic-plastic-power-law creep deformation behavior. Evolution of the stress with time under the punch during elastic, plastic, and creep processes was analyzed. The onset of plastic deformation was found to occur at a nominal stress about 1.12 times the yield stress of the material. The size of the developed plastic zone was predicted to be about three times the radius of the punch. The material flow behavior and the pile-up on specimen surface have been modeled.

  2. Plastic deformation and creep damage evaluations of type 316 austenitic stainless steels by EBSD

    SciTech Connect

    Yoda, Rika; Yokomaku, Toshinori; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2010-10-15

    The inspection method of plastic and/or creep deformations has been required as the quantitative damage estimation procedure for structural components especially used in electric power plants. In this study, the method using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to the deformation and damage evaluation of austenitic stainless steels strained by tension or compression at room temperature and also tested in creep at high temperature. It was found that the value of Grain Average Misorientation (GAM) which showed the average misorientation for the whole observed area including over several dozen grains, was a very useful parameter for quantifying the microstructural change as either the plastic or creep strain increased. The unique linear correlation was obtained between GAM and plastic strain in tension and compression. For creep damage evaluation, the difference of grain average misorientation from the value of the unstrained specimen ({Delta}GAM) showed an excellent correlation with the inelastic strain below strain at which the tertiary creep began.

  3. Temperature-dependent creep buckling of plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. A.; Berke, L.

    1981-01-01

    Time-dependent lateral deflection of flat rectangular plates is predicted by the Norton-Bailey (Norton 1929, Bailey 1935) power law for material creep. The plates have a through-thickness steady-state temperature distribution, and the effects are considered by using Maxwell's law to modify the power creep law. Equations are derived for creep exponents of 3 and 5, using the sandwich plate element to predict creep buckling of plates. Predictions of creep buckling with a temperature variation between the inner and outer plate surfaces are found to be somewhat dependent on the creep buckling relationship assumed. When significant scatter justifies a variation in the creep constants up to an order of magnitude, discrepancies in predictions using the two exponents are reasonable, and for one engineering material, the predictions have the same degree of agreement with experimental data as have the respective creep laws.

  4. On the creep deformation of nickel foams under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burteau, Anthony; Bartout, Jean-Dominique; Bienvenu, Yves; Forest, Samuel

    2014-10-01

    A finite-element computational strategy is developed to study the viscoplastic deformation mechanisms at work in a nickel foam sample under compression creep. The constitutive law for pure nickel accounts for both diffusional and dislocation creep mechanisms. The finite-element results show the competition between both mechanisms due to the strong heterogeneity of the stress distribution in the foam. The initiation of the viscoplastic buckling phenomenon leading to cell crushing in tertiary creep is illustrated. The overall model prediction is compared to the results of compression creep tests performed in vacuo at 900 C. xml:lang="fr"

  5. Effect of Tungsten on Primary Creep Deformation and Minimum Creep Rate of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar; Mathew, M. D.

    2014-10-01

    Effect of tungsten on transient creep deformation and minimum creep rate of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel has been assessed. Tungsten content in the 9Cr-RAFM steel has been varied between 1 and 2 wt pct, and creep tests were carried out over the stress range of 180 and 260 MPa at 823 K (550 C). The tempered martensitic steel exhibited primary creep followed by tertiary stage of creep deformation with a minimum in creep deformation rate. The primary creep behavior has been assessed based on the Garofalo relationship, , considering minimum creep rate instead of steady-state creep rate . The relationships between (i) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with minimum creep rate, (ii) rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' with time to reach minimum creep rate, and (iii) initial creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the first-order reaction-rate theory has prevailed throughout the transient region of the RAFM steel having different tungsten contents. The rate of exhaustion of transient creep r' and minimum creep rate decreased, whereas the transient strain ? T increased with increase in tungsten content. A master transient creep curve of the steels has been developed considering the variation of with . The effect of tungsten on the variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress has been rationalized by invoking the back-stress concept.

  6. Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms for Nanocluster-Strengthened Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, Matthew C; Kovarik, L.; Miller, Michael K; Daehn, Glenn; Mills, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanically alloyed, nanostructured ferritic steels represent a class of alloys that can display high resistance to radiation and creep deformation, which are derived from the presence of nanoclusters, precipitates and solute segregation to the grain boundaries. The creep responses for a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic steel were measured over a range of temperatures and stress levels. The stress exponent was observed to vary non-linearly with applied stress; stress exponents were found to decrease with decreasing stress approaching unity at low stress. Transmission electron microscopy studies clearly demonstrated that creep deformation proceeds by a dislocation glide within nanoscale grains and that glide dislocations are attracted to and pinned by nanoclusters. In light of these observations, a new model of the creep response, inspired by the Kocks-Argon-Ashby model, is developed to explain the low creep rates and small stress exponents that are exhibited by these alloys.

  7. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part I; Isothermal Creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This two-part paper is the first published report on the long term, low temperature creep of hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi. Constant load tensile creep tests were conducted on hot-extruded near-stoichiometric NiTi at 300, 373 and 473 K under initial applied stresses varying between 200 and 350 MPa as long as 15 months. These temperatures corresponded to the martensitic, two-phase and austenitic phase regions, respectively. Normal primary creep lasting several months was observed under all conditions indicating dislocation activity. Although steady-state creep was not observed under these conditions, the estimated creep rates varied between 10(exp -10) and 10(exp -9)/s. The creep behavior of the two phases showed significant differences. The martensitic phase exhibited a large strain on loading followed by a primary creep region accumulating a small amount of strain over a period of several months. The loading strain was attributed to the detwinning of the martensitic phase whereas the subsequent strain accumulation was attributed to dislocation glide-controlled creep. An "incubation period" was observed before the occurrence of detwinning. In contrast, the austenitic phase exhibited a relatively smaller loading strain followed by a primary creep region, where the creep strain continued to increase over several months. It is concluded that the creep of the austenitic phase occurs by a dislocation glide-controlled creep mechanism as well as by the nucleation and growth of deformation twins.

  8. Threshold Stress Creep Behavior of Alloy 617 at Intermediate Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Benz; L.J. Carroll; J.K. Wright; R.N. Wright; T. Lillo

    2014-06-01

    Creep of Alloy 617, a solid solution Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, was studied in the temperature range of 1023 K to 1273 K (750 °C to 1000 °C). Typical power-law creep behavior with a stress exponent of approximately 5 is observed at temperatures from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C). Creep at 1023 K (750 °C), however, exhibits threshold stress behavior coinciding with the temperature at which a low volume fraction of ordered coherent y' precipitates forms. The threshold stress is determined experimentally to be around 70 MPa at 1023 K (750 °C) and is verified to be near zero at 1173 K (900 °C)—temperatures directly correlating to the formation and dissolution of y' precipitates, respectively. The y' precipitates provide an obstacle to continued dislocation motion and result in the presence of a threshold stress. TEM analysis of specimens crept at 1023 K (750 °C) to various strains, and modeling of stresses necessary for y' precipitate dislocation bypass, suggests that the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates is the controlling factor for continued deformation at the end of primary creep and into the tertiary creep regime. As creep deformation proceeds at an applied stress of 121 MPa and the precipitates coarsen, the stress required for Orowan bowing is reached and this mechanism becomes active. At the minimum creep rate at an applied stress of 145 MPa, the finer precipitate size results in higher Orowan bowing stresses and the creep deformation is dominated by the climb of dislocations around the y' precipitates.

  9. Creep deformation in near-γ TiAl: Part 1. the influence of microstructure on creep deformation in Ti-49Al-1V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Brian D.; Jones, J. Wayne; Allison, John E.

    1995-11-01

    The influence of microstructure on creep deformation was examined in the near-y TiAl alloy Ti-49A1-1V. Specifically, microstructures with varying volume fractions of lamellar constituent were produced through thermomechanical processing. Creep studies were conducted on these various microstructures under constant load in air at temperatures between 760 °C and 870 °C and at stresses ranging from 50 to 200 MPa. Microstructure significantly influences the creep behavior of this alloy, with a fully lamellar microstructure yielding the highest creep resistance of the microstructures examined. Creep resistance is dependent on the volume fraction of lamellar constituent, with the lowest creep resistance observed at intermediate lamellar volume fractions. Examination of the creep deformation structure revealed planar slip of dislocations in the equiaxed y microstructure, while subboundary formation was observed in the duplex microstructure. The decrease in creep resistance of the duplex microstructure, compared with the equiaxed y microstructure, is attributed to an increase in dislocation mobility within the equiaxed y constituent, that results from partitioning of oxygen from the γ phase to the α2 phase. Dislocation motion in the fully lamellar microstructure was confined to the individual lamellae, with no evidence of shearing of γ/γ or γ/α2 interfaces. This suggests that the high creep resistance of the fully lamellar microstructure is a result of the fine spacing of the lamellar structure, which results in a decreased effective slip length for dislocation motion over that found in the duplex and equiaxed y microstructures.

  10. Creep Behavior, Deformation Mechanisms, and Creep Life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ABE, Fujio

    2015-12-01

    The creep behavior, deformation mechanisms, and the correlation between creep deformation parameters and creep life have been investigated for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (Gr.91, 9Cr-1Mo-VNb) by analyzing creep strain data at 723 K to 998 K (450 C to 725 C), 40 to 450 MPa, and t r = 11.4 to 68,755 hours in NIMS Creep Data Sheet. The time to rupture t r is reasonably correlated with the minimum creep rate {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } and the acceleration of creep rate by strain in the acceleration region dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ?, as t r = 1.5/[ {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } ( dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ?)], where {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } and dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ? reflect the creep behavior in the transient and acceleration regions, respectively. The {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } is inversely proportional to the time to minimum creep rate t m, while it is proportional to the strain to minimum creep rate ? m, as {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } = 0.54 ( ? m/ t m). The ? m decreases with decreasing stress, suggesting that the creep deformation in the transient region becomes localized in the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundaries with decreasing stress. The duration of acceleration region is proportional to the duration of transient region, while the dln {dot{\\varepsilon }} /d ? is inversely proportional to the ? m. The t r is also correlated with the t m, as t r = g t m, where g is a constant. The present creep life equations reasonably predict the degradation in creep rupture strength at long times. The downward deviation takes place in the t r vs {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } curves (Monkman-Grant plot). At the same {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } , both the ? m and t m change upon the condition of t m ? ? m. The decrease in ? m with decreasing stress, corresponding to decreasing {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } , causes a decrease in t m, indicating the downward deviation of the t r vs {dot{\\varepsilon }}_{ min } curves.

  11. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  12. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Ebert, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature (above 0.5 Tm) deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Temperature sensitivity of the yield stress, as well as high (compared to self diffusion) apparent tensile activation enthalpies were the result of the internal stress not being proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and, to a lesser extent, increasing grain diameter, reaching high values which may be apparent values. The thoria particle dispersion may have been altered by elevated temperature tensile and creep deformation.

  13. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  14. Creep deformation in near-{gamma} TiAl. 2: Influence of carbon on creep deformation in Ti-48Al-1V-0.3C

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, B.D.; Jones, J.W.; Allison, J.E.

    1995-11-01

    The influence of interstitial strengthening and microstructure on creep deformation has been examined in the near-{gamma} TiAl alloy Ti-48Al-1V-0.3C. Creep studies were conducted under constant load in air at 815 c in the stress range of 50 to 200 MPa. Significant improvement in creep resistance was observed in this alloy compared with a similar alloy (Ti-49Al-1V) containing low levels of carbon (0.07 at. pct). The degree of strengthening resulting from the addition of carbon was found to be dependent on microstructure. At 815 C and 150 MPa, the addition of carbon reduced the minimum creep rate by a factor of approximately 20 in the equiaxed {gamma} and duplex microstructures and by a factor of 3 in the fully lamellar microstructures. Carbide precipitation occurred in this alloy when aged in the temperature range of 700 C to 950 C. The addition of carbon leads to a decease in the stress exponent from 4 to 3 in the duplex and equiaxed {gamma} microstructures and the inhibition of sub-boundary formation in the duplex microstructure. This suggests that solute/dislocation interaction mechanisms, rather than a direct effect of carbide precipitates, are responsible for the significant increase in creep resistance observed in this alloy.

  15. Sharp interface model of creep deformation in crystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, Y.; McFadden, G. B.; Sekerka, R. F.; Boettinger, W. J.

    2015-08-01

    We present a rigorous irreversible thermodynamics treatment of creep deformation of solid materials with interfaces described as geometric surfaces capable of vacancy generation and absorption and moving under the influence of local thermodynamic forces. The free energy dissipation rate derived in this work permits clear identification of thermodynamic driving forces for all stages of the creep process and formulation of kinetic equations of creep deformation and microstructure evolution. The theory incorporates capillary effects and reveals the different roles played by the interface free energy and interface stress. To describe the interaction of grain boundaries with stresses, we classify grain boundaries into coherent, incoherent and semicoherent, depending on their mechanical response to the stress. To prepare for future applications, we specialize the general equations to a particular case of a linear-elastic solid with a small concentration of vacancies. The proposed theory creates a thermodynamic framework for addressing more complex cases, such as creep in multicomponent alloys and cross-effects among vacancy generation/absorption and grain boundary motion and sliding.

  16. Creep Properties and Deformation Mechanisms of a FGH95 Ni-based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jun; Tian, Su-gui; Zhou, Xiao-ming

    2013-07-01

    By means of full heat treatment, microstructure observation, lattice parameters determination, and the measurement of creep curves, an investigation has been conducted into the microstructure and creep mechanisms of FGH95 Ni-based superalloy. Results show that after the alloy is hot isostatically pressed, coarse ?' phase discontinuously distributes along the previous particle boundaries. After solution treatment at high temperature and aging, the grain size has no obvious change, and the amount of coarse ?' phase decreases, and a high volume fraction of fine ?' phase dispersedly precipitates in the ? matrix. Moreover, the granular carbides are found to be precipitated along grain boundaries, which can hinder the grain boundaries' sliding and enhance the creep resistance of the alloy. By x-ray diffraction analysis, it is indicated that the lattice misfit between the ? and ?' phases decreases in the alloy after full heat treatment. In the ranges of experimental temperatures and applied stresses, the creep activation energy of the alloy is measured to be 630.4 kJ/mol. During creep, the deformation mechanisms of the alloy are that dislocations slip in the ? matrix or shear into the ?' phase. Thereinto, the creep dislocations move over the ?' phase by the Orowan mechanism, and the < { 1 10 } rangle super-dislocation shearing into the ?' phase can be decomposed to form the configuration of (1/3) < { 1 12 } rangle super-Shockleys' partials and the stacking fault.

  17. Elevated temperature creep-rupture behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-03-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of [001] oriented single crystals of the nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100 was investigated at temperatures of 925 and 1000 °C. In the stress and temperature ranges studied, the steady state creep rate, time to failure, time to the onset of secondary creep, and the time to the onset of tertiary creep all exhibited power law dependencies on the applied stress. The creep rate exponents for this alloy were between seven and eight, and the modulus-corrected activation energy for creep was approximately 350 kjoule/mole, which was comparable to the measured activa-tion energy for Ostwald ripening of the γ' precipitates. Oriented γ' coarsening to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress was very prominent during creep. At 1000 °C, the formation of a continuous γ-γ' lamellar structure was completed during the primary creep stage. Shear through the γ-γ ' interface is considered to be the rate limiting step in the deformation process. Gradual thickening of the lamellae appeared to be the cause of the onset of tertiary creep. At 925 °C, the fully developed lamellar structure was not achieved until the secondary or tertiary creep stages. At this temperature, the γ-γ' lamellar structure did not appear to be as beneficial for creep resistance as at the higher temperature.

  18. Elevated temperature creep-rupture behavior of the single crystal nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of 001-line-oriented single crystals of the nickel-base superalloy NASAIR 100 was investigated at temperatures of 925 and 1000 C. In the stress and temperature ranges studied, the steady state creep rate, time to failure, time to the onset of secondary creep, and the time to the onset of tertiary creep all exhibited power law dependencies on the applied stress. The creep rate exponents for this alloy were between seven and eight, and the modulus-corrected activation energy for creep was approximately 350 kjoule/mole, which was comparable to the measured activation energy for Ostwald ripening of the gamma-prime precipitates. Oriented gamma-prime coarsening to form lamellae perpendicular to the applied stress was very prominent during creep. At 1000 C, the formation of a continuous gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure was completed during the primary creep stage. Shear through the gamma-gamma-prime interface is considerd to be the rate limiting step in the deformation process. Gradual thickening of the lamellae appeared to be the cause of the onset of tertiary creep. At 925 C, the fully developed lamellar structure was not achieved until the secondary or tertiary creep stages. At this temperature, the gamma-gamma-prime lamellar structure did not appear to be as beneficial for creep resistance as at the higher temperature.

  19. Elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovic, J. J.; Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Sensitivity of the elevated temperature deformation of TD-nickel to grain size and shape was examined in both tension and creep. Elevated temperature strength increased with increasing grain diameter and increasing L/D ratio. Measured activation enthalpies in tension and creep were not the same. In tension, the internal stress was not proportional to the shear modulus. Creep activation enthalpies increased with increasing L/D ratio and increasing grain diameter, to high values compared with that of the self diffusion enthalpy. It has been postulated that two concurrent processes contribute to the elevated temperature deformation of polycrystalline TD-nickel: (1) diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and (2) dislocation motion.

  20. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  1. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  2. A microstructural study of creep and thermal fatigue deformation in 60Sn-40Pb solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Tribula, D.

    1990-06-02

    Thermal fatigue failures of solder joints in electronic devices often arise from cyclic shear strains imposed by the mismatched thermal expansion coefficients of the materials that bind the joint as temperature changes are encountered. Increased solder joint reliability demands a fundamental understanding of the metallurigical mechanisms that control the fatigue to design accurate accelerated probative tests and new, more fatigue resistant solder alloys. The high temperatures and slow strain rates that pertain to thermal fatigue imply that creep is an important deformation mode in the thermal fatigue cycle. In this work, the creep behaviour of a solder joint is studied to determine the solder's microstructural response to this type of deformation and to relate this to the more complex problem of thermal fatigue. It is shown that creep failures arise from the inherent inhomogeneity and instability of the solder microstructure and suggest that small compositional changes of the binary near-eutectic Pn-Sn alloy may defeat the observed failure mechanisms. This work presents creep and thermal fatigue data for several near-eutectic Pb-Sn solder compositions and concludes that a 58Sn-40Pb-2In and a 58Sn-40Pb-2Cd alloy show significantly enhanced fatigue resistance over that of the simple binary material. 80 refs., 33 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Improved Creep Measurements for Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Ye, X.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2010-01-01

    Our team has developed a novel approach to measuring creep at extremely high temperatures using electrostatic levitation (ESL). This method has been demonstrated on niobium up to 2300 C, while ESL has melted tungsten (3400 C). This method has been extended to lower temperatures and higher stresses and applied to new materials, including a niobium-based superalloy, MASC. High-precision machined spheres of the sample are levitated in the NASA MSFC ESL, a national user facility and heated with a laser. The samples are rotated with an induction motor at up to 30,000 revolutions per second. The rapid rotation loads the sample through centripetal acceleration, producing a shear stress of about 60 MPa at the center, causing the sample to deform. The deformation of the sample is captured on high-speed video, which is analyzed by machine-vision software from the University of Massachusetts. The deformations are compared to finite element models to determine the constitutive constants in the creep relation. Furthermore, the non-contact method exploits stress gradients within the sample to determine the stress exponent in a single test.

  4. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of CLAM steel at 823 K and 873 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Boyu; Huang, Bo; Li, Chunjing; Liu, Shaojun; Xu, Gang; Zhao, Yanyun; Huang, Qunying

    2014-12-01

    China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel is selected as the candidate structural material in Fusion Design Study (FDS) series fusion reactor conceptual designs. The creep property of CLAM steel has been studied in this paper. Creep tests have been carried out at 823 K and 873 K over a stress range of 150-230 MPa. The creep curves showed three creep regimes, primary creep, steady-state creep and tertiary creep. The relationship between minimum creep rate (ε˙min) and the applied stress (σ) could be described by Norton power law, and the stress exponent n was decreased with the increase of the creep temperature. The creep mechanism was analyzed with the fractographes of the rupture specimens which were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coarsening of precipitates observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM) indicated the microstructural degradation after creep test.

  5. Room Temperature Creep Of SiC/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Gyekenyesi, Andrew; Levine, Stanley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a recent experimental study, time dependent deformation was observed for a damaged Hi-Nicalon reinforced, BN interphase, chemically vapor infiltrated SiC matrix composites subjected to static loading at room temperature. The static load curves resembled primary creep curves. In addition, acoustic emission was monitored during the test and significant AE activity was recorded while maintaining a constant load, which suggested matrix cracking or interfacial sliding. For similar composites with carbon interphases, little or no time dependent deformation was observed. Evidently, exposure of the BN interphase to the ambient environment resulted in a reduction in the interfacial mechanical properties, i.e. interfacial shear strength and/or debond energy. These results were in qualitative agreement with observations made by Eldridge of a reduction in interfacial shear stress with time at room temperature as measured by fiber push-in experiments.

  6. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J.; Bradshaw, C.; Rogers, J. R.; Rathz, T. J.; Wall, J. J.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P. K.; Hyers, R. W.

    2005-01-01

    Conventional techniques for measuring creep are limited to about 1700 C, so a new technique is required for higher temperatures. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  7. Non-contact Creep Resistance Measurement for Ultra-high temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghuyn; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Rogers, Jan; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Continuing pressures for higher performance and efficiency in propulsion are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature materials. Some immediate applications in spaceflight include combustion chambers for advanced chemical rockets and turbomachinery for jet engines and power conversion in nuclear-electric propulsion. In the case of rockets, the combination of high stresses and high temperatures make the characterization of creep properties very important. Creep is even more important in the turbomachinery, where a long service life is an additional constraint. Some very high-temperature materials are being developed, including platinum group metals, carbides, borides, and silicides. But the measurement of creep properties at very high temperatures is itself problematic, because the testing instrument must operate at such high temperatures. Conventional techniques are limited to about 1700 C. A new, containerless technique for measuring creep deformation has been developed. This technique is based on electrostatic levitation (ESL) of a spherical sample, which is heated to the measurement temperature and rotated at a rate such that the centrifugal acceleration causes creep deformation. Creep of samples has been demonstrated at up to 2300 C in the ESL facility at NASA MSFC, while ESL itself has been applied at over 3000 C, and has no theoretical maximum temperature. The preliminary results and future directions of this NASA-funded research collaboration will be presented.

  8. High temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Swindeman, Robert W.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1989-01-01

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt % 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150.degree.-1200.degree. C. and then cold deforming 5-15 %. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700.degree. C.

  9. Improved high temperature creep resistant austenitic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1988-05-13

    An improved austenitic alloy having in wt% 19-21 Cr, 30-35 Ni, 1.5-2.5 Mn, 2-3 Mo, 0.1-0.4 Si, 0.3-0.5 Ti, 0.1-0.3 Nb, 0.1-0.5 V, 0.001-0.005 P, 0.08-0.12 C, 0.01-0.03 N, 0.005-0.01 B and the balance iron that is further improved by annealing for up to 1 hour at 1150-1200/degree/C and then cold deforming 5-15%. The alloy exhibits dramatically improved creep rupture resistance and ductility at 700/degree/C. 2 figs.

  10. Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

    2012-10-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

  11. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  12. The role of creep in high temperature low cycle fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Spera, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The significance of the role that creep can play in governing high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue resistance is investigated by conducting strain cycling tests on two high-temperature stainless steel alloys and making concurrent measurements of stress, temperature, and strain at various frequencies. The results are then analyzed in terms of damage imposed by creep and fatigue components. It is shown that creep can play an important and sometimes dominant role in low cycle fatigue at high temperatures. The results of the study include the findings that: (1) the simple life-fraction theory described is adequate for calculating creep damage when the cyclic creep rupture curve is used as a basis for analysis; (2) a method of universal slopes originally developed for room temperature use is sufficiently accurate at high temperature to be used to calculate pure fatigue damage; and (3) a linear creep-fatigue damage rule can explain the transitions observed from one failure mode to another.

  13. Creep model of unsaturated sliding zone soils and long-term deformation analysis of landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liangchao; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yeming

    2015-04-01

    Sliding zone soil is a special soil layer formed in the development of a landslide. Its creep behavior plays a significant role in long-term deformation of landslides. Due to rainfall infiltration and reservoir water level fluctuation, the soils in the slide zone are often in unsaturated state. Therefore, the investigation of creep behaviors of the unsaturated sliding zone soils is of great importance for understanding the mechanism of the long-term deformation of a landslide in reservoir areas. In this study, the full-process creep curves of the unsaturated soils in the sliding zone in different net confining pressure, matric suctions and stress levels were obtained from a large number of laboratory triaxial creep tests. A nonlinear creep model for unsaturated soils and its three-dimensional form was then deduced based on the component model theory and unsaturated soil mechanics. This creep model was validated with laboratory creep data. The results show that this creep model can effectively and accurately describe the nonlinear creep behaviors of the unsaturated sliding zone soils. In order to apply this creep model to predict the long-term deformation process of landslides, a numerical model for simulating the coupled seepage and creep deformation of unsaturated sliding zone soils was developed based on this creep model through the finite element method (FEM). By using this numerical model, we simulated the deformation process of the Shuping landslide located in the Three Gorges reservoir area, under the cycling reservoir water level fluctuation during one year. The simulation results of creep displacement were then compared with the field deformation monitoring data, showing a good agreement in trend. The results show that the creeping deformations of landslides have strong connections with the changes of reservoir water level. The creep model of unsaturated sliding zone soils and the findings obtained by numerical simulations in this study are conducive to reveal the mechanisms of the dynamic process of landslide deformation, and serve as an important basis for the prediction and evaluation of landslides.

  14. Concrete creep at transient temperature: constitutive law and mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, J.C.; Bazant, Z.P.; Marchertas, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    A constitutive law which describes the transient thermal creep of concrete is presented. Moisture and temperature are two major parameters in this constitutive law. Aside from load, creep, cracking, and thermal (shrinkage) strains, stress-induced hygrothermal strains are also included in the analysis. The theory agrees with most types of test data which include basic creep, thermal expansion, shrinkage, swelling, creep at cyclic heating or drying, and creep at heating under compression or bending. Examples are given to demonstrate agreement between the theory and the experimental data. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Elevated temperature creep properties of the 54Fe-29Ni-17Co "Kovar" alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, John Joseph, Jr.; Rejent, Jerome Andrew; Schmale, David T.

    2009-01-22

    The outline of this presentation is: (1) Applications of Kovar Alloy in metal/ceramic brazing; (2) Diffusion bonding of precision-photoetched Kovar parts; (3) Sample composition and annealing conditions; (4) Intermediate temperature creep properties (350-650 C); (5) Power law creep correlations--with and without modulus correction; (6) Compressive stress-strain properties (23-900 C); (7) Effect of creep deformation on grain growth; and (8) Application of the power law creep correlation to the diffusion bonding application. The summary and conclusions are: Elevated temperature creep properties of Kovar from 750-900 C obey a power law creep equation with a stress exponent equal to 4.9, modulus compensated activation energy of 47.96 kcal/mole. Grain growth in Kovar creep samples tested at 750 and 800 C is quite sluggish. Significant grain growth occurs at 850 C and above, this is consistent with isothermal grain growth studies performed on Kovar alloy wires. Finite element analysis of the diffusion bonding of Kovar predict that stresses of 30 MPa and higher are needed for good bonding at 850 C, we believe that 'sintering' effects must be accounted for to allow FEA to be predictive of actual processing conditions. Additional creep tests are planned at 250-650 C.

  16. High-Temperature Creep of Fine-Grained Anorthite Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, K.; Koizumi, S.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    Rheology of the lower crust has often been compared to the creep properties of polycrystalline anorthite. Samples that have been used in previous studies (Dimanov et al., 1999; Rybacki and Dresen, 2000) were prepared through crystallization of anorthite glass which can remain in the experiment and also contain some impurities such as absorbed water, TiO2, MgO and Fe2O3. In this study, we synthesized genuinely pure polycrystalline anorthite using the technique that does not allow the contamination of water and glass phase. Also, we prepared anorthite aggregates with glass phase and/or a small amount (1wt%) of MgO to investigate the creep properties of pure and impure anorthite aggregates. Pure anorthite powders were prepared through high temperature reaction of highly pure and nano-sized powders of CaCO3, Al2O3 and SiO2 and then they were vacuum sintered (Koizumi et al., 2010). For MgO doping, we added Mg(OH)2powders at the synthesis of anorthite powders. Glass phase was introduced to the samples by sintering above melting temperature and subsequent quenching. Constant load tests under 1 atmosphere were performed at temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1380?C and stresses of 10 to 120 MPa. We measured Arithmetic mean grain size of specimens by microstructural observations using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after creep tests. Grain sizes of all the specimens were around 1 ?m before and after the creep test. Log stress versus log strain rate showed a linear relationship where its slope gave a stress exponent, n of 1, indicating that all the samples were deformed under diffusion creep. Anorthite containing MgO and glass phase were more than two and one orders of magnitude weaker than genuinely pure anorthite aggregates, respectively. Further, our pure aggregate exhibited three orders of magnitude lager strength compared to the "pure" aggregate used in previous studies. These results indicate that a small amount of glass and/or impurities including water have a great influence on the strength of polycrystalline anorthite aggregates.

  17. High temperature indentation creep tests on anhydrite - a promising first look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, D.; Rller, K.; Stckhert, B.

    2014-08-01

    Indentation creep tests are established in materials engineering, providing information on rheology, deformation mechanisms, and related microstructures of materials. Here we explore the potential of this method on natural, polycrystalline anhydrite. The tests are run at atmospheric pressure, temperatures between 700 and 920 C, and reference stresses between 7 and 30 MPa. An activation energy Q of 338 kJ mol-1 and a stress exponent n of 3.9 are derived. Deformation is localized into shear zones bounding a less deformed approximately conical plug underneath the indenter. Shear zone microstructures reveal inhomogeneous crystal-plastic deformation, subgrains, and extensive strain-induced grain boundary migration, while mechanical twinning appears not to be activated. Microstructure and mechanical data are consistent with deformation by dislocation creep.

  18. High temperature indentation creep tests on anhydrite - a promising first look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorner, D.; Rller, K.; Stckhert, B.

    2013-11-01

    Indentation creep tests are established in materials engineering, providing information on rheology, deformation mechanisms, and related microstructures of materials. Here we explore the potential of this method on natural, polycrystalline anhydrite. The tests are run at atmospheric pressure, temperatures between 700 C and 920 C, and reference stresses between 7 MPa and 30 MPa. An activation energy Q of 338 kJ mol-1 and a stress exponent n of 3.9 are derived. Deformation is localized into shear zones bounding a less deformed approximately conical plug underneath the indenter. Shear zone microstructures reveal inhomogeneous crystal plastic deformation, subgrains, and extensive strain induced grain boundary migration, while mechanical twinning appears not to be activated. Microstructure and mechanical data are consistent with deformation by dislocation creep. Extrapolated to slow natural strain rates, the flow law predicts a high flow strength of anhydrite compared to previous studies.

  19. Creep-strengthening of steel at high temperatures using nano-sized carbonitride dispersions.

    PubMed

    Taneike, Masaki; Abe, Fujio; Sawada, Kota

    2003-07-17

    Creep is a time-dependent mechanism of plastic deformation, which takes place in a range of materials under low stress-that is, under stresses lower than the yield stress. Metals and alloys can be designed to withstand creep at high temperatures, usually by a process called dispersion strengthening, in which fine particles are evenly distributed throughout the matrix. For example, high-temperature creep-resistant ferritic steels achieve optimal creep strength (at 923 K) through the dispersion of yttrium oxide nanoparticles. However, the oxide particles are introduced by complicated mechanical alloying techniques and, as a result, the production of large-scale industrial components is economically unfeasible. Here we report the production of a 9 per cent Cr martensitic steel dispersed with nanometre-scale carbonitride particles using conventional processing techniques. At 923 K, our dispersion-strengthened material exhibits a time-to-rupture that is increased by two orders of magnitude relative to the current strongest creep-resistant steels. This improvement in creep resistance is attributed to a mechanism of boundary pinning by the thermally stable carbonitride precipitates. The material also demonstrates enough fracture toughness. Our results should lead to improved grades of creep-resistant steels and to the economical manufacture of large-scale steel components for high-temperature applications. PMID:12867976

  20. Creep mechanisms and interface-enhanced deformation twinning in a two-phase lamellar TiAl alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L.M., LLNL

    1997-03-01

    Deformation mechanisms and the role of interfaces in deformation twinning of a two-phase [TiAl({gamma})/Ti{sub 3}Al({alpha}{sub 2})] lamellar alloy creep deformed at elevated temperatures have been investigated. Since the multiplication of lattice dislocations within both {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} lamellae is very limited at a low stress level due to a refined lamellar microstructure, the glide of interfacial dislocations on both {gamma}/{alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma}/{gamma} interfaces (i.e interface sliding) becomes an important deformation mode. Obstacles such as impinged lattice dislocations can impede the movement of interfacial dislocations, which glide in a cooperative fashion along the lamellar interfaces. The impediment of dislocation motion subsequently causes a dislocation pile-up in front of obstacles as creep strain accumulates. When the crystals deform at high stress level, deformation twinning becomes a predominant deformation mode. Deformation twins are found to nucleate from the interfaces as a result of a local stress concentration generated from dislocation pile-ups. It is suggested that the deformation twinning in lamellar TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al crystals can be vieived as a stress relaxation process for the concentration of stress at the head of each dislocation pile-up. An interface-assisted twinning mechanism is accordingly proposed and discussed.

  1. Creep behaviour of Cu-30 percent Zn at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The present, intermediate-temperature (573-823 K) range investigation of creep properties for single-phase Cu-30 percent Zn alpha-brass observed inverse, linear, and sigmoidal primary-creep transients above 573 K under stresses that yield minimum creep rates in the 10 to the -7th to 2 x 10 to the -4th range; normal primary creep occurred in all other conditions. In conjunction with a review of the pertinent literature, a detailed analysis of these data suggests that no clearly defined, classes M-to-A-to-M transition exists in this alloy notwithstanding the presence of both classes' characteristics under nominally similar stresses and temperatures.

  2. Time temperature-stress dependence of boron fiber deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Flexural stress relaxation (FSR) and flexural internal friction (FIF) techniques were employed to measure the time-dependent deformation of boron fibers from -190 to 800 C. The principal specimens were 203 micrometers diameter fibers commercially produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a 13 micrometer tungsten substrate. The observation of complete creep strain recovery with time and temperature indicated that CVD boron fibers deform flexurally as anelastic solids with no plastic component.

  3. Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xingshuo

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the leading concepts of the Generation IV nuclear reactor development, which is the core component of Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The major challenge in the research and development of NGNP is the performance and reliability of structure materials at high temperature. Alloy 617, with an exceptional combination of high temperature strength and oxidation resistance, has been selected as a primary candidate material for structural use, particularly in Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) which has an outlet temperature in the range of 850 to 950C and an inner pressure from 5 to 20MPa. In order to qualify the material to be used at the operation condition for a designed service life of 60 years, a comprehensive scientific understanding of creep behavior at high temperature and low stress regime is necessary. In addition, the creep mechanism and the impact factors such as precipitates, grain size, and grain boundary characters need to be evaluated for the purpose of alloy design and development. In this study, thermomechanically processed specimens of alloy 617 with different grain sizes were fabricated, and creep tests with a systematic test matrix covering the temperatures of 850 to 1050C and stress levels from 5 to 100MPa were conducted. Creep data was analyzed, and the creep curves were found to be unconventional without a well-defined steady-state creep. Very good linear relationships were determined for minimum creep rate versus stress levels with the stress exponents determined around 3-5 depending on the grain size and test condition. Activation energies were also calculated for different stress levels, and the values are close to 400kJ/mol, which is higher than that for self-diffusion in nickel. Power law dislocation climb-glide mechanism was proposed as the dominant creep mechanism in the test condition regime. Dynamic recrystallization happening at high strain range enhanced dislocation climb and are believed to be responsible for the monotonically increasing creep rates. Apart from dislocation creep, diffusional creep in existence at low stress level in fine-grained (ASTM 8) material also contributed partly to the creep rates. A reasonable prediction on the long term performance of alloy 617 was also made by extrapolation method using optimized parameters based on creep test data. Furthermore, microstructure characterization was performed utilizing Optical Microscopy (OM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and related analytical techniques on samples from both before and after creep, with special attention given to grain size effects, grain boundary type, and dislocation substructures. Evidences for dislocation climb and dislocation glide were found through detailed dislocation analysis by TEM, proving the dislocation climb-glide mechanism. The formation of subgrain boundary, the changes in boundary characters and grain sizes was confirmed by EBSD analysis for dynamic recrystallization. The effects of initial grain size and grain boundary character distribution on the creep behavior and mechanism were also evaluated. Through the results obtained from this experimental study, new insights were provided into how changes in microstructure take place during high temperature creep of alloy 617, creep mechanism at different conditions was identified, and the creep deformation model was discussed. The results will also serve to technological and code case development and design of materials for NGNP.

  4. Creep and Environmental Effects on High Temperature Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Carroll; C. Cabet; R. Madland; R. Wright

    2011-06-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 C. System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior in both air and impure helium, representative of the VHTR primary coolant. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% in air at 950 C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile stress, consistent with the observed change in fracture mode from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Increases in the tensile hold time, beyond 180 sec, was not detrimental to the creep-fatigue resistance. Grain boundary damage in the form of grain boundary cracking was present in the bulk of the creep-fatigue specimens. This bulk cracking was quantified and found to be similar for hold times of up to 1800 sec consistent with the saturation in failure lives and rapid stress relaxation observed during the creep portion of the creep-fatigue cycle.

  5. Nuclear deformation at finite temperature.

    PubMed

    Alhassid, Y; Gilbreth, C N; Bertsch, G F

    2014-12-31

    Deformation, a key concept in our understanding of heavy nuclei, is based on a mean-field description that breaks the rotational invariance of the nuclear many-body Hamiltonian. We present a method to analyze nuclear deformations at finite temperature in a framework that preserves rotational invariance. The auxiliary-field Monte Carlo method is used to generate a statistical ensemble and calculate the probability distribution associated with the quadrupole operator. Applying the technique to nuclei in the rare-earth region, we identify model-independent signatures of deformation and find that deformation effects persist to temperatures higher than the spherical-to-deformed shape phase-transition temperature of mean-field theory. PMID:25615315

  6. High temperature creep of SiC densified using a transient liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Jou, Z.C.; Virkar, A.V. ); Cutler, R.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Silicon carbide-based ceramics can be rapidly densified above approximately 1850 {degree}C due to a transient liquid phase resulting from the reaction between alumina and aluminum oxycarbides. The resulting ceramics are fine-grained, dense, and exhibit high strength at room temperature. SiC hot pressed at 1875 {degree}C for 10 min in Ar was subjected to creep deformation in bending at elevated temperatures between 1500 and 1650 {degree}C in Ar. Creep was thermally activated with an activation energy of 743 kJ/mol. Creep rates at 1575 {degree}C were between 10{sup {minus}9}/s and 10{sup {minus}7}/s at an applied stress between 38 and 200 MPa, respectively, resulting in a stress exponent of {approx}1.7.

  7. Brittle creep in basalt and its application to time-dependent volcano deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, M. J.; Baud, P.; Meredith, P. G.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bell, A. F.; Main, I. G.

    2011-07-01

    Time-dependent brittle deformation is a fundamental and pervasive process operating in the Earth's upper crust. Its characterization is a pre-requisite to understanding and unraveling the complexities of crustal evolution and dynamics. The preferential chemical interaction between pore fluids and strained atomic bonds at crack tips, a mechanism known as stress corrosion, allows rock to fail under a constant stress that is well below its short-term strength over an extended period of time; a process known as brittle creep. Here we present the first experimental measurements of brittle creep in a basic igneous rock (a basalt from Mt. Etna volcano) under triaxial stress conditions. Results from conventional creep experiments show that creep strain rates are highly dependent on the level of applied stress (and can be equally well fit by a power law or an exponential law); with a 20% increase in stress producing close to three orders of magnitude increase in creep strain rate. Results from stress-stepping creep experiments show that creep strain rates are also influenced by the imposed effective confining pressure. We show that only part of this change can be attributed to the purely mechanical influence of an increase in effective pressure, with the remainder interpreted as due to a reduction in stress corrosion reactions; the result of a reduction in crack aperture that restricts the rate of transport of reactive species to crack tips. Overall, our results also suggest that a critical level of crack damage is required before the deformation starts to accelerate to failure, regardless of the level of applied stress and the time taken to reach this point. The experimental results are discussed in terms of microstructural observations and fits to a macroscopic creep law, and compared with the observed deformation history at Mt. Etna volcano.

  8. The constitutive representation of high-temperature creep damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    The elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations of Bodner-Partom were applied to modeling creep damage in a high temperature Ni-alloy, B1900 + Hf. Both tertiary creep in bulk materials and creep crack growth in flawed materials were considered. In the latter case, the energy rate line integral was used for characterizing the crack driving force, and the rate of crack extension was computed using a local damage formulation that assumed fracture was controlled by cavitation occurring within the crack-tip process zone. The results of this investigation were used to assess the evolution equation for isotropic damage utilized in the Bodner-Partom constitutive equations.

  9. The Effects of Ferrite Content and Morphology on the Mechanical Properties and Room Temperature Creep of Quenched and Tempered SAE 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng; Bhole, Sanjiwan; Northwood, Derek

    The room temperature creep behavior is investigated for a commercial SAE 4340 steel containing small amounts of ferrite. Significant creep deformation occurs at stress levels below 1/3 ?0.2 (The yield strength at 0.2% offset strain). Small amounts of ferrite (0% to 4%) have no influence on the hardness and yield strength. However, these small amounts of ferrite play an important role in controlling the creep resistance. The presence of any ferrite leads to a reduction in the creep resistance. The creep deformation at room temperature increases with an increase in the amount of ferrite. The effects of ferrite morphology and an inhomogeneous microstructure on the creep resistance are discussed.

  10. Post- and interseismic deformation due to both localized and distributed creep at depth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, E. A.; Zhang, G.; Hines, T.

    2013-12-01

    There are two end-member representations of the ductile lithosphere (i.e., the lower crust and uppermost mantle) commonly used in models of post- and interseismic deformation around strike-slip faults: either (1) laterally homogeneous ductile layers, with sharp contrasts in rheological properties between the layers, in which creep is distributed; or (2) discrete extensions of the fault at depth in which creep is fully localized. The most realistic representation of the ductile lithosphere on earthquake cycle time scales likely falls between these two end-members. Researchers have considered both distributed and localized creep when interpreting post- and interseismic deformation, although the two mechanisms are most commonly treated separately, with the localized creep often approximated by kinematic slip on planar faults. There are a few noteworthy models that considered the feedback between both distributed and localized creep, although those models were largely constrained to 2D geometries of infinite length faults. The thickness of shear zones in the ductile lithosphere may be comparable to the locking depth of the fault, and the existence of a deep shear zone does not preclude the possibility that some distributed creep occurs in the surrounding lithosphere. Furthermore, variations in rheology, including both rheological models and their parameters, may be more subtle than the discrete contrasts typically assumed. In this presentation, we consider models of postseismic deformation following a finite length, strike-slip fault, as well as models of interseismic deformation around an infinite length strike-slip fault. Both sets of models are capable of localized and distributed creep at depth, and use Maxwell viscoelasticity. We show that the horizontal surface velocities during the early postseismic period are most sensitive to the viscosity of the shear zone; however during much of the interseismic period the shear zone is not apparent from the surface deformation, which is consistent with very large uniform viscosities in the ductile lithosphere. On the other hand, the vertical postseismic surface deformation is highly sensitive to the depth-dependent distribution of viscosities, regardless of whether the model contains purely distributed creep or also includes a component of localized creep. Hence, vertical postseismic deformation can discriminate vertical contrasts in viscosity, but is not a good discriminant of localized vs. distributed creep at depth. Models that contain components of both localized and distributed creep predict transient postseismic deformation, characterized by a fast relaxation phase followed by a slower relaxation phase, even when the model only contains steady Maxwell viscosities. This transience is equivalent to that predicted in models that approximate the ductile lithosphere with transient viscoelasticity, and we discuss the implication on the lithosphere rheology inferred from deformation following the 1997 Manyi, China, earthquake. Finally, we address the mechanism in which shear zones might develop under strike-slip faults and the implication of power-law creep rheologies.

  11. The high temperature creep behavior of oxides and oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Linda E.; Tressler, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature was conducted on the high-temperature creep behavior of single and polycrystalline oxides which potentially could serve as fiber reinforcements in ceramics or metal matrix applications. Sapphire when oriented with the basal plane perpendicular to the fiber axis (c-axis oriented) is highly creep resistant at temperatures in excess of 1600 C and applied loads of 100 MPa and higher. Pyramidal slip is preferentially activated in sapphire under these conditions and steady-state creep rates in the range of 10(exp -7) to 10 (exp -8)/s were reported. Data on the creep resistance of polycrystalline beryllia suggest that C-axiz oriented single crystal beryllia may be a viable candidate as a fiber reinforcement material; however, the issure of fabricability and moisture sensitivity must be addressed for this material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) also appears to be a fiber candidate material having a high resistance to creep which is due to it's complex crystal structure and high Peierl resistance. The high creep resistance of garnet suggests that there may be other complex ternary oxides such as single crystal mullite which may also be candidate materials for fiber reinforcements. Finally, CVD and single crystal SiC, although not oxides, do possess a high resistance to creep in the temperature range between 1550 and 1850 C and under stresses of 110 to 220 MPa. From a review of the literature, it appears that for high creep resistant applications sapphire, silicon carbide, yttrium aluminum garnet, mullite, and beryllia are desirable candidate materials which require further investigation.

  12. A model for high temperature creep of single crystal superalloys based on nonlocal damage and viscoplastic material behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, B. T.; Hackl, K.

    2014-07-01

    A model for high temperature creep of single crystal superalloys is developed, which includes constitutive laws for nonlocal damage and viscoplasticity. It is based on a variational formulation, employing potentials for free energy, and dissipation originating from plasticity and damage. Evolution equations for plastic strain and damage variables are derived from the well-established minimum principle for the dissipation potential. The model is capable of describing the different stages of creep in a unified way. Plastic deformation in superalloys incorporates the evolution of dislocation densities of the different phases present. It results in a time dependence of the creep rate in primary and secondary creep. Tertiary creep is taken into account by introducing local and nonlocal damage. Herein, the nonlocal one is included in order to model strain localization as well as to remove mesh dependence of finite element calculations. Numerical results and comparisons with experimental data of the single crystal superalloy LEK94 are shown.

  13. Creep-fatigue criteria and inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.; Ogata, T.

    1994-02-01

    The ever increasing demand for safety requires that stringent and conservative methodology be developed for design and analysis of reactor components. At present modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for construction of steam generators in fast breeder reactors. Therefore high-temperature material properties and extensive insight into deformation behavior and creep-fatigue life are required to develop design guidelines for use of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in actual plant components. However, existing information on creep-fatigue and deformation response of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is insufficient, and further experimental and modeling efforts are needed. A joint effort between the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the United States and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan was started in 1991 to investigate the inelastic behavior of and to develop creep-fatigue criteria for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at elevated temperatures. The current program focuses on uniaxial and biaxial fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue tests. Results of this effort are presented in this report. Section 2 introduces the test material and experimental arrangement. Uniaxial exploratory deformation tests and unified constitutive equations for inelastic analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are presented in Sections 3 and 4, respectively. Axial fatigue and creep-fatigue test results are discussed in Section 5. Section 6 is devoted to constant stress creep tests. Biaxial fatigue and creep-fatigue tests are described in Section 7. Progress in creep-fatigue life evaluation is reported in Section 8.

  14. Plastic Deformation of Aluminum Single Crystals at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R D; Young, A P; Schwope, A D

    1956-01-01

    This report describes the results of a comprehensive study of plastic deformation of aluminum single crystals over a wide range of temperatures. The results of constant-stress creep tests have been reported for the temperature range from 400 degrees to 900 degrees F. For these tests, a new capacitance-type extensometer was designed. This unit has a range of 0.30 inch over which the sensitivity is very nearly linear and can be varied from as low a sensitivity as is desired to a maximum of 20 microinches per millivolt with good stability. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of small amounts of prestraining, by two different methods, on the creep and tensile properties of these aluminum single crystals. From observations it has been concluded that plastic deformation takes place predominantly by slip which is accompanied by the mechanisms of kinking and polygonization.

  15. Elevated temperature deformation of thoria dispersed nickel-chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of thoria nickel-chromium (TD-NiCr) was examined over the temperature range 593 C (1100 F) to 1260 C (2300 F) in tension and compression and at 1093 C (2000 F) in creep. Major emphasis was placed on: (1) the effects of the material and test related variables (grain size, temperature, stress and strain rate) on the deformation process; and (2) the evaluation of single crystal TD-NiCr material produced by a directional recrystallization process. Elevated temperature yield strength levels and creep activation enthalpies were found to increase with increasing grain size reaching maximum values for the single crystal TD-NiCr. Stress exponent of the steady state creep rate was also significantly higher for the single crystal TD-NiCr as compared to that determined for the polycrystalline materials. The elevated temperature deformation of TD-NiCr was analyzed in terms of two concurrent, parallel processes: diffusion controlled grain boundary sliding, and dislocation motion.

  16. High-Temperature Deformation of Enstatite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystricky, M.; Lawlis, J.; Mackwell, S. J.; Heidelbach, F.; Raterron, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Although enstatite is a significant component of the upper mantle, its rheology is still poorly understood. We have performed an experimental investigation of the mechanical properties of enstatite at high pressure and temperature in the proto- and ortho-enstatite stability fields. Synthetic enstatite powders were produced by reacting San Carlos olivine powders with lab-grade quartz. Powders were hot-pressed at high PT, and were then baked at 1000C under controlled oxygen fugacity conditions to remove all hydrous defect species. The polycrystalline enstatite samples were deformed in a Paterson gas-medium apparatus at temperatures of 1200-1300C, an oxygen fugacity buffered at Ni/NiO, and confining pressures of 300 or 450 MPa. Under these conditions, samples were in the orthoenstatite field at 450 MPa and likely mainly in the protoenstatite field at 300 MPa. At both confining pressures, the mechanical data display a progressive increase of the stress exponent n from 1 to 3 as a function of differential stress, suggesting a transition from diffusional to dislocation creep. Non-linear least-square fits to the high-stress data yielded flow laws with n=3 and activation energies of 600 and 720 kJ/mol for ortho- and proto-enstatite, respectively. The measured strengths are significantly higher than those derived from Raleigh et al. (1971) and Ross and Nielsen (1978), due to the influence of water on the mechanical behavior of their samples. Deformed samples were analysed using optical microscopy, SEM and TEM. Because enstatite reverts to clinoenstatite during quenching, the microstructures present highly twinned grains composed of thin alternating domains of clino- and ortho-pyroxene. Nevertheless, the microstructures show evidence of dislocation processes in the form of undulatory extinction and kink bands. Crystallographic preferred orientations measured by EBSD are axisymmetric and indicate preferential slip on (100)[001]. High resolution TEM indicates that for samples deformed at 450MPa, the thin ortho- and clino-pyroxene lamellae are bound by partial c dislocations in (100) planes, suggesting extensive gliding of partial c dislocations on (100) in samples deformed in the orthoenstatite field. Our high-stress mechanical data for protoenstatite is in perfect agreement with the extrapolation of the flow law for dislocation creep on (100)[001], obtained for single crystals deformed in the protoenstatite stability field (Mackwell, 1991). This confirms that the deformation in our samples is likely controlled by slip on (100)[001], arguably the weakest slip system in enstatite. Comparison of our results with dislocation creep flow laws for olivine indicates that enstatite is almost half an order of magnitude stronger than olivine at our experimental conditions. However, as enstatite has a slightly higher activation energy than olivine, the difference in strength is not likely to be as high in the upper mantle.

  17. Progressive evolution of microfabrics in high-temperature indentation creep experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, S.; Dorner, D.; Stoeckhert, B.

    2014-12-01

    Microfabrics of natural rocks as well as of those deformed in laboratory experiments are studied post-mortem, the history of fabric evolution being inferred from a finite state. This is a major drawback when being interested in modification of fabrics related to progressive deformation. Here we present a novel approach to analyze and compare fabrics in different stages of evolution, taking spatial position to mimic a time series. Using this approach, evolution in time can be investigated on one sample deformed in a single indentation creep test. Such experiments at high temperatures and atmospheric pressure provide information on mechanical properties of rock-forming minerals as well as on microfabrics developed during inhomogeneous deformation underneath the indenter. Using a conventional creep apparatus, a cylindrical alumina indenter, 2 mm in diameter, is driven by a dead load into the flat surface of a specimen. A penetration depth of 1 mm is typically reached after hours to days, depending on material, applied temperature, and load. Previous experiments on natural, polycrystalline anhydrite carried out at temperatures between 700C and 920 C yield a stress exponent of 3.9 indicating deformation in the dislocation creep regime, consistent with microstructural observations (Dorner et al., 2014; Solid Earth). Within a cone-shaped region in front of the indenter, the original microfabric appears entirely unaffected. The neutral cone is mantled by highly deformed shear zones. During progressive indentation this structure of undeformed cone and shear zones propagates into the specimen. Thus, for a homogeneous starting material, serial sections of the deformed specimen normal to the indenter axis provide insight into fabrics in distinct stages of evolution. Microfabrics developed at different distance in front of the approaching indenter can be taken to represent a time series. A disadvantage of the technique is that the history of shear zone deformation is complex, comprising components of tangential stretching and simple shear, which complicates the interpretation of fabrics and crystallographic preferred orientations. Notwithstanding, indentation creep tests seem to be a sound experimental approach to study microstructural evolution in time using a single experimentally deformed sample.

  18. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Sommers, B. R.; Lytton, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on Haynes 188 cobalt-base alloy and alpha titanium. The tests on Haynes 188 were conducted at 1600 F and 1800 F for stresses from 3 to 20 ksi, and the as-received, mill-annealed results were compared to specimens given 5%, 10%, and 15% room temperature prestrains and then annealed one hour at 1800 F. The tests on alpha titanium were performed at 7,250 and 10,000 psi at 500 C. One creep test was done at 527 C and 10,000 psi to provide information on kinetics. Results for annealed titanium were compared to specimens given 10% and 20% room temperature prestrains followed by 100 hours recovery at 550 C. Electron microscopy was used to relate dislocation and precipitate structure to the creep behavior of the two materials. The results on Haynes 188 alloy reveal that the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F increases with increasing prestrain for exposure times less than 1,000 hours, the increase at 15% prestrain being more than a factor of ten.

  19. Constrained cavity growth models of longitudinal creep deformation of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. J.; Nix, W. D.

    1986-02-01

    Two models of constrained cavity growth are developed to describe the long-term longitudinal creep behavior of nickel based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. For both models the rupture time is taken as the time for a transverse grain boundary to cavitate fully. A diffusive cavity growth law is assumed to govern cavitation. The applicability of the respective models is determined by the particular grain morphology achieved by thermal-mechanical processing. The first model assumes that longitudinal grain boundaries are unable to slide; hence displacements due to cavitation must be matched by displacements due to dislocation creep in adjoining grains. This model predicts a low stress exponent at the transition from single crystal to cavitation creep behavior, and higher stress exponents at stresses below this transition. Good agreement is found between the model predictions and creep data for MA 754 at 1000 and 1093 °C. A second model considers a grain morphology wherein longitudinal grain boundaries are able to slide by means of deformation of pockets of fine grains. Cavitation of transverse grain boundaries is thus controlled by grain boundary sliding. This model predicts a stress exponent of 1 at low stresses, and serves as an upper bound for the creep rate when a duplex grain morphology is present. Model predictions are in good agreement with creep data for a heat of MA 754 with a duplex grain morphology.

  20. Creep of Ni(3)Al in the temperature regime of anomalous flow behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchic, Michael David

    Much attention has been paid to understanding the dynamics of dislocation motion and substructure formation in Ni3Al in the anomalous flow regime. However, most of the experimental work that has been performed in the lowest temperatures of the anomalous flow regime has been under constant-strain-rate conditions. An alternative and perhaps more fundamental way to probe the plastic behavior of materials is a monotonic creep test, in which the stress and temperature are held constant while the time-dependent strain is measured. The aim of this study is to use constant-stress experiments to further explore the plastic flow anomaly in L12 alloys at low temperatures. Tension creep experiments have been carried out on <123> oriented single crystals of Ni75Al24Ta1 at temperatures between 293 and 473 K. We have observed primary creep leading to exhaustion at all temperatures and stresses, with creep rates declining faster than predicted by the logarithmic creep law. The total strain and creep strain have an anomalous dependence on temperature, which is consistent with the flow stress anomaly. We have also observed other unusual behavior in our creep experiments; for example, the reinitiation of plastic flow at low temperatures after a modest increment in applied stress shows a sigmoidal response, i.e., there is a significant time delay before the plastic strain rate accelerates to a maximum value. We also examined the ability to reinitiate plastic flow in samples that have been crept to exhaustion by simply lowering the test temperature. In addition, we have also performed conventional constant-displacement-rate experiments in the same temperature range. From these experiments, we have discovered that unlike most metals, Ni3Al displays a negative dependence of the work hardening rate (WHR) with increasing strain rate. For tests at intermediate temperatures (373 and 423 K), the WHRs of crystals tested at moderately high strain rates (10-2 s-1) are half the WHRs of crystals tested at conventional strain rates (10 -5 s-1), and this anomalous dependence has also been shown to be reversible with changes in strain rate. The implications of all results are discussed in light of our efforts to model plastic deformation in these alloys.

