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Sample records for temperature cycle tests

  1. Angular Alignment Testing of Laser Mirror Mounts Under Temperature Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, K. T.; DeYoung, R. J.; Sandford, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A number of commercial and custom-built laser mirror mounts were tested for angular alignment sensitivity during temperature cycling from room temperature (20 C) to 40 C. A Nd:YAG laser beam was reflected off a mirror that was held by the mount under test and was directed to a position-sensitive detector. Horizontal and vertical movement of the reflected beam was recorded, and the angular movement, as a function of temperature (coefficient of thermal tilt (CTT)) was calculated from these data. In addition, the amount of hysteresis in the movement after cycling from room temperature to 40 C and back was determined. All commercial mounts showed greater angular movement than the simpler National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (NASA LASE) custom mirror mounts.

  2. Investigation results of optical fiber splice cycle temperature tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Semen R.; Inyakin, Vladimir V.; Miftyachitdinov, Sergey H.; Ploshay, Leonid L.

    2001-10-01

    Results of cycle temperature tests of optical fiber fusion splices are represented. An algorithm, method and object of investigation are described. Thermochamber providing temperature range from -- 60 degree(s)C to + 50 degree(s)C was used to carry out temperature tests. Whole delivery length of optical cable was tested. Fibers at the cable end were sequentially joined together. Two splice groups were investigated. First group consisted of splices with reflection attenuation less than 90 dB. Second group included splices with reflection attenuation more than 100 dB. One-half of each group splices was protected by sleeves, another -- by silicon gel. Splice parameters were measured by optical time domain reflectometer.

  3. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  4. Long-term storage life of light source modules by temperature cycling accelerated life test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ningning, Sun; Manqing, Tan; Ping, Li; Jian, Jiao; Xiaofeng, Guo; Wentao, Guo

    2014-05-01

    Light source modules are the most crucial and fragile devices that affect the life and reliability of the interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). While the light emitting chips were stable in most cases, the module packaging proved to be less satisfactory. In long-term storage or the working environment, the ambient temperature changes constantly and thus the packaging and coupling performance of light source modules are more likely to degrade slowly due to different materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion in the bonding interface. A constant temperature accelerated life test cannot evaluate the impact of temperature variation on the performance of a module package, so the temperature cycling accelerated life test was studied. The main failure mechanism affecting light source modules is package failure due to solder fatigue failure including a fiber coupling shift, loss of cooling efficiency and thermal resistor degradation, so the Norris-Landzberg model was used to model solder fatigue life and determine the activation energy related to solder fatigue failure mechanism. By analyzing the test data, activation energy was determined and then the mean life of light source modules in different storage environments with a continuously changing temperature was simulated, which has provided direct reference data for the storage life prediction of IFOG.

  5. Cycling Performance of a Columnar-Structured Complex Perovskite in a Temperature Gradient Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, N.; Sebold, D.; Sohn, Y. J.; Mauer, G.; Vaßen, R.

    2015-10-01

    To increase the efficiency of turbines for the power generation and the aircraft industry, advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are required. They need to be long-term stable at temperatures higher than 1200 °C. Nowadays, yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is applied as standard TBC material. But its long-term application at temperatures higher than 1200 °C leads to detrimental phase changes and sintering effects. Therefore, new materials have to be investigated, for example, complex perovskites. They provide high melting points, high thermal expansion coefficients and thermal conductivities of approx. 2.0 W/(m K). In this work, the complex perovskite La(Al1/4Mg1/2Ta1/4)O3 (LAMT) was investigated. It was deposited by the suspension plasma spraying (SPS) process, resulting in a columnar microstructure of the coating. The coatings were tested in thermal cycling gradient tests and they show excellent results, even though some phase decomposition was found.

  6. Long term testing of start-stop cycles on high temperature PEM fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Arvind; Kabza, Alexander; Scholta, Joachim

    2015-03-01

    A PEM fuel cell with an operating temperature above 100 °C is desired for increasing the kinetics of reactions, reduced sensitivity to impurities of the fuel, as well as for the reduction of the requirements on thermal and water management systems. High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (HT-PEMFC) can effectively be combined with CHP systems to offer a simple system design and higher overall system efficiencies. For HT-PEMFC systems, the development of elaborated start/stop strategies is essential in mitigation of fuel cell degradation during these events. A 5 cell co-flow stack is assembled with BASF P1100W membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an active area of 163.5 cm2. Continuous operation and more than 1500 start stop cycles have been performed in order to study the degradation effects of both continuous operation and of repeated start stops using a protective start-stop algorithm, which is designed to avoid the formation of aggressive cell potentials. The repeated use of this procedure led to a degradation of 26 μV/cycle at a current density of 0.25 A cm-2 and 11 μV/cycle at a current density of 0.03 A cm-2. At open circuit voltage (OCV), a higher degradation rate of 133 μV/cycle was observed.

  7. Current activities in standardization of high-temperature, low-cycle-fatigue testing techniques in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Ellis, J. Rodney; Swindeman, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard E606-80 is the most often used recommended testing practice for low-cycle-fatigue (LCF) testing in the United States. The standard was first adopted in 1977 for LCF testing at room temperature and was modified in 1980 to include high-temperature testing practices. Current activity within ASTM is aimed at extending the E606-80 recommended practices to LCF under thermomechanical conditions, LCF in high-pressure hydrogen, and LCF in metal-matrix composite materials. Interlaboratory testing programs conducted to generate a technical base for modifying E606-80 for the aforementioned LCF test types are discussed.

  8. Low Temperature Life-cycle Testing of a Lithium-ion Battery for Low-earth-orbiting Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha

    2004-01-01

    A flight-qualified, lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery developed for the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 lander is undergoing life-testing at low temperature under a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) profile to assess its capability to provide long term energy storage for aerospace missions. NASA has embarked upon an ambitious course to return humans to the moon by 2015-2020 in preparation for robotic and human exploration of Mars and robotic exploration of the moons of outer planets. Li-ion batteries are excellent candidates to provide power and energy storage for multiple aspects of these missions due to their low specific energy, low energy density, and excellent low temperature performance. Laboratory testing of Li-ion technology is necessary in order to assess lifetime, characterize multi-cell battery-level performance under aerospace conditions, and to gauge safety aspects of the technology. Life-cycle testing provides an opportunity to examine battery-level performance and the dynamics of individual cells in the stack over the entire life of the battery. Data generated through this testing will be critical to establish confidence in the technology for its widespread use in manned and unmanned mission. This paper discusses the performance of the 28 volt, 25 ampere-hour battery through 6000 LEO cycles, which corresponds to one year on LEO orbit. Testing is being performed at 0 C and 40% depth-of-discharge. Individual cell behaviors and their effect on the performance of the battery are described. Capacity, impedance, energy efficiency and end-of-discharge voltage at 1000 cycle intervals are reported. Results from this life-testing will help contribute to the database on battery-level performance of aerospace Li-ion batteries and low temperature cycling under LEO conditions.

  9. Effects of test design and temperature in a partial life-cycle study with the freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum.

    PubMed

    Macken, Ailbhe; Le Page, Gareth; Hayfield, Amanda; Williams, Timothy D; Brown, Rebecca J

    2012-09-01

    Potamopyrgus antipodarum is a candidate for a standardized mollusk partial life-cycle study. This is a comparative study of two test designs (microplate and beaker), with additional endpoints to the proposed guideline methods, for example, tracking of continuous reproductive output over 28 d and attributing it to individual female snails. In addition, an investigation of the effects of temperature (16, 20, and 25°C) on reproduction was also conducted employing the microplate design. PMID:22573501

  10. Combined effects of temperature and pyriproxyfen stress in a full life-cycle test with Chironomus riparius (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Tassou, Koffi Tcha; Schulz, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    Traditional risk assessment guidelines employ acute or chronic toxicity tests for a maximum of one generation of organisms. These tests are usually performed in the laboratory at a constant standard temperature, although in the field organisms may experience different temperatures, which may be a source of additional stress. Climate change-related temperature shifts may have serious impacts on ectotherm populations that are key components of the aquatic food chains, particularly in combination with the exposure of pollutants affecting their development. Here, a chronic full life-cycle test with Chironomus riparius from the first-instar larvae in the parental (P) generation until emergence in the subsequent F1 generation was conducted at different temperatures (16 and 24C), testing the effect of the insect growth regulator pyriproxyfen at 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100?g/L. The emergence ratios were significantly affected by the interaction of temperature, chemical treatment, and generation, showing that, at lower temperatures, the negative effects of pyriproxyfen exposure were significantly greater in the F1 generation than in the P generation. The development rate showed that the effects of the interactions were significant in the F1 generation, underscoring the importance of extended exposure as a useful amendment to the risk assessment of those agrochemicals potentially influencing developmental and reproductive parameters in intact organisms. Moreover, results demonstrated that any difference from the standard temperature of 20C might result in additional stress, leading to disruption of biological functions in C. riparius, highlighting the interaction among different global climate change-related variables. PMID:22865670

  11. Tests of cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Paton, C D; Hopkins, W G

    2001-01-01

    Performance tests are an integral component of assessment for competitive cyclists in practical and research settings. Cycle ergometry is the basis of most of these tests. Most cycle ergometers are stationary devices that measure power while a cyclist pedals against sliding friction (e.g. Monark), electromagnetic braking (e.g. Lode), or air resistance (e.g. Kingcycle). Mobile ergometers (e.g. SRM cranks) allow measurement of power through the drive train of the cyclist's own bike in real or simulated competitions on the road, in a velodrome or in the laboratory. The manufacturers' calibration of all ergometers is questionable; dynamic recalibration with a special rig is therefore desirable for comparison of cyclists tested on different ergometers. For monitoring changes in performance of a cyclist, an ergometer should introduce negligible random error (variation) in its measurements; in this respect, SRM cranks appear to be the best ergometer, but more comparison studies of ergometers are needed. Random error in the cyclist's performance should also be minimised by choice of an appropriate type of test. Tests based on physiological measures (e.g. maximum oxygen uptake, anaerobic threshold) and tests requiring self-selection of pace (e.g. constant-duration and constant-distance tests) usually produce random error of at least approximately 2 to 3% in the measure of power output. Random error as low as approximately 1% is possible for measures of power in 'all-out' sprints, incremental tests, constant-power tests to exhaustion and probably also time trials in an indoor velodrome. Measures with such low error might be suitable for tracking the small changes in competitive performance that matter to elite cyclists. PMID:11428686

  12. Reliability testing of the Hughes temperature controlled 1/4 watt split cycle cryogenic cooler (HD-1045 (V)/UA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James; Dunmire, Howard; Samuels, Raemon; Trively, Martin

    1989-12-01

    The U.S. Army CECOM Center for Night Vision and Electro-Optics (C2NVEO) is responsible for developing cryogenic coolers for all infrared imaging systems for the Army. C2NVEO also maintains configuration management control of the forward-looking infrared (FLIR) Common Module coolers used in thermal imagers in fielded Army weapon systems such as: M60A3 and M1 Tanks, Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) System, tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided (TOW) Missile System, and Army Attack Helicopters. Currently, there are over 30,000 coolers in fielded systems and several thousand more are added each year. C2NVEO conducts development programs and monitors contractor internal research and development efforts to improve cooler performance such as reliability, audio noise, power consumption, and output vibration. The HD-1045 1/4-Watt Split Stirling Cooler was originally designed and developed by the C2NVEO in the early 1970s as a replacement for the gas bottle/cryostat used on the Manportable Common Thermal Night Sights. To date, however, the HD-1045 cooler has been used in the field in the Integrated Sight Unit (ISU) of the BFV System and is currently being used in the Driver Thermal Viewer (DTV) full scale development program. This document describes and reports the results of reliability testing done on Hughes Temperature Controlled 1/4 Watt split Cycle Cryogenic Coolers (HD-1045 (V)/UA), referred to herein as the coolers.

  13. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  14. Optical fiber distributed sensing structural health monitoring (SHM) strain measurements taken during cryotank Y-joint test article load cycling at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, W. S.

    2007-09-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240°C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  15. High-Temperature, Low-Cycle Fatigue of Copper-Base Alloys for Rocket Nozzles. Part 1: Data Summary for Materials Tested in Prior Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A more detailed analysis of the results obtained in 188 previously reported low-cycle fatigue tests of various candidate materials for regeneratively-cooled, reusable rocket nozzle liners was reported. Plots of load range versus cycles were reported for each test along with a stress-strain hysteresis loop near half-life. In addition, a summary table was provided to compare N5 (cycles to a five percent load range drop) and Nf (cycles to complete specimen separation) values for each test.

  16. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harkness, J.D.

    1980-04-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cycled under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  17. Transposed critical temperature Rankine thermodynamic cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    The transposed critical temperature (TPCT) is shown to be an extremely important thermodynamic property in the selection of the working fluid and turbine states for optimized geothermal power plants operating on a closed organic (binary) Rankine cycle. When the optimum working fluid composition and process states are determined for given source and sink conditions (7 parameter optimization), turbine inlet states are found to be consistently adjacent to the low pressure side of the working fluids' TPCT line on pressure-enthalpy coordinates. Although the TPCT concepts herein may find numerous future applications in high temperature, advanced cycles for fossil or nuclear fired steam power plants and in supercritical organic Rankine heat recovery bottoming cycles for Diesel engines, this discussion is limited to moderate temperature (150 to 250/sup 0/C) closed simple organic Rankine cycle geothermal power plants. Conceptual design calculations pertinent to the first geothermal binary cycle Demonstration Plant are included.

  18. Electrical characteristics for Sn-Ag-Cu solder bump with Ti/Ni/Cu under-bump metallization after temperature cycling tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, T. I.; Lin, Y. C.; Duh, J. G.; Hsu, Tom

    2006-10-01

    Lead-free solder bumps have been widely used in current flip-chip technology (FCT) due to environmental issues. Solder joints after temperature cycling tests were employed to investigate the interfacial reaction between the Ti/Ni/Cu under-bump metallization and Sn-Ag-Cu solders. The interfacial morphology and quantitative analysis of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) were obtained by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and field emission electron probe microanalysis (FE-EPMA). Various types of IMCs such as (Cu1-x,Agx)6Sn5, (Cu1-y,Agy)3Sn, and (Ag1-z,Cuz)3Sn were observed. In addition to conventional I-V measurements by a special sample preparation technique, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) internal probing system was introduced to evaluate the electrical characteristics in the IMCs after various test conditions. The electrical data would be correlated to microstructural evolution due to the interfacial reaction between the solder and under-bump metallurgy (UBM). This study demonstrated the successful employment of an internal nanoprobing approach, which would help further understanding of the electrical behavior within an IMC layer in the solder/UBM assembly.

  19. Cycle life test of secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the life cycling program on rechargeable calls are reported. Information on required data, the use of which the data will be put, application details, including orbital description, charge control methods, load rquirements, etc., are given. Cycle tests were performed on 660 sealed, nickel cadmium cells. The cells consisted of seven sample classifications ranging form 3.0 to 20 amp. hours. Nickel cadmium, silver cadmium, and silver zinc sealed cells, excluding synchronous orbit and accelerated test packs were added. The capacities of the nickel cadmium cells, the silver cadmium and the silver zinc cells differed in range of amp hrs. The cells were cylced under different load, charge control, and temperature conditions. All cell packs are recharged by use of a pack voltage limit. All charging is constant current until the voltage limit is reached.

  20. Electronic assembly thermal testing - Dwell/duration/cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbel, Mark; Clawson, James F.

    1990-01-01

    Testing of electronic assemblies varies throughout industry, NASA, and the military. Differences include test levels, atmospheric versus vacuum testing of assemblies, dwell durations at temperature extremes (especially high temperature), and thermal cycling versus dwell testing. Of particular interest are the different philosophies of thermal cycling versus single-cycle thermal dwell. An examination of the various failure physics for electronic assemblies has been initiated at JPL. The intent is to determine which failure modes are best revealed by thermal cycling testing and which are susceptible to high-temperature dwell physics. Preliminary results of this study are presented, along with discussions of testing goals, flight environments, reliability models, and the differences between industry and JPL design/test approaches.

  1. The role of creep in high temperature low cycle fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Spera, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The significance of the role that creep can play in governing high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue resistance is investigated by conducting strain cycling tests on two high-temperature stainless steel alloys and making concurrent measurements of stress, temperature, and strain at various frequencies. The results are then analyzed in terms of damage imposed by creep and fatigue components. It is shown that creep can play an important and sometimes dominant role in low cycle fatigue at high temperatures. The results of the study include the findings that: (1) the simple life-fraction theory described is adequate for calculating creep damage when the cyclic creep rupture curve is used as a basis for analysis; (2) a method of universal slopes originally developed for room temperature use is sufficiently accurate at high temperature to be used to calculate pure fatigue damage; and (3) a linear creep-fatigue damage rule can explain the transitions observed from one failure mode to another.

  2. PSOC cycle testing method for lithium-ion secondary batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ken; Negishi, Akira; Nozaki, Ken; Tsuda, Izumi; Takano, Kiyonami

    A cycle testing procedure is proposed which carries out charge and discharge in a partial state of charge (PSOC) with some testing levels such as an averaged state of charge, temperature, etc. The PSOC cycle test with this procedure was carried out for a commercial lithium-ion cell for about 20,000 cycles, and the testing procedure and test results are discussed. The features of the degradation due to PSOC cycle test in the tested lithium-ion cell were clarified as follows. The degradation during the PSOC cycle test was greater at higher environmental temperature. The degradation was greatest at a high average SOC, and smallest at SOC=50%. The degradation increased again at a low average SOC. In the test results for 2 years with 20,000 PSOC cycles, which converted to 2200 cycles of full-capacity charge and discharge, capacity degradation was 32% even at the greatest degradation at 318 K and 8% or less at 278 K. The proposed testing procedure is useful for evaluating a cell used on partial charge and discharge cycles.

  3. A combined cycle engine test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C.

    1995-09-01

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  4. Fast Response Temperature Measurements in Stirling Cycle Cryocooler Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, K.; Dadd, M. W.; Bailey, P. B.; Stone, C. R.

    2008-03-01

    One reason that heat transfer processes are not well understood is the difficulty of obtaining reliable temperature measurements when gas temperatures vary rapidly. In the work described here gas temperatures have been measured using a fine wire resistance thermometer with a 3.8 micron active sensor. The equipment represented the basic elements of a cryocooler: a clearance seal linear compressor and a wire mesh regenerator. Both were operated close to ambient temperature, with gas temperatures being measured close to the regenerator. The test rig was run at different volume ratios, frequencies (8-50 Hz), gases and filling pressures (1-26 bar). The waveforms of the gas temperature were found to vary dramatically for differing flow regimes. The results suggested that the thermometer was measuring the temperatures of two distinct volumes of gas, and that the gas must remain stratified in the compression space. A flow transition was identified from the cycle-by-cycle variations in temperature. The critical Reynolds number was determined to be 9.6-11. At the critical condition, the temperature was so unstable that fluctuations up to 250 Hz were observed. A series of validation tests have confirmed that the observed temperatures were not artifacts.

  5. Testing of a Stirling cycle cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.; Keshock, E.G.; Murphy, R.W.

    1988-09-01

    Stirling cycle coolers have long been used as low temperature refrigeration devices. They are relatively compact, reliable, commercially available, and use helium as the working fluid. The Stirling cycle, in principle, can be used for household refrigeration and heat pumping applications as well. Currently, these applications are almost entirely provided by the vapor compression technology using chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) as working fluids. It has been known that CFCs cause depletion of the ozone layer that protects the earth against harmful levels of ultraviolet radiation from the sun. A recent report of a ''hole'' in the ozone layer above Antarctica and of possible environmental and health consequences from ozone depletion aroused public attention. The urgent need to reduce the future used of CFCs should instigate investigation of non-CFC alternative technologies. The Stirling cooler technology, which does not use CFCs, could be a viable alternative. A laboratory test of the performance of a Stirling cooler is reported and its implications for household refrigeration are explored. 11 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Ni-MH storage test and cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dell, R. Dan; Klein, Glenn C.; Schmidt, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Gates Aerospace Batteries is conducting two long term test programs to fully characterize the NiMH cell technology for aerospace applications. The first program analyzes the effects of long term storage upon cell performance. The second program analyzes cycle life testing and preliminary production lot testing. This paper summarizes these approaches to testing the NiMH couple and culminates with initial storage and testing recommendations. Long term storage presents challenges to deter the adverse condition of capacity fade in NiMH cells. Elevated but stabilized pressures and elevated but stabilized end-of-charge voltages also appear to be a characteristic phenomenon of long term storage modes. However, the performance degradation is dependent upon specific characteristics of the metal-hydride alloy. To date, there is no objective evidence with which to recommend the proper method for storage and handling of NiMH cells upon shipment. This is particularly critical due to limited data points that indicate open circuit storage at room temperature for 60 to 90 days will result in irrecoverable capacity loss. Accordingly a test plan was developed to determine what method of mid-term to long-term storage will prevent irrecoverable capacity loss. The explicit assumption is that trickle charging at some rate above the self-discharge rate will prevent the irreversible chemical changes to the negative electrode that result in the irrecoverable capacity loss. Another premise is that lower storage temperatures, typically 0 C for aerospace customers, will impede any negative chemical reactions. Three different trickle charge rates are expected to yield a fairly flat response with respect to recoverable capacity versus baseline cells in two different modes of open circuit. Specific attributes monitored include: end-of-charge voltage, end-of-charge pressure, mid-point discharge voltage, capacity, and end-of-discharge pressure. Cycle life testing and preliminary production lot testing continue to dominate the overall technology development effort at GAB. The cell life test program reflects continuing improvements in baseline cell designs. Performance improvements include lower and more stable charge voltages and pressures. The continuing review of production lot testing assures conformance to the design criteria and expectations. This is especially critical during this period of transferring technology from research and development status to production.

  7. Plasma-Catalysis During Temperature Transient Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoard, John

    2001-08-05

    A combination of catalysts is used together with nonthermal plasma in simulated diesel exhaust, while the gas temperature is varied. The catalysts both store and convert pollutants. As a result, pollutant concentrations during temperature ramps are different than those at steady state conditions. The data are presented for plasma followed by BaY, alumina, and Pt catalysts in simulated exhaust. When temperature ramps from high to low, apparent NOx conversion is quite high. However, when temperature is ramped from low to high, lower apparent conversions are seen. In a typical test cycle, average NOx conversion between 100 and 400 C is 60%. Peak conversion during the down ramp is over 90%, and minimum conversion during the up ramp is 30%. The composition of the effluent gas also varies during the temperature cycle. Intermediates such as methyl nitrate and hydrogen cyanide are not present following the combination of catalysts.