  1. Strain localization during high temperature creep of marble: The effect of inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Naumann, M.; Dresen, G.

    2014-11-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's middle and lower crust is often localized in ductile shear zones. To better understand the initiation and propagation of high-temperature shear zones induced by the presence of structural and material heterogeneities, we performed deformation experiments in the dislocation creep regime on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) or strong (novaculite) second phase inclusions. The samples were mostly deformed in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of ? 1.9 10- 4 s- 1 to bulk shear strains ? between 0.02 and 2.9 using a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. At low strain, twisted specimens with weak inclusions show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at ? > 0.1-0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed conditions is about 20 MPa, which is ? 8% lower than the strength of intact samples. Strain progressively localized within the matrix with increasing bulk strain, but decayed rapidly with increasing distance from the inclusion tip. Microstructural analysis shows twinning and recrystallization within this process zone, with a strong crystallographic preferred orientation, dominated by {r} and (c) slip in < a >. Recrystallization-induced weakening starts at local shear strain of about 1 in the process zone, corresponding to a bulk shear strain of about 0.1. In contrast, torsion of a sample containing strong inclusions deformed at similar stress as inclusion-free samples, but do not show localization. The experiments demonstrate that the presence of weak heterogeneities initiates localized creep at local stress concentrations around the inclusion tips. Recrystallization-induced grain size reduction may only locally promote grain boundary diffusion creep. Accordingly, the bulk strength of the twisted aggregate is close to or slightly below the lower (isostress) strength bound, determined from the flow strength and volume fraction of matrix and inclusions.

  2. Measurement of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials by a Novel Non-Contact Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyers, Robert W.; Lee, Jonghyun; Rogers, Jan R.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    A non-contact technique for measuring the creep properties of materials has been developed and validated as part of a collaboration among the University of Massachusetts, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Electrostatic Levitation Facility (ESL), and the University of Tennessee. This novel method has several advantages over conventional creep testing. The sample is deformed by the centripetal acceleration from the rapid rotation, and the deformed shapes are analyzed to determine the strain. Since there is no contact with grips, there is no theoretical maximum temperature and no concern about chemical compatibility. Materials may be tested at the service temperature even for extreme environments such as rocket nozzles, or above the service temperature for accelerated testing of materials for applications such as jet engines or turbopumps for liquid-fueled engines. The creep measurements have been demonstrated to 2400 C with niobium, while the test facility, the NASA MSFC ESL, has processed materials up to 3400 C. Furthermore, the ESL creep method employs a distribution of stress to determine the stress exponent from a single test, versus the many tests required by conventional methods. Determination of the stress exponent from the ESL creep tests requires very precise measurement of the surface shape of the deformed sample for comparison to deformations predicted by finite element models for different stress exponents. An error analysis shows that the stress exponent can be determined to about 1% accuracy with the current methods and apparatus. The creep properties of single-crystal niobium at 1985 C showed excellent agreement with conventional tests performed according to ASTM Standard E-139. Tests on other metals, ceramics, and composites relevant to rocket propulsion and turbine engines are underway.

  3. High-temperature deformation behavior of nickel aluminum(titanium) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitabjian, Paul Harout

    Intermetallics are candidate materials to replace Ni-based superalloys for high-temperature structural applications. With proper alloying additions to improve their creep strength and ductility, NiAl-based intermetallic alloys have the potential to extend the operating temperatures of structural materials by hundreds of degrees. Here, we discuss the effects of Ti alloying additions on the high-temperature deformation behavior of NiAl(Ti) single crystals. We examine creep in the solid-solution strengthened alloys: Ni-47.5Al-2.5Ti and Ni-47Al-3Ti. Single crystals were deformed in compression in the "hard" <001> and "soft" <111> orientations, at temperatures between 827spC and 1250spC. The results show that Ti has a very powerful solute strengthening effect in NiAl. The creep rates for the solid-solution alloy were as much as three to four orders of magnitude lower than for unalloyed NiAl. We attempt to understand this solid-solution strengthening effect by studying the stress and temperature dependence of the creep rate for these alloys as well as deformation transients associated with stress changes. These results suggest that solute drag effects dominate the creep resistance at the highest temperatures and lowest stresses. The solute drag hypothesis is supported by observations of solute size effects of Ti and by the form of dislocation substructures found in creep-deformed crystals. We also examine the high-temperature deformation behavior of two-phased Ni-42.5Al-7.5Ti single crystals. Having characterized the microstructure of this alloy, we present the results of high-temperature mechanical testing, showing that this has creep strengths that compare favorably with commercial nickel-based superalloys. An examination of deformed microstructures, however, reveals that deformation in these alloys does not occur by creep. Instead, the propagation of cracks, which ultimately leads to catastrophic failure, occurs even at 1200spC. Finally, we present several models to describe the deformation behavior of NiAl(Ti) solid-solution single crystals at high temperatures that are based on the solute-drag-controlled deformation. We conclude that strengthening in solid-solution NiAl(Ti) occurs by solute drag as well as by ordinary dislocation hardening.

  4. High-temperature deformation and diffusion in oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J.L.

    1992-06-01

    High-temperature, steady-state deformation is usually controlled by diffusion of the slowest moving ion along its fastest diffusion path. Therefore, measurements of steady-state deformation can, in principle, be used to obtain information concerning diffusion. This paper will briefly review the assumptions that relate creep, defect chemistry, and diffusion. Steady-state deformation of the NaCI-structured oxides, Co{sub 1-x}O and Mn{sub l-x}O, and the perovskite-structured high-temperature superconductors YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}0{sub x} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}0{sub x} will be discussed, emphasizing diffusion of the minority defects.

  5. Multimechanism-Deformation Parameters of Domal Salts Using Transient Creep Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON, DARRELL E

    1999-09-01

    Use of Gulf Coast salt domes for construction of very large storage caverns by solution mining has grown significantly in the last several decades. In fact, among the largest developers of storage caverns along the Gulf Coast is the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) which has purchased or constructed 62 crude oil storage caverns in four storage sites (domes). Although SPR and commercial caverns have been operated economically for many years, the caverns still exhibit some relatively poorly understood behaviors, especially involving creep closure volume loss and hanging string damage from salt falls. Since it is possible to postulate that some of these behaviors stem from geomechanical or reformational aspects of the salt, a method of correlating the cavern response to mechanical creep behavior as determined in the laboratory could be of considerable value. Recently, detailed study of the creep response of domal salts has cast some insight into the influence of different salt origins on cavern behavior. The study used a simple graphical analysis of limited non-steady state data to establish an approach or bound to steady state, as an estimate of the steady state behavior of a given salt. This permitted analysis of sparse creep databases for domal salts. It appears that a shortcoming of this steady state analysis method is that it obscures some critical differences of the salt material behavior. In an attempt to overcome the steady state analysis shortcomings, a method was developed based on integration of the Multimechanism-Deformation (M-D) creep constitutive model to obtain fits to the transient response. This integration process permits definition of all the material sensitive parameters of the model, while those parameters that are constants or material insensitive parameters are fixed independently. The transient analysis method has proven more sensitive to differences in the creep characteristics and has provided a way of defining different behaviors within a given dome. Characteristics defined by the transient analysis are related quantitatively to the volume loss creep rate of the SPR caverns. This increase in understanding of the domal material creep response already has pointed to the possibility y of delineating the existence of material spines within a specific dome. Further definition of the domal geology and structure seems possible only through expansion of the creep databases for domal salts.

  6. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain-boundary diffusion and precipitation on pore walls. As a first step to better describe creep in sands and sandstones, we have derived a simple model for intergranular pressure solution (IPS) within an ordered pack of spherical grains, employing existing IPS rate models, such as those derived by Renard et al. (1999) and Spiers et al. (2004). This universal model is able to predict the conditions under which each of the respective pressure solution serial processes, i.e. diffusion, precipitation or dissolution, is dominant. In essence, this creates generic deformation mechanism maps for any granular material. We have used our model to predict the amount and rate of compaction for sandstone reservoirs, and compared our predictions to known subsidence rates for reservoirs around the world. This gives a first order-comparison to verify whether or not IPS is an important mechanism in controlling reservoir compaction.

  7. Elastic phase-strain distribution in a particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composite deforming by slip or creep

    SciTech Connect

    Daymond, M.R.; Lund, C.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Dunand, D.C.

    1999-11-01

    The macroscopic load-bearing capability of a composite is directly related to the strain partitioning due to load transfer between the component phases. Using neutron diffraction, the elastic mean phase strains were measured during in-situ loading of a Cu-15 vol pct Mo particulate metal-matrix composite (MMC) at 25 C, 300 C, and 350 C. The degree of load sharing at each temperature was compared to finite-element (FE) results. The load transfer from the matrix to reinforcement is both qualitatively and quantitatively different at low and high temperatures. When the matrix creeps, load transfer is less effective than when the matrix deforms by slip; also, load transfer at elevated temperatures decreases with increasing applied stress.

  8. High-Temperature Deformation of Dry Diabase with Application to Tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackwell, S. J.; Zimmerman, M. E.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have performed an experimental study to quantify the high-temperature creep behavior of natural diabase rocks under dry deformation conditions. Samples of both Maryland diabase and Columbia diabase were investigated to measure the effects of temperature, oxygen fugacity, and plagioclase-to-pyroxene ratio on creep strength. Flow laws determined for creep of these diabases were characterized by an activation energy of Q = 485 +/- 30 kJ/mol and a stress exponent of n = 4.7 +/- 0.6, indicative of deformation dominated by dislocation creep processes. Although n and Q are the same for the two rocks within experimental error, the Maryland diabase, which has the lower plagioclase content, is significantly stronger than the Columbia diabase. Thus the modal abundance of the various minerals plays an important role in defining rock strength. Within the s ample-to-sample variation, no clear influence of oxygen fugacity on creep strength could be discerned for either rock. The dry creep strengths of both rocks are significantly greater than values previously measured on diabase under "as-received" or wet conditions. Application of these results to the present conditions in the lithosphere on Venus predicts a high viscosity crust with strong dynamic coupling between mantle convection and crustal deformation, consistent with measurements of topography and gravity for that planet.

  9. Cell structure in cold worked and creep deformed phosphorus alloyed copper

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rui; Pettersson, Niklas; Martinsson, Åsa; Sandström, Rolf

    2014-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examinations on as-received, cold worked, as well as cold worked and creep tested phosphorus-alloyed oxygen-free copper (Cu-OFP) have been carried out to study the role of the cell structure. The cell size decreased linearly with increasing plastic deformation in tension. The flow stress in the tests could also be correlated to the cell size. The observed relation between the flow stress and the cell size was in excellent agreement with previously published results. The dense dislocation walls that appeared after cold work in tension is likely to be the main reason for the dramatic increase in creep strength. The dense dislocation walls act as barriers against dislocation motion and their presence also reduces the recovery rate due to an unbalanced dislocation content.

  10. Pressure sintering and creep deformation: a joint modeling approach. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Notis, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    Goal was to understand the mechanisms and microstructure affecting hot-pressing and creep processes. CoO was hot-pressed to different porosity levels and densification maps drawn. Creep experiments were carried out on pure CoO. Dislocation structure of deformed CoO was studied. Grain growth rates in CoO changes from a square dependence with time to a cubic dependence as porosity drops below 2 to 3%. Pores tend to remain on grain boundaries during both final and intermediate-stage densification. A wide variety of ceramics were examined for segregation of impurities: NiO-MgO, NiO-Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, NiO-TiO/sub 2/, Ni-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Precipitation processes are being studied in NiO-Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and in magnesium aluminate spinel.

  11. Parameter correlation of high-temperature creep constitutive equation for RPV metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Lin-Jun; Ren, Xin; Shen, Ming-Xue; Tu, Li-Qun

    2015-10-01

    Constant-temperature and constant-load creep tests of SA-508 stainless steel were performed at six temperatures, and the creep behavior and properties of this material were determined. Constitutive models were established based on an isothermal creep method to describe the high-temperature creep behavior of SA-508. Material parameter k, stress exponent n?, and temperature exponent nt of the established constitutive models were determined through experimental data via numerical optimization techniques. The relationship of k, n?, and nt was evaluated, and a new coefficient model of k-T, n?-T, nt-T, and nt-n? was formulated through the parameters of the isothermal creep equation. Moreover, the isothermal creep equation for this material at every temperature point from 450C to 1000C was obtained from the models. This method can serve as a reference for isothermal creep analysis and provide a way for the safety assessment of components of reactor pressure vessels.

  12. High-precision Non-Contact Measurement of Creep of Ultra-High Temperature Materials for Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For high-temperature applications (greater than 2,000 C) such as solid rocket motors, hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines, creep becomes one of the most important design factors to be considered. Conventional creep-testing methods, where the specimen and test apparatus are in contact with each other, are limited to temperatures approximately 1,700 C. Development of alloys for higher-temperature applications is limited by the availability of testing methods at temperatures above 2000 C. Development of alloys for applications requiring a long service life at temperatures as low as 1500 C, such as the next generation of jet turbine superalloys, is limited by the difficulty of accelerated testing at temperatures above 1700 C. For these reasons, a new, non-contact creep-measurement technique is needed for higher temperature applications. A new non-contact method for creep measurements of ultra-high-temperature metals and ceramics has been developed and validated. Using the electrostatic levitation (ESL) facility at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, a spherical sample is rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation due to centrifugal acceleration. Very accurate measurement of the deformed shape through digital image analysis allows the stress exponent n to be determined very precisely from a single test, rather than from numerous conventional tests. Validation tests on single-crystal niobium spheres showed excellent agreement with conventional tests at 1985 C; however the non-contact method provides much greater precision while using only about 40 milligrams of material. This method is being applied to materials including metals and ceramics for non-eroding throats in solid rockets and next-generation superalloys for turbine engines. Recent advances in the method and the current state of these new measurements will be presented.

  13. Room-temperature transverse compressive creep of thick Kevlar fabric/ epoxy laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.; Guess, T.R.

    1980-01-01

    Creep and recovery of thick Kevlar 49/epoxy composites were investigated in transverse compressive loading at room temperature. Cylindrical samples with void contents of 4 and 14 percent were tested along with those of unreinforced resin. The composites exhibited logarithmic creep. Creep rates were 2 times higher over the entire stress range for the high porosity composites. At a stress of 87 MPa the resin creep curve was similar to that of the composites. At higher stresses, the resin crept faster and exhibited more strain. It is proposed that axial compressive creep of the cylindrical composite specimens is governed by Poisson induced strains leading to tensile loading of the reinforcing fibers. Axial initial strain and creep rate data for the composite were converted to radial data using measured values of Poisson ratio. These values of composite specimen radial creep rate were in good agreement with tensile creep data of Kevlar 49 fibers.

  14. Ambient-temperature creep failure of silver-aided diffusion bonds between steel

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Kassner, M.E.; Rosen, R.S.

    1990-01-15

    It has long been known that thin (e.g., 1 {mu}m {minus} 1 mm) interlayer bonds between higher strength base materials may have high ultimate tensile or rupture strengths despite the relatively low strength of the filler metal. The high strength of the joint is due to the mechanical constraint provided by the stronger base metals which restricts transverse contraction of the interlayer. The constraint produces a triaxial state or stress and reduces the effective stress, thus reducing the tendency for the interlayer to plastically deform. Plasticity of the base metal reduces the constraint and decreases the strength of the bond. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, the validity of the base-metal- accelerated'' delayed-failure theory for bonds utilizing plastic base metals was checked. Creep-rupture tests were performed on diffusion-bonded specimens using silver interlayers deposited by planar-magnetron sputtering (PMS), a physical vapor-deposition process. The PMS process was preferred because of the superior quality and strength of the bond and because this modern low-temperature joining process is increasingly utilized for joining ceramic and composite materials. The role of plastic base metals in the fracture process was further investigated by conducting tensile-rupture tests of diffusion bonds made with stainless steel base metals of different yield strengths, and therefore different creep rates. The second purpose was to determine whether delayed failure occurs in interlayer bonds between elastic base metals, which do not creep over the range of applied stresses. This question is particularly relevant since many alloys, ceramics and composites fall within this category. Again, ambient and near-ambient temperature creep-rupture tests were performed at a variety of stresses below the UTS of the bond. 25 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Elevated temperature creep properties of NiAl cryomilled with and without Y2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Luton, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    The creep properties of lots of NiAl cryomilled with and without Y2O3 have been determined in compression and tension. Although identical cryomilling procedures were used, differences in composition were found between the lot ground with 0.5 vol% yttria and the lot ground without Y2O3. Compression testing between 1000 and 1300 K yielded similar creep strengths for both materials, while tensile creep rupture testing indicated that the yttria-containing alloy was slightly stronger than the Y2O3-free version. Both compression and tensile testing showed two deformation regimes; whereas the stress state did not affect the high stress exponent (n approximately equals 10) mechanism, the low stress exponent regime n was approximately 6 in tension and approximately 2 in compression. The strengths in tension were somewhat less than those measured in compression, but the estimated activation energies (Q) of approximately 600 kJ/mol for tensile testing were closer to the previously measured values (approximately 700 kJ/mol) for NiAl-AlN and very different from the Q's of 400 and 200 kJ/mol for compression tests in the high and low stress exponent regimes, respectively. A Larson-Miller comparison indicated that cryomilling can produce an alloy with long-term, high-temperature strength at least equal to conventional superalloys.

  16. Deformation and fracture of low alloy steels at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Marriott, D.L.; Stubbins, J.F.; Leckie, F.A.; Muddle, B.

    1988-12-01

    This project formed part of the initiative in the AR TD program to characterize high temperature, time-dependent damage processes in low alloy steels, for use in the construction of coal-gasification plant. This project was broadly aimed at adding to the knowledge base for this bainitic form of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, as it related to time-dependent performance at elevated temperature. Its original intention was to obtain information in specific grades of 2.25Cr 1Mo steel, in particular those containing reduced residual elements and microalloyed modifications, which were being considered as candidate materials at the time. This objective was subsequently modified, in the course of the contract period, to a more generic study of bainitic steel, using the 2.25Cr 1Mo material as a representative of the class. The main thrust of the project was directed initially at the detrimental effect of cyclic loading on creep resistance and manifesting itself in an apparently severe creep-fatigue interaction. Three subtasks were eventually identified. These are: a study of the evolution of microstructural changes in bainitic materials during steady load creep and under constant amplitude cyclic deformation, investigation of the effect of cyclic softening on the fatigue and creep strength of complex geometries, focusing on circumferentially notched bars, and investigation of the influence of environment as a possible cause of observed fatigue/elevated temperature interaction through its effects on crack initiation and propagation, using EDM notched specimens tested in air and vacuum. Results are discussed. 24 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Interpretation of microstructures in high temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, H.J.

    1999-07-01

    In each historical period the microstructures produced by high temperature straining were probed by the current technology, this giving rise to new models and theories of rate controlling mechanisms. The progress in understanding has not been monotonic since occasionally theories were developed to high levels of sophistication while overlooking aspects of the substructure which were to become significant. New technologies such as TEM, or SEM-EBSP-OIM have made possible great leaps forward but often leave unresolved problems on a different scale. Experimental observations are presented of substructures in Al with solute, dynamic precipitates, dispersoids and reinforcing particles and in both austenitic and ferritic stainless steels, thus providing a range of crystal structures and stacking fault energies (SFE). After the historical analysis, the current view of the hot-worked state will be presented with comparison of the conflicting theories. The analysis is centered on dislocation strain and there is only mention of pertinent interactions with grain boundary related deformation. The first seventy references point to research being done during the period that Prof. Julia Weertman (also the author) was pursuing research for the Ph.D. or starting a teaching career. it was an exciting time in which the applications of dislocation theory to cold working, recovery and creep were being confirmed by intragranular structural observations. Both the new modes of microscopic examination and the enhanced theories made possible the surge in fundamental understanding of hot working mechanisms that were summarized in the following twenty classic reviews. Finally, the remaining fifty references survey the current research which attempts to clarify the more complex details of the mechanisms: dynamic recovery (DRV) and dynamic recrystallization (DRX).

  18. High temperature tensile deformation behavior of Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan; Shrestha, Triratna; Charit, Indrajit

    2014-10-01

    Candidate structural materials for advanced reactors need to have superior high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties among other characteristics. The ferritic-martensitic Grade 92 steel (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.5Mo, wt.%) is considered such a candidate structural material. Tensile tests were performed at temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 C in the strain rate range of 10-5-10-3 s-1. After analyzing the tensile results using the Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn (BMD) equation, a stress exponent of about 9.5 and an activation energy of about 646 kJ/mol were obtained. In the light of high values of the stress exponent and activation energy, the threshold stress concept was used to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. As a result of this modification, the true activation energy and stress exponent of the high temperature deformation in Grade 92 steel were found to be about 245 kJ/mol and 5, respectively. Thus, the dominant high temperature deformation mechanism was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed.

  19. Modelling and analysis of creep deformation and fracture in a 1 Cr 1/2 Mo ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, B. F.; Osgerby, D.

    A quantitative model, based upon a proposed new mechanism of creep deformation in particle-hardened alloys, has been validated by analysis of creep data from a 13CrMo 4 4 (1Cr 1/2 Mo) material tested under a range of stresses and temperatures. The methodology that has been used to extract the model parameters quantifies, as a first approximation, only the main degradation (damage) processes - in the case of the 1CR 1/2 Mo steel, these are considered to be the parallel operation of particle-coarsening and a progressively increasing stress due to a constant-load boundary condition. These 'global' model parameters can then be modified (only slightly) as required to obtain a detailed description and 'fit' to the rupture lifetime and strain/time trajectory of any individual test. The global model parameter approach may be thought of as predicting average behavior and the detailed fits as taking account of uncertainties (scatter) due to variability in the material. Using the global parameter dataset, predictions have also been made of behavior under biaxial stressing; constant straining rate; constant total strain (stress relaxation) and the likely success or otherwise of metallographic and mechanical remanent lifetime procedures.

  20. Deterministic Multiaxial Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancements for CARES/Creep Integrated Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep rupture criterion. However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of sum, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of Ns methodology and the CARES/Creep program.

  1. Analytical, Numerical, and Experimental Investigation on a Non-Contact Method for the Measurements of Creep Properties of Ultra-High-Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Responsive access to space requires re-use of components such as rocket nozzles that operate at extremely high temperatures. For such applications, new ultra-hightemperature materials that can operate over 2,000 C are required. At the temperatures higher than the fifty percent of the melting temperature, the characterization of creep properties is indispensable. Since conventional methods for the measurement of creep is limited below 1,700 C, a new technique that can be applied at higher temperatures is strongly demanded. This research develops a non-contact method for the measurement of creep at the temperatures over 2,300 C. Using the electrostatic levitator in NASA MSFC, a spherical sample was rotated to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deforming sample was captured with a digital camera and analyzed to measure creep deformation. Numerical and analytical analyses have also been conducted to compare the experimental results. Analytical, numerical, and experimental results showed a good agreement with one another.

  2. Microstructure, creep, and tensile deformation in Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. H.; Chen, R. T.; Starke, E. A.

    1987-08-01

    The effects of microstructure, temperature, and stress level on the creep response of Ti-6211 have been investigated. A variety of microstructures simulating the heat affected zone of a weld (HAZ), as well as the as-received structure, were tested in a temperature range of 298 K to 873 K. At stress levels below the tensile yield strength, creep curves saturate in the ambient temperature regime. The colony type Widmanstätten alpha + beta as-received structure exhibited the highest creep strains at ambient temperatures. Long slip lengths associated with the large colony size, and sliding along various interfaces account for the relatively high creep strains to saturation. Planar arrays of straight dislocations operating on a single slip system were observed for samples crept at 298 K while thermally activated cross slip was observed for samples crept at 453 K. Beta-annealed martensitic micro-structures displayed enhanced creep resistance, out-performing other recrystallized HAZ structures. Above 778 K the activation energy of creep is close to that for self-diffusion in titanium, suggesting that diffusion-controlled dislocation mechanisms are the rate-controlling processes at elevated temperatures. Creep rupture at elevated temperatures occurred by microvoid nucleation and growth. Fracture occurred along colony boundaries in the as-received structure but appear to be intergranular with the crack propagating along G. B. alpha/matrix interfaces in the equiaxed microstructures. Sliding along alpha/beta interfaces, colony boundaries, prior beta grain boundaries, and slip traces contributed to the creep strain and rupture process. Cyclic creep with a loading-unloading sequence was also performed at room temperature and cyclic creep acceleration was observed.

  3. Creep-fatigue interaction at high temperature; Proceedings of the Symposium, 112th ASME Winter Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, Dec. 1-6, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritos, George K.; Ochoa, O. O.

    Various papers on creep-fatigue interaction at high temperature are presented. Individual topics addressed include: analysis of elevated temperature fatigue crack growth mechanisms in Alloy 718, physically based microcrack propagation laws for creep-fatigue-environment interaction, in situ SEM observation of short fatigue crack growth in Waspaloy at 700 C under cyclic and dwell conditions, evolution of creep-fatigue life prediction models, TMF design considerations in turbine airfoils of advanced turbine engines. Also discussed are: high temperature fatigue life prediction computer code based on the total strain version of strainrange partitioning, atomic theory of thermodynamics of internal variables, geometrically nonlinear analysis of interlaminar stresses in unsymmetrically laminated plates subjected to uniform thermal loading, experimental investigation of creep crack tip deformation using moire interferometry. (For individual items see A93-31336 to A93-31344)

  4. Constitutive Modeling of High Temperature Uniaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Responses of Alloy 617

    SciTech Connect

    P.G. Pritchard; L.J. Carroll; T. Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Inconel Alloy 617 is a high temperature creep and corrosion resistant alloy and is a leading candidate for use in Intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) of the Next Generation Nuclear Plants (NGNP). The IHX of the NGNP is expected to experience operating temperatures in the range of 800 degrees - 950 degrees C, which is in the creep regime of Alloy 617. A broad set of uniaxial, low-cycle fatigue, fatigue-creep, ratcheting, and ratcheting-creep experiments are conducted in order to study the fatigue and ratcheting responses, and their interactions with the creep response at high temperatures. A unified constitutive model developed at North Carolina State University is used to simulate these experimental responses. The model is developed based on the Chaboche viscoplastic model framework. It includes cyclic hardening/softening, strain rate dependence, strain range dependence, static and dynamic recovery modeling features. For simulation of the alloy 617 responses, new techniques of model parameter determination are developed for optimized simulations. This paper compares the experimental responses and model simulations for demonstrating the strengths and shortcomings of the model.

  5. In-situ scanning electron microscopy (sem) observations of the tensile and tensile-creep deformation of Titanium-8Aluminum-1mo-1v (wt.%) alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh Dastidar, Indraroop

    Titanium (Ti) and titanium alloys (Ti alloys) are attractive for structural applications, such as in the aerospace and automotive industries due to their high specific strength, excellent corrosion resistance and good ability to withstand elevated temperatures. To develop Ti alloys with better mechanical properties, it is necessary to comprehend the deformation behavior of available Ti alloys. Previous studies performed by another graduate student, Dr. Hongmei Li, involved investigation of the deformation behavior of commercially pure (CP) Ti, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt.%), Ti-3Al-2.5V (wt.%) and Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) alloys. The current thesis focused on investigating the deformation behavior of Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V (wt.%). In-situ tensile and tensile-creep experiments were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature (RT) to 650OC inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM), which allowed for the observation of the surface deformation evolution. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) was used to identify the distribution of the active deformation systems. In this thesis efforts were made to characterize the various deformation modes of the Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V (wt.%) alloy as a function of the testing conditions (stress and temperature). It was observed that prismatic slip made up the majority of the observed slip systems during the RT tensile deformation, while basal and prismatic slip were almost equally active during the 455OC tensile deformation. Grain boundary ledges were observed during the elevated temperature tensile-creep deformation and from this observation it was suggested that grain boundary sliding was an active deformation mode. This work also involved estimating the Critical Resolved Shear Stress (CRSS) ratios of the alpha-phase deformation modes. The CRSS ratios were compared with the CRSS ratios of CP Ti and other Ti alloys. Overall, this work was intended to add more data to the scientific literature of Ti alloys in order to better comprehend their deformation modes, so as to design and develop higher performance Ti alloys.

  6. Correlation of creep rate with microstructural changes during high temperature creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Hochella, W. A.; Lytton, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques of electron microscopy were used to examine the microstructural changes which occur during primary creep for two important types of engineering alloys: (1) alloys strengthened by solid-solution additions, and (2) dispersion-strengthened alloys. The metals chosen for study are unalloyed titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, and the cobalt-base alloy, Haynes 188. Results to date on NGR 47-004-108 show that development of prior dislocation substructure in Haynes 188 by 10% prestrain and annealing for one hour at 1800 F increases the time to reach 0.5% creep strain at 1600 F by more than an order of magnitude for creep stresses from 3 to 20 ksi. For creep at 1800 F, similar results were obtaind for stresses above 7 ksi, but the prior substructure decreases creep resistance below 7 ksi. This effect appears to be related to instability of grain structure at 1800 F in prestrained material.

  7. Elevated temperature flow strength, creep resistance and diffusion welding characteristics of Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Moore, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the flow strength, creep resistance and diffusion welding characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo has been conducted. Two mill-processed forms of this alloy were examined. The forged material had been processed above the beta transus (approximately 1275 K) while the rolled form had been subjected to work below the beta transus. Between 1150 and 1250 K, the forged material was stronger and more creep resistant than the rolled alloy. Both forms exhibit superplastic characteristics in this temperature range. Strain measurements during diffusion welding experiments at 1200 K reveal that weld interfaces have no measurable effect on the overall creep deformation. Significant deformation appears to be necessary to produce a quality diffusion weld between superplastic materials. A 'soft' interlayer inserted between faying surfaces would seemingly allow manufacture of quality diffusion welds with little overall deformation.

  8. Elevated-temperature flow strength, creep resistance and diffusion welding characteristics of Ti-gAl-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Moore, T. J.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the flow strength, creep resistance and diffusion welding characteristics of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Nb-1Ta-0.8Mo was conducted. Two mill-processed forms of this alloy were examined. The forged material was essentially processed above the beta transus while the rolled form was subjected to considerable work below the beta transus. Between 1150 and 1250 K, the forged material was stronger and more creep resistant than the rolled alloy. Both forms exhibit superplastic characteristics in this temperature range. Strain measurements during diffusion welding experiments at 1200 K reveal that weld interfaces have no measurable effect on the overall creep deformation. Significant deformation appears to be necessary to produce a quality diffusion weld between superplastic materials. A 'soft' interlayer inserted between faying surfaces would seemingly allow manufacture of quality diffusion welds with little overall deformation.

  9. Experimental characterization of crack tip deformation fields in Alloy 718 at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Lyons, J.; Sutton, M.; Reynolds, A.

    1998-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests were conducted at temperatures of 650 C and 704 C in air, using Inconel 719. A noncontacting measurement technique, based on computer vision and digital image correlation, was applied to directly measure surface displacements and strains prior to and during creep crack growth. For the first time, quantitative comparisons at elevated temperatures are presented between experimentally measured near-crack-tip deformation fields and theoretical linear elastic and viscoelastic fracture mechanics solutions. The results establish that linear elastic conditions dominate the near-crack-tip displacements and strains at 650 C during crack growth, and confirm that K{sub 1} is a viable continuum-based fracture parameter for creep crack growth characterization. Postmortem fractographic analyses indicate that grain boundary embrittlement leads to crack extension before a significant amount of creep occurs at this temperature. At higher temperatures, however, no crack growth was observed due to crack tip blunting and concurrent stress reduction after load application.

  10. Effect of Normalization Temperature on Creep Strength of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; J.A. Simpson

    2006-05-01

    The effect of normalization temperature from 850 to 1050C on the structure and creep-rupture properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied. Normalization at temperatures less than 925C resulted in structures containing significant polygonized, recovered ferrite. These structures had poor creep-rupture strength; roughly two orders of magnitude increase in minimum creep rate or decrease in rupture life for 850C compared to 1050C normalization at test conditions of 600C and 145 MPa. Room-temperature strength and hardness were also reduced. Normalization at temperatures between 925C and 1000C also resulted in reduced creep strength in comparison with 1050C normalization, even though tempered martensite microstructures were formed and little change in room temperature strength was observedthe reduction was attributed to subtle differences in fine MX precipitates. The effect of reduced normalization temperature was more pronounced for higher temperature, lower stress creep-rupture conditions.

  11. Generation of long time creep data on refractory alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Ebert, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum creep tests were conducted on tantalum, tungsten, and molybdenum alloys to develop creep data and to evaluate the influence of liquid lithium exposure on the creep behavior of the tantalum alloy T-111. Test conditions were generally selected to provide 1% creep in 1000 to 10,000 hours, with test temperatures ranging from 1600 to 2912 F (1144 to 1873 K). Tests on T-111 specimens exposed to vacuum and to liquid lithium for various times and temperatures showed large reductions in creep strength for exposures in the 1800 to 1900 F (1255 to 1310 K) range. Tests on the ASTAR 811c showed a significant influence of grain size on the creep strength of this material, with larger grain size specimens being significantly stronger above the equicohesive temperature of 2000 F (1366 K).

  12. Elevated temperature creep behavior of RSP/PM Al-13% Zr

    SciTech Connect

    Mahidhara, R.K.

    1995-10-15

    The promise of Rapid Solidification Processing (RSP) has opened new avenues for alloy development. Major goals have been to develop aluminum alloys for elevated temperature applications because of their superior strength to weight ratio. A number of investigations have been carried out on the precipitation behavior in Al-Zr alloys, using transmission electron microscopy. An important strengthening precipitate in the Al-Zr alloy is Al{sub 3}Zr which essentially belongs to tetragonal crystal system with a c/a ratio of 4.06, a lattice mismatch in the range 1.0 to 2.88% and interfacial energy in the range 10 to 2.13 J/m{sup 2}. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the creep deformation and fracture behavior of an Al-Zr alloy containing about 13 wt% Zr at an elevated temperature of 698 K.

  13. Application of an Uncoupled Elastic-plastic-creep Constitutive Model to Metals at High Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    A uniaxial, uncoupled constitutive model to predict the response of thermal and rate dependent elastic-plastic material behavior is presented. The model is based on an incremental classicial plasticity theory extended to account for thermal, creep, and transient temperature conditions. Revisions to he combined hardening rule of the theory allow for better representation of cyclic phenomenon including the high rate of strain hardening upon cyclic reyield and cyclic saturation. An alternative approach is taken to model the rate dependent inelastic deformation which utilizes hysteresis loops and stress relaxation test data at various temperatures. The model is evaluated and compared to experiments which involve various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy-X.

  14. Generation of long time creep data on refractory alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum creep tests were performed on tungsten, molybdenum, and tantalum alloys to develop design creep data and to evaluate the influence of liquid lithium exposure on the creep resistance of a tantalum alloy. Test conditions were generally selected to provide 1% creep in 1000 to 10,000 hours, with the test temperatures ranging between 1600 and 2900 F (1144 K and 1866 K). One percent creep life data from a tantalum-base T-111 alloy (Ta-8%W-2%Hf) were analyzed using a station function method to provide an improved parametric representation of the T-111 data. In addition, the minimum creep rate data from an ASTAR 811C alloy (Ta-8%W-1%Re-0.7%Hf0.025%C) were analyzed to determine the stress and temperature dependence of creep rate. Results of this analysis indicated that the activation energy for creep decreased from about 150 Kcal/mole (5130 J/mole) above 2400 F (1589 K) to about 110 Kcal/mole (3760 J/mole) below 2000 F (1361 K). This temperature range corresponds to the range where the creep mechanism changes from grain boundary sliding to intragranular creep.

  15. Mechanisms of High Temperature/Low Stress Creep of Ni-Based Superalloy Single Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Mills

    2009-03-05

    Cast nickel-based superalloys are used for blades in land-based, energy conversion and powerplant applications, as well as in aircraft gas turbines operating at temperatures up to 1100 C, where creep is one of the life-limiting factors. Creep of superalloy single crystals has been extensively studied over the last several decades. Surprisingly, only recently has work focused specifically on the dislocation mechanisms that govern high temperature and low stress creep. Nevertheless, the perpetual goal of better engine efficiency demands that the creep mechanisms operative in this regime be fully understood in order to develop alloys and microstructures with improved high temperature capability. At present, the micro-mechanisms controlling creep before and after rafting (the microstructure evolution typical of high temperature creep) has occurred have yet to be identified and modeled, particularly for [001] oriented single crystals. This crystal orientation is most interesting technologically since it exhibits the highest creep strength. The major goal of the program entitled ''Mechanisms of High Temperature/Low Stress Creep of Ni-Based Superalloy Single Crystals'' (DOE Grant DE-FG02-04ER46137) has been to elucidate these creep mechanisms in cast nickel-based superalloys. We have utilized a combination of detailed microstructure and dislocation substructure analysis combined with the development of a novel phase-field model for microstructure evolution.

  16. Quantitative analysis of microstructure deformation in creep fenomena of ferritic SA-213 T22 and austenitic SA-213 TP304H material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyana, Cukup; Taufik, Ahmad; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    The failure of critical component of fossil fired power plant that operated in creep range (high stress, high temperature and in the long term) depends on its microstructure characteristics. Ferritic low carbon steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) and Austenitic stainless alloy (18Cr-8Ni) are used as a boiler tube in the secondary superheater outlet header to deliver steam before entering the turbin. The tube failure is occurred in a form of rupture, resulting trip that disrupts the continuity of the electrical generation. The research in quantification of the microstructure deformation has been done in predicting the remaining life of the tube through interrupted accelerated creep test. For Austenitic Stainless Alloy (18Cr-8Ni), creep test was done in 550°C with the stress 424.5 MPa and for Ferritic Low Carbon Steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) in 570°C with the stress 189 MPa. The interrupted accelerated creep test was done by stopping the observation in condition 60%, 70%, 80% and 90% of remaining life, the creep test fracture was done before. Then the micro hardness test, photo micro, SEM and EDS were obtained from those samples. Refer to ASTM E122, microstructure parameters were calculated. The results indicated that there are a consistency of decreasing their grain diameters, increasing their grain size numbers, micro hardness, and the length of crack or void number per unit area with the decreasing of remaining life. While morphology of grain (stated in parameter α=LV/LH) relatively constant for austenitic. However, for ferritic the change of morphology revealed significantly. Fracture mode propagation of ferritic material is growth with voids transgranular and intergranular crack, and for austenitic material the fracture growth with intergranular creep fracture void and wedge crack. In this research, it was proposed a formulation of mathematical model for creep behavior corresponding their curve fitting resulted for the primary, secondary and tertiary in accelerated creep test. In addition, it was also developed a new method for predicting the remaining life using quantification of microstructure and using expansion of parameter Larson Miller from Taylor series for critical component in high temperature in industry. It was found that the proposed method was easier to be applied in field with the results more accurate then Larson Miller Method.

  17. Creep and creep fracture of zirconium and zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Troy Allyn

    The creep and creep failure mechanisms for zirconium and zirconium alloys have not been established, yet these properties are required to establish safe conditions for the interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. The purpose of this research, then, is to determine the relevant creep and creep fracture mechanisms controlling the deformation and failure of zirconium and zirconium alloys at elevated temperatures. Currently, the maximum allowable temperatures for the storage of spent nuclear fuel are defined by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission based on a limited set of experimental data. Recent changes in regulations will be evaluated and recommendations made regarding their applicability. Various studies in the past have reported that zirconium and zirconium alloys exhibit anomalous creep properties. A detailed analysis of the creep properties of zirconium and zirconium alloys is presented based on an extensive literature review. Next, developments in creep fracture phenomena in engineering materials over the past several decades will be discussed and related to the creep fracture of zirconium alloys. As will be discussed, the mechanism for plasticity can be intimately tied to the fracture mechanism. The results of uniaxial creep tests on zirconium at temperatures of 350--700C and stresses of 8--70 MPa and uniaxial creep tests on Zircaloy-2 at temperatures of 300--600C and stresses of 24--382 MPa and subsequent microstructural investigation using a scanning electron microscope will be discussed, particularly as relevant to the fracture mechanisms for this alloy.

  18. The fate of fluid inclusions during high-temperature experimental deformation of olivine aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Torsion experiments on initially wet and dry olivine aggregates at equivalent deformation conditions investigated the fate of fluid inclusions (FIs) during high-temperature deformation. Wet samples were produced by adding water to San Carlos olivine powders before hot pressing; those hot pressed without water are considered dry. After hot pressing, wet and dry aggregates have comparable grain sizes, but wet aggregates have more abundant primary FIs. Talc jackets were fitted around some wet and dry samples prior to deformation to hydrate samples during deformation via talc dehydration at elevated temperature, whereas other samples were deformed without talc. At similar strain rates (~1.0 10-4 s-1), the peak shear stress for the dry sample (no talc) was 190-220 MPa, whereas all other samples reached 180 MPa; the strengths of wet ( talc) and dry (+ talc) specimens appear similar. Deformed samples reveal abundant FIs, reduced grain size, shape preferred orientation of olivine, and a pervasive low-angle fabric (C') to the shear plane defined by aligned FIs. Samples deformed with talc have FI-rich and FI-depleted domains; where FIs are abundant, the C' fabric is better developed and grain size is smaller. Electron backscatter diffraction pole figures suggest that olivine deformed in the dislocation creep regime via the (010)[100] slip system. Results of these experiments suggest that FIs are redistributed during dislocation creep, leading to the development of grain-scale, high-diffusivity pathways.

  19. Creep and creep-rupture behavior of Alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Ding, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from creep and creep-rupture tests conducted on 18 heats of Alloy 718 were used to formulate models for predicting high temperature time dependent behavior of this alloy. Creep tests were conducted on specimens taken from a number of commercial product forms including plate, bar, and forgoing material that had been procured and heat treated in accordance with ASTM specifications B-670 or B-637. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 427 to 760{degree}C ad at test times to about 87,000 h. Comparisons are given between experimental data and the analytical models. The analytical models for creep-rupture included one based on lot-centering regression analysis and two based on the Minimum Commitment Method. A master'' curve approach was used to develop and equation for estimating creep deformation up to the onset of tertiary creep. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Creep rupture analysis of a beam resting on high temperature foundation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gu, Randy J.; Cozzarelli, Francis A.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified uniaxial strain controlled creep damage law is deduced with the use of experimental observation from a more complex strain dependent law. This creep damage law correlates the creep damage, which is interpreted as the density variation in the material, directly with the accumulated creep strain. Based on the deduced uniaxial strain controlled creep damage law, a continuum mechanical creep rupture analysis is carried out for a beam resting on a high temperature elastic (Winkler) foundation. The analysis includes the determination of the nondimensional time for initial rupture, the propagation of the rupture front with the associated thinning of the beam, and the influence of creep damage on the deflection of the beam. Creep damage starts accumulating in the beam as soon as the load is applied, and a creep rupture front develops at and propagates from the point at which the creep damage first reaches its critical value. By introducing a series of fundamental assumptions within the framework of technical Euler-Bernoulli type beam theory, a governing set of integro-differential equations is derived in terms of the nondimensional bending moment and the deflection. These governing equations are subjected to a set of interface conditions at the propagating rupture front. A numerical technique is developed to solve the governing equations together with the interface equations, and the computed results are presented and discussed in detail.

  1. The effect of low angle boundary misorientation on creep deformation in the superalloy CM 247 LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirsch, Mathew

    The effect of low angle boundary misorientation on the creep properties of superalloy CM 247LC bicrystals has been investigated in the medium temperature - medium stress creep regime. Constant load tensile creep tests were performed on mixed Low Angle Boundary (LAB) samples with misorientations ranging from 3o-16o; the LABs where the boundaries were oriented approximately transverse to the tensile axis. Five repeats of each LAB sample were ruptured with an initial stress of 300 MPa and three repeats of each LAB sample were ruptured with an initial stress of 200 MPa, both at 950°C. A drastic decrease in creep rupture life and strain to failure was observed in bicrystals with misorientations greater than ˜10°. Fractography of the fracture surfaces indicated that a transition from ductile transgranular fracture to intergranular fracture coincided with the decrease in creep properties. The decrease in strain to failure was correlated to a decrease in the slip compatibility factor m'. Specimens of several misorientations were also interrupted prior to failure at strains of 2%, 5% and 10% and examined by electron microscopy techniques in an effort to better understand the sequences leading to failure. For samples that fractured intergranularly, voids formed adjacent to large MC carbides located at the LABs and propagated along the boundary, ultimately linking to cracks that initiated at the specimen edge. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) scans were performed and Crystal reference Orientation (CO) maps were generated from the partially crept specimens. An increase in misorientation from the crystal reference orientation was observed with increasing LAB misorientation for a given interrupted strain level indicative of the poorer slip compatibility at the higher misorientations Two bicrystals with nearly identical scalar misorientation, both ˜10°, exhibited surprisingly different behavior with one failing intergranularly at low strain to failure and the other failing transgranularly at high strain to failure; these differences were related to the different slip compatibilities as determined by an analysis of the nature of their misorientations. In addition, grain boundary migration was prevalent in the samples that fractured transgranularly, but was rarely observed on any specimen that fractured intergranularly. Based on the collective observations, it is concluded that (1) it is necessary to consider more than just the scalar misorientation when considering whether a single crystal containing LABs should be rejected and (2) characterization of the properties of superalloy bicrystals grown using traditional Bridgman methods is difficult due to the complex, non-planar nature of the resulting LABs that is associated with their dendritic growth.

  2. Impurities in silicon carbide ceramics and their role during high temperature creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Mozdzierz, N.; Eveno, P.

    1993-12-01

    The high-temperature compressive creep behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramics with different additive packages (boron and carbon or no additive) is investigated as a function of several parameters: the microstructure, the nature of the additives and that of the impurities. Additional carbon is present in all the materials investigated, as graphite precipitates of various size and amount. In materials densified with addition of boron, large precipitates of B{25}C and small amorphous silica pockets are identified. In the case of materials containing impurities, small precipitates of FeSi, Fe or Ti5Si3 are detected. Creep experiments are conducted on materials with no additives and on others containing boron and carbon additives, at temperatures ranging from 1 773 K to 1 973 K and under stresses from 100 to 1 100 MPa. A comparison of the creep behaviour of the various materials points out to the destructive effect of carbon precipitates on the creep rate: the stationary creep rate of the material containing carbon (and boron) additives is by a factor 2.5-5 faster, eventhough its grain size is much larger! The creep of both investigated materials is described by a power law with a stress exponent of 1.5 in a low stress range and 3.5-4 in a high stress range. The corresponding activation energies are 364 kJ/mole and 453 kJ/mole in the low stress range and about 629 kJ/mole in the high stress range. At low stresses the materials deform by grain boundary sliding compensated mainly by diffusion along the grain boundaries and to a lesser extent by limited cavitation, as a result of the barrier role played by grain boundaries for dislocations. At high stresses the grain boundaries are no longer an obstacle to dislocation motion, which becomes the dominant deformation mechanism. La microstructure de deux cramiques, SiC sans ajouts et SiC avec bore et carbone, est tudie par microscopie lectronique transmission dans le but d'valuer l'influence des additifs sur les proprits mcaniques haute temprature. Dans tous les matriaux, des prcipits de graphite de diffrentes tailles sont observs. Le carbure de silicium fabriqu avec du bore contient des grands prcipits de B{25}C et des petites poches de silice amorphe. A partir de nos observations de la microstructure, une prvision des proprits mcaniques des matriaux est possible. Ces prvisions sont compares aux rsultats de fluage haute temprature. Les matriaux sans ajouts et ceux avec carbone et bore sont dforms entre 1 773 K et 1 973 K, sous des contraintes de 100 1 100 MPa. Le comportement des deux matriaux suit une loi de puissance avec un exposant de contrainte de 1,5 pour les faibles contraintes et de 3,5-4 pour les fortes contraintes. Les valeurs d'nergie d'activation des deux types de matriaux sont respectivement 364 et 453 kJ/mole dans le domaine de faibles contraintes et 629 kJ/mole aux fortes contraintes. L'observation de la microstructure des matriaux dforms montre comme mcanisme principal de fluage le glissement aux joints de grains accommod par la diffusion et accompagn par une faible cavitation due la non-permabilit des joints de grains pour les dislocations. Aux plus fortes contraintes, les joints de grains deviennent plus permables, et la dformation par mcanismes de dislocations devient alors prpondrante.

  3. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  4. High-Temperature Creep Behavior Of Fiber-Reinforced Niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Titran, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    Study conducted to determine feasibility of using composite materials in advanced space power systems, described in 22-page report. Tungsten fibers reduce creep and mass in advanced power systems. Reinforcing niobium alloys with tungsten fibers increases their resistances to creep by factors of as much as 10.

  5. ACCEPT: a three-dimensional finite element program for large deformation elastic-plastic-creep analysis of pressurized tubes (LWBR/AWBA Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Hutula, D.N.; Wiancko, B.E.

    1980-03-01

    ACCEPT is a three-dimensional finite element computer program for analysis of large-deformation elastic-plastic-creep response of Zircaloy tubes subjected to temperature, surface pressures, and axial force. A twenty-mode, tri-quadratic, isoparametric element is used along with a Zircaloy materials model. A linear time-incremental procedure with residual force correction is used to solve for the time-dependent response. The program features an algorithm which automatically chooses the time step sizes to control the accuracy and numerical stability of the solution. A contact-separation capability allows modeling of interaction of reactor fuel rod cladding with fuel pellets or external supports.

  6. Creep Deformation, Rupture Analysis, Heat Treatment and Residual Stress Measurement of Monolithic and Welded Grade 91 Steel for Power Plant Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Triratna

    Modified 9Cr-1 Mo (Grade 91) steel is currently considered as a candidate material for reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) and reactor internals for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and in fossil-fuel fired power plants at higher temperatures and stresses. The tensile creep behavior of Grade 91 steel was studied in the temperature range of 600°C to 750°C and stresses between 35 MPa and 350 MPa. Heat treatment of Grade 91 steel was studied by normalizing and tempering the steel at various temperatures and times. Moreover, Thermo-Ca1c(TM) calculation was used to predict the precipitate stability and their evolution, and construct carbon isopleths of Grade 91 steel. Residual stress distribution across gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) in Grade 91 steel was measured by the time-of-flight neutron diffraction using the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) diffractometer at Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA. Analysis of creep results yielded stress exponents of ˜9-11 in the higher stress regime and ˜1 in the lower stress regime. The creep behavior of Grade 91 steel was described by the modified Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn relation. The rate-controlling creep deformation mechanism in the high stress regime was identified as the edge dislocation climb with a stress exponent of n = 5. On the other hand, the deformation mechanism in the Newtonian viscous creep regime (n = 1) was identified as the Nabarro-Herring creep. Creep rupture data were analyzed in terms of Monkman-Grant relation and Larson-Miller parameter. Creep damage tolerance factor and stress exponent were used to identify the cause of creep damage. The fracture surface morphology of the ruptured specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy to elucidate the failure mechanisms. Fracture mechanism map for Grade 91 steel was developed based on the available material parameters and experimental observations. The microstructural evolution of heat treated steel was correlated with the differential scanning calorimetric study. The combination of microstructural studies with optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, microhardness profiles, and calorimetric plots helped in the understanding of the evolution of microstructure and precipitates in Grade 91 steel. The residual stresses were determined at the mid-thickness of the plate, 4.35 mm and 2.35 mm below the surface of the as-welded and post-weld heat treated plate. The residual stresses of the as-welded plate were compared with the post-weld heat treated plate. The post-weld heat treatment significantly reduced the residual stress in the base metal, heat affected zone, and the weld zone. Vickers microhardness profiles of the as-welded, and post-weld heat treated specimens were also determined and correlated with the observed residual stress profile and microstructure.

  7. Time-dependent deformation at elevated temperatures in basalt from El Hierro, Stromboli and Teide volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. M.; Fahrner, D.; Harnett, C. E.; Fazio, M.

    2014-12-01

    Time dependent deformation describes the process whereby brittle materials deform at a stress level below their short-term material strength (Ss), but over an extended time frame. Although generally well understood in engineering (where it is known as static fatigue or "creep"), knowledge of how rocks creep and fail has wide ramifications in areas as diverse as mine tunnel supports and the long term stability of critically loaded rock slopes. A particular hazard relates to the instability of volcano flanks. A large number of flank collapses are known such as Stromboli (Aeolian islands), Teide, and El Hierro (Canary Islands). Collapses on volcanic islands are especially complex as they necessarily involve the combination of active tectonics, heat, and fluids. Not only does the volcanic system generate stresses that reach close to the failure strength of the rocks involved, but when combined with active pore fluid the process of stress corrosion allows the rock mass to deform and creep at stresses far lower than Ss. Despite the obvious geological hazard that edifice failure poses, the phenomenon of creep in volcanic rocks at elevated temperatures has yet to be thoroughly investigated in a well controlled laboratory setting. We present new data using rocks taken from Stromboli, El Heirro and Teide volcanoes in order to better understand the interplay between the fundamental rock mechanics of these basalts and the effects of elevated temperature fluids (activating stress corrosion mechanisms). Experiments were conducted over short (30-60 minute) and long (8-10 hour) time scales. For this, we use the method of Heap et al., (2011) to impose a constant stress (creep) domain deformation monitored via non-contact axial displacement transducers. This is achieved via a conventional triaxial cell to impose shallow conditions of pressure (<25 MPa) and temperature (<200 °C), and equipped with a 3D laboratory seismicity array (known as acoustic emission, AE) to monitor the micro cracking due to the imposed deformation. By measuring the AE generated during deformation we are then able to apply fracture forecast models to predict, retrospectively, the time of failure. We find that higher temperatures increase the strain rate during creep for the same %Ss, and that the accuracy of the forecast does not change with increasing temperature.

  8. High temperature inelastic deformation under uniaxial loading - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, K. S.; Lindholm, U. S.; Bodner, S. R.; Walker, K. P.

    1989-01-01

    The elevated-temperature uniaxial inelastic deformation behavior of an Ni-base alloy, B1900 + Hf, is investigated by performing isothermal tensile, creep, cyclic, stress relaxation, and thermomechanical fatigue tests. The range of strain rates examined is from 10 to the -7th to 100 per sec, while the test temperatures range from 25 to 1093 C. This extensive constitutive data base has been used for evaluating the unified constitutive models of Bodner and Partom (1972) and of Walker (1972) which apply for the small-strain regime. Comparison of test results with independent model predictions indicates good agreement over a broad range of loading conditions, demonstrating the applicability of the unified-constitutive-equation approach for describing the strongly nonlinear and temperature-dependent response of meals under a wide range of deformation and thermal histories. Thus the results give confidence that the unified approach is an effective and efficient approach in which complex history-dependent thermoviscoplastic flow can be represented within a single inelastic strain-rate term.

  9. A transition stress in the creep of an alpha phase zirconium alloy at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, A.T.; Ecob, R.C.

    1985-11-01

    Creep studies on Zircaloy-4, conducted in the temperature range 973 to 1073 K by the present authors, have indicated that a transition in the creep behaviour occurs at a temperature dependent value of the applied stress. This transition has been identified with the stress required to produce macroscopic yielding. It has been proposed that at applied stresses above the transition stress creep occurs predominantly by a recovery controlled dislocation mechanism, whereas at lower stress a further mechanism is required to achieve the strain accommodation necessary at grain boundaries. The purpose of this paper is to present detailed evidence of the transition in creep behaviour and offer suggestions on the nature of the creep rate controlling mechanism at low stress.

  10. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of types 316 and 316L(N) stainless steels and their weld metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, G.; Mannan, S. L.; Mathew, M. D.; Rao, K. Bhanu

    2000-04-01

    The creep properties of a nuclear-grade type 316(L) stainless steel (SS) alloyed with nitrogen (316L(N) SS) and its weld metal were studied at 873 and 923 K in the range of applied stresses from 100 to 335 MPa. The results were compared with those obtained on a nuclear-grade type 316 SS, which is lean in nitrogen. The creep rupture lives of the weld metals were found to be lower than those of the respective base metals by a factor of 5 to 10. Both the base and weld metals of 316L(N) SS exhibited better resistance to creep deformation compared to their 316 SS counterparts at identical test conditions. A power-law relationship between the minimum creep rate and applied stress was found to be obeyed for both the base and weld metals. Both the weld metals generally exhibited lower rupture elongation than the respective base metals; however, at 873 K, the 316 SS base and weld metals had similar rupture elongation at identical applied stresses. Comparison of the rupture lives of the two steels to the ASME curves for the expected minimum stress to rupture for 316 SS base and weld metals showed that, for 316L(N) SS, the specifications for maximum allowable stresses based on data for 316 SS could prove overconservative. The influence of nitrogen on the creep deformation and fracture behavior, especially in terms of its modifying the precipitation kinetics, is discussed in light of the microstructural observations. In welds containing ? ferrite, the kinetics of its transformation and the nature of the transformation products control the deformation and fracture behavior. The influence of nitrogen on the ? ferrite transformation behavior and coarsening kinetics is also discussed, on the basis of extensive characterization by metallographic techniques.

  11. Tensile and creep rupture properties of (16) uncoated and (2) coated engineering alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, L. J.; Koster, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    Sixteen test materials were supplied by NASA-Lewis Research Center as wrought bar or cast remelt stock. The cast remelt stock was cast into test blanks with two such materials being also evaluated after Jocoat coating was applied. Mechanical properties evaluated included tensile, modulus of elasticity, Poisson's Ratio, creep properties and creep rupture strength. Tests were conducted at temperatures applicable to the service temperature of the various alloys. This range extended from room temperature to 1000 C.

  12. Processing, Microstructure and Creep Behavior of Mo-Si-B-Based Intermetallic Alloys for Very High Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vijay Vasudevan

    2008-03-31

    This research project is concerned with developing a fundamental understanding of the effects of processing and microstructure on the creep behavior of refractory intermetallic alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system. In the first part of this project, the compression creep behavior of a Mo-8.9Si-7.71B (in at.%) alloy, at 1100 and 1200 C was studied, whereas in the second part of the project, the constant strain rate compression behavior at 1200, 1300 and 1400 C of a nominally Mo-20Si-10B (in at.%) alloy, processed such as to yield five different {alpha}-Mo volume fractions ranging from 5 to 46%, was studied. In order to determine the deformation and damage mechanisms and rationalize the creep/high temperature deformation data and parameters, the microstructure of both undeformed and deformed samples was characterized in detail using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with back scattered electron imaging (BSE) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD)/orientation electron microscopy in the SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructure of both alloys was three-phase, being composed of {alpha}-Mo, Mo{sub 3}Si and T2-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} phases. The values of stress exponents and activation energies, and their dependence on microstructure were determined. The data suggested the operation of both dislocation as well as diffusional mechanisms, depending on alloy, test temperature, stress level and microstructure. Microstructural observations of post-crept/deformed samples indicated the presence of many voids in the {alpha}-Mo grains and few cracks in the intermetallic particles and along their interfaces with the {alpha}-Mo matrix. TEM observations revealed the presence of recrystallized {alpha}-Mo grains and sub-grain boundaries composed of dislocation arrays within the grains (in Mo-8.9Si-7.71B) or fine sub-grains with a high density of b = 1/2<111> dislocations (in Mo-20Si-10B), which are consistent with the values of the respective stress exponents and activation energies that were obtained and provide confirmatory evidence for the operation of diffusional (former alloy) or dislocation (latter alloy) creep mechanisms. In contrast, the intermetallic phases contained very few dislocations, but many cracks. The relative contributions of the {alpha}-Mo and the intermetallic particles to the overall deformation process, including their individual and collective dependence on temperature and strain rate are discussed in light of the present results and those from previous reports.

  13. Influence of deformation behavior, oxydation, and temperature on the long time cyclic stress behavior of high temperature steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maile, K.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of different parameters on the creep-fatigue behavior of several steel alloys was investigated. The higher the temperature the lower the crack initiation value. Pauses during the cycle reduce the damage. Oxidation reduces and protective gas increases the lifetime. Prior loading and prior deformation reduce the lifetime. Short annealing slightly affects the cycle stress behavior. The test results do not satisfactorily agree with methods of extrapolation and damage accumulation.

  14. Generation of long time creep data on refractory alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Ebert, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Four separate studies of various aspects of the vacuum creep behavior of two tantalum alloys (T-111 and ASTAR 811C) and of pure CVD tungsten are reported. The first part of the program involved a study of the influence of high temperature pre-exposure to vacuum or to liquid lithium on the subsequent creep behavior T-111 alloy. Results of this study revealed significant effects of pre-exposure on the 1% creep life of T-111, with life reductions of about 3 orders of magnitude being observed in extreme cases. The second part of this study involved an investigation of the creep behavior of T-111 under conditions of continuously increasing stress and decreasing temperature which simulated the conditions anticipated in radioisotope capsule service. Results of this study showed that such test conditions produced a creep curve having a very unusual shape, and led to the identification of a new creep design parameter for this type of service. The third area of investigation was a study of the influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and creep behavior of ASTAR 811C. The fourth part of the program was directed toward a preliminary characterization of the 1% creep life of CVD tungsten as obtained from two different sources.

  15. Theory of collective flux creep. [in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigel'man, M. V.; Geshkenbein, V. B.; Larkin, A. I.; Vinokur, V. M.

    1989-01-01

    The nature of flux-creep phenomena in the case of collective pinning by weak disorder is discussed. The Anderson concept of flux bundle is explored and developed. The dependence of the bundle activation barrier U on current j is studied and is shown to be of power-law type: U(j) is proportional to j exp -alpha. The values of exponent alpha for the different regimes of collective creep are found.

  16. Temperature dependence of creep compliance of highly cross-linked epoxy: A molecular simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Khabaz, Fardin Khare, Ketan S. Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-15

    We have used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the effect of temperature on the creep compliance of neat cross-linked epoxy. Experimental studies of mechanical behavior of cross-linked epoxy in literature commonly report creep compliance values, whereas molecular simulations of these systems have primarily focused on the Young’s modulus. In this work, in order to obtain a more direct comparison between experiments and simulations, atomistically detailed models of the cross-linked epoxy are used to study their creep compliance as a function of temperature using MD simulations. The creep tests are performed by applying a constant tensile stress and monitoring the resulting strain in the system. Our results show that simulated values of creep compliance increase with an increase in both time and temperature. We believe that such calculations of the creep compliance, along with the use of time temperature superposition, hold great promise in connecting the molecular insight obtained from molecular simulation at small length- and time-scales with the experimental behavior of such materials. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first reported effort that investigates the creep compliance behavior of cross-linked epoxy using MD simulations.

  17. High temperature tensile and creep behaviour of low pressure plasma-sprayed Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y coating alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature tensile and creep behavior of low pressure plasma-sprayed plates of a typical Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y alloy has been studied. From room temperature to 800 K, the Ni-Co-Cr-Al-Y alloy studied has nearly a constant low ductility and a high strength. At higher temperatures, it becomes weak and highly ductile. At and above 1123 K, the behavior is highly dependent on strain rate and exhibits classic superplastic characteristics with a high ductility at intermediate strain rates and a strain rate sensitivity of about 0.5. At either higher or lower strain rates, the ductility decreases and the strain rate sensitivities are about 0.2. In the superplastic deformation range, the activation energy for creep is 120 + or - 20 kJ/mol, suggesting a diffusion-aided grain boundary sliding mechanism. Outside the superplastic range, the activation energy for creep is calculated to be 290 + or - 20 kJ/mol.

  18. Creeping Deformation by the Precise Leveling Survey at the central part of the Longitudinal valley fault, Southeast Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, N.; Murase, M.; Ishiguro, S.; Ozawa, K.; Lin, J.; Chen, W.; Lin, C.

    2011-12-01

    We would like to know the distributed asperity for seismic hazard and forecast. It is closely related to slip distribution on the fault in interseismic. We focused on the accumulating process of the stress at the boundary between the creeping and the locking zone, to clear the behavior on the fault. The Longitudinal Valley Fault (LVF), 150 km long and NNE-SSW striking, passes through the eastern Taiwan, and represents the obvious surface expression of the collision boundary between the Philippine Sea plate and the Eurasian continental plate. Owing to such a high deformation rate, many earthquakes have occurred along the LVF. The 1951 earthquake sequence represents a good example. The southern of LVF segment is observed to be high speed creeping based on the creep meter and leveling survey etc. The northern of LVF segment is not observed to be creeping and are found huge earthquakes evidence by paleo-seismology study in the trench. Yuili fault is one of the active segments of the longitudinal valley faults, is located around the boundary between creeping and locking area. It is reverse fault with east dip. We established about 30km leveling route from Yuli to Changbin to detect the vertical deformation in detail. Murase et al. (2009, 2010, and 2011) established about 30 km densely leveling route from Yuli to Changbin to detect the vertical deformation across the LVF for two years. As a result, the vertical displacement is 1.7 cm in 200 m across the LVF and 2.7 cm in 1000 m, referred to the west end of our route. In addition, a synclinal deformation is detected on the hanging wall side of the fault. This result is caused by the geometry of and the slipping distribution on the fault. The deformation detected in the period from 2009 to 2010 denotes the same tendency and rate of that from 2008 to 2009. We compared to the airphotographs which are taken by Taiwanese government at different age (1978 and 2007). If the creeping on the fault has continued for 30 years, the accumulation of displacement reaches about 1m, which is significantly-distinguishable by photogrammetric method. We measure profiles across the fault on 1978 and 2007 air-photograph by photogrammetric system respectively. The comparing result is shown that there are regional differences in deformation in relatively narrow region. About this result, we think two possibility; one is the creeping is not uniformity along the fault, second is the photogrammetry is not enough quality. We should actually check the creeping or not. We made thee new leveling survey lines in last year. In this August , we carried out second leveling survey in three area. We can show the variation of the deformation pattern and uplift rate across the LVF in this presentation.

  19. Generation of long time creep data on refractory alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1970-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted on two tantalum alloys (ASTAR 811C and T-111 alloy), on a molybdenum alloy (TZM), and on CVD tungsten. The T-111 alloy 1% creep life data have been subjected to Manson's station function analysis, and the progress on this analysis is described. In another test program, the behavior of T-111 alloy with continuously varying temperatures and stresses has been studied. The results indicated that the previously described analysis predicts the observed creep behavior with reasonable accuracy. In addition to the T-111 test program, conventional 1% creep life data have been obtained for ASTAR 811C alloy. Previously observed effects of heat treatment on the creep strength of this material have been discussed and a model involving carbide strengthening primarily at the grain boundaries, rather than in a classical dispersion hardening mechanism, has been proposed to explain the observed results.

  20. Deterministic and Probabilistic Creep and Creep Rupture Enhancement to CARES/Creep: Multiaxial Creep Life Prediction of Ceramic Structures Using Continuum Damage Mechanics and the Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadaan, Osama M.; Powers, Lynn M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1998-01-01

    High temperature and long duration applications of monolithic ceramics can place their failure mode in the creep rupture regime. A previous model advanced by the authors described a methodology by which the creep rupture life of a loaded component can be predicted. That model was based on the life fraction damage accumulation rule in association with the modified Monkman-Grant creep ripture criterion However, that model did not take into account the deteriorating state of the material due to creep damage (e.g., cavitation) as time elapsed. In addition, the material creep parameters used in that life prediction methodology, were based on uniaxial creep curves displaying primary and secondary creep behavior, with no tertiary regime. The objective of this paper is to present a creep life prediction methodology based on a modified form of the Kachanov-Rabotnov continuum damage mechanics (CDM) theory. In this theory, the uniaxial creep rate is described in terms of stress, temperature, time, and the current state of material damage. This scalar damage state parameter is basically an abstract measure of the current state of material damage due to creep deformation. The damage rate is assumed to vary with stress, temperature, time, and the current state of damage itself. Multiaxial creep and creep rupture formulations of the CDM approach are presented in this paper. Parameter estimation methodologies based on nonlinear regression analysis are also described for both, isothermal constant stress states and anisothermal variable stress conditions This creep life prediction methodology was preliminarily added to the integrated design code CARES/Creep (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures/Creep), which is a postprocessor program to commercially available finite element analysis (FEA) packages. Two examples, showing comparisons between experimental and predicted creep lives of ceramic specimens, are used to demonstrate the viability of this methodology and the CARES/Creep program.

  1. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  2. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  3. Processing and mechanical properties of high-temperature/high-performance composites. Book 4, Section 3: Flow and creep strength. Annual report, 15 September 1988-14 September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-15

    Substantial activity has been initiated to examine creep strength and ductility during both plastic flow and creep in the presence of reinforcements. The variables of principal interest are the reinforcement aspect ratio and size, as well as their fracture/debond resistance. Papers include: Flow strength and ductility of an aluminum alloy reinforced with SiC particulates; Aspects of the high temperature performance of ceramics and ceramic composites; Brittle-to-ductile transition in silicon carbide; Mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced aluminum-matrix composites; Combined Mode I - Mode III fracture toughness of alumina particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy-matrix composites; Numerical study of high temperature creep deformation in metal-matrix composites; Plastic flow in ductile materials containing a cubic array of rigid spheres; Influence of pressure on damage evolution and fracture in metal-matrix composites; Fracture mechanism maps in stress space.

  4. The effect of environment on the creep deformation of ultra-high purity nickel-chromium-iron alloys at 360 degrees Celcius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraventi, Denise Jean

    2000-10-01

    Steam generators in pressurized water nuclear power plants have experienced significant problems with intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) on the inner diameter of steam generator tubing for over 25 years. In the course of research to understand IGSCC, it has been shown that creep deformation may play a significant role in the cracking of commercial Alloy 600 (Ni-16Cr-9Fe-0.03C). The primary water environment can cause decreases in creep resistance (i.e., faster creep rates, shorter time to failure, and higher creep strains). During corrosion under the conditions of interest, both hydrogen reduction and metal dissolution occur. One or both may contribute to the enhancement of creep. The purpose of this work was to isolate the mechanism by which the water environment causes the creep deformation to increase. Activation area and activation enthalpy for glide were measured in argon and primary water on high purity Ni-16Cr-9Fe alloys. The results indicated that the activation area was reduced by primary water, consistent with a hydrogen enhanced plasticity mechanism for enhanced creep. The stress dependence of creep was also examined in argon and primary water. The results indicated that the internal stress of the alloy is reduced by the primary water environment. Lower internal stress is consistent with both a hydrogen model as well as a vacancy-aided climb model for enhanced creep. To isolate the effect of hydrogen on the creep of the alloy, experiments were conducted in a dissociated hydrogen environment. The results indicated that hydrogen would only increase the steady state creep rate if present before loading of the samples. However, if the sample was already in steady state creep and hydrogen introduced, a transient in the creep strain was observed. The creep rate returned to the original steady state rate in a short time. The results indicate that while hydrogen does affect the steady state creep to an extent, hydrogen cannot completely account for the increase in creep rate observed in primary water. Also, the presence of the aggressive environment before loading appears to be required to increase the creep rate, indicating that the effect of environment may be significant in the primary creep regime.

  5. Phase Transformation and Creep Behavior in Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy in Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Parikshith K.; Desai, Uri; Monroe, James; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron; Bigelow, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The creep behavior and the phase transformation of Ti50Pd30Ni20 High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy (HTSMA) is investigated by standard creep tests and thermomechanical tests. Ingots of the alloy are induction melted, extruded at high temperature, from which cylindrical specimens are cut and surface polished. A custom high temperature test setup is assembled to conduct the thermomechanical tests. Following preliminary monotonic tests, standard creep tests and thermally induced phase transformation tests are conducted on the specimen. The creep test results suggest that over the operating temperatures and stresses of this alloy, the microstructural mechanisms responsible for creep change. At lower stresses and temperatures, the primary creep mechanism is a mixture of dislocation glide and dislocation creep. As the stress and temperature increase, the mechanism shifts to predominantly dislocation creep. If the operational stress or temperature is raised even further, the mechanism shifts to diffusion creep. The thermally induced phase transformation tests show that actuator performance can be affected by rate independent irrecoverable strain (transformation induced plasticity + retained martensite) as well as creep. The rate of heating and cooling can adversely impact the actuators performance. While the rate independent irrecoverable strain is readily apparent early in the actuators life, viscoplastic strain continues to accumulate over the lifespan of the HTSMA. Thus, in order to get full actuation out of the HTSMA, the heating and cooling rates must be sufficiently high enough to avoid creep.

  6. Creep strength and microstructure of F82H steels near tempering temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozuka, K.; Esaka, H.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.

    2015-09-01

    Creep rupture tests near the tempering temperature were performed, and the creep behavior at high temperatures and the structures of fracture specimens were investigated. Three kinds of F82H test specimens were used: IEA-heat, mod.3, and BA07. The time-to-rupture of the BA07 specimens was the longest under all the test conditions. This was because the minimum creep rates of BA07 were smallest, and a large quantity of fine precipitates of MX from the ESR treatment were considered to be effective in providing creep resistance. Although mod.3 specimens showed a high creep resistance under high stress, the time-to-rupture of mod.3 and IEA-heat were almost the same at low stress. This was because the fine tempered martensitic structure was weakened by being subjected to a high temperature for a long period. Therefore, it is considered that a large quantity of fine MX precipitates are effective for creep resistance near the tempering temperature.

  7. Effects of cold rolling deformation on microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Cheng; Sun, Gui-Xun; Jiang, Zhong-Hao; Ji, Chang-Tao; Liu, Jia-An; Lian, Jian-She

    2014-02-01

    Effects of cold rolling deformation on the microstructure, hardness, and creep behavior of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel (HNASS) are investigated. Microstructure characterization shows that 70% cold rolling deformation results in significant refinement of the microstructure of this steel, with its average twin thickness reducing from 6.4 ?m to 14 nm. Nanoindentation tests at different strain rates demonstrate that the hardness of the steel with nano-scale twins (nt-HNASS) is about 2 times as high as that of steel with micro-scale twins (mt-HNASS). The hardness of nt-HNASS exhibits a pronounced strain rate dependence with a strain rate sensitivity (m value) of 0.0319, which is far higher than that of mt-HNASS (m = 0.0029). nt-HNASS shows more significant load plateaus and a higher creep rate than mt-HNASS. Analysis reveals that higher hardness and larger m value of nt-HNASS arise from stronger strain hardening role, which is caused by the higher storage rate of dislocations and the interactions between dislocations and high density twins. The more significant load plateaus and higher creep rates of nt-HNASS are due to the rapid relaxation of the dislocation structures generated during loading.

  8. Low Temperature Creep of a Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-2Cb-1Ta-0.8Mo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, H. P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for the analysis of low temperature creep of titanium alloys in order to establish design limitations due to the effect of creep. The creep data on a titanium Ti-6Al-2Cb-1Ta-0.8Mo are used in the analysis. A creep equation is formulated to determine the allowable stresses so that creep at ambient temperatures can be kept within an acceptable limit during the service life of engineering structures or instruments. Microcreep which is important to design of precision instruments is included in the discussion also.

  9. Creep Effects on Design below the Temperature Limits of ASME Section III Subsection NB

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I; Eno, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Some recent studies of material response have identified an issue that crosses over and blurs the boundary between ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III Subsection NB and Subsection NH. For very long design lives, the effects of creep show up at lower and lower temperature as the design life increases. Although true for the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties, the effect is more apparent, e.g. creep effects show up sooner, at local structural discontinuities and peak thermal stress locations. This is because creep is a function of time, temperature and stress and the higher the localized stress, the lower in temperature creep begins to cause damage. If the threshold is below the Subsection NB to NH temperature boundary, 700 F for ferritic steels and 800 F for austenitic materials, then this potential failure mode will not be considered. Unfortunately, there is no experience base with very long lives at temperatures close to but under the Subsection NB to NH boundary to draw upon. This issue is of particular interest in the application of Subsection NB rules of construction to some High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) concepts. The purpose of this paper is, thus, twofold; one part is about statistical treatment and extrapolation of sparse data for a specific material of interest, A533B; the other part is about how these results could impact current design procedures in Subsection NB.

  10. Creep Effects on Design below the Temperature Limits of ASME Section III Subsection NB

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Jetter, Robert I; Eno, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Some recent studies of material response have identified an issue that crosses over and blurs the boundary between ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III Subsection NB and Subsection NH. For very long design lives, the effects of creep show up at lower and lower temperature as the design life increases. Although true for the temperature at which the allowable stress is governed by creep properties, the effect is more apparent, e.g. creep effects show up sooner, at local structural discontinuities and peak thermal stress locations. This is because creep is a function of time, temperature and stress and the higher the localized stress, the lower in temperature creep begins to cause damage. If the threshold is below the Subsection NB to NH temperature boundary, 700 F for ferritic steels and 800 F for austenitic materials, then this potential failure mode will not be considered. Unfortunately, there is no experience base with very long lives at temperatures close to but under the Subsection NB to NH boundary to draw upon. This issue is of particular interest in the application of Subsection NB rules of construction to some High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) concepts. The purpose of this paper is, thus, twofold; one part is about statistical treatment and extrapolation of sparse data for a specific material of interest, A533B; the other part is about how these results could impact current design procedures in Subsection NB.

  11. Creep-fatigue interaction in aircraft gas turbine components by simulation and testing at scaled temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabour, Mohammad Hossein

    Advanced gas turbine engines, which use hot section airfoil cooling, present a wide range of design problems. The frequencies of applied loads and the natural frequencies of the blade also are important since they have significant effects on failure of the component due to fatigue phenomenon. Due to high temperature environment the thermal creep and fatigue are quite severe. One-dimensional creep model, using ANSYS has been formulated in order to predict the creep life of a gas turbine engine blade. Innovative mathematical models for the prediction of the operating life of aircraft components, specifically gas turbine blades, which are subjected to creep-fatigue at high temperatures, are proposed. The components are modeled by FEM, mathematically, and using similitude principles. Three models have been suggested and evaluated numerically and experimentally. Using FEM method for natural frequencies causes phenomena such as curve veering which is studied in more detail. The simulation studies on the life-limiting modes of failure, as well as estimating the expected lifetime of the blade, using the proposed models have been carried out. Although the scale model approach has been used for quite some time, the thermal scaling has been used in this study for the first time. The only thermal studies in literature using scaling for structures is by NASA in which materials of both the prototype and the model are the same, but in the present study materials also are different. The finite element method is employed to model the structure. Because of stress redistribution due to the creep process, it is necessary to include a full inelastic creep step in the finite element formulation. Otherwise over-conservative creep life predictions will be estimated if only the initial elastic stresses are considered. The experimental investigations are carried out in order to validate the models. The main contributions in the thesis are: (1) Using similitude theory for life prediction of components in general, and specifically using thermal scaling for the first time for prototype and model with two different materials. (2) Developing 1-D creep ANSYS macro to study creep effects to get meaningful results for industrial applications of gas turbine blade. (3) Analyzing the curve veering and flattening phenomena in rotating blade at thermal environment, using Lagrange-Bhat method. (4) Simple constitutive models in creep-fatigue interaction are proposed that can predict the lifetime in complicated situations of creep-fatigue, using the pure creep and pure fatigue test data.

  12. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  13. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber, Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) Nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber, and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  14. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  15. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.S.; Adams, D.F.

    1989-04-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  16. Irradiation creep in structural materials at ITER operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep is plastic deformation of a material under the influence of irradiation and stress. Below the regime of thermal creep, there remains a deformation mechanism under irradiation that is weakly temperature dependent and clearly different from thermal creep. This is irradiation creep. Both stress and irradiation are required for irradiation creep. Irradiation creep studies for applications in the past focused mostly on liquid metal fast breeder reactors where temperatures are usually above 400{degrees}C. Fusion reactors, especially nearterm devices such as the ITER will have components operating at temperatures as low as 100{degrees}C exposed to high neutron fluxes. Theories of irradiation creep based on steady-state point defect concentrations do not predict significant irradiation creep deformation at these temperatures; however, data from research reactors show that irradiation creep strains at 60{degrees}C are as high or higher than at temperatures above 300{degrees}C for austenitic stainless steels. Irradiation creep of nickel has also been observed at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Creep Mechanisms of a Ni-Co-Based-Wrought Superalloy with Low Stacking Fault Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Chenggang; Xu, Ling; Cui, Chuanyong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    In order to study the influences of stress and temperature on the creep deformation mechanisms of a newly developed Ni-Co-based superalloy with low stacking fault energy, creep experiments were carried out under a stress range of 345 to 840 MPa and a temperature range of 923 K to 1088 K (650 °C to 815 °C). The mechanisms operated under the various creep conditions were identified and the reasons for their transformation were well discussed. A deformation mechanism map under different creep conditions was summarized, which provides a qualitative representation of the operative creep mechanisms as a function of stress and temperature.

  18. Inelastic deformation and damage at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krempl, E.

    1992-06-01

    Combined experimental and theoretical investigations into the inelastic deformation and damage behavior of engineering alloys at elevated temperatures are being pursued. The analysis of previously performed strain rate change and relaxation tests on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel showed the need for inclusion of a recovery of state term in the growth laws for the state variables of the viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO). Recovery of state terms were introduced and the experimental results were satisfactorily simulated. The finite deformation theory of VBO has been developed further to include a convected derivative rationale for the choice of the objective stress rate. The reversing direct current voltage drop measurements during low cycle fatigue at elevated temperature were improved. A passive filter bank and new positioning devices for the coils were installed. Tests at 650 C and lasting several days showed excessive, uncontrollable temperature changes. It was decided to drop the test temperature to 538 C which is close to the operating temperature of type 304 stainless steel. The temperature fluctuations in torsion tests were within +/- 3 C which was considered satisfactory.

  19. Elevated-temperature tensile and creep properties of several ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of several ferritic stainless steels were determined. The alloys evaluated included Armco 18SR, GE 1541, and NASA-18T-A. Tensile and creep strength properties at 1073 and 1273 K and residual room temperature tensile properties after creep testing were measured. In addition, 1273 K tensile and creep tests and residual property testing were conducted with Armco 18SR and GE 1541 which were exposed for 200 hours to a severe oxidizing environment in automotive thermal reactors. Aside from the residual tensile properties for Armco 18SR, prior exposure did not affect the mechanical properties of either alloy. The 1273 K creep strength parallel to the sheet-rolling direction was similar for all three alloys. At 1073 K, NASA-18T-A had better creep strength than either Armco 18SR or GE 1541. NASA-18T-A possesses better residual properties after creep testing than either Armco 18SR or Ge 1541.

  20. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    SciTech Connect

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  1. The Creep of Single Crystals of Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R D; Shober, F R; Schwope, A D

    1953-01-01

    The creep of single crystals of high-purity aluminum was investigated in the range of temperatures from room temperature to 400 F and at resolved-shear-stress levels of 200, 300, and 400 psi. The tests were designed in an attempt to produce data regarding the relation between the rate of strain and the mechanism of deformation. The creep data are analyzed in terms of shear strain rate and the results are discussed with regard to existing creep theories. Stress-strain curves were determined for the crystals in tinsel and constant-load-rate tests in the same temperature range to supplement the study of plastic deformation by creep with information regarding the part played by crystal orientation, differences in strain markings, and other variables in plastic deformation.

  2. Preliminary study of creep thresholds and thermomechanical response in Haynes 188 at temperatures in the range 649 to 871 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, J. R.; Bartolotta, P. A.; Mladsi, S. W.

    1987-01-01

    The following conclusions were drawn from this study of creep thresholds and thermomechanical response: (1) creep threshold can be determined using the latest electrohydraulic test equipment, providing that test durations are short and relatively large accumulations of creep strain are used in defining the threshold; (2) significant creep strains were measured under monotonic loading as stress levels as low as 4 ksi at temperatures predicted for solar receiver service; and (3) the material exhibited creep ratchetting during simulated service cycles, a result not predicted by analysis using current constitutive models for Haynes 188.

  3. Temperature effects on the strainrange partitioning approach for creep-fatigue analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Hirschberg, M. H.; Manson, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination is made of the influence of temperature on the strain-range partitioning approach to creep-fatigue. Results for 2.5Cr-1Mo steel and Type 316 stainless steel show the four partitioned strain range-life relationships to be temperature insensitive to within a factor of two on cyclic life. Monotonic creep and tensile ductilities were also found to be temperature insensitive to within a factor of two. The approach provides bounds on cyclic life that can be readily established for any type of inelastic strain cycle.

  4. The influence of cavitation damage upon high temperature creep under stationary and non-stationary loading conditions. Part III: Creep at steady increasing load and true stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boček, M.; Hoffmann, M.

    1984-11-01

    In this paper for ideally plastic materials the influence of high temperature cavitation damage upon creep at steady increasing loads is investigated. The damage function A(t) enters a constitutive equation for plastíc flow through an effective stress σ e. For given loading conditions the latter is derived from the solution of Hart's tensile test equation. In the present paper the case of time linear increase in load ( F = constant) and in true stress ( /.s = constant) is investigated. The creep equations for cavitating as well as for non-cavitating materials are derived and the volume change during creep at /.F = constant are calculated.

  5. Inelastic deformation and damage at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krempl, E.

    Combined experimental and theoretical investigations into the inelastic deformation and damage behavior of engineering alloys at elevated temperatures are being pursued. Modeling of effects of recovery of state observed in modified 9Cr-lMo steel has been completed. Finite deformation formulations of viscoplasticity theory based on overstress (VBO) include a modified growth law for the equilibrium stress and a rationale for choosing objective derivatives of stress-like state variables. Numerical simulations are in progress. Seven biaxial low-cycle fatigue tests at 538 C have been completed with the reversing DC potential drop apparatus attached. A new method of data analysis and smoothing was developed which showed a significant increase in voltage drop in the area of crack formation. Correlation with solutions of Laplace's Equation for a semi-elliptical crack showed similar shapes for the voltage drop.

  6. Room-Temperature Nanoindentation Creep of Thermally Cycled Ultrasonically Bonded Heavy Aluminum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyakwa, P. A.; Marques, V. M. F.; Corfield, M. R.; Li, J. F.; Yang, L.; Johnson, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    Recent findings suggest that creep occurs during thermal cycling of ultrasonically bonded wires, the extent of which is influenced by the nature of the temperature cycle, particularly its peak temperature. In this work, this hypothesis is investigated through a study of the power-law creep behavior of bonded 375- ?m aluminum wires that have been thermally cycled. Data from a study of two wire purity levels (99.999% and 99.99%) and two different cycling profiles (-55C to 125C and -60C to 170C) are presented. Room-temperature creep stress exponents are derived for the wire bonds from constant-load nanoindentation tests and compared with their respective microstructures.

  7. Effect of unloading time on interrupted creep in copper

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, H.D. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    The effect of unloading time on the interrupted creep behavior of polycrystalline copper specimens was investigated over the temperature range 298--773 K. Up to 553 K, cyclic creep acceleration could be explained in terms of deformation and hardening using a dislocation glide model with recovery during unloading being due to dislocation climb. At higher temperatures, recrystallization effects probably influence behavior.

  8. Irradiation creep of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide at low neutron fluences

    SciTech Connect

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Shimoda, Kazuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ozawa, Kazumi; Katoh, Yutai

    2014-12-01

    The irradiation creep behavior of nano-powder sintered silicon carbide was investigated using the bend stress relaxation method under neutron irradiation up to 1.9 dpa. The creep deformation was observed at all temperatures ranging from 380 to 1180 °C mainly from the irradiation creep but with the increasing contributions from the thermal creep at higher temperatures. Microstructural observation and data analysis were performed.

  9. High temperature deformation behavior of solid and semi-solid alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, M.S.; Overfelt, R.A.

    1999-12-10

    The mechanical response of alloy 718 with various microstructures in the solid and semi-solid state has been characterized. The experimental results presented for the lower temperature solid state deformation are in good agreement with published literature values and extend the experimental range to higher temperatures and lower strain rates. When dendrites were aligned along the compression axis, the directionally solidified materials exhibited an activation energy for plastic flow consistent with the activation energy for creep and self-diffusion in nickel, even at temperatures within the mushy zone. However, samples containing non-aligned grains in the semi-solid state exhibited a greater dependence of deformation with temperature; this was associated with lubricated flow of the grains due to the intergranular liquid in the mushy zone.

  10. A theoretical model of accelerated irradiation creep at low temperatures by transient interstitial absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed using the reaction rate theory of radiation effects to explain experimental results that showed higher than expected values of irradiation creep at low temperatures in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The customary assumption that the point defect concentrations are at steady state was not made; rather, the time dependence of the vacancy and interstitial concentrations and the creep rate were explicitly calculated. For temperatures below about 100 to 200{degree}C, the time required for the vacancy concentration to reach steady state exceeds the duration of the experiment. For example, if materials parameters typical of austenitic stainless steel are used, the calculated vacancy transient dose at 100{degree}C is about 100 dpa. At 550{degree}C this transient is over by 10{sup {minus}8} dpa. During the time that the vacancy population remains lower than its steady state value, dislocation climb is increased since defects of primarily one type are being absorbed. Using the time-dependent point defect concentrations, the dislocation climb velocity has been calculated as a function of time and a climb-enabled glide creep model had been invoked. The extended transient time for the vacancies leads to high creep rates at low temperatures. In agreement with the experimental observations, a minimum in the temperature dependence of creep is predicted at a temperature between 50 and 350{degree}C. The temperature at which the minimum occurs decreases as the irradiation dose increases. Predicted values of creep at 8 dpa are in good agreement with the results of the ORR-MFE-6J/7J experiment.

  11. Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cabet, Celine; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the Very High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 degrees C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanism/s and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 degrees C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens, although evidence of grain boundary cavitation was not observed. Despite the absence of grain boundary cavitation to accelerate crack propagation, the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain was detrimental to cycle life. This suggests that creepfatigue interaction may occur by a different mechanism or that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

  12. Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

  13. Strain localization and grain size reduction during high-stress low-temperature plasticity and subsequent creep below the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepmann, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    A sequence of high-stress crystal-plasticity with accompanying microcracking and subsequent creep at low stresses in the plastosphere can be triggered by the rupture of a fault in a major earthquake within the overlying seismogenic zone. In this study, microfabrics are analyzed by polarized light microscopy and electron microscopic techniques (SEM/EBSD, FIB, TEM) in rocks (vein quartz, peridotite) experimentally deformed at conditions that correspond to those prevailing in the upper plastosphere following a major earthquake. The experiments are carried out in a Griggs-type solid medium apparatus with a deformation stage at low temperature (300 to 600 °C) and high stress ("kick") followed by a stage at higher temperature (900 to 1000 °C) and isostatic ("cook") or low stress ("creep"). The resulting microfabrics show amazing resemblance to those observed in rocks from natural deep continuations of seismically active fault zones (i.e., shear zones). Localized zones of small new grains (a few µm in diameter) without systematic crystallographic preferred orientation within deformed host grains occur. The new grains develop by grain-boundary migration driven by the reduction in surface and strain energies at low stresses from highly damaged zones formed by initial low-temperature plasticity with associated cataclasis at high-stress deformation. A high variability in grain size is observed with the smallest grain size in the center of the highly damaged zones. The grain size reduction is controlled by strain during the initial high-stress deformation and growth is occurring only during the low-stress stage - rendering conventional grain size piezometers inappropriate. In large remnant host grains, short-wavelength undulatory extinction is reflecting low-stress modification (recovery) outside the highly damaged zones but in areas of original high dislocation densities formed at high-stress low-temperature plasticity. Extrapolation to natural conditions suggests that the observed characteristic microstructures may develop within as little as tens of years and less than ten thousands of years. The characteristic deformation and recrystallization microstructures can be expected to be stable over geological time scales, since driving forces for further modification are not sufficient to erase the characteristic heterogeneities. Thus, they are diagnostic for a past sequence of high-stress deformation (a combination of brittle failure and low-temperature plasticity) followed by creep at low stresses (recovery and recrystallization) in shear zones as deep continuations of seismically active fault zones. Such a sequence can explain initial grain size reduction localized along highly damaged zones during high-stress crystal-plasticity further leading to localized recrystallization during subsequent low-stress creep.

  14. Thermal-mechanical effects of low-temperature plasticity (the Peierls mechanism) on the deformation of a viscoelastic shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yuen, David A.; Karato, Shun-Ichiro

    1999-04-01

    We studied for the first time the effects of low-temperature plasticity on the formation of shear zones. A thermal-mechanical model has been developed for describing the shear deformation of Maxwell viscoelastic material with a rheology close to dry olivine. We employed a one-dimensional model with a half-width of L deforming under a constant velocity U at the boundary, and the spatially-averaged strain rate U/L was set to O(10-14) s-1. In addition to diffusion and power-law creep, we included deformation by low-temperature plasticity, called the Peierls mechanism, which is significant at low temperatures and has a strong exponential dependence on the stress. When a sufficient magnitude of heat is generated by the rapid conversion from elastically-stored energy into viscous dissipation, thermal instability takes place and the deformation localizes in a narrow region. By comparing the condition for thermal instability, we found that the low-temperature plasticity inhibits the development of thermal instability in shear zones in case of constant strain rate. The Peierls mechanism enhances deformation at a significantly lower stress compared to the rheology with solely diffusion creep and power-law creep. The enhanced deformation by low-temperature plasticity produces lower amount of dissipative heating, and thus stabilizes the shear zone. Comparing the stability between constant strain-rate and constant stress boundary conditions, we found that the Peierls mechanism exerts an opposite destabilizing effect in the case of constant stress. For dry olivine rheology and realistic magnitude of the strain rate, the effect of low-temperature plasticity is significant for temperatures between around 800 K and 1000 K. This finding suggests that the low-temperature plasticity may be crucial in determining the thermal-mechanical stability in the shallow portion of slabs.

  15. Creep-rupture in powder metallurgical nickel-base superalloys at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. C.; Blackburn, M. J.

    1980-03-01

    To gain insight into the factors which control the creep-rupture properties of powder metallurgical nickel-base superalloys at intermediate temperatures (650 to 775C), a comparative study was conducted on the alloys AF115, modified MAR-M432 (B6) and modified IN100 (MERL76). Creep-rupture properties in these alloys were characterized in terms of the stress and temperature dependence of the secondary creep rate, ?S, andrupture time, t R . Within the limited stress ranges used, the stress dependence of both ?S and t R at 704C can be represented by power laws ?S and C n and t R = M? -p ; where C, M, n, and p are constants. The stress exponents n and p are approximately equal for both AF115 and B6 with values of 16 and 7, respectively. In the case of MERL76, n and p are different, with values of 15 and 5, respectively. The apparent activation energies, Q, are 700, 370 and 520 KJ mol-1 for AF115, B6 and MERL76, respectively. For these alloys, long creep-rupture lives are associated with large values of n and Q. The sig-nificant differences in n and Q values between AF115 and B6 were related to creep re-covery processes for which the lattice misfit between the gamma and the gamma prime was identified to be an important parameter. However, the unequal n and p values in MERL76 compared with those in AF115 and B6, were traced to differences in fracture mode. Failures in AF115 and B6 were initiated at carbide particles at grain boundaries. In contrast, fracture in MERL76 was initiated at grain boundary triple junctions. The rupture lives of AF115 and B6 can be modeled reasonably well by the growth of cavities during secondary creep and propagation of a surface-nucleated crack during the tertiary creep.

  16. Temperature dependence of optically induced cell deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias R.; Stange, Roland; Kaes, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical properties of any material change with temperature, hence this must be true for cellular material. In biology many functions are known to undergo modulations with temperature, like myosin motor activity, mechanical properties of actin filament solutions, CO2 uptake of cultured cells or sex determination of several species. As mechanical properties of living cells are considered to play an important role in many cell functions it is surprising that only little is known on how the rheology of single cells is affected by temperature. We report the systematic temperature dependence of single cell deformations in Optical Stretcher (OS) measurements. The temperature is changed on a scale of about 20 minutes up to hours and compared to defined temperature shocks in the range of milliseconds. Thereby, a strong temperature dependence of the mechanics of single suspended cells is revealed. We conclude that the observable differences arise rather from viscosity changes of the cytosol than from structural changes of the cytoskeleton. These findings have implications for the interpretation of many rheological measurements, especially for laser based approaches in biological studies.

  17. Thermal transients and creep effects on theoretical and experimental assessment in operating high temperature steam piping

    SciTech Connect

    Cesari, F.; Menghini, S.; Regis, V.

    1982-01-01

    Transient, creep and relaxation studies of operating high pressure piping in AISI 316 have been developed by the Italian Electrical Board in view of reassessing the structural and mechanical integrity of the line. The influence of the prestressing on the pipe is examined to determine the modifications on stress and strain response in time. Sectional analysis with 3D finite element computer programme, assuming elastic and elastic-plastic deformation of the material, shows the congruence of theoretical approach with the experimental data; also, local strain gauge monitoring of some sections offers a good tool for validating theoretical computations which are in acceptable agreement with the quantities recorded. Many creep-relaxation cycles are introduced to simulate the effect of further long-term exposure to the piping in creep range, up to 50,000 hours, and to understand the cold spring effect on piping stress. The examination of cycles in creep regime allows to describe the behaviour of time dependent stress redistribution along the line, and gives some estimation about the safety margin existing in the structure.

  18. Low temperature creep crack growth in low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rui; Sandstrm, Rolf; Seitisleam, Facredin

    2005-02-01

    Uni-axial creep and creep crack growth (CCG) tests between 320 C and 420 C have been carried out in a low alloy reactor pressure vessel steel (ASTM A508 class 2). Both as-received material and simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ) microstructure have been tested. CCG does occur at tested temperatures. The lifetimes for the CCG tests are considerably shorter than those for the uni-axial creep tests at the same reference stress and temperature. This is more pronounced at longer lifetimes or lower stresses. Increasing temperature causes a significant reduction of lifetime, e.g. the CCG lifetime on the simulated CGHAZ is reduced by a factor of five as temperature raises from 320 C to 340 C at given reference stresses. Three distinct regions relating crack length and time are observed for the CCG tests. After incubation, the crack grows steadily until it accelerates to approach failure. For the longer time CCG tests, the cracks propagate intergranularly, independent of temperature and microstructure. An approximate linear extrapolation based on the stress-time results indicates that the reference stress causing failure in the simulated CGHAZ due to CCG at a given lifetime of 100 000 h at 320 C is lower than both yield and tensile strengths, showing that the design stress should be based on creep crack growth property rather than static strength.

  19. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  20. Analysis of excessive deformation behavior of a PMMA-touch screen panel laminated material in a high temperature condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeon; Wang, Jaeyoon; Park, Seon-Mi; Hong, Seokmoo; Kim, Naksoo

    2011-12-01

    In this study, the bending and twisting deformations of a laminated material composed of PMMA (Poly Methyl Methacrylate) and TSP (Touch Screen Panel) were analyzed at a high temperature condition. At similar conditions, a PC (Polycarbonate)/TSP material had little deformation, but the PMMA-TSP material showed excessive bending deformation with twisting. To determine the factors that cause the deformation, 5 factors relating to material properties were systematically analyzed using FE (Finite element) analysis. The results demonstrated that variations in each of the 5 factors affect the deformation of material, and the strongest influence on the deformation behavior of the material at high temperature comes from the CTE, residual stress, and the creep effect. The validity of the analytical research was confirmed by comparing not only differences in the material properties of PMMA and PC, but also by comparing the results of the FE analysis of PMMA-TSP and PC-TSP. In the analysis, it was discovered that CTE, creep coefficient, and residual stress are the most significant causes of deformation of the laminated material.

  1. Microstructural Evolution of an Extensional Shear Zone: the Transition from Dislocation Creep to Grain Boundary Sliding in Naturally Deformed Plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, E.; Hirth, G.; John, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present microstructural, LPO, and misorientation data from EBSD analyses to interpret the deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed plagioclase in an amphibolite-facies extensional shear zone within oceanic crust. Textural data and mineral chemistry data for thermometry were acquired on samples of gabbro mylonite collected from the footwall of the Atlantis Bank oceanic core complex; we focus on a monophase plagioclase layer with a high ratio of recrystallized matrix grains to porphyroclasts. Sample microstructures are subdivided into three regions: seven porphyroclasts, recrystallized grains immediately adjacent to those porphyroclasts, and the population of recrystallized matrix grains. All porphyroclasts exhibit subgrain development and show clustering of low-angle (3-10º) misorientation axes within the {010} plane, consistent with slip on {010}. However, only one porphyroclast is oriented for operation of the {010}<001> easy slip system. The small recrystallized grains immediately adjacent to the porphyroclasts do not show a host control relationship with their respective porphyroclasts, and these grains are also smaller than the subgrains of the porphyroclasts. Recrystallized matrix grains are fine-grained (mean grain size 8 μm) and slightly elongate parallel to foliation, with local misorientations concentrated along grain boundaries and junctions. They exhibit a weak, nonrandom LPO suggesting the activity of the {111}<110> slip system, and their neighbor-pair misorientations are shifted towards higher angles. We interpret the distinctive relationships between the three regions as evidence of a transition from dislocation creep to dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding (DisGBS). Porphyroclast subgrains and misorientation axes suggest the operation of dislocation creep, but the lack of host control in the adjacent recrystallized grains precludes grain size reduction through subgrain rotation recrystallization alone. High driving force bulge nucleation likely contributed to the grain size reduction and recrystallization of matrix grains, triggering the onset of grain size sensitive DisGBS. We suggest that the transition between deformation mechanisms is an effective weakening mechanism that contributed to development of the shear zone.

  2. High temperature deformation of a submicron grained Al-12 wt% Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.H.; Kao, P.W.

    1997-06-15

    Compressive deformation behavior of a MA Al-12wt%Ti alloy has been studied at 623--773 K with strain rates from 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. A high stress exponent was observed in the stress dependence of strain rate. By assuming that the presence of a threshold stress is the cause of the high stress exponent, the experimental data were analyzed and compared with existing models. The creep behavior of this alloy is found similar to the dispersion strengthened Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloys. It is suggested that the high temperature deformation of this alloy is mainly governed by the fine carbide and oxide strengthened aluminum matrix, which can be described by lattice-diffusion controlled creep with a constant structure. In addition, a strong temperature dependence of the threshold stress was observed. It might be related to certain grain boundary processes and/or thermally activated deformation of strengthening particles.

  3. Effect of temperature on tensile and creep characteristics of PRD49 fiber/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, M. P.

    1972-01-01

    Tensile and creep data of PRD49-1 and 3 fiber/epoxy-resin composites are presented. Tensile data were obtained from 20 to 477 K (-423 to 400 F). Tensile strengths and moduli were determined at selected temperatures. Creep data are presented for fiber composites at 297, 422 and 450 K (75, 300, and 350 F) for as long as 1000 hours at stress levels of approximately 50 and 80 percent of the ultimate tensile strength at 297 K (75 F). Details of tensile specimens and test procedures used in the investigation are presented.

  4. Creep testing of foil-gage metals at elevated temperature using an automated data acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    A method is being developed to obtain creep data on foil gage metals at elevated temperatures using an automated data acquisition system in conjunction with a mechanically counter balanced extensometer. The automated system components include the Hewlett-Packard (HP) 9845A desktop computer, the HP 3455A digital voltmeter and the HP 3495A scanner. Software for test monitoring and data collection was developed; data manipulation, including curve plotting was done with a HP regression analysis software package. Initial creep tests were conducted on .003 in. thick foil specimens of Ti-6A1-4V at temperatures of 800 F and 1000 F and at stress levels of 25 ksi and 45 ksi. For comparison, duplicate tests were run on .049 in. thick specimens sheet of the same alloy. During testing, the furnace and specimen temperature, bridge voltage, strain and load output were automatically monitored and recorded at predetermined intervals. Using the HP regression analysis program, recorded strain output was plotted as a function of time. These resultant creep curves indicate that, under similar conditions of temperature and stress, foil gage specimens exhibit a higher creep rate than sheet specimens.

  5. Copper modified austenitic stainless steel alloys with improved high temperature creep resistance

    DOEpatents

    Swindeman, R.W.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1987-04-28

    An improved austenitic stainless steel that incorporates copper into a base Fe-Ni-Cr alloy having minor alloying substituents of Mo, Mn, Si, T, Nb, V, C, N, P, B which exhibits significant improvement in high temperature creep resistance over previous steels. 3 figs.

  6. Creep Testing of High-Temperature Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb Alloy Completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb (Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb) alloy is under development for high-temperature, high heatflux applications, such as actively cooled, hypersonic vehicle heat exchangers and rocket engine combustion chambers. Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb offers a superior combination of strength and conductivity. It has also shown exceptional low-cycle fatigue properties. Following preliminary testing to determine the best processing route, a more detailed testing program was initiated to determine the creep lives and creep rates of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy specimens produced by extrusion. Testing was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center with constant-load vacuum creep units. Considering expected operating temperatures and mission lives, we developed a test matrix to accurately determine the creep properties of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb between 500 and 800 C. Six bars of Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb were extruded. From these bars, 54 creep samples were machined and tested. The figure on the left shows the steady-state, or second-stage, creep rates for the samples. Comparison data for NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt % Ag-0.5 wt % Zr), the alloy currently used in combustion chamber liners, were not unavailable. Therefore the steady-state creep rates for Cu at similar temperatures are presented. As expected, in comparison to pure Cu, the creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb are much lower. The lives of the samples are presented in the figure on the right. As shown, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb at 800 C is comparable to NARloy-Z at 648 C. At equivalent temperatures, Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb enjoys a 20 to 50 percent advantage in stress for a given life and 1 to 3 orders of magnitude greater life at a given stress. The improved properties allow for design tradeoffs and improvements in new and existing heat exchangers such as the next generation of combustion chamber liners. Average creep rates for Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb and pure Cu are shown. Average creep lives for Cu-8 Cr- 4 Nb and NARloy-Z are also shown. Currently, two companies are interested in the commercial usage of the Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb alloy. The Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International is conducting independent testing to analyze the properties for their projected needs in advanced rocket engine applications. Metallamics, a company based in Traverse City, Michigan, is entering into a Space Act Agreement to evaluate and test Cu-Cr-Nb alloys as materials for welding electrodes that are used in robotic welding operations. Creep rate is one of the alloy properties that determines the degree to which a welding electrode will mushroom or expand at the tip. A material with a low creep rate will resist mushrooming and give the electrode a longer life, minimizing downtime. This application holds the potential for large-scale usage of the alloy in the automotive and other industries. Success here would dramatically decrease the cost of the alloy and increase availability for aerospace applications.

  7. Effect of temperature on the formation of creep substructure in sodium chloride single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Pharr, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the substructure morphology and the cell and subgrain size was investigated experimentally in NaCl single crystals under creep in the temperature range 573-873 K. It is found that the effect of temperature on the cell and subgrain sizes is weak in comparison with the effect of stress. However, there was a qualitative change in the substructure morphology with temperature, with the cells and subgrains better defined at higher temperatures. The volume fraction of the cell boundaries decreased with increasing temperature, thereby indicating a refinement of the microstructure at higher temperatures.

  8. The role of grain boundary sliding on creep deformation characteristics of discontinuous reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.

    1994-10-01

    In this study, the grain boundary sliding behavior in discontinuous reinforced composites is investigated numerically. Results indicate that the stress enhancement factor for the composite is much larger than the one observed for the matrix material. In the composite, the increase in the strain rates as a result of grain boundary sliding occurs in a wider stress range in comparison to the matrix. It is shown that the experimentally observed large scale triple point grain boundary cavitation in the composites could occur as a result of large grain rotations resulting from grain boundary sliding and evolution of triaxial stress state. Also, the observed larger creep exponent values or stress dependent creep exponent values for the composites may not be explained solely by the mechanism of grain boundary sliding.

  9. Deformation behavior of a Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr intermetallic alloy in the temperature range 300 to 1300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Locci, I. E.; Noebe, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation properties of an extruded Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr (at. pct) alloy in the temperature range 300-1300 K were investigated under initial tensile strain rates that varied between 10 exp -6 and 10 exp -3/sec and in constant load compression creep between 1073 and 1300 K. Three deformation regimes were observed: region I, occurring between 400 and 673 K, which consisted of an athermal regime of less than 0.3 percent tensile ductility; region II, between 673 and 1073, where exponential creep was dominant; and region III, between 1073 and 1300 K, where a significant improvement in tensile ductility was observed.

  10. Evaluation of Permanent Deformation of CRM-Reinforced SMA and Its Correlation with Dynamic Stiffness and Dynamic Creep

    PubMed Central

    Mashaan, Nuha Salim; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2013-01-01

    Today, rapid economic and industrial growth generates increasing amounts of waste materials such as waste tyre rubber. Attempts to inspire a green technology which is more environmentally friendly that can produce economic value are a major consideration in the utilization of waste materials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of waste tyre rubber (crumb rubber modifier (CRM)), in stone mastic asphalt (SMA 20) performance. The virgin bitumen (80/100) penetration grade was used, modified with crumb rubber at four different modification levels, namely, 6%, 12%, 16%, and 20% by weight of the bitumen. The testing undertaken on the asphalt mix comprises the indirect tensile (dynamic stiffness), dynamic creep, and wheel tracking tests. By the experimentation, the appropriate amount of CRM was found to be 16% by weight of bitumen. The results show that the addition of CRM into the mixture has an obvious significant effect on the performance properties of SMA which could improve the mixture's resistance against permanent deformation. Further, higher correlation coefficient was obtained between the rut depth and permanent strain as compared to resilient modulus; thus dynamic creep test might be a more reliable test in evaluating the rut resistance of asphalt mixture. PMID:24302883

  11. Temperature effects on the strainrange partitioning approach for creep-fatigue analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Hirschberg, M. H.; Manson, S. S.

    1972-01-01

    Examination is made of the influence of temperature on the strainrange partitioning approach to creep-fatigue. Results for Cr-Mo steel and Type 316 stainless steel show the four partitioned strainrange-life relationships to be temperature insensitive to within a factor of two on cyclic life. Monotonic creep and tensile ductilities were also found to be temperature insensitive to within a factor of two. The approach provides bounds on cyclic life that can be readily established for any type of inelastic strain cycle. Continuous strain cycling results obtained over a broad range of high temperatures and frequencies are in excellent agreement with bounds provided by the approach. The observed transition from one bound to the other is also in good agreement with the approach.

  12. Creep behavior of copper at intermediate temperatures. II - Surface microstructural observations. III - A comparison with theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Langdon, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three different types of microstructural slip features are noted to occur during the creep of Cu at 0.46-0.72 of absolute melting point. While single slip is associated with higher temperatures and lower stresses, complex wavy slip features are observed at higher temperatures and higher stresses as well as with increasing strains: suggesting the importance of cross-slip mechanisms. At lower temperatures and higher stresses the multiple-slip morphologies observed indicate that cross-slip mechanisms may control the creep of polycrystalline Cu only over a limited stress and temperature range. A phenomenological model is proposed which assumes that (1) cell boundaries within subgrains act as both sources of, and obstacles to, gliding dislocations, and (2) dislocation annihilation occurs at the cell boundaries by climb and cross-slip.

  13. Creep-fatigue of High Temperature Materials for VHTR: Effect of Cyclic Loading and Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Celine Cabet; L. Carroll; R. Wright; R. Madland

    2011-05-01

    Alloy 617 is the one of the leading candidate materials for Intermediate Heat eXchangers (IHX) of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). System start-ups and shut-downs as well as power transients will produce low cycle fatigue (LCF) loadings of components. Furthermore, the anticipated IHX operating temperature, up to 950°C, is in the range of creep so that creep-fatigue interaction, which can significantly increase the fatigue crack growth, may be one of the primary IHX damage modes. To address the needs for Alloy 617 codification and licensing, a significant creep-fatigue testing program is underway at Idaho National Laboratory. Strain controlled LCF tests including hold times up to 1800s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at total strain range of 0.3% and 0.6% in air at 950°C. Creep-fatigue testing was also performed in a simulated VHTR impure helium coolant for selected experimental conditions. The creep-fatigue tests resulted in failure times up to 1000 hrs. Fatigue resistance was significantly decreased when a hold time was added at peak stress and when the total strain was increased. The fracture mode also changed from transgranular to intergranular with introduction of a tensile hold. Changes in the microstructure were methodically characterized. A combined effect of temperature, cyclic and static loading and environment was evidenced in the targeted operating conditions of the IHX. This paper This paper reviews the data previously published by Carroll and co-workers in references 10 and 11 focusing on the role of inelastic strain accumulation and of oxidation in the initiation and propagation of surface fatigue cracks.

  14. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  15. Plastic Deformation of Micromachined Silicon Diaphragms with a Sealed Cavity at High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Juan; Ward, Michael; Kinnell, Peter; Craddock, Russell; Wei, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Single crystal silicon (SCS) diaphragms are widely used as pressure sensitive elements in micromachined pressure sensors. However, for harsh environments applications, pure silicon diaphragms are hardly used because of the deterioration of SCS in both electrical and mechanical properties. To survive at the elevated temperature, the silicon structures must work in combination with other advanced materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon on insulator (SOI), for improved performance and reduced cost. Hence, in order to extend the operating temperatures of existing SCS microstructures, this work investigates the mechanical behavior of pressurized SCS diaphragms at high temperatures. A model was developed to predict the plastic deformation of SCS diaphragms and was verified by the experiments. The evolution of the deformation was obtained by studying the surface profiles at different anneal stages. The slow continuous deformation was considered as creep for the diaphragms with a radius of 2.5 mm at 600 °C. The occurrence of plastic deformation was successfully predicted by the model and was observed at the operating temperature of 800 °C and 900 °C, respectively. PMID:26861332

  16. Plastic Deformation of Micromachined Silicon Diaphragms with a Sealed Cavity at High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Ren, Juan; Ward, Michael; Kinnell, Peter; Craddock, Russell; Wei, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Single crystal silicon (SCS) diaphragms are widely used as pressure sensitive elements in micromachined pressure sensors. However, for harsh environments applications, pure silicon diaphragms are hardly used because of the deterioration of SCS in both electrical and mechanical properties. To survive at the elevated temperature, the silicon structures must work in combination with other advanced materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC) or silicon on insulator (SOI), for improved performance and reduced cost. Hence, in order to extend the operating temperatures of existing SCS microstructures, this work investigates the mechanical behavior of pressurized SCS diaphragms at high temperatures. A model was developed to predict the plastic deformation of SCS diaphragms and was verified by the experiments. The evolution of the deformation was obtained by studying the surface profiles at different anneal stages. The slow continuous deformation was considered as creep for the diaphragms with a radius of 2.5 mm at 600 C. The occurrence of plastic deformation was successfully predicted by the model and was observed at the operating temperature of 800 C and 900 C, respectively. PMID:26861332

  17. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and a corresponding development of a back stress due to a significant increase in the dislocation density during thermal cycling.