  8. Low-cycle fatigue testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieurade, H. P.

    1978-01-01

    The good design of highly stressed mechanical components requires accurate knowledge of the service behavior of materials. The main methods for solving the problems of designers are: determination of the mechanical properties of the material after cyclic stabilization; plotting of resistance to plastic deformation curves; effect of temperature on the life on low cycle fatigue; and simulation of notched parts behavior.

  9. Combined cycle thermal performance diagnostic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, T.P.

    1999-11-01

    The trend toward higher combined cycle power plant capacity and efficiency have resulted in increasingly complex thermodynamic designs. The testing methods, instrumentation, and analytical techniques employed on these complex combined cycle systems have advanced commensurate with the needs to not only validate the design, but also to diagnose thermal performance problems. More accurate techniques have been developed to accurately determine critical thermal performance operating parameters of the gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators (HRSG`s), and steam turbine. These diagnostic methods borrow heavily from ASME power Test Code acceptance test techniques, but go much deeper into sub-system and sub-component performance. The knowledge and expertise developed through years of new development testing at GE has been channeled into the aftermarket service diagnostic business. This is to address the operation and maintenance needs of the owners and operators of these complex combined cycle plants. Owners of these plants now have the opportunity to have their plant performance diagnosed accurately and cost-effectively. This paper will present the testing methods and analytical techniques associated with diagnosing thermal performance problems on combined cycle plants.

  10. Solar High Temperature Water-Splitting Cycle with Quantum Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Robin; Davenport, Roger; Talbot, Jan; Herz, Richard; Genders, David; Symons, Peter; Brown, Lloyd

    2014-04-25

    A sulfur family chemical cycle having ammonia as the working fluid and reagent was developed as a cost-effective and efficient hydrogen production technology based on a solar thermochemical water-splitting cycle. The sulfur ammonia (SA) cycle is a renewable and sustainable process that is unique in that it is an all-fluid cycle (i.e., with no solids handling). It uses a moderate temperature solar plant with the solar receiver operating at 800°C. All electricity needed is generated internally from recovered heat. The plant would operate continuously with low cost storage and it is a good potential solar thermochemical hydrogen production cycle for reaching the DOE cost goals. Two approaches were considered for the hydrogen production step of the SA cycle: (1) photocatalytic, and (2) electrolytic oxidation of ammonium sulfite to ammonium sulfate in aqueous solutions. Also, two sub-cycles were evaluated for the oxygen evolution side of the SA cycle: (1) zinc sulfate/zinc oxide, and (2) potassium sulfate/potassium pyrosulfate. The laboratory testing and optimization of all the process steps for each version of the SA cycle were proven in the laboratory or have been fully demonstrated by others, but further optimization is still possible and needed. The solar configuration evolved to a 50 MW(thermal) central receiver system with a North heliostat field, a cavity receiver, and NaCl molten salt storage to allow continuous operation. The H2A economic model was used to optimize and trade-off SA cycle configurations. Parametric studies of chemical plant performance have indicated process efficiencies of ~20%. Although the current process efficiency is technically acceptable, an increased efficiency is needed if the DOE cost targets are to be reached. There are two interrelated areas in which there is the potential for significant efficiency improvements: electrolysis cell voltage and excessive water vaporization. Methods to significantly reduce water evaporation are proposed for future activities. Electrolysis membranes that permit higher temperatures and lower voltages are attainable. The oxygen half cycle will need further development and improvement.

  11. Wheelchair batteries: driving cycles and testing.

    PubMed

    Kauzlarich, J J; Ulrich, V; Bresler, M; Bruning, T

    1983-07-01

    The battery performance of electric wheelchairs was measured under indoor and outdoor conditions, and simulated driving cycles for these two environments were derived from these tests. Driving cycles were used to bench-test deep discharge wet cell and gel cell lead-acid batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and experimental nickel-zinc batteries. Results of this study support the conclusion that deep discharge wet cell lead-acid batteries satisfy wheelchair requirements and are the most economical choice. The effect of simulated wheelchair controller pulse width modulation on battery discharge compared to d.c. discharge was found to be negligible. A simple model analogous to Miner's Rule (3) plus results plotted on a Ragone chart of average power versus discharge time were found to correlate the effect of the highly variable actual power requirements of an electric wheelchair. Miner's Rule can predict battery performance for a given driving cycle. PMID:6887065

  12. DIETS FOR 'CERIODAPHNIA RETICULATA' LIFE CYCLE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two diets were compared for the cladoceran, Ceriodaphnia reticulata for use in culturing and life-cycle toxicity tests. One diet is a suspension of dry yeast dissolved in distilled water and fed at a rate of 250 microgram per animal. The other diet is prepared from frozen adult b...

  13. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope solar cell module thermal cycle test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Alexander; Edge, Ted; Willowby, Douglas; Gerlach, Lothar

    1992-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) solar array consists of two identical double roll-out wings designed after the Hughes flexible roll-up solar array (FRUSA) and was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) to meet specified HST power output requirements at the end of 2 years, with a functional lifetime of 5 years. The requirement that the HST solar array remain functional both mechanically and electrically during its 5-year lifetime meant that the array must withstand 30,000 low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycles between approximately +100 and -100 C. In order to evaluate the ability of the array to meet this requirement, an accelerated thermal cycle test in vacuum was conducted at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), using two 128-cell solar array modules which duplicated the flight HST solar array. Several other tests were performed on the modules. The thermal cycle test was interrupted after 2,577 cycles, and a 'cold-roll' test was performed on one of the modules in order to evaluate the ability of the flight array to survive an emergency deployment during the dark (cold) portion of an orbit. A posttest static shadow test was performed on one of the modules in order to analyze temperature gradients across the module. Finally, current in-flight electrical performance data from the actual HST flight solar array will be tested.

  15. High-temperature combustor liner tests in structural component response test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Jet engine combustor liners were tested in the structural component response facility at NASA Lewis. In this facility combustor liners were thermally cycled to simulate a flight envelope of takeoff, cruise, and return to idle. Temperatures were measured with both thermocouples and an infrared thermal imaging system. A conventional stacked-ring louvered combustor liner developed a crack at 1603 cycles. This test was discontinued after 1728 cycles because of distortion of the liner. A segmented or float wall combustor liner tested at the same heat flux showed no significant change after 1600 cycles. Changes are being made in the facility to allow higher temperatures.

  16. Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures in a research engine for gas stream temperatures cycling between 1067 and 1567 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Yeh, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine blade temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled blades in a research turbojet engine, cycling between cruise and idle conditions. Transient data were recorded by a high speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 3.9 K (7 F). Turbine inlet pressures were repeatable between cycles to within 0.32 N/sq cm (0.47 psia). The tests were conducted at a gas stream temperature of 1567 K (2360 F) at cruise, and 1067 K (1460 F) at idle conditions. The corresponding gas stream pressures were about 26.2 and 22.4 N/sq cm (38 and 32.5 psia) respectively. The nominal coolant inlet temperature was about 811 K (1000 F).

  17. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  18. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  19. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  20. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  1. 40 CFR 90.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 90.410 Section 90...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.410 Engine test cycle. (a) Follow the appropriate 6-mode test cycle for Class I, I-B and...

  2. 12 CFR 252.145 - Mid-cycle stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mid-cycle stress test. 252.145 Section 252.145... (CONTINUED) ENHANCED PRUDENTIAL STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.145 Mid-cycle stress test. (a) Mid-cycle stress test requirement. In addition to the...

  3. 12 CFR 252.145 - Mid-cycle stress test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mid-cycle stress test. 252.145 Section 252.145... (CONTINUED) ENHANCED PRUDENTIAL STANDARDS (REGULATION YY) Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Covered Companies § 252.145 Mid-cycle stress test. (a) Mid-cycle stress test requirement. In addition to the...

  4. Non-Nuclear Validation Test Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    Both NASA and DOE have programs that are investigating advanced power conversion cycles for planetary surface power on the moon or Mars, or for next generation nuclear power plants on earth. Although open Brayton cycles are in use for many applications (combined cycle power plants, aircraft engines), only a few closed Brayton cycles have been tested. Experience with closed Brayton cycles coupled to nuclear reactors is even more limited and current projections of Brayton cycle performance are based on analytic models. This report describes and compares experimental results with model predictions from a series of non-nuclear tests using a small scale closed loop Brayton cycle available at Sandia National Laboratories. A substantial amount of testing has been performed, and the information is being used to help validate models. In this report we summarize the results from three kinds of tests. These tests include: 1) test results that are useful for validating the characteristic flow curves of the turbomachinery for various gases ranging from ideal gases (Ar or Ar/He) to non-ideal gases such as CO2, 2) test results that represent shut down transients and decay heat removal capability of Brayton loops after reactor shut down, and 3) tests that map a range of operating power versus shaft speed curve and turbine inlet temperature that are useful for predicting stable operating conditions during both normal and off-normal operating behavior. These tests reveal significant interactions between the reactor and balance of plant. Specifically these results predict limited speed up behavior of the turbomachinery caused by loss of load, the conditions for stable operation, and for direct cooled reactors, the tests reveal that the coast down behavior during loss of power events can extend for hours provided the ultimate heat sink remains available.

  5. Titan's latitudinal temperature distribution and seasonal cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Potter, B. E.

    1986-02-01

    Voyager IRIS brightness temperature measurements of Titan at a wavelength of 530/cm are crudely indicative of ground or lower tropospheric temperatures and indicate 93 K for the equator and 91 K for both northern and southern high latitudes. The symmetry between north and south is unexpected for the time of Voyager encounter (Northern Titan spring). It is shown that this near-symmetry can arise naturally in a model where the poles are 'pinned' year-round at the dew point of CH4-N2 lakes or, more probably, a CH4-N2 rich surface layer on a deep ethane-rich ocean. For a polar temperature of 91 K, the model implies that the atmosphere contains somewhat less than 8 percent mole fraction of CH4.

  6. Titan's latitudinal temperature distribution and seasonal cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Potter, B. E.

    1986-01-01

    Voyager IRIS brightness temperature measurements of Titan at a wavelength of 530/cm are crudely indicative of ground or lower tropospheric temperatures and indicate 93 K for the equator and 91 K for both northern and southern high latitudes. The symmetry between north and south is unexpected for the time of Voyager encounter (Northern Titan spring). It is shown that this near-symmetry can arise naturally in a model where the poles are 'pinned' year-round at the dew point of CH4-N2 lakes or, more probably, a CH4-N2 rich surface layer on a deep ethane-rich ocean. For a polar temperature of 91 K, the model implies that the atmosphere contains somewhat less than 8 percent mole fraction of CH4.

  7. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  8. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.336-79 Diesel engine test cycle. (a) The following 13-mode cycle shall be followed in dynamometer...

  9. Thermal cycling tests on surface-mount assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.W.

    1988-03-01

    The capability of surface-mount (SM) solder joints to withstand various thermal cycle stresses was evaluated through electrical circuit resistance changes of a test pattern and by visual examination for cracks in the solder after exposure to thermal cycling. The joints connected different electrical components, primarily leadless-chip carriers (LCCs), and printed wiring-board (PWB) pads on different laminate substrates. Laminate compositions were epoxy-glass and polyimide-glass with and without copper/Invar/copper (CIC) inner layers, polyimide-quartz, epoxy-Kevlar, and polyimide-Kevlar. The most resistant joints were between small LCCs (24 and 48 pins) and polyimide-glass laminate with CIC inner layers. Processing in joint formation was found to be an important part of joint resistant. Thermal cycling was varied with respect to both time and temperature. A few resistors, capacitors, and inductors showed opens after 500 30-min cycles between -65/degree/C and 125/degree/C. Appreciable moisture contents were measured for laminate materials, especially those of polyimide-Kevlar after equilibration in 100/percent/ relative humidity at room temperature. If not removed or reduced, moisture can cause delamination in vapor-phase soldering. 17 refs, 12 figs.,10 tabs.

  10. Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

  11. Thermal Cycling of Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) Test Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint US/Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA is currently being used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station (ISS), which will use arrays based on the same solar cells used in the MCSA. The US supplied the photovoltaic power modules (PPMs) and provided technical and programmatic oversight while Russia provided the array support structures and deployment mechanism and built and tested the array. In order to ensure that there would be no problems with the interface between US and Russian hardware, an accelerated thermal life cycle test was performed at NASA Lewis Research Center on two representative samples of the MCSA. Over an eight-month period (August 1994 - March 1995), two 15-cell MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles (+80 C to -100 C), equivalent to four years on-orbit. The test objectives, facility, procedure and results are described in this paper. Post-test inspection and evaluation revealed no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early as an artifact of the test and removed from consideration. The interesting nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell, which only occurred at elevated temperatures, is discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the US solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit).

  12. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test cycle validation criteria. 86... Procedures § 86.1341-98 Test cycle validation criteria. Section 86.1341-98 includes text that specifies... excluded from both cycle validation and the integrated work used for emissions calculations. (4)...

  13. Low-cycle fatigue of a VZh175 high-temperature alloy under elastoplastic deformation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, M. S.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Bakradze, M. M.; Gorbovets, M. A.; Gol'dberg, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    The low-cycle fatigue of a VZh175 nickel superalloy is studied under conditions of complete deformation per loading cycle at an initial cycle asymmetry R = 0, a deformation amplitude ɛa = 0.4-0.6%, and a temperature of 20 and 650°C. The specific features of cyclic hardening/softening of the alloy under these conditions are detected. The mechanisms of fatigue crack nucleation and growth are analyzed as functions of the deformation amplitude and the test temperature.

  14. Ammonia/water absorption cycles with relatively high generator temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the performance of single-state ammonia/water absorption cycles (COPs up to 0.8) is appreciably superior to that of commercial single-state water/lithium bromide appliances (COPs up to 0.72), with ammonia/water cycles having the additional advantage of satisfactory operation with air cooling and in refrigeration and heat pump modes, if high-temperature collectors, such as evacuated tubular collectors, are available. In particular, the improved performance of the two-stage cycle should permit improvement in overall steady-state system performance when used in conjunction with evacuated tubular collectors.

  15. Mantle temperature under drifting deformable continents during the supercontinent cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    The thermal heterogeneity of the Earth's mantle under the drifting continents during a supercontinent cycle is a controversial issue in earth science. Here, a series of numerical simulations of mantle convection are performed in 3D spherical-shell geometry, incorporating drifting deformable continents and self-consistent plate tectonics, to evaluate the subcontinental mantle temperature during a supercontinent cycle. Results show that the laterally averaged temperature anomaly of the subcontinental mantle remains within several tens of degrees (±50 °C) throughout the simulation time. Even after the formation of the supercontinent and the development of subcontinental plumes due to the subduction of the oceanic plates, the laterally averaged temperature anomaly of the deep mantle under the continent is within +10 °C. This implies that there is no substantial temperature difference between the subcontinental and suboceanic mantles during a supercontinent cycle. The temperature anomaly immediately beneath the supercontinent is generally positive owing to the thermal insulation effect and the active upwelling plumes from the core-mantle boundary. In the present simulation, the formation of a supercontinent causes the laterally averaged subcontinental temperature to increase by a maximum of 50 °C, which would produce sufficient tensional force to break up the supercontinent. The periodic assembly and dispersal of continental fragments, referred to as the supercontinent cycle, bear close relation to the evolution of mantle convection and plate tectonics. Supercontinent formation involves complex processes of introversion, extroversion or a combination of these in uniting dispersed continental fragments, as against the simple opening and closing of individual oceans envisaged in Wilson cycle. In the present study, I evaluate supercontinent processes in a realistic mantle convection regime. Results show that the assembly of supercontinents is accompanied by a combination of introversion and extroversion processes. The regular periodicity of the supercontinent cycles observed in previous 2D and 3D simulation models with rigid nondeformable continents is not confirmed. The small-scale thermal heterogeneity is dominated in deep mantle convection during the supercontinent cycle, although the large-scale, active upwelling plumes intermittently originate under drifting continents and/or the supercontinent. Results suggest that active subducting cold plates along continental margins generate thermal heterogeneity with short-wavelength structures, which is consistent with the thermal heterogeneity in the present-day mantle convection inferred from seismic tomography models. References: [1] Yoshida, M. Mantle temperature under drifting deformable continents during the supercontinent cycle, Geophys. Res. Lett., 2013, in press. [2] Yoshida, M. and M. Santosh, Mantle convection modeling of supercontinent cycle: Introversion, extroversion, or combination?, 2013, submitted.

  16. Effect of saddle height on skin temperature measured in different days of cycling.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, Jose Ignacio; Carpes, Felipe P; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Infrared thermography can be useful to explore the effects of exercise on neuromuscular function. During cycling, it could be used to investigate the effects of saddle height on thermoregulation. The aim of this study was to examine whether different cycling postures, elicited by different knee flexion angles, could influence skin temperature. Furthermore, we also determined whether the reproducibility of thermal measurements in response to cycling differed in the body regions affected or not affected by saddle height. Sixteen cyclists participated in three tests of 45 min of cycling at their individual 50 % peak power output. Each test was performed in a different knee flexion position on the bicycle (20°, 30°, 40° knee flexion when the pedal crank was at 180°). Different knee angles were obtained by changing saddle height. Skin temperatures were determined by infrared thermography before, immediately after and 10 min after the cycling test, in 16 different regions of interest (ROI) in the trunk and lower limbs. Changes in saddle height did not result in changes in skin temperature in the ROI. However, lower knee flexion elicited higher temperature in popliteus after cycling than higher flexion (p = 0.008 and ES = 0.8), and higher knee flexion elicited lower temperature variation in the tibialis anterior than intermediate knee flexion (p = 0.004 and ES = 0.8). Absolute temperatures obtained good and very good intraday reproducibility in the different measurements (ICCs between 0.44 and 0.85), but temperature variations showed lower reproducibility (ICCs between 0.11 and 0.74). Different postures assumed by the cyclist due to different saddle height did not influence temperature measurements. Skin temperature can be measured on different days with good repeatability, but temperature variations can be more sensitive to the effects of an intervention. PMID:27026901

  17. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89.410 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.410 Engine test cycle. (a)...

  18. Bypass control valve seal and bearing life cycle test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundback, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    The operating characteristics of a bypass control valve seal and bearing life cycle tests are reported. Data from the initial assembly, leak, torque, and deflection tests are included along with the cycle life test results and conclusions. The equipment involved was to be used in the nuclear engine for the rocket vehicles program.

  19. A cycle timer for testing electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltis, R. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents a cycle timer which enables the accurate following and repetition of SAE driving schedules of stop and go cycles, for electric vehicles, by reducing the human factor. The system which consists of a programmable read-only memory (PROM) stores each of these cycles, which are detailed, on its own plug-in card. The actual vehicle speed, and the PROM indicated desired speed are displayed on a dual scale meter allowing the driver to match them. A speed change is preceded by a half second buzzer warning and a new cycle by a one second warning. The PROM controls the recycle start time as well as the buzzer activation. A 5 volt regulator providing logic power, and a 12 volt dc-dc converter providing analog and memory power are described.

  20. Effect of Temperature Cycling and Exposure to Extreme Temperatures on Reliability of Solid Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In this work, results of multiple temperature cycling (TC) (up to 1,000 cycles) of different types of solid tantalum capacitors are analyzed and reported. Deformation of chip tantalum during temperature variations simulating reflow soldering conditions was measured to evaluate the possibility of the pop-corning effect in the parts. To simulate the effect of short-time exposures to solder reflow temperatures on the reliability of tantalum capacitors, several part types were subjected to multiple cycles (up to 100) between room temperature and 240 C with periodical measurements of electrical characteristics of the parts. Mechanisms of degradation caused by temperature cycling and exposure to high temperatures, and the requirements of MIL-PRF-55365 for assessment of the resistance of the parts to soldering heat are discussed.

  1. Temperature effects on sealed lead acid batteries and charging techniques to prolong cycle life.

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Ronda

    2004-06-01

    Sealed lead acid cells are used in many projects in Sandia National Laboratories Department 2660 Telemetry and Instrumentation systems. The importance of these cells in battery packs for powering electronics to remotely conduct tests is significant. Since many tests are carried out in flight or launched, temperature is a major factor. It is also important that the battery packs are properly charged so that the test is completed before the pack cannot supply sufficient power. Department 2665 conducted research and studies to determine the effects of temperature on cycle time as well as charging techniques to maximize cycle life and cycle times on sealed lead acid cells. The studies proved that both temperature and charging techniques are very important for battery life to support successful field testing and expensive flight and launched tests. This report demonstrates the effects of temperature on cycle time for SLA cells as well as proper charging techniques to get the most life and cycle time out of SLA cells in battery packs.

  2. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  3. Cold startup and low temperature performance of the Brayton cycle electrical subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J. E.; Bainbridge, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    Cold performance tests and startup tests were conducted on the Brayton-cycle inverter, motor-driven pump, dc supply, speed control with parasitic load resistor and the Brayton control system. These tests were performed with the components in a vacuum and mounted on coldplates. A temperature range of ?25 to -50 C was used for the tests. No failures occurred, and component performance gave no indication that there would be any problem with the safe operation of the Brayton power generating system.

  4. Room Temperature and Elevated Temperature Composite Sandwich Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra P.

    1998-01-01

    Testing of composite sandwich joint elements has been completed to verify the strength capacity of joints designed to carry specified running loads representative of a high speed civil transport wing. Static tension testing at both room and an elevated temperature of 350 F and fatigue testing at room temperature were conducted to determine strength capacity, fatigue life, and failure modes. Static tension test results yielded failure loads above the design loads for the room temperature tests, confirming the ability of the joint concepts tested to carry their design loads. However, strength reductions as large as 30% were observed at the elevated test temperature, where all failure loads were below the room temperature design loads for the specific joint designs tested. Fatigue testing resulted in lower than predicted fatigue lives.

  5. The Framatome ANP Indirect-Cycle Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Copsey, Bernie; Lecomte, Michel; Brinkmann, Gerd; Capitaine, Alain; Deberne, Nicolas

    2004-07-01

    Framatome ANP is developing a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, relying on its previous experience with high temperature reactor designs, from its participation in the MODUL and the GT-MHR designs. The Framatome ANP VHTR design is based on an indirect cycle coupled to an 'off-the-shelf' combined cycle gas turbine. Although direct cycle HTR's are being promoted for their high efficiency, preliminary evaluations show that the Framatome ANP design efficiency is on par with a direct cycle while avoiding PGS (Power Generation System) developments and keeping the PGS contamination free. This concept was independently evaluated with sensitivity analysis by EDF. Moreover, the nuclear heat source of the indirect cycle could also be used to qualify the direct cycle components without risk of contamination behind the IHX, thus assisting in the preparation for the later introduction of that technology. Relying to the maximum extent on available technology, the Framatome ANP VHTR plant can demonstrate high-efficiency electricity generation and carbon-free hydrogen production. (authors)

  6. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Steven A.; Fuller, Robert; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Nichols, Kenneth; Brown, Nicholas

    2005-02-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of ˜1000 K.

  7. Operational Results of a Closed Brayton Cycle Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Brown, Nicholas; Fuller, Robert; Nichols, Kenneth

    2005-02-06

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kWth with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  8. Operational results of a Closed Brayton Cycle test-loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, Robert; Wright, Steven Alan; Nichols, Kenneth Graham.; Brown, Nicholas; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2004-11-01

    A number of space and terrestrial power system designs plan to use nuclear reactors that are coupled to Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems to generate electrical power. Because very little experience exists regarding the operational behavior of these systems, Sandia National Laboratories (through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development program) is developing a closed-loop test bed that can be used to determine the operational behavior of these systems and to validate models for these systems. Sandia has contracted Barber-Nichols Corporation to design, fabricate, and assemble a Closed-loop Brayton Cycle (CBC) system. This system was developed by modifying commercially available hardware. It uses a 30 kWe Capstone C-30 gas-turbine unit (www.capstoneturbine.com) with a modified housing that permits the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller that are connected to the turbo-machinery in a closed loop. The test-loop reuses the Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator. The Capstone system's nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system are also reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled either by adjusting the alternator load by either using the electrical grid or a separate load bank. This report describes the test-loop hardware SBL-30 (Sandia Brayton Loop-30kWe). Also presented are results of early testing and modeling of the unit. The SBL-30 hardware is currently configured with a heater that is limited to 80 kW{sub th} with a maximum outlet temperature of {approx}1000 K.

  9. A comparison of single-cycle versus multi-cycle proof testing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.; Russell, Dale A.

    1988-01-01

    Proof testing was a useful supplement to conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of space shuttle main engine (SSME) components. Since many of these components involve thin sections and high toughness materials, such as Inconel 718, conventional single-cycle proof test logic is not applicable due to the propensity for stable crack growth during the proof tests. Experience with five-cycle proof testing of SSME components is summarized and a framework is outlined for understanding multi-cycle proof testing using the fracture mechanics concept of a resistance curve. Extreme value statistics are also used to propose an empirical approach to compare the advantages and disadvantages of single- versus multi-cycle proof testing. The importance of the initial flaw size distribution and specimen thickness in such a comparison is also discussed.

  10. Testing Method for Heat Resistance Under Temperature Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, K.; Kawasaki, A.; Itoh, Y.; Harada, Y.; Ono, F.

    2007-12-01

    Testing Method for Heat Resistance under Temperature Gradient” is a Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) newly established by the Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, after deliberations by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee, in accordance with the Industrial Standardization Law. This standard specified the testing method for heat resistance under temperature gradient of materials and coated members of equipment exposed to high temperature, such as aircraft engines, gas turbines, and so on. This paper introduces the principle and overview of the established standard. In addition, taking the heat cycle test using the burner rig for instance, we specifically illustrate the acquirable data and their analysis in the standard. Monitoring of the effective thermal conductivity and acoustic emission particularly enables to the non-destructive evaluation of failure cycle.

  11. Relationship between skin temperature and muscle activation during incremental cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Priego Quesada, Jose I; Carpes, Felipe P; Bini, Rodrigo R; Salvador Palmer, Rosario; Pérez-Soriano, Pedro; Cibrián Ortiz de Anda, Rosa M

    2015-02-01

    While different studies showed that better fitness level adds to the efficiency of the thermoregulatory system, the relationship between muscular effort and skin temperature is still unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the relationship between neuromuscular activation and skin temperature during cycle exercise. Ten physically active participants performed an incremental workload cycling test to exhaustion while neuromuscular activations were recorded (via surface electromyography - EMG) from rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis. Thermographic images were recorded before, immediately after and 10 min after finishing the cycling test, at four body regions of interest corresponding to the muscles where neuromuscular activations were monitored. Frequency band analysis was conducted to assess spectral properties of EMG signals in order to infer on priority in recruitment of motor units. Significant inverse relationship between changes in skin temperature and changes in overall neuromuscular activation for vastus lateralis was observed (r<-0.5 and p<0.04). Significant positive relationship was observed between skin temperature and low frequency components of neuromuscular activation from vastus lateralis (r>0.7 and p<0.01). Participants with larger overall activation and reduced low frequency component for vastus lateralis activation presented a better adaptive response of their thermoregulatory system by showing fewer changes in skin temperature after incremental cycling test. PMID:25660627

  12. 40 CFR 86.1333 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: ER28AP14.006 Where: Max Test Speed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii) For Otto-cycle engines: ER28AP14.007 Where: Max Test Speed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of...

  13. Performing microchannel temperature cycling reactions using reciprocating reagent shuttling along a radial temperature gradient.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ji-Yen; Hsieh, Chien-Ju; Chuang, Yung-Chuan; Hsieh, Jing-Ru

    2005-06-01

    This study develops a novel temperature cycling strategy for executing temperature cycling reactions in laser-etched poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips. The developed microfluidic chip is circular in shape and is clamped in contact with a circular ITO heater chip of an equivalent diameter. Both chips are fabricated using an economic and versatile laser scribing process. Using this arrangement, a self-sustained radial temperature gradient is generated within the microfluidic chip without the need to thermally isolate the different temperature zones. This study demonstrates the temperature cycling capabilities of the reported microfluidic device by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process using ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit (rbcL) gene as a template. The temperature ramping rate of the sample inside the microchannel is determined from the spectral change of a thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) solution pumped into the channel. The present results confirm that a rapid thermal cycling effect is achieved despite the low thermal conductivity of the PMMA substrate. Using IR thermometry, it is found that the radial temperature gradient of the chip is approximately 2 degrees C mm(-1). The simple system presented in this study has considerable potential for miniaturizing complex integrated reactions requiring different cycling parameters. PMID:15912243

  14. Use of strainrange partitioning to predict high temperature low-cycle fatigue life. [of metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, M. H.; Halford, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamental concepts of the strainrange partitioning approach to high temperature, low low-cycle fatigue are reviewed. Procedures are presented by which the partitioned strainrange versus life relationships for any material can be generated. Laboratory tests are suggested for further verifying the ability of the method of strainrange partitioning to predict life.

  15. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm... emissions during the next test will accurately represent those from an engine starting at room temperature. For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to...

  16. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm... emissions during the next test will accurately represent those from an engine starting at room temperature. For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to...

  17. 40 CFR 1048.510 - What transient duty cycles apply for laboratory testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cycle statistics and compare with the established criteria as specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm... emissions during the next test will accurately represent those from an engine starting at room temperature. For example, if an engine starting at room temperature warms up enough in three minutes to...

  18. Low cycle fatigue behavior of Zircaloy-2 at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhakar Rao, G.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Nudurupati, Saibaba; Mahobia, G. S.; Chattopadhyay, Kausik; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2013-10-01

    Fuel cladding and pressure tubes of Zircaloy-2 in pressurized light and heavy water nuclear reactors experience plastic strain cycles due to power fluctuations in the reactor, such strain cycles cause low cycle fatigue (LCF) and could be life limiting factor for them. Factors like strain rate, strain amplitude and temperature are known to have marked influence on LCF behavior. The effect of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 on LCF behavior of Zircaloy-2 was studied, at different strain amplitudes between ±0.50% and ±1.25% at room temperature. Fatigue life was decreased with lowering of strain rate from 10-2 to 10-4 s-1 at all the strain amplitudes studied. While there was cyclic softening at lower strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩽ ±0.60%) cyclic hardening was exhibited at higher strain amplitudes (Δεt/2 ⩾ ±1.00%) at all the strain rates. Further, there was secondary cyclic hardening during the later stage of cycling at all the strain amplitudes and the strain rates. Cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loops at the lowest strain rate of 10-4 s-1 were found to be heavily serrated, resulting from dynamic strain aging (DSA). There was significant effect of strain rate on dislocation substructure. The results are discussed in terms of high concentration of point defects generated during cyclic straining and their role in enhancing interaction between solutes and dislocations.

  19. Integrated Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    S. X. Li; D. Vaden; R. W. Benedict; T. A. Johnson; B. R. Westphal; Guy L. Frederickson

    2007-09-01

    An integrated efficiency test was conducted with sodium bonded, spent EBR-II drive fuel elements. The major equipment involved in the test were the element chopper, Mk-IV electrorefiner, cathode processor, and casting furnace. Four electrorefining batches (containing 54.4 kg heavy metal) were processes under the fixed operating parameters that have been developed for this equipment based on over a decade’s worth of processing experience. A mass balance across this equipment was performed. Actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies were established based on the mass balance and chemical analytical results of various samples taken from process streams during the integrated efficiency test.

  20. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Da-Xi; Beach, Duane E.

    2005-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range. Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  1. Intermediate Temperature Water Heat Pipe Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devarakonda, Angirasa; Xiong, Daxi; Beach, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Heat pipes are among the most promising technologies for space radiator systems. Water heat pipes are explored in the intermediate temperature range of 400 to above 500 K. The thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of water are reviewed in this temperature range. Test Data are reported for a copper-water heat pipe. The heat pipe was tested under different orientations. Water heat pipes show promise in this temperature range.Fabrication and testing issues are being addressed.

  2. Temperature-entropy formulation of thermoelectric thermodynamic cycles.

    PubMed

    Chua, H T; Ng, K C; Xuan, X C; Yap, C; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2002-05-01

    A temperature-entropy formulation is derived for thermoelectric devices. Thermoelectric chiller and generator cycles can then be cast in the same irreversible thermodynamics framework commonly applied to conventional large-scale cooling and power generation equipment, including a transparent identification of the principal energy flows and performance bottlenecks (dissipation). Distinct differences in chiller versus generator mode are highlighted and illustrated with data from commercial thermoelectric units. PMID:12059651

  3. Cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. II - Accelerated cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1986-01-01

    A cycle life test of nickel-hydrogen (Ni/H2) cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered-type nickel electrode were carried out at 23 C using a 45-min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. Ten cells containing 21 to 36 percent KOH were tested. Since this accelerated test regime accelerated the cycle life roughly twice as fast as a typical LEO regime, the present results indicate that the cells with 26 percent KOH may last over 5 years in an 80 percent depth-of-discharge cycling in an LEO regime. Cells with lower KOH concentrations (21 to 23.5 percent) also showed longer cycle life than those with KOH concentrations of 31 percent or higher, although the life was shorter than those with 26 percent KOH.

  4. KOH concentration effect on cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells. III - Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A cycle life test of Ni/H2 cells containing electrolytes of various KOH concentrations and a sintered type nickel electrode was carried out at 23 C using a 45 min accelerated low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime at 80 percent depth of discharge. One of three cells containing 26 percent KOH has achieved over 28,000 cycles, and the other two 19,000 cycles, without a sign of failure. Two other cells containing 31 percent KOH electrolyte, which is the concentration presently used in aerospace cells, failed after 2,979 and 3,620 cycles. This result indicates that the cycle life of the present type of Ni/H2 cells may be extended by a factor of 5 to 10 simply by lowering the KOH concentration. Long cycle life of a Ni/H2 battery at high depth-of-discharge operation is desired, particularly for an LEO spacecraft application. Typically, battery life of about 30,000 cycles is required for a five year mission in an LEO. Such a cycle life with presently available cells can be assured only at a very low depth-of-discharge operation. Results of testing already show that the cycle life of an Ni/H2 cell is tremendously improved by simply using an electrolyte of low KOH concentration.

  5. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to the discrete-mode duty cycles specified in this section, as described in 40 CFR 1039.505. ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission...

  6. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to the discrete-mode duty cycles specified in this section, as described in 40 CFR 1039.505. ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission...

  7. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to the discrete-mode duty cycles specified in this section, as described in 40 CFR 1039.505. ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission...

  8. 40 CFR 89.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... to the discrete-mode duty cycles specified in this section, as described in 40 CFR 1039.505. ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 89.410 Section 89...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission...

  9. Test of US Federal Life Cycle Inventory Data Interoperability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life cycle assessment practitioners must gather data from a variety of sources. For modeling activities in the US, practitioners may wish to use life cycle inventory data from public databases and libraries provided by US government entities. An exercise was conducted to test if ...

  10. Electrochemical and physical analysis of a Li-ion cell cycled at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Joongpyo; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Song, Xiangyun; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-06-21

    Laboratory-size LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/graphite lithium-ion pouch cells were cycled over 100 percent DOD at room temperature and 60 degrees C in order to investigate high-temperature degradation mechanisms of this important technology. Capacity fade for the cell was correlated with that for the individual components, using electrochemical analysis of the electrodes and other diagnostic techniques. The high-temperature cell lost 65 percent of its initial capacity after 140 cycles at 60 degrees C compared to only 4 percent loss for the cell cycled at room temperature. Cell ohmic impedance increased significantly with the elevated temperature cycling, resulting in some of loss of capacity at the C/2 rate. However, as determined with slow rate testing of the individual electrodes, the anode retained most of its original capacity, while the cathode lost 65 percent, even when cycled with a fresh source of lithium. Diagnostic evaluation of cell components including XRD, Raman, CSAFM and suggest capacity loss occurs primarily due to a rise in the impedance of the cathode, especially at the end-of-charge. The impedance rise may be caused in part by a loss of the conductive carbon at the surface of the cathode and/or by an organic film on the surface of the cathode that becomes non-ionically conductive at low lithium content.

  11. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  12. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  13. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  14. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  15. 40 CFR 91.410 - Engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Engine test cycle. 91.410 Section 91...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.410 Engine... in dynamometer operation tests of marine engines. (b) During each non-idle mode the specified...

  16. Elevated temperature alters carbon cycling in a model microbial community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosier, A.; Li, Z.; Thomas, B. C.; Hettich, R. L.; Pan, C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's climate is regulated by biogeochemical carbon exchanges between the land, oceans and atmosphere that are chiefly driven by microorganisms. Microbial communities are therefore indispensible to the study of carbon cycling and its impacts on the global climate system. In spite of the critical role of microbial communities in carbon cycling processes, microbial activity is currently minimally represented or altogether absent from most Earth System Models. Method development and hypothesis-driven experimentation on tractable model ecosystems of reduced complexity, as presented here, are essential for building molecularly resolved, benchmarked carbon-climate models. Here, we use chemoautotropic acid mine drainage biofilms as a model community to determine how elevated temperature, a key parameter of global climate change, regulates the flow of carbon through microbial-based ecosystems. This study represents the first community proteomics analysis using tandem mass tags (TMT), which enable accurate, precise, and reproducible quantification of proteins. We compare protein expression levels of biofilms growing over a narrow temperature range expected to occur with predicted climate changes. We show that elevated temperature leads to up-regulation of proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and protein modification, and down-regulation of proteins involved in growth and reproduction. Closely related bacterial genotypes differ in their response to temperature: Elevated temperature represses carbon fixation by two Leptospirillum genotypes, whereas carbon fixation is significantly up-regulated at higher temperature by a third closely related genotypic group. Leptospirillum group III bacteria are more susceptible to viral stress at elevated temperature, which may lead to greater carbon turnover in the microbial food web through the release of viral lysate. Overall, this proteogenomics approach revealed the effects of climate change on carbon cycling pathways and other microbial activities. When scaled to more complex ecosystems and integrated into Earth System Models, this approach could significantly improve predictions of global carbon-climate feedbacks. Experiments such as these are a critical first step designed at understanding climate change impacts in order to better predict ecosystem adaptations, assess the viability of mitigation strategies, and inform relevant policy decisions.

  17. Elevation of Continuous Low-Cycle Fatigue Behaviour of High Temperature P122 Boiler Material

    SciTech Connect

    Pumwa, John; Soo Woo Nam

    2002-07-01

    The complex thermal-mechanical loading of power-generating plant components usually comprises of creep, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue which are thermally induced by start-ups, load changes and shut-downs, producing in-stationary temperature gradients and hence creating strain as well as stress fields. In order to select the correct materials for these hostile environmental conditions, it is vitally important to understand the behaviour of mechanical properties of these materials. This paper reports the results of Low-cycle fatigue tests of P122 (HCM12A or 12Cr-1.8W-1.5Cu) high temperature boiler material, which is one of the latest developed materials for high temperature environments. The tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 550 deg. C to 700 deg. C at 50 deg. C intervals with strain ranges of {+-}1.5 to {+-}3.0% at 0.5% intervals using a closed-loop hydraulic Instron material testing machine with a servo hydraulic controller. The results confirm that P122 is comparable to conventional high temperature steels. Moreover, the fracture mode assessments strongly revealed a ductile transgranular fracture mode. (authors)

  18. a Low Temperature Regenerator Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, A.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Feller, J. R.; Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.

    2008-03-01

    Testing regenerators presents an interesting challenge. When incorporated into a cryocooler, a regenerator is intimately coupled to the other components: expander, heat exchangers, and compressor. It is difficult to isolate the performance of any single component. We have developed a low temperature test facility that will allow us to separate the performance of the regenerator from the rest of the cryocooler. The purpose of the facility is the characterization of test regenerators using novel materials and/or geometries in temperature ranges down to 15 K. It consists of the following elements: The test column has two regenerators stacked in series. The coldest stage regenerator is the device under test. The warmer stage regenerator contains a stack of stainless steel screen, a well-characterized material. A commercial cryocooler is used to fix the temperatures at both ends of the test regenerator, cooling both heat exchangers flanging the regenerator stack. Heaters allow varying the temperatures and allow measurement of the remaining cooling power, and thus, regenerator effectiveness. A linear compressor delivers an oscillating pressure to the regenerator assembly. An inertance tube and reservoir provide the proper phase difference between mass flow and pressure. This phase shift, along with the imposed temperature differential, simulates the conditions of the test regenerator when used in an actual pulse tube cryocooler. This paper presents development details of the regenerator test facility, and test results on a second stage, stainless steel screen test regenerator.

  19. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R. H.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.

    2013-05-01

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between Ka-band temperature estimates, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR) temperature estimates and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the models ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations have only a small delay of about 15 min with the TIR observations which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  20. Effect of welding structure on high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties for MIG welded A5083 aluminum alloys at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuri, Tetsumi; Ogata, Toshio; Saito, Masahiro; Hirayama, Yoshiaki

    2001-07-01

    High-cycle and low-cycle fatigue properties of aluminum alloy A5083 base and A5183 weld metals and the effect of welding structure on their fatigue properties have been investigated at cryogenic temperatures in order to evaluate the long-life reliability and safety of the structural materials used in liquid hydrogen supertankers and storage tanks and to develop a welding process for these applications. In the high-cycle fatigue tests, the S-N curves of A5083 base and A5183 weld metals shifted to higher stress levels, i.e., the longer life side at lower test temperatures. The ratios of 10 6-cycles fatigue strength (FS) to tensile strength (TS) for A5183 weld metals were slightly lower than those of A5083 base metals at each test temperature. Although the ratios of FS to TS for austenitic stainless steels weld metals at 4 K decreased substantially to about 0.4, that of A5183 weld metal was 0.65 even at 4 K and it indicated an excellent high-cycle fatigue property. Fatigue crack initiation sites in A5183 weld metals were occurred from the blowholes if the blowholes were located in the vicinity of the specimen surfaces. However, effects of the blowholes on high-cycle fatigue properties are not clear or significant. In the low-cycle fatigue tests, the fatigue lives of A5183 weld metals were slightly shorter than those of A5083 base metals at cryogenic temperatures. However, the fatigue lives of A5183 weld metals at 4 K were superior to that of conventional A5083 weld metals. The deterioration of low-cycle fatigue properties of A5183 weld metals at cryogenic temperatures were due to the intergranular fracture surface observed in fatigue crack propagation regions.

  1. Experimental transient vane temperatures in a cascade for gas stream temperature cycling between 922 and 1644 K (1200 and 2500 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauntner, D. J.; Kaufman, A.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental transient turbine vane metal temperatures were obtained from tests conducted on air-cooled vanes installed in a four-vane cascade for a gas temperature cycled between 922 and 1644 K (1200 and 2500 F). Transient data were recorded by a high-speed data acquisition system. Temperatures at the same phase of each transient cycle were repeatable between cycles to within 11 kelvins (20 F), simulated cruise and idle steady-state readings were repeated by the cruise and idle readings taken from the ends of a transient half-cycle at low pressure to within 17 kelvins (30 F). The tests were conducted at pressure levels of 31 and 83 N-sq cm (45 and 120 psia) with coolant temperatures of 811 and 589 K (1000 and 600 F), respectively.

  2. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  3. 40 CFR 86.336-79 - Diesel engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Diesel engine test cycle. 86.336-79... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  4. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...). (g) For hybrid vehicles, correct for the net energy change of the energy storage device as described... differences are consistent with the criteria as specified in 40 CFR part 1066. If the speeds do not conform to these criteria, the test is not valid and must be repeated. (e) Run test cycles as specified in 40...

  5. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...). (g) For hybrid vehicles, correct for the net energy change of the energy storage device as described... differences are consistent with the criteria as specified in 40 CFR part 1066. If the speeds do not conform to these criteria, the test is not valid and must be repeated. (e) Run test cycles as specified in 40...

  6. 40 CFR 1037.510 - Duty-cycle exhaust testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (g) For hybrid vehicles, correct for the net energy change of the energy storage device as described... differences are consistent with the criteria as specified in 40 CFR part 1066. If the speeds do not conform to these criteria, the test is not valid and must be repeated. (e) Run test cycles as specified in 40...

  7. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-05-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running.

  8. Results of accelerated thermal cycle tests of solar cells modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P.; Mueller, R.; Salama, M.; Yasui, R.

    1976-01-01

    Various candidate solar panel designs were evaluated, both theoretically and experimentally, with respect to their thermal cycling survival capability, and in particular with respect to an accelerated simulation of thermal cycles representative of Viking '75 mission requirements. The experimental results were obtained on 'mini-panels' thermally cycled in a newly installed automated test facility herein described. The resulting damage was analyzed physically and theoretically, and on the basis of these analyses the panel design was suitably modified to significantly improve its ability to withstand the thermal environment. These successful modifications demonstrate the value of the complementary theoretical-experimental approach adopted, and discussed in detail in this paper.