  18. Microstructural Parameters Controlling High-Temperature Creep Life of the Nickel-Base Single-Crystal Superalloy MC2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Graverend, Jean-Briac; Cormier, Jonathan; Kruch, Serge; Gallerneau, Franck; Mendez, Jos

    2012-11-01

    The influence of both topologically close-packed (TCP) phase precipitation and pores on the creep life of a single-crystal superalloy has been studied at 1323 K (1050 C)/160 MPa. Despite very reproducible primary and secondary creep stages, the creep life is scattered for this specific condition where a very steep tertiary creep stage is observed, corresponding to a highly localized failure process. Image processing was performed after failure to determine the stereological parameters characterizing pores and TCP-phase particles. It was determined that pores are major determinants of creep life under these temperature and stress conditions. It was also observed that the average surface area or the density of pores is not sufficient to explain creep life variability. A homogenization method including modified ?/ ?' microstructure area surrounding pores and TCP-phase particles was developed and correlated to creep life. It is shown that the greater the extent of the modified microstructure, the lower the creep life. Moreover, a better understanding of the TCP-phase role in controlling the creep life was obtained: TCP-phase particles modified the local stress field and disturbed the local ?/ ?' microstructure. They enhance the generation of vacancies and subsequent nucleation and growth of pores.

  19. Effect of Nb and Cu on the high temperature creep properties of a high MnN austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyu-Ho; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Huh, Joo-Youl; Park, Dae-Bum; Hong, Sung-Min; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Jung, Woo-Sang

    2013-09-15

    The effect of Nb and Cu addition on the creep properties of a high MnN austenitic stainless steel was investigated at 600 and 650 C. In the original high MnN steel, which was initially precipitate-free, the precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M = Cr, Fe) and Cr{sub 2}N took place mostly on grain boudaries during creep deformation. On the other hand, the minor addition of Nb resulted in high number density of Z-phases (CrNbN) and MX (M = Nb; X = C, N) carbonitrides inside grains by combining with a high content of N, while suppressing the formation of Cr{sub 2}N. The addition of Cu gave rise to the independent precipitation of nanometer-sized metallic Cu particles. The combination of the different precipitate-forming mechanisms associated with Z-phase, MX and Cu-rich precipitates turned out to improve the creep-resistance significantly. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the precipitation were discussed using thermo-kinetic simulations. - Highlights: The creep rupture life was improved by Nb and Cu addition. The creep resistance of the steel A2 in this study was comparable to that of TP347HFG. The size of Z-phase and MX carbonitride did not change significantly after creep test. The nanometer sized Cu-rich precipitate was observed after creep. The predicted size of precipitates by MatCalc agreed well with measured size.

  20. Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories

    SciTech Connect

    Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    1999-03-01

    Furnace designers and refractory engineers recognize that optimized furnace superstructure design and refractory selection are needed as glass production furnaces are continually striving toward greater output and efficiencies. Harsher operating conditions test refractories to the limit, while changing production technology (such as the conversion to oxy-fuel from traditional air-fuel firing) can alter the way the materials perform. Refractories for both oxy- and air-fuel fired furnace superstructures are subjected to high temperatures during service that may cause them to excessively creep or subside if the refractory material is not creep resistant, or if it is subjected to high stress, or both. Furnace designers can ensure that superstructure structural integrity is maintained if the creep behavior of the refractory material is well understood and well represented by appropriate engineering creep models. Several issues limit the abilities of furnace designers to (1) choose the optimum refractory for their applications, (2) optimize the engineering design, or (3) predict the service mechanical integrity of their furnace superstructures. Published engineering creep data are essentially non-existent for almost all commercially available refractories used for glass furnace superstructures. The limited data that do exist are supplied by the various refractory suppliers. Unfortunately, these suppliers generally have different ways of conducting their mechanical testing and they also interpret and report their data differently; this makes it hard for furnace designers to draw fair comparisons between competing grades of candidate refractories. Furthermore, the refractory supplier's data are often not available in a form that can be readily used for furnace design and for the prediction and design of long-term structural integrity of furnace superstructures. With the aim of providing such comparable data, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technology and its Advanced Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

  1. High-temperature fracturing and subsequent grain-size-sensitive creep in lower crustal gabbros: Evidence for coseismic loading followed by creep during decaying stress in the lower crust?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okudaira, Takamoto; Je?bek, Petr; Stnitz, Holger; Fusseis, Florian

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of shear zone formation in lower crustal, relatively "dry" rocks is still poorly understood. We have studied the high-temperature deformation of the Hasvik gabbro (northern Norway) which commences by fracturing. The 10-20 m wide fractures show little displacement. The fine-grained plagioclase and orthopyroxene in the fractures lack a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) or a systematic crystallographic orientation with respect to the host grains. Fractures grade into narrow shear zones, which are composed of fine (10-20 m), equant grains of recrystallized plagioclase, amphibole, and pyroxene. Recrystallized plagioclase and pyroxene have compositions different from the magmatic grains, suggesting that they have formed by nucleation and growth. Based on conventional plagioclase-amphibole thermobarometry, the shear zones have formed at temperatures and pressures of 700-750C and 0.5-0.6 GPa. The observed primary minerals cut by fractures suggest high-temperature fracturing in the absence of high pore pressures, which implies a high strength of the lower crustal gabbros and high stresses at fracturing. The shear zones are characterized by the lack of CPO and a small grain size, suggesting that the mechanism of deformation of the fine-grained plagioclase and orthopyroxene has been grain boundary sliding accommodated by diffusive mass transfer. The amphibole grains have strong CPOs, which most likely result from oriented growth and/or rigid body rotations during deformation. The process that initiated the fracturing and subsequent viscous creep in the Hasvik gabbro may have resulted from a process of coseismic loading followed by creep during decaying stress in the lower crust.

  2. Room-temperature deformation in a Laves phase

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, J.D.; Hall, E.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of two-phase V-Hf-Nb and V-Hf-Nb-Ti alloys plastically deformed at room temperature shows that {l brace}111{r brace}{l angle}112{r angle} twinning is a major deformation mode for the HfV{sub 2}-based Laves phase. Bands of concentrated shear are also observed. Possible approaches to enhance low-temperature deformability in other Laves phases are discussed.

  3. Creep deformation and rupture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel weldments and its constituents (base metal, weld metal and simulated heat affected zones)

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Rao, K.B.S.; Mannan, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Microstructure across a weldment base metal through transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) to cast weld metal. HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldment consists of coarse-grain bainite, fine-grain bainite and intercritical region. These HAZ microstructures were simulated by isothermal heat-treatments. Creep tests were carried out on base metal, weld metal, weldment and the simulated HAZ structures. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of 2.25Cr-1Mo weldments has been assessed based on the properties of its constituents. Coarse-grain bainite with low ductility and intercritical structure with low strength are the critical components of HAZ determining performance of the weldments.

  4. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, Grigoreta M; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  5. Effect of carbide precipitation on the creep behavior of alloy 800HT in the temperature range 700 C to 900 C

    SciTech Connect

    El-Magd, E.; Nicolini, G.; Farag, M.

    1996-03-01

    The creep behavior of alloy 800HT was studied at 700 C, 800 C, and 900 C under stresses ranging from 30 to 170 MPa. Samples that were tested in the as-quenched condition after solution treatment exhibited longer creep life than those that were over aged before testing. This difference in creep life was found to increase at lower creep stresses at a given temperature. This phenomenon is attributed to the precipitation of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides during the early stages of creep, which strengthen the material by exerting threshold stresses on moving dislocations and thereby reducing the creep rate. A model is developed to describe the influence of carbide precipitation during creep on the behavior of the material under different creep temperatures and stresses. Comparison with the experimental results shows that the model gives accurate predictions of the creep behavior of the material in the range of stresses and temperatures used in the present study. In addition to its predictive value, the model is useful in understanding the factors that affect the creep behavior of materials when precipitation of hard phases is taking place during creep. The strengthening effect of particle precipitation during creep, as represented by the value of the threshold stress, is shown to be a complex function of the supersaturation of the matrix, the applied creep stress, and the test temperature.

  6. The cryostat for deformation of crystals at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunkeyev, K.; Sarmukhanov, E.; Bekeshev, A.; Sagimbaeva, Sh; Bizhanova, K.

    2012-12-01

    The cryostat was worked out, helped to deform the crystals at 80 K with different degree of deformation and to register luminescence, absorption and thermally activated characteristics of crystals, also to record the ionic and thermally stimulated currents of the dipole defects depolarization. The degree of crystal's deformation is given by compressing screw pitch which is equal to 1 mm at a complete revolution of the crystal holder. The construction of the cryostat allows to set experimentally the desired degree of crystal's deformation. Deformation can be removed from the crystal and re-update at different temperatures.

  7. Effect of prior creep at 1365 K on the room temperature tensile properties of several oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to determine whether oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are subject to creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin-gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and advanced ODS-NiCrAl types; the alloys included microstructures ranging from an essentially perfect single crystal to a structure consisting of very small elongated grains. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, appearance of dispersoid free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and/or internal oxidation are interpreted as creep degradation effects. The amount of degradation depends on creep strain, and degradation appears to be due to diffusional creep which produces dispersoid free bands around grain boundaries acting as vacancy sources.

  8. Creep of plasma sprayed zirconia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firestone, R. F.; Logan, W. R.; Adams, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings with three different porosities and different initial particle sizes were deformed in compression at initial loads of 1000, 2000, and 3500 psi and temperatures of 1100 C, 1250 C, and 1400 C. The coatings were stabilized with lime, magnesia, and two different concentrations of yttria. Creep began as soon as the load was applied and continued at a constantly decreasing rate until the load was removed. Temperature and stabilization had a pronounced effect on creep rate. The creep rate for 20% Y2O3-80% ZrO2 was 1/3 to 1/2 that of 8% Y2O3-92% ZrO2. Both magnesia and calcia stabilized ZrO2 crept at a rate 5 to 10 times that of the 20% Y2O3 material. A near proportionality between creep rate and applied stress was observed. The rate controlling process appeared to be thermally activated, with an activation energy of approximately 100 cal/gm mole K. Creep deformation was due to cracking and particle sliding.

  9. Modeling creep behavior in a directionally solidified nickel base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Alejandro R.

    Directionally solidified (DS) nickel-base superalloys provide significant improvements relative to the limitations inherent to equiaxed materials in the areas of creep resistance, oxidation, and low and high cycle fatigue resistance. Since these materials are being pushed to the limits of their capability in gas turbine applications, accurate mathematical models are needed to predict the service lives of the hot-section components to prevent unscheduled outages due to sudden mechanical failures. The objectives of this study are to perform critical experiments and investigate the high temperature tensile, fracture toughness, creep deformation, creep rupture and creep crack growth behavior of DS GTD111 as well as to apply creep deformation, rupture and crack growth models that will enable the accurate representation of the life times of the DS GTD111 superalloy gas turbine components that are exposed to high temperatures under sustained tensile stresses. The applied models will be capable of accurately representing the creep deformation, rupture and crack growth behavior as a function of stress, time and temperature. The yield strength and fracture toughness behavior with temperature is governed by the gamma particles. The longitudinal direction showed higher ductility and strength than the transverse direction. The TL direction exhibited higher fracture toughness than the LT orientation because the crack follows a more tortuous path. The longitudinal direction showed higher creep ductility, lower minimum strain rates and longer creep rupture times than the transverse direction. The results in the transverse direction were similar to the ones for the equiaxed version of this superalloy. Two models for creep deformation have been evaluated. The power-law model includes a secondary and a tertiary creep term with the primary creep represented by a constant. A theta-projection model has also been evaluated and it appears to provide a more accurate representation of creep deformation over a wide range of stress, time and temperature conditions. The Monkman-Grant relationship, the Larson-Miller parameter and the theta projection model have been successfully used to predict the time to rupture for different orientation-temperature-stress conditions. The time dependent fracture mechanics approach is used to model creep crack growth behavior. The creep crack grows faster at higher temperatures and in the LT orientation, but the crack advance rate is uniquely characterized by Ct independent of the orientation and temperature.

  10. Accelerator-Based Irradiation Creep of Pyrolytic Carbon Used in TRISO Fuel Particles for the (VHTR) Very Hight Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lumin Wang; Gary Was

    2010-07-30

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is one of the important structural materials in the TRISO fuel particles which will be used in the next generation of gas-cooled very-high-temperature reactors (VHTR). When the TRISO particles are under irradiation at high temperatures, creep of the PyC layers may cause radial cracking leading to catastrophic particle failure. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the creep behavior of PyC during irradiation is required to predict the overall fuel performance.

  11. Analysis of the Deformation Behavior in Tension and Tension-Creep of Ti-3Al-2.5V (wt pct) at 296 K and 728 K (23 C and 455 C) Using In Situ SEM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongmei; Boehlert, Carl J.; Bieler, Thomas R.; Crimp, Martin A.

    2014-12-01

    The deformation behavior of a Ti-3Al-2.5V (wt pct) near-? alloy was investigated during in situ deformation inside a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two plates with distinct textures were examined. Tensile experiments were performed at 296 K and 728 K (455 C) (~0.4 T m), while a tensile-creep experiment was performed at 728 K (455 C) and 180 MPa ( ?/ ? ys = 0.72). The active deformation systems were identified in the ? phase using electron backscattered diffraction based slip-trace analysis and SEM images of the surface. Prismatic slip deformation was the dominant slip mode observed for all the experiments in both plates, which was supported by a critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) ratio analysis. However, due to the texture of plate 1, which strongly favored the activation of prismatic slip, the percentages of prismatic slip activity for specimens from plate 1 tested at 296 K and 728 K (23 C and 455 C) were higher than the specimens from plate 2 under the same testing conditions. T1 twinning was an active deformation mode at both 296 K and 728 K (23 C and 455 C), but the extent of twinning activity decreased with increased temperature. T1 twinning was more frequently observed in specimens from plate 2, which exhibited a higher fraction of twinning systems favoring activation at both 296 K and 728 K (23 C and 455 C). The tension-creep experiment revealed less slip and more grain boundary sliding than in the higher strain rate tensile experiments. Using a previously demonstrated bootstrapping statistical analysis methodology, the relative CRSS ratios of prismatic, pyramidal < a>, pyramidal < c+ a>, and T1 twinning deformation systems compared with basal slip were calculated and discussed in light of similar measurements made on CP Ti and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt pct).

  12. Precipitation Behavior in the Heat-Affected Zone of Boron-Added 9Cr-3W-3Co Steel During Post-Weld Heat Treatment and Creep Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Tsukamoto, Susumu; Sawada, Kota; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Abe, Fujio

    2015-05-01

    In the previous paper, we demonstrated that the addition of boron was effective in preventing type IV failure due to suppression of grain refinement in the heat-affected zone at the peak temperature of around AC3 (AC3 HAZ). However, some fine prior austenite grains (PAGs) still remained around the coarse PAG boundaries, and these fine PAGs may affect the creep property of the welded joint. In the present study, the effect of these fine PAGs on the creep property of the boron-added 9Cr-3Co-3W steel (B steel) Ac3 HAZ is investigated. Different heat treatments are carried out on B steel base metal to form different Ac3 HAZ-simulated microstructures of coarse PAG with and without fine PAGs. Ac3 HAZ microstructure shows that a lot of M23C6 carbides are formed at the block boundary in the interior of coarse PAG. On the other hand, few M23C6 carbides are formed at the fine PAG boundaries, but a number of ? phases (W6Fe7 type) cover the boundary. The formation of ? phase retards the recovery of dislocation at the fine PAG boundary and contributes to stabilizing the microstructure in the primary and transient creep regions. The ? phase transforms to the Laves phase during creep. As the growth rate of Laves phase is higher than that of M23C6 carbides during creep, the creep strength of fine PAG boundary, which is strengthened only by Laves phase, becomes a little bit lower than the other boundaries strengthened by M23C6 carbides after long-term creep. The mismatch of creep strength between the fine PAG boundary and the matrix should be taken into account to attain an excellent long-term creep property of the B steel welded joint.

  13. Elevated temperature tension, compression and creep-rupture behavior of (001)-oriented single crystal superalloy PWA 1480

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.; Miner, Robert V.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile and compressive flow behavior at various temperatures and strain rates, and tensile creep rupture behavior at 850 and 1050 C and various stresses were studied for (001)-oriented single crystals of the Ni-base superalloy PWA 1480. At temperatures up to 760 C, the flow stress is insensitive to strain rate and of greater magnitude in tension than in compression. At temperatures of 800 C and above, the flow stress decreases continuously with decreasing strain rate and the tension/compression anisotropy diminishes. The second stage creep rate and rupture time exhibited power law relationships with the applied stress for both 850 and 1050 C, however with different stress dependencies. The stress exponent for the steady state creep rate was about 7 at 1050 C, but much higher at 850 C, about 12. Directional coarsening of the gamma' phase occurred during creep at 1050 C, but not at 850 C.

  14. Effect of Phosphorous Inoculation on Creep Behavior of a Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Masoumeh; Khalilpour, Hamid

    2014-10-01

    Creep behavior of Al-Si hypereutectic alloys inoculated with phosphorus was investigated using the impression creep testing. The results showed that at stress regimes of up to 400-450 MPa and temperatures up to 300 C, no significant creep deformation occurred in both uninoculated and inoculated specimens; however, at temperatures above 300 C, the inoculated alloys presented better creep properties. Creep data were used to calculate the stress exponent of steady-state creep rate, n, and creep activation energy, Q, for different additive conditions where n was found varied between 5 and 8. Owing to the fact that most alloys have lower values for n (4, 5), threshold stress was estimated for studied conditions. The creep governing mechanisms for different conditions are discussed here, with a particular attention to the effect of phosphorous addition on the microstructural features, including number of primary silicon particles, mean primary silicon spacing, and morphology and distribution of eutectic silicon.

  15. Creep of chemically vapour deposited SiC fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with negligible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  16. Creep of chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The creep, thermal expansion, and elastic modulus properties for chemically vapor deposited SiC fibers were measured between 1000 and 1500 C. Creep strain was observed to increase logarithmically with time, monotonically with temperature, and linearly with tensile stress up to 600 MPa. The controlling activation energy was 480 + or - 20 kJ/mole. Thermal pretreatments near 1200 and 1450 C were found to significantly reduce fiber creep. These results coupled with creep recovery observations indicate that below 1400 C fiber creep is anelastic with neglible plastic component. This allowed a simple predictive method to be developed for describing fiber total deformation as a function of time, temperature, and stress. Mechanistic analysis of the property data suggests that fiber creep is the result of beta-SiC grain boundary sliding controlled by a small percent of free silicon in the grain boundaries.

  17. Evidence of post-seismic creep type deformations derived by tilt and acoustic emission monitoring of mining induced seismic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milev, Alexander; Share, Pieter-Ewald; Naoi, Makoto; Durrheim, Raymond; Yabe, Yasuo; Ogasawara, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masao

    2015-04-01

    In this study we try to understand pre- and post-failure rock behavior associated with mining induced seismic events. This involves underground installation of various high precision instruments, including geophones, acoustic emission sensors, tilt- and strain-meters at a number of sites in deep level South African gold mines. The rate of tilt, strain and the seismic ground motion were analysed in order to understand the coseismic and aseismic deformation of the rocks. A good correspondence between the coseismic and the aseismic deformations was found. The rate of coseismic and aseismic tilt, as well as seismicity recorded by the mine seismic network, are approximately constant until the daily blasting time, which takes place from about 19:30 until shortly before 21:00. During the blasting time and the subsequent seismic events, the coseismic tilt and strain shows a rapid increase. Much of the aseismic deformation, however, occurs independently of the seismic events and blasting. In an attempt to distinguish between the different mechanisms of tilting two types of events were recognized. The "fast" seismic events characterized with sharp increase of the tilt during the seismic rupture and "slow" seismic events characterized by creep type post seismic deformations. Tilt behaviour before and after a seismic event was also analysed. The fact that no recognizable aftertilt was observed for more of the "fast" seismic events means that there is no gradual release of stress and an associated continuous strain rate change afterwards. It can therefore be concluded that a large seismic event causes a rapid change in the state of stress rather than a gradual change in the strain rate During the monitoring period a seismic event with MW 2.2 occurred in the vicinity of the instrumented site. This event was recorded by both the CSIR integrated monitoring system and JAGUARS acoustic emission network. More than 21,000 AE aftershocks were located in the first 150 hours after the main event. Using the distribution of the AE events the position of the fault in the source area was successfully delineated. The rupture area, elastic properties of the rock, the state of stress before the event occurred and frictional parameters of the rupture were used as input parameters to both numerical and analytical tools to reproduce the expected tilt. The calculated values were compared with the real values as recorded by the installed tiltmeters. A good correlation between the calculated and monitored amount of tilt was found. The tilt changes associated with this event showed a well pronounced after-tilt. The distribution of the AE events following the main shock was related to after tilt in order to quantify post slip behavior of the source. There was no evidence found for coseismic expansion of the source after the main slip. Therefore the hypothesis of the post-seismic creep behaviour of the source was proposed to explain the large amount of tilt following the main shock.

  18. Elevated temperature Mg-Al-Sr: Creep resistance, mechanical properties, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baril, Eric; Labelle, Pierre; Pekguleryuz, Mihriban

    2003-11-01

    Mg-Al-Sr-based alloys (AJ alloys) have shown superior creep performance and tensile strength at temperatures as high as 175 with stresses up to 70 MPa. Mg-6Al-2.4Sr (AJ62x) exhibits an optimum combination of creep resistance and excellent castability, while AJ62Lx (strontium <2.1) has better ductility than other AJ formulations. The AJ alloy microstructure is characterized by the Al4Sr-?(Mg) lamellar phase that forms at the interdendritic/grain boundary region of the primary magne sium matrix. Mg-5Al-2Sr (AJ52x) contains a ternary phase that was tentatively named Al3Mg13Sr. When the strontium level is low in AJ62x, the volume fraction of Al4Sr is reduced, the aluminum supersaturation of the magnesium primary phase increases, and Mg17Al12 forms. In this article, a mechanism is proposed whereby the creep resistance decreases with the strontium level but the tensile strength and ductility increase.

  19. Creep behavior of a rapidly solidified Al-5Cr-2Zr alloy between room temperature and 823 K

    SciTech Connect

    Brahmi, A.; Gerique, T.; Lieblich, M.; Torralba, M.

    1996-12-15

    Rapidly solidified (RS) Al-Cr-Zr alloys are established contenders for applications in the aircraft industry where lower cost, lightweight substitutes for titanium alloys are being sought for use in the temperature range of 473 to 723 K. Creep resistance is one of the critical properties of any material intended for high temperature applications. Therefore, a precise knowledge of creep behavior and a clear understanding of the mechanisms controlling creep in these materials are of great importance. The good thermal stability exhibited by the RS Al-5Cr-2Zr (wt.%) alloy makes it a good candidate for applications where high creep resistance is needed. This paper presents the results of creep behavior over a wide range of temperatures (0.32 to 0.88 Tm, where Tm = 933 K is the melt temperature of pure aluminum) of an Al-5Cr-2Zr alloy processed by gas atomization and extrusion and includes a brief discussion on the creep mechanisms that may be involved.

  20. Significance of geometrical relationships between low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, T.; Pennock, G.; Drury, M. R.; Sintubin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although quartz is one of the most studied minerals in the Earth's crust when it comes to its rheology, the interpretation of intracrystalline deformation microstructures with respect to deformation conditions and mechanisms, remains highly contentious. Moreover, inconsistent use of terminology for both deformation microstructures and mechanisms makes a correct assessment of observations and interpretations in published material very difficult. With respect to low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz, different conflicting genetic models have been proposed. Most probably, the lack of consensus means that there is no unique interpretation for these microstructures, primarily because their initiation and development depend on many ambient conditions. We extensively studied these intracrystalline deformation microstructures by means of optical microscopy, Hot-Cathodoluminescence, SEM-Cathodoluminescence and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Orientation Imaging, in vein quartz of the High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium, France, Luxemburg, Germany), (de)formed in a low-temperature regime. Firstly, we propose a new, purely descriptive terminology for the low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed quartz: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and strings. The strings can be further subdivided into blocky (BS), straight (SS) and recrystallised (RS) morphological types. FEBs have consistently been called deformation lamellae in quartz and planar slip bands in metals. WEBs have been called deformation bands, prismatic kink bands or type II kink bands. Strings have formerly been called shear bands, deformation bands or type I kink bands. No distinction between blocky and straight morphological string types had ever been made. Secondly, a survey of the pre-recrystallisation stages in the history of the intracrystalline deformation microstructures reveals that the different types of low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in naturally deformed vein quartz show particular geometrical relationships, in our opinion a to date underexposed aspect of these microstructures. Several of these geometrical relationships will be presented and their potential implications with respect to deformation mechanisms and conditions will be discussed. The geometrical relationships observed may suggest a similar formation mechanism for the different microstructures, a weakening effect for successive microstructure formation and a strong dependency on the crystallographic orientation.

  1. High temperature deformation mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels at cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugino, Yoshito; Ukai, Shigeharu; Oono, Naoko; Hayashi, Shigenari; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Masuda, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    The ODS ferritic steels realize potentially higher operating temperature due to structural stability by the dispersed nano-size oxide particles. The deformation process and mechanism of 15CrODS ferritic steels were investigated at 1073 K and 1173 K for the cold-rolled and recrystallized conditions. Tensile and creep tests were conducted at the stress in parallel (LD) and perpendicular (TD) directions to the grain boundaries. Strain rate varied from 10-1 to 10-9 s-1. For the LD specimens, deformation in the cold rolled and recrystallized conditions is reinforced by finely dispersed oxide particles. The dominant deformation process for the recrystallized TD specimen is controlled through the grain boundary sliding and stress accommodation via diffusional creep at temperature of 1173 K and lower strain rate less than 10-4 s-1. The grain boundary sliding couldn't be rate-controlling process at 1073 K for the as-cold rolled TD specimen, where a dynamic recovery of the dislocation produced by cold-rolling is related to the deformation process.

  2. Lifetimes statistics for single Kevlar 49 aramid filaments in creep-rupture at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    Kevlar 49 fibrous composites are routinely fabricated to have strengths above 1.5 GPa(200 ksi), but in many applications one would like to sustain such stresses for long time periods, sometimes at elevated temperatures. Thus the temperature dependence of the creep-rupture process in the fibers is of interest. Experimental data are presented for the lifetime of single Kevlar 49 filaments under constant stress at elevated temperatures. The goal of this research was to fully characterize the statistical strength and lifetime behavior of single filaments in order to separate fiber effects from fiber/matrix interactions in the creep-rupture lifetime of Kevlar 49/epoxy composites as described for example in Phoenix and Wu (1983). First we conducted experiments to determine distributions for the strength of filaments from the two distinct spools as a function of temperature. As expected, the data could generally be fitted by a two-parameter Weibull distribution. Lifetime experiments at 80 and 130/sup 0/C were conducted at several stress levels chosen as suitable fractions of the Weibull scale parameter for short-term strength for that temperature. The lifetime data were well modelled by a two-parameter Weibull distribution with large variability.

  3. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic superalloy revealed by in situ neutron diffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Wu, Wei; Teng, Zhenke; Liaw, Peter K

    2014-10-22

    In this study, the ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)Al B2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticitymore » theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.« less

  4. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  5. Influence of phosphorus on the creep ductility of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrm, Rolf; Wu, Rui

    2013-10-01

    Around 1990 it was discovered that pure copper could have extra low creep ductility in the temperature interval 180-250 C. The material was intended for use in canisters for nuclear waste disposal. Although extra low creep ductility was not observed much below 180 C and the temperature in the canister will never exceed 100 C, it was feared that the creep ductility could reach low values at lower temperatures after long term exposure. If 50 ppm phosphorus was added to the copper the low creep ductility disappeared. A creep cavitation model is presented that can quantitatively describe the cavitation behaviour in uniaxial and multiaxial creep tests as well as the observed creep ductility for copper with and without phosphorus. A so-called double ledge model has been introduced that demonstrates why the nucleation rate of creep cavities is often proportional to the creep rate. The phosphorus agglomerates at the grain boundaries and limits their local deformation and thereby reduces the formation and growth of cavities. This explains why extra low creep ductility does not occur in phosphorus alloyed copper.

  6. Compilation of Surface Creep on California Faults and Comparison of WGCEP 2007 Deformation Model to Pacific-North American Plate Motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wisely, Beth A.; Schmidt, David A.; Weldon, Ray J., II

    2008-01-01

    This Appendix contains 3 sections that 1) documents published observations of surface creep on California faults, 2) constructs line integrals across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion, and 3) constructs strain tensors of volumes across the WG-07 deformation model to compare to the Pacific ? North America plate motion. Observation of creep on faults is a critical part of our earthquake rupture model because if a fault is observed to creep the moment released as earthquakes is reduced from what would be inferred directly from the fault?s slip rate. There is considerable debate about how representative creep measured at the surface during a short time period is of the whole fault surface through the entire seismic cycle (e.g. Hudnut and Clark, 1989). Observationally, it is clear that the amount of creep varies spatially and temporally on a fault. However, from a practical point of view a single creep rate is associated with a fault section and the reduction in seismic moment generated by the fault is accommodated in seismic hazard models by reducing the surface area that generates earthquakes or by reducing the slip rate that is converted into seismic energy. WG-07 decided to follow the practice of past Working Groups and the National Seismic Hazard Map and used creep rate (where it was judged to be interseismic, see Table P1) to reduce the area of the fault surface that generates seismic events. In addition to following past practice, this decision allowed the Working Group to use a reduction of slip rate as a separate factor to accommodate aftershocks, post seismic slip, possible aseismic permanent deformation along fault zones and other processes that are inferred to affect the entire surface area of a fault, and thus are better modeled as a reduction in slip rate. C-zones are also handled by a reduction in slip rate, because they are inferred to include regions of widely distributed shear that is not completely expressed as earthquakes large enough to model. Because the ratio of the rate of creep relative to the total slip rate is often used to infer the average depth of creep, the ?depth? of creep can be calculated and used to reduce the surface area of a fault that generates earthquakes in our model. This reduction of surface area of rupture is described by an ?aseismicity factor,? assigned to each creeping fault in Appendix A. An aseismicity factor of less than 1 is only assigned to faults that are inferred to creep during the entire interseismic period. A single aseismicity factor was chosen for each section of the fault that creeps by expert opinion from the observations documented here. Uncertainties were not determined for the aseismicity factor, and thus it represents an unmodeled (and difficult to model) source of error. This Appendix simply provides the documentation of known creep, the type and precision of its measurement, and attempts to characterize the creep as interseismic, afterslip, transient or triggered. Parts 2 and 3 of this Appendix compare the WG-07 deformation model and the seismic source model it generates to the strain generated by the Pacific - North American plate motion. The concept is that plate motion generates essentially all of the elastic strain in the vicinity of the plate boundary that can be released as earthquakes. Adding up the slip rates on faults and all others sources of deformation (such as C-zones and distributed ?background? seismicity) should approximately yield the plate motion. This addition is usually accomplished by one of four approaches: 1) line integrals that sum deformation along discrete paths through the deforming zone between the two plates, 2) seismic moment tensors that add up seismic moment of a representative set of earthquakes generated by a crustal volume spanning the plate boundary, 3) strain tensors generated by adding up the strain associated with all of the faults in a crustal volume spanning the plate

  7. Effect of heat treatment temperature on creep-rupture properties of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of heat treatment at 1100 to 1250C on the creep-rupture properties of an Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloy were studied. Tests were conducted at 593C (1100F) and 207 MPa (30 ksi) in air. The modes of fracture were identified using optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. Analytical electron microscopy was also used to study characteristics of the microstructure, including dislocations, ordered domains, and precipitates. The creep results showed maximum creep-rupture resistance with a heat treatment at approximately 1150C, with significant decreases in rupture life after heat treatments at both lower and higher temperatures. The peak in creep life was associated with fine precipitates that were observed after the 1150C heat treatment and persisted during prolonged creep at 593C. Heat treatment at 1150C appeared to cause dissolution of coarser precipitates which then reprecipitated as new fine particles upon cooling or during creep. These fine precipitates then pinned dislocations and grain boundaries to produce strength during creep.

  8. Diffusion creep of enstatite at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Mei, S.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Deformation behavior of fine-grained enstatite (g.s. ~ 8 μm) was investigated with triaxial compressive creep experiments at high pressures (4.2 - 6.9 GPa) and high temperatures (1373 - 1573 K) using a deformation-DIA apparatus. Experiments were carried out under anhydrous conditions. In each experiment, a sample column composed of a sample and alumina pistons was assembled with a boron nitride sleeve and graphite resistance heater into a 6.2-mm edge length cubic pressure medium. Experiments were carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In a run, differential stress and sample displacement were monitored in-situ using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively. Based on results from this study, the deformation behavior of enstatite under anhydrous conditions has been quantitatively presented in the form of a flow law that describes the dependence of deformation rate on stress, temperature, and pressure. Specifically, data fitting yields the dependence of creep rate on stress with an exponent of n ≈ 1; indicating samples were deformed in the regime of diffusion creep. Experimental results also yield the dependences of creep rate on temperature and pressure with an activation energy of ~250 kJ/mol and activation volume of ~3.5×10-6 m3/mol, respectively. The flow laws for enstatite, one important constituent component for the upper mantle, quantified from this study provides a necessary constraint for modeling the dynamic activities occurring within Earth's interior.

  9. Microstructural changes of CM186LC single-crystal superalloy during creep deformation at 750 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, B; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-10-01

    The microstructure of creep-tested CM186LC Ni-base single-crystal alloy was studied to assess its suitability for use in the gas turbine environment. Creep tests were conducted at 750 degrees C and at stresses of 560 and 675 MPa up to 11 440 h. The microstructure of fractured and terminated specimens was investigated by light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and analytical transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural analysis revealed the differences in the microstructure of creep-tested CM186LC depending on the stress applied during creep at 750 degrees C. PMID:17100893

  10. Development of a constitutive model for creep and life prediction of advanced silicon nitride ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.L.; Liu, K.C.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    A constitutive model capable of describing deformation and predicting rupture life was developed for high temperature ceramic materials under general thermal-mechanical loading conditions. The model was developed based on the deformation and fracture behavior observed from a systematic experimental study on an advanced silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic material. Validity of the model was evaluated with reference to creep and creep rupture data obtained under constant and stepwise-varied loading conditions, including the effects of annealing on creep and creep rupture behavior.

  11. Microstructural influence on high temperature creep flow of Zr-1%NbO alloy in near- ?, ( ? + ?), and ? temperature ranges in a high vacuum environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddour, Djilali; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Franoise; Brachet, Jean-Christophe; Portier, Laurence; Pineau, Andr

    2011-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile creep tests were carried out at 650-1100 C in a high vacuum environment on Zr-1%NbO tubes with various microstructures. The effect of microstructure on creep flow in the ( ? + ?) temperature range is significant (the creep rate being modified by up to three orders of magnitude) under stresses lower than 10 MPa, that is, for stress values of one order of magnitude lower than those characteristic of prototypical Loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions. Under stresses higher than about 20 MPa, this effect is much smaller. No transformation-induced plasticity was detected from anisothermal creep tests, once the creep strain was thoroughly taken into account to process experimental strain vs. time data.

  12. Elevated temperature deformation behavior of a dispersion-strengthened Al-Fe,V,Si alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Shantanu

    1996-12-01

    The deformation behavior of a rapidly solidified, dispersion-strengthened Al alloy containing 11.7 pct Fe, 1.2 pct V, and 2.4 pct Si was studied at test temperatures up to 450 C using constantstress creep and constnt strain-rate tensile tests. Apparent stress exponents ( n) up to 24 and an activation energy of 360 kJ/mol were obtained with the standard Arrhenius type power-law creep equation, which also suggested a change in behavior at 300 C. Substructure-invariant and dislocation/dispersoid interaction models were found to be inadequate for explaining the behavior. When the data were replotted asdot \\varepsilon ^{1/n} vs ?, two regimes were found between 350 C and 450 C. A model with a pseudothreshold stress ( ? Th' ) for the higher stress regime resulted in n 3, indicating solute drag in this regime. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed departureside pinning of dislocations at higher stresses. In the lower stress regime, TEM showed dislocation subgrain structures. Here, the model resulted in a stress exponent of 4.5 indicating the dislocation climb mechanism. At temperatures below 300 C, a single regime was found along with lower activation energies and a stress dependence of 3. Dislocation pipe diffusion is proposed to explain the lower activation energy. The origin of ? Th' has been tied to dislocation generation at the grain boundaries.

  13. Investigation of the rate-controlling mechanism(s) for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting by use of high pressure as a variable. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Using high pressure as a variable, the rate-controlling mechanism for high temperature creep and the relationship between creep and melting is investigated for silicon and nickel. An apparatus is used in which the samples are heated to melting point and subjected to 1 to 3 GigaPascal pressure. The stress behavior of the materials are then studied.

  14. On rafting in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy after high and low temperature creep

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, P.; Berglin, L.; Jansson, C.

    1998-12-18

    Rafting (also known as directional coarsening) was first studied more than 25 years ago in SX Udimet 700. At intermediate temperatures, 700--800 C, no microstructural changes were seen during the creep of SX alloys in tests which lasted less than a few thousand hours. In a study of CMSX-4 crept at 750 C the immediate area of the fracture contained many cracks, but away from the fracture the microstructure looked identical to that of the uncrept material. It was not possible to see a change in the material with scanning electron microscopy. The aim of the work presented here was to find a way of imaging low and intermediate temperature creep damage using simple techniques and equipment readily available in most laboratories. This area is one of practical importance as SX alloys are being introduced into industrial gas turbines for power generation and principles for condition assessment need to be developed which are relevant to the temperature of usage. As a first step towards finding a solution it was necessary to study the conditions under which rafting occurred in other SX alloys and a brief summary of some important findings is given.

  15. A unified creep-plasticity model suitable for thermo-mechanical loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavik, D.; Sehitoglu, H.

    1988-01-01

    An experimentally based unified creep-plasticity constitutive model was implemented for 1070 steel. Accurate rate and temperature effects were obtained for isothermal and thermo-mechanical loading by incorporating deformation mechanisms into the constitutive equations in a simple way.

  16. Plasticity and diffusion creep of dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, N. E.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Newman, J.

    2008-08-01

    Natural and synthetic dolomites have been shortened in triaxial compression experiments at temperatures of 400-850 C, equilibrium CO 2 pore pressures, effective confining pressures of 50-400 MPa, and strain rates of 10 - 4 to 10 - 7 s - 1 . At low temperatures ( T < 700 C) natural and synthetic dolomites exhibit high crystal-plastic strengths (> 600 MPa), both for coarse-grained (240 ?m) and fine-grained (2 ?m and 12 ?m) samples; differential stresses vary little with strain rate or temperature and microstructures of coarse-grained samples are dominated by f-twins and undulatory extinction. An exponential relation ( ?? = ??o exp[ ?( ?1 - ?3)] between strain rate ?? and differential stress ( ?1 - ?3) describes the crystal plasticity of dolomite at a fixed Pe and T, with ? = 0.079 ( 0.01) MPa - 1 and 0.023 ( 07.03) MPa - 1 for coarse- and fine-grained materials, respectively. However, measured values of ( ?1 - ?3) increase with increasing temperature, a trend that has been observed for dolomite single crystals but cannot be described by an Arrhenius relation. At high temperatures ( T ? 800 C for coarse, T ? 700 C for fine), dolomite strengths are reduced with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate, but the mechanisms of deformation differ depending on grain size. High temperature flow strengths of coarse-grained dolomite can be described by a power law ?? = ??o[( ?1 - ?3) / ?] nexp(- H* / RT) with a large value of n (> 5) and a ratio of parameters H* / n = 60 ( 6) kJ/mol. Microstructures of coarse-grained samples deformed at T ? 800 C show evidence of dislocation creep with little mechanical twinning. High temperature flow strengths of fine-grained synthetic dolomite fit a thermally activated Newtonian law, where the effective n = 1.28 ( 0.15) and H* = 280 ( 45 kJ/mol), consistent with diffusion creep. The change in mechanical response of coarse-grained natural dolomite with increasing temperature represents a transition from twinning and slip with little or no recovery to dislocation creep, while the change in response of fine-grained synthetic dolomite represents a transition from crystal plasticity to diffusion creep. The combined results for coarse- and fine-grained dolomites define a deformation mechanism map with fields of crystal plasticity, dislocation creep, and diffusion creep. Strengths of coarse-grained dolomite in the crystal plastic and dislocation creep fields are much larger than strengths of calcite rocks deformed by similar mechanisms. In contrast, strengths of fine-grained dolomite deformed by diffusion creep are more comparable to those of fine-grained calcite, suggesting little contrast in rheology.

  17. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  18. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoica, G M; Stoica, A D; Miller, M K; Ma, D

    2014-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels that have promising properties for service in extreme environments in future nuclear reactors. This is due to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing numerous Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along grain boundaries. Although nanoclusters account primarily for the exceptional resistance to irradiation damage and high-temperature creep, little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the ferritic matrix. Here we report an in situ mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of ultrafine ferrite grains to stresses using state-of-the-art neutron diffraction. We show the experimental determination of single-crystal elastic constants for a 14YWT alloy, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy that leads to elastic softening and instability of the ferrite. We also demonstrate, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strains, that a deformation crossover exists from low-temperature lattice hardening to high-temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation. PMID:25300893

  19. Steady, dynamic, creep/recovery, and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends: Temperature sweep tests and applicability of Cox-Merz rule.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ali; Bayramba?, Kadir; Eroglu, Zeynep; Toker, Omer S; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Karaman, Safa; Dogan, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    In this study, physicochemical, rheological (steady, dynamic, and creep/recovery), and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends (0, 5, 10, and 15% molasses) were investigated. The blends showed shear thinning behavior, as described by Ostwald de Waele model (R(2) (?)??0.955). Consistency coefficient value (K) of the blends decreased with increasing molasses concentration in the sample. Storage modulus (G') of blends was higher than loss modulus (G?), exhibiting weak gel-like behavior. Molasses addition decreased G' and G? values. Temperature sweep tests indicated that blends followed Arrhenius relationship. A modified Cox-Merz rule was applicable using shift factors. Compliance values (J(t)) increased as molasses concentration increased, revealing that deformation stability and internal viscosity (?1) decreased with concentration. Creep behavior was characterized using Burger model. Obtained J data as a function of time could be satisfactorily fitted to Burger model (R(2) (?)??0.994). The final percentage recovery of blends remarkably decreased with the increase of molasses concentration. Firmness, consistency, cohesiveness, and viscosity index values decreased with molasses addition. According to the results of the current study, molasses amount to be added to the yoghurt should be determined regarding rheological properties since resistance of the sample to deformation decreased with increase in molasses concentration. PMID:25614154

  20. High-temperature creep rupture of low alloy ferritic steel butt-welded pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and end loadings.

    PubMed

    Vakili-Tahami, F; Hayhurst, D R; Wong, M T

    2005-11-15

    Constitutive equations are reviewed and presented for low alloy ferritic steels which undergo creep deformation and damage at high temperatures; and, a thermodynamic framework is provided for the deformation rate potentials used in the equations. Finite element continuum damage mechanics studies have been carried out using these constitutive equations on butt-welded low alloy ferritic steel pipes subjected to combined internal pressure and axial loads at 590 and 620 degrees C. Two dominant modes of failure have been identified: firstly, fusion boundary failure at high stresses; and, secondly, Type IV failure at low stresses. The stress level at which the switch in failure mechanism takes place has been found to be associated with the relative creep resistance and lifetimes, over a wide range of uniaxial stresses, for parent, heat affected zone, Type IV and weld materials. The equi-biaxial stress loading condition (mean diameter stress equal to the axial stress) has been confirmed to be the worst loading condition. For this condition, simple design formulae are proposed for both 590 and 620 degrees C. PMID:16243708

  1. Creep of PEEK-graphite fibre composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enns, Jonathan; Cahoon, J. R.

    1991-05-01

    The thermoplastic matrix composites are a relatively new class of materials and their mechanical properties have not yet been fully characterized. Therefore, a study was initiated to determine the high temperature creep behavior of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) matrix-graphite fiber composites, one of the new thermoplastic matrix composites. The samples were tested in the longitudinal direction (direction of maximum strength) using 3-point bending with a span length of 2.5 inches. Tests were conducted at 8 temperatures from 20 C to 220 C. Creep tests were conducted for period of time ranging from a few hours to a few days. The Larson-Miller parameter method shows some promise for predicting long term creep behavior of PEEK-graphite fiber composite material. Creep failure occurs suddenly after very small creep deformations of only 0.01-0.04 percent at high temperatures and is, therefore, quite insidious in nature since imminent failure is most difficult to detect.

  2. Some problems on the theory of creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabotnov, Y N

    1953-01-01

    The term creep of metals is applied to the phenomenon in which, at temperatures beyond a certain limit, the metal subjected to a load slowly undergoes deformation with time. For the case of steel, the creep phenomenon must be taken into account at temperatures above 400 degrees C. Very slow deformations for a prolonged period are cumulative and lead either to inadmissible changes in the dimensions of a structural part or to its failure. The theory of creep constitutes part of the mechanics of dense media and the mechanical formulation of the problem may be given as the following: a body is subjected to the action of a given system of forces, or initial displacements are prescribed on its surface. It is required to find the stress distribution in the body and the changes or its deformations with time. For the solution of the problem of creep as thus formulated, a mechanical theory of creep is required. Such theory must necessarily bear an external, overall character based, not on the investigation of microprocesses, but on the results of mechanical tests.

  3. Water weakening of clinopyroxenite in diffusion creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hier-Majumder, Saswata; Mei, Shenghua; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2005-07-01

    We performed triaxial compressive creep tests to study water weakening of clinopyroxenite in the diffusion creep regime. All tests were carried out on fine-grained samples at confining pressures between 100 and 300 MPa at temperatures of 1321 to 1421 K for water-saturated and 1398 to 1508 K for anhydrous conditions. Samples were prepared by hot-pressing ground powder of Sleaford Bay clinopyroxenite. Water was added to the sample during the run by dehydration of a talc sleeve. Water-saturated aggregates crept 30 times faster than aggregates under anhydrous conditions at a temperature of 1400 K and a pressure of 300 MPa. The stress exponent in both cases was 1, and the activation energies under water-saturated and anhydrous conditions were 340 30 and 760 20 kJ/mol, respectively. Under water-saturated conditions creep rate increased with increasing water fugacity to the power 1.4 0.2 with an activation volume for creep of 14 6 10-6 m3/mol. Comparison of the water weakening in aggregates of clinopyroxene, olivine, and anorthite deformed in the diffusion creep regime indicates that the creep strength of clinopyroxene has a stronger dependence on the water fugacity than do the creep strengths of olivine and anorthite. In water-rich environments, clinopyroxene will be the weakest component in polycrystalline rocks composed of these phases.

  4. Creep deformation and fracture of a Cr/Mo/V bolting steel containing selected trace-element additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larouk, Z.; Pilkington, R.

    1999-08-01

    The article reports the creep behavior, at 565 C, of 1Cr1Mo0.75V (Ti, B) (Durehete D1055) steel, in each of two grain sizes and doped with individual trace elements such as P, As, and Sn, in comparison to a reference cast of the base material containing 0.08 wt pct Ti. The addition of the trace elements P, As, or Sn (each <0.045 wt pct) appears to produce no significant effect on creep strength or creep crack-growth resistance at 565 C. The fine-grained material shows low creep strength but notch strengthening, while the coarse-grained material shows higher creep strength and exhibits notch weakening for test times up to 2750 hours. From creep crack-growth tests, it appears that the C* parameter is not appropriate for correlating the creep crack-growth rate under the present test conditions. The parameters K I or ? net are found to correlate better, but, from the present data, it is not possible to judge which of these parameters is more appropriate for general use. It is suggested that the presence of Ti in CrMoV steels has an inhibiting effect on trace-element embrittlement.

  5. High temperature deformation of hot-pressed polycrystalline orthoenstatite. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehghan-Banadaki, A.

    1983-01-01

    Artificial hot pressed polycrystalline samples were prepared from purified powder of Bamble, Norway, orthoenstatite, (Mg0.86Fe0.14)SiO3. The uniaxial creep behavior of the polycrystalline orthoenstatite was studied over stress ranges of 10-180 MPa and temperatures of 1500-1700 K (0.82-0.93 T sub m) under two different oxygen fugacities, namely equilibrium (Mo-MoO2 buffer) and a reducing (graphite heating element) atmosphere, respectively. An intergranular glassy phase of different compositions with a cavitational creep deformation were observed. In the Mo-MoO2 buffer atmosphere with PO2 approx. 10 to the minus 11 power - 10 to the minus 13 power atmospheres, the results of an analytical electron microscopy analysis indicate that the glassy phases are richer in Ca and Al due to the residual impurities after hot pressing. In the reducing atmosphere with an oxygen fugacity of PO2 approx. 10 to the minus 3 power - 10 to the minus 25 power atmospheres, the results of analytical electron microscopy analysis indicate that the glassy phase is almost pure silica with the presence of free iron precipitate on grain facets and at triple junctions due to the reduction of bulk materials.

  6. The effect of elevated temperature on the inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 solid polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryther, Chad E. C.

    The inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 neat resin, a high-temperature thermoset polymer, was investigated at temperatures in the 274--316 C range. The experimental program was developed to explore the influence of temperature on strain-controlled tensile loading, relaxation and creep behaviors. The experimental results clearly demonstrate that the mechanical behavior of PMR-15 polymer exhibits a strong dependence on temperature. During strain-controlled tensile loading, the slope of the stress-strain curve in the quasi-elastic region decreases and the slope of the stress-strain curve in the flow stress region increases with increasing temperature. At a given strain rate, the flow stress level decreases with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the transition from quasi-elastic behavior to inelastic flow becomes less pronounced with increasing temperature. During relaxation, the amount of the stress drop for a given prior strain rate decreases with increasing temperature. At a given prior strain rate and creep stress level, increasing temperature results in increased creep strain accumulation. Based on the experimental results the Viscoplasticity Based on Overstress for Polymers (VBOP) theory was augmented to account for the effects of elevated temperature. Several model parameters were determined to depend on temperature. Those parameters were developed into functions of temperature. The augmented VBOP was then employed to predict the response of the PMR-15 polymer under various test histories at temperatures in the 274--316 C range. An enhanced procedure for determining VBOP model parameters that utilizes a McLean type dip test to assess the equilibrium stress was developed. Model predictions were considerably improved by employing an enhanced model characterization procedure. Additionally, the effects of prior isothermal aging at various temperatures in the 260--316 C range on the inelastic deformation behavior of PMR-15 at 288 C were evaluated. For PMR-15 aged at 260--302 C, the initial slope of the stress-strain curve and the flow stress increase with prior aging duration. The shape of the knee of the stress-strain curve becomes more pronounced and the departure from quasi-linear behavior is delayed with increasing prior aging time. Experimental results reveal that there is no relationship between prior aging temperature and elastic modulus, tangent modulus, the shape of the knee of the stress-strain curve or departure from quasi-linear behavior. This implies that for aging temperatures in the 260--302 C range, mechanical behavior depends only on prior aging duration and not on prior aging temperature. However, testing of PMR-15 aged at 316 C revealed a decrease in flow stress with increasing prior aging duration. This suggests that a degradation mechanism, not present at lower aging temperatures, is in effect during aging at 316 C.

  7. New constraints on upper mantle creep mechanism inferred from silicon grain-boundary diffusion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Hongzhan; Koizumi, Sanae; Sakamoto, Naoya; Hashiguchi, Minako; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi; Marquardt, Katharina; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Katsura, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    The creep in the Earth's interior is dominated either by diffusion creep which causes Newtonian mantle flow, or by dislocation creep which results in non-Newtonian mantle flow. Although previous deformation studies on olivine claimed a transition from dislocation creep to diffusion creep with depth in the upper mantle, they might misunderstand the creep rates due to experimental difficulties. Since creep in olivine is controlled by silicon diffusion, we measured the silicon grain-boundary diffusion coefficient in well-sintered iron-free olivine aggregates as a function of temperature, pressure, and water content, showing activation energy, activation volume, and water content exponent of 220 30 kJ /mol, 4.0 0.7 cm3 /mol, and 0.26 0.07, respectively. Our results based on Si diffusion in forsterite predict that diffusion creep dominates at low pressures and low temperatures, whereas dislocation creep dominates under high pressure and high temperature conditions. Water has negligible effects on both diffusion and dislocation creep. There is a transition from diffusion creep in the shallow upper mantle to dislocation creep in deeper regions. This explains the seismic anisotropy increases at the Gutenberg discontinuity beneath oceans and at the mid-lithosphere discontinuity beneath continents.

  8. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  9. An Evaluation of the Potential for Creep of 3013 Inner Can Lids

    SciTech Connect

    KERRY, DUNN

    2005-03-15

    This report provides the technical basis to conclude that creep induced deformation of Type 304L austenitic stainless steel can lids on inner 3013 containers will be insignificant unless the temperature of storage exceeds 400 C. This conclusion is based on experimental literature data for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel and on a phenomenological evaluation of potential creep processes.

  10. Experiment and Modeling of Simultaneous Creep, Plasticity and Transformation of High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys During Cyclic Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Parikshith K.; Desai, Uri; Chatzigeorgiou, George; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Monroe, James; Karaman, Ibrahim; Noebe, Ron; Bigelow, Glen

    2010-01-01

    The present work is focused on studying the cycling actuation behavior of HTSMAs undergoing simultaneous creep and transformation. For the thermomechanical testing, a high temperature test setup was assembled on a MTS frame with the capability to test up to temperatures of 600 C. Constant stress thermal cycling tests were conducted to establish the actuation characteristics and the phase diagram for the chosen HTSMA. Additionally, creep tests were conducted at constant stress levels at different test temperatures to characterize the creep behavior of the alloy over the operational range. A thermodynamic constitutive model is developed and extended to take into account a) the effect of multiple thermal cycling on the generation of plastic strains due to transformation (TRIP strains) and b) both primary and secondary creep effects. The model calibration is based on the test results. The creep tests and the uniaxial tests are used to identify the viscoplastic behavior of the material. The parameters for the SMA properties, regarding the transformation and transformation induced plastic strain evolutions, are obtained from the material phase diagram and the thermomechanical tests. The model is validated by predicting the material behavior at different thermomechanical test conditions.

  11. High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys with High Ti Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliephake, Daniel; Azim, Maria; von Klinski-Wetzel, Katharina; Gorr, Bronislava; Christ, Hans-Jürgen; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P.; Heilmaier, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Multiphase alloys in the Mo-Si-B system are potential high-temperature structural materials due to their good oxidation and creep resistance. Since they suffer from relatively high densities, the current study focuses on the influence of density-reducing Ti additions on creep and oxidation behavior at temperatures above 1273 K (1000 °C). Two alloys with compositions of Mo-12.5Si-8.5B-27.5Ti and Mo-9Si-8B-29Ti (in at. pct) were synthesized by arc melting and then homogenized by annealing in vacuum for 150 hours at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both alloys show similar creep behavior at stresses of 100 to 300 MPa and temperatures of 1473 K and 1573 K (1200 °C and 1300 °C), although they possess different intermetallic volume fractions. They exhibit superior creep resistance and lower density than a state-of-the-art Ni-base superalloy (single-crystalline CMSX-4) as well as other Mo-Si-B alloys. Solid solution strengthening due to Ti was confirmed by Vickers hardness measurements and is believed to be the reason for the significant increase in creep resistance compared to Mo-Si-B alloys without Ti, but with comparable microstructural length scales. The addition of Ti degrades oxidation resistance relative to a Mo-9Si-8B reference alloy due to the formation of a relatively porous duplex layer with titania matrix enabling easy inward diffusion of oxygen.

  12. New Insights on the Rheology of Olivine Deformed under Lithospheric Temperature Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Demouchy, S. A.; Mussi, A.; Tommasi, A.