  9. Test Plan for the Bearing Dust Cycle Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunderson, Katelyn; Aitchison, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of these experiments is to test the dust-resistant seal on the high performance glove disconnect system (HPGD), to analyze the response of the bearing to lunar regolith simulant effects.

  10. A comparison of single-cycle versus multiple-cycle proof testing strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudak, S. J., Jr.; Mcclung, R. C.; Bartlett, M. L.; Fitzgerald, J. H.; Russell, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation of single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (MCPT) strategies for SSME components is described. Data for initial sizes and shapes of actual SSME hardware defects are analyzed statistically. Closed-form estimates of the J-integral for surface flaws are derived with a modified reference stress method. The results of load- and displacement-controlled stable crack growth tests on thin IN-718 plates with deep surface flaws are summarized. A J-resistance curve for the surface-cracked configuration is developed and compared with data from thick compact tension specimens. The potential for further crack growth during large unload/reload cycles is discussed, highlighting conflicting data in the literature. A simple model for ductile crack growth during MCPT based on the J-resistance curve is used to study the potential effects of key variables. The projected changes in the crack size distribution during MCPT depend on the interactions between several key parameters, including the number of proof cycles, the nature of the resistance curve, the initial crack size distribution, the component boundary conditions (load vs. displacement control), and the magnitude of the applied load or displacement. The relative advantages of single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing appear to be specific, therefore, to individual component geometry, material, and loading.

  11. Temperature controlled tensile testing of individual nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lisa Y.; Terrab, Soraya; Murphy, Kathryn F.; Sullivan, John P.; Cheng, Xuemei; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel experimental method for quantitatively characterizing the temperature-dependent mechanical behavior of individual nanostructures during uniaxial straining. By combining a microelectromechanical tensile testing device with a low thermal mass and digital image correlation providing nm-level displacement resolution, we show successful incorporation of a testing platform in a vacuum cryostat system with an integrated heater and temperature control. Characterization of the local sample temperature and time-dependent response at both low and high temperature demonstrates a testing range of ˜90-475 K and steady-state drift rates less than 0.04 K/min. In situ operation of the tensile testing device employing resistively heated thermal actuators while imaging with an optical microscope enables high-resolution displacement measurements, from which stress-strain behavior of the nanoscale specimens is deduced. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach in measuring the temperature dependence of tensile strength in nominally defect-free ⟨110⟩ Pd nanowhiskers. We uncover a pronounced sensitivity of the plastic response to testing temperature over a range of ˜300 K, with an ultimate strength in excess of 6 GPa at low temperature. The results are discussed in the context of thermally activated deformation mechanisms and defect nucleation in defect-free metallic nanostructures.

  12. Analysis of Low Temperature Organic Rankine Cycles for Solar Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfei

    The present work focuses on Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems and their application to low temperature waste heat recovery, combined heat and power as well as off-grid solar power generation applications. As CO_2 issues come to the fore front and fossil fuels become more expensive, interest in low grade heat recovery has grown dramatically in the past few years. Solar energy, as a clean, renewable, pollution-free and sustainable energy has great potential for the use of ORC systems. Several ORC solutions have been proposed to generate electricity from low temperature sources. The ORC systems discussed here can be applied to fields such as solar thermal, biological waste heat, engine exhaust gases, small-scale cogeneration, domestic boilers, etc. The current work presents a thermodynamic and economic analysis for the use of ORC systems to convert solar energy or low exergy energy to generate electrical power. The organic working fluids investigated here were selected to investigate the effect of the fluid saturation temperature on the performance of ORCs. The working fluids under investigation are R113, R245fa, R123, with boiling points between 40°C and 200°C at pressures from 10 kPa to 10 MPa. Ambient temperature air at 20oC to 30oC is utilized as cooling resource, and allowing for a temperature difference 10°C for effective heat transfer. Consequently, the working fluids are condensed at 40°C. A combined first- and second-law analysis is performed by varying some system independent parameters at various reference temperatures. The present work shows that ORC systems can be viable and economical for the applications such as waste heat use and off-grid power generation even though they are likely to be more expensive than grid power.

  13. TEMPERATURE DEPENDANT BEHAVIOUR OBSERVED IN THE AFIP-6 IRRADIATION TEST

    SciTech Connect

    A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs; P. Medvedev; S.J. Miller; F. J. Rice; M. K. Meyer; D. M. Perez

    2012-03-01

    The AFIP-6 test assembly was irradiated for one cycle in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory. The experiment was designed to test two monolithic fuel plates at power and burn-ups which bounded the operating conditions of both ATR and HFIR driver fuel. Both plates contained a solid U-Mo fuel foil with a zirconium diffusion barrier between 6061-aluminum cladding plates bonded by hot isostatic pressing. The experiment was designed with an orifice to restrict the coolant flow in order to obtain prototypic coolant temperature conditions. While these coolant temperatures were obtained, the reduced flow resulted in a sufficiently low heat transfer coefficient that failure of the fuel plates occurred. The increased fuel temperature led to significant variations in the fission gas retention behaviour of the U-Mo fuel. These variations in performance are outlined herein.

  14. Analysis of a Temperature-Controlled Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator During a Driving Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, F. P.; Alves, A.; Pires, J. M.; Martins, L. B.; Martins, J.; Oliveira, J.; Teixeira, J.; Goncalves, L. M.; Hall, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric generators can be used in automotive exhaust energy recovery. As car engines operate under wide variable loads, it is a challenge to design a system for operating efficiently under these variable conditions. This means being able to avoid excessive thermal dilution under low engine loads and being able to operate under high load, high temperature events without the need to deflect the exhaust gases with bypass systems. The authors have previously proposed a thermoelectric generator (TEG) concept with temperature control based on the operating principle of the variable conductance heat pipe/thermosiphon. This strategy allows the TEG modules’ hot face to work under constant, optimized temperature. The variable engine load will only affect the number of modules exposed to the heat source, not the heat transfer temperature. This prevents module overheating under high engine loads and avoids thermal dilution under low engine loads. The present work assesses the merit of the aforementioned approach by analysing the generator output during driving cycles simulated with an energy model of a light vehicle. For the baseline evaporator and condenser configuration, the driving cycle averaged electrical power outputs were approximately 320 W and 550 W for the type-approval Worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure Class 3 driving cycle and for a real-world highway driving cycle, respectively.

  15. High-Cycle Fatigue Properties at Cryogenic Temperatures in INCONEL 718

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.; Yuri, T.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Takeuchi, E.; Ogata, T.; Matsuoka, S.

    2006-03-31

    High-cycle fatigue properties at 4 K, 20 K, 77 K and 293 K were investigated in forged-INCONEL 718 nickel-based superalloy with a mean gamma ({gamma}) grain size of 25 {mu}m. In the present material, plate-like delta phase precipitated at {gamma} grain boundaries and niobium (Nb)-enriched MC type carbides precipitated coarsely throughout the specimens. The 0.2% proof stress and the tensile strength of this alloy increased with decreasing temperature, without decreasing elongation or reduction of area. High-cycle fatigue strengths also increased with decreasing temperature although the fatigue limit at each temperature didn't appear even around 107 cycles. Fatigue cracks initiated near the specimen surface and formed faceted structures around crack initiation sites. Fatigue cracks predominantly initiated from coarse Nb-enriched carbides and faceted structures mainly corresponded to these carbides. In lower stress amplitude tests, however, facets were formed through transgranular crack initiation and growth. These kinds of distinctive crack initiation behavior seem to lower the high-cycle fatigue strength below room temperature in the present material.

  16. Analysis of a Temperature-Controlled Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator During a Driving Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, F. P.; Alves, A.; Pires, J. M.; Martins, L. B.; Martins, J.; Oliveira, J.; Teixeira, J.; Goncalves, L. M.; Hall, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators can be used in automotive exhaust energy recovery. As car engines operate under wide variable loads, it is a challenge to design a system for operating efficiently under these variable conditions. This means being able to avoid excessive thermal dilution under low engine loads and being able to operate under high load, high temperature events without the need to deflect the exhaust gases with bypass systems. The authors have previously proposed a thermoelectric generator (TEG) concept with temperature control based on the operating principle of the variable conductance heat pipe/thermosiphon. This strategy allows the TEG modules’ hot face to work under constant, optimized temperature. The variable engine load will only affect the number of modules exposed to the heat source, not the heat transfer temperature. This prevents module overheating under high engine loads and avoids thermal dilution under low engine loads. The present work assesses the merit of the aforementioned approach by analysing the generator output during driving cycles simulated with an energy model of a light vehicle. For the baseline evaporator and condenser configuration, the driving cycle averaged electrical power outputs were approximately 320 W and 550 W for the type-approval Worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure Class 3 driving cycle and for a real-world highway driving cycle, respectively.

  17. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of two iron base high temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum elevated temperature low cycle fatigue and thermal fatigue tests of 304 stainless steel and A-286 alloy have shown significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. At constant temperature, the cyclic life of both alloys was lower at lower frequencies. Combined temperature-strain cycling reduced fatigue life with respect to isothermal life at the maximum temperature of the thermal cycle. Life reductions with in-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature, compression at low temperature) were attributed to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed tensile grain boundary sliding. The proposed mechanism for out-of-phase cavity generation involved accumulation of unreversed compressive grain boundary displacements which could not be geometrically accomodated by intragranular deformation in the low-ductility A-286 alloy.

  18. Acoustic testing of high temperature panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leatherwood, Jack D.; Clevenson, Sherman A.; Powell, Clemans A.; Daniels, Edward F.

    1990-10-01

    Results are presented of a series of thermal-acoustic tests conducted on the NASA Langley Research Center Thermal-Acoustic Test Apparatus to (1) investigate techniques for obtaining strain measurements on metallic and carbon-carbon materials at elevated temperature; (2) document the dynamic strain response characteristics of several superalloy honeycomb thermal protection system panels at elevated temperatures of up to 1200 F; and (3) determine the strain response and sonic fatigue behavior of four carbon-carbon panels at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A second study tested four carbon-carbon panels to document panel dynamic response characteristics at ambient and elevated temperature, determine time to failure and faliure modes, and collect continuous strain data up to panel failure. Strain data are presented from both types of panels, and problems encountered in obtaining reliable strain data on the carbon-carbon panels are described. The failure modes of the carbon-carbon panels are examined.

  19. Temperature and Strain-Rate Effects on Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Schiffers, H.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of strain rate (4 x 10(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -3)/s) and temperature on the Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H have been evaluated in the range 750 C to 950 C. Total axial strain controlled LCF tests were conducted in air at a strain amplitude of +/- 0.30 pct. LCF life decreased with decreasing strain rate and increasing temperature. The cyclic stress response behavior showed a marked variation with temperature and strain rate. The time- and temperature- dependent processes which influence the cyclic stress response and life have been identified and their relative importance assessed. Dynamic strain aging, time-dependent deformation, precipitation of parallel platelets of M(23)C6 on grain boundaries and incoherent ledges of twins, and oxidation were found to operate depending on the test conditions. The largest effect on life was shown by oxidation processes.

  20. Loss of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 Function Affects "Siesta" Behavior but Not Synchronization to Temperature Cycles.

    PubMed

    Roessingh, Sanne; Wolfgang, Werner; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    To maintain synchrony with the environment, circadian clocks use a wide range of cycling sensory cues that provide input to the clock (zeitgebers), including environmental temperature cycles (TCs). There is some knowledge about which clock neuronal groups are important for temperature synchronization, but we currently lack knowledge on the temperature receptors and their signaling pathways that feed temperature information to the (neuronal) clock. Since TRPA1 is a well-known thermosensor that functions in a range of temperature-related behaviors, and it is potentially expressed in clock neurons, we set out to test the putative role of TRPA1 in temperature synchronization of the circadian clock. We found that flies lacking TRPA1 are still able to synchronize their behavioral activity to TCs comparable to wild-type flies, both in 16°C : 25°C and 20°C : 29°C TCs. In addition, we found that flies lacking TRPA1 show higher activity levels during the middle of the warm phase of 20°C : 29°C TCs, and we show that this TRPA1-mediated repression of locomotor activity during the "siesta" is caused by a lack of sleep. Based on these data, we conclude that the TRPA1 channel is not required for temperature synchronization in this broad temperature range but instead is required to repress activity during the warm part of the day. PMID:26459465

  1. Life cycle testing of sodium-sulfur satellite battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. M.; Dueber, R. E.; Fritts, D. H.

    1985-12-01

    The performance characteristics of sodium-beta double prime alumina-sulfur (Na/S) cells are being investigated under quiescent conditions (with the only variables being charge/discharge rates and the depth-of-discharge) with the purpose of establishing a basis for predicting the cycle life of the Na/S cells. All Na/S cells demonstrated a cycle life useful for certain Air Force applications, with no cycle life dependence on the depth-of-discharge values. The failures of two cells (of a total of eight tested) after extended cycling seems to be best explained by internal short circuiting, indicating the importance of cell matching when building batteries.

  2. Outer planet spacecraft temperature testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Avila, A.

    2002-01-01

    Unmanned spacecraft flown on missions to the outer planets of the solar system have included flybys, planetary orbiters, and atmospheric probes during the last three decades. The thermal design, test, and analysis approach applied to these spacecraft evolved from the passive thermal designs applied to the earlier lunar and interplanetary spacecraft. The inflight temperature data from representative sets of engineering subsystems and science instruments from a subset of these spacecraft are compared to those obtained during the ground test programs and from the prelaunch predictions. Several lessons are presented with specific recommendations for considerations for new projects to aid in the planning of cost effective temperature design, test, and analysis programs.

  3. Temperature distortion generator for turboshaft engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, G. A.; Barth, R. L.; Biesiadny, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures and unique hardware used to conduct an experimental investigation into the response of a small-turboshaft-engine compression system to various hot gas ingestion patterns are presented. The temperature distortion generator described herein uses gaseous hydrogen to create both steady-state and time-variant, or transient, temperature distortion at the engine inlet. The range of transient temperature ramps produced by the distortion generator during the engine tests was from less than 111 deg K/sec (200 deg R/sec) to above 611 deg K/sec (1100 deg R/sec); instantaneous temperatures to 422 deg K (760 deg R) above ambient were generated. The distortion generator was used to document the maximum inlet temperatures and temperature rise rates that the compression system could tolerate before the onset of stall for various circumferential distortions as well as the compressor system response during stall.

  4. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, T. R. H.; Crow, W. T.; Hain, C.

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth-orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between temperature estimates from microwave Ka-band, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR), and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13 (both averaged over Africa and Europe). Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the model's ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. The equivalent average timing for Ka-band is 13:44, which is influenced by the effect of increased sensing depth in desert areas. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations lag the TIR observations by only 15 min, which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  5. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells: Cycle life test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    The service life and storage stability for several storage batteries were determined. The batteries included silver-zinc batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries, and silver-cadmium batteries. The cell performance characteristics and limitations are to be used by spacecraft power systems planners and designers. A statistical analysis of the life cycle prediction and cause of failure versus test conditions is presented.

  6. Effect of an aerodynamic helmet on head temperature, core temperature, and cycling power compared with a traditional helmet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua F; Brown, Skyler R; Lange, Andrew P; Brothers, R Matthew

    2013-12-01

    Nonvented "aerodynamic helmets" reduce wind resistance but may increase head (Th) and gastrointestinal (Tgi) temperature and reduce performance when worn in hot conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that Th and Tgi would be greater during low-intensity cycling (LIC) in the heat while wearing an aero helmet (AERO) vs. a traditional vented racing helmet (REG). This study also tested the hypothesis that Th, Tgi, and finish time would be greater, and power output would be reduced during a self-paced time trial in the heat with AERO vs. REG. Ten highly trained heat-acclimated endurance athletes conducted LIC (50% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, LIC) and a high-intensity 12-km self-paced time trial (12-km TT) on a cycle ergometer in 39° C on 2 different days (AERO and REG), separated by >48 hours. During LIC, Th was higher at minute 7.5 and all time points thereafter in AERO vs. REG (p < 0.05). Similarly, during the 12-km TT, Th was higher at minutes 12.5, 15, and 17.5 in AERO vs. REG (p < 0.05). Heart rate (HR) and Tgi increased during LIC and during 12-km TT (both p < 0.001); however, no significant interaction (helmet × time) existed for HR or Tgi at either intensity (all p > 0.05). No group differences existed for finish time or power output during the 12-km TT (both p > 0.05). In conclusion, Th becomes elevated during cycling in the heat with an aero helmet compared with a traditional vented racing helmet during LIC and high-intensity cycling, yet Tgi and HR responses are similar irrespective of helmet type and Th. Furthermore, the higher Th that develops when an aero helmet is worn during cycling in the heat does not affect power output or cycling performance during short-duration high-intensity events. PMID:23539083

  7. High temperature electronics technology: Life test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, D. J.

    1984-09-01

    This report presents the results of a series of life tests of silicon Integrated Injection Logic (I2L) microcircuits designed to operate for long periods at temperatures as high as 300 C. The technology needed to design and fabricate these microcircuits was previously developed under Contract N00173-79-C-0010. Two life tests were conducted: an operating-life test at 300 C and a nonoperating-life test at 360 C. Ten chip packages, each containing four identical ring oscillator/counter test circuits, were tested at each temperature. A total of 80 microcircuits were fabricated using two different metallization processes. None of the 300 C test specimens failed; 24 circuits of the 40 completed 3206 hours, and 16 completed 2342 hours. Of the 40 circuits tested at 360 C, 4 experienced infant mortality failure at about 1000 hours, but the remaining 36 circuits ran without failure for 2618 hours. Posttest analysis indicates that metallization deterioration began with scattered formation of void and extruded gold crystals in the connecting runs. The overall test results were considered very encouraging, and operational life is estimated to more than 18,000 hours at 300 deg C. Continued development efforts are recommended.

  8. Laurentide Ice Sheet Basal Temperatures at the Last Glacial Cycle As Inferred from Borehole Temperature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickler, C.; Beltrami, H.; Mareschal, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Twelve temperature-depth profiles (>1500 m) located in Eastern to Central Canada were studied to determine the past ground surface temperature histories (GSTH) for the Last Glacial Cycle (LGC) and afterwards. The GSTHs were inferred using singular variable decomposition (SVD). Three locations (Sudbury, Manitouwadge, and Thompson) presented multiple boreholes. Here, simultaneous inversion was utilized to illustrate any regional trends present. For all studied sites, the inversion shows that ground surface temperatures throughout the LGC near the pressure melting point of ice, -1.41-2.51°C. These ground surface temperatures are representative of the basal temperatures of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, which covered the region throughout the LGC. These temperatures allow for the possibility of basal flow and fast flowing ice streams, which have been inferred from geomorphological data and are consistent with modeling efforts. Regional variations in basal temperatures are observed. These could be attributed to fluctuations in ice sheet thickness and proximity to the edge of the ice sheet. No correlation between heat flow and the amplitude of the GSTH variations was observed, leading to the conclusion that the basal temperatures in this region are primarily driven by ice dynamics.

  9. Mir Cooperative Solar Array Project Accelerated Life Thermal Cycling Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1996-01-01

    The Mir Cooperative Solar Array (MCSA) project was a joint U.S./Russian effort to build a photovoltaic (PV) solar array and deliver it to the Russian space station Mir. The MCSA will be used to increase the electrical power on Mir and provide PV array performance data in support of Phase 1 of the International Space Station. The MCSA was brought to Mir by space shuttle Atlantis in November 1995. This report describes an accelerated thermal life cycle test which was performed on two samples of the MCSA. In eight months time, two MCSA solar array 'mini' panel test articles were simultaneously put through 24,000 thermal cycles. There was no significant degradation in the structural integrity of the test articles and no electrical degradation, not including one cell damaged early and removed from consideration. The nature of the performance degradation caused by this one cell is briefly discussed. As a result of this test, changes were made to improve some aspects of the solar cell coupon-to-support frame interface on the flight unit. It was concluded from the results that the integration of the U.S. solar cell modules with the Russian support structure would be able to withstand at least 24,000 thermal cycles (4 years on-orbit). This was considered a successful development test.

  10. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William G.; Bonner, Richard W.; Dussinger, Peter M.; Hartenstine, John R.; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 725 K (170 to 450 C), including space nuclear power system radiators, fuel cells, and high temperature electronics cooling. Historically, water has been used in heat pipes at temperatures up to about 425 K (150 C). Recent life tests, updated below, demonstrate that titanium/water and Monel/water heat pipes can be used at temperatures up to 550 K (277 C), due to water's favorable transport properties. At temperatures above roughly 570 K (300 C), water is no longer a suitable fluid, due to high vapor pressure and low surface tension as the critical point is approached. At higher temperatures, another working fluid/envelope combination is required, either an organic or halide working fluid. An electromotive force method was used to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This procedure was used to reject aluminum and aluminum alloys as envelope materials, due to their high decomposition potential. Titanium and three corrosion resistant superalloys were chosen as envelope materials. Life tests were conducted with these envelopes and six different working fluids: AlBr3, GaCl3, SnCl4, TiCl4, TiBr4, and eutectic diphenyl/diphenyl oxide (Therminol VP-1/Dowtherm A). All of the life tests except for the GaCl3 are ongoing; the GaCl3 was incompatible. As the temperature approaches 725 K (450 C), cesium is a potential heat pipe working fluid. Life tests results are also presented for cesium/Monel 400 and cesium/70-30 copper/nickel heat pipes operating near 750 K (477 C). These materials are not suitable for long term operation, due to copper transport from the condenser to the evaporator.

  11. Temperature Oscillations Drive Cycles in the Activity of MMP-2,9 Secreted by a Human Trabecular Meshwork Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Li, Stanley Ka-lok; Banerjee, Juni; Jang, Christopher; Sehgal, Amita; Stone, Richard A.; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Aqueous humor inflow falls 50% during sleeping hours without proportional fall in IOP, partly reflecting reduced outflow facility. The mechanisms underlying outflow facility cycling are unknown. One outflow facility regulator is matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release from trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Because anterior segment temperature must oscillate due to core temperature cycling and eyelid closure during sleep, we tested whether physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive cycles in the activity of secreted MMP. Methods. Temperature of transformed normal human TM cells (hTM5 line) was fixed or alternated 12 hours/12 hours between 33°C and 37°C. Activity of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 was measured by zymography, and gene expression by RT-PCR and quantitative PCR. Results. Raising temperature to 37°C increased, and lowering to 33°C reduced, activity of secreted MMP. Switching between 37°C and 33°C altered MMP-9 by 40% ± 3% and MMP-2 by 22% ± 2%. Peripheral circadian clocks did not mediate temperature-driven cycling of MMP secretion because MMP-release oscillations did not persist at constant temperature after 3 to 6 days of alternating temperatures, and temperature cycles did not entrain clock-gene expression in these cells. Furthermore, inhibiting heat shock transcription factor 1, which links temperature and peripheral clock-gene oscillations, inhibited MMP-9 but not MMP-2 temperature-driven MMP cycling. Inhibition of heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels altered total MMP secretion but not temperature-induced modulations. Inhibiting cold-sensitive TRPM-8 channels had no effect. Conclusions. Physiologically relevant temperature oscillations drive fluctuations of secreted MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in hTM5 cells independent of peripheral clock genes and temperature-sensitive TRP channels. PMID:25655795

  12. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 2: Strainrange partitioning and low-cycle fatigue results at 538 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    Low-cycle fatigue tests of 1/2 Hard AMZIRC Copper and NARloy Z were performed in argon at 538 C to determine partitioned strain range versus life relationships. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests of a Zr-Cr-Mg copper-base alloy were also performed. Strain ranges, lower than those employed in previous tests, were imposed in order to extend the fatigue life curve out to approximately 400,000 cycles. An experimental copper alloy and an experimental silver alloy were also studied. Tensile tests were performed in air at room temperature and in argon at 538 C. Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue tests were performed at 538 C in argon to define the fatigue life over the regime from 300 to 3,000 cycles. For the silver alloy, three additional heat treatments were introduced, and a limited evaluation of the short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue behavior at 538 C was performed.

  13. Debranching and temperature-cycled crystallization of waxy rice starch and their digestibility.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Feng; Ma, Fei; Gao, Qunyu; Yu, Shujuan; Kong, Fansheng; Zhu, Siming

    2014-11-26

    Slowly digestible starch (SDS) was obtained through debranched waxy rice starch and subsequent crystallization under isothermal and temperature-cycled conditions. Temperature-cycled crystallization of dual 4/-20 °C produced a higher yield of SDS product than isotherm crystallization. Crystal structure of SDS products changed from A-type to a mixture of B and V-type X-ray diffraction patterns. The relative crystallinity was higher in the temperature-cycled samples than that of isotherm. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy suggested that the peripheral regions of isothermal storage starch were better organized than temperature-cycles. Temperature cycling induced higher onset temperature for melting of crystals than isothermal storage under a differential scanning calorimeter. The cycled temperature storage induced a greater amount of SDS than the isothermal storage. PMID:25256463

  14. Recent geographic convergence in diurnal and annual temperature cycling flattens global thermal profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, George; Dillon, Michael E.

    2014-11-01

    Warming mean temperatures over the past century have probably shifted distributions, altered phenologies, increased extinction risks, and impacted agriculture and human health. However, knowledge of mean temperatures alone does not provide a complete understanding either of changes in the climate itself or of how changing climate will affect organisms. Temporal temperature variation, primarily driven by daily and annual temperature cycles, has profound effects on organism physiology and ecology, yet changes in temperature cycling over the past 40 years are still poorly understood. Here we estimate global changes in the magnitudes of diurnal and annual temperature cycles from 1975 to 2013 from an analysis of over 1.4 billion hourly temperature measurements from 7,906 weather stations. Increases in daily temperature variation since 1975 in polar (1.4 °C), temperate (1.0 °C) and tropical (0.3 °C) regions parallel increases in mean temperature. Concurrently, magnitudes of annual temperature cycles decreased by 0.6 °C in polar regions, increased by 0.4 °C in temperate regions, and remained largely unchanged in tropical regions. Stronger increases in daily temperature cycling relative to changes in annual temperature cycling in temperate and polar regions mean that, with respect to diurnal and annual cycling, the world is flattening as temperate and polar regions converge on tropical temperature cycling profiles.

  15. Developing and Testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Houser, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Is the water cycle intensifying in response to global warming due to temperature-driven changes in atmospheric water holding capacity? To address this question, we are developing and testing Water Cycle Intensification Indicator (WCI) to quantify the current and future change in the strength of the water cycle across the conterminous U.S. in support of the National Climate Assessment (NCA). The WCI consists of a suite of primary water cycle trend and extreme composites that are spatially- and temporally-scalable for summarizing how the climate changes results in stronger or more extreme water cycling over the nation. We calculated trend and extreme in water cycle components using NASA-produced data and modeling products. Six water cycle variables are chosen, including precipitation, evaporation, runoff, moisture convergence flux, terrestrial storage and water vapor. Our preliminary results showed that the strength of water cycle depends on specific regions and variables, even different datasets. For instance, precipitation from MERRA-Land offline simulation is consistent with the CPC unified precipitation dataset in showing positive trend over the northeastern, northwestern and west north central, but negative trend over the western and central regions. However, negative trends are observed in MERRA-land over the southern Texas and some parts of the southern coast, contrary to the positive trend revealed by the unified dataset in the same area. Next, we are going to integrate and combine the trends and extremes of these water cycle components to develop a suite of climate indicators to monitor the changes of water cycle as result of climate change. These indicators will be implemented and tested over the nation for further optimization. Moreover, we will also be developing innovative WCI visualization, documentation and distribution methods to disseminate WCI products to the public and stakeholders.

  16. Ceramic high temperature receiver design and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. B.

    1982-01-01

    The High Temperature Solar Thermal Receiver, which was tested a Edwards AFB, CA during the winter of 1980-1981, evolved from technologies developed over a five year period of work. This receiver was tested at the Army Solar Furnace at White Sands, NM in 1976. The receiver, was tested successfully at 1768 deg F and showed thermal efficiencies of 85%. The results were sufficiently promising to lead ERDA to fund our development and test of a 250 kW receiver to measure the efficiency of an open cavity receiver atop a central tower of a heliostat field. This receiver was required to be design scalable to 10, 50, and 100 MW-electric sizes to show applicability to central power tower receivers. That receiver employed rectagular silicon carbide panels and vertical stanchions to achieve scalability. The construction was shown to be fully scalable; and the receiver was operated at temperatures up to 2000 deg F to achieve the performance goals of the experiment during tests at the GIT advanced components test facility during the fall of 1978.

  17. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad E.; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA Subassembly (MTSAS) was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort was testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon's EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. Lunar environment testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 Nomenclature loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This exceeded any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  18. Ultrasonic waveguide transducer for high temperature testing of ceramic honeycomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, N.; An, C. P.; Nickerson, S. T.; Gunasekaran, N.; Shi, Z.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical ultrasonic waveguide transducer designed for in situ material property characterization of ceramic honeycomb at high temperatures (>1200°C) and under fast thermal cycles (>1000°C/min). The low thermal conductivity MACOR waveguide allows the use of conventional transducer (max temp. 50°C) at one end and guides ultrasonic waves into the high temperature region where the characterization is carried out. The impact of time, temperature, and heating/cooling rates on the material behavior was studied. It was demonstrated that the same transducer could also be used for in-situ crack detection during the thermal shock testing of ceramic honeycomb.

  19. Life-cycle testing of receiving waters with Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Konetsky, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia are commonly used to estimate toxicity of effluents or receiving waters but can sometimes yield {open_quotes}no toxicity{close_quotes} outcomes even if pollutants are present. We conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) see if tests with longer exposure periods would reveal evidence for toxicity that might not be evident from 7-day tests, and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia reproduction. In the first set of tests, C. dubia was reared in diluted mineral water (negative control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a retention basin containing sediments contaminated with mercury, other metals and polychlorinated biphenyls. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only, but this water was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added, prior to testing. C. dubia survival and reproduction did not differ much among the three water types in the first set of tests, but these two parameters were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia appeared to be relatively insensitive to general water-quality factors, but quite sensitive to food-related factors. Regression analyses showed that the predictability of life-time reproduction by C. dubia from the results of 7-day tests was very low (R{sup 2}< 0.35) in five of the six experiments. The increase in predictability as a function of test duration also differed among water types in the first set of tests, and among treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, 7-day tests with C. dubia may be used to quantify water-quality problems, but it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of these tests to longer time scales.

  20. Low Cycle Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Behavior of Alloy 617 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cabet, Celine; Carroll, Laura; Wright, Richard

    2013-10-01

    Alloy 617 is the leading candidate material for an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) application of the Very High Temperature Nuclear Reactor (VHTR), expected to have an outlet temperature as high as 950 degrees C. Acceptance of Alloy 617 in Section III of the ASME Code for nuclear construction requires a detailed understanding of the creep-fatigue behavior. Initial creep-fatigue work on Alloy 617 suggests a more dominant role of environment with increasing temperature and/or hold times evidenced through changes in creep-fatigue crack growth mechanism/s and failure life. Continuous cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue testing of Alloy 617 was conducted at 950 degrees C and 0.3% and 0.6% total strain in air to simulate damage modes expected in a VHTR application. Continuous cycle specimens exhibited transgranular cracking. Intergranular cracking was observed in the creep-fatigue specimens, although evidence of grain boundary cavitation was not observed. Despite the absence of grain boundary cavitation to accelerate crack propagation, the addition of a hold time at peak tensile strain was detrimental to cycle life. This suggests that creepfatigue interaction may occur by a different mechanism or that the environment may be partially responsible for accelerating failure.

  1. Life-cycle testing of receiving waters with Ceriodaphnia dubia

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, A.J.; Beane, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Seven-day tests with Ceriodaphnia are commonly used to estimate the toxicity of effluents or receiving waters, but may yield no toxicity outcomes even when pollutants are present (a possible type II error). The authors conducted two sets of full life-cycle tests with C. dubia to (1) see if tests with longer exposure periods revealed evidence for toxicity that might not be evident from shorter tests, and (2) determine the relative importance of water quality versus food as factors influencing C. dubia reproduction. In the first set of tests, daphnids were reared in diluted mineral water (control), water from a stream impacted by coal fly-ash, or water from a mercury-contaminated retention basin. The second set of tests used water from the retention basin only, but this water was either filtered or not filtered, and food was either added or not added. C. dubia survival and reproduction did not differ much among the three waters in the first set of tests. However, both parameters were strongly affected by the filtering and food-addition treatments in the second set of tests. Thus, C. dubia seems to be moderately insensitive to general water-quality factors, but quite sensitive to food-related parameters. Regression analysis showed that the predictability of life-time reproduction of C. dubia from 7-day test results was low in five of six cases. The increase in predictability as a function of test duration also differed among water types (first set of tests), and among treatments (second set of tests). Thus, 7-day tests with C. dubia may be used to quantify water-quality problems, but it may not be possible to reliably extrapolate the results of such tests to longer time scales.

  2. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests — Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2007-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and CP-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results from previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  3. Intermediate Temperature Fluids Life Tests - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Sarraf, David B.; Locci, Ivan E.; Anderson, William G.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of different applications that could use heat pipes or loop heat pipes (LHPs) in the intermediate temperature range of 450 to 750 K, including space nuclear power system radiators, and high temperature electronics cooling. Potential working fluids include organic fluids, elements, and halides, with halides being the least understood, with only a few life tests conducted. Potential envelope materials for halide working fluids include pure aluminum, aluminum alloys, commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium alloys, and corrosion resistant superalloys. Life tests were conducted with three halides (AlBr3, SbBr3, and TiCl4) and water in three different envelopes: two aluminum alloys (Al-5052, Al-6061) and Cp-2 titanium. The AlBr3 attacked the grain boundaries in the aluminum envelopes, and formed TiAl compounds in the titanium. The SbBr3 was incompatible with the only envelope material that it was tested with, Al-6061. TiCl4 and water were both compatible with CP2-titanium. A theoretical model was developed that uses electromotive force differences to predict the compatibility of halide working fluids with envelope materials. This theory predicts that iron, nickel, and molybdenum are good envelope materials, while aluminum and titanium halides are good working fluids. The model is in good agreement with results form previous life tests, as well as the current life tests.

  4. High temperature impression creep testing of weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, W.S.; Matlock, D.K.; Olson, D.L.; Wang, S.H.

    1985-06-01

    The impression creep test technique, a modified hot hardness test in which the time dependence of the indentor displacement correlates directly to creep properties, has been utilized to measure the localized creep properties across welded joints. High temperature creep data, as a function of position, with respect to the fusion line, were measured on an autogeneous GTA aluminum weld and on an austenitic stainless steel to ferritic steel dissimilar metal weldment. The creep resistance of the aluminum weld decreased with position on traversing from the solidified weld metal to the base metal, and the variation in creep resistance with position was shown to correlate directly to gradients in microstructure.

  5. The Annual Cycle in Equatorial Convection and Sea Surface Temperature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Todd P.; Wallace, John M.

    1992-10-01

    The coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic exhibits a distinct annual cycle that is reflected in contrasting conditions at the times of the two equinoxes. The contrasts are so strong that they dominate the annual march of zonally averaged outgoing longwave radiation for the equatorial belt. The March equinox corresponds to the warm season when the equatorial cold tongues in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic are absent. With the onset of summer monsoon convection over Colombia, Central America, and West Africa in May-June, northward surface winds strengthen over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, the equatorial cold tongues reappear, and the marine convection shifts from the equatorial belt to the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs) along 8N. As the northern summer program the ITCZs remain strong and shift northward to new 10N, while sea surface temperature (SST) continues to drop over the cold tongues and the southern tropics, perhaps in response to the expanding stratocumulus cloud decks in the latter region. The cold tongui-ITCZ complex persists through the September equinox, which is characterized by suppressed conviction, not only over the cold tongues but also over much of equatorial South America.On the basis of observational evidence concerning the timing and year-to-year regularity of the surface wind changes during the development of the cold tongues, it is argued that 1) the increase in the northward surface winds in response to the onset of the northern summer monsoon may be instrumental in reestablishing the cold tongues and 2) positive feedbacks involving both the zonal and meridional wind components contribute to the remarkable robustness of the cold tongue-ITCZ complexes in both oceans.

  6. Feasibility Investigation for Performing Fireball Temperature Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapphorn, Ralph M.; Kurtz, Joe

    1997-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested by the Launch Abort Subpanel and the Power Systems Subpanel of the Interagency Nuclear Safety Review Panel to investigate the feasibility of using spectroscopic techniques to measure propellant fireball gas temperatures. This report outlines the modeling and experimental approaches and results of this investigation. Descriptions of the theoretical particle temperature and mass effusion models are presented along with the results of the survivability of small plutonium dioxide (less than or equal to 1000 microns diameter) particles entrained in various propellant fireball scenarios. The experimental test systems used to measure the hydroxide radical, water, and particle graybody spectral emissions and absorptions are discussed. Spectral results along with temperatures extracted by analyzing the spectral features are presented for the flames investigated in the laboratory environment. Methods of implementing spectroscopic measurements for future testing using the WSTF Large-scale Hydrogen/Oxygen Explosion Facility are discussed, and the accuracy expected for these measurements is estimated from laboratory measurements.

  7. The Impact of Elevated Temperatures on Continental Carbon Cycling in the Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancost, R. D.; Handley, L.; Taylor, K. W.; Collinson, M. E.; Weijers, J.; Talbot, H. M.; Hollis, C. J.; Grogan, D. S.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Recent climate and biogeochemical modelling suggests that methane flux from wetlands and soils was greater during past greenhouse climates, due to a combination of higher continental temperatures, an enhanced hydrological cycle, and elevated primary production. Here, we examine continental environments in the Paleogene using a range of biomarker proxies (complemented by palaeobotanical approaches), including air temperatures derived from the distribution of soil bacterial glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (the MBT/CBT proxy), as well as evidence from wetland and lacustrine settings for enhanced methane cycling. Previously published and new MBT/CBT records parallel sea surface temperature records, suggesting elevated continental temperatures during the Eocene even at mid- to high latitudes (New Zealand, 20-28°C; the Arctic, 17°C; across the Sierra Nevada, 15-25°C; and SE England, 20-30°C). Such temperatures are broadly consistent with paleobotanical records and would have directly led to increased methane production via the metabolic impact of temperature on rates of methanogenesis. To test this, we have determined the distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of archaeal ether lipids and bacterial hopanoids in thermally immature Eocene lignites. In particular, the Cobham lignite, deposited in SE England and spanning the PETM, is characterised by markedly higher concentrations of both methanogen and methanotroph biomarkers compared to modern and Holocene temperate peats. Elevated temperatures, by fostering either stratification and/or decreased oxygen solubility, could have also led to enhanced methane production in Paleogene lakes. Both the Messel Shale (Germany) and Green River Formation, specifically the Parachute Creek oil shale horizons (Utah and Wyoming), are characterised by strongly reducing conditions (including euxinic conditions in the latter), as well as abundant methanogen and methanotroph biomarkers. Such results confirm model predictions of elevated Eocene methane levels relative to the Holocene (x10), but suggest that even these could be underestimates as they do not take into account lacustrine production and are generally characterised by lower high latitude temperatures than proxies suggest.

  8. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  9. Evaluation of Package Stress during Temperature Cycling using Metal Deformation Measurement and FEM Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeglauer, J.; Bohm, C.; Otremba, R.; Maerz, J.; Nelle, P.; Stecher, M.; Alpern, P.

    2006-02-07

    Plastic encapsulated devices that are exposed to Temperature Cycling (TC) tests undergo an excessive mechanical stress due to different Coefficients of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of the various materials used in the system. Especially in the corners of the die, passivation cracks and shifted metal lines can be observed, which demonstrates an increasing mechanical stress from chip center to the corners of the die. This effect has been known for a long time. This paper presents a simple measurement technique to quantify the mechanical shear stress at the chip-Mold Compound (MC) interface by measuring the deformation of a periodical metal structure. Based on this deformation measurement, we evaluated the stress distribution within the package, and the influence of different parameters such as number of cycles and chip size. Furthermore, these experimental results were compared with FEM simulation, and showed good agreement but could not account in all cases for the total amount of observed shift.

  10. Testing of reciprocating seals for application in a Stirling cycle engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curulla, J. F.; Beck, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    Six single stage reciprocating seal configurations to the requirements of the Stirling cycle engine were evaluated. The seals tested were: the Boeing Footseal, NASA Chevron polyimide seal, Bell seal, Quad seal, Tetraseal, and Dynabak seal. None of these seal configurations met the leakage goals of .002 cc/sec at helium gas pressure of 1.22 x 10 to the 7th power PA, rod speed of 7.19 m/sec peak, and seal environmental temperature of 408 K for 1500 hours. Most seals failed due to high temperatures. Catastrophic failures were observed for a minimum number of test runs characterized by extremely high leakage rates and large temperature rises. The Bell seal attained 63 hours of run time at significantly lowered test conditions.

  11. 40 CFR 86.1360-2007 - Supplemental emission test; test cycle and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Supplemental emission test; test cycle and procedures. 86.1360-2007 Section 86.1360-2007 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Emission...

  12. Daily Cycle of Air Temperature and Surface Temperature in Stone Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Li, Y.; Wang, X.; Yuan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization is one of the most profound human activities that impact on climate change. In cities, where are highly artificial areas, the conflict between human activity and natural climate is particularly prominent. Urban areas always have the larger area of impervious land, the higher consumption of greenhouse gases, more emissions of anthropogenic heat and air pollution, all contribute to the urban warming phenomena. Understanding the mechanisms causing a variety of phenomena involved in the urban warming is critical to distinguish the anthropogenic effect and natural variation in the climate change. However, the exact dynamics of urban warming were poorly understood, and effective control strategies are not available. Here we present a study of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in Stone Forest. The specific heat of the stones in the Stone Forest and concrete of the man-made structures within the cities are approximate. Besides, the height of the Stone Forest and the height of buildings within the city are also similar. As a scenic area, the Stone Forest is being preserved and only opened for sightseeing. There is no anthropogenic heat, as well air pollution within the Stone Forest. The thermal environment in Stone Forest can be considered to be a simulation of thermal environment in the city, which can reveal the effect of man-made structures on urban thermal environment. We conducted the field studies and numerical analysis in the Stone Forest for 4 typical urban morphology and environment scenarios, including high-rise compact cities, low-rise sparse cities, garden cities and isolated single stone. Air temperature and relative humidity were measured every half an hour in 15 different locations, which within different spatial distribution of stones and can represent the four urban scenarios respectively. At the same time, an infrared camera was used to take thermal images and get the hourly surface temperatures of stones and vegetation in the measurement area. The differences of the daily cycle of air temperature and surface temperature in these four scenarios show a significant impact of urban man-made structures on the dynamics of urban thermal environment.

  13. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including Limit Cycle Oscillation behavior.

  14. Life Cycle Tests on a Hollow Cathode Based Plasma Contactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Schneider, Todd A.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster with a mission duration of 12 days. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta II second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma, and a Hollow Cathode Plasma Contactor (HCPC) emits the collected electrons from the Delta II, completing the electrical circuit to the ambient plasma. The HCPC for the ProSEDS mission have made it necessary to turn off the HCPC once a minute throughout the entire mission. Because of the unusual operating requirements by the ProSEDS mission, an engineering development unit of the HCPC was built to demonstrate the HCPC design would start reliably for the life of the ProSEDS mission. During the life test the engineering unit cycled for over 10,000 on/off cycles without missing a single start, and during that same test the HCPC unit demonstrated the capability to emit 0 to 5 A electron emission current. The performance of the HCPC unit during this life test will be discussed.

  15. A Comparison of Single-Cycle Versus Multiple-Cycle Proof Testing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Millwater, H. R.; Russell, D. A.; Orient, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (SCPT and MCPT) strategies for reusable aerospace propulsion system components are critically evaluated and compared from a rigorous elastic-plastic fracture mechanics perspective. Earlier MCPT studies are briefly reviewed. New J-integral estimation methods for semi-elliptical surface cracks and cracks at notches are derived and validated. Engineering methods are developed to characterize crack growth rates during elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the tear-fatigue interaction near instability. Surface crack growth experiments are conducted with Inconel 718 to characterize tearing resistance, FCG under small-scale yielding and elastic-plastic conditions, and crack growth during simulated MCPT. Fractography and acoustic emission studies provide additional insight. The relative merits of SCPT and MCPT are directly compared using a probabilistic analysis linked with an elastic-plastic crack growth computer code. The conditional probability of failure in service is computed for a population of components that have survived a previous proof test, based on an assumed distribution of initial crack depths. Parameter studies investigate the influence of proof factor, tearing resistance, crack shape, initial crack depth distribution, and notches on the MCPT vs. SCPT comparison. The parameter studies provide a rational basis to formulate conclusions about the relative advantages and disadvantages of SCPT and MCPT. Practical engineering guidelines are proposed to help select the optimum proof test protocol in a given application.