    2014-12-01

    Rheology of mantle rocks at lithospheric temperatures remains poorly constrained, since most experimental studies on creep mechanisms of olivine single crystals ((MgFe)2SiO4, Pbnm) and polycrystalline olivine aggregates were performed at high-temperatures (T >> 1200oC). In this study, we report results from deformation experiments on oriented single crystals of San Carlos olivine and polycrystalline olivine aggregate at temperatures relevant of the uppermost mantle (ranging from 800o to 1090oC) in tri-axial compression. The experiments were carried out at a confining pressure of 300 MPa in a high-resolution gas-medium mechanical testing apparatus at various constant strain rates (from 7 x 10-6 s-1 to 1 x 10-4 s-1). Mechanical tests show that mantle lithosphere is actually weaker than previously inferred from the extrapolation of high-temperature experiments. In this study, we present characterization of dislocation microstructures based on transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography. It is shown that below 1000C, dislocation activity is restricted to [001] glide with a strong predominance of {110} as glide planes. We observe recovery mechanisms which suggest that the mechanical properties observed in laboratory experiments represent an upper bound for the actual behavior of olivine under lithospheric mantle conditions. Moreover, the drastic reduction in slip system activity observed questions the ability of deforming olivine aggregates in the ductile regime at such temperatures. We show that ductility is preserved thanks to the activation of alternative deformation mechanisms in grain boundaries involving disclinations.

  13. Micromechanisms of creep in clay-rich gouge from the Central Deforming Zone of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, M. E.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.

    2015-02-01

    We report the strength and constitutive behavior of gouge sampled from the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ) of the San Andreas Fault. Layers of flaked CDZ gouge were sheared in the triaxial saw cut configuration using the stress relaxation technique to measure the gouge strength over 4 orders of magnitude in shear strain rate and at rates as low as 5 10-10s-1 and within an order of magnitude of in situ rates. Deformation conditions correspond to the in situ effective normal stress (100 MPa) and temperature (65 to 120C) at the sampling depth of 2.7 km. Gouge was sheared dry and with brine pore fluid at 25 MPa pore pressure. Dry gouge is stronger and more rate strengthening than brine-saturated gouge. Brine-saturated CDZ gouge strengthens with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature, and the dependencies of strength on strain rate and temperature increase at rates below 5 10-9s-1. At strain rates greater than 5 10-9s-1, the rate dependence is consistent with previous studies on the CDZ gouge conducted at even higher rates. The increase in rate dependence below 5 10-9s-1 indicates a change in the rate-controlling deformation mechanism. The magnitude of the friction rate dependence parameter, a, and the temperature sensitivity of a are consistent with crystal plasticity of the phyllosilicates. We hypothesize a micromechanical model for the CDZ gouge whereby a transition from fracture and delamination-accommodated frictional flow to crystal plasticity-accommodated frictional flow occurs with decreasing strain rate.

  14. Numerical creep analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    A large deformation creep algorithm is presented that includes pore pressure and fluid migration effects. Its application is illustrated by the numericl analysis of rock folding with attendant fluid migration. 6 references, 2 figures. (ACR)

  15. Flaw assessment guide for high-temperature reactor components subject to creep-fatigue loading

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, R.A. . Berkeley Nuclear Labs.); Ruggles, M.B. ); Takahashi, Y. . Komae Research Lab.)

    1990-10-01

    A high-temperature flaw assessment procedure is described. This procedure is a result of a collaborative effort between Electric Power Research Institute in the United States, Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry in Japan, and Nuclear Electric plc in the United Kingdom. The procedure addresses preexisting defects subject to creep-fatigue loading conditions. Laws employed to calculate the crack growth per cycle are defined in terms of fracture mechanics parameters and constants related to the component material. The crack-growth laws can be integrated to calculate the remaining life of a component or to predict the amount of crack extension in a given period. Fatigue and creep crack growth per cycle are calculated separately, and the total crack extension is taken as the simple sum of the two contributions. An interaction between the two propagation modes is accounted for in the material properties in the separate calculations. In producing the procedure, limitations of the approach have been identified. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  16. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30C. Additionally, irradiation-induced defect clusters and dislocation loops were observed and the irradiated samples did not show any bubble or void.

  17. Transient Creep of a Composite Lower Crust. 2; A Polymineralic Basis for Rapidly Evolving Postseismic Deformation Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, Erik R.

    1996-01-01

    Postseismic horizontal strain and displacement following the June 28, 1992, Landers, California, earthquake (M(sub W) 7.3) is broad scale and cannot be explained solely by delayed afterslip located at the rupturing fault trace. Both the observed strain at Pifion Flat Observatory (PFO) and observed Global Positioning System receiver velocities evolve rapidly after the Landers-Big Bear earthquake sequence. The observed exponential decay of these motions, with timescales of 4-34 days, may reflect a soft creep rheology in the lower crust and brittle-ductile transition zone or even within the seismogenic crust itself. Here a simple model of a two-dimensional screw dislocation in a layered Maxwell viscoelastic Earth is employed in conjunction with a composite rheology to demonstrate that the short timescale transient response modes (approx. = 4-34 days) are consistent with the behavior of a biviscous lower crust. The lowest viscosity of this system is derivable from laboratory experimental data on the long-term creep of natural quarztites, and the highest viscosity is consistent with isostasy-related lower crustal flow in a continental extensional tectonic environment. The model predicts significant stress relaxation at the base of the seismogenic crust. Near the base of the seismogenic zone, and about 4 km away from the mainshock, the rate of predicted relaxation is of the order of 0.01 MPa/ d during the first 20 days of postseismic flow. Oblate spheroidal inclusions at 5% concentration levels that are both aligned and fairly flat in shape and that have a viscosity of 3-4 x 10(exp 15) Pa s are consistent with both the amplitude and decay time of horizontal crustal strain observed at PFO after the Landers mainshock. It is speculated that the structures exposed in cross sections and in seismic reflection profiles of the lower crust that have mylonitic associations are, in part, the cause of such rapid postseismic evolution in southeastern California. Unmylonitized quartz-rich rock at sufficiently elevated temperatures could also contribute to the rapid decay modes.

  18. Nucleation and growth characteristics of cavities during the early stages of tensile creep deformation in a superplastic zirconia-20 wt% alumina composite

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.M.; Chokshi, A.H.; Nutt, S.R.

    1997-09-01

    Constant-stress tensile creep experiments on a superplastic 3-mol%-yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia composite with 20 wt% alumina revealed that cavities nucleate relatively early during tensile deformation. The number of cavities nucleated increases with increasing imposed stress. The cavities nucleate at triple points associated largely with an alumina grain, and then grow rapidly in a cracklike manner to attain dimensions on the order of the grain facet size. It is suggested that coarser-grained superplastic ceramics exhibit lower ductility due to the ease in formation of such grain boundary facet-cracks and their interlinkage to form a macroscopic crack of critical dimensions.

  19. Creep properties of catalyst coated membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Habisch, Aronne; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Creep as a time-dependent mechanical damage acting either independently or in conjunction with other degradation mechanisms is known to reduce the membrane durability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Due to the important ionomer coupling of membrane and catalyst layers in PEFCs, the present work evaluates membrane creep when constrained within a catalyst coated membrane (CCM). Three key factors dominating creep life in commonly used perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes, including creep stress, temperature, and relative humidity, were investigated by applying ex-situ creep loading and unloading experiments under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The creep strain and recovery of the CCM were found to be highly dependent on the environmental conditions and applied stress levels, where the temperature effect on creep strain was the most significant. Repetitive creep - recovery cycles revealed that significant creep damage can accumulate in the material over time. This accumulated creep damage was found to be independent of the loading frequency while both peak strain and permanent deformation increased with the stress duration. Based on the present findings, it is recommended to reduce the operating temperature and ensure adequate membrane hydration in order to mitigate harmful creep effects in PEFCs.

  20. High-temperature creep with physical and chemical aging, and associated viscoelastic constitutive equations of polyimide-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Skontorp, A.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    The high-temperature creep with physical and chemical aging of a polyimide-matrix composite has been studied with a combined experimental and analytical micromechanics approach. High-temperature aging and creep experiments are carried out to determine the effects of aging on both a neat polyimide (Avimid-N) resin and polyimide-matrix composite. The effect of aging on the polyimide resin is found to be in the form of a volume reduction and a small change in its glass- transition temperature. For both the neat polyimide resin and its composite, aging strains have been distinguished from total high-temperature strains and, thus, true mechanical creep strains can be properly determined. A micromechanics model based on the recently developed homogenization theory is used to study the viscoelastic effective constitutive equations of the composite. The effect of aging-induced property change is taken into account implicitly, through the input neat resin data in the formulation. Comparisons are made between the homogenization predictions and the experimentally obtained effective properties, and good agreement is observed. In the long-term high-temperature creep, it has been found that the complexities associated with the composite microstructural inhomogeneities and imperfection may lead to some discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results.

  1. Nano-mesoscopic structural characterization of 9Cr-ODS martensitic steel for improving creep strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, S.; Ukai, S.; Sakasegawa, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Kaito, T.; Narita, T.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the effect on creep strength and microstructure of 9Cr-oxide dispersion strengthened martensitic steel (9Cr-ODS steel) produced by differences in titanium concentration and consolidation temperature. The increase of titanium concentration to 0.30-0.35 wt% was shown to provide considerable improvement of creep strength accompanied by the increase of residual-? ferrite. The elevation of hot-extrusion temperature degraded the creep strength, however, it appeared to increase the volume fraction of residual-? ferrite. The creep deformation process of 9Cr-ODS steel was discussed to explain these results based on microstructure observations.

  2. Unified creep-plasticity model for halite

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, R. D.

    1980-11-01

    There are two national energy programs which are considering caverns in geological salt (NaCl) as a storage repository. One is the disposal of nuclear wastes and the other is the storage of oil. Both short-time and long-time structural deformations and stresses must be predictable for these applications. At 300K, the nominal initial temperature for both applications, the salt is at 0.28 of the melting temperature and exhibits a significant time dependent behavior. A constitutive model has been developed which describes the behavior observed in an extensive set of triaxial creep tests. Analysis of these tests showed that a single deformation mechanism seems to be operative over the stress and temperature range of interest so that the secondary creep data can be represented by a power of the stress over the entire test range. This simple behavior allowed a new unified creep-plasticity model to be applied with some confidence. The resulting model recognizes no inherent difference between plastic and creep strains yet models the total inelastic strain reasonably well including primary and secondary creep and reverse loadings. A multiaxial formulation is applied with a back stress. A Bauschinger effect is exhibited as a consequence and is present regardless of the time scale over which the loading is applied. The model would be interpreted as kinematic hardening in the sense of classical plasticity. Comparisons are made between test data and model behavior.

  3. Probabilistic models for creep-fatigue in a steel alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibisoglu, Fatmagul

    In high temperature components subjected to long term cyclic operation, simultaneous creep and fatigue damage occur. A new methodology for creep-fatigue life assessment has been adopted without the need to separate creep and fatigue damage or expended life. Probabilistic models, described by hold times in tension and total strain range at temperature, have been derived based on the creep rupture behavior of a steel alloy. These models have been validated with the observed creep-fatigue life of the material with a scatter band close to a factor of 2. Uncertainties of the creep-fatigue model parameters have been estimated with WinBUGS which is an open source Bayesian analysis software tool that uses Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to fit statistical models. Secondly, creep deformation in stress relaxation data has been analyzed. Well performing creep equations have been validated with the observed data. The creep model with the highest goodness of fit among the validated models has been used to estimate probability of exceedance at 0.6% strain level for the steel alloy.

  4. High pressure and temperature deformation experiments on San Carlos olivine and implications for upper mantle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Sushant; Frost, Daniel J.; Walte, Nicolas; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Heidelbach, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Crystallographic preferred orientation developed in olivine due to shearing in the mantle is thought to be the prominent reason behind seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Seismic anisotropy in upper mantle can be observed up to a depth of 350 km with a marked drop in the strength of anisotropy seen around 250 km. Studies on natural rock samples from the mantle and deformation experiments performed on olivine have revealed that olivine deforms mainly through dislocation creep with Burgers vectors parallel to the [100] crystallographic axis under low pressure conditions (up to 3 GPa). Under similar pressures, evidence of [001] slip has been reported due to the presence of water. In order to understand the deformation mechanism in olivine at pressures greater than 3 GPa, we have performed experiments using the deformation DIA multi-anvil apparatus. The DIA consist of 6 square faceted anvils that compress a cubic high-pressure assembly. The deformation DIA possesses two vertically acting opposing inner rams, which can be operated independently of the main compressive force to deform the sample assembly. The experimental setup consists of a hot-pressed sample of polycrystalline dry San Carlos olivine 0.2 mm cut from a 1.2 mm diameter core at 45 . This slice is sandwiched between alumina pistons also cut at 45 in simple shear geometry. Experiments have been performed at 3, 5 and 8 GPa at a deformation anvil strain rate of 1.0x10-4 s-1and temperatures between 1200-1400 C. Deformed samples were cut normal to the shear plane and parallel to the shear direction. Then the sample was polished and analyzed using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) to identify the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). The fabric that developed in olivine deformed at 3 GPa mainly resulted from the [100] slip on the (010) plane. Samples deformed at 5 GPa showed both [100] and [001] slip. On the other hand, samples deformed at 8 GPa and 1200 C, show deformation mainly through slip of the [001] slip on the {0hk} plane. These observations can be interpreted as resulting from the progressive hardening of [100] slip with respect to [001] slip with increasing pressure. TEM observations have been made on several of the recovered samples in order to correlate the developed CPO with the action of specific dislocations. Samples deformed at 8 GPa and 1200 C show straight edge dislocations in the plane normal to the diffraction vector, g: 004. Whereas, experiments performed at 1400 C and 8 GPa resulted in very few visible subgrains in the SEM orientation contrast image and only very weak CPO could be observed. TEM study on this sample shows that [001] & [100] edge dislocations were co-activated in climb-configuration which resulted in no perceptible CPO. These results lead us to believe that the transition that occurs between a-slip to c-slip with increasing pressure is rather a gradual process. On the other hand our results imply that at depths over 250 km in the upper mantle, temperatures may be high enough to reinitiate [100] slip. Co-activation of both a-slip and c-slip will not lead to any CPO and the mantle will become seismically isotropic in this scenario. This might be the reason for isotropic behavior of mantle below 250 km depth.

  5. Modeling of combined high-temperature creep and cyclic plasticity in components using continuum damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, F. P. E.; Hayhurst, D. R.

    1992-06-01

    A computer-based finite-element viscoplastic damage solver is presented to analyze structural components subject to combined cyclic thermal and mechanical loading. The solver is capable of predicting the combined evolution of creep and cyclic plasticity damage by solution of the combined boundary-initial value problem. The solver has been used to predict the high-temperature behavior of a slag tap component subjected to cyclic thermal loading generated by infrared heaters and water cooling ducts. It is found that the initiation of damage and microcracking occur early in the lifetime at about 3000 cycles adjacent to the cooling duct. The propagation of failure zones stabilizes at 60,000 cycles after which no further damage evolution occurs.

  6. An Evaluation for Creep of 3013 Inner Can Lids

    SciTech Connect

    DAUGHERTY, W. L.; GIBBS, K. M.; LOUTHAN JR., M. R.; DUNN, K. A.

    2005-09-01

    The deflection of Type 304L austenitic stainless steel can lids on inner 3013 containers is monitored to identify any buildup of pressure within the container. This paper provides the technical basis to conclude that creep-induced deformation of these lids will be insignificant unless the temperature of storage exceeds 400 C. This conclusion is based on experimental literature data for Types 304 and 316 stainless steel and on a phenomenological evaluation of potential creep processes.

  7. Determination of Static Strength and Creep Buckling of Unstiffened Circular Cylinders Subjected to Bending at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathauser, Eldon E.; Berkovits, Avraham

    1959-01-01

    A method based on a semiempirical procedure is presented for predicting static strength and creep buckling of unstiffened circular cylinders subjected to pure bending at elevated temperatures. The method is applicable to cylinders that are loaded into the inelastic stress range prior to buckling and fail in a local mode. The predicted bending moments associated with static strength and creep buckling are compared with experimental data (taken from NACA RM 57El7) obtained from tests at 500 F on 5052-0 aluminum-alloy cylinders with radius- thickness ratios ranging from 125 to 250.

  8. Effect of initial gamma prime size on the elevated temperature creep properties of single crystal nickel base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of initial gamma-prime size and shape on the high-temperature creep properties of two single-crystal Ni-base superalloys was investigated. The two alloys were chosen to represent different magnitudes of gamma/gamma-prime lattice mismatch. A range of initial microstructures was produced by various quenching and aging treatments. Creep-rupture testing at 1000 C was performed under stresses where gamma-prime directionally coarsens to form gamma/gamma-prime lamellae in the early portion of the creep life. Both alloys exhibited a peak in creep resistance as a function of initial gamma-prime size. The peak corresponded to an initial microstructure consisting of cuboidal precipitates aligned along 001 line directions. These aligned cuboidal gamma-prime particles directionally coarsened into a relatively perfect lamellar gamma/gamma-prime structure in the early stages of creep, whereas the more irregularly shaped and distributed gamma-prime particles in both under- and overaged material formed more irregular lamellae with more imperfections. The alloy with a lower magnitude of mismatch was less sensitive to initial gamma-prime size and shape.

  9. Effect of initial gamma prime size on the elevated temperature creep properties of single crystal nickel base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathal, M. V.

    1987-11-01

    The influence of initial γ' size and shape on the high temperature creep properties of two single crystal nickel-base superalloys was investigated. The two alloys were chosen to represent different magnitudes of γ-γ' lattice mismatch. A range of initial microstructures was produced by various quenching and aging treatments. Creep-rupture testing at 1000 °C was performed under stresses where γ' directionally coarsens to form γ-γ' lamellae in the early portion of the creep life. Both alloys exhibited a peak in creep resistance as a function of initial γ' size. The peak corresponded to an initial microstructure consisting of cuboidal precipitates aligned along [001] directions. These aligned cuboidal γ' particles directionally coarsened into a relatively perfect lamellar γ-γ' structure in the early stages of creep, whereas the more irregularly shaped and distributed γ' particles in both under and overaged material formed more irregular lamellae with more imperfections. The alloy with a lower magnitude of mismatch was less sensitive to initial γ'size and shape.

  10. Creep of carbon-yarn and carbon-carbon composites at high temperatures and high stresses. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sines, G.; Yang, Z.; Vickers, B.D.

    1988-05-01

    To better understand the creep-behavior of carbon yarn and carbon-carbon composites, creep experiments were developed that permitted testing at high temperatures (up to 2500 C) and at high stresses (up to 850 MPa) on specially prepared, uniaxial specimens that had a known gage length. Using a Dorn-type power-law relation to model steady-state creep, the apparent activation energy for the carbon-yarn and carbon-composite specimens was determined to be 1082 kj/mol. This value represents a single thermally activated process, vacancy diffusion, that compares favorably with the various types of graphitizable carbon. The value determined for the stress exponent was 7.5. It too was found to be independent of the carbon-matrix's presence and independent of the specimens' loading history. Values of the pre-exponential constant for the carbon yarn and carbon composites were also calculated. The carbon matrix greatly improves the creep resistance of the carbon composite. This improvement was attributed to the matrix's microstructure. It distributes applied loads more evenly and it may also impose a triaxial stress state in the yarns's filaments. It is proposed that such a stress state may inhibit the flux of vacancies, thus accounting in part for this increase in creep resistance.

  11. Improving high temperature creep resistance of reduced activation steels by addition of nitrogen and intermediate heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. B.; Zhang, C.; Xia, Z. X.; Yang, Z. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we report an enhanced high-temperature creep resistance in reduced activation ferrite/martensite (RAFM) steels, by introducing nitrogen (0.035 wt%, M3 steel) and employing a novel intermediate heat treatment I-Q-T (intermediate treatment, quenching and tempering). In comparison with all the control groups, the uniaxial tests of the I-Q-T treated M3 steel showed significant increase in rupture time and decrease in elongation. The microstructures of the samples were further characterized to elucidate the origin of the enhanced creep resistance. It is found that, by introducing nitrogen, the primary TaC particles were refined; by employing the I-Q-T heat treatment, the dispersed fine secondary MX precipitates, as well as the lath subgrains containing high-density dislocations, were increased: all are responsible for the improved creep resistance.

  12. Cyclic creep-rupture behavior of three high-temperature alloys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of some important characteristics of the cyclic creep-rupture curves for the titanium alloy 6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo at 900 and 1100 F (755 and 865 K), the cobalt-base alloy L-605 at 1180 F (910 K), and for two hardness levels of 316 stainless steel at 1300 F (980 K). The cyclic creep-rupture curve relates tensile stress and tensile time-to-rupture for strain-limited cyclic loading and has been found to be independent of the total strain range and the level of compressive stress employed in the cyclic creep-rupture tests. The cyclic creep-rupture curve was always found to be above and to the right of the conventional (constant load) monotonic creep-rupture curve by factors ranging from 2 to 10 in time-to-rupture. This factor tends to be greatest when the creep ductility is large. Cyclic creep acceleration was observed in every cyclic creep-rupture test conducted. The phenomenon was most pronounced at the highest stress levels and when the tensile and compressive stresses were completely reversed. In general, creep rates were found to be lower in compression than in tension for equal true stresses. The differences, however, were strongly material-dependent.

  13. Bend stress relaxation and tensile primary creep of a polycrystalline alpha-SiC fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hee Man, Yun; Goldsby, Jon C.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the thermomechanical behavior (creep and stress relaxation) of ceramic fibers is of both practical and basic interest. On the practical level, ceramic fibers are the reinforcement for ceramic matrix composites which are being developed for use in high temperature applications. It is important to understand and model the total creep of fibers at low strain levels where creep is predominantly in the primary stage. In addition, there are many applications where the component will only be subjected to thermal strains. Therefore, the stress relaxation of composite consituents in such circumstances will be an important factor in composite design and performance. The objective of this paper is to compare and analyze bend stress relaxation and tensile creep data for alpha-SiC fibers produced by the Carborundum Co. (Niagara Falls, NY). This fiber is of current technical interest and is similar in composition to bulk alpha-SiC which has been studied under compressive creep conditions. The temperature, time, and stress dependences will be discussed for the stress relaxation and creep results. In addition, some creep and relaxation recovery experiments were performed in order to understand the complete viscoelastic behavior, i.e. both recoverable and nonrecoverable creep components of these materials. The data will be presented in order to model the deformation behavior and compare relaxation and/or creep behavior for relatively low deformation strain conditions of practical concern. Where applicable, the tensile creep results will be compared to bend stress relaxation data.

  14. Modeling the Role of Dislocation Substructure During Class M and Exponential Creep. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Iskovitz, Ilana Seiden; Freed, A. D.

    1995-01-01

    The different substructures that form in the power-law and exponential creep regimes for single phase crystalline materials under various conditions of stress, temperature and strain are reviewed. The microstructure is correlated both qualitatively and quantitatively with power-law and exponential creep as well as with steady state and non-steady state deformation behavior. These observations suggest that creep is influenced by a complex interaction between several elements of the microstructure, such as dislocations, cells and subgrains. The stability of the creep substructure is examined in both of these creep regimes during stress and temperature change experiments. These observations are rationalized on the basis of a phenomenological model, where normal primary creep is interpreted as a series of constant structure exponential creep rate-stress relationships. The implications of this viewpoint on the magnitude of the stress exponent and steady state behavior are discussed. A theory is developed to predict the macroscopic creep behavior of a single phase material using quantitative microstructural data. In this technique the thermally activated deformation mechanisms proposed by dislocation physics are interlinked with a previously developed multiphase, three-dimensional. dislocation substructure creep model. This procedure leads to several coupled differential equations interrelating macroscopic creep plasticity with microstructural evolution.

  15. Development of constitutive models for cyclic plasticity and creep behavior of super alloys at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    An uncoupled constitutive model for predicting the transient response of thermal and rate dependent, inelastic material behavior was developed. The uncoupled model assumes that there is a temperature below which the total strain consists essentially of elastic and rate insensitive inelastic strains only. Above this temperature, the rate dependent inelastic strain (creep) dominates. The rate insensitive inelastic strain component is modelled in an incremental form with a yield function, blow rule and hardening law. Revisions to the hardening rule permit the model to predict temperature-dependent kinematic-isotropic hardening behavior, cyclic saturation, asymmetric stress-strain response upon stress reversal, and variable Bauschinger effect. The rate dependent inelastic strain component is modelled using a rate equation in terms of back stress, drag stress and exponent n as functions of temperature and strain. A sequence of hysteresis loops and relaxation tests are utilized to define the rate dependent inelastic strain rate. Evaluation of the model has been performed by comparison with experiments involving various thermal and mechanical load histories on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and Hastelloy X.

  16. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C; Sediako, Dimitry; Shook, S; Sediako, A

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and exceUent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new alloy. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material becomes an important factor in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated-temperature applications. These studies were performed using E3 neutron spectrometer of the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre in Chalk River, ON, and HIPPO time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, NM.

  17. Creep: Long-term Time-Dependent Rock Deformation in a Deep-sea Laboratory in the Ionian sea: a Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, P. G.; Boon, S.; Vinciguerra, S.; Bowles, J.; NEMO Group,.

    2003-12-01

    Time-dependent brittle rock deformation is of first-order importance for understanding the long-term behavior of water saturated rocks in the Earth's upper crust. Interpretation of results from traditional laboratory brittle creep experiments have generally been in terms of three individual creep phases; primary (decelerating), secondary (constant strain rate or quasi-steady-state) and tertiary (accelerating or unstable). The deformation may be distributed during the first two, but localizes onto a fault plane during phase three. More recently, models have been proposed that explain the trimodal shape of creep curves in terms of the competition between a weakening mechanism and a strengthening mechanism, with the weakening mechanism eventually dominating and leading to localized failure. However, a major problem is that it is difficult to distinguish between these competing mechanisms and models given the lower limit of strain rates achievable in laboratory experiments over practicable time scales. This study aims to address that problem directly by extending significantly the range of achievable strain rates through much longer-term experiments conducted in a deep-sea laboratory in the Ionian sea. The project takes advantage of a collaboration with the NEMO Group-INFN, a consortium that is developing a large volume (1 km3) deep-sea detector for high-energy (>1019 eV) cosmic neutrinos. A suitable test site has been identified, some 20km north-east of Catania in Sicily, at a depth of 2100m. Within the CREEP deformation apparatus, confining pressure is provided by the ambient water pressure (>22MPa), and the constant axial stress is provided by an actuator that amplifies this pressure. Measurement transducers and a data acquisition system are sealed internally, with power provided for up to 6 months by an internal battery pack. The great advantage of operating in the deep sea in this way is that the system is essentially passive, has few moving parts, and requires no maintenance. The apparatus is held in place by a disposable cast-iron anchor and supported above the seabed by a deep-sea buoyage system. On completion of each experiment, an acoustic release detaches from the anchor and allows the apparatus to float to the surface to be recovered by the oceanographic research vessel.

  18. Creep Laboratory manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osgerby, S.; Loveday, M. S.

    1992-06-01

    A manual for the NPL Creep Laboratory, a collective name given to two testing laboratories, the Uniaxial Creep Laboratory and the Advanced High Temperature Mechanical Testing Laboratory, is presented. The first laboratory is devoted to uniaxial creep testing and houses approximately 50 high sensitivity creep machines including 10 constant stress cam lever machines. The second laboratory houses a low cycle fatigue testing machine of 100 kN capacity driven by a servo-electric actuator, five machines for uniaxial tensile creep testing of engineering ceramics at temperatures up to 1600C, and an electronic creep machine. Details of the operational procedures for carrying out uniaxial creep testing are given. Calibration procedures to be followed in order to comply with the specifications laid down by British standards, and to provide traceability back to the primary standards are described.

  19. Correlation of Creep Behavior of Domal Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.

    1999-02-16

    The experimentally determined creep responses of a number of domal salts have been reported in, the literature. Some of these creep results were obtained using standard (conventional) creep tests. However, more typically, the creep data have come from multistage creep tests, where the number of specimens available for testing was small. An incremental test uses abrupt changes in stress and temperature to produce several time increments (stages) of different creep conditions. Clearly, the ability to analyze these limited data and to correlate them with each other could be of considerable potential value in establishing the mechanical characteristics of salt domes, both generally and specifically. In any analysis, it is necessary to have a framework of rules to provide consistency. The basis for the framework is the Multimechanism-Deformation (M-D) constitutive model. This model utilizes considerable general knowledge of material creep deformation to supplement specific knowledge of the material response of salt. Because the creep of salt is controlled by just a few micromechanical mechanisms, regardless of the origin of the salt, certain of the material parameters are values that can be considered universal to salt. Actual data analysis utilizes the methodology developed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) program, and the response of a bedded pure WIPP salt as the baseline for comparison of the domal salts. Creep data from Weeks Island, Bryan Mound, West Hackberry, Bayou Choctaw, and Big Hill salt domes, which are all sites of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, were analyzed, as were data from the Avery Island, Moss Bluff, and Jennings salt domes. The analysis permits the parameter value sets for the domal salts to be determined in terms of the M-D model with various degrees of completeness. In turn this permits detailed numerical calculations simulating cavern response. Where the set is incomplete because of the sparse database, reasonable assumptions permit the set to be completed. From the analysis, two distinct response groups were evident, with the salts of one group measurably more creep resistant than the other group. Interestingly, these groups correspond well with the indirectly determined creep closure of the SPR storage caverns, a correlation that probably should be expected. Certainly, the results suggest a simple laboratory determination of the creep characteristics of a salt material from a dome site can indicate the relative behavior of any potential cavern placed within that dome.

  20. Comparison of measured temperatures, thermal stresses and creep residues with predictions on a built-up titanium structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1987-01-01

    Temperature, thermal stresses, and residual creep stresses were studied by comparing laboratory values measured on a built-up titanium structure with values calculated from finite-element models. Several such models were used to examine the relationship between computational thermal stresses and thermal stresses measured on a built-up structure. Element suitability, element density, and computational temperature discrepancies were studied to determine their impact on measured and calculated thermal stress. The optimum number of elements is established from a balance between element density and suitable safety margins, such that the answer is acceptably safe yet is economical from a computational viewpoint. It is noted that situations exist where relatively small excursions of calculated temperatures from measured values result in far more than proportional increases in thermal stress values. Measured residual stresses due to creep significantly exceeded the values computed by the piecewise linear elastic strain analogy approach. The most important element in the computation is the correct definition of the creep law. Computational methodology advances in predicting residual stresses due to creep require significantly more viscoelastic material characterization.

  1. High temperature deformation behavior of the molybdenum alloy TZM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrotzek, T.; Martin, U.; Hoffmann, A.

    2010-07-01

    The molybdenum alloy TZM (Mo-0.5wt%Ti-0.08wt%Zr) is a commonly used constructional material for high-temperature applications. It is well known that molybdenum and its alloys develop a distinct subgrain structure and texture during hot deformation. These microstructural aspects have a significant effect on strength at elevated temperatures. It was observed that with proceeding primary recrystallization and therefore with disappearance of subgrains the yield strength drops almost to the level of pure molybdenum. The aim of the present work was to investigate and describe the strain hardening of hot deformed TZM on a microstructural basis. For this purpose sintered and prerolled TZM rods were recrystallized and each of them deformed to a specific degree of deformation afterwards. Especially the evolution of disorientation distributions was analyzed by electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) and used to describe the work hardening effect. The yield strength was determined by tensile tests between room temperature and 1473 K. By analyzing disorientation profiles the formation and evolution of geometrically necessary and incidental dislocation boundaries could be observed. A model developed by Pantleon was used to describe the work hardening of TZM.

  2. Low temperature deformation kinetics of ruthenium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, D.C.; Pollock, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    The kinetics of low temperature deformation were investigated in several different polycrystalline RuAl alloys with the use of strain rate change experiments at 77 K and 298 K. Compositions investigated include RuAl, RuAl+0.5%B, Ru{sub 51.5}Al{sub 48.5}, Ru{sub 52}Al{sub 48}, Ru{sub 53}Al{sub 47}+0.5%B. Ru{sub 54.5}Al{sub 45.5}, and Ru{sub 52}Al{sub 43}Sc{sub 5}. Flow stresses did not vary substantially with temperature between 77 K and 298 K. Rate sensitivities were low compared to other B2 compounds and similar in all compositions investigated. Analyses of dislocation substructures after low strain deformation were conducted. The deformation kinetics and substructural observations suggest a higher intrinsic deformability for RuAl alloys with respect to the other high temperature B2 aluminides.

  3. Study of creep behavior of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, M; Latour, R A; Ogale, A A; Shalaby, S W

    1998-05-01

    The short- and long-term creep behaviors of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) systems (compression-molded UHMWPE sheets and self-reinforced UHMWPE composites) have been investigated. The short-term (30-120 min) creep experiment was conducted at a load of 1 MPa and a temperature range of 37-62 degrees C. Based on short-term creep data, the long-term creep behavior of UHMWPE systems at 1 MPa and 37 degrees C was predicted using time-temperature superposition and analytical formulas. Compared to actual long-term creep experiments of up to 110 days, the predicted creep values were found to well describe the creep properties of the materials. The creep behaviors of the UHMWPE systems were then evaluated for a creep time of longer than 10 years, and it was found that most creep deformation occurs in the early periods. The shift factors associated with time-temperature superposition were found to increase with increasing temperature, as per the Arrhenius equation. The effects of temperature, materials, and load on the shift factors could be explained by the classical free volume theory. PMID:9549616

  4. Room temperature creep-fatigue response of selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meimei; Singh, B. N.; Stubbins, J. F.

    2004-08-01

    Two copper alloys, dispersion-strengthened CuAl25 and precipitation-hardened CuCrZr, were examined under fatigue and fatigue with hold time loading conditions. Tests were carried out at room temperature and hold times were imposed at maximum tensile and maximum compressive strains. It was found that hold times could be damaging even at room temperature, well below temperatures typically associated with creep. Hold times resulted in shorter fatigue lives in the high cycle fatigue, long life regime (i.e., at low strain amplitudes) than those of materials tested under the same conditions without hold times. The influence of hold times on fatigue life in the low cycle fatigue, short life regime (i.e., at high strain amplitudes) was minimal. When hold time effects were observed, fatigue lives were reduced with hold times as short as two seconds. Appreciable stress relaxation was observed during the hold period at all applied strain levels in both tension and compression. In all cases, stresses relaxed quickly within the first few seconds of the hold period and much more gradually thereafter. The CuAl25 alloy showed a larger effect of hold time on reduction of high cycle fatigue life than did the CuCrZr alloy.

  5. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transformation temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antolovich, Stephen D.; Saxena, Ashok; Cullers, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges of the aerospace industry is to develop more efficient turbine engines. Greater efficiency entails reduced specific strength and larger temperature gradients, the latter of which means higher operating temperatures and increased thermal conductivity. Continued development of nickel-based superalloys has provided steady increases in engine efficiency and the limits of superalloys have probably not been realized. However, other material systems are under intense investigation for possible use in high temperature engines. Ceramic, intermetallic, and various composite systems are being explored in an effort to exploit the much higher melting temperatures of these systems. NiAl is considered a potential alternative to conventional superalloys due to its excellent oxidation resistance, low density, and high melting temperature. The fact that NiAl is the most common coating for current superalloy turbine blades is a tribute to its oxidation resistance. Its density is one-third that of typical superalloys and in most temperature ranges its thermal conductivity is twice that of common superalloys. Despite these many advantages, NiAl requires more investigation before it is ready to be used in engines. Binary NiAl in general has poor high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. On-going research in alloy design continues to make improvements in the high-temperature strength of NiAl. The factors controlling low temperature ductility have been identified in the last few years. Small, but reproducible ductility can now be achieved at room temperature through careful control of chemical purity and processing. But the mechanisms controlling the transition from brittle to ductile behavior are not fully understood. Research in the area of fatigue deformation can aid the development of the NiAl system in two ways. Fatigue properties must be documented and optimized before NiAl can be applied to engineering systems. More importantly though, probing the deformation mechanisms operating in fatigue will lead to a better understanding of NiAl's unique characteristics. Low cycle fatigue properties have been reported on binary NiAl in the past year, yet those studies were limited to two temperature ranges: room temperature and near 1000 K. Eventually, fatigue property data will be needed for a wide range of temperatures and compositions. The intermediate temperature range near the brittle-to-ductile transition was chosen for this study to ascertain whether the sharp change occurring in monotonic behavior also occurs under cyclic conditions. An effort was made to characterize the dislocation structures which evolved during fatigue testing and comment on their role in the deformation process.

  6. High-pressure and high-temperature deformation experiments on polycrystalline wadsleyite using the rotational Drickamer apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farla, Robert; Amulele, George; Girard, Jennifer; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Karato, Shun-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-pressure, torsional deformation experiments on polycrystalline wadsleyite were carried out using the rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA). The experimental conditions ranged between temperatures of 2000-2200 K at pressures of 20 1 GPa. Prior to deformation, the fine-grained (1-5 m) wadsleyite specimens were synthesized from San Carlos olivine in a Kawai-type multi-anvil apparatus. The samples were loaded in the RDA, pressurized and heated, and deformed at stepped strain rates of 5-60 10-6 s-1. The stress was determined through the analysis of the orientation dependence on changes in lattice spacing for the (141), (240) and (040) planes. The strain was determined from the orientation of a molybdenum strain marker. Most stepped strain-rate tests reveal the stress exponent n to be 4.7 0.5, suggesting power-law dislocation creep operated. Various samples exhibit grain-size reduction (to 0.1-0.6 m), possibly associated with dynamic recrystallization or with partial phase transformation to ringwoodite. Transmission electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analyses provide information on the dominant slip system in wadsleyite as 1/2<111> slip on {101} planes, as well as slip in the [100] direction. Dislocation density, even in recrystallized grains, is very high (likely >1014 m-2), reflecting the final high stresses in the samples during deformation. The results provide greater constraints on the regimes of various deformation mechanisms in wadsleyite at various experimental conditions.

  7. Elevated temperature creep-fatigue crack propagation in nickel-base alloys and 1 Cr-Mo-V steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmy, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Wüthrich, C.

    1988-04-01

    The crack growth behavior of several high temperature nickel-base alloys, under cyclic and static loading, is studied and reviewed. In the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) MA 6000 and MA 754 alloys, the high temperature crack propagation exhibited orientation dependence under cyclic as well as under static loading. The creep crack growth (CCG) behavior of cast nickel-base IN-738 and IN-939* superalloys at 850 °C could be characterized by the stress intensity factor, K 1. In the case of the alloy IN-901 at 500 °C and 600 °C, K 1 was found to be the relevant parameter to characterize the creep crack growth behavior. The energy rate line integral, C*, may be the appropriate loading parameter to describe the creep crack growth behavior of the nickel-iron base IN-800H alloy at 800 °C. The creep crack growth data of 1 Cr-Mo-V steel, with bainitic microstructure, at 550 °C could be correlated better by C * than by K 1.

  8. Irradiation creep at temperatures of 400 {degrees}C and below for application to near-term fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Gibson, L.T.; Mansur, L.K.

    1996-12-31

    To study irradiation creep at 400{degrees}C and below, a series of six austenitic stainless steels and two ferritic alloys was irradiated sequentially in two research reactors where the neutron spectrum was tailored to produce a He production rate typical of a fusion device. Irradiation began in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor; and, after an atomic displacement level of 7.4 dpa, the specimens were moved to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for the remainder of the 19 dpa accumulated. Irradiation temperatures of 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C were studied with internally pressurized tubes of type 316 stainless steel, PCA, HT 9, and a series of four laboratory heats of: Fe-13.5Cr-15Ni, Fe-13.5Cr-35Ni, Fe-1 3.5Cr-1 W-0.18Ti, and Fe-16Cr. At 330{degrees}C, irradiation creep was shown to be linear in fluence and stress. There was little or no effect of cold-work on creep under these conditions at all temperatures investigated. The HT9 demonstrated a large deviation from linearity at high stress levels, and a minimum in irradiation creep with increasing stress was observed in the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary alloys.

  9. Overview of strategies for high-temperature creep and oxidation resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Santella, Michael L; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    A family of creep-resistant, alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steel alloys is under development for structural use in fossil energy conversion and combustion system applications. The AFA alloys developed to date exhibit comparable creep-rupture lives to state-of-the-art advanced austenitic alloys, and superior oxidation resistance in the {approx}923 K to 1173 K (650 C to 900 C) temperature range due to the formation of a protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale rather than the Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales that form on conventional stainless steel alloys. This article overviews the alloy design approaches used to obtain high-temperature creep strength in AFA alloys via considerations of phase equilibrium from thermodynamic calculations as well as microstructure characterization. Strengthening precipitates under evaluation include MC-type carbides or intermetallic phases such as NiAl-B2, Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)-Laves, Ni{sub 3}Al-L1{sub 2}, etc. in the austenitic single-phase matrix. Creep, tensile, and oxidation properties of the AFA alloys are discussed relative to compositional and microstructural factors.

  10. Temperature Dependent Cyclic Deformation Mechanisms in Haynes 188 Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Castelli, Michael G.; Allen, Gorden P.; Ellis, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188, has been investigated over a range of temperatures between 25 and 1000 C under isothermal and in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) conditions. Constant mechanical strain rates (epsilon-dot) of 10(exp -3)/s and 10(exp -4)/s were examined with a fully reversed strain range of 0.8%. Particular attention was given to the effects of dynamic strain aging (DSA) on the stress-strain response and low cycle fatigue life. A correlation between cyclic deformation behavior and microstructural substructure was made through detailed transmission electron microscopy. Although DSA was found to occur over a wide temperature range between approximately 300 and 750 C the microstructural characteristics and the deformation mechanisms responsible for DSA varied considerably and were dependent upon temperature. In general, the operation of DSA processes led to a maximum of the cyclic stress amplitude at 650 C and was accompanied by pronounced planar slip, relatively high dislocation density, and the generation of stacking faults. DSA was evidenced through a combination of phenomena, including serrated yielding, an inverse dependence of the maximum cyclic hardening with epsilon-dot, and an instantaneous inverse epsilon-dot sensitivity verified by specialized epsilon-dot -change tests. The TMF cyclic hardening behavior of the alloy appeared to be dictated by the substructural changes occuring at the maximum temperature in the TMF cycle.

  11. A creep apparatus to explore the quenching and ageing phenomena of PVC films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. H. D.; Mcgarry, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    A creep apparatus has been constructed for an in situ determination of length and length change. Using this apparatus, the creep behavior of PVC thin films associated with quenching and aging was studied. The more severe the quench through the glass transition temperature, the greater is the instantaneous elastic deformation and the subsequent creep behavior. As aging proceeds, the quenched films gradually lose the ductility incurred by quenching. These results agree well with the well-known phenomena of physical aging. Thus, the changes reflecting molecular mobilities due to quenching and aging can be properly monitored by such a creep apparatus.

  12. Microstructural development and mechanical behavior of eutectic bismuth-tin and eutectic indium-tin in response to high temperature deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.L.F. |

    1993-11-01

    The mechanical behavior and microstructure of eutectic Bi-Sn and In-Sn solders were studied in parallel in order to better understand high temperature deformation of these alloys. Bi-Sn solder joints were made with Cu substrates, and In-Sn joints were made with either Cu or Ni substrates. The as-cast microstructure of Bi-Sn is complex regular, with the two eutectic phases interconnected in complicated patterns. The as-cast microstructure of In-Sn depends on the substrate. In-Sn on Cu has a non-uniform microstructure caused by diffusion of Cu into the solder during sample preparation, with regions of the Sn-rich {gamma} phase imbedded in a matrix of the In-rich {beta} phase. The microstructure of In-Sn on Ni is uniform and lamellar and the two phases are strongly coupled. The solders deform non-uniformly, with deformation concentrating in a band along the length of the sample for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu, though the deformation is more diffuse in In-Sn than in Bi-Sn. Deformation of In-Sn on Ni spreads throughout the width of the joint. The different deformation patterns affect the shape of the stress-strain curves. Stress-strain curves for Bi-Sn and In-Sn on Cu exhibit sharp decays in the engineering stress after reaching a peak. Most of this stress decay is removed for In-Sn on Ni. The creep behavior of In-Sn also depends on the substrate, with the creep deformation controlled by the soft P phase of the eutectic for In-Sn on Cu and controlled by the harder {gamma} phase for In-Sn on Ni. When In-Sn on Ni samples are aged, the microstructure coarsens and changes to an array of {gamma} phase regions in a matrix of the {beta} phase, and the creep behavior changes to resemble that of In-Sn on Cu. The creep behavior of Bi-Sn changes with temperature. Two independent mechanisms operate at lower temperatures, but there is still some question as to whether one or both of these, or a third mechanism, operates at higher temperatures.

  13. High-temperature flexural creep of ZrB2-SiC ceramics in argon atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2012-01-01

    Four-point flexure creep deformation of ZrB2-30 vol% SiC ceramics in argon atmosphere under a static load of 19 MPa for 0-100 h at 1500 and 1600 C was investigated. The strain rate at 1600 oC was 3.7 times higher than that at 1500 oC. Microstructural evolution during creep consisted of nucleation and growth of triple-point cavitations which were always associated with SiC particles. Due to the low stress, only isolated cavitations were nucleated, and no microcracks were formed. For up to 100 h at 1500 and 1600 C, the grains maintained their size and shape. The cavitations in both size and number showed no obvious difference from 26 to 100 h at 1500 C, whereas that showed a significant increase from 26 to 100 h at 1600 C. Present study suggested that ZrB2-30 vol% SiC exhibited relatively good microstructural stability and creep resistance at 1500 C in argon atmosphere.

  14. Creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomer based on polyurethane/epoxy resin IPNs matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, S.; Yu, M.; Fu, J.; Li, P. D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly investigated the creep and recovery behaviors of magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) based on polyurethane/epoxy resin (EP) graft interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). The influences of constant stress level, content of EP, particle distribution, magnetic field and temperature on the creep and recovery behaviors were systematically investigated. As expected, results suggested that the presence of IPNs leads to a significant improvement of creep resistance of MRE, and creep and recovery behaviors of MRE were highly dependent on magnetic field and temperature. To further understand its deformation mechanism, several models (i.e., Findley’s power law model, Burgers model, and Weibull distribution equation) were used to fit the measured creep and recovery data. Results showed that the modeling of creep and recovery of samples was satisfactorily conducted by using these models. The influences of content of EP and magnetic field on fitting parameters were discussed, and relevant physical mechanism was proposed to explain it qualitatively.

  15. Creep of Uncoated and Cu-Cr Coated NARloy-Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, R. J.; Chiang, K. T.

    1998-01-01

    Stress rupture creep tests were performed on uncoated and Cu-30vol%Cr coated NARloy-Z copper alloy specimens exposed to air at 482 C to 704 C. The results showed that creep failure in air of unprotected NARloy-Z was precipitated by brittle intergranular surface cracking produced by strain assisted grain boundary oxidation (SAGBO) which in turn caused early onset of tertiary creep. For the protected specimens, the Cu-Cr coating remained adherent throughout the tests and was effective in slowing down the rate of oxygen absorption, particularly at the higher temperatures, by formation of a continuous chromium oxide scale. As the result of reducing oxygen ingress, the coating prevented SAGBO initiated early creep failure, extended creep deformation and increased the creep rupture life of NARloy-Z over the entire 482 C to 704 C test temperature range.

  16. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    DOEpatents

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  17. Superplastic Deformation of ice: Experimental Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, D. L.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Creep experiments on fine-grained ice reveal the existence of three creep regimes: (1) a dislocation creep regime; (2) a superplastic flow regime in which grain boundary sliding is an important deformation process; and (3) a basal slip creep regime in which the strain rate is limited by basal slip. Dislocation creep in ice is likely climb-limited, is characterized by a stress exponent of 4.0, and is independent of grain size. Superplastic flow is characterized by a stress exponent of 1.8 and depends inversely on grain size to the 1.4 power. Basal slip limited creep is characterized by a stress exponent of 2.4 and is independent of grain size. A fourth creep mechanism, diffusional flow, which usually occurs at very low stresses, is inaccessible at practical laboratory strain rates even for our finest grain sizes of approximately 3 micrometers. A constitutive equation based on these experimental results that includes flow laws for these four creep mechanisms is described. This equation is in excellent agreement with published laboratory creep data for coarse-grained samples at high temperatures. Superplastic flow of ice is the rate-limiting creep mechanism over a wide range of temperatures and grain sizes at stresses less than or equal to 0.1 MPa, conditions which overlap those occurring in glaciers, ice sheets, and icy planetary interiors.

  18. Low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derez, Tine; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn; Sintubin, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    A review of numerous genetic interpretations of the individual low-temperature intracrystalline deformation microstructures in quartz shows that there is no consensus concerning their formation mechanisms. Therefore, we introduce a new, purely descriptive terminology for the three categories of intracrystalline deformation microstructures formed in the low-quartz stability field: fine extinction bands (FEB), wide extinction bands (WEB) and localised extinction bands (LEB). The localised extinction bands are further subdivided into blocky (bLEB), straight (sLEB) and granular (gLEB) morphological types. A detailed polarised light microscopy study of vein-quartz from the low-grade metamorphic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium) further reveals a series of particular geometric relationships between these newly defined intracrystalline deformation microstructures. These geometric relationships are largely unrecognised or underemphasised in the literature and need to be taken into account in any future genetic interpretation. Based on our observations and a critical assessment of the current genetic models, we argue that the interpretation of the pertinent microstructures in terms of ambient conditions and deformation history should be made with care, as long as the genesis of these microstructures is not better confined.

  19. Buckling Analysis in Creep Conditions: Review and Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Turbat, Andre; Drubay, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    In the case of structures operating at high temperature in normal or accidental conditions, the influence of creep has to be considered at the design stage because this phenomenon may reduce the lifetime significantly. This is true in particular for buckling analysis: in creep conditions, the buckling sometimes occurs after a long period under a compressive load which is lower than the critical load assessed when considering an instantaneous buckling. The main reason is that creep deformations induce an amplification of the initial geometrical imperfections and consequently a reduction of the buckling load. Some Design Codes incorporate special rules and/or methods to take creep buckling into account. Creep buckling analysis methods aim at evaluating critical loading for a given hold period with creep or alternatively critical creep time for a given loading. The Codes where creep buckling is considered also define margins with respect to critical loading: it shall be demonstrated that creep instability will not occur during the whole lifetime when multiplying the specified loading by a coefficient (design factor) depending on the situation level. For the design of NPP, specific creep buckling rules exist in the US, France and Russia. In the US, ASME, Section III, Subsection NH, which is dedicated to high temperature components design, provides limits which are applicable to general geometrical configurations and loading conditions that may cause buckling due to creep behaviour of the material. For load-controlled time-dependent creep buckling, the design factors to apply to the specified loadings are 1.5 for levels A, B or C service loadings and 1.25 for level D service loadings. A design factor is not required in the case of purely strain-controlled buckling. No specific method is provided to obtain critical loading or critical time for creep instability. In France, creep buckling rules included in RCC-MR, Chapter RB or RC 3200 are similar to those of ASME, Subsection NH. In addition, a new simplified method has been developed recently to assess critical creep loading/time for a shell under mechanical loading. Diagrams, presently valid for 316 austenitic steel, have been established from a ring model with perfect plasticity. Creep buckling load is determined applying a reduction factor to Euler instantaneous buckling load, depending on temperature, hold time, thinness of the structure and geometrical imperfection amplitude. This method has been validated by experimental tests and finite element results. It will be included in Appendix A7 of RCC-MR, Edition 2000. In Russia, the document PNAE G-7-002-86 applicable to NPP equipment and pipeline strength analysis, presents stability check analytical calculations to be performed to determine the allowable loading or allowable operation lifetime for typical geometries (cylindrical shells, dished ends) and loadings (external pressure, axial force). In the case of stability analysis under creep, creep deformation is assessed using a Norton law. In Germany, a KTA project including an analytical method for creep buckling analysis had also been proposed at the beginning of 90's to be used in HTR development. Finally, in India, a creep buckling analysis method has been proposed in the framework of PFBR project. As per this approach, elastic-plastic analysis should be performed replacing the instantaneous stress-strain curve at the design temperature by the isochronous curve for the time corresponding to the lifetime of the component and the same temperature. These methods are applied in the case of cylindrical shells under external pressure and comparative results are provided. The RCC-MR method appears to be reasonably conservative and applicable with several creep law types. (authors)

  20. Low temperature deformation detwinning - a reverse mode of twinning.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. D.; Liu, W.; Lu, L.; Ren, Y.; Nie, Z. H.; Almer, J.; Cheng, S.; Shen, Y. F.; Zuo, L.; Liaw, P. K.; Lu, K.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the plasticity in bulk nanocrystalline metals have, to date, been attributed to the grain-boundary-mediated process, stress-induced grain coalescence, dislocation plasticity, and/or twinning. Here we report a different mechanism - detwinning, which operates at low temperatures during the tensile deformation of an electrodeposited Cu with a high density of nanosized growth twins. Both three-dimensional XRD microscopy using the Laue method with a submicron-sized polychromatic beam and high-energy XRD technique with a monochromatic beam provide the direct experimental evidences for low temperature detwinning of nanoscale twins.

  1. High-temperature deformation behavior of KCl-RbCl solid solution alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Duong, H.; McClelland, R.J.; Wolfenstine, J. ); Beeman, M. )

    1992-05-01

    It is well established that the creep behavior of metallic solid solution alloys can be divided into two types. The main criterion for this classification is based on the value of the stress exponent, n. When n {approximately} 5 the creep behavior of the metallic solid solution alloys is similar to that observed in pure metals, where the rate-controlling deformation mechanism is attributed to a dislocation climb process. This type of metallic alloy is designated as a class II solid solution ally after the original classification of Sherby and Burke and Cannon and Sherby. It is the purpose of this paper to present some preliminary results on the creep behavior of KCl-RbCl solid solution alloys and to compare these results with that observed in the KCl-NaCl system and metallic solid solution alloys. The variation of the stress exponent and dislocation substructure with composition will be reported.

  2. Creep of rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Neville L.; Hansen, Francis D.

    1983-03-01

    A review is presented of the fundamental flow properties and processes in experimentally deformed natural and synthetic halite single crystals and polycrystalline aggregates. Included in the summary are discussions of: (a) microstructures induced during steady-state creep; (b) creep-rupture of rocksalt; (c) experiments associated with "Project Salt Vault" and more recent field studies; and (d) brine migration. A representative steady-state flow law determined for natural aggregates and maximum natural deviatoric stresses deduced from subgrain sizes are applied briefly to considerations of creep in waste repositories and of salt dome dynamics. While the mechanical behavior of rocksalt is probably better understood than for all other rock types, further investigations, especially on load path, stress history and creep-rupture are clearly mandated. Furthermore, additional investigations of brine migration and of bench and field-scale deformations are needed, the latter incorporating realistic rocksalt flow properties into numerical simulations of natural rock-mass response.

  3. Mechanisms of high-temperature, solid-state flow in minerals and ceramics and their bearing on the creep behavior of the mantle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of applying laboratory silicate-flow data to the mantle, where conditions can be vastly different, is approached through a critical review of high-temperature flow mechanisms in ceramics and their relation to empirical flow laws. The intimate association of solid-state diffusion and high-temperature creep in pure metals is found to apply to ceramics as well. It is shown that in ceramics of moderate grain size, compared on the basis of self-diffusivity and elastic modulus, normalized creep rates compare remarkably well. This comparison is paralleled by the near universal occurrence of similar creep-induced structures, and it is thought that the derived empirical flow laws can be associated with dislocation creep. Creep data in fine-grained ceramics, on the other hand, are found to compare poorly with theories involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects and have not been successfully correlated by self-diffusion rates. We conclude that these fine-grained materials creep primarily by a quasi-viscous grain-boundary sliding mechanism which is unlikely to predominate in the earth's deep interior. Creep predictions for the mantle reveal that under most conditions the empirical dislocation creep behavior predominates over the mechanisms involving the stress-directed diffusion of point defects. The probable role of polymorphic transformations in the transition zone is also discussed. ?? 1973.

  4. CREEP AND CREEP-FATIGUE OF ALLOY 617 WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jill; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2014-08-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) may be joined to piping or other components by welding. Creep-fatigue deformation is expected to be a predominant failure mechanism of the IHX1 and thus weldments used in its fabrication will experience varying cyclic stresses interrupted by periods of elevated temperature deformation. These periods of elevated temperature deformation are greatly influenced by a materials’ creep behavior. The nickel-base solid solution strengthened alloy, Alloy 617, is the primary material candidate for a VHTR-type IHX, and it is expected that Alloy 617 filler metal will be used for welds. Alloy 617 is not yet been integrated into Section III of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, however, nuclear component design with Alloy 617 requires ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) Code qualification. The Code will dictate design for welded construction through significant performance reductions. Despite the similar compositions of the weldment and base material, significantly different microstructures and mechanical properties are inevitable. Experience of nickel alloy welds in structural applications suggests that most high temperature failures occur at the weldments or in the heat-affected zone. Reliably guarding against this type of failure is particularly challenging at high temperatures due to the variations in the inelastic response of the constituent parts of the weldment (i.e., weld metal, heat-affected zone, and base metal) [ref]. This work focuses on the creep-fatigue behavior of nickel-based weldments, a need noted during the development of the draft Alloy 617 ASME Code Case. An understanding of Alloy 617 weldments when subjected to this important deformation mode will enable determination of the appropriate design parameters associated with their use. Specifically, the three main areas emphasized are the performance reduction due to a weld discontinuity in terms of the reduced number of the cycles to failure and whether a saturation in reduced cycle life with increased hold times is observed, the microstructural stability over long cycle times, and finally, the location of the generated weldment data on a creep-fatigue damage diagram (D-diagram).

  5. Steady-State Creep of Rock Salt: Improved Approaches for Lab Determination and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, R.-M.; Salzer, K.; Popp, T.; Lüdeling, C.

    2015-11-01

    Actual problems in geotechnical design, e.g., of underground openings for radioactive waste repositories or high-pressure gas storages, require sophisticated constitutive models and consistent parameters for rock salt that facilitate reliable prognosis of stress-dependent deformation and associated damage. Predictions have to comprise the active mining phase with open excavations as well as the long-term development of the backfilled mine or repository. While convergence-induced damage occurs mostly in the vicinity of openings, the long-term behaviour of the backfilled system is dominated by the damage-free steady-state creep. However, because in experiments the time necessary to reach truly stationary creep rates can range from few days to years, depending mainly on temperature and stress, an innovative but simple creep testing approach is suggested to obtain more reliable results: A series of multi-step tests with loading and unloading cycles allows a more reliable estimate of stationary creep rate in a reasonable time. For modelling, we use the advanced strain-hardening approach of Günther-Salzer, which comprehensively describes all relevant deformation properties of rock salt such as creep and damage-induced rock failure within the scope of an unified creep ansatz. The capability of the combination of improved creep testing procedures and accompanied modelling is demonstrated by recalculating multi-step creep tests at different loading and temperature conditions. Thus reliable extrapolations relevant to in-situ creep rates (10^{-9} to 10^{-13} s^{-1}) become possible.

  6. Creep Strain and Strain Rate Response of 2219 Al Alloy at High Stress Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Wagner, John A.; Lisagor, W. Barry

    1998-01-01

    As a result of high localized plastic deformation experienced during proof testing in an International Space Station connecting module, a study was undertaken to determine the deformation response of a 2219-T851 roll forging. After prestraining 2219-T851 Al specimens to simulate strains observed during the proof testing, creep tests were conducted in the temperature range from ambient temperature to 107 C (225 F) at stress levels approaching the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T851 Al. Strain-time histories and strain rate responses were examined. The strain rate response was extremely high initially, but decayed rapidly, spanning as much as five orders of magnitude during primary creep. Select specimens were subjected to incremental step loading and exhibited initial creep rates of similar magnitude for each load step. Although the creep rates decreased quickly at all loads, the creep rates dropped faster and reached lower strain rate levels for lower applied loads. The initial creep rate and creep rate decay associated with primary creep were similar for specimens with and without prestrain; however, prestraining (strain hardening) the specimens, as in the aforementioned proof test, resulted in significantly longer creep life.

  7. Improved microstructure for creep strength in high-temperature austenitic alloys for energy conversion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Garrett

    The current dominant role of fossil fuels for use in energy conversion applications is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. In order to ensure the continued availability of these limited resources, it is critically important that remaining fossil fuel reserves are utilized as efficiently as possible. Increasing operating temperature in power plants is the most straightforward method of increasing plant efficiency, but over long life cycles in the harsh operating conditions of modern supercritical coal-fired power plants, current-generation materials are cannot be used above ˜620°C due to corrosion and/or creep-strength limitations. One possible class of materials for higher-temperature use are dispersion-strengthened alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels: in this work, Fe-20Cr-(20-30)Ni-2Nb-5Al at. % strengthened by a fine Fe2Nb C14 Laves phase dispersion. While the Laves phase has not been successfully used as a strengthener before, some prior research has indicated that the Laves phase could act as a stable high-temperature strengthener, if it could be more finely dispersed. This work attempted to refine the Laves phase by first solutionizing the alloy, then cold-working to introduce a dense dislocation structure, and finally aging in order to allow the Laves phase to nucleate on these dislocations. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to analyze the material after thermomechanical processing. Final results showed that the size, scale, homogeneity of dispersion, and volume fraction of precipitated Laves phase particles were all altered by prestraining, and at high levels of prestrain (90% reduction in thickness), a significantly finer Laves phase dispersion was obtained when compared with the non-prestrained aged material.

  8. Clash of Porphyroblasts - Mechanical and chemical interaction of strong objects in a weak deforming matrix and the acceleration of dissolution precipitation creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Hagen; Huet, Benjamin; Grasemann, Bernhard; Schuster, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The presence of porphyroblasts in metamorphic rocks has a strong influence on the microstructures that develop during deformation. Valuable as gauges for the sense of shear, single isolated porphyroblasts and -clasts have attracted enormous attention and vigorous discussion in the geological community. Naturally, however, porphyroblasts often occur in populations. Therefore, the understanding of multi-porphyroblast interaction is of great significance. We use amphibolite-facies garnet mica schists from the Upper Austroalpine Wlz Complex for a case study. The microstructure of mm-cm sized, densely distributed garnet porphyroblasts indicates interference of the blasts. Blasts are subjected to convergence parallel to the instantaneous shortening axis, causing (i) accumulation and deformation of strain caps, (ii) fracturing of the garnets and (iii) dissolution of garnet at collision sites. Parallel to the instantaneous stretching axis, (i) cone-shaped strain shadows are linked between neighbouring garnets and (ii) separation of garnet clusters occurs preferably. Dissolution precipitation creep accommodates the major part of deformation. Consequently, the matrix separates due to the dense population of porphyroblasts. The matrix differentiates to dissolution sites and precipitation sites in the respective quadrants of stretching and shortening around the blasts. Quantitative chemical analysis and thermodynamic modelling are utilised to examine compositional variations in minerals within the stretching and shortening domains. The results show that the present-day assemblage in these rocks records no deviations from lithostatic pressure.

  9. Stress-Strain Rate Relations in Ultra High Carbon Steels Deformed in the Ferrite Range of Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C K; Lesuer, D R; Sherby, O D; Taleff, E M

    2003-02-20

    The stress-strain rate relations in ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been analyzed at high temperatures in the ferrite range where dislocation slip is the principal deformation mechanism. Specifically, the present investigation centers on the factors influencing the strength of UHCS in the ferrite range of 500 to 700 C and in the strain rate range of 10{sup -3} to 10{sup 3} s{sup -1}. These steels contain iron carbide as a second phase either in the form of spheroidite or pearlite and vary in the grain size according to the processing history. The new variables that need to be taken into account are the effect of ferromagnetism and its change with temperature on the creep strength of the ferritic UHCSs. Recent studies have shown that ferromagnetism strongly influences the lattice and dislocation pipe diffusion coefficient and the elastic modulus of iron in the ferrite range of temperature. These variables are shown to influence the creep strength of ferrite-base steels and explain the high activation energies that are observed in many of the ferritic UHCSs.

  10. Mechanisms of elevated-temperature deformation in the B2 aluminides NiAl and CoAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaney, D. L.; Nix, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A strain rate change technique, developed previously for distinguishing between pure-metal and alloy-type creep behavior, was used to study the elevated-temperature deformation behavior of the intermetallic compounds NiAl and CoAl. Tests on NiAl were conducted at temperatures between 1100 and 1300 K while tests on CoAl were performed at temperatures ranging from 1200 to 1400 K. NiAl exhibits pure-metal type behavior over the entire temperature range studied. CoAl, however, undergoes a transition from pure-metal to alloy-type deformation behavior as the temperature is decreased from 1400 to 1200 K. Slip appears to be inherently more difficult in CoAl than in NiAl, with lattice friction effects limiting the mobility of dislocations at a much higher tmeperature in CoAl than in NiAl. The superior strength of CoAl at elevated temperatures may, therefore, be related to a greater lattice friction strengthening effect in CoAl than in NiAl.

  11. Effect of interconnect creep on long-term performance of SOFC of one cell stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-02-01

    Creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 1073oK. High temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and CTE compatibility with other SOFC components. Since the melting temperature of most stainless steel is around 1800oK, possible creep deformation of IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of interconnect creep behavior on stack geometry change and stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the fuel and air channel geometry changes due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel interconnect, therefore indicating possible SOFC performance change under long term operations. IC creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long term steady state operating temperature. It is found that creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel and the air flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  12. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie Corinne Scheidt

    1994-01-01

    This thesis presents the on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes four effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for four variables, namely, high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects by model to the combination by experiment were conducted. Thus, for Inconel 718, the basic model assumption of independence between effects was evaluated. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported this assumption.

  13. Oscillatory rheology and creep behavior of barley ?-D-glucan concentrate dough: effect of particle size, temperature, and water content.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim; Thomas, Linu; Al-Attar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Small amplitude oscillatory rheology and creep behavior of ?-glucan concentrate (BGC) dough were studied as function of particle size (74, 105, 149, 297, and 595 ?m), BGC particle-to-water ratio (1:4, 1:5, and 1:6), and temperature (25, 40, 55, 70, and 85 C). The color intensity and protein content increased with decreasing particle size by creating more surface areas. The water holding capacity (WHC) and sediment volume fraction increased with increasing particle size from 74 to 595 ?m, which directly influences the mechanical rigidity and viscoelasticity of the dough. The dough exhibited predominating solid-like behavior (elastic modulus, G' > viscous modulus, G?). A discrete retardation spectrum is employed to the creep data to obtain retardation time and compliance parameters, which varied significantly with particle size and the process temperature. Creep tests exhibited more pronounced effect on dough behavior compared to oscillatory measurement. The protein denaturation temperature was insignificantly increased with particle fractions from 107 to 110 C. All those information could be helpful to identify the particle size range and WHC of BGC that could be useful to produce a ?-d-glucan enriched designed food. PMID:25603841

  14. Extreme ductile deformation of fine-grained salt by coupled solution-precipitation creep and microcracking: Microstructural evidence from perennial Zechstein sequence (Neuhof salt mine, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Desbois, Guillaume; Schwedt, Alexander; Lexa, Ondrej; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-04-01

    Microstructural study revealed that the ductile flow of intensely folded fine-grained salt exposed in an underground mine (Zechstein-Werra salt sequence, Neuhof mine, Germany) was accommodated by coupled activity of solution-precipitation (SP) creep and microcracking of the halite grains. The grain cores of the halite aggregates contain remnants of sedimentary microstructures with straight and chevron shaped fluid inclusion trails (FITs) and are surrounded by two concentric mantles reflecting different events of salt precipitation. Numerous intra-granular or transgranular microcracks originate at the tips of FITs and propagate preferentially along the interface between sedimentary cores and the surrounding mantle of reprecipitated halite. These microcracks are interpreted as tensional Griffith cracks. Microcracks starting at grain boundary triple junctions or grain boundary ledges form due to stress concentrations generated by grain boundary sliding (GBS). Solid or fluid inclusions frequently alter the course of the propagating microcracks or the cracks terminate at these inclusions. Because the inner mantle containing the microcracks is corroded and is surrounded by microcrack-free outer mantle, microcracking is interpreted to reflect transient failure of the aggregate. Microcracking is argued to play a fundamental role in the continuation and enhancement of the SP-GBS creep during halokinesis of the Werra salt, because the transgranular cracks (1) provide the ingress of additional fluid in the grain boundary network when cross-cutting the FITs and (2) decrease grain size by splitting the grains. More over, the ingress of additional fluids into grain boundaries is also provided by non-conservative grain boundary migration that advanced into FITs bearing cores of grains. Described readjustments of the microstructure and mechanical and chemical feedbacks for the grain boundary diffusion flow in halite-brine system are proposed to be comparable to other rock-fluid or rock-melt aggregates deforming by the grain boundary sliding (GBS) coupled deformation mechanisms.

  15. Creep-constitutive behavior of Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu solder using an internal stress approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rist, Martin A.; Plumbridge, W. J.; Cooper, S.

    2006-05-01

    The experimental tensile creep deformation of bulk Sn-3.8Ag-0.7Cu solder at temperatures between 263 K and 398 K, covering lifetimes up to 3,500 h, has been rationalized using constitutive equations that incorporate structure-related internal state variables. Primary creep is accounted for using an evolving internal back stress, due to the interaction between the soft matrix phase and a more creep-resistant particle phase. Steady-state creep is incorporated using a conventional power law, modified to include the steady-state value of internal stress. It is demonstrated that the observed behavior is well-fitted using creep constants for pure tin in the modified creep power law. A preliminary analysis of damage-induced tertiary creep is also presented.

  16. Error correction for Moir based creep measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi; Harding, Kevin G.; Nieters, Edward J.; Tait, Robert W.; Hasz, Wayne C.; Piche, Nicole

    2014-05-01

    Due to the high temperatures and stresses present in the high-pressure section of a gas turbine, the airfoils experience creep or radial stretching. Nowadays manufacturers are putting in place condition-based maintenance programs in which the condition of individual components is assessed to determine their remaining lives. To accurately track this creep effect and predict the impact on part life, the ability to accurately assess creep has become an important engineering challenge. One approach for measuring creep is using moir imaging. Using pad-print technology, a grating pattern can be directly printed on a turbine bucket, and it compares against a reference pattern built in the creep measurement system to create moir interference pattern. The authors assembled a creep measurement prototype for this application. By measuring the frequency change of the moir fringes, it is then possible to determine the local creep distribution. However, since the sensitivity requirement for the creep measurement is very stringent (0.1 micron), the measurement result can be easily offset due to optical system aberrations, tilts and magnification. In this paper, a mechanical specimen subjected to a tensile test to induce plastic deformation up to 4% in the gage was used to evaluate the system. The results show some offset compared to the readings from a strain gage and an extensometer. By using a new grating pattern with two subset patterns, it was possible to correct these offset errors.

  17. The effect of neutron irradiation on the fatigue and fatigue-creep behaviour of structural material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Schaaf, B.

    1988-07-01

    The primary circuit of a pulsed type fusion reactor will be subjected to cyclic loads at high temperature. Deformation rates will be in the range from below 10 -6 s -1 (creep) to 1 s -1 (fatigue) leading to creep-fatigue interaction in the neutron irradiated structural materials. The effects of neutron irradiation on fatigue and fatigue-creep interaction are reviewed. The study of austenitic stainless steel is most advanced, but the test conditions are still far from the first wall operating conditions, leaving a lot of uncertainties. It is expected that irradiation reduces the fatigue-creep endurance of austenites to very low levels, because of enhanced intergranular cracking. Two classes of alloys in an early stage of development, low activation steels and vanadium base alloys, hold the promise to be more fatigue-creep resistant due to their more ductile creep behaviour.

  18. Correlation between permanent deformation-related performance parameters of asphalt concrete mixes and binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adorjányi, Kálmán; Füleki, Péter

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines methods to predict the performance of hot asphalt concrete mixes based on performance parameters of binders. Specifically, relationships between binder parameters determined from multiple stress creep and recovery tests were correlated to the creep parameters of hot asphalt concrete mixes obtained from cyclic load compression testing. For the determination of creep parameters, a modified expression of the creep curve is proposed to cover the entire spectrum of permanent deformation; including the tertiary creep phase. Non-recoverable compliance, unrecovered strain, and recoverable strain of binders show good correlation to creep parameters of hot asphalt concrete mixes such as creep rate and high temperature performance ratio. Additionally, unrecovered strain and non-recoverable compliance of binders correlates well with mean rut depth of asphalt concrete mixes. However, no correlation has been detected between the difference in non-recoverable compliance of binders and permanent deformation parameters of asphalt concrete mixes.

  19. Creep in electronic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  20. Part 2: The creep behavior of Ti-Al-Nb O + bcc orthorhombic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Boehlert, C.J.; Miracle, D.B.

    1999-09-01

    The intermediate-temperature (650 C to 760 C) creep behavior of orthorhombic (O) + bcc alloys containing 50 at. pct Ti was studied. Ti-25Al-25Nb, Ti-23Al-27Nb, and Ti-12Al-38Nb ingots were processed and heat treated to obtain a wide variety of microstructures. Creep deformation mechanisms and the effects of grain size, phase volume fraction, tension vs compression and aging on creep rates were examined. Unaged microstructures, which transformed during the creep experiments, exhibited larger primary creep strains than transformed microstructure, which were crept after long-term aging. The deformation observations and calculated creep exponents and activation energies suggested that separate creep mechanisms, dependent on the applied stress level, were dominating the secondary creep behavior. Coble creep characteristics, including relatively low activation energies and dislocation densities as well as stress exponents close to unity, were exhibited at low applied stresses. Experiments on fiducially marked specimens indicated that grain-boundary sliding was occurring for intermediate applied stresses. In this regime, the minimum creep rates were proportional to the applied stress squared and inversely proportional to the grain size. Overall, the minimum creep rates were dependent on microstructure and stress. Within the low-to-intermediate stress regimes, subtransus processed and heat-treated microstructures, which contained much finer grain sizes than supertransus microstructures, exhibited the poorest creep resistance. The influence of grain size was not as significant within the high-stress regime. It is shown that for low-to-intermediate stress levels, grain size is the dominant microstructural feature influencing the creep behavior of O + bcc alloys.

  1. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Time dependent notch sensitivity was observed in Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings between 1000 and 1400 F (538 -760 C), but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy and Inconel 718, it occurred in notched specimens loaded below the yield strength when the creep deformation was localized. For each alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined that characterizes the notch sensitive behavior.

  2. High-temperature viscoelastic creep constitutive equations for polymer composites: Homogenization theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Skontorp, A.; Wang, S.S.; Shibuya, Y.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, a homogenization theory is developed to determine high-temperature effective viscoelastic constitutive equations for fiber-reinforced polymer composites. The homogenization theory approximates the microstructure of a fiber composite, and determine simultaneously effective macroscopic constitutive properties of the composite and the associated microscopic strain and stress in the heterogeneous material. The time-temperature dependent homogenization theory requires that the viscoelastic constituent properties of the matrix phase at elevated temperatures, the governing equations for the composites, and the boundary conditions of the problem be Laplace transformed to a conjugate problem. The homogenized effective properties in the transformed domain are determined, using a two-scale asymptotic expansion of field variables and an averaging procedure. Field solutions in the unit cell are determined from basic and first-order governing equations with the aid of a boundary integral method (BIM). Effective viscoelastic constitutive properties of the composite at elevated temperatures are determined by an inverse transformation, as are the microscopic stress and deformation in the composite. Using this method, interactions among fibers and between the fibers and the matrix can be evaluated explicitly, resulting in accurate solutions for composites with high-volume fraction of reinforcing fibers. Examples are given for the case of a carbon-fiber reinforced thermoplastic polyamide composite in an elevated temperature environment. The homogenization predictions are in good agreement with experimental data available for the composite.

  3. Transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, N.L.; Kirby, S.H.

    1978-01-01

    We review transient creep and semibrittle behavior of crystalline solids. The results are expected to be pertinent to crystalline rocks undergoing deformation in the depth range 5 to 20 km, corresponding to depths of focus of many major earthquakes. Transient creep data for crystalline rocks at elevated temperatures are analyzed but are poorly understood because of lack of information on the deformation processes which, at low to moderate pressure, are likely to be semibrittle in nature. Activation energies for transient creep at high effective confining pressure are much higher than those found for atmospheric pressure tests in which thermally-activated microfracturing probably dominates the creep rate. Empirical transient creep equations are extrapolated at 200?? to 600??C, stresses from 0.1 to 1.0 kbar, to times ranging from 3.17??102 to 3.17??108 years. At the higher temperatures, appreciable transient creep strains may take place but the physical significance of the results is in question because the flow mechanisms have not been determined. The purpose of this paper is to stimulate careful research on this important topic. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  4. High temperature plastic deformation of multilayered YTZP/ZTA composites obtained by tape casting

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Melendo, M.; Clauss, C.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.; De Portu, G.; Roncari, E.; Pinasco, P.

    1998-07-01

    Laminar composites containing layers of 3 mol% yttria-stabilized tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} (YTZP) and a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/3YTZP (60/40 vol.%) have been fabricated via a tape casting process that allowed formation of multilayers with strong and sharp interfaces. Compressive tests at constant strain rate and constant load were carried out on these materials in air at temperatures between 1,200 and 1,400 C with the stress axis both parallel and perpendicular to the layer interfaces. Microstructural observations of strained composites indicated that deformation is achieved primarily by grain boundary sliding. The stress exponent n and the activation energy for flow Q decrease from 2 to 1 and from 650 to 550 kJ/mol, respectively, with increasing stress. Such a trend has already been observed in the monolithic constituents, suggesting that the same rate controlling mechanisms may operate in the composites. The creep behavior of the softer phase (YTZP) is strongly influenced by the laminar microstructure, increasing the flow stress with respect to the bulk material.

  5. Improved High-Temperature Microstructural Stability and Creep Property of Novel Co-Base Single-Crystal Alloys Containing Ta and Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, F.; Zhou, H. J.; Feng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of Ta and Ti additions on microstructural stability and creep behavior in novel Co-Al-W base single-crystal alloys has been investigated. Compared to the ternary alloy, the ?' solvus temperature and ?' volume fraction were raised by individual additions of Ta and Ti, and increased further in the quinary alloy containing both alloying additions. In contrast to ternary and quaternary alloys, an improved microstructural stability with the stable ?- ?' two-phase microstructure and more than 60% ?' volume fraction existed in the quinary alloy after prolonged aging treatment at 1050C for 1000 h. The creep behavior at 900C revealed lower creep rates and longer rupture lives in the quaternary alloys compared to the ternary alloy, whereas the quinary alloy exhibited even better creep resistance. When the creep temperature was elevated to about 1000C, the creep resistance of the quinary alloy exceeded the previously reported Co-Al-W-base alloys and first-generation Ni-base single-crystal superalloys. The improved creep resistance at approximately 1000C was considered to be associated with high ?' volume fraction, ?' directional coarsening, and dislocation substructure, which included ?- ?' interfacial dislocation networks and the sheared ?' precipitates containing stacking faults and anti-phase boundaries.

  6. Finite Element Based Stress Analysis of Graphite Component in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Core Using Linear and Nonlinear Irradiation Creep Models

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurindranath

    2015-01-01

    Irradiation creep plays a major role in the structural integrity of the graphite components in high temperature gas cooled reactors. Finite element procedures combined with a suitable irradiation creep model can be used to simulate the time-integrated structural integrity of complex shapes, such as the reactor core graphite reflector and fuel bricks. In the present work a comparative study was undertaken to understand the effect of linear and nonlinear irradiation creep on results of finite element based stress analysis. Numerical results were generated through finite element simulations of a typical graphite reflector.

  7. Alternatives to a power-law creep model for rock salt at temperatures below 160/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Wawersik, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Five sets of steady state creep estimates for rock salt were analyzed to compare the results of power-law fits for dislocation climb with the fits by models for cross-slip, glide, and a combination of cross-slip and climb. It was determined that a cross-slip model yields the mechanistically most credible fit with activation energies and activation areas matching those published for NaCl single crystals. High power-law stress exponents also ruled out the possibility that pressure solution and recrystallization played a major role to the lowest recorded strain rates on the order of 10/sup -10/ s/sup -1/. The conclusion concerning cross-slip as the rate controlling step during creep of rock salt below 160/sup 0/C is consistent with many glide related microstructural features in samples deformed in the laboratory at or below 110/sup 0/C. It is emphasized, however, that the role of cross-slip does not imply the absence of other mechanisms including dislocation climb and subgrain formation but merely suggests that they are not dominant. 58 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. A deformation-mechanism material model for NIKE 3-D

    SciTech Connect

    Raboin, P.J.

    1993-01-04

    The structural, finite element code, NIKE2D has a, new material model called the Deformation-Mechanism Model (DMM). This model uses kinetic equations to predict deformation rates for specific deformation-mechanisms. These mechanisms depend on temperature, applied stress, a strength parameter and grain size. Five kinetic equations are available, and they model Obstacle Controlled Plasticity, Power Law Creep, Power Law Breakdown, Diffusion Controlled Deformation and Slip Creep. A strength parameter models isotropic strain hardening and dynamic recovery. Grain size changes are modeled with a dynamic grain growth equation which depends on temperature, current grain size and the deformation rate. These kinetic equations and their evolutionary parameters are capable of predicting rate-dependent deformation behavior for many metals. In addition, multiple deformation-mechanisms can be combined in this material model to predict the rate dependent behavior of a material across several regimes of deformation behavior.

  9. Microstructural Changes of a Creep-Damaged Nickel-Based K002 Superalloy Containing Hf Element under Different HIP Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Zhou, Yu; Dong, Jian; Wang, Tianyou; Zhao, Zihua; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Effects of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) temperature on the microstructural evolution of a nickel-based K002 superalloy containing Hf element after long-term service were investigated using three different soaking temperatures during HIP. The degraded γ' precipitates represented coarse and irregular morphology after long-term service. These γ' precipitates still were of coarse and irregular shape, but the size and volume fraction of γ' precipitates were markedly reduced under HIP condition of 1,190°C/200 MPa/4 h, indicating that the γ' precipitates were experiencing a dissolution process. Meanwhile, the concentrically oriented N-type γ' rafting structure around the cavities was formed. With HIP temperature increase to 1,220°C and 1,250°C, the small-sized, cubic and regular γ' precipitates were re-precipitated, and the concentrically oriented γ' structure vanished. The unstable morphology induced by the nucleation and growth of γ matrix was found near the creep cavities, indicating that the solute atoms diffused inward the creep-induced cavities during HIP. However, at HIP temperature of 1,220°C and 1,250°C, a large number of blocky MC(2)-type carbides containing amounts of Hf elements were precipitated, demonstrating that HIP treatment at higher temperatures can result in the formation of a large number of blocky MC(2)-type carbides.

  10. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Observations of orientation dependent creep of Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Knobloch, C.; Glock, K.; Glatzel, U.

    1999-07-01

    The influence of crystal orientation on the high temperature creep behavior of Ni{sub 3}(Al Ti Ta) was investigated by tensile creep testing under a constant load at a temperature of 1,123K. The single crystals were oriented close to [001], [011], [111], [557] and [012]. The results show an increasing stationary creep rate from [111] over [011] to [001]. The evolution of the microstructure during creep deformation was studied, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Only few systems are active in the primary regime, whereas several slip systems operate in the secondary stage. habit planes of dislocation pairs separated by an antiphase boundary were examined and compared with anisotropic elastic calculations, explaining the good creep response of [111] oriented using crystals.

  12. Evaluation of Magnesium Die-Casting Alloys for Elevated Temperature Applications: Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Creep Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Suming; Easton, Mark A.; Abbott, Trevor B.; Nie, Jian-Feng; Dargusch, Matthew S.; Hort, Norbert; Gibson, Mark A.

    2015-08-01

    Several families of magnesium die-casting alloys have been developed to operate at the elevated temperatures experienced in automotive powertrain applications. Most alloys are based on the Mg-Al system with alloying additions such as silicon, strontium, calcium, and rare earth elements (RE), although alloys with RE as the primary alloying constituent are also considered. This work presents an evaluation of the tensile properties and creep resistance of the most common magnesium die-casting alloys, in conjunction with the analysis of microstructure. The alloys investigated include AS31 (Mg-3Al-1Si), AJ52 (Mg-5Al-2Sr), MRI153A (Mg-9Al-1Ca-0.1Sr), MRI153M (Mg-8Al-1Ca-0.3Sr), MRI230D (Mg-6.5Al-2Ca-1Sn-0.3Sr), AXJ530 (Mg-5Al-3Ca-0.2Sr), AE42 (Mg-4Al-2RE), AE44 (Mg-4Al-4RE), and AM-HP2+ (Mg-3.5RE-0.4Zn). It is shown that, among the various alloys evaluated, MRI230D, AXJ530, and AM-HP2+ have higher yield strength than the Al alloy A380, but the ductility is relatively low at room temperature for these alloys. In contrast, AS31 and the AE series alloys have very good room temperature ductility, but their yield strength is lower than that of A380. In terms of creep resistance, MRI230D, AXJ530, AE44, and AM-HP2+ are all comparable to the Al alloy counterpart at 423 K and 448 K (150 C and 175 C). Microstructural factors that are most important to the strength and creep resistance of the Mg die-casting alloys are discussed.

  13. Effect of Deformation Temperatures on High Temperature Tensile Instability of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Hongxia; Zhu, Liang; Zhou, Hui; Tu, Peng

    2014-09-01

    The characteristics of instability have been investigated on two low nickel austenite stainless steel at the temperatures of 950-1200 C through the uniaxial tensile test and tensile unload test. The results show geometrical instability is not concurrent with load instability in high temperature tensile. The deformation of specimens are uniform before the load instability, then appear non-uniform in some local area of specimen but they do not directly lead to the geometric instability. With the increase of deformation temperature, load instability strain and strain hardening exponent n are both no obvious variation, and load instability true strain is close to n and depends on n. The geometric instability strain and strain rate sensitivity coefficient m both increase with the increase of temperature, and the strain between load instability and geometric instability depends on m and is the main part of the geometric instability strain.

  14. Review of deformation behavior of tungsten at temperature less than 0.2 absolute melting temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The deformation behavior of tungsten at temperatures 0.2 T sub m is reviewed, with primary emphasis on the temperature dependence of the yield stress and the ductile-brittle transition temperature. It appears that a model based on the high Peierls stress of tungsten best accounts for the observed mechanical behavior at low temperatures. Recent research is discussed which suggests an important role of electron concentration and bonding on the mechanical behavior of tungsten. It is concluded that future research on tungsten should include studies to define more clearly the correlation between electron concentration and mechanical behavior of tungsten alloys and other transition metal alloys.

  15. Relation between creep compliance and elastic modulus in organic-rich shales observed through laboratory experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Hiroki; Zoback, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We studied the ductile creep behavior of organic-rich shales from shale gas reservoirs in North America through laboratory triaxial experiments to better understand controls on the physical behavior of these rocks over time and the effect of creep on other rock properties. Laboratory experiments conducted at room-temperature conditions show that creep deformation observed at in-situ differential stress conditions is approximately linear with the applied differential pressure. The creep behavior is also anisotropic such that creep occurs more in the bedding-perpendicular direction than in the bedding-parallel direction. The reduction in sample volume during creep suggests that the creep is accommodated by a small amount of pore compaction occurring in the clay-aggregates and/or the relatively porous kerogen in the rock. Thus, the tendency to creep (creep compliance) is generally observed to increases with clay and kerogen volume. However, the strongest correlation is found between creep compliance and Young's modulus. A strong negative correlation between creep compliance and elastic Young's modulus exists regardless of the sample orientation and despite the wide range of sample mineralogy (5-50% clay, 5-60% quartz-feldspar-pyrite, 0-80% carbonates). This correlation is quite interesting as inelastic creep and elastic stiffness depend on somewhat different physical attributes. We attempt to quantitatively explain the correlation between creep behavior and elastic stiffness by appealing to a stress-partitioning that occurs between the soft components (clay and kerogen) and stiff components (quartz, feldspar, pyrite, carbonates) of the shale rock. First, the stress-partitioning occurring within the soft and stiff components is quantified based on the rock composition, elastic properties of the individual components, and the overall average Young's modulus of the rock. By combining the stress-partitioning behavior with knowledge that the creep behavior is linear against the applied stress, we forward calculate the creep compliance of the whole rock. Results show that when creep is linear against stress, a unique relation between creep compliance and elastic modulus can be established for rocks with similar mineral assemblages, consistent with our laboratory results. Thus, our results provide insights into how creep behaviors of poly-mineralic rocks can be re-constructed from the creep properties of the individual phases composing the rock.

  16. Impression Creep Behavior of a Cast AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirian, F.; Mahmudi, R.

    2009-01-01

    The creep behavior of the cast AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated by impression testing. The tests were carried out under constant punching stress in the range 100 to 650 MPa, corresponding to 0.007 ? ? imp/ G ? 0.044, at temperatures in the range 425 to 570 K. Assuming a power-law relationship between the impression velocity and stress, depending on the testing temperature, stress exponents of 4.2 to 6.0 were obtained. When the experimental creep rates were normalized to the grain size and effective diffusion coefficient, a stress exponent of approximately 5 was obtained, which is in complete agreement with stress exponents determined by the conventional creep testing of the same material reported in the literature. Calculation of the activation energy showed a slight decrease in the activation energy with increasing stress such that the creep-activation energy of 122.9 kJ/mol at ? imp/ G = 0.020 decreases to 94.0 kJ/mol at ? imp/ G = 0.040. Based on the obtained stress exponents and activation energy data, it is proposed that dislocation climb is the controlling creep mechanism. However, due to the decreasing trend of creep-activation energy with stress, it is suggested that two parallel mechanisms of lattice and pipe-diffusion-controlled dislocation climb are competing. To elucidate the contribution of each mechanism to the overall creep deformation, the creep rates were calculated based on the effective activation energy. This yielded a criterion that showed that, in the high-stress regimes, the experimental activation energies fall in the range in which the operative creep mechanism is dislocation climb controlled by dislocation pipe diffusion. In the low-stress regime, however, the lattice-diffusion dislocation climb is dominant.

  17. Helium effects on creep properties of Fe-14CrWTi ODS steel at 650 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Jung, P.; Rebac, T.; Duval, F.; Sauvage, T.; de Carlan, Y.; Barthe, M. F.

    2014-10-01

    In the present paper, the effects of helium on creep properties of Fe-14CrWTi ODS steel were studied by in-beam and post He-implantation creep tests. In-situ creep was performed in an in-beam creep device under uniaxial tensile stresses from 350 to 370 MPa during homogeneous helium implantation. Helium ions of energies varying from 0 to 25 MeV were implanted at a rate of 6 10-3 appm/s (corresponding to a displacement dose rate of 1.5 10-6 dpa/s). The average temperature was controlled to 650 C within 2 C. In addition, post He-implantation creep tests were conducted at 650 C as well. Subsequently, fracture surfaces and helium bubble evolution were studied in detail by SEM and TEM observations, respectively. Preliminary creep results show that helium slightly shortens the creep life time of ODS steel at 650 C. Fracture surfaces of reference as well as implanted specimens, show areas with various grades of deformation. Areas of highest deformation can be interpreted as necking, while areas of low deformation show in helium implanted specimens a more granular structure. The results are discussed in terms of possible embrittlement of ODS steels by helium.

  18. Creep in Topopah Spring Member welded tuff. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Noel, J.S.; Price, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    A laboratory investigation has been carried out to determine the effects of elevated temperature and stress on the creep deformation of welded tuffs recovered from Busted Butte in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Water saturated specimens of tuff from thermal/mechanical unit TSw2 were tested in creep at a confining pressure of 5.0 MPa, a pore pressure of 4.5 MPa, and temperatures of 25 and 250 C. At each stress level the load was held constant for a minimum of 2.5 {times} 10{sup 5} seconds and for as long as 1.8 {times} 10{sup 6} seconds. One specimen was tested at a single stress of 80 MPa and a temperature of 250 C. The sample failed after a short time. Subsequent experiments were initiated with an initial differential stress of 50 or 60 MPa; the stress was then increased in 10 MPa increments until failure. The data showed that creep deformation occurred in the form of time-dependent axial and radial strains, particularly beyond 90% of the unconfined, quasi-static fracture strength. There was little dilatancy associated with the deformation of the welded tuff at stresses below 90% of the fracture strength. Insufficient data have been collected in this preliminary study to determine the relationship between temperature, stress, creep deformation to failure, and total failure time at a fixed creep stress.

  19. Influence of impurities and deformation temperature on the saturation microstructure and ductility of HPT-deformed nickel

    PubMed Central

    Rathmayr, Georg B.; Pippan, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    Ni with different purities between 99.69 and 99.99 wt.% was deformed by high-pressure torsion (HPT) to high strains, where no further refinement of the microstructure is observed. The HPT deformation temperature varied between −196 and 400 °C. Both impurities and temperature significantly affect the lower limit of the grain size obtained by HPT. In the investigated samples, carbon was the most important impurity element in controlling the limit of grain refinement. The decrease in grain size due to an increase in the carbon content from 0.008 to 0.06 wt.% for HPT-deformed Ni samples at room temperature enhanced the ultimate tensile strength from 1000 to 1700 MPa. Surprisingly, the carbon content did not deteriorate the ductility, defined as the reduction in area, which is mainly limited by the total amount of impurities besides carbon. Furthermore, the deformation temperature dependency on ductility was not very pronounced and only visible for deformation temperatures above 200 °C. PMID:22163380

  20. Can Competition Between Frictional Sliding and Viscous Creep Determine Megathrust Fault Slip Style?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.

    2014-12-01

    In exhumed megathrust analogues, deformation is partitioned between continuous and discontinuous deformation structures, commonly reflecting partitioning between concurrent frictional and viscous shear. This partitioning is a function of material properties, strain rate, and fluid pressure distribution. Mineral strength and preferred deformation mechanism vary down-dip as a function of temperature and pressure; however, incoming sediment composition, roughness of the sea floor, and the relative proportions of competent and incompetent material, all affect bulk rheology, and may vary both with depth and along strike. Fluid pressure varies with depth, but also along strike if fluid sources and/or permeability vary along the margin. At the locations of major dehydration reactions, localized peaks in fluid pressure occur if permeability is low. These zones of low effective stress may allow for frictional sliding in rocks normally deforming by viscous shearing flow, and could relate to zones of tremor and slow slip. Frictional sliding and possible associated tensile fractures would, however, allow fluid escape, resulting in fluid pressure fluctuations and a time-dependent interplay between continuous and discontinuous deformation. Locally elevated effective stress increases frictional strength, promoting failure by viscous mechanisms. If this is true, and representative of large-scale megathrust behavior, then decreased fluid pressure may promote creep. In a fluid-saturated, tabular fault zone with small grain size, this creep can take place by pressure solution creep at subgreenschist conditions. If pressure solution is the active mineral deformation mechanism, and shear is distributed though a tabular zone, viscous shearing flow at plate boundary rates is possible at temperatures significantly less than required for the onset of dislocation creep in quartzofeldspathic rocks. In a wide shear zone, such viscous flow may occur at low differential stress. A hypothesis to consider, consistent with field observations of coexisting frictional sliding and pressure solution creep, is then that locked megathrust segments have relatively low effective stress and prefer frictional over viscous deformation, whereas creeping segments have higher effective stress and dominantly deform viscously.

  1. Autonomous Repair Mechanism of Creep Damage in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Kwakernaak, C.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sloof, W. G.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brck, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    The autonomous repair mechanism of creep cavitation during high-temperature deformation has been investigated in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N alloys. Combined electron-microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography reveal how the improved creep properties result from Au precipitation within the creep cavities, preferentially formed on grain boundaries oriented perpendicular to the applied stress. The selective precipitation of Au atoms at the free creep cavity surface results in pore filling, and thereby, autonomous repair of the creep damage. The large difference in atomic size between the Au and Fe strongly hampers the nucleation of precipitates in the matrix. As a result, the matrix acts as a reservoir for the supersaturated solute until damage occurs. Grain boundaries and dislocations are found to act as fast transport routes for solute gold from the matrix to the creep cavities. The mechanism responsible for the self-healing can be characterized by a simple model for cavity growth and cavity filling.

  2. Effect of particle size and temperature on rheology and creep behavior of barley ?-d-glucan concentrate dough.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Jasim

    2014-10-13

    Concentrated ?-D-glucan has been added in the formulation of food products development that attributing human health. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of particle size (74, 105, 149, 297 and 595 ?m) of barley ?-D-glucan concentrate (BGC) on two fundamental rheological properties namely oscillatory rheology and creep in a dough system (sample to water = 1:2). The water holding capacity, sediment volume fraction and protein content increased with an increase in particle size from 74 ?m to 595 ?m, which directly influences the mechanical strength and visco-elasticity of the dough. The dough exhibited predominating solid-like behavior (elastic modulus, G'>viscous modulus, G"). The G' decreased systematically with increasing temperature from 25 to 85 C at the frequency range of 0.1-10 Hz except for the dough having particle size of 105 ?m, which could be associated with increase in protein content in the fraction. A discrete retardation spectrum is employed to the creep data to obtain retardation time and compliance parameters which varied significantly with particle size and the process temperature. All those information could be helpful to identify the particle size range of BGC that could be useful to produce a ?-D-glucan enriched designed food. PMID:25037333

  3. Effects of NaCl, pH, and Potential on the Static Creep Behavior of AA1100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Quanhe; Quesnel, David J.

    2013-03-01

    The creep rates of AA1100 are measured during exposure to a variety of aggressive environments. NaCl solutions of various concentrations have no influence on the steady-state creep behavior, producing creep rates comparable to those measured in lab air at room temperature. However, after an initial incubation period of steady strain rate, a dramatic increase of strain rate is observed on exposure to HCl solutions and NaOH solutions, as well as during cathodic polarization of specimens in NaCl solutions. Creep strain produces a continuous deformation and elongation of the sample surface that is comparable to slow strain rates at crack tips thought to control the kinetics of crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC). In this experiment, we separate the strain and surface deformation from the complex geometry of the crack tip to better understand the processes at work. Based on this concept, two possible explanations for the environmental influences on creep strain rates are discussed relating to the anodic dissolution of the free surface and hydrogen influences on deformation mechanisms. Consistencies of pH dependence between corrosion creep and SCC at low pH prove a creep-involved SCC mechanism, while the discrepancies between corrosion creep behavior and previous SCC results at high pH indicate a rate-limit step change in the crack propagation of the SCC process.

  4. Influence of thermally activated processes on the deformation behavior during low temperature ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, S.; Scholze, M.; F-X Wagner, M.

    2016-03-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are generally hard to deform. Therefore, the application of conventional severe plastic deformation methods to generate ultrafine-grained microstructures and to further increase strength is considerably limited. In this study, we consider low temperature deformation in a custom-built, cooled equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) tool (internal angle 90°) as an alternative approach to severely plastically deform a 7075 aluminum alloy. To document the maximum improvement of mechanical properties, these alloys are initially deformed from a solid solution heat-treated condition. We characterize the mechanical behavior and the microstructure of the coarse grained initial material at different low temperatures, and we analyze how a tendency for the PLC effect and the strain-hardening rate affect the formability during subsequent severe plastic deformation at low temperatures. We then discuss how the deformation temperature and velocity influence the occurrence of PLC effects and the homogeneity of the deformed ECAP billets. Besides the mechanical properties and these microstructural changes, we discuss technologically relevant processing parameters (such as pressing forces) and practical limitations, as well as changes in fracture behavior of the low temperature deformed materials as a function of deformation temperature.

  5. Influence of high pressure hydrogen environment on creep deformation of Mo-Re, Haynes 188, and NARloy-Z alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. M. L.; Yang, Charles C.; Ouyang, Shewang; Jerina, K. L.; Schwartz, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of three types of alloys at elevated temperatures. The reasons for the consideration of hydrogen effects are the potential use of hydrogen as a coolant in gas-cooled reactors and fuel in advanced hypersonic vehicles. The materials used in hydrogen atmosphere must not be embrittled by hydrogen at ambient temperature and should have good strength in hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperature. The paucity of information concerning the mechanical performance in hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperature has been a limiting factor in the selection and design of structural components for operation in hydrogen environment.

  6. The evolution of the grain boundary ensemble of polycrystalline nickel under creep at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenkin, E. V.; Ivanov, K. V.

    2013-03-01

    The evolution of the grain boundary ensemble of polycrystalline nickel under creep at 823 K (~0.5 ?m) has been investigated by the electron backscattered diffraction technique. At low strains, delamination of twin grain boundaries ?3 is found to take place, giving rise to coincidence site lattice grain boundaries ?9 and ?27. Low-angle misorientations in the material are shown to increase considerably with increase in the degree of strain, which causes a decrease in the fraction of the coincidence site lattice grain boundaries due to interaction with lattice dislocations.

  7. Irradiation Creep of Chemically Vapor Deposited Silicon Carbide as Estimated by Bend Stress Relaxation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Kondo, Sosuke; Kohyama, Akira

    2007-01-01

    The bend stress relaxation technique was applied for an irradiation creep study of high purity, chemically vapor-deposited beta-phase silicon carbide (CVD SiC) ceramic. A constant bend strain was applied to thin strip samples during neutron irradiation to fluences 0.2-4.2 dpa at various temperatures in the range {approx}400 to {approx}1080 C. Irradiation creep strain at <0.7 dpa exhibited only a weak dependence on irradiation temperature. However, the creep strain dependence on fluence was non-linear due to the early domination of the initial transient creep, and a transition in creep behavior was found between 950 and 1080 C. Steady-state irradiation creep compliances of polycrystalline CVD SiC at doses >0.7 dpa were estimated to be 2.7({+-}2.6) x 10{sup -7} and 1.5({+-}0.8) x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} at {approx}600 to {approx}950 C and {approx}1080 C, respectively, whereas linear-averaged creep compliances of 1-2 x 10{sup -6} (MPa dpa){sup -1} were obtained for doses of 0.6-0.7 dpa at all temperatures. Monocrystalline 3C SiC samples exhibited significantly smaller transient creep strain and greater subsequent deformation when loaded along <0 1 1> direction.

  8. A model of compaction creep in carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    2015-04-01

    Rocks in compressional stress conditions are subject to long-term creep deformations. We created a simple conceptual micomechanical model of creep in rocks combining microscopic fracturing and pressure solution. This was then scaled up to macroscopic scale by a statistical mechanical approach to predict strain rate at core scale. The model uses no fitting parameter and have a few input parameters: effective stress, porosity, pore size distribution, temperature and water saturation. Internal parameters are Young's modulus, interfacial energy of wet calcite and dissolution rates of calcite, all of which are measurable independently. Existing long-term creep experiments were used to verify the model which was able to predict the magnitude of the resulting strain in largely different effective stress, temperature and water saturation conditions. The model was also able to predict the compaction of a producing chalk reservoir with a good agreement. Further generalization of the model might function as a general theory of long-term creep of rocks in compressional settings.

  9. Creep property and microstructure evolution of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy in [011] orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, G.M. Yu, J.J.; Hu, Z.Q.; Sun, X.F.

    2013-12-15

    The creep property and microstructure evolution of a single crystal superalloy with [011] orientation were investigated at the temperatures of 700 °C, 900 °C and 1040 °C. It is shown that there exist stages of primary, steady-state, and tertiary creep under the lower temperature 700 °C. As the temperature increases to high temperatures of 900 °C and 1040 °C, steady-state creep stage is reduced or disappears and the shape of creep curves is dominated by an extensive tertiary stage. The minimum creep strain rate exhibits power law dependence on the applied stress; the stress exponents at 700 °C, 900 °C and 1040 °C are 28, 13 and 6.5, respectively. Microstructure observation shows that the morphologies of γ′ phase almost keep original shape at the lower temperature 700 °C and high applied stress. With the increasing creep temperature, γ′ precipitates tend to link together and form lamellar structure at an angle of 45° inclined to the applied stress. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations reveal that multiple < 110 > (111) slip systems gliding in the matrix channels and shearing γ′ precipitates by stacking faults or bending dislocation pairs are the main deformation mechanism at the lower temperature of 700 °C. At the high temperatures of 900 °C and 1040 °C, dislocation networks are formed at γ/γ′ interfaces and the γ′ rafts are sheared by dislocation pairs. - Highlights: • Creep properties of < 011 >-oriented single crystal superalloys were investigated. • γ′ phases become rafting at an angle of 45° inclined to the applied stress. • Creep deformation mechanisms depend on temperature and stress.

  10. Deformation characteristics and time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 at intermediate temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Udimet 700 sheet, bar, and investment castings was observed between 1000 and 1400 F (538-760 C) but not at 1600 F (871 C). As was the case for Modified Waspaloy, Waspaloy, Rene 41, Inconel 718, and TD-NiCr, it occurred when notched specimens were loaded below the yield strength and when creep deformation was localized. For each gamma-prime strengthened alloy and notched specimen geometry, a stress-average particle size zone can be defined to characterize the notch-sensitive behavior.

  11. Mechanisms of time-dependent deformation in porous limestone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantut, Nicolas; Heap, Michael J.; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2014-07-01

    We performed triaxial deformation experiments on a water-saturated porous limestone under constant strain rate and constant stress (creep) conditions. The tests were conducted at room temperature and at low effective pressures Peff=10 and Peff=20 MPa, in a regime where the rock is nominally brittle when tested at a constant strain rate of 10-5 s-1. Under these conditions and at constant stress, the phenomenon of brittle creep occurs. At Peff=10 MPa, brittle creep follows similar trends as those observed in other rock types (e.g., sandstones and granites): only small strains are accumulated before failure, and damage accumulation with increasing strain (as monitored by P wave speeds measurements during the tests) is not strongly dependent on the applied stresses. At Peff=20 MPa, brittle creep is also macroscopically observed, but when the creep strain rate is lower than ?10-7 s-1, we observe that (1) much larger strains are accumulated, (2) less damage is accumulated with increasing strain, and (3) the deformation tends to be more compactant. These observations can be understood by considering that another deformation mechanism, different from crack growth, is active at low strain rates. We explore this possibility by constructing a deformation mechanism map that includes both subcritical crack growth and pressure solution creep processes; the increasing contribution of pressure solution creep at low strain rates is consistent with our observations.

  12. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture, and at 316 C as mixed matrix superplastic rupture and matrix-dipersoid debonding.

  13. Thermal deformation of concentrators in an axisymmetric temperature field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bairamov, R.; Machuev, Y. I.; Nazarov, A.; Sokolov, Y. V.; Solodovnikova, L. A.; Fokin, V. G.

    1985-01-01

    Axisymmetric thermal deformations of paraboloid mirrors, due to heating, are examined for a mirror with a optical axis oriented toward the Sun. A governing differential equation is derived using Mushtari-Donnel-Vlasov simplifications, and a solution is presented which makes it possible to determine the principal deformation characteristics.

  14. Deformation of Lawsonite at High Pressure and High Temperature - Implications for Low Velocity Layers in Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiguet, E.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Gillet, P.

    2014-12-01

    During subduction, the hydrated oceanic crust undergoes a series of metamorphic reactions and transform gradually to blueschists and eclogite at depths of 20-50 km. Detailed seismic observations of subduction zones suggest a complex layered structure with the presence of a Low Velocity Layer (LVL) related to the oceanic crust [1] persisting to considerable depths (100- 250 km).While the transformation from blueschist to eclogite [2] and the presence of glaucophane up to 90-100 km [3] could explain some of these observations, the presence of LVL at greater depths could be related to the presence of the hydrous mineral lawsonite (CaAl2(Si2O7)(OH)2 H2O). Its stability field extends to 8.5 GPa and 1100K corresponding to depths up to 250 km in cold hydrous part of subducting slabs [4]. Because these regions undergo large and heterogeneous deformation, lawsonite plasticity and crystal preferred orientation (CPOs) may strongly influence the dynamic of subduction zones and the seismic properties. We present a deformation study at high presssure and high temperature on lawsonite. Six samples were deformed at 4-10 GPa and 600K to 1000K using a D-DIA apparatus [5] at 13-BMD at GSECARS beamline, APS, in axial compression up to 30% deformation with strain rates of 3.10-4s-1 to 6.10-6s-1. We measured in-situ lattice strains (a proxy for macroscopic stress), texture and strain using synchrotron radiations and calculated the macroscopic stress using lawsonite elastic properties [6]. Results from lattice strain analysis show a dependence of flow stress with temperature and strain rate. Texture analysis coupled with transmission electron microscopy showed that dislocation creep is the dominant deformation mechanism under our deformation conditions. [1] Abers, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 176, 323-330, 2000 [2] Helffrich et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 94, 753-763, 1989 [3] Bezacier et al., Tectonophysics, 494, 201-210, 2010 [4] Schmidt & Poli, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 163, 361-379,1998 [5] Wang et al, Review for Scientific Instruments, 74(6), 3002-3011, 2003 [6] Chantel et al., Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 349-350, 116-125, 2012

  15. Analysis of creep behavior in thermoplastics based on visco-elastic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takenobu; Somiya, Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    Plastics and fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) are used in the aerospace industry because of their mechanical properties. However, despite their excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, plastics and FRP eventually deform visco-elastically at high temperatures. Most of the research has focused on the creep behavior of FRPs, but few studies have investigated the linear visco-elastic behavior. Linear visco-elastic behavior and non-linear visco-elastic behavior occur with physical aging in these plastics. In this study, the non-linear visco-elastic behavior of plastics and FRP was investigated based on the bending creep deformation of polycarbonate (PC) and polyoxymethylene (POM). Moreover, the effects of the fiber volume fraction on the creep characteristics were investigated using glass fiber-reinforced polycarbonate (GFRPC). The creep deformation was calculated using the linear visco-elastic theory based on these effects, and comparison between experimental and estimated data showed that the creep analysis sufficiently predicted the creep behavior.

  16. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of type 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Ioka, Ikuo; Jitsukawa, Shiro

    1996-12-31

    A single heat of solution annealed 316 ss was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400 C. Tensile properties were studied vs dose and temperature. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking (STN), and strain hardening capacity were seen. Magnitude of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength and decrease STN to <0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in STN occur after irradiation at 330 C but failure mode remains ductile.

  17. The constant-hardness creep compliance of polycrystalline ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caswell, Tess E.; Cooper, Reid F.; Goldsby, David L.

    2015-08-01

    We have performed creep and stress-reduction experiments on polycrystalline ice (grain sizes, d ? 30 and ? 245 m) in the grain boundary sliding and dislocation creep regimes (stresses ? = 0.5-5 MPa, temperature T = 233 K) to determine the constant-hardness creep compliance under these conditions. Our results are consistent with a microstructural state-variable description of dislocation-effected deformation whose rate is accelerated by grain boundary sliding. The fine-grained specimens reveal no subgrain boundaries, indicating that the stress-sensitive microstructural feature upon which the state-variable behavior is founded may be the dislocation structure of the grain boundaries. Deviations of our constant-hardness data from the behavior predicted by the state-variable formulation allow estimation of the viscosity of the grain boundaries, which is ~4.8 106 Pa s at this temperature.

  18. High-temperature deformation of diopside crystal: 3. Influences of pO2 and SiO2 precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoul, Olivier; Raterron, Paul

    1994-05-01

    Single crystals of gem quality diopside (with Fe/(Ca+Mg+Fe) ? 0.02) were deformed in a dead load apparatus under controlled oxygen partial pressure (pO2), in the range 810-14-210-9 MPa, at two temperatures T1 = 1100C and T2 = 1200C. The aim of these experiments was to investigate the sensitivity of diopside creep rate to pO2 at these two temperatures. T1 and T2 are on both sides of a critical temperature Tc ? 1130-1140C at which the activation energy E* of the creep rate decreases (from 442 to 48 kJ/mol) with rising temperature (Raterron and Jaoul, 1991) when siliceous microdroplets (?0.1 ?m in size) form (Ingrin et al., 1991). Specimens were deformed with axial compressive stress ? (110-143 MPa) along [010]; with this setting, the {110}1/2 slip systems are symetrically activated, and strain rates ?? are in the range 210-8-210-7 s-1. At T1 and under low pO2, we find ???pO2-0.2000.033 for samples that lack SiO2-rich precipitates in the host. At T2 and at the highest pO2 explored, ?? becomes insensitive to pO2 for samples that contain SiO2-rich precipitates in the matrix. Electrical conductivity ?e shows similar sensitivities to pO2 (Huebner and Voigt, 1988). We propose a point defect model based on the chemistry of nonstoichiometric compounds with cationic vacancies and ferric iron Fe3+ as majority point defects. The model predicts the critical values of Tc and pO2c beyond which the increasing abundance of the majority point defects promotes SiO2 precipitation. Tc and pO2c values are interdependent; they are also functions of Fe content in diopside and of its initial nonstoichiometry. This model offers an explanation of the pO2 dependencies of point defects concentrations as well. A comparison with experimental ?? and ?e sensitivities to pO2 suggests that interstitial divalent cations, which are minority defects, control electrical transport and diffusion-assisted dislocation glide. The model also shows that the occurrence of SiO2 precipitation does not necessarily imply a supersilicic starting material.

  19. Present-day deformation along the El Pilar Fault in eastern Venezuela: Evidence of creep along a major transform boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouanne, Franois; Audemard, Franck A.; Beck, Christian; Van Welden, Aurlien; Ollarves, Reinaldo; Reinoza, Carlos

    2011-05-01

    The right-lateral strike-slip El Pilar Fault is one of the major structures that accommodate the relative displacement between the Caribbean and South-America Plates. This fault, which trends East-West along the northeastern Venezuela margin, is a seismogenic source, and shows numerous evidence for active tectonics, including deformation of the Quaternary sediments filling the Cariaco Gulf. Because the main El Pilar Fault strand belongs to a set of strike-slip faults and thrusts between the stable Guyana shield (South) and the Caribbean oceanic floor (North), a GPS network was designed and installed to measure the relative motion of the El Pilar Fault and other faults. The results obtained from the comparison of 2003 and 2005 surveys indicate: (i) a lack of significant displacement (especially shortening) in the Serrania del Interior (Neogene cordillera overthrusted above the Guyana craton), (ii) an eastward displacement (relative to fixed south America plate) up to 22 mm/year of benchmarks located north of the El Pilar Fault. Velocities simulations using dislocations in an elastic half-space show: (1) the concentration along the El Pilar Fault of the whole Caribbean-South America relative displacement, (2) the existence of an important component of aseismic displacement along the upper part of the El Pilar Fault. Between 12 km depth and the surface, only 40% of displacement is locked for the western segment and 50% for the eastern segment. This last phenomenon may be related to the existence of serpentinite lenses along the fault zone as observed for segments of San Andreas and North Anatolian faults.