  16. A Comparison of Single-Cycle Versus Multiple-Cycle Proof Testing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClung, R. C.; Chell, G. G.; Millwater, H. R.; Russell, D. A.; Millwater, H. R.

    1999-01-01

    Single-cycle and multiple-cycle proof testing (SCPT and MCPT) strategies for reusable aerospace propulsion system components are critically evaluated and compared from a rigorous elastic-plastic fracture mechanics perspective. Earlier MCPT studies are briefly reviewed. New J-integral estimation methods for semielliptical surface cracks and cracks at notches are derived and validated. Engineering methods are developed to characterize crack growth rates during elastic-plastic fatigue crack growth (FCG) and the tear-fatigue interaction near instability. Surface crack growth experiments are conducted with Inconel 718 to characterize tearing resistance, FCG under small-scale yielding and elastic-plastic conditions, and crack growth during simulated MCPT. Fractography and acoustic emission studies provide additional insight. The relative merits of SCPT and MCPT are directly compared using a probabilistic analysis linked with an elastic-plastic crack growth computer code. The conditional probability of failure in service is computed for a population of components that have survived a previous proof test, based on an assumed distribution of initial crack depths. Parameter studies investigate the influence of proof factor, tearing resistance, crack shape, initial crack depth distribution, and notches on the MCPT versus SCPT comparison. The parameter studies provide a rational basis to formulate conclusions about the relative advantages and disadvantages of SCPT and MCPT. Practical engineering guidelines are proposed to help select the optimum proof test protocol in a given application.

  17. Optimization Of Nakazima Test At Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Turetta, A.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2007-04-07

    Nowadays hot forming of High Strength Steel is gaining the strict requirements of automotive producer: in fact deformation performed simultaneously with quenching assures a fully martensitic microstructure at room temperature and thus high strength properties that allow the thickness reduction of the body-in-white components. Basic aspects of hot stamping are still under investigation and supplementary achievements are expected for a successful application of sheet metal forming technologies at elevated temperatures. Among data needed to settle a numerical model of the process, information about material formability may help in better designing and optimizing hot stamping operations. In the first part of the work, a new experimental apparatus based on Nakazima concept is presented; process parameters are optimized in order to accurately replicate the thermo-mechanical conditions typical of the industrial process, paying particular attention to the thermal and microstructural evolution. On the other hand, as commercial FE codes require the implementation of Forming Limit Diagrams at constant temperature, numerical investigations have been performed in order to determine the proper testing conditions to obtain FLD at nearly constant temperature.

  18. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-03-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 75C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45C. Above 60C the resin appears to not load at all.

  19. The influence of temperature on the cycle life performance of rechargeable Li-TiS2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Huang, C.-K.; Deligiannis, F.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report studies on the influence of low temperature on the properties and cycling performance of six selected electrolytes. The electrolytes investigated were 2-MeTHF, EC/2-MeTHF, THF, THF/2-MeTHF, EC/THF, and EC/THF/2-MeTHF. All the electrolytes contained 1.5M LiAsF6. Open circuit stand tests indicated that organic electrolytes exhibited improved stability towards lithium at 10 C. However, cycling of the cells at 10 C did not result in improved cycle life performance.

  20. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzichristodoulou, C.; Allebrod, F.; Mogensen, M.

    2013-05-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 °C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established test station is provided.

  1. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station.

    PubMed

    Chatzichristodoulou, C; Allebrod, F; Mogensen, M

    2013-05-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 °C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established test station is provided. PMID:23742566

  2. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as the ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  3. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  4. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  5. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  6. A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, B.; Weng, Y.W.

    2010-05-15

    A combined power and ejector refrigeration cycle for low temperature heat sources is under investigation in this paper. The proposed cycle combines the organic Rankine cycle and the ejector refrigeration cycle. The ejector is driven by the exhausts from the turbine to produce power and refrigeration simultaneously. A simulation was carried out to analyze the cycle performance using R245fa as the working fluid. A thermal efficiency of 34.1%, an effective efficiency of 18.7% and an exergy efficiency of 56.8% can be obtained at a generating temperature of 395 K, a condensing temperature of 298 K and an evaporating temperature of 280 K. Simulation results show that the proposed cycle has a big potential to produce refrigeration and most exergy losses take place in the ejector. (author)

  7. Advanced Low Temperature Geothermal Power Cycles (The ENTIV Organic Project) Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mugerwa, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Feasibility study of advanced low temperature thermal power cycles for the Entiv Organic Project. Study evaluates amonia-water mixed working fluid energy conversion processes developed and licensed under Kalex in comparison with Kalina cycles. Both cycles are developed using low temperature thermal resource from the Lower Klamath Lake Geothermal Area. An economic feasibility evaluation was conducted for a pilot plant which was deemed unfeasible by the Project Sponsor (Entiv).

  8. High-Cycle Fatigue Resistance of Si-Mo Ductile Cast Iron as Affected by Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteis, Paolo; Scavino, Giorgio; Castello, Alessandro; Firrao, Donato

    2015-09-01

    Silicon-molybdenum ductile cast irons are used to fabricate exhaust manifolds of internal combustion engines of large series cars, where the maximum pointwise temperature at full engine load may be higher than 973 K (700 °C). In this application, high-temperature oxidation and thermo-mechanical fatigue (the latter being caused by the engine start and stop and by the variation of its power output) have been the subject of several studies and are well known, whereas little attention has been devoted to the high-cycle fatigue, arising from the engine vibration. Therefore, the mechanical behavior of Si-Mo cast iron is studied here by means of stress-life fatigue tests up to 10 million cycles, at temperatures gradually increasing up to 973 K (700 °C). The mechanical characterization is completed by tensile and compressive tests and ensuing fractographic examinations; the mechanical test results are correlated with the cast iron microstructure and heat treatment.

  9. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, Adam M.; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L.; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A.; Peretz, Fred J.; Robb, Kevin R.; Wilson, Dane F.; Yoder, Jr, Graydon L.

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  10. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle thermal fatigue behavior has been investigated on a flat Haynes 188 alloy specimen, under the test condition of 30-Hz cycle frequency (33-msec pulse period and 10-msec pulse width including a 0.2-msec pulse spike; ref. 4). Temperature distributions were calculated with one-dimensional finite difference models. The calculations show that that the 0.2-msec pulse spike can cause an additional 40 C temperature fluctuation with an interaction depth of 0.08 mm near the specimen surface region. This temperature swing will be superimposed onto the temperature swing of 80 C that is induced by the 10-msec laser pulse near the 0.53-mm-deep surface interaction region.

  11. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  12. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  13. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  14. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47... temperature test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Prepare two samples for testing that measure 5 inches by 1/2 inch... which are 4 inches apart and immersed in a heat transfer medium at a test temperature range of 65...

  15. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  16. Automatic 300-4 K temperature cycling apparatus.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, C A

    1978-05-01

    The apparatus described here automatically cycles small samples between 300 and 4 K by alternately raising and lowering the sample through the neck of a commercial liquid helium storage Dewar. A bellows, which is pressurized by the helium boil-off gas, provides all of the required mechanical motion. By utilizing the cooling available from the boil-off gas, liquid helium helium consumption is limited to 0.03 l/cyc for a 12-g sample. Cycle times can be as short as 5 min. PMID:18699173

  17. Low-cycle fatigue of two austenitic alloys in hydrogen gas and air at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaske, C. E.; Rice, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue resistance of type 347 stainless steel and Hastelloy Alloy X was evaluated in constant-amplitude, strain-controlled fatigue tests conducted under continuous negative strain cycling at a constant strain rate of 0.001 per sec and at total axial strain ranges of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 percent in both hydrogen gas and laboratory air environments in the temperature range 538-871 C. Elevated-temperature, compressive-strain hold-time experiments were also conducted. In hydrogen, the cyclic stress-strain behavior of both materials at 538 C was characterized by appreciable cyclic hardening at all strain ranges. At 871 C neither material hardened significantly; in fact, at 5% strain range 347 steel showed continuous cyclic softening until failure. The fatigue resistance of 347 steel was slightly higher than that of Alloy X at all temperatures and strain ranges. Ten-minute compressive hold time experiments at 760 and 871 C resulted in increased fatigue lives for 347 steel and decreased fatigue lives for Alloy X. Both alloys showed slightly lower fatigue resistance in air than in hydrogen. Some fractographic and metallographic results are also given.

  18. The effect of temperature cycling typical of low earth orbit satellites on thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogro-Campero, A.; Turner, L. G.; Bogorad, A.; Herschitz, R.

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) were temperature cycled to simulate conditions of a low earth orbit satellite. In one series of tests, epitaxial and polycrystalline YBCO films were cycled between temperatures of +/- 80 C in vacuum and in nitrogen for hundreds of cycles. The room temperature resistance of an epitaxial YBCO film increased by about 10 percent, but the superconducting transition temperature was unchanged. The largest changes were for a polycrystalline YBCO film on oxidized silicon with a zirconia buffer layer, for which the transition temperature decreased by 3 K. An extended test was carried out for epitaxial films. After 3200 cycles (corresponding to about 230 days in space), transition temperatures and critical current densities remained unchanged.

  19. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G.

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required process conditions for the TGH demonstration. Operation of the TGH with and without the ABS system will demonstrate an increase in geothermal resource productivity for the VPC from 1 MW/(million lb) of brine to 1.75 MW/(million lb) of brine, a 75% increase.

  20. Performance evaluation of a low-temperature solar Rankine cycle system utilizing R245fa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.D.; Zhao, L.; Wang, J.L.; Zhang, W.Z.; Zhao, X.Z.; Wu, W.

    2010-03-15

    A low-temperature solar Rankine system utilizing R245fa as the working fluid is proposed and an experimental system is designed, constructed and tested. Both the evacuated solar collectors and the flat plate solar collectors are used in the experimental system; meanwhile, a rolling-piston R245fa expander is also mounted in the system. The new designed R245fa expander works stably in the experiment, with an average expansion power output of 1.73 kW and an average isentropic efficiency of 45.2%. The overall power generation efficiency estimated is 4.2%, when the evacuated solar collector is utilized in the system, and with the condition of flat plate solar collector, it is about 3.2%. The experimental results show that using R245fa as working fluid in the low-temperature solar power Rankine cycle system is feasible and the performance is acceptable. (author)

  1. Definition study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and associated test program and test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The Definition Study of a Variable Cycle Experimental Engine (VCEE) and Associated Test Program and Test Plan, was initiated to identify the most cost effective program for a follow-on to the AST Test Bed Program. The VCEE Study defined various subscale VCE's based on different available core engine components, and a full scale VCEE utilizing current technology. The cycles were selected, preliminary design accomplished and program plans and engineering costs developed for several program options. In addition to the VCEE program plans and options, a limited effort was applied to identifying programs that could logically be accomplished on the AST Test Bed Program VCE to extend the usefulness of this test hardware. Component programs were provided that could be accomplished prior to the start of a VCEE program.

  2. Temperature Cycles Induce Early Maturation in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major impediment in improvement of channel catfish by selective breeding is that a high percent of fish do not spawn until the third year. The conditions that lead to sexual maturation in fish have not been established. Size, nutritional state and number of seasonal cycles have all been suggeste...

  3. Thermoregulation and energetics in hibernating black bears: metabolic rate and the mystery of multi-day body temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Tøien, Øivind; Blake, John; Barnes, Brian M

    2015-05-01

    Black bears overwintering in outdoor hibernacula in Alaska decrease metabolism to as low as 25 % basal rates, while core body temperature (T(b)) decreases from 37 to 38 °C to a mid-hibernation average of 33 °C. T b develops cycles of 1.6-7.3 days length within a 30-36 °C range, with no circadian component. We do not know the mechanism or function underlying behind the T(b) cycles, although bears avoid T(b) of <30 °C and shorter cycles are predicted from higher rates of heat loss in colder conditions. To test this we manipulated den temperatures (T(den)) of 12 hibernating bears with body mass (BM) from 35.5 to 116.5 kg while recording T(b), metabolic rate (M), and shivering. T b cycle length (0.8-11.2 days) shortened as T den decreased (partial R(2) = 0.490, p < 0.001). Large bears with low thermal conductance (TC) showed more variation in T b cycle length with changes in T(den) than did smaller bears with high TC. Minimum T b across cycles was not consistent. At low T(den) bears shivered both during rising and decreasing phases of T(b) cycles, with minimum shivering during the fastest drop in T(b). At higher T den the T b pattern was more irregular. Mean M through T(b) cycles was negatively correlated to T den below lower critical temperatures (1.4-10.4 °C). Minimum M (0.3509 W/kg ± 0.0121 SE) during mid-hibernation scaled to BM [M (W) = 1.217 × BM (kg)(0.6979), R(2) = 0.855, p < 0.001]. Hibernating thermal conductance (TC) was negatively correlated to BM (R(2) = 0.721, p < 0.001); bears with high TC had the same T(b) cycle length as bears with low TC except at high T(den), thus not supporting the hypothesis that cooling rate alone determines T(b) cycle length. We conclude that T(b) cycling is effected by control of thermoregulatory heat production, and T(b) cycling may not be present when hibernating bears use passive thermoregulation. More intense shivering in the rising phase of cycles may contribute to the prevention of muscle disuse atrophy. Bears hibernating in cold conditions use more energy during hibernation than in warmer conditions. At T den below lower critical temperature, no extra energy expenditure results from T b cycling compared to keeping a stable T(b.) PMID:25648622

  4. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the life cycle of Ornithodoros (Pavlovskyella) erraticus (Ixodoidea: Argasidae).

    PubMed

    el Shoura, S M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of different temperatures (18, 22, 28, and 32.5 C, at constant 75% RH) and relative humidities (0, 15, 42, 60, 75, 84, and 92%, at constant 28 C) on the duration of the life cycle of Ornithodoros (Pavlovskyella) erraticus is studied in the laboratory. The egg incubation period is longer at 22 C than at the other temperatures tested; the percentage of hatched eggs was markedly increased at 28 C in comparison with other temperatures (T's) and relative humidities (RH's) tested. At constant 28 C, most larvae (86.2%) are ready to feed within 7.2 days posthatching; they feed for 5-52 min and molt to N1 in 7.8 days postfeeding. Five nymphal instars are recorded. Unfed N1-N5 survived for a longer period at 18 C than at other temperatures, whereas the effect of RH's was insignificant. After feeding, nymphal premolting periods differ from one instar to another and from one T or RH to another. At 28 C, the males emerge from N3, N4, and N5 in 9-15 days postfeeding, while females emerge only from N4 and N5 in 10-16 days. The overall sex ratio (3 male:5 female) is not affected by different T's and RH's. The female and male life spans were longer (means 720 and 500 days, respectively) at 22 C than at other T's and RH's. This study shows that the duration of the life cycle of O. erraticus decreases with rising T and increases with an increase in RH. However, the 28 C and 75% RH seem to be the optimum conditions for this species. PMID:3437349

  5. High temperature triaxial tests on Rochester shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruijn, Rolf; Burlini, Luigi; Misra, Santanu

    2010-05-01

    Phyllosilicates are one of the major components of the crust, responsible for strength weakening during deformation. High pressure and temperature experiments of natural samples rich in phyllosilicates are needed to test the relevance of proposed weakening mechanisms induced by phyllosilicates, derived from lab experiments on single phase and synthetic polyphase rocks and single crystals. Here, we present the preliminary results of a series of high temperature triaxial tests performed on the illite-rich Rochester Shale (USA - New York) using a Paterson type gas-medium HPT testing machine. Cylindrical samples with homogeneous microstructure and 12-14% porosity were fabricated by cold and hot-isostatically pressing, <150 μm crushed Rochester Shale particles. Experiments were conducted at 500- 700 °C temperature and varying strain rate from 5x10-6 to 7x10-4 s-1, while keeping confining pressure constant at 300 MPa. Synthetic hot-pressed samples were deformed up to a total shortening of 7.5 to 13%. To study the significance of mica dehydration, iron or copper jackets were used in combination with non-porous or porous spacers. Water content was measured before and after experiments using Karl Fischer Titration (KFT). All experiments show, after yielding at 0.6% strain, rapid hardening in nearly linear fashion until about 4-5% strain, from where stress increases at reducing rates to values at 10% strain, between 400 and 675 MPa, depending on experimental conditions. Neither failure nor steady state however, is achieved within the maximum strain of 13%. Experiments performed under 500 °C and 300 MPa confining pressure show weak strain rate dependence. In addition, iron-jacketed samples appear harder than copper-jacketed ones. At 700 °C samples are 17 to 37% weaker and more sensitive to strain rate than during 500 °C experiments. Although, iron-jacketed samples behave stronger than copper-jacketed ones. By visual inspection, samples appear homogeneously shortened. Preliminary analysis suggests that deformation is mostly accommodated by pore collapse. Although, with finite strain, pore collapse becomes less significant. A temperature, strain rate and jacket material dependent elastic deformation was inferred from significant differences between total and finite strain. For 500 °C experiments using copper jackets, elastic strain component of total strain was 49-57%, but for iron jacket experiments, the elastic strain component ranged between 58 and 70%. At 700 °C, iron- and copper-jacketed samples experienced elastic strain component ranging between 6 and 28% and around 47%, respectively. In any case, elastic strain is larger is than strain at the yield point, suggesting additional mechanisms play a role here. KFT analysis reveals that water loss is dependent on jacket material and presence of deformation. In deformation experiments, the iron jacket and non-porous spacers trap water completely. Iron jackets are slightly permeable during static experiments (0.02 wt% H2O/hr). With temperature, copper jackets become more permeable for water (0.06 wt% H2O/hr at 500 °C and 1.0 wt% H2O/hr at 700 °C). A temperature dependent linear relationship exists between permanent strain and porosity decrease. During 500 °C and 700 °C experiments, by approximation, porosity reduces at a rate of respectively 0.45% and 0.56% per strain percent. Density increases linearly with permanent strain as well (slope is 0.03 g cm-3 per strain percent).

  6. High temperature pressurized high frequency testing rig and test method

    DOEpatents

    De La Cruz, Jose; Lacey, Paul

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus is described which permits the lubricity of fuel compositions at or near temperatures and pressures experienced by compression ignition fuel injector components during operation in a running engine. The apparatus consists of means to apply a measured force between two surfaces and oscillate them at high frequency while wetted with a sample of the fuel composition heated to an operator selected temperature. Provision is made to permit operation at or near the flash point of the fuel compositions. Additionally a method of using the subject apparatus to simulate ASTM Testing Method D6079 is disclosed, said method involving using the disclosed apparatus to contact the faces of prepared workpieces under a measured load, sealing the workface contact point into the disclosed apparatus while immersing said contact point between said workfaces in a lubricating media to be tested, pressurizing and heating the chamber and thereby the fluid and workfaces therewithin, using the disclosed apparatus to impart a differential linear motion between the workpieces at their contact point until a measurable scar is imparted to at least one workpiece workface, and then evaluating the workface scar.

  7. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  8. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  9. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  10. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  11. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operability test; temperature... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with...

  12. Influence of temperature, environment, and thermal aging on the continuous cycle fatigue behavior of Hastelloy X and Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Strizak, J.P.; Brinkman, C.R.; Booker, M.K.; Rittenhouse, P.L.

    1982-04-01

    Results are presented for strain-controlled fatigue and tensile tests for two nickel-base, solution-hardened reference structural alloys for use in several High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts. These alloys, Hastelloy X and Inconel 617, were tested from room temperature to 871/sup 0/C in air and impure helium. Materials were tested in both the solution-annealed and the preaged conditios, in which aging consisted of isothermal exposure at one of several temperatures for periods of up to 20,000 h. Comparisons are given between the strain-controlled fatigue lives of these and several other commonly used alloys, all tested at 538/sup 0/C. An analysis is also presented of the continuous cycle fatigue data obtained from room temperature to 427/sup 0/C for Hastelloy G, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy C-276, and Hastelloy C-4, an effort undertaken in support of ASME code development.

  13. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... above the first test temperature. (ii) If ignition (flame) is observed in 5 minutes or less after the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as...

  14. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... above the first test temperature. (ii) If ignition (flame) is observed in 5 minutes or less after the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as...

  15. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... above the first test temperature. (ii) If ignition (flame) is observed in 5 minutes or less after the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Autogenous-ignition temperature test. 35.20... Autogenous-ignition temperature test. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test, referred to hereinafter as...

  16. MAVRIC Flutter Model Transonic Limit Cycle Oscillation Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.; Spain, Charles V.; Keller, Donald F.; Moses, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    The Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation semi-span wind-tunnel model (MAVRIC-I), a business jet wing-fuselage flutter model, was tested in NASA Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the goal of obtaining experimental data suitable for Computational Aeroelasticity code validation at transonic separation onset conditions. This research model is notable for its inexpensive construction and instrumentation installation procedures. Unsteady pressures and wing responses were obtained for three wingtip configurations of clean, tipstore, and winglet. Traditional flutter boundaries were measured over the range of M = 0.6 to 0.9 and maps of Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) behavior were made in the range of M = 0.85 to 0.95. Effects of dynamic pressure and angle-of-attack were measured. Testing in both R134a heavy gas and air provided unique data on Reynolds number, transition effects, and the effect of speed of sound on LCO behavior. The data set provides excellent code validation test cases for the important class of flow conditions involving shock-induced transonic flow separation onset at low wing angles, including LCO behavior.