  20. Extended-time-scale creep measurement on Maraging cantilever blade springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virdone, Nicole; Agresti, Juri; Bertolini, Alessandro; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Stellacci, Rosalia; Kamp, Justin; Mantovani, Maddalena; Sannibale, Virginio; Tarallo, Marco; Kaltenegger, Lisa

    2008-08-01

    Two controlled temperature facilities were built to induce an accelerated creep rate in a Maraging steel GAS spring and to measure the material's creep over an artificially extended period of time. The data acquisition of the first experiment lasted for almost a year, but then the blades were allowed to creep for six more years before measuring the permanent deformation integrated over time. The data from this first experiment was polluted by a defect in the data acquisition software, but yielded overall creep limits and an evaluation of the Arrhenius acceleration of creep speed with temperature (1.28±0.13 °C -1). The duration of the second experiment was only 1 year but more free of systematic errors. The effective test period of this second experiment (normalized with the Arrhenius acceleration measured in the first experiment) extends in billions of years showing no sign of anomalous creep. The result of both experiments also produced a simple procedure capable of eliminating all practical effects of creep from the Advanced LIGO seismic isolation and suspensions. Measurements of creep under various stress levels, and of the thermal variations of Young's modulus (2.023 (±0.013)×10 -4 °C -1) are reported as well.

  1. Elevated Temperature Creep Properties of Conventional 50Au-50Cu and 47Au 50Cu-3Ni Braze Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS JR.,JOHN J.; SCHMALE,DAVID T.

    2000-12-18

    The elevated temperature creep properties of the 50Au-50Cu wt% and 47Au-50Cu-3Ni braze alloys have been evaluated over the temperature range 250-850 C. At elevated temperatures, i.e., 450-850 C, both alloys were tested in the annealed condition (2 hrs. 750 C/water quenched). The minimum strain rate properties over this temperature range are well fit by the Garofalo sinh equation. At lower temperatures (250 and 350 C), power law equations were found to characterize the data for both alloys. For samples held long periods of time at 375 C (96 hrs.) and slowly cooled to room temperature, an ordering reaction was observed. For the case of the 50Au-50Cu braze alloy, the stress necessary to reach the same, strain rate increased by about 15% above the baseline data. The limited data for ordered 47Au-50Cu-3Ni alloy reflected a,smaller strength increase. However, the sluggishness of this ordering reaction in both alloys does not appear to pose a problem for braze joints cooled at reasonable rates following brazing.

  2. Brief summary of the evolution of high-temperature creep-fatigue life prediction models for crack initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of high-temperature, creep-fatigue, life-prediction methods used for cyclic crack initiation is traced from inception in the late 1940's. The methods reviewed are material models as opposed to structural life prediction models. Material life models are used by both structural durability analysts and by material scientists. The latter use micromechanistic models as guidance to improve a material's crack initiation resistance. Nearly one hundred approaches and their variations have been proposed to date. This proliferation poses a problem in deciding which method is most appropriate for a given application. Approaches were identified as being combinations of thirteen different classifications. This review is intended to aid both developers and users of high-temperature fatigue life prediction methods by providing a background from which choices can be made. The need for high-temperature, fatigue-life prediction methods followed immediately on the heels of the development of large, costly, high-technology industrial and aerospace equipment immediately following the second world war. Major advances were made in the design and manufacture of high-temperature, high-pressure boilers and steam turbines, nuclear reactors, high-temperature forming dies, high-performance poppet valves, aeronautical gas turbine engines, reusable rocket engines, etc. These advances could no longer be accomplished simply by trial and error using the 'build-em and bust-em' approach. Development lead times were too great and costs too prohibitive to retain such an approach. Analytic assessments of anticipated performance, cost, and durability were introduced to cut costs and shorten lead times. The analytic tools were quite primitive at first and out of necessity evolved in parallel with hardware development. After forty years more descriptive, more accurate, and more efficient analytic tools are being developed. These include thermal-structural finite element and boundary element analyses, advanced constitutive stress-strain-temperature-time relations, and creep-fatigue-environmental models for crack initiation and propagation. The high-temperature durability methods that have evolved for calculating high-temperature fatigue crack initiation lives of structural engineering materials are addressed. Only a few of the methods were refined to the point of being directly useable in design. Recently, two of the methods were transcribed into computer software for use with personal computers.

  3. Brief summary of the evolution of high-temperature creep-fatigue life prediction models for crack initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1993-10-01

    The evolution of high-temperature, creep-fatigue, life-prediction methods used for cyclic crack initiation is traced from inception in the late 1940's. The methods reviewed are material models as opposed to structural life prediction models. Material life models are used by both structural durability analysts and by material scientists. The latter use micromechanistic models as guidance to improve a material's crack initiation resistance. Nearly one hundred approaches and their variations have been proposed to date. This proliferation poses a problem in deciding which method is most appropriate for a given application. Approaches were identified as being combinations of thirteen different classifications. This review is intended to aid both developers and users of high-temperature fatigue life prediction methods by providing a background from which choices can be made. The need for high-temperature, fatigue-life prediction methods followed immediately on the heels of the development of large, costly, high-technology industrial and aerospace equipment immediately following the second world war. Major advances were made in the design and manufacture of high-temperature, high-pressure boilers and steam turbines, nuclear reactors, high-temperature forming dies, high-performance poppet valves, aeronautical gas turbine engines, reusable rocket engines, etc. These advances could no longer be accomplished simply by trial and error using the 'build-em and bust-em' approach. Development lead times were too great and costs too prohibitive to retain such an approach. Analytic assessments of anticipated performance, cost, and durability were introduced to cut costs and shorten lead times. The analytic tools were quite primitive at first and out of necessity evolved in parallel with hardware development. After forty years more descriptive, more accurate, and more efficient analytic tools are being developed. These include thermal-structural finite element and boundary element analyses, advanced constitutive stress-strain-temperature-time relations, and creep-fatigue-environmental models for crack initiation and propagation. The high-temperature durability methods that have evolved for calculating high-temperature fatigue crack initiation lives of structural engineering materials are addressed. Only a few of the methods were refined to the point of being directly useable in design.

  4. Effect of high temperature creep and oxidation on residual room temperature properties for several thin sheet superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Superalloys are being considered for the primary heat shields and supports in the thermal protection system of both hypersonic transport and space shuttle vehicles. Since conservative design philosophy dictates designs based on residual material properties at the end of the service life, material characterization after exposure to the environmental conditions imposed by the flight requirements of these two classes of vehicles is needed on the candidate alloys. An investigation was conducted to provide some of the necessary data, with emphasis placed on oxidation, creep, and residual properties of thin-gage sheet material.

  5. Segregation At Stacking Faults Within The ?' Phase Of Two Ni-base Superalloys Following Intermediate Temperature Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, G. B.; Shi, R.; Genc, Arda; Vorontsov, V. A.; Kovarik, Libor; Rae, C.M. F.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art energy dispersive spectroscopy, it has been established for the first time that there exists significant compositional variation (enrichment of Co and Cr and deficiency of Ni and Al) associated with superlattice intrinsic stacking faults created in the ordered ?' precipitates following intermediate temperature deformation of two commercial superalloys. The results indicate that long range diffusion of these elements is intimately involved in the precipitate shearing process and is therefore closely linked to the time-dependent deformation of the alloys.

  6. Low-temperature direct copper-to-copper bonding enabled by creep on (111) surfaces of nanotwinned Cu.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Min; Lin, Han-Wen; Huang, Yi-Sa; Chu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chih; Lyu, Dian-Rong; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Tu, King-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Direct Cu-to-Cu bonding was achieved at temperatures of 150-250?C using a compressive stress of 100?psi (0.69?MPa) held for 10-60?min at 10(-3)?torr. The key controlling parameter for direct bonding is rapid surface diffusion on (111) surface of Cu. Instead of using (111) oriented single crystal of Cu, oriented (111) texture of extremely high degree, exceeding 90%, was fabricated using the oriented nano-twin Cu. The bonded interface between two (111) surfaces forms a twist-type grain boundary. If the grain boundary has a low angle, it has a hexagonal network of screw dislocations. Such network image was obtained by plan-view transmission electron microscopy. A simple kinetic model of surface creep is presented; and the calculated and measured time of bonding is in reasonable agreement. PMID:25962757

  7. Low-temperature direct copper-to-copper bonding enabled by creep on (111) surfaces of nanotwinned Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Min; Lin, Han-Wen; Huang, Yi-Sa; Chu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chih; Lyu, Dian-Rong; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Tu, King-Ning

    2015-05-01

    Direct Cu-to-Cu bonding was achieved at temperatures of 150-250?C using a compressive stress of 100?psi (0.69?MPa) held for 10-60?min at 10-3?torr. The key controlling parameter for direct bonding is rapid surface diffusion on (111) surface of Cu. Instead of using (111) oriented single crystal of Cu, oriented (111) texture of extremely high degree, exceeding 90%, was fabricated using the oriented nano-twin Cu. The bonded interface between two (111) surfaces forms a twist-type grain boundary. If the grain boundary has a low angle, it has a hexagonal network of screw dislocations. Such network image was obtained by plan-view transmission electron microscopy. A simple kinetic model of surface creep is presented; and the calculated and measured time of bonding is in reasonable agreement.

  8. Low-temperature direct copper-to-copper bonding enabled by creep on (111) surfaces of nanotwinned Cu

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chien-Min; Lin, Han-Wen; Huang, Yi-Sa; Chu, Yi-Cheng; Chen, Chih; Lyu, Dian-Rong; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Tu, King-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Direct Cu-to-Cu bonding was achieved at temperatures of 150–250 °C using a compressive stress of 100 psi (0.69 MPa) held for 10–60 min at 10−3 torr. The key controlling parameter for direct bonding is rapid surface diffusion on (111) surface of Cu. Instead of using (111) oriented single crystal of Cu, oriented (111) texture of extremely high degree, exceeding 90%, was fabricated using the oriented nano-twin Cu. The bonded interface between two (111) surfaces forms a twist-type grain boundary. If the grain boundary has a low angle, it has a hexagonal network of screw dislocations. Such network image was obtained by plan-view transmission electron microscopy. A simple kinetic model of surface creep is presented; and the calculated and measured time of bonding is in reasonable agreement. PMID:25962757

  9. Brittle creep and subcritical crack propagation in glass submitted to triaxial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Céline; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Bouyer, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    An experimental work is presented that aimed at improving our understanding of the mechanical evolution of cracks under brittle creep conditions. Brittle creep may be an important slow deformation process in the Earth's crust. Synthetic glass samples have been used to observe and document brittle creep due to slow crack-propagation. A crack density of 0.05 was introduced in intact synthetic glass samples by thermal shock. Creep tests were performed at constant confining pressure (15 MPa) for water saturated conditions. Data were obtained by maintaining the differential-stress constant in steps of 24 h duration. A set of sensors allowed us to record strains and acoustic emissions during creep. The effect of temperature on creep was investigated from ambient temperature to 70°C. The activation energy for crack growth was found to be 32 kJ/mol. In secondary creep, a large dilatancy was observed that did not occur in constant strain rate tests. This is correlated to acoustic emission activity associated with crack growth. As a consequence, slow crack growth has been evidenced in glass. Beyond secondary creep, failure in tertiary creep was found to be a progressive process. The data are interpreted through a previously developed micromechanical damage model that describes crack propagation. This model allows one to predict the secondary brittle creep phase and also to give an analytical expression for the time to rupture. Comparison between glass and crystalline rock indicates that the brittle creep behavior is probably controlled by the same process even if stress sensitivity for glass is lower than for rocks.

  10. Back stress in dislocation creep. Part 1: Basic concepts and measuring techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadek, J.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is proposed whereby the plastic deformation of metal materials is determined by the difference between the applied stress and the back stress which characterizes the resistance of the material to plastic deformation. The back stress is usually equivalent to the internal stress or the friction stress and depends on the magnitude of the applied stress and temperature. The concept of back stress is applied to the case of the dislocation creep of precipitation-hardened or dispersion-strengthened metal materials. An additivity rule is formulated which can be useful in interpreting the creep behavior of such materials.

  11. Characterization of a 14Cr ODS steel by means of small punch and uniaxial testing with regard to creep and fatigue at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchhausen, M.; Turba, K.; de Haan, F.; Hhner, P.; Austin, T.; de Carlan, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A 14Cr ODS steel was characterized at elevated temperatures with regard to its behavior in small punch and uniaxial creep tests and in low cycle fatigue tests. A comparison of small punch and uniaxial creep tests at 650 C revealed a strong anisotropy of the material when strained parallel and perpendicular to the extrusion direction with rupture times being several orders of magnitude lower for the perpendicular direction. The stress-rupture and Larson-Miller plots show a very large scatter of the creep data. This scatter is strongly reduced when rupture time is plotted against minimum deflection rate or minimum creep rate (Monkman-Grant plot). Fatigue tests have been carried out at 650 C and 750 C. The alloy is cyclically very stable with practically no hardening/softening. Results from the tests at both temperatures can be described by a common power law. An increase in the test temperature has little influence on the fatigue ductility exponent. For a given total strain level, the fatigue life of the alloy is reduced with increasing temperature.

  12. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H.P.

    2015-01-01

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a?100? carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a?110? dislocations by dislocation reactions; the a?110? dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a?110? dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged. PMID:25663749

  13. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocation reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.

  14. Creep Strength of Nb-1Zr for SP-100 Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horak, James A.; Egner, Larry K.

    1994-07-01

    Power systems that are used to provide electrical power in space are designed to optimize conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and to minimize the mass and volume that must be launched. Only refractory metals and their alloys have sufficient long-term strength for several years of uninterrupted operation at the required temperatures of 1200 K and above. The high power densities and temperatures at which these reactors must operate require the use of liquid-metal coolants. The alloy Nb-1 wt % Zr (Nb-lZr), which exhibits excellent corrosion resistance to alkali liquid-metals at high temperatures, is being considered for the fuel cladding, reactor structural, and heat-transport systems for the SP-100 reactor system. Useful lifetime of this system is limited by creep deformation in the reactor core. Nb-lZr sheet procured to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications for reactor grade and commercial grade has been processed by several different cold work and annealing treatments to attempt to produce the grain structure (size, shape, and distribution of sizes) that provides the maximum creep strength of this alloy at temperatures from 1250 to 1450 K. The effects of grain size, differences in oxygen concentrations, tungsten concentrations, and electron beam and gas tungsten arc weldments on creep strength were studied. Grain size has a large effect on creep strength at 1450 K but only material with a very large grain size (150 ?m) exhibits significantly higher creep strength at 1350 K. Differences in oxygen or tungsten concentrations did not affect creep strength, and the creep strengths of weldments were equal to, or greater than, those for base metal.

  15. High-temperature deformation of uniaxially aligned lamellar TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Heinrich, H.; Abaecherli, V.; Wilkins, D.J.; Kostorz, G.

    1999-07-01

    Uniaxially aligned polysynthetically twinned two-phase TiAl/Ti{sub 3}Al material is produced by induction zone melting and deformed in uniaxial compression. Above 1,000 K the strain rate sensitivity is independent of the lamellar orientation and increases strongly with increasing deformation temperature. Results for the strain rate sensitivity parameters are somewhat lower than those obtained for {gamma}-TiAl single- and polycrystals. If the lamellae are oriented parallel or perpendicular to the deformation axis, the flow stress decreases with increasing strain. After plastic deformation the dislocation density in the lamellae is remarkably low indicating recovery processes. At the lamellar interfaces misfit dislocations and periodic arrangements of dislocations with Burgers vectors inclined to the lamellar boundaries are found. In contrast to deformation at lower temperatures, deformation twinning is rare.

  16. Changes in borehole temperatures, ice content and creep velocities - results from 10 years of monitoring mountain permafrost in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noetzli, Jeannette; Vonder Muehll, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    The network for permafrost monitoring in Switzerland (PERMOS) has been built up since the early 1990s aiming to document the state and changes of mountain permafrost on a long-term basis. Following a 6 year pilot-phase starting in 2000, the PERMOS network is now funded and integrated into the national and international monitoring structures. The observations are based on three elements: (1) ground temperatures measured in boreholes and at the surface near to the drill site, (2) changes in subsurface ice and water content at the drill sites by geo-electrical surveys, and (3) velocities of permafrost creep determined by geodetic surveys and/or photogrammetry. In addition, standardized documentation of fast mass movements from permafrost areas (e.g., rock fall) is being established. In this contribution, we present measurement results of all observation parameters and their joint interpretation, along with a short overview on PERMOS and its monitoring strategy. The connection between air temperatures and permafrost temperatures is not straightforward. Effects of winter snow conditions, surface cover (cooling effects by coarse blocks), subsurface ice content (effects of latent heat), and steep topography mask changes in atmospheric conditions when they propagate into the subsurface. The signal is additionally delayed by the high thermal inertia of the system. This can explain why temperature time series from 24 boreholes of up to 20 years length do not (or not yet) reflect a clear warming signal. Seasonal variations in air temperatures and snow conditions, however, are well visible in active layer thicknesses in most boreholes, with the intensity of the signal depending on site characteristics. The information gained from borehole temperatures is complemented by geo-electrical surveys. Results can be linked to changes in frozen and unfrozen water content, indicate substantial degradation of ground ice, and show the potential of a combined approach compared to thermal monitoring alone. Kinematics results show an increase of creep velocities or even a destabilization of rock glaciers in the past years or decades. In view of the borehole measurements, this acceleration may be related to changes in water content or availability. The inventory of rock falls comprises more than 150 events from permafrost regions, with an increase of events in the past two decades. This is likely a result of a combination of factors: growing human activities in high mountain regions, raised public and scientific awareness to this phenomena, and an increase of such events.

  17. Influence of precipitate morphology on intermediate temperature creep properties of a nickel-base superalloy single crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Mackay, R. A.; Miner, R. V.

    1989-01-01

    The relative creep behavior of cuboidal (as-heat treated) and rafted (precrept at 1000 C) gamma-prime microstructures in the single-crystal Ni-based superalloy NASAIR 100 at 760 C was investigated using SEM and TEM examinations of materials at various stages of creep. It was found that, at high applied stresses, the crystals with cuboidal gamma-prime structure had both lower minimum creep rates and longer rupture lives than the crystals with lamellar gamma-prime. At lower stress levels, the initially cuboidal gamma-prime microstructure maintained a lower creep rate, but exhibited a similar rupture life compared to the prerafted crystals.

  18. Non-Contact Measurements of Creep Properties of Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Bradshaw, Richard C.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Wall, James J.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter

    2006-01-01

    State-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic aircraft, nuclear electric/thermal propulsion for spacecraft, and more efficient jet engines are driving ever more demanding needs for high-temperature (>2000 C) materials. At such high temperatures, creep rises as one of the most important design factors to be considered. Since conventional measurement techniques for creep resistance are limited to about 17OO0C, a new technique is in demand for higher temperatures. This paper presents a non-contact method using electrostatic levitation (ESL) which is applicable to both metallic and non-metallic materials. The samples were rotated quickly enough to cause creep deformation by centrifugal acceleration. The deformation of the samples was captured with a high speed camera and then the images were analyzed to estimate creep resistance. Finite element analyses were performed and compared to the experiments to verify the new method. Results are presented for niobium and tungsten, representative refractory materials at 2300 C and 2700 C respectively.

  19. Creep-fatigue life prediction of in situ composite solders

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, C.G.; Sastry, S.M.L.; Jerina, K.L.

    1995-12-01

    Eutectic tin-lead solder alloys subjected to cyclic loading at room temperature experience creep-fatigue interactions due to high homologous temperature. Intermetallic reinforcements of Ni{sub 3}Sn{sub 4} and Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} are incorporated into eutectic tin-lead alloy by rapid solidification processes to form in situ composite solders. In this study, the in situ composite solders were subjected to combined creep and fatigue deformation at room temperature. Under cyclic deformation, the dominant damage mechanism of in situ composite solders is proposed to be growth of cavities. A constrained cavity growth model is applied to predict creep-fatigue life by taking into account the tensile loading component as well as the compressive loading component when reversed processes can occur. An algorithm to calculate cavity growth in each fatigue cycle is used to predict the number of fatigue cycles to failure, based on a critical cavity size of failure. Calculated lives are compared to experimental data under several fatigue histories, which include fully reversed stress-controlled fatigue, zero-tension stress-controlled fatigue, stress-controlled fatigue with tension hold time, fully reversed strain-controlled fatigue, and zero-tension strain-controlled fatigue. The model predicts the creep-fatigue lives within a factor of 2 with the incorporation of an appropriate compressive healing factor in most cases. Discrepancy between calculated lives and experimental results is discussed.

  20. Deformation Mechanisms in Austenitic TRIP/TWIP Steel as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stefan; Wolf, Steffen; Martin, Ulrich; Krüger, Lutz; Rafaja, David

    2016-01-01

    A high-alloy austenitic CrMnNi steel was deformed at temperatures between 213 K and 473 K (-60 °C and 200 °C) and the resulting microstructures were investigated. At low temperatures, the deformation was mainly accompanied by the direct martensitic transformation of γ-austenite to α'-martensite (fcc → bcc), whereas at ambient temperatures, the transformation via ɛ-martensite (fcc → hcp → bcc) was observed in deformation bands. Deformation twinning of the austenite became the dominant deformation mechanism at 373 K (100 °C), whereas the conventional dislocation glide represented the prevailing deformation mode at 473 K (200 °C). The change of the deformation mechanisms was attributed to the temperature dependence of both the driving force of the martensitic γ → α' transformation and the stacking fault energy of the austenite. The continuous transition between the ɛ-martensite formation and the twinning could be explained by different stacking fault arrangements on every second and on each successive {111} austenite lattice plane, respectively, when the stacking fault energy increased. A continuous transition between the transformation-induced plasticity effect and the twinning-induced plasticity effect was observed with increasing deformation temperature. Whereas the formation of α'-martensite was mainly responsible for increased work hardening, the stacking fault configurations forming ɛ-martensite and twins induced additional elongation during tensile testing.

  1. Creep Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant Used in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-01-02

    High operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells require that sealant must function at high temperature between 600o and 900oC and in the oxidizing and reducing environments of fuel and air. It should be noted that creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 800oC, which exceeds the glass transition temperature Tg for most glass ceramic materials. The goal of the study is to develop a creep model to capture the creep behavior of glass ceramic materials at high temperature and to investigate the effect of creep of glass ceramic sealant materials on stresses in glass seal and on the various interfaces of glass seal with other layers. The self-consistent creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the stresses in various parts. The stress in glass seals were released due to its creep behavior during the operating environments.

  2. An activated energy approach for accelerated testing of the deformation of UHMWPE in artificial joints.

    PubMed

    Galetz, Mathias Christian; Glatzel, Uwe

    2010-05-01

    The deformation behavior of ultrahigh molecular polyethylene (UHMWPE) is studied in the temperature range of 23-80 degrees C. Samples are examined in quasi-static compression, tensile and creep tests to determine the accelerated deformation of UHMWPE at elevated temperatures. The deformation mechanisms under compression load can be described by one strain rate and temperature dependent Eyring process. The activation energy and volume of that process do not change between 23 degrees C and 50 degrees C. This suggests that the deformation mechanism under compression remains stable within this temperature range. Tribological tests are conducted to transfer this activated energy approach to the deformation behavior under loading typical for artificial knee joints. While this approach does not cover the wear mechanisms close to the surface, testing at higher temperatures is shown to have a significant potential to reduce the testing time for lifetime predictions in terms of the macroscopic creep and deformation behavior of artificial joints. PMID:20346901

  3. Creep cavitation bands control porosity and fluid flow in lower crustal shear zones

    SciTech Connect

    Menegon, Luca; Fusseis, Florian; Stunitz, Holger; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-03-01

    Shear zones channelize fluid flow in Earth’s crust. However, little is known about deep crustal fluid migration and how fluids are channelized and distributed in a deforming lower crustal shear zone. This study investigates the deformation mechanisms, fluid-rock interaction, and development of porosity in a monzonite ultramylonite from Lofoten, northern Norway. The rock was deformed and transformed into an ultramylonite under lower crustal conditions (temperature = 700–730 °C, pressure = 0.65–0.8 GPa). The ultramylonite consists of feldspathic layers and domains of amphibole + quartz + calcite, which result from hydration reactions of magmatic clinopyroxene. The average grain size in both domains is <25 mm. Microstructural observations and electron backscatter diffraction analysis are consistent with diffusion creep as the dominant deformation mechanism in both domains. Festoons of isolated quartz grains define C'-type bands in feldspathic layers. These quartz grains do not show a crystallographic preferred orientation. The alignment of quartz grains is parallel to the preferred elongation of pores in the ultramylonites, as evidenced from synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Such C'-type bands are interpreted as creep cavitation bands resulting from diffusion creep deformation associated with grain boundary sliding. Mass-balance calculation indicates a 2% volume increase during the protolith-ultramylonite transformation, which is consistent with synkinematic formation of creep cavities producing dilatancy. Thus, this study presents evidence that creep cavitation bands may control deep crustal porosity and fluid flow. Nucleation of new phases in creep cavitation bands inhibits grain growth and enhances the activity of grain size–sensitive creep, thereby stabilizing strain localization in the polymineralic ultramylonites.

  4. Anisotropic deformation of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, R. W. L.

    2013-09-01

    Zr-2.5Nb alloy is used for the pressure tubes in CANDU reactor fuel channels. In reactor, the pressure tube normally operates at 300 C and experiences a primary coolant fluid internal pressure of approximately 10 MPa. Manufacturing and processing procedures generate an anisotropic state in the pressure tube which makes the tube stronger in the hoop (transverse) direction than in the axial (longitudinal) direction. This anisotropy condition is present for temperatures less than 500 C. During postulated accident conditions where the material temperature could reach 1000 C, it might be assumed that the high temperature and subsequent phase change would reduce the inherent anisotropy, and thus affect the deformation behaviour (ballooning) of the pressure tube. From constant-load, rapid-temperature-ramp, uniaxial deformation tests, the deformation rate in the longitudinal direction of the tube behaves differently than the deformation rate in the transverse direction of the tube. This anisotropic mechanical behaviour appears to persist at temperatures up to 1000 C. This paper presents the results of high-temperature deformation tests using longitudinal and transverse specimens taken from as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. It is shown that the anisotropic deformation behaviour observed at high temperatures is largely due to the stable crystallographic texture of the ?-Zr phase constituent in the material that was previously observed by neutron diffraction measurements during heating at temperatures up to 1050 C. The deformation behaviour is also influenced by the phase transformation occurring at high temperatures during heating. The effects of texture and phase transformation on the anisotropic deformation of as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material are discussed in the context of the tube ballooning behaviour. Because of the high temperatures in postulated accident scenarios, any irradiation damage will be annealed from the pressure tube material and thus the unirradiated material results presented in this paper are also applicable to irradiated pressure tubes.

  5. Creep Measurement Video Extensometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaster, Mark; Vickerman, Mary; Padula, Santo, II; Juhas, John

    2011-01-01

    Understanding material behavior under load is critical to the efficient and accurate design of advanced aircraft and spacecraft. Technologies such as the one disclosed here allow accurate creep measurements to be taken automatically, reducing error. The goal was to develop a non-contact, automated system capable of capturing images that could subsequently be processed to obtain the strain characteristics of these materials during deformation, while maintaining adequate resolution to capture the true deformation response of the material. The measurement system comprises a high-resolution digital camera, computer, and software that work collectively to interpret the image.

  6. Experimental deformation of rocksalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handin, J.; Russell, J. E.; Carter, N. L.

    Using newly designed apparatus for triaxial-compression testing of 10 by 20-cm cores of Avery Island rocksalt at constant strain-rates between 10-4 and 10-6/s, temperatures between 100° and 200°C, and confining pressures of 3.4 and 20 MPa, comparing our data with those of other workers on the same material, and observing natural deformations of rocksalt, we find that (1) constant-strain-rate and quasi-constant stress-rate tests (both often called quasi-static compression tests) yield essentially similar stress-strain relations, and these depend strongly on strain rate and temperature, but not confining pressure; (2) fracture excluded, the deformation mechanisms observed for differential stresses between 0.5 and 20 MPa are intracrystal-line slip (dislocation glide and cross-slip) and polygonization (dislocation glide and climb by ion-vacancy pipe diffusion); (3) the same steady-state strain rate ɛ., and flow stress are reached at the same temperature in both constant-strain-rate and constant-stress (creep) tests, but the strain-time data from transient creep tests do not match the strain-hardening data unless the initial strain, ɛ0 (time-dependent in rocksalt) is accounted for; in creep tests the clock is not started until the desired constant stress is reached; (4) because the stress-strain curve contains the entire history of the deformation, the constant-strain-rate test rather than the creep test may well be preferred as the source of constitutive data; (5) furthermore, if the stress or temperature of the creep test is too low to achieve the steady state in laboratory time, one cannot predict the steady-state flow stress or strain rate from the transient response alone, whereas we can estimate them rather well from constant-strain-rate data even when strain rates are too high or temperatures too low to reach the steady state within a few hours; (6) the so-called "baseline creep law", giving creep strain, ɛ = ea[1-exp(-ξt)]+ɛ. ss t, where ea, ξ, and ɛ. ss are regarded as material properties as well as fitting parameters, can be valid, if at all, only over intervals of stress and temperature where the same deformation mechanisms operate and only if it is independent of structural changes, that is of loading path, and it poorly predicts constant-stress-rate response in triaxial-compression tests and long-term, low-stress response from data taken over short time at high stress; (7) a potentially more useful, semi-empirical constitutive model, incorporating stress (σ), strain (ɛ), strain rate (ɛ.), and absolute temperature (T), and capable of matching at least limited constant-strain-rate, constant-stress-rate, constant-stress (creep), and relaxation (nearly constant strain) data even though constant structure is assumed, is σ=Kɛ. q exp(B/T)[1={exp(-r1ɛ) + exp(-r2ɛ)}/2], where K, q, B, r1, and r2 are to be treated as fitting parameters until their physical significance is better understood; (8) however, we doubt that any single, perfectly general constitutive equation can be written to satisfy all conditions pertinent to repository design, say 25° ≤ T ≤ 300°C and 1 ≤ σ ≤ 20 MPa, and also to be workable in numerical modeling; (9) hence, no matter how abundant and precise site-specific laboratory data may become, one can expect only to approximate the rheological behavior of the prototype.

  7. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  8. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF DIFFUSIONAL CREEP IN NANOCRYSTALLINE UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Tapan G. Desai; Paul C. Millett; Dieter Wolf

    2008-09-01

    We present the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study hightemperature deformation of nanocrystalline UO2. In qualitative agreement with experimental observations, the oxygen sub-lattice undergoes a structural transition at a temperature of about 2200 K (i.e., well below the melting point of 3450 K of our model system), whereas the uranium sub-lattice remains unchanged all the way up to melting. At temperatures well above this structural transition, columnar nanocrystalline model microstructures with a uniform grain size and grain shape were subjected to constantstress loading at levels low enough to avoid microcracking and dislocation nucleation from the GBs. Our simulations reveal that in the absence of grain growth, the material deforms via GB diffusion creep (also known as Coble creep). Analysis of the underlying self-diffusion behavior in undeformed nanocrystalline UO2 reveals that, on our MD time scale, the uranium ions diffuse only via the grain boundaries (GBs) whereas the much faster moving oxygen ions diffuse through both the lattice and the GBs. As expected for the Coble-creep mechanism, the creep activation energy agrees well with that for GB diffusion of the slowest moving species, i.e., of the uranium ions.

  9. Life Estimation and Creep Damage Quantification of Service Exposed Reformer Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, A.; Roy, N.; Roy, B. N.; Ray, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    This paper deals with evaluation of creep damage of ~11 years service exposed primary hydrogen reformer tube made of HP-40 grade of steel in a petrochemical industry, which has been carried out in terms of Kachanav's continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model (K-model) and Bogdanoff model (B-model) based on Markov process. Residual life of the tubes was estimated based on hot tensile, conventional creep deformation under identical test conditions, optical microscopy and fractography. Accumulation of damage due to creep has been quantified through microstructural studies. The as received tubes did not reveal any degradation in the material like creep cavitation or voids, but there was indeed loss of tensile strength from room temperature to 870C for the bottom portion of the tube due to ageing and overheating. Scatter in creep deformation behaviour of the material is probably due to variation in mode of fracture and scatter in voids. From statistical point of view, Weibull distribution pattern for analysing probability of rupture due to void area shifts with increase in true strain towards the higher population of void. The estimation of mean time to reach a specific damage state from K- model and B-model is in close agreement with that of experimental data and can describe the sudden changes of the creep damage in the tertiary region as well. A remnant life of >10 years is estimated at the operating stress-temperature conditions of the top as well as bottom portion of the tube.

  10. The Effect of Temperature Condition on Material Deformation and Die Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Jia; Jie, Zhou; Jin-jin, Ji; Liang, Huang; Hai, Yang

    2013-07-01

    The characteristics of temperature change on die and billet are very complex during the deformation process because of the interaction between them and some unstable external factors. In this paper, the numerical simulation model for the crank shaft die forging was established by means of the rigid-plastic FEM method. The model was validated by optical non-contact 3D measurementATOS. Based on available research results, this paper explored the effect of temperature conditions on material deformation and die wear. Three parameters, press velocity and initial temperature of billet and die, were chosen to illustrate the effects. From the experimental results, the effect of process parameters on deformation ability of the material is simple, while the effect on die wear is relatively complicated. The press velocity plays an important role on die wear when the initial temperature of the billet has larger influence on material deformation. A conclusion can be drawn that when the initial temperature of the billet is 1100 C, the initial temperature of the die is 250 C, and the velocity is kept in the range of 200-300 mm/s, the optimum solution for deformation ability of the material and die wear can be obtained. It is possible for the conclusion to be extended further for the control of temperature condition to optimize die life and material deformation.

  11. Influence of the Temperature of Gases on the Deformation Characteristics of Moving Water Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, D. V.; Volkov, R. S.; Zhdanova, A. O.; Kuznetsov, G. V.; Strizhak, P. A.

    2015-07-01

    An experimental analysis of the influence of the temperature of gases on the deformation characteristics of water droplets moving through them is carried out. High-speed (up to 105 frames per second) photography with video cameras and cross-correlation complexes, as well as panoramic optical methods of recording the motion parameters of gaseous and liquid flows, were used. The laws governing the movement of water droplets through gases with a temperature of about 1100 K and in air at relatively low (to 280 K) and moderate (about 300 K) temperatures have been studied. The principal characteristics of the deformation of water droplets (duration, extension, and amplitudes of "deformation cycles") have been established. The differences in the characteristic shapes of droplets during their motion in gaseous media (at different temperatures of the latter) have been determined. The times during which droplets retain a certain shape in the deformation process have been calculated.

  12. Thermal deformation of a large space panel caused by temperature difference between front and rear sides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Naoki; Kurokawa, Haruhisa; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Kokaji, Shigeru; Suzuki, Akio

    This paper describes the development of a ground test system for determining the thermal deformation of large antenna panels to be used in space. The system is designed to measure the deformation occurring as a result of temperature differences between the front and rear surfaces of the panel. In the experimental set-up, a symmetric honeycomb panel was used. The front surface of the panel was heated by IR radiation, and the deformation was determined using a fringe scanning moire system which measured the shape of the rear surface. It was found that the temperature difference realized by the system was of the same order as was estimated on the orbit. The variations in the temperature difference were less than 15 percent of the average value. The effects of temperature distribution on the deformation were evaluated to be negligible by an FEM calculation.

  13. ORNL irradiation creep facility

    SciTech Connect

    Reiley, T.C.; Auble, R.L.; Beckers, R.M.; Bloom, E.E.; Duncan, M.G.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shannon, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    A machine was developed at ORNL to measure the rates of elongation observed under irradiation in stressed materials. The source of radiation is a beam of 60 MeV alpha particles from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). This choice allows experiments to be performed which simulate the effects of fast neutrons. A brief review of irradiation creep and experimental constraints associated with each measurement technique is given. Factors are presented which lead to the experimental choices made for the Irradiation Creep Facility (ICF). The ICF consists of a helium-filled chamber which houses a high-precision mechanical testing device. The specimen to be tested must be thermally stabilized with respect to the temperature fluctuations imposed by the particle beam which passes through the specimen. Electrical resistance of the specimen is the temperature control parameter chosen. Very high precision in length measurement and temperature control are required to detect the small elongation rates relevant to irradiation creep in the test periods available (approx. 1 day). The apparatus components and features required for the above are presented in some detail, along with the experimental procedures. The damage processes associated with light ions are discussed and displacement rates are calculated. Recent irradiation creep results are given, demonstrating the suitability of the apparatus for high resolution experiments. Also discussed is the suitability of the ICF for making high precision thermal creep measurements.

  14. Brief summary of the evolution of high-temperature creep-fatigue life prediction models for crack initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Halford, G.R.

    1993-10-01

    The evolution of high-temperature, creep-fatigue, life-prediction methods used for cyclic crack initiation is traced from inception in the late 1940`s. The methods reviewed are material models as opposed to structural life prediction models. Material life models are used by both structural durability analysts and by material scientists. The latter use micromechanistic models as guidance to improve a material`s crack initiation resistance. Nearly one hundred approaches and their variations have been proposed to date. This proliferation poses a problem in deciding which method is most appropriate for a given application. Approaches were identified as being combinations of thirteen different classifications. This review is intended to aid both developers and users of high-temperature fatigue life prediction methods by providing a background from which choices can be made. The need for high-temperature, fatigue-life prediction methods followed immediately on the heels of the development of large, costly, high-technology industrial and aerospace equipment immediately following the second world war. Major advances were made in the design and manufacture of high-temperature, high-pressure boilers and steam turbines, nuclear reactors, high-temperature forming dies, high-performance poppet valves, aeronautical gas turbine engines, reusable rocket engines, etc. These advances could no longer be accomplished simply by trial and error using the `build-em and bust-em` approach. Development lead times were too great and costs too prohibitive to retain such an approach. Analytic assessments of anticipated performance, cost, and durability were introduced to cut costs and shorten lead times. The analytic tools were quite primitive at first and out of necessity evolved in parallel with hardware development. After forty years more descriptive, more accurate, and more efficient analytic tools are being developed.

  15. Application of two creep fatigue life models for the prediction of elevated temperature crack initiation of a nickel base alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.; Nissley, D. M.; Halford, G. R.; Saltsman, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic Damage Accumulation (CDA) and Total Strain-Strain Range Partitioning (TS-SRP) models for predicting the creep-fatigue crack initiation life of high temperature alloys are presented. The models differ in their fundamental assumptions regarding the controlling parameters for fatigue crack initiation and in the amount of data required to determine model constants. The CDA model represents a ductility exhaustion approach and uses stress quantities to calculate the cyclic fatigue damage. The TS-SRP model is based on the use of total mechanical strain and earlier concepts of the Strain Range Partitioning Method. Both models were applied to a well controlled fatigue data set at a high temperature nickel base alloy, B1900 + Hf, tested at 1600 F and 1800 F. The tests were divided into a baseline data set required to determine model constants and a verification data set for evaluation of the predictive capability of the models. Both models correlated the baseline data set to within factors of two in life, and predicted the verification data set to within a factor of three or better. In addition, sample calculations to demonstrate the application of each model and discusions of the predictive capabilities and areas requiring further development are presented.

  16. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High Temperature Strenth and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, PJ

    2004-09-30

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation-Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metals. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815EC (1500EC) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential invention disclosures were not pursued. One objective of this project was to improve the high temperature creep resistance of the recently developed 803 alloy, while another was to have a wrought modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance and corrosion resistance than the commonly used alloy 800H. The project was intended to use the established expertise at ORNL to design specific microalloying element additions to appropriately tailor the microstructure during aging or creep so that fine, stable carbides develop for strength. If possible, oxidation/corrosion resistance at high temperatures would also be enhanced. Optimum processing was to be developed for plate and tube products.

  17. An investigation on the creep and fracture behavior of cast nickel-base superalloy IN738LC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianting, Guo; Ranucci, D.; Picco, E.; Strocchi, P. M.

    1983-11-01

    The creep-rupture properties of cast nickel-base superalloy IN738LC were studied over the temperature range 750 to 950 °C. Our results show that primary and steady-state creep should not be regarded as distinct stages and that they have basically the same deformation mechanism. The dependence of the steady-state creep rate, ɛs, on stress, δ, and on temperature, T, for this superalloy can be described as ɛs = Aδ nexp( -Qc/RT). n = 8.3 - 9.8 and Qc = 570 - 730 kJ mol-1 at high stress levels, whereas n = 4.1 - 4.9 and Qc = 370 - 420 kJ mol-1 at low stress levels. The observations of dislocation structures during steady-state creep confirm that the creep mechanism is different in the high and low stress regimes. The observations of the microstructure show that the initial acceleration in creep rate during the tertiary stage is connected with changes in the size and distribution of γ' particles during creep. Rupture occurs by the propagation of oxidized intergranular cracks which initiate at the specimen surface, and the rate of crack propagation is controlled by the deformation behavior of the superalloy.

  18. Microplastic deformation of submicrocrystalline and coarse-grained titanium at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Kolobov, Yu. R.; Bakach, G. P.; Skosyrskii, A. B.; Zhorovkov, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    Results obtained from a comparison study on the deformation behavior of submicrocrystalline and coarsegrained titanium in the temperature interval 295-773 K are presented. The microplastic strain mechanisms underlying a change in the deformation behavior of submicrocrystalline titanium in the melting temperature interval 0.35-0.40 ? m and a reduction in the strain hardening effect due to formation of submicrocrystalline structure of the material are examined. A multiscale model for development of microplastic deformation in submicrocrystalline metals and alloys is offered.

  19. High temperature deformation in 2036 Al and 0.2 wt % Zr-2036 A1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Schwartz, A.J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1995-11-01

    The microstructure and high-temperature deformation of 2036 Al and a 0.2 wt % Zr modified 2036 Al were characterized. A particle-simulated- nucleation process was applied to refine grain structure in both alloys. Thermomechanically processed materials were tested from 450 to 500 C and strain rates from 2{times}10{sup {minus}1} to 2{times}10{sup {minus}4}s{sup {minus}1}. Strain rate sensitivity exponent, activation energy, and total elongation were measured, and the deformation mechanism was proposed. Effect of Zr on microstructure and deformation of 2036 Al at elevated temperatures was discussed.

  20. Model for transient creep of southeastern New Mexico rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, W; Wawersik, W R; Lauson, H S

    1980-11-01

    In a previous analysis, existing experimental data pertaining to creep tests on rock salt from the Salado formation of S.E. New Mexico were fitted to an exponential transient creep law. While very early time portions of creep strain histories were not fitted very well for tests at low temperatures and stresses, initial creep rates in particular generally being underestimated, the exponential creep law has the property that the transient creep strain approaches a finite limit with time, and is therefore desirable from a creep modelling point of view. In this report, an analysis of transient creep is made. It is found that exponential transient creep can be related to steady-state creep through a universal creep curve. The resultant description is convenient for creep analyses where very early time behavior is not important.

  1. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part I- Temperature Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of deformation and failure behaviors in the austenitic stainless steels (annealed 304, 316, 316LN, and 20% cold-worked 316LN) in terms of equivalent true stress-true strain curves. The true stress-true strain curves up to the final fracture were calculated from the tensile test data obtained at -150 ~ 450oC using an iterative technique of finite element simulation. Analysis was largely focused on the necking deformation and fracture: Key parameters such as the strain hardening rate, equivalent fracture stress, fracture strain, and tensile fracture energy were evaluated, and their temperature dependencies were investigated. It was shown that a significantly high strain hardening rate was still retained during unstable deformation although overall strain hardening rate beyond the onset of necking was lower than that of the uniform deformation. The values of the parameters except for fracture strain decreased with temperature up to 200oC and were saturated as the temperature came close to the maximum test temperature 450oC. The fracture strain increased and had a maximum at -50oC to 20oC before decreasing with temperature. It was explained that these temperature dependencies of fracture properties were associated with a change in the dominant strain hardening mechanism with test temperature. Also, it was seen that the pre-straining of material has little effect on the strain hardening rate during necking deformation and on fracture properties.

  2. Study on the high temperature deformation measurement using the mark shearing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaixi; Xie, Huimin; Dai, Xianglu; Wu, Lifu

    2015-09-01

    The mark shearing technique has been successfully utilized for room-temperature strain measurement in solid mechanics research. However, when the method is applied to deformation measurement at high temperature, some new issues will occur. From our experience, we have found that an inevitable thermal radiation will emit from the oven in the measurement and may lead to a distortion of the measuring system. As a result, an undesired measurement error will arise; furthermore, the oxidation resistance marker is crucial to obtain an ideal result. In order to solve the abovementioned issues, the mark shearing techniques for high-temperature deformation measurement are studied in this work, and a novel method for fabricating the marker pattern is proposed, which can be utilized to fabricate a deformation carrier for high temperature on a different specimen surface. In combination with this marker with our self-developed mark shearing system, the high-temperature (1000?C) mechanical properties of the high-temperature nickel alloy (GH4037) was measured. In order to characterize the thermal deformation caused by the oven during the high temperature experiment, the surface temperature distribution of the mark shearing system is measured by an infrared camera. On the basis of this result, the corresponding thermal deformation is analyzed by the finite element analysis (FEM) method. From the analysis result, we can conclude that the virtual strain of the system incurred by thermal radiation cannot be ignored for a long-time measurement.

  3. On rate-dependent polycrystal deformation: the temperature sensitivity of cold dwell fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Cuddihy, M. A.; Dunne, F. P. E.

    2015-01-01

    A temperature and rate-dependent crystal plasticity framework has been used to examine the temperature sensitivity of stress relaxation, creep and load shedding in model Ti-6Al polycrystal behaviour under dwell fatigue conditions. A temperature close to 120°C is found to lead to the strongest stress redistribution and load shedding, resulting from the coupling between crystallographic slip rate and slip system dislocation hardening. For temperatures in excess of about 230°C, grain-level load shedding from soft to hard grains diminishes because of the more rapid stress relaxation, leading ultimately to the diminution of the load shedding and hence, it is argued, the elimination of the dwell debit. Under conditions of cyclic stress dwell, at temperatures between 20°C and 230°C for which load shedding occurs, the rate-dependent accumulation of local slip by ratcheting is shown to lead to the progressive cycle-by-cycle redistribution of stress from soft to hard grains. This phenomenon is termed cyclic load shedding since it also depends on the material's creep response, but develops over and above the well-known dwell load shedding, thus providing an additional rationale for the incubation of facet nucleation. PMID:26528078

  4. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for Si3N4-Sc2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1990-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at triple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  5. High-temperature deformation and microstructural analysis for silicon nitride-scandium(III) oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, Deock-Soo; Sanders, William A.

    1992-01-01

    It was indicated that Si3N4 doped with Sc2O3 may exhibit high temperature mechanical properties superior to Si3N4 systems with various other oxide sintered additives. High temperature deformation of samples was studied by characterizing the microstructures before and after deformation. It was found that elements of the additive, such as Sc and O, exist in small amounts at very thin grain boundary layers and most of them stay in secondary phases at tripple and multiple grain boundary junctions. These secondary phases are devitrified as crystalline Sc2Si2O7. Deformation of the samples was dominated by cavitational processes rather than movements of dislocations. Thus the excellent deformation resistance of the samples at high temperature can be attributed to the very small thickness of the grain boundary layers and the crystalline secondary phase.

  6. Cryogenic deformation of high temperature superconductive composite structures

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Michels, William (Brookline, MA); Bingert, John F. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An improvement in a process of preparing a composite high temperature oxide superconductive wire is provided and involves conducting at least one cross-sectional reduction step in the processing preparation of the wire at sub-ambient temperatures.

  7. Microstructure and low-temperature plastic deformation of Al-Li alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, N. V.; Zabrodin, P. A.; Spuskanyuk, V. Z.; Davydenko, A. A.; Pustovalov, V. V.; Fomenko, V. S.; Braude, I. S.

    2012-01-01

    Features of the plastic deformation of solid Al-Li solutions with microstructures formed by direct and angular hydroextrusion are studied under tension at temperatures of 4.2-350 K. It is found that the grain size reductions, increases in the average density of defects, and changes in the orientational textures during combined hydroextrusion lead to increased strength and reduced plasticity of the microcrystalline alloy relative to initially large-grained samples. The high yield stress of the microcrystalline alloy is explained by a higher grain density and the evolution of an orientational texture. The strong temperature dependence of the yield stress is typical of thermally activated interactions between dislocations and local obstacles in the form of deformation defects produced during hydroextrusion. The low plasticity of the microcrystalline alloy, which already shows up as a localization of plastic deformation with small deformations, is caused by a low rate of work hardening owing to enhanced dynamic recovery of fine grains even at low temperatures. The rate of dynamic recovery decreases, while uniform deformation increases, at temperatures of 77 K and below. Based on data on the high stress rate sensitivity at temperatures above 77 K and the low activation volume for plastic deformation of microcrystalline Al-Li, it is proposed that high-angle grain boundaries may serve as highly efficient sources and sinks of mobile dislocations.

  8. Corrosion and Creep of Candidate Alloys in High Temperature Helium and Steam Environments for the NGNP

    SciTech Connect

    Was, Gary; Jones, J. W.

    2013-06-21

    This project aims to understand the processes by which candidate materials degrade in He and supercritical water/steam environments characteristic of the current NGNP design. We will focus on understanding the roles of temperature, and carbon and oxygen potential in the 750-850 degree C range on both uniform oxidation and selective internal oxidation along grain boundaries in alloys 617 and 800H in supercritical water in the temperature range 500-600 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature rang 750-850 degree C; and examining the application of static and cyclic stresses in combination with impure He environments in the temperature range 750-850 degree C over a range of oxygen and carbon potentials in helium. Combined, these studies wil elucidate the potential high damage rate processes in environments and alloys relevant to the NGNP.

  9. Mechanisms responsible for texture development in a 5182 aluminum alloy deformed at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Chen, S.R.; Kocks, U.F.; Schwartz, A.J.; MacEwen, S.R.; Beaudoin, A.J.

    1998-12-01

    The textures that develop in a 5182 aluminum alloy as a result of monotonic high-temperature compression have been investigated. The authors found that the deformation texture was a function of temperature. For compressive deformation at 300 C and below the material formed the classic (101) deformation texture, while the material develops a texture that is a combination of the classical uniaxial compression deformation texture, (101), and static recrystallization texture, (001), as a result of the deformation alone when the deformation temperature was at and above 400 C. The investigation has focused on determining the mechanism responsible for the development of this unusual progression of deformation textures. In addition the authors have performed orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) to identify the shapes of grains with particular orientations and grain-to-grain orientation relationships. The conclusions are summarized as follows: The texture development is not a result of static processes, i.e. static recrystallization at the various hold times altered neither the textures nor the constitutive behavior. Simulation using a crystal plasticity model indicates that the combination of a cube component prevalent in the original texture, slip activity on 011 planes, and increased rate sensitivity leads to a combined (001) and (101) texture. Finally, the microscopic OIM results are consistent with these observations.

  10. Creep-Fatigue Interaction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatigue fives in metals are nominally time independent below 0.5 T(sub Melt). At higher temperatures, fatigue lives are altered due to time-dependent, thermally activated creep. Conversely, creep rates are altered by super. imposed fatigue loading. Creep and fatigue generally interact synergistically to reduce material lifetime. Their interaction, therefore, is of importance to structural durability of high-temperature structures such as nuclear reactors, reusable rocket engines, gas turbine engines, terrestrial steam turbines, pressure vessel and piping components, casting dies, molds for plastics, and pollution control devices. Safety and lifecycle costs force designers to quantify these interactions. Analytical and experimental approaches to creep-fatigue began in the era following World War II. In this article experimental and life prediction approaches are reviewed for assessing creep-fatigue interactions of metallic materials. Mechanistic models are also discussed briefly.

  11. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a fourth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are presented. The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subjected to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue, or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation was randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 was analyzed using the developed methodology.

  12. Computational simulation of probabilistic lifetime strength for aerospace materials subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Lola; Bast, Callie C.; Trimble, Greg A.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of a fourth year effort of a research program, conducted for NASA-LeRC by the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology that provides probabilistic lifetime strength of aerospace materials via computational simulation. A probabilistic material strength degradation model, in the form of a randomized multifactor interaction equation, is postulated for strength degradation of structural components of aerospace propulsion systems subject to a number of effects or primitive variables. These primitive variables may include high temperature, fatigue or creep. In most cases, strength is reduced as a result of the action of a variable. This multifactor interaction strength degradation equation has been randomized and is included in the computer program, PROMISS. Also included in the research is the development of methodology to calibrate the above-described constitutive equation using actual experimental materials data together with regression analysis of that data, thereby predicting values for the empirical material constants for each effect or primitive variable. This regression methodology is included in the computer program, PROMISC. Actual experimental materials data were obtained from industry and the open literature for materials typically for applications in aerospace propulsion system components. Material data for Inconel 718 has been analyzed using the developed methodology.

  13. Continuous turbine blade creep measurement based on Moir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yi; Tait, Robert; Harding, Kevin; Nieters, Edward J.; Hasz, Wayne C.; Piche, Nicole

    2012-11-01

    Moir imaging has been used to measure creep in the airfoil section of gas turbine blades. The ability to accurately assess creep and other failure modes has become an important engineering challenge, because gas turbine manufacturers are putting in place condition-based maintenance programs. In such maintenance programs, the condition of individual components is assessed to determine their remaining lives. Using pad-print technology, a grating pattern was printed directly on a turbine blade for localized creep detection using the spacing change of moir pattern fringes. A creep measurement prototype was assembled for this application which contained a lens, reference grating, camera and lighting module. This prototype comprised a bench-top camera system that can read moir patterns from the turbine blade sensor at shutdown to determine creep level in individual parts by analyzing the moir fringes. Sensitivity analyses and noise factor studies were performed to evaluate the system. Analysis software was also developed. A correlation study with strain gages was performed and the measurement results from the moir system align well with the strain gage readings. A mechanical specimen subjected to a one cycle tensile test at high temperature to induce plastic deformation in the gage was used to evaluate the system and the result of this test exhibited good correlation to extensometer readings.

  14. Creep behavior of Fe-bearing olivine under hydrous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, Miki; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2015-09-01

    To understand the effect of iron content on the creep behavior of olivine, (MgxFe(1 - x))2SiO4, under hydrous conditions, we have conducted tri-axial compressive creep experiments on samples of polycrystalline olivine with Mg contents of x = 0.53, 0.77, 0.90, and 1. Samples were deformed at stresses of 25 to 320 MPa, temperatures of 1050 to 1200C, a confining pressure of 300 MPa, and a water fugacity of 300 MPa using a gas-medium high-pressure apparatus. Under hydrous conditions, our results yield the following expression for strain rate as a function of iron content for 0.53 ? x ? 0.90 in the dislocation creep regime: ??=??0.90((1-x/0.1))1/2exp[2261030.9-x/RT]. In this equation, the strain rate of San Carlos olivine, ??0.90, is a function of T, ?, and fH2O. As previously shown for anhydrous conditions, an increase in iron content directly increases creep rate. In addition, an increase in iron content increases hydrogen solubility and therefore indirectly increases creep rate. This flow law allows us to extrapolate our results to a wide range of mantle conditions, not only for Earth's mantle but also for the mantle of Mars.

  15. Field theory and diffusion creep predictions in polycrystalline aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, A.; Busso, E. P.; Forest, S.

    2015-07-01

    In polycrystals, stress-driven vacancy diffusion at high homologous temperatures leads to inelastic deformation. In this work, a novel continuum mechanics framework is proposed to describe the strain fields resulting from such a diffusion-driven process in a polycrystalline aggregate where grains and grain boundaries are explicitly considered. The choice of an anisotropic eigenstrain in the grain boundary region provides the driving force for the diffusive creep processes. The corresponding inelastic strain rate is shown to be related to the gradient of the vacancy flux. Dislocation driven deformation is then introduced as an additional mechanism, through standard crystal plasticity constitutive equations. The fully coupled diffusion-mechanical model is implemented into the finite element method and then used to describe the biaxial creep behaviour of FCC polycrystalline aggregates. The corresponding results revealed for the first time that such a coupled diffusion-stress approach, involving the gradient of the vacancy flux, can accurately predict the well-known macroscopic strain rate dependency on stress and grain size in the diffusion creep regime. They also predict strongly heterogeneous viscoplastic strain fields, especially close to grain boundaries triple junctions. Finally, a smooth transition from Herring and Coble to dislocation creep behaviour is predicted and compared to experimental results for copper.