  17. WESF cesium capsule behavior at high temperature or during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Gray, W.J.; Shippell, R.J.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1985-06-01

    Double-walled stainless steel (SS) capsules prepared for storage of radioactive /sup 137/Cs from defense waste are now being considered for use as sources for commercial irradiation. Cesium was recovered at B-plant from the high-level radioactive waste generated during processing of defense nuclear fuel. It was then purified, converted to the chloride form, and encapsulated at the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The molten cesium chloride salt was encapsulated by pouring it into the inner of two concentric SS cylinders. Each cylinder was fitted with a SS end cap that was welded in place by inert gas-tungsten arc welding. The capsule configuration and dimensions are shown in Figure 1. In a recent review of the safety of these capsules, Tingey, Wheelwright, and Lytle (1984) indicated that experimental studies were continuing to produce long-term corrosion data, to reaffirm capsule integrity during a 90-min fire where capsule temperatures reached 800/sup 0/C, to monitor mechanical properties as a function of time, and to assess the effects of thermal cycling due to periodic transfer of the capsules from a water storage pool to the air environment of an irradiator facility. This report covers results from tests that simulated the effects of the 90-min fire and from thermal cycling actual WESF cesium capsules for 3845 cycles over a period of six months. 11 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Effect of HIP temperature on microstructure and low cycle fatigue strength of CuCrZr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Enoeda, Mikio

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the HIP cycle temperatures on the metallurgic degradation and the mechanical properties of CuCrZr alloy, assessments of the microstructure, tensile test, Charpy impact test and low cycle fatigue test are performed for various heat treated CuCrZr alloys, which were solution-annealed followed by water-quenched and aged state of CuCrZr with simulated HIP cycle at temperatures of 980 and 1045 °C. Grain growth occurred on 1045 °C HIP CuCrZr, though slightly on 980 °C HIP CuCrZr. Metallurgic degradation such as voids was not found by optical and SEM observations. There were coarse precipitates in all the CuCrZr and the precipitates did not easily dissolve at 980 °C. The low cycle fatigue strength of 1045 °C HIP CuCrZr was lower than that of other CuCrZr because of the metallurgic degradation caused by the heat cycle, while that of other CuCrZr was corresponding to the best fit curve of ITER MPH.

  19. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Qiu, Shipeng; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape memory alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently we have shown that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt% Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. The investigation we report here extends that original work to ascertain whether further increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional changes in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free austenite finish temperature of 113 C, and to determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted on the aforementioned alloy at various stresses from 50-300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 165, 200, 230, 260, 290, 320 and 350 C. The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays an equally significant role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain observed during thermal cycling to 290 C. In situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature showed that the differences in transformation strain were mostly related to changes in martensite texture when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape memory alloys for optimal performance.

  20. High temperature erosion testing in a gasifier environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Rawers, James C.; Adler, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    The development of materials with the ability to operate in adverse conditions while resisting the effects of erosion and corrosion is essential to the future success of high efficiency power plants. Many next generation coal power plants are envisioned as combined cycle, with gasifiers used to produce both steam and syngas. The gasifier sections of these plants require materials of construction that are resistant to the effects of erosion from silica found in the gas streams and corrosion caused by a reducing atmosphere that may contain sulfur and chloride compounds. The Albany Research Center has developed a test apparatus designed to test the erosion-resistance of candidate materials under a range of environmental conditions, including those found in gasifiers. This Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear test apparatus (HAET) has been used to evaluate a group of high alloy candidate materials such as iron aluminide and Haynes HR 160, and compare them to a conventional 310 stainless steel. Erosion tests were conducted using 270μm silica abrasive, a typical impact velocities of 20 m/sec at temperatures up to 700°C in an atmosphere simulating gasifier conditions. The effects of erosion under these conditions on the surface scales that form are described. The total loss rate, loss rates due to erosion and corrosion for the test materials are compared.

  1. Characteristic signatures of aerospace nickel-cadmium cells on life-cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Toft, M.R.; Rao, G.M.

    1996-11-01

    NASA-Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) is continuing its long-standing program of life-cycle tests of Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) cells from various battery cell vendors at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) in Crane, Indiana in order to predict on-orbit performance and develop onboard management strategies for both nominal and anomalous batteries. Testing is presently in progress on several packs and different sizes of the two types of NiCd cells currently manufactured by Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. (EPI). These two designs are the Super{copyright} NiCd cell and the Magnum{copyright} NiCd cell, the significant difference between the two types being the type of separator material. Anomalous charge voltage divergences have been observed in cells from both designs, particularly at cold temperatures and fairly low depths-of-discharge. A similar divergence has also been observed in the one on-board battery of the LEO SAMPEX (Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer) spacecraft. This paper illustrates the life-cycle test voltage divergences, shows how they differ from divergences observed on previous life-cycle tests of EPI cells, and report the data from at least one attempt to manage the voltage divergence.

  2. Effect of nitrogen on high temperature low cycle fatigue behaviors in type 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Ryu, Woo-Seog; Hong, Jun Hwa; Choi, Si-Kyung

    1998-04-01

    Strain-controlled low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted in the temperature range of RT-600C and air atmosphere to investigate the nitrogen effect on LCF behavior of type 316L stainless steels with different nitrogen contents (0.04-0.15%). The waveform of LCF was a symmetrical triangle with a strain amplitude of 0.5% and a constant strain rate of 210 -3/s was employed for most tests. Cyclic stress response of the alloys exhibited a gradual cyclic softening at RT, but a cyclic hardening at an early stage of fatigue life at 300-600C. The hardening at high temperature was attributed to dynamic strain aging (DSA). Nitrogen addition decreased hardening magnitude (maximum cyclic stress first cyclic stress) because nitrogen retarded DSA for these conditions. The dislocation structures were changed from cell to planar structure with increasing temperature and nitrogen addition by DSA and short range order (SRO). Fatigue life was a maximum at 0.1% nitrogen content, which was attributed to the balance between DSA and SRO.

  3. Forward-Biased Thermal Cycling: A New Module Qualification Test

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C. R.; Pruett, J.; Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.; Ottoson, L.

    2000-01-01

    Following a proposal by BP Solarex to modify the standard module qualification sequence, we performed a forward-biased themal cycling on three types of commercial modules to evaluate the procedure. The total number of thermal cycles was doubled to 400 and maximum power measurements were made every 50 cycles.

  4. Pressure cycle rheology of nanofluids at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Yrac, Rommel; Amani, Mahmood

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal suspensions of particles dispersed in a base fluid (or drilling fluid) are commonly used in oil industry to aid the drilling of oil well into the ground. Nanofluids, the colloidal suspensions of nano-sized particles dispersed in a basefluid, have also shown potentials as cooling and abrasive fluids. Utilizing them along with drilling fluids under cyclic high-pressure loadings have not been investigated so far. In the present work, rheological characteristics of silicon oil based nanofluids (prepared with alumina nanoparticles) under pressures up to 1000 bar are investigated using a high-pressure viscometer. The rheological characteristics of nanofluids are measured and are compared with that of the basefluid under increasing and decreasing pressures. Relative viscosity variations of nanofluids were observed to have influenced by the shear rate. In addition, under cyclic high-pressure loading viscosity values of nanofluids are observed to have reduced. This reduction in viscosity at the second pressure cycle could have been caused by the de-agglomeration of particles in the first cycle while working a high-pressure and high-shear condition.

  5. Actual Versus Predicted Cardiovascular Demands in Submaximal Cycle Ergometer Testing

    PubMed Central

    HOEHN, AMANDA M.; MULLENBACH, MEGAN J.; FOUNTAINE, CHARLES J.

    2015-01-01

    The Astrand-Rhyming cycle ergometer test (ARCET) is a commonly administered submaximal test for estimating aerobic capacity. Whereas typically utilized in clinical populations, the validity of the ARCET to predict VO2max in a non-clinical population, especially female, is less clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ARCET in a sample of healthy and physically active college students. Subjects (13 females, 10 males) performed a maximal cycle ergometer test to volitional exhaustion to determine VO2max. At least 48 hours later, subjects performed the ARCET protocol. Predicted VO2max was calculated following the ARCET format using the age corrected factor. There was no significant difference (p=.045) between actual (41.0±7.97 ml/kg/min) and predicted VO2max (40.3±7.58 ml/kg/min). When split for gender there was a significant difference between actual and predicted VO2 for males, (45.1±7.74 vs. 42.7±8.26 ml/kg/min, p=0.029) but no significant difference observed for females, (37.9±6.9 vs. 38.5±6.77 ml/kg/min, p=0.675). The correlation between actual and predicted VO2 was r=0.84, p<0.001 with an SEE= 4.3 ml/kg/min. When split for gender, the correlation for males was r=0.94, p<0.001, SEE=2.72 ml/kg/min; for females, r=0.74, p=0.004, SEE=4.67 ml/kg/min. The results of this study indicate that the ARCET accurately estimated VO2max in a healthy college population of both male and female subjects. Implications of this study suggest the ARCET can be used to assess aerobic capacity in both fitness and clinical settings where measurement via open-circuit spirometry is either unavailable or impractical.

  6. Thermal Design of an Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor Combined Cycle Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, Samuel E.; Anghaie, Samim; Smith, Blair; Knight, Travis

    2004-07-01

    Current work modeling high temperature compact heat exchangers may demonstrate the design feasibility of a Vapor Core Reactor (VCR) driven combined cycle power plant. For solid nuclear fuel designs, the cycle efficiency is typically limited by a metallurgical temperature limit which is dictated by fuel and structural melting points. In a vapor core, the gas/vapor phase nuclear fuel is uniformly mixed with the topping cycle working fluid. Heat is generated homogeneously throughout the working fluid thus extending the metallurgical temperature limit. Because of the high temperature, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation is employed for topping cycle power extraction. MHD rejected heat is transported via compact heat exchanger to a conventional Brayton gas turbine bottoming cycle. High bottoming cycle mass flow rates are required to remove the waste heat because of low heat capacities for the bottoming cycle gas. High mass flow is also necessary to balance the high Uranium Tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) mass flow rate in the topping cycle. Heat exchanger design is critical due to the high temperatures and corrosive influence of fluoride compounds and fission products existing in VCR/MHD exhaust. Working fluid compositions for the topping cycle include variations of Uranium Tetrafluoride, Helium and various electrical conductivity seeds for the MHD. Bottoming cycle working fluid compositions include variations of Helium and Xenon. Some thought has been given to include liquid metal vapor in the bottoming cycle for a Cheng or evaporative cooled design enhancement. The NASA Glenn Lewis Research Center code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) is utilized for evaluating chemical species existing in the gas stream. Work being conducted demonstrates the compact heat exchanger design, utilization of the CEA code, and assessment of different topping and bottoming working fluid compositions. (authors)

  7. Where can we find a seasonal cycle of the Atlantic water temperature within the Arctic Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, Camille; Steele, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Recent mooring observations in the Arctic Basin suggest the existence of a seasonality of Atlantic Water (AW) temperature. Here the DRAKKAR global ocean/sea-ice model is used to examine the seasonal cycle amplitude of AW temperature within the Arctic Ocean and to investigate the possible mechanisms governing this seasonality. The simulation as well as available mooring data reveals that the amplitude of the AW temperature seasonal cycle is significant only in the Nansen Basin along the continental slope, where AW is primarily advected. In the model, the seasonal cycle of the AW temperature is advected from Fram Strait up to St. Anna Trough and then re-energized by the Barents Sea Branch. This suggests that the seasonal AW temperature signal survives over a finite distance (1000 km). Interannual changes in the seasonal cycle amplitude can be as large as the mean seasonal cycle amplitude; thus seasonality is difficult to characterize from observations spanning only a short period. The seasonal bias of in-situ observations taken during spring and summer does not induce a large error when considering the interannual-to-decadal variations of AW temperature, because the seasonal cycle accounts for a small or negligible part of AW temperature variability, even near the inflow region.

  8. 30 CFR 35.20 - Autogenous-ignition temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS FIRE-RESISTANT HYDRAULIC FLUIDS Test Requirements § 35.20... ignition-temperature test, is to determine the lowest autogenous-ignition temperature of a hydraulic...

  9. The relationship of air temperature variations over the northern hemisphere during the secular and 11-year solar cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryzhakov, L. Y.; Tomskaya, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison was made of air temperature anomaly maps for the months of January and July against a background of high and low secular solar activity, with and without regard for the 11 year cycle. By comparing temperature variations during the 11 year and secular cycles, it is found that the 11 year cycle influences thermal conditions more strongly than the secular cycle, and that temperature differences between extreme phases of the solar cycles are greater in January than in July.

  10. 33 CFR 159.119 - Operability test; temperature range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Operability test; temperature range. The device must operate in an ambient temperature of 5 °C with inlet operating fluid temperature varying from 2 °C to 32 °C and in an ambient temperature of 50 °C with inlet... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operability test;...

  11. The GISS sounding temperature impact test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halem, M.; Ghil, M.; Atlas, R.; Susskind, J.; Quirk, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The impact of DST 5 and DST 6 satellite sounding data on mid-range forecasting was studied. The GISS temperature sounding technique, the GISS time-continuous four-dimensional assimilation procedure based on optimal statistical analysis, the GISS forecast model, and the verification techniques developed, including impact on local precipitation forecasts are described. It is found that the impact of sounding data was substantial and beneficial for the winter test period, Jan. 29 - Feb. 21. 1976. Forecasts started from initial state obtained with the aid of satellite data showed a mean improvement of about 4 points in the 48 and 772 hours Sub 1 scores as verified over North America and Europe. This corresponds to an 8 to 12 hour forecast improvement in the forecast range at 48 hours. An automated local precipitation forecast model applied to 128 cities in the United States showed on an average 15% improvement when satellite data was used for numerical forecasts. The improvement was 75% in the midwest.

  12. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  13. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  14. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  15. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  16. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  17. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  18. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  19. 33 CFR 159.115 - Temperature range test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature range test. 159.115...) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.115 Temperature range test. (a) The device must be held at a temperature of 60 °C or higher for a period of 16 hours. (b) The...

  20. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  1. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.98 Tests during low temperature operation. (a) The applicant shall specify the minimum temperature for safe operation and two persons will perform the tests described...

  2. Off-design performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle: effects of ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jinling; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Shijie; Xiao, Yunhan

    2010-02-01

    The present work investigates the influence of ambient temperature on the steady-state off-design thermodynamic performance of a chemical looping combustion (CLC) combined cycle. A sensitivity analysis of the CLC reactor system was conducted, which shows that the parameters that influence the temperatures of the CLC reactors most are the flow rate and temperature of air entering the air reactor. For the ambient temperature variation, three off-design control strategies have been assumed and compared: 1) without any Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) control, 2) IGV control to maintain air reactor temperature and 3) IGV control to maintain constant fuel reactor temperature, aside from fuel flow rate adjusting. Results indicate that, compared with the conventional combined cycle, due to the requirement of pressure balance at outlet of the two CLC reactors, CLC combined cycle shows completely different off-design thermodynamic characteristics regardless of the control strategy adopted. For the first control strategy, temperatures of the two CLC reactors both rise obviously as ambient temperature increases. IGV control adopted by the second and the third strategy has the effect to maintain one of the two reactors' temperatures at design condition when ambient temperature is above design point. Compare with the second strategy, the third would induce more severe decrease of efficiency and output power of the CLC combined cycle.

  3. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Gaydosh, Darrell; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Garg, Anita

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape memory alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently we have shown that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt% Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. This investigation extends that original work to ascertain whether further increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional improvement in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free Af of 113 oC, and to determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted in the aforementioned alloy at various stress levels from 50-300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 165, 200, 230, 260, 290, 320 and 350 oC. The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain available in the system, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays a role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain being developed by thermal cycling to 290 oC. In situ, neutron diffraction showed that the differences in transformation strain were related to differences in martensite texture within the microstructure when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape memory alloys for optimal performance.

  4. Conducting High Cycle Fatigue Strength Step Tests on Gamma TiAl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad; Draper, Sue; Pereira, J. Mike

    2002-01-01

    High cycle fatigue strength testing of gamma TiAl by the step test method is investigated. A design of experiments was implemented to determine if the coaxing effect occurred during testing. Since coaxing was not observed, step testing was deemed a suitable method to define the fatigue strength at 106 cycles.

  5. 40 CFR 86.335-79 - Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. 86... Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.335-79 Gasoline-fueled engine test cycle. (a) The following test sequence shall be followed...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld engines... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld engines... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld engines... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing...

  9. The annual cycle in equatorial convection and sea surface temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.P.; Wallace, J.M. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1992-10-01

    The coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic exhibits a distinct annual cycle that is reflected in contrasting conditions at the times of the two equinoxes. The contrasts are so strong that they dominate the annual march of zonally averaged outgoing long wave radiation for the equatorial belt. The March equinox corresponds to the warm season when the equatorial cold tongues in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic area absent. With the onset of summer monsoon convection over Colombia, Central America, and West Africa in May-June, northward surface winds strengthen over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, the equatorial cold tongues reappear, and the marine convection shifts from the equatorial belt to the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs) along 8 deg N. On the basis of observational evidence concerning the timing and year-to-year regularity of the surface wind changes during the development of the cold tongues, it is argued that (1) the increase in the northward surface winds in response to the onset of the northern summer monsoon may be instrumental in reestablishing the cold tongues, and (2) positive feedbacks involving both the zonal and meridional wind components contribute to the remarkable robustness of the cold tongue-ITCZs complexes in both oceans. 36 refs.

  10. The annual cycle in equatorial convection and sea surface temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Todd P.; Wallace, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The coupled atmosphere-ocean system in the equatorial eastern Pacific and Atlantic exhibits a distinct annual cycle that is reflected in contrasting conditions at the times of the two equinoxes. The contrasts are so strong that they dominate the annual march of zonally averaged outgoing long wave radiation for the equatorial belt. The March equinox corresponds to the warm season when the equatorial cold tongues in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic area absent. With the onset of summer monsoon convection over Colombia, Central America, and West Africa in May-June, northward surface winds strengthen over the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, the equatorial cold tongues reappear, and the marine convection shifts from the equatorial belt to the intertropical convergence zones (ITCZs) along 8 deg N. On the basis of observational evidence concerning the timing and year-to-year regularity of the surface wind changes during the development of the cold tongues, it is argued that (1) the increase in the northward surface winds in response to the onset of the northern summer monsoon may be instrumental in reestablishing the cold tongues, and (2) positive feedbacks involving both the zonal and meridional wind components contribute to the remarkable robustness of the cold tongue-ITCZs complexes in both oceans.

  11. Influence of mold surface temperature on polymer part warpage in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, G. R.; Pacher, G. A.; Pichler, A.; Friesenbichler, W.; Gruber, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic mold surface temperature control was examined for its influence on the warpage. A test mold, featuring two different rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) technologies was used to manufacture complex plate-shaped parts having different ribs, varying thin-wall regions, and both, circular and rectangular cut-outs. The mold's nozzle side is equipped with the areal heating and cooling technology BFMOLD®, where the heating/cooling channels are replaced by a ball-filled slot near the cavity surface flooded through with hot and cold water sequentially. Two local electrical ceramic heating elements are installed into the mold's ejection side. Based on a 23 full-factorial design of experiments (DoE) plan, varying nozzle temperature (Tnozzle), rapid heat cycle molding temperature (TRHCM) and holding pressure (pn), specimens of POM were manufactured systematically. Five specimens were examined per DoE run. The resulting warpage was measured at 6 surface line scans per part using the non-contact confocal topography system FRT MicroProf®. Two warpage parameters were calculated, the curvature of a 2nd order approximation a, and the vertical deflection at the profile center d. Both, the influence strength and the acting direction of the process parameters and their interactions on a and d were calculated by statistical analysis. Linear mathematical process models were determined for a and d to predict the warpage as a function of the process parameter settings. Finally, an optimum process setting was predicted, based on the process models and Microsoft Excel GRG solver. Clear and significant influences of TRHCM, pn, Tnozzle, and the interaction of TRHCM and pn were determined. While TRHCM was dominant close to the gate, pn became more effective as the flow length increased.

  12. [Effect of raised temperature on the developmental cycle of Candida utilis yeasts].

    PubMed

    Pozmogova, I N; Medvedeva, G A

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the submaximal temperature (41.5 degrees C) on growth was studied with a synchronous periodic yeast culture. If the cells were subjected to the action of elevated temperature at the beginning of the growth cycle, the formation of buds was not inhibited in contrast to the separation of nuclei between the daughter and parent cells. If the cells started their growth cycle at the optimal temperature of 32 degrees C and, after spending 0.6 of the cycle at this temperature, were subjected to a temperature of 41.5 degrees C, the separation of nuclei between the daughter and parent cells took place, but the cells were not entirely separated one from another. PMID:566842

  13. Laurentide Ice Sheet basal temperatures during the last glacial cycle as inferred from borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickler, C.; Beltrami, H.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Thirteen temperature-depth profiles ( ≥ 1500 m) measured in boreholes in eastern and central Canada were inverted to determine the ground surface temperature histories during and after the last glacial cycle. The sites are located in the southern part of the region that was covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The inversions yield ground surface temperatures ranging from -1.4 to 3.0 °C throughout the last glacial cycle. These temperatures, near the pressure melting point of ice, allowed basal flow and fast flowing ice streams at the base of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Despite such conditions, which have been inferred from geomorphological data, the ice sheet persisted throughout the last glacial cycle. Our results suggest some regional trends in basal temperatures with possible control by internal heat flow.

  14. Laurentide Ice Sheet basal temperatures at the Last Glacial Cycle as inferred from borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickler, C.; Beltrami, H.; Mareschal, J.-C.

    2015-08-01

    Thirteen temperature-depth profiles (≥ 1500 m) measured in boreholes in eastern and central Canada were inverted to determine the ground surface temperature histories during and after the last glacial cycle. The sites are located in the southern part of the region covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The inversions yield ground surface temperatures ranging from -1.4 to 3.0 °C throughout the last glacial cycle. These temperatures, near the pressure melting point of ice, allowed basal flow and fast flowing ice streams at the base of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Despite such conditions, which have been inferred from geomorphological data, the ice sheet persisted throughout the last glacial cycle. Our results suggest some regional trends in basal temperatures with possible control by internal heat flow.

  15. Biochemical composition and sediment temperature in relation to the reproductive cycle in the Lugworm arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, E.; Howie, D. I. D.

    Sediment temperature, and the biochemical composition of lugworm tissues, have been studied in relation to the reproductive cycle. Frequency distributions of oocyte diameter were used as an index of reproductive maturity. There is some evidence that the annual cycle of sediment temperature has a role in controlling events in the reproductive cycle. Fluctuations in biochemical composition are due chiefly to the storage and utilisation of reserve materials in the reproductive process. Protein and lipid in the gut tissue are the main reserves used in gametogenesis.

  16. Low-temperature, manganese oxide-based, thermochemical water splitting cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingjun; Bhawe, Yashodhan; Davis, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    Thermochemical cycles that split water into stoichiometric amounts of hydrogen and oxygen below 1,000 °C, and do not involve toxic or corrosive intermediates, are highly desirable because they can convert heat into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. We report a manganese-based thermochemical cycle with a highest operating temperature of 850 °C that is completely recyclable and does not involve toxic or corrosive components. The thermochemical cycle utilizes redox reactions of Mn(II)/Mn(III) oxides. The shuttling of Na+ into and out of the manganese oxides in the hydrogen and oxygen evolution steps, respectively, provides the key thermodynamic driving forces and allows for the cycle to be closed at temperatures below 1,000 °C. The production of hydrogen and oxygen is fully reproducible for at least five cycles. PMID:22647608

  17. Ultraviolet irradiation at elevated temperatures and thermal cycling in vacuum of FEP-A covered silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broder, J. D.; Marsik, S. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments were designed and performed on silicon solar cells covered with heat-bonded FEP-A in an effort to explain the rapid degeneration of open-circuit voltage and maximum power observered on cells of this type included in an experiment on the ATS-6 spacecraft. Solar cells were exposed to ultraviolet light in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 30 to 105 C. The samples were then subjected to thermal cycling from 130 to -130 C. Inspection following irradiation indicated that all the covers remained physically intact. However, during the temperature cycling heat-bonded covers showed cracking. The test showed that heat-bonded FEP-A covers embrittle during UV exposure and the embrittlement is dependent upon sample temperature during irradiation. The results of the experiment suggest a probable mechanism for the degradation of the FEP-A cells on ATS-6.

  18. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1341-98 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... guidance see § 86.1341-90” (a) Through (b)(2) . For guidance see § 86.1341-90. (b)(3) All feedback torques... reference idle portions of the cycle where CITT is not applied, use measured torque values for cycle validation and the reference torque values for calculating the brake horsepower-hour value used in...

  1. Effect of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition in PHB-producing sequencing batch reactor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yang; Marang, Leonie; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Muyzer, Gerard; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-01-01

    The impact of temperature and cycle length on microbial competition between polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)-producing populations enriched in feast-famine sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) was investigated at temperatures of 20 °C and 30 °C, and in a cycle length range of 1–18 h. In this study, the microbial community structure of the PHB-producing enrichments was found to be strongly dependent on temperature, but not on cycle length. Zoogloea and Plasticicumulans acidivorans dominated the SBRs operated at 20 °C and 30 °C, respectively. Both enrichments accumulated PHB more than 75% of cell dry weight. Short-term temperature change experiments revealed that P. acidivorans was more temperature sensitive as compared with Zoogloea. This is particularly true for the PHB degradation, resulting in incomplete PHB degradation in P. acidivorans at 20 °C. Incomplete PHB degradation limited biomass growth and allowed Zoogloea to outcompete P. acidivorans. The PHB content at the end of the feast phase correlated well with the cycle length at a constant solid retention time (SRT). These results suggest that to establish enrichment with the capacity to store a high fraction of PHB, the number of cycles per SRT should be minimized independent of the temperature. PMID:21107441

  2. FREEZE-THAW CYCLING AND COLD TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON GEOMEMBRANE SHEETS AND SEAMS. Project summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of freeze-thaw cycling on the tensile strength of 19 geomembranes and 31 different seam types were investigated. The study was performed in three parts using different test conditions. Part I involved incubating unconfined specimens in freeze-thaw cycles and then per...

  3. Development and testing of a high cycle life 30 A-h sealed AgO-Zn battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogner, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    A two-phase program was initiated to investigate design parameters and technology to develop an improved AgO-Zn battery. The basic performance goal was 100 charge/discharge cycles (22 h/2 h) at 50 percent depth of discharge following a six-month period of charged stand at room temperature. Phase 1, cell evaluation, involved testing 70 cells in five-cell groups. The major design variables were active material ratios, electrolyte concentrations, separator systems, and negative plate shape. Phase 1 testing showed that cycle life could be improved 10 percent to 20 percent by using greater ratios of zinc to silver oxide and higher electrolyte concentrations. Wedge-shaped negatives increased cycle life by nearly 100 percent. Phase 2 battery evaluation, which was initiated before the Phase 1 results were known completely, involved evaluation of six designs as 19-cell batteries. Only one battery exceeded 100 cycles following nine months charged stand.

  4. Physiological and transcriptional responses of anaerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to diurnal temperature cycles.

    PubMed

    Hebly, Marit; de Ridder, Dick; de Hulster, Erik A F; de la Torre Cortes, Pilar; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2014-07-01

    Diurnal temperature cycling is an intrinsic characteristic of many exposed microbial ecosystems. However, its influence on yeast physiology and the yeast transcriptome has not been studied in detail. In this study, 24-h sinusoidal temperature cycles, oscillating between 12°C and 30°C, were imposed on anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After three diurnal temperature cycles (DTC), concentrations of glucose and extracellular metabolites as well as CO2 production rates showed regular, reproducible circadian rhythms. DTC also led to waves of transcriptional activation and repression, which involved one-sixth of the yeast genome. A substantial fraction of these DTC-responsive genes appeared to respond primarily to changes in the glucose concentration. Elimination of known glucose-responsive genes revealed an overrepresentation of previously identified temperature-responsive genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle and de novo purine biosynthesis. In-depth analysis demonstrated that DTC led to a partial synchronization of the cell cycle of the yeast populations in chemostat cultures, which was lost upon release from DTC. Comparison of DTC results with data from steady-state cultures showed that the 24-h DTC was sufficiently slow to allow S. cerevisiae chemostat cultures to acclimate their transcriptome and physiology at the DTC temperature maximum and to approach acclimation at the DTC temperature minimum. Furthermore, this comparison and literature data on growth rate-dependent cell cycle phase distribution indicated that cell cycle synchronization was most likely an effect of imposed fluctuations of the relative growth rate (μ/μmax) rather than a direct effect of temperature. PMID:24814792

  5. Evidence for Solar-Cycle Forcing and Secular Variation in the Armagh Observatory Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    A prominent feature of previous long-term temperature studies has been the appearance of warming since the 1880s, this often being taken as evidence for anthropogenic-induced global warming. In this investigation, the long-term, annual, mean temperature record (1844-1992) of the Armagh Observatory (Armagh, North Ireland), a set of temperature data based on maximum and minimum thermometers that predates the 1880s and correlates well with northern hemispheric and global standards, is examined for evidence of systematic variation, in particular, as related to solar-cycle forcing and secular variation. Indeed, both appear to be embedded within the Armagh data. Removal of these effects, each contributing about 8% to the overall reduction in variance, yields residuals that are randomly distributed. Application of the 10-year moving average to the residuals, furthermore, strongly suggests that the behavior of the residuals is episodic, inferring that (for extended periods of time) temperatures at Armagh sometimes were warmer or cooler (than expected), while at other times they were stable. Comparison of cyclic averages of annual mean temperatures against the lengths of the associated Hale cycles (i.e., the length of two, sequentially numbered, even-odd sunspot cycle pairs) strongly suggests that the temperatures correlate inversely (r = -0.886 at less than 2% level of significance) against the length of the associated Hale cycle. Because sunspot cycle 22 ended in 1996, the present Hale cycle probably will be shorter than average, implying that temperatures at Armagh over this Hale cycle will be warmer (about 9.31 q 0.23 C at the 90% confidence level) than average (= 9.00 C).

  6. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Anaerobic Chemostat Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Subjected to Diurnal Temperature Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Hebly, Marit; de Ridder, Dick; de Hulster, Erik A. F.; de la Torre Cortes, Pilar; Pronk, Jack T.

    2014-01-01

    Diurnal temperature cycling is an intrinsic characteristic of many exposed microbial ecosystems. However, its influence on yeast physiology and the yeast transcriptome has not been studied in detail. In this study, 24-h sinusoidal temperature cycles, oscillating between 12°C and 30°C, were imposed on anaerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After three diurnal temperature cycles (DTC), concentrations of glucose and extracellular metabolites as well as CO2 production rates showed regular, reproducible circadian rhythms. DTC also led to waves of transcriptional activation and repression, which involved one-sixth of the yeast genome. A substantial fraction of these DTC-responsive genes appeared to respond primarily to changes in the glucose concentration. Elimination of known glucose-responsive genes revealed an overrepresentation of previously identified temperature-responsive genes as well as genes involved in the cell cycle and de novo purine biosynthesis. In-depth analysis demonstrated that DTC led to a partial synchronization of the cell cycle of the yeast populations in chemostat cultures, which was lost upon release from DTC. Comparison of DTC results with data from steady-state cultures showed that the 24-h DTC was sufficiently slow to allow S. cerevisiae chemostat cultures to acclimate their transcriptome and physiology at the DTC temperature maximum and to approach acclimation at the DTC temperature minimum. Furthermore, this comparison and literature data on growth rate-dependent cell cycle phase distribution indicated that cell cycle synchronization was most likely an effect of imposed fluctuations of the relative growth rate (μ/μmax) rather than a direct effect of temperature. PMID:24814792

  7. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below...

  8. The impact of component performance on the overall cycle performance of small-scale low temperature organic Rankine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M.; Sayma, A. I.

    2015-08-01

    Low temperature organic Rankine cycles offer a promising technology for the generation of power from low temperature heat sources. Small-scale systems (∼10kW) are of significant interest, however there is a current lack of commercially viable expanders. For a potential expander to be economically viable for small-scale applications it is reasonable to assume that the same expander must have the ability to be implemented within a number of different ORC applications. It is therefore important to design and optimise the cycle considering the component performance, most notably the expander, both at different thermodynamic conditions, and using alternative organic fluids. This paper demonstrates a novel modelling methodology that combines a previously generated turbine performance map with cycle analysis to establish at what heat source conditions optimal system performance can be achieved using an existing turbine design. The results obtained show that the same turbine can be effectively utilised within a number of different ORC applications by changing the working fluid. By selecting suitable working fluids, this turbine can be used to convert pressurised hot water at temperatures between 360K and 400K, and mass flow rates between 0.45kg/s and 2.7kg/s, into useful power with outputs between 1.5kW and 27kW. This is a significant result since it allows the same turbine to be implemented into a variety of applications, improving the economy of scale. This work has also confirmed the suitability of the candidate turbine for a range of low temperature ORC applications.

  9. A New High-Speed, High-Cycle, Gear-Tooth Bending Fatigue Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, David B.; Dykas, Brian D.; LaBerge, Kelsen E.; Zakrajsek, Andrew J.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    A new high-speed test capability for determining the high cycle bending-fatigue characteristics of gear teeth has been developed. Experiments were performed in the test facility using a standard spur gear test specimens designed for use in NASA Glenn s drive system test facilities. These tests varied in load condition and cycle-rate. The cycle-rate varied from 50 to 1000 Hz. The loads varied from high-stress, low-cycle loads to near infinite life conditions. Over 100 tests were conducted using AISI 9310 steel spur gear specimen. These results were then compared to previous data in the literature for correlation. Additionally, a cycle-rate sensitivity analysis was conducted by grouping the results according to cycle-rate and comparing the data sets. Methods used to study and verify load-path and facility dynamics are also discussed.

  10. Irradiation data for the MFA-1 and MFA-2 tests during FFTF cycles 10A and 10B

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.V.

    1996-10-30

    This report provides key information on the irradiation environment of the MONJU fuel test MFA-1 and MFA-2 in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during operating cycles 10A and 10B.This information includes the fission powers, neutron fluxes, sodium temperatures and sodium flow rates in MFA-1, MFA-2, and adjacent assemblies. It also includes MFA-1 and MFA-2 compositions as a function of exposure during cycles 10A and 10B. The work was performed at the request of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuels (PNC) of Japan.

  11. Specimen for high-temperature tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Split nut with internal taper to hold specially formed specimen composed of filaments of refractory material provides means for holding at high temperature and under tension so that performance evaluations may be made.

  12. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  13. A two-fold increase of carbon cycle sensitivity to tropical temperature variations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuhui; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Myneni, Ranga B; Cox, Peter; Heimann, Martin; Miller, John; Peng, Shushi; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hui; Chen, Anping

    2014-02-13

    Earth system models project that the tropical land carbon sink will decrease in size in response to an increase in warming and drought during this century, probably causing a positive climate feedback. But available data are too limited at present to test the predicted changes in the tropical carbon balance in response to climate change. Long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide data provide a global record that integrates the interannual variability of the global carbon balance. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that most of this variability originates in the terrestrial biosphere. In particular, the year-to-year variations in the atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate (CGR) are thought to be the result of fluctuations in the carbon fluxes of tropical land areas. Recently, the response of CGR to tropical climate interannual variability was used to put a constraint on the sensitivity of tropical land carbon to climate change. Here we use the long-term CGR record from Mauna Loa and the South Pole to show that the sensitivity of CGR to tropical temperature interannual variability has increased by a factor of 1.9 ± 0.3 in the past five decades. We find that this sensitivity was greater when tropical land regions experienced drier conditions. This suggests that the sensitivity of CGR to interannual temperature variations is regulated by moisture conditions, even though the direct correlation between CGR and tropical precipitation is weak. We also find that present terrestrial carbon cycle models do not capture the observed enhancement in CGR sensitivity in the past five decades. More realistic model predictions of future carbon cycle and climate feedbacks require a better understanding of the processes driving the response of tropical ecosystems to drought and warming. PMID:24463514

  14. A two-fold increase of carbon cycle sensitivity to tropical temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuhui; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Myneni, Ranga B.; Cox, Peter; Heimann, Martin; Miller, John; Peng, Shushi; Wang, Tao; Yang, Hui; Chen, Anping

    2014-02-01

    Earth system models project that the tropical land carbon sink will decrease in size in response to an increase in warming and drought during this century, probably causing a positive climate feedback. But available data are too limited at present to test the predicted changes in the tropical carbon balance in response to climate change. Long-term atmospheric carbon dioxide data provide a global record that integrates the interannual variability of the global carbon balance. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrate that most of this variability originates in the terrestrial biosphere. In particular, the year-to-year variations in the atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate (CGR) are thought to be the result of fluctuations in the carbon fluxes of tropical land areas. Recently, the response of CGR to tropical climate interannual variability was used to put a constraint on the sensitivity of tropical land carbon to climate change. Here we use the long-term CGR record from Mauna Loa and the South Pole to show that the sensitivity of CGR to tropical temperature interannual variability has increased by a factor of 1.9+/-0.3 in the past five decades. We find that this sensitivity was greater when tropical land regions experienced drier conditions. This suggests that the sensitivity of CGR to interannual temperature variations is regulated by moisture conditions, even though the direct correlation between CGR and tropical precipitation is weak. We also find that present terrestrial carbon cycle models do not capture the observed enhancement in CGR sensitivity in the past five decades. More realistic model predictions of future carbon cycle and climate feedbacks require a better understanding of the processes driving the response of tropical ecosystems to drought and warming.

  15. A modified heat leak test facility employing a closed-cycle helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Boroski, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    A Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) has been in use at Fermilab for many years. The apparatus has successfully measured the thermal performance of a variety of cryostat components under simulated operating conditions. While an effective tool in the cryostat design process, the HLTF has several limitations. Temperatures are normally fixed at cryogen boiling points and run times are limited to cryogen inventory. Moreover, close personnel attention is required to maintain system inventories and sustain system equilibrium. To provide longer measurement periods without perturbation and to minimize personnel interaction, a new heat leak measurement facility (HLTF-2) has been designed that incorporates a closed-cycle helium refrigerator. The two-stage refrigerator provides cooling to the various temperature stations of the HLTF while eliminating the need for cryogens. Eliminating cryogen inventories has resulted in a reduction of the amount of direct personnel attention required.

  16. Infrared Temperature Measurements of a Reciprocating Seal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinders, M. A.; Wilcock, D. F.; Winer, W. O.

    1983-01-01

    A system has been developed to perform a computer analysis on surface temperature data in tribological systems, taken by an infrared radiation scanning device. The infrared scanner which normally scans at 25 fields per second and 100 lines per field has been modified to scan any single line at 2500 lines per second. The system was used to analyze four friction experiments as part of a thermal behavior study of Stirling engine seals in cooperation between Georgia Institute of Technology and Mechanical Technology, Incorporated. The friction experiments involved two tribo pairs, Rulon on steel and Rulon on sapphire. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the relative rate of cooling and the mechanical cycle time of the system. For rapid mechanical cycle times in the friction experiment the surface temperature distribution reflects the distribution of energy input on the surface and the temperatures persist for periods longer than that of the mechanical cycle.

  17. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  18. The onion fly modulates the adult eclosion time in response to amplitude of temperature cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Watari, Yasuhiko

    2011-08-01

    To confirm whether the amplitude of diel temperature cycles causes a phase shift of adult eclosion rhythm of the onion fly, Delia antiqua, the peak time ( Ø E) of adult eclosion was determined under various thermoperiods with a fixed temperature either in the warm or cool phase and temperature differences ranging from 1°C to 4°C between the two phases. Irrespective of the temperature level during the warm or cool phase, Ø E occurred earlier with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. The results strongly support the previous conclusion of Tanaka and Watari (Naturwissenschaften 90:76-79, 2003) that D. antiqua responds to the amplitude of temperature cycle as a cue for the circadian adult eclosion timing. The phase advance was larger in thermoperiods with a fixed warm-phase temperature than in those with a fixed cool-phase temperature. This might be ascribed to the interaction between the amplitude and level of temperature in the thermoperiodic regimes.

  19. Cycle life testing of lithium-ion batteries for small satellite LEO space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, S.T.; Feikert, J.H.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1993-08-16

    In 1990, Sony corporation announced their intention to manufacture a rechargeable lithium ion battery, based on the intercalation of lithium ions into a carbonaceous anode. The cells were first introduced for portable telephone use in June, 1991. (1) A 3.6V average cell voltage (4.1-2.75V range); (2) Excellent cycle life (1200 @ 100% DOD); (3) Good capacity retention (70% after 6 months); (4) Wide temperature range performance ({minus}20 to +60{degrees}C); (5) Excellent Discharge rate (82% capacity at 30 min. discharge rate); (6) Excellent Charge rate (100% Charge in <3 hrs); and (7) High energy density (264 W*hr/1 and 120 Whr/kg for ``D`` size cell. These specifications show significant promise for application of these batteries in low earth orbit (LEO) small satellites, particularly when compared to existing NiH{sub 2} and NiCd technology. The very high energy density and specific energy will reduce power system volume and weight. The wide temperature range enables simpler thermal design, particularly for new, small, high power satellites. The materials used in the lithium ion batteries are relatively inexpensive and benign, so that we expect costs to come down substantially in the future. The specified cycle life at 100% DOD is also 50% longer than most NiCds, so low DOD (depth of discharge) performance could be substantial. This study was undertaken to: (a) assess the feasibility for using lithium ion cells on small satellite LEO missions and (b) verify the claims of the manufacturer. This was accomplished by performing a detailed autopsy and various depth of discharge and rate tests on the cells. Of special interest was the cycle life performance of these cell at various depths of discharge DOD`s, to get an initial measure of the reduction in capacity fade with cycle conditions. Low DOD`s are used to extend the life of all batteries used in a space application.

  20. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK TEST CYCLES: COMBINING DRIVEABILITY WITH REALISTIC ENGINE EXERCISE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy-duty engine certification testing uses a cycle that is scaled to the capabilities of each engine. As such, every engine should be equally challenged by the cycle's power demands. It would seem that a chassis cycle, similarly scaled to the capabilities of each vehicle, could...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with the following steady-state duty cycle: G3 mode No. Engine speed a Torque(percent) b Weighting... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one of the following steady-state duty cycles: (1) The following duty cycle applies for...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with the following steady-state duty cycle: G3 mode No. Engine speed a Torque(percent) b Weighting... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one of the following steady-state duty cycles: (1) The following duty cycle applies for...

  3. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential role of the dolomitic sorbent in enhancing the electric energy production efficiency of the plant, thanks to the better cleaning of the heat exchange surface that can be achieved. If such improvement is accounted for, all the potential impacts are considerably decreased (e.g. the Climate change by 28%), and in the comparison with the traditional operation 17 impact categories out of 19 are reduced. PMID:25465510

  4. A Statistical Test of Uniformity in Solar Cycle Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway David H.

    2012-01-01

    Several indices are used to characterize the solar activity cycle. Key among these are: the International Sunspot Number, the Group Sunspot Number, Sunspot Area, and 10.7 cm Radio Flux. A valuable aspect of these indices is the length of the record -- many decades and many (different) 11-year cycles. However, this valuable length-of-record attribute has an inherent problem in that it requires many different observers and observing systems. This can lead to non-uniformity in the datasets and subsequent erroneous conclusions about solar cycle behavior. The sunspot numbers are obtained by counting sunspot groups and individual sunspots on a daily basis. This suggests that the day-to-day and month-to-month variations in these numbers should follow Poisson Statistics and be proportional to the square-root of the sunspot numbers themselves. Examining the historical records of these indices indicates that this is indeed the case - even with Sunspot Area and 10.7 cm Radio Flux. The ratios of the RMS variations to the square-root of the indices themselves are relatively constant with little variation over the phase of each solar cycle or from small to large solar cycles. There are, however, important step-like changes in these ratios associated with changes in observer and/or observer system. Here we show how these variations can be used to construct more uniform datasets.

  5. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: duration of its cell cycle and phases at growth rates affected by temperature.

    PubMed

    Vítová, Milada; Bišová, Kateřina; Hlavová, Monika; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Zachleder, Vilém; Cížková, Mária

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized cultures of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were grown photoautotrophically under a wide range of environmental conditions including temperature (15-37 °C), different mean light intensities (132, 150, 264 μmol m⁻² s⁻¹), different illumination regimes (continuous illumination or alternation of light/dark periods of different durations), and culture methods (batch or continuous culture regimes). These variable experimental approaches were chosen in order to assess the role of temperature in the timing of cell division, the length of the cell cycle and its pre- and post-commitment phases. Analysis of the effect of temperature, from 15 to 37 °C, on synchronized cultures showed that the length of the cell cycle varied markedly from times as short as 14 h to as long as 36 h. We have shown that the length of the cell cycle was proportional to growth rate under any given combination of growth conditions. These findings were supported by the determination of the temperature coefficient (Q₁₀), whose values were above the level expected for temperature-compensated processes. The data presented here show that cell cycle duration in C. reinhardtii is a function of growth rate and is not controlled by a temperature independent endogenous timer or oscillator, including a circadian one. PMID:21573815

  6. Modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant design duty cycle. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.

    1989-12-31

    This document defines the Plant Design Duty Cycle (PCDC) for the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The duty cycle is a set of events and their design number of occurrences over the life of the plant for which the MHTGR plant shall be designed to ensure that the plant meets all the top-level requirements. The duty cycle is representative of the types of events to be expected in multiple reactor module-turbine plant configurations of the MHTGR. A