  16. Deformation mechanisms of NiAl cyclicly deformed near the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullers, Cheryl L.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1993-01-01

    The intermetallic compound NiAl is one of many advanced materials which is being scrutinized for possible use in high temperature, structural applications. Stoichiometric NiAl has a high melting temperature, excellent oxidation resistance, and good thermal conductivity. Past research has concentrated on improving monotonic properties. The encouraging results obtained on binary and micro-alloyed NiAl over the past ten years have led to the broadening of NiAl experimental programs. The purpose of this research project was to determine the low cycle fatigue properties and dislocation mechanisms of stoichiometric NiAl at temperatures near the monotonic brittle-to-ductile transition. The fatigue properties were found to change only slightly in the temperature range of 600 to 700 K; a temperature range over which monotonic ductility and fracture strength increase markedly. The shape of the cyclic hardening curves coincided with the changes observed in the dislocation structures. The evolution of dislocation structures did not appear to change with temperature.

  17. Invited review paper: Fault creep caused by subduction of rough seafloor relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kelin; Bilek, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Among the wide range of thermal, petrologic, hydrological, and structural factors that potentially affect subduction earthquakes, the roughness of the subducting seafloor is among the most important. By reviewing seismic and geodetic studies of megathrust locking/creeping state, we find that creeping is the predominant mode of subduction in areas of extremely rugged subducting seafloor such as the Kyushu margin, Manila Trench, northern Hikurangi, and southeastern Costa Rica. In Java and Mariana, megathrust creeping state is not yet constrained by geodetic observations, but the very rugged subducting seafloor and lack of large earthquakes also suggest aseismic creep. Large topographic features on otherwise relatively smooth subducting seafloor such as the Nazca Ridge off Peru, the Investigator Fracture Zone off Sumatra, and the Joban seamount chain in southern Japan Trench also cause creep and often stop the propagation of large ruptures. Similar to all other known giant earthquakes, the Tohoku earthquake of March 2011 occurred in an area of relatively smooth subducting seafloor. The Tohoku event also offers an example of subducting seamounts stopping rupture propagation. Very rugged subducting seafloor not only retards the process of shear localization, but also gives rise to heterogeneous stresses. In this situation, the fault zone creeps because of distributed deformation of fractured rocks, and the creep may take place as transient events of various spatial and temporal scales accompanied with small and medium-size earthquakes. This process cannot be described as stable or unstable friction along a single contact surface. The association of large earthquakes with relatively smooth subducting seafloor and creep with very rugged subducting seafloor calls for further investigation. Seafloor near-trench geodetic monitoring, high-resolution imaging of subduction fault structure, studies of exhumed ancient subduction zones, and laboratory studies of low-temperature creep will greatly improve our understanding of the seismogenic and creep processes and their hazard implications.

  18. Electrochemical control of creep in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Xing-Long; Jin, Hai-Jun

    2013-11-11

    We have investigated the mechanical stability of nanoporous gold (npg) in an electrochemical environment, using in situ dilatometry and compression experiments. It is demonstrated that the gold nano-ligaments creep under the action of surface stress which leads to spontaneous volume contractions in macroscopic npg samples. The creep of npg, under or without external forces, can be controlled electrochemically. The creep rate increases with increasing potential in double-layer potential region, and deceases to almost zero when the gold surface is adsorbed with oxygen. Surprisingly, we also noticed a correlation between creep and surface diffusivity, which links the deformation of nanocrystals to mobility of surface atoms.

  19. Thermal creep model for CWSR zircaloy-4 cladding taking into account the annealing of the irradiation hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelaere, Chantal; Limon, Roger; Duguay, Chrstelle; Pinte, Gerard; Le Breton, Michel; Bouffioux, Pol; Chabretou, Valerie; Miquet, Alain

    2012-02-15

    After irradiation and cooling in a pool, spent nuclear fuel assemblies are either transported for wet storage to a devoted site or loaded in casks for dry storage. During dry transportation or at the beginning of dry storage, the cladding is expected to be submitted to creep deformation under the hoop stress induced by the internal pressure of the fuel rod. The thermal creep is a potential mechanism that might lead to cladding failure. A new creep model was developed, based on a database of creep tests on as-received and irradiated cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding in a wide range of temperatures (310 degrees C to 470 degrees C) and hoop stress (80 to 260 MPa). Based on three laws-a flow law, a strain-hardening recovery law, and an annealing of irradiation hardening law this model allows the simulation of not only the transient creep and the steady-state creep, but also the early creep acceleration observed on irradiated samples tested in severe conditions, which was not taken into account in the previous models. The extrapolation of the creep model in the conditions of very long-term creep tests is reassuring, proving the robustness of the chosen formalism. The creep model has been assessed in progressively decreasing stress conditions, more representative of a transport. Set up to predict the cladding creep behavior under variable temperature and stress conditions, this model can easily be implemented into codes in order to simulate the thermomechanical behavior of spent fuel rods in various scenarios of postirradiation phases. (authors)

  20. Probabilistic material strength degradation model for Inconel 718 components subjected to high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bast, C.C.S.

    1994-03-01

    This thesis presents the on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes four effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for four variables, namely, high temperature, mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of mechanical fatigue, creep, and thermal fatigue was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects by model to the combination by experiment were conducted. Thus, for Inconel 718, the basic model assumption of independence between effects was evaluated. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported this assumption.

  1. Evidence of dislocation cross-slip in MAX phase deformed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Antoine; Joulain, Anne; Thilly, Ludovic; Tromas, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Ti2AlN nanolayered ternary alloy has been plastically deformed under confining pressure at 900C. The dislocation configurations of the deformed material have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The results show a drastic evolution compared to the dislocation configurations observed in the Ti2AlN samples deformed at room temperature. In particular, they evidence out-of-basal-plane dislocations and interactions. Moreover numerous cross-slip events from basal plane to prismatic or pyramidal planes are observed. These original results are discussed in the context of the Brittle-to-Ductile Transition of the nanolayered ternary alloys. PMID:25220949

  2. Vacancy-creep model for EAC of metallic materials in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, P.; Saario, T.; Karjalainen-Roikonen, P.; Piippo, J.; Taehtinen, S.; Itaeaho, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1996-12-01

    A new mechanistic model for environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of metallic materials is presented. In this model the mechanism of cracking involves selective dissolution or oxidation of metallic cations in the oxide film and transport of the generated vacancies to the base metal ahead of the crack tip. The mechanism of cracking is based on interactions of vacancies with dislocations enhancing concentration of slip to the highly stressed region ahead of the crack tip. The validity of the model is discussed based on both new experimental and literature data. It is shown that selective oxidation and, thus, vacancy generation takes place in the same electrochemical potential range where EAC cracking is observed at different temperatures in different materials such as in stainless steels, Ni-base alloys and brass. This model can be applied to explain the observed transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC), intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) phenomena of these materials used in high temperature water environments.

  3. Transient Creep and Strain Energy Dissipation: An Experimental Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faul, Ulrich; Jackson, Ian

    2015-05-01

    Energy dissipation due to intrinsic attenuation occurs at elevated temperatures in rocks as a result of a range of processes. Examples where small-strain, transient deformation occurs are seismic waves, tidal deformation, and at longer timescales post-glacial rebound and far-field post-seismic deformation. Experiments at mantle temperatures and seismic frequencies show that grain boundary sliding is a key process that results in a broad absorption band, as indicated by seismic observations. Models of grain boundary sliding predict a smooth transition from elastic behavior through an anelastic regime toward viscous (Maxwell) behavior, consistent with experimental observations. Other mechanisms that may contribute to dissipation in Earth, at least locally, are dislocations and melt. Extrapolation of the laboratory data shows that first-order observations of planetary behavior and structure can be explained by the effects of temperature and pressure on transient creep properties, but that locally, additional mechanisms are required.

  4. Microstructure and Creep Behavior of a Directional Solidification Nickel-based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ning; Tian, Sugui; Yu, Huichen; Li, Ying; Meng, Xianlin

    2015-07-01

    By means of creep property measurement and microstructure observation, an investigation has been made into microstructure and creep behavior of a directional solidification Ni-based superalloy at high temperatures. Results show that after full heat treatment, small cuboidal ?' precipitates distribute in the dendrite regions, while coarser ones distribute in the inter-dendrite regions. In the primary stage of creep, the ?' phase in alloy is transformed into the rafted structure along the direction vertical to stress axis, and then the creep of alloy enters the steady state stage. And dislocations slipping in the g matrix and climbing over the rafted ?' phase are thought to be the deformation mechanism of the alloy during steady creep stage. At the latter stage of creep, the alternate slipping of dislocations may shear and twist the rafted ?'/? phases, which promotes the initiation and propagation of the micro-cracks along the boundaries near the coarser rafted ?' phase. And the bigger probability of the creep damage occurs in the grain boundaries along 45 angles relative to the stress axis due to them bearing relatively bigger shearing stress.

  5. Deformation by a kink mechanism in high temperature materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.; Peralta, P.; Hirth, J.P.

    1999-10-08

    A new double kink dislocation model has been developed to explain the temperature dependence of the yield stress in materials such as oxides and intermetallics that require high temperatures for plastic flow. The major variation in the free energy for the formation of a double kink nucleus with stress is the kink-kink interaction energy. However, there is also a stress dependence of the pre-exponential factor in the strain rate constitutive equation arising from kink diffusion. Numerical solution of the resulting equations shows that there are temperature regimes where the stress varies logarithmically with temperature. The model explains quantitatively the temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress on different slip systems for sapphire and spinel in terms of different activation energies for Kink diffusion. The model can be modified to explain compositional softening in spinel by incorporating enhanced kink nucleation at cation vacancies. This changes both the pre-exponential term and the activation energy and explains why the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) decreases as the inverse of the square of the vacancy concentration, as is observed.

  6. High temperature deformation of friction stir processed 7075 aluminium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaliere, P. . E-mail: pasquale.cavaliere@unile.it; Squillace, A.

    2005-08-15

    The mechanical and microstructural properties of 7075 aluminium alloy resulting from Friction Stir Processing (FSP), into sheets of 7 mm thickness, were analysed in the present study. The sheets were processed perpendicularly to the rolling direction; the tensile mechanical properties were evaluated at room temperature in the transverse and longitudinal directions with respect to the processing one. Tensile tests were also performed at higher temperatures and different strain rates in the nugget zone, in order to analyse the superplastic properties of the recrystallized material and to observe the differences from the parent material as a function of the strong grain refinement due to the Friction Stir Process. The high temperature behaviour of the material was studied, in the parallel direction, by means of tensile tests in the temperature and strain rate ranges of 150-500 deg. C and 10{sup -} {sup 2}-10{sup -} {sup 4} s{sup -} {sup 1} respectively, electron microscopy (FEGSEM) observations were carried out to investigate more closely the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested at different temperatures and strain rates.

  7. Aging effects on high-temperature creep properties of a solid oxide fuel cell glass-ceramic sealant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Kuang; Lin, Kun-Liang; Yeh, Jing-Hong; Shiu, Wei-Hong; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Lee, Ruey-Yi

    2013-11-01

    Creep properties at 800 °C are investigated for a newly developed solid oxide fuel cell BaO-B2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 glass-ceramic sealant (GC-9) in variously aged conditions using a ring-on-ring test technique. GC-9 specimens are thermally aged at 750 °C for 4 h (designated as non-aged), 100 h, or 1000 h after sintering at 850 °C. Results show a longer thermal aging treatment leads to a higher crystallinity and greater creep resistance for the given glass-ceramic sealant. When subjected to an applied constant load at 800 °C, the 1000 h-aged GC-9 lasts much longer than the non-aged and 100 h-aged ones before rupture. The 1000 h-aged GC-9 also exhibits a creep strain rate much smaller than that in the non-aged and 100 h-aged samples. The value of creep stress exponent increases from 6 to 29 as the aging treatment time is increased from 4 h to 1000 h. The creep strength at a rupture time of 1000 h for the non-aged, 100 h-aged, and 1000 h-aged GC-9 is about 21%, 28%, and 39%, respectively, of the corresponding Weibull characteristic strength at 800 °C.

  8. Creep ratcheting simplified methods experience from structural design of elevated temperature components

    SciTech Connect

    Severud, L.K.

    1984-01-01

    During the last decade, advancements in inelastic analysis methods for evaluating elevated temperature structural response have been considerable. Still, the desire to use simplified, less-costly, and easier-to-understand analysis methods for design remains very high. Past activities, using both detailed inelastic and simplified methods, have been very productive. It is instructive to view some of the lessons learned, to assess the technology status, and to provide guidance and identify development needs for future applications. Experience in use of simplified methods and some comparison to results from detailed inelastic solutions are surveyed. Guidance on inappropriate use is also provided as well as identification of domains of applicability for proper use of the various retacheting simplified methods.

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MICROSTRUCTURAL DAMAGE DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE CREEP-FATIGUE OF A NICKEL ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Carroll; M.C. Carroll; C. Cabet; R.N. Wright

    2013-02-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). To evaluate the behavior of this material in the expected service conditions, strain-controlled cyclic tests that include hold times up to 9000 s at maximum tensile strain were conducted at 950 degrees C. The fatigue resistance decreased when a hold time was added at peak tensile strain, owing to the mechanisms resulting in a change in fracture mode from transgranular in pure fatigue to intergranular in creep–fatigue. Increases in the tensile hold duration beyond an initial value were not detrimental to the creep–fatigue resistance. An analysis of the evolving failure modes was facilitated by interrupting tests during cycling for ex situ microstructural investigation.

  10. Sensitivity of the creep-rupture properties of Waspaloy sheet to sharp-edged notches in the temperature range 1000-1400 deg F.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    Time-dependent notch sensitivity of Waspaloy was observed at test temperatures from 1000 to 1300 deg F. Its occurrence in this range was dependent on the heat treatment. ?Overaging' eliminated the notch sensitivity. Optimum combination of smooth and notched specimen strengths for material solution treated at 1975 deg F were obtained by aging 24 hr at 1550 deg F. Necessary conditions for time-dependent notch sensitivity were (1) the notch specimen loads had to be below the approximate 0.2 percent offset yield strength; and (2 ) test data from smooth specimens had to indicate that small amounts of creep used up large fractions of creep-rupture life. No reasons were evident why these criteria will not prove applicable to other alloys.

  11. Low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of Ni-based alloy 230 at 850 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Yang, Zhiqing; Sokolov, Mikhail A; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) and creep-fatigue testing of Ni-based alloy 230 were carried out at 850 C. The material creep-fatigue life decreased compared with its low cycle fatigue life at the same total strain range. Longer hold time at peak tensile strain further reduced the material creep-fatigue life. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction, a novel material deformation characterization method was applied, which revealed that in low cycle fatigue testing as the total strain range increased, the deformation was segregated to grain boundaries since the test temperature was higher than the material equicohesive temperature and grain boundaries became weaker regions compared with grains. Creep-fatigue tests enhanced the localized deformation, resulting in material interior intergranular cracking, and accelerated material damage. Precipitation in alloy 230 helped slip dispersion, favorable for fatigue property, but grain boundary cellular precipitates formed after material exposure to the elevated temperature had a deleterious effect on the material low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue property.

  12. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 6, Plastic Deformation and Fracture of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mughrabi, Hael

    1996-12-01

    This self-contained handbook focuses on the mechanisms of plastic deformation and fracture affecting a wide variety of materials. From the Contents: Mughrabi: Introduction. Gil Sevillano: Flow Stress and Work Hardening. Leffers/Van Houtte/Aernoudt: Deformation and Textures of Metals at Large Strain. Kubin: Dislocation Patterning. Neuhuser/Schwink: Solid Solution Strengthening. Umakoshi: Deformation of Intermettalic Compounds. Reppich: Particle Strengthening. Blum: High Temperature Deformation and Creep of Crystalline Solids. Mukherjee: Superplasticity in Metals, Ceramics and Intermetallics. Argon: Inelastic Deformation and Fracture of Glassy Solids. Suresh: Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue. Riedel: Frature Mechanisms. Kato: Friction and Wear.

  13. Microstructural stability and creep of directionally solidified alumina/YAG eutectic monofilaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Lawrence Edwin

    2000-10-01

    Fiber strength retention and creep currently limit the use of polycrystalline oxide fibers in ceramic matrix composite applications up to 1100°C. Single phase - single crystal fibers show superior creep resistance up to 1500°C but have a significant strength loss at moderate temperatures due to processing flaws, which undergo slow crack growth. In hopes of overcoming these shortcomings, Directionally Solidified Al2O3 - YAG eutectic fibers were grown at various rates by the Edge-defined, Film-fed Growth method (EFG) and their microstructure and mechanical properties were studied in this thesis. It was hypothesized that these two phase - single crystal structures would exhibit an increase in strength and a decrease in slow crack growth rates as the transverse phase size decreases. Additionally, that the creep resistance would increase to single crystal values as the phase aspect ratio increased. A digital microstructural analysis procedure was developed as part of the thesis in order to quantify the various microstructures from the EFG processing study. Microstructural stability plays a significant role in determining the "use temperature and life" of fibers. Coarsening effects the strength, creep resistance, as well as the rupture life. In this work, the kinetics of homogeneous coarsening as well as heterogeneous coarsening on the bare fiber surfaces was investigated. A "site specific" TEM thin foil preparation method was developed so that the mechanism for coarsening could be analysis. A methodology was developed in order to determine if the creep behavior of a fiber was affected by any heterogeneous coarsening defect. Creep data which showed no effects was analyzed for its steady state creep behavior. The creep data showed a significant variation in the stress exponent as a function of test temperature and fiber microstructure. A threshold stress analysis was employed in order to obtain a reasonable effective activation energy of ≅1100 kJ/mole °K. TEM analysis of the crept fibers suggested that the Sapphire phase was deforming by a dislocation mechanism, while the YAG phase deformed by a diffusional mechanism. A creep model was developed which contained geometrical factors for describing the microstructure. Microstructural data from the digital analysis was entered into the creep model and validates the creep hypothesis.

  14. Temperature deformations of the mirror of a radio telescope antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avdeyev, V. I.; Grach, S. A.; Kozhakhmetov, K. K.; Kostenko, F. I.

    1979-01-01

    The stress informed state of the mirror of an antenna, with a diameter of 3 m, for a radio interferometer used in space, and located in a temperature field is examined. The mirror represents a parabolic shell, consisting of 19 identical parts. The problem is based on representations of the thermoelasticity of thin shells.

  15. Temperature Effects on Deformation and Serration Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys (HEAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C.-W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Gao, M. C.; Uhl, J. T.; Liaw, P. K.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2014-09-01

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress-strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress drops and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. The model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.

  16. Temperature Effects on Deformation and Serration Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys (HEAs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C.-W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Gao, M. C.; Uhl, J. T.; Liaw, P. K.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress-strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress drops and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. The model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.

  17. Viscoelastoplastic Deformation and Damage Response of Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saleeb, Atef F.; Kasemer, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent deformation and damage behavior can significantly affect the life of aerospace propulsion components. Consequently, one needs an accurate constitutive model that can represent both reversible and irreversible behavior under multiaxial loading conditions. This paper details the characterization and utilization of a multi-mechanism constitutive model of the GVIPS class (Generalized Viscoplastic with Potential Structure) that has been extended to describe the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Associated material constants were characterized at five elevated temperatures where viscoelastoplastic behavior was observed, and at three elevated temperatures where damage (of both the stiffness reduction and strength reduction type) was incurred. Experimental data from a wide variety of uniaxial load cases were used to correlate and validate the proposed GVIPS model. Presented are the optimized material parameters, and the viscoelastoplastic deformation and damage responses at the various temperatures.

  18. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; Gao, M. C.; Uhl, J. T.; Liaw, P. K.; Dahmen, K. A.

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress drops and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.

  19. Temperature effects on deformation and serration behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Antonaglia, J.; Xie, X.; Tang, Z.; Tsai, C. -W.; Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Laktionova, M. O.; Tabachnikova, E. D.; Yeh, J. W.; Senkov, O. N.; et al

    2014-09-16

    Many materials are known to deform under shear in an intermittent way with slip avalanches detected as acoustic emission and serrations in the stress–strain curves. Similar serrations have recently been observed in a new class of materials, called high-entropy alloys (HEAs). Here, we discuss the serration behaviors of several HEAs from cryogenic to elevated temperatures. The experimental results of slow compression and tension tests are compared with the predictions of a slip-avalanche model for the deformation of a broad range of solids. The results shed light on the deformation processes in HEAs. Temperature effects on the distributions of stress dropsmore » and the decrease of the cutoff (i.e., of the largest observed slip size) for increasing temperature qualitatively agree with the model predictions. As a result, the model is used to quantify the serration characteristics of HEAs, and pertinent implications are discussed.« less

  20. Phenomenology of the creep process of a precipitation-hardenable AlMgSi alloy wires for overhead power lines. Experimental tests. Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knych, Tadeusz; Mamala, Andrzej; Smyrak, Beata

    2009-05-01

    The article presents the results of the experimental test on the creep process of AlMgSi alloy wires (series 6xxx) under the conditions of variable stress. A theoretical analysis of equivalency rheological results of stress and temperature changes by means of Bayley-Norton function, which describes well the low-temperature aluminum alloys creep, was carried out. Therefore, the described issue became one-dimensional. On the basis of experimental tests, it has been proved that negative gradients of stress and temperature may generate three types of rheological behaviour, such as: Temporary decrease of creep speed (type 1), Temporary stop of creep deformation (dead time)type 2 and reverse after creep (type 3). The applicable nature of tests is placed in overhead power lines, which undergo cyclical stress- and time-dependent operation. Such a nature of conductor operation creates favourable conditions to decrease creep intensity, whereas its history and value and speed of stress and temperature lowering decide whether conductor rheological activity loss will take place. The actual material parameter controlling the conductor rheological behaviour is stress and temperature rheological equivalent. The article contains exemplary results of current-carrying capacity changes of AlMgSi alloy conductor on a given temperature range, and the calculations include actual creep characteristic and cumulated rheological inactivity caused by negative gradients of stress and temperature.

  1. Sessile dislocations by reactions in NiAl severely deformed at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geist, D.; Gammer, C.; Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H. P.

    2015-02-05

    B2 ordered NiAl is known for its poor room temperature (RT) ductility; failure occurs in a brittle like manner even in ductile single crystals deforming by single slip. In the present study NiAl was severely deformed at RT using the method of high pressure torsion (HPT) enabling the hitherto impossible investigation of multiple slip deformation. Methods of transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the dislocations formed by the plastic deformation showing that as expected dislocations with Burgers vector a(100) carry the plasticity during HPT deformation at RT. In addition, we observe that they often form a(110) dislocations by dislocationmore » reactions; the a(110) dislocations are considered to be sessile based on calculations found in the literature. It is therefore concluded that the frequently encountered 3D dislocation networks containing sessile a(110) dislocations are pinned and lead to deformation-induced embrittlement. In spite of the severe deformation, the chemical order remains unchanged.« less

  2. The Use of CDM Analysis Techniques in High Temperature Creep Failure of Welded Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayhurst, David R.; Wong, Man Tak; Vakili-Tahami, Farid

    Techniques are reviewed for the calibration of constitutive relationships for the different phases of the weld. It is shown how the calibration is carried out using property ratios, and a knowledge of the constitutive equations of the parent material. The results of CDM analyses, obtained using the two-dimensional solver Damage XX, are reviewed for: a butt-welded pipe at 565°C and, a welded cylinder-sphere pipe intersection at 590°C. Results are then presented of a three-dimensional CDM solution for a three-degree slice of the welded cylinder-sphere pipe intersection, and shown to be in close agreement with the two-dimensional, Damage XX, solution. Then the paper examines damage growth at a constant temperature of 590°C in a ferritic steel butt-welded pipe subjected to a combined constant internal pressure of 4MPa and a constant global bending moment of 49kNm. The CDM results for a three-dimensional analysis are compared with qualitative experimental results, and good correlation is indicated.

  3. Water weakening of clinopyroxene in the dislocation creep regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Hiraga, T.; Kohlstedt, D. L.

    2006-08-01

    We performed a series of triaxial compressive creep experiments at two different water fugacities to investigate the effect of water on the creep strength of a natural clinopyroxenite. Samples were deformed under water-saturated conditions at temperatures between 1373 and 1473 K, confining pressures of 150 and 300 MPa, and differential stresses from 34 to 261 MPa. Strain rates were in the range 10-7 to 10-5 s-1. Water fugacity was controlled at either 140 or 280 MPa. The creep results yield a stress exponent of 2.7 0.3 and an activation energy of 670 40 kJ/mol. Compared to dry clinopyroxene, wet samples creep over 100 times faster at a given temperature, confining pressure, water fugacity, and differential stress. The creep rate of clinopyroxene is proportional to the water fugacity to the 3.0 0.6 power, with an activation volume of 0 m3/mol. One possible water-weakening mechanism is an enhancement of the rate of dislocation climb associated with increases in the concentration of jogs and the diffusivity of silicon ions. Compared to other major minerals in Earth's lower crust, specifically olivine and plagioclase, the water-weakening effect is most significant for clinopyroxene. Under hydrous conditions the strengths of clinopyroxene and anorthite are comparable over the investigated stress range, and both phases are weaker than olivine. Since the mineral assemblages in Earth's lower continental crust are often dominated by plagioclase and pyroxene, in places where a wet flow law applies, the mechanical behavior of clinopyroxene will have a substantial effect on creep strength.

  4. Temperature-dependent mechanical deformation of silicon at the nanoscale: Phase transformation versus defect propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Tran, T. T.; Smillie, L. A.; Subianto, D.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.; Haberl, B.

    2015-05-28

    This study uses high-temperature nanoindentation coupled with in situ electrical measurements to investigate the temperature dependence (25–200 °C) of the phase transformation behavior of diamond cubic (dc) silicon at the nanoscale. Along with in situ indentation and electrical data, ex situ characterizations, such as Raman and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, have been used to reveal the indentation-induced deformation mechanisms. We find that phase transformation and defect propagation within the crystal lattice are not mutually exclusive deformation processes at elevated temperature. Both can occur at temperatures up to 150 °C but to different extents, depending on the temperature and loading conditions. For nanoindentation, we observe that phase transformation is dominant below 100 °C but that deformation by twinning along (111) planes dominates at 150 °C and 200 °C. This work, therefore, provides clear insight into the temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in dc-Si at the nanoscale and helps to clarify previous inconsistencies in the literature.

  5. Creep of CoO single crystals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Seltzer, M. S.; Wilcox, B. A.

    1971-01-01

    The crystals were creep tested in compression over ranges of temperature, stress, and oxygen pressure. The creep curves were S-shaped, and only the inflection creep rate was analyzed. A formula is presented for the inflection creep rate in the range from 1000 to 1200 C, 850 to 1700 psi, and 0.001 to 1 atm oxygen. Slip was found to occur on two orthogonal slip systems. The presence of subboundaries was observed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. It is suggested that the creep rate is controlled by oxygen diffusion.

  6. Evolution of Precipitate Microstructure During Creep of an AA7449 T7651 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fribourg, G.; Brchet, Y.; Chemin, J. L.; Deschamps, A.

    2011-12-01

    Creep forming is a process where plastic deformation is applied at the material's aging temperature. It enables to obtain parts of complex shape with reduced internal stresses and finds applications, for instance, in the aerospace industry. In this article, we report in-situ small-angle X-ray scattering measurements during creep experiments carried out on an AA7449 Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy in the T7651 temper. In the range of temperatures of 413 K to 453 K (140 C to 180 C), we show that the initial microstructure is not stable with respect to the applied stress/strain. Accelerated precipitation coarsening is shown to occur, clearly related to the plastic deformation. This strain-induced microstructure evolution is shown to happen even at temperatures well below the aging temperature that has led to the initial temper.

  7. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  8. Observation of Grain Rotations to Elucidate the Development of Crystal Preferred Orientation during Diffusion Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, G.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    The seismic anisotropy in Earth's upper mantle is explained by the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of rock-forming minerals, which have anisotropic elasticity. Our team showed that the CPO of forsterite is produced even during diffusion creep (Miyazaki et al. 2013). The purpose of this study is to understand the mechanism of the development of CPO of forsterite by observations of samples surface after the sample deformation where the fine-scale strain markers were imposed.We deformed cylindrical polycrystalline samples of synthesized forsterite plus 20 vol. % diopside at its diffusion creep regime. We polished the lateral side of the sample where we imposed grooves parallel to the compression axis of the sample using a focused ion beam. These marker lines allow us to observe grain rotation due to a plastic deformation of the sample. After the high temperature compression creep experiment under atmosphere, we observed the marker lines under scanning electron microscope.We succeeded to observe the marker lines after the deformation. Strain of bulk sample and of the marker line exhibit the similar value indicating the similar deformation proceeded both at bulk and surface regions of the samples. Grain rotation, which is identified by misfits of the markers at grain boundaries and rotation of intra-granular markers, were observed in all the samples. No distortion of the markers within the grains was found indicating the absence of intragranular deformation process such as a glide of dislocations; however, in the samples deformed at high stress (~300 MPa), curved intra-granular markers were observed, which is consistent with dislocation activity at high stress condition. Our results show the significant grain rotation, which is necessary process for the development of CPO, during diffusion creep as well as the ability of identification of the deformation mechanism of the bulk sample by the observation of the sample surface.

  9. Creep fatigue life prediction for engine hot section materials (isotropic)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Vito; Nissley, David; Lin, Li-Sen Jim

    1985-01-01

    The first two years of a two-phase program aimed at improving the high temperature crack initiation life prediction technology for gas turbine hot section components are discussed. In Phase 1 (baseline) effort, low cycle fatigue (LCF) models, using a data base generated for a cast nickel base gas turbine hot section alloy (B1900+Hf), were evaluated for their ability to predict the crack initiation life for relevant creep-fatigue loading conditions and to define data required for determination of model constants. The variables included strain range and rate, mean strain, strain hold times and temperature. None of the models predicted all of the life trends within reasonable data requirements. A Cycle Damage Accumulation (CDA) was therefore developed which follows an exhaustion of material ductility approach. Material ductility is estimated based on observed similarities of deformation structure between fatigue, tensile and creep tests. The cycle damage function is based on total strain range, maximum stress and stress amplitude and includes both time independent and time dependent components. The CDA model accurately predicts all of the trends in creep-fatigue life with loading conditions. In addition, all of the CDA model constants are determinable from rapid cycle, fully reversed fatigue tests and monotonic tensile and/or creep data.

  10. Effects of Ce Addition on High Temperature Deformation Behavior of Cu-Cr-Zr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Volinsky, Alex A.; Tran, Hai T.; Chai, Zhe; Liu, Ping; Tian, Baohong

    2015-10-01

    Hot deformation behavior of the Cu-Cr-Zr and Cu-Cr-Zr-Ce alloys was investigated by compressive tests using the Glee-ble-1500D thermomechanical simulator at 650-850 °C and 0.001-10 s-1 strain rate. The flow stress decreased with the deformation temperature at a given stain rate. However, the flow stress increased with the strain rate at the same deformation temperature. The constitutive equations for two kinds of alloys were obtained by correlating the flow stress, the strain rate and temperature using stepwise regression analysis. The addition of Ce can refine the grain and effectively accelerate dynamic recrystallization. The processing maps were established, based on the dynamic material model. Instability zones in the flow behavior can be easily recognized. Hot deformation optimal processing parameters were obtained in the range of this experiment. The hot deformation characteristics and microstructure were also analyzed by the processing maps. The addition of Ce can optimize hot workability of the Cu-Cr-Zr alloy.

  11. The Role of Eta Phase Formation on the Creep Strength and Ductility of INCONEL Alloy 740 at 1023 K (750 C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingledecker, J. P.; Pharr, G. M.

    2012-06-01

    INCONEL alloy 740 is an age-hardenable nickel-based superalloy proposed for advanced ultrasupercritical steam boiler applications operating at high stress and long times above 973 K (700 C), where creep will be the dominate deformation mode. During high-temperature exposure, the alloy can form eta phase platelets that many have suggested may be detrimental to creep strength and ductility. In this study, creep-rupture tests were conducted on smooth and notched bars of INCONEL alloy 740 at 1023 K (750 C) for times up to 20,000 hours. Examination of the creep-rupture life, creep ductility, failure modes, and microstructure by quantitative electron microscopy shows that a small amount of eta phase does not diminish the creep performance. Applied stress appears to have a minor effect on the precipitation of the eta phase but not its growth rate. Based on the observation that the microstructure after 20,000 hours of creep exposure has reached equilibrium in comparison to thermodynamic calculations, it is concluded that 20,000 hour creep tests are adequate for prediction of long-term creep performance.

  12. The Role of Eta Phase Formation on the Creep Strength and Ductility of INCONEL Alloy 740 t 1023 k (750 Degrees C)

    SciTech Connect

    Shingledecker, John P; Pharr, George Mathews

    2012-01-01

    INCONEL alloy 740 is an age-hardenable nickel-based superalloy proposed for advanced ultrasupercritical steam boiler applications operating at high stress and long times above 973 K (700 C), where creep will be the dominate deformation mode. During high-temperature exposure, the alloy can form eta phase platelets that many have suggested may be detrimental to creep strength and ductility. In this study, creep-rupture tests were conducted on smooth and notched bars of INCONEL alloy 740 at 1023 K (750 C) for times up to 20,000 hours. Examination of the creep-rupture life, creep ductility, failure modes, and microstructure by quantitative electron microscopy shows that a small amount of eta phase does not diminish the creep performance. Applied stress appears to have a minor effect on the precipitation of the eta phase but not its growth rate. Based on the observation that the microstructure after 20,000 hours of creep exposure has reached equilibrium in comparison to thermodynamic calculations, it is concluded that 20,000 hour creep tests are adequate for prediction of long-term creep performance.

  13. Deformation Behavior and Dynamic Recovery Kinetics of Ultrahigh Strength Steel BR1500HS at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yufeng; Ji, Shuai; Zhang, Yandong; Wu, Dongsen; Quan, Guozheng

    2015-10-01

    The flow behaviors of ultrahigh strength steel BR1500HS at elevated temperature were studied by performing hot tension tests at the temperatures of 773 K, 873 K, 1023 K and 1173 K, and strain rates of 0.01 s-1, 0.1 s-1 and 1 s-1 on a Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. The true stress-strain curves were obtained and their characteristics were analyzed. Relationships among the maximum stress, temperature and strain rate were described by means of the conventional hyperbolic sine equation. The average deformation activation energy in the whole deformation temperatures was determined as Q = 235.257 KJ/mol by regression analysis. Based on ?(d?/d?) verse ?2 curves, the values of dynamic recovery (DRV) rate coefficient, r, saturated stress, ?rec, and yield strength, ?0, under different deformation conditions were calculated. In order to estimate the DRV volume fractions, the modified Avrami type equation including r (r = 106.911351Z-0.059) as a function of the temperature compensating parameter, Z, was established, and then the effects of deformation conditions on the DRV kinetics were described in details.

  14. Deformation, Stress Relaxation, and Crystallization of Lithium Silicate Glass Fibers Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.; Brow, Richard K.; Kim, Cheol W.; Reis, Signo T.

    2004-01-01

    The deformation and crystallization of Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 2SiO2 and Li(sub 2)O (center dot) 1.6SiO2 glass fibers subjected to a bending stress were measured as a function of time over the temperature range -50 to -150 C below the glass transition temperature (Tg). The glass fibers can be permanently deformed at temperatures about 100 C below T (sub)g, and they crystallize significantly at temperatures close to, but below T,, about 150 C lower than the onset temperature for crystallization for these glasses in the no-stress condition. The crystallization was found to occur only on the surface of the glass fibers with no detectable difference in the extent of crystallization in tensile and compressive stress regions. The relaxation mechanism for fiber deformation can be best described by a stretched exponential (Kohlrausch-Williams-Watt (KWW) approximation), rather than a single exponential model.The activation energy for stress relaxation, Es, for the glass fibers ranges between 175 and 195 kJ/mol, which is considerably smaller than the activation energy for viscous flow, E, (about 400 kJ/mol) near T, for these glasses at normal, stress-free condition. It is suspected that a viscosity relaxation mechanism could be responsible for permanent deformation and crystallization of the glass fibers below T,

  15. Influence of phase composition and microstructure on the high temperature creep properties of a model single crystal nickel-base superalloy: An atom probe/AEM study

    SciTech Connect

    Jayaram, R.; Miller, M.K.

    1995-05-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) have been used to characterize the microstructure of as-quenched and creep-tested model single crystal nickel-base superalloys having the nominal bulk composition Ni-x at.% Mo-2.0% Ta-13.7% Al (x = 7.8--9.2%). The results showed that Ta partitioned preferentially to the {gamma}{prime} phase whereas Mo partitioned to the {gamma} matrix. Atom probe composition profiles across {gamma}-{gamma}{prime} interfaces did not reveal any evidence of solute segregation and statistical analyses of the data did not indicate ultrafine solute clusters in the {gamma} matrix. Acicular {delta} phase precipitates were detected in number densities approximately one order of magnitude higher in the 9.2% Mo alloy as compared to the 8.6 and 8.8% Mo alloy. There was some indication that the DO{sub 22}-ordered {gamma}{double_prime} phase is stable at 982 C, the temperature at which the creep tests were performed. The absence of interfacial solute segregation and clustering in the {gamma} matrix suggested that the high creep life of this model alloy system is influenced by the nature of the dislocation network at the {gamma}-{gamma}{prime} interface with a possible strengthening contribution from the DO{sub 22}-ordered phase.

  16. Constitutive Model for Anisotropic Creep Behaviors of Single-Crystal Ni-Base Superalloys in the Low-Temperature, High-Stress Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yoon Suk; Parthasarathy, Triplicane A.; Woodward, Christopher; Dimiduk, Dennis M.; Uchic, Michael D.

    2012-06-01

    A crystallographic constitutive model is developed to capture orientation-sensitive primary and secondary creep behaviors within approximately 20 deg from the [0 0 1] orientation in single-crystal superalloys for the low-temperature and high-stress regime. The crystal plasticity-based constitutive formulations phenomenologically incorporate experimentally observed dislocation micromechanisms. Specifically, the model numerically delineates the nucleation, propagation, and hardening of a < 1 { 1 2} rangle dislocations that shear multiple ?^' } precipitates by creating extended stacking faults. Detailed numerical descriptions involve slip-system kinematics from a/2 < 1 { 1 }0 rangle dislocations shearing the ? -phase matrix, a < 1 { 1 2} rangle stacking fault dislocation ribbons shearing the ?^' } -phase precipitate, interactions between a/2 < 1 { 1 }0 rangle dislocations to nucleate a < 1 1 2rangle dislocations, and interactions between the two types of dislocations. The new constitutive model was implemented in the finite-element method (FEM) framework and used to predict primary and secondary creep of a single-crystal superalloy CMSX-4 in three selected orientations near the [0 0 1] at 1023 K (750 C) and 750 MPa. Simulation results showed a reasonable, qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The simulation results also indicated that a/2 < 1 { 1 }0 rangle matrix dislocations are important to limit the propagation of a < 1 { 1 2} rangle dislocations, which leads to the transition to secondary creep.

  17. Development of Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Fe-Cr-Ni Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloy with Improved High-Temperature Strength and Creep-Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2001-06-15

    In February of 1999, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Special Metals Corporation - Huntington Alloys (formerly INCO Alloys International, Inc.) to develop a modified wrought austenitic stainless alloy with considerably more strength and corrosion resistance than alloy 800H or 800HT, but with otherwise similar engineering and application characteristics. Alloy 800H and related alloys have extensive use in coal flue gas environments, as well as for tubing or structural components in chemical and petrochemical applications. The main concept of the project was make small, deliberate elemental microalloying additions to this Fe-based alloy to produce, with proper processing, fine stable carbide dispersions for enhanced high temperature creep-strength and rupture resistance, with similar or better oxidation/corrosion resistance. The project began with alloy 803, a Fe-25Cr-35NiTi,Nb alloy recently developed by INCO, as the base alloy for modification. Smaller commercial developmental alloy heats were produced by Special Metal. At the end of the project, three rounds of alloy development had produced a modified 803 alloy with significantly better creep resistance above 815 C (1500 C) than standard alloy 803 in the solution-annealed (SA) condition. The new upgraded 803 alloy also had the potential for a processing boost in that creep resistance for certain kinds of manufactured components that was not found in the standard alloy. The upgraded 803 alloy showed similar or slightly better oxidation and corrosion resistance relative to standard 803. Creep strength and oxidation/corrosion resistance of the upgraded 803 alloy were significantly better than found in alloy 800 H, as originally intended. The CRADA was terminated in February 2003. A contributing factor was Special Metals Corporation being in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Additional testing, further commercial scale-up, and any potential invention disclosures were not pursued.

  18. Plasticity and creep of polycrystalline magnesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, C. A.; Holyoke, C. W.; Kronenberg, A. K.; Newman, J.

    2011-12-01

    Carbonates may be incorporated in the mantle at collisional plate boundaries by a number of processes, including subduction of weathered oceanic crust and fault-bounded tectonic slivers of seamounts that are not left behind in the accretionary wedge. High-magnesium carbonates, dolomite and magnesite have been observed in ultra-deep metamorphic collisional terrains and they have been observed (or inferred) in mantle xenoliths from well-preserved (or partially back-reacted) inclusions. Magnesite can also be formed in the mantle by reaction with CO2-rich fluids, and is commonly found within serpentinized peridotite bodies. Once magnesite is formed in subducting slabs, it is likely to remain as an important carbon-bearing phase, as its stability extends over a wide range of (upper, transitional and possibly lower) mantle conditions. In order to quantify the mechanical properties of magnesite aggregates, we performed a series of triaxial compression experiments on cylinders of a natural, fine-grained (d~1 μm) magnesite aggregate at temperatures of 400-775°C and strain rates of 10-4/s - 10-6/s at a constant effective pressure of 300 MPa using a Heard-type gas confining medium deformation apparatus. Experiments performed at 1*10-5/s, show that the strength of magnesite is weakly temperature dependent from 400 to 600°C and becomes strongly temperature dependent at T ≥ 600°C as strengths decrease from 500 MPa to 5 MPa (at 775°C). The microstructures in the sample deformed at 500°C include angular grains and pores, similar to those observed in the starting material. However, the grains and pore boundaries in the sample deformed at 775°C are considerably more rounded. These first deformation experiments on polycrystalline magnesite reveal results indicate a transition in the dominant deformation mechanism with increasing temperature. Based on comparisons with deformation mechanisms of other carbonates, and their associated mechanical responses, we expect that magnesite deforms by low-temperature crystal plasticity at temperatures less than 600°C (at 1*10-5/s) and it deforms by diffusion (coble) creep at higher temperatures. Comparisons of magnesite, calcite, dolomite and olivine strengths along a P-T path within a subducting slab indicate that calcite is the weakest phase in the upper 100 km, where it is stable, but magnesite becomes weaker than all of the other phases at greater depths. These results indicate that magnesite may play a significant role as a weak phase that affects the rheology of subducting slabs.

  19. The effect of high temperature deformation conditions on the secondary recrystallization of MA 754 plate

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; Paik, K.W.; Park, L.J.; Kim, Y.G.; Tundermann, J.H.; Barbadillo, J.J. de

    1998-02-03

    Nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys produced by the mechanical alloying process are being used for high temperature applications because of their excellent high temperature strength which can be useful up to relatively high fraction of their melting points. The high temperature strength of ODS alloys is attributed to the presence of inert, finely dispersed oxide particles which give dispersion strengthening effect by acting as barriers to dislocation motion. In order to develop high temperature strength, fine grains should be transformed into elongated coarse grains which contribute to the retardation of creep process and prolongation of rupture life. This is possible with a high temperature anneal during which secondary recrystallization occurs. INCONEL alloy MA 754 which has been used as a turbine vane material in advanced jet engines obtains a desired grain structure by isothermal annealing. The general objectives of thermomechanical processing (TMP) of ODS alloys is to achieve coarse grain morphologies by means of secondary recrystallization, and to increase the availability of the necessary product forms. However, subsequent secondary recrystallization depends strongly on the temperature, strain, strain rate of the prior TMP operation and such compositional factors as yttria content and the amount of excess oxygen. The problem is more severe in complex shaped parts. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of temperature and strain rate of hot compression on the microstructure and secondary recrystallization of primary rolled INCONEL alloy MA 754 plate. The relationship between as-compressed and as-annealed grain structure is also investigated.

  20. High temperature deformation and ternary alloying of NbCr{sub 2} Laves intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Takasugi, T.; Hanada, S.; Yoshida, M.

    1996-10-01

    A study has been conducted to examine the effect of ternary alloying elements on high temperature deformation of the C15 NbCr{sub 2} based intermetallics in Nb-Cr-X (X = V, Mo and W) alloy systems, which have attractive properties as high temperature structural materials. The high temperature deformation of the C15 NbCr{sub 2} intermetallics can be improved by two alloying methods. One method is based on geometrical consideration for site occupation and atomic size factor of component elements and additive elements in the single phase C15 lattice; addition of Mo and V can promote dislocation movement without introducing significant hardening. The other method is based on microstructural modification through ternary alloying; moderate addition of these elements results in a variety of duplex microstructure consisting of the C15 phase and bcc solid solution without forming any intermediate phases, and can enhance the high temperature deformability. Particularly, alloys with duplex microstructure equilibrating with Cr-rich bcc solid solution is shown to exhibit superior deformability. Also, lattice property of the additive atoms in the C15 structure and phase relation between the C15 structure and the bcc solid solution are investigated by OM, XRD, TEM and ALCHEMI observations and then discussed in association with observed mechanical behavior.

  1. In-situ Phase Transformation and Deformation of Iron at High Pressure andTemperature

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason; Nasiatka, James; Voltolini, Marco; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2008-07-01

    With a membrane based mechanism to allow for pressure change of a sample in aradial diffraction diamond anvil cell (rDAC) and simultaneous infra-red laser heating, itis now possible to investigate texture changes during deformation and phasetransformations over a wide range of temperature-pressure conditions. The device isused to study bcc (alpha), fcc (gamma) and hcp (epislon) iron. In bcc iron, room temperature compression generates a texture characterized by (100) and (111) poles parallel to the compression direction. During the deformation induced phase transformation to hcp iron, a subset of orientations are favored to transform to the hcp structure first and generate a texture of (01-10) at high angles to the compression direction. Upon further deformation, the remaining grains transform, resulting in a texture that obeys the Burgers relationship of (110)bcc // (0001)hcp. This is in contrast to high temperature results that indicate that texture is developed through dominant pyramidal {2-1-12}<2-1-13> and basal (0001)-{2-1-10} slip based on polycrystal plasticity modeling. We also observe that the high temperature fcc phase develops a 110 texture typical for fcc metals deformed in compression.

  2. Measurements for displacement and deformation at high temperature by using edge detection of digital image.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Fang, Xufei; Su, Honghong; Feng, Xue

    2015-10-10

    In this work, we propose a structural deformation measuring method based on structural feature processing (straight line/edge detection) of the recorded digital images for specimens subjected to a high-temperature environment. Both radiation light and oxidation at high temperatures challenge the optics-based measurements. The images of a rectangular piece of copper specimen are obtained by using a bandpass filtering method at high temperatures, then all the edges are detected by using an edge detection operator, and then a Hough transform is conducted to search the straight edges for the calculation of deformation. Especially, due to the severe oxidation, a special seed strategy is adopted to reduce the oxidation effect and obtain an accurate result. For validation, the structural thermal deformation and the values of coefficients of thermal expansion for the copper specimen are measured and compared with data in the literature. The results reveal that the proposed method is accurate to measure the deformation of the structures at high temperatures. PMID:26479811

  3. The effect of high temperature deformation on the hot ductility of niobium-microalloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarandi, Faramarz Mh

    Low hot ductility at the straightening stage of the steel continuous casting process, where the surface temperature ranges from 600 to 1200C, is associated with transverse cracking on the billet surface. This is attributed to various microalloying elements, which are essential for the mechanical characteristics of the final products. Thermomechanical processing is a new approach to alleviate this problem. In this work, two grades of Nb-containing steel, one modified with B, were examined. In order to simulate the key parameters of continuous casting, specimens were melted in situ and subjected to thermal conditions similar to that occurring in a continuous casting mill. They were also deformed at different stages of the thermal schedule. Finally, the hot ductility was evaluated at the end of the thermal schedule, corresponding to the straightening stage in continuous casting at which the hot ductility problem occurs in the continuous casting process. The results showed that the presence of B is noticeably beneficial to the hot ductility. Failure mode analysis was performed and the mechanism of fracture was elaborated. As well, the potential mechanisms under which B can improve the hot ductility were proposed. Deformation during solidification (i.e. in the liquid + solid two phase region) led to a significant loss of hot ductility in both steels. By contrast, deformation in the delta-ferrite region, after solidification, was either detrimental or beneficial depending on the deformation start temperature. The hot ductility was considerably improved in the steel without B when deformation was applied during the delta ? gamma transformation. The effect of such deformation on the other steel grade was not significant. Examination of the microstructure revealed that such improvement is related to a grain refinement in austenite. Therefore, the effect of deformation parameters was studied in detail and the optimum condition leading to the greatest improvement in the hot ductility was determined. Finally, some solutions to the industrial problem in the continuous casting process were proposed.

  4. The influence of hydrogen on the transition from power-law creep to low-temperature plasticity of olivine at lithospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tielke, Jacob; Zimmerman, Mark; Kohlstedt, David

    2015-04-01

    At high-temperature (asthenospheric) conditions, strain rate of olivine-rich mantle rocks follows a power-law dependence on stress. At lower-temperature (lithospheric) conditions, strain rate exhibits an exponential dependence on stress. However, the influence of water (hydrogen) on the transition from high-temperature to low-temperature behavior is poorly constrained. To investigate the influence of water on the transition in flow regimes at lithospheric conditions, deformation experiments on single crystals of San Carlos olivine under both wet (hydrogen-rich) and dry (hydrogen-poor) conditions were carried out. Crystals were oriented relative to the applied load to exert the maximum shear stress on the (100)[001] and (001)[100] dislocation slip systems, which are the dominate (weakest) slip systems at both low temperatures and under wet conditions. Experiments were carried out using a gas-medium apparatus with high resolution in stress (2 MPa) and temperature (2C). For the wet experiments, hydrogen was supplied to the crystals using talc sealed in nickel jackets. Deformation experiments were carried out in either triaxial compression or direct shear geometries at 1000-1300C, differential stresses of 120 to 670 MPa, and resultant strain rates of 6 x 10-6 to 4 x 10-4 s-1. At high-temperature, under dry conditions, strain rate is a power-law function of stress with a stress exponent of 3.5 and an Arrhenius function of temperature with an activation energy of 520 kJ/mol. At low-temperature and high-stress conditions, under dry conditions, strain rate increases exponentially with increasing stress with an activation energy of 360 kJ/mol. These observations are consistent with a transition from a climb-controlled dislocation mechanism at higher temperatures to a glide-controlled dislocation mechanism at lower temperatures for hydrogen-poor olivine crystals. Under wet conditions, the strain rate dependence on stress follows a power-law relationship with a stress exponent of 3.5 and an activation energy of 330 kJ/mol and does not transition to an exponential dependence on stress. Post-deformation electron-backscatter diffraction analyses indicate development of low-angle boundaries with rotation about the [010] axis, consistent with deformation resulting from glide of dislocations on the (100)[001] and (001)[100] slip systems. Water concentrations in crystals from wet experiments determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were 157 to 190 ppm H/Si, similar to values obtained from xenoliths derived from the lithospheric mantle. These analyses indicate that the presence of water in the lithospheric mantle results in considerable weakening and that power-law flow behavior of mantle rocks may operate at shallower depths than previously thought.

  5. Analyzing thermal deformation of large mirrors caused by temperature gradient using a simplified way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bin, Xie; Chi, Yu J.; Ji, Guo P.; Hong, Xiao Z.

    2006-02-01

    Some space-based telescopes have primary mirrors with great size which make active thermal control almost impossible. Sunshield is introduced to provide a relatively stable environment. Primary mirror's diameter is commonly several meters large and several millimeters thick such as in NGST or JWST. Even after segmented, it still could be one meter large. If temperature difference exists between two sides of mirror commonly with no heat source inside, great deformation could happen and then decrease performance of whole system. Theories to analyze deformation considering radius, thickness and material properties of mirror based on simplified models are proposed. Primary mirror is supposed to be spherical. Considering axial symmetry, only part of primary mirror is analyzed. To be convenient, thermal stress is converted to a moment by select proper thermal refercence. Most deformation caused by thermal stress can be seen as impacts of equivalent moment at both ends of selected part. Based on such hypotheses, analysis can be greatly simplified. At last, relationship between deformation and radius, thickness or material properties of primary mirror is given. To testify results, thermal deformation cause by thermal gradient along radius is also calculated using finite element method software: MSC NASTRAN/PATRAN. Considering axial symmetry, only 1/4 part of the segmented primary mirror is modeled. Fitful boundary conditions and temperature loads are also applied to it. Finally results from theoretical and finite element method were coincident. Simplified theories were proved to be accurate.

  6. Beyond the D-DIA: new initiatives for deformation experiments at higher pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Jing, Z.; Yu, T.; Hilairet, N.; Nishiyama, N.

    2011-12-01

    Advances in experimental high-pressure, high-temperature deformation have relied to a large extent on technological developments. From the pioneer work of F.D. Adams [1] in generating differential stress at high pressure to deform rocks plastically to Griggs' famous deformation apparatus [2], each new invention has enabled numerous scientific publications and brought our understanding of rock deformation to a new level. For the past few years, two major workhorses in deformation experiments above 3 GPa are the rotational deformation apparatus (RDA) [3] and the deformation DIA (D-DIA) [4]. These developments brought us to almost 20 GPa under controlled differential stress and strain rates. Several new initiatives are being undertaken at GSECARS aiming at further enhancing experimental capabilities to higher pressures, temperatures and better in situ characterization of the deforming samples. We constructed a modified RDA with microtomography capability at high pressure which is used to image, in situ and in 3D, fabric evolution in multi-phase composites under large shear strains, to shed lights on the physics of complex earth materials during deformation. A large version of D-DIA (DDIA-30) has also been developed taking advantages of the rigidity of large guide blocks for much improved alignment. A 6-6 multianvil cell (MA6-6) [5] is used for deformation experiments with various truncated edge lengths, without having to change the large first-stage anvils. This configuration has the potential to reach pressure conditions corresponding to the lower mantle. We present recent results of these developments, and their potential applications for understanding dynamic processes from the upper mantle to the lower mantle. [1] Adams, F. D. and J. T. Nicolson (1900) Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London. A, 195: 363-401. [2] Griggs, D.T. (1967) Geophys. J. Roy. Astr. Soc., 14:19-31. [3] Yamazaki, D., and S. Karato (2001) Rev. Sci. Instrum., 72:4207-4211. [4] Wang, Y., I. Getting, W. Durham, D. Weidner (2003) Rev. Sci. Instrum., 74:3002-3011. [5] Nishiyama, N., Y. Wang, T. Sanehira, T. Irifune, M. Rivers (2008) High Pres. Res., 28, 307-314.

  7. Creep-fatigue as a possible cause of dental amalgam margin failure.

    PubMed

    Williams, P T; Hedge, G L

    1985-03-01

    Fracture of the margins is the most common cause of failure of dental amalgam restorations. Both corrosion and creep have been identified as possible contributors to this type of failure. The stresses that induce creep may arise from the continued setting expansion of the amalgam, the formation of corrosion products, mastication, or from the thermal expansion of the amalgam during ingestion of hot foods. The latter two are low-frequency cyclic stresses. The amalgams used in dentistry have fusion temperatures only about 40 degrees C above mouth temperature, and they experience grain boundary sliding during creep deformation. Since grain boundary sliding, low-frequency cyclic stresses, and a temperature near the fusion temperature of the alloy are prerequisites for so-called "creep-fatigue fracture", this type of fracture may contribute to amalgam margin failure. Amalgam made from seven different alloys was condensed into stainless steel dies. After being allowed to set for seven days, the specimens were thermally cycled between 4 degrees C and 50 degrees C for 500 and 1000 cycles. Amalgam margin integrity was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy both before and after each cycling period. The amount of margin fracture was calculated after 1000 cycles. Thermal cycling of amalgam restorations placed in stainless steel dies resulted in predominantly intergranular fracturing of the amalgam margins, indicating that creep-fatigue failure may be a significant contributor to in vivo margin fracturing. PMID:3855901

  8. Plastic Creep and Brittle-Ductile Transition in Hydrated Rocks of the Plate Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical observations suggest that the formation of hydrous phyllosilicate-bearing rocks such as serpentinites favor aseismic slip on the plate interface. I review our current understanding of deformation of serpentines and similar phyllosilicates in the first 100 km of subduction and discuss some pending questions on measurements and modeling of the behavior and properties of the complex serpentinite rocks. Experimental studies suggest that serpentines have low enough mechanical strength to act as a "stabilizer" of stable creep, but the actual strength of serpentinites will depend on the exact nature of the crystallographic structure and fabric of the stable serpentine variety. Low-temperature, flat-layered lizardite has strong anisotropy in strength. Lizardite-serpentinite strength will depend crystal-preferred orientation (CPO), with isotropic texture having high strength (>300 MPa) and foliated serpentinites having small strength (<100 MPa), independent of temperature, pressure, and strain rate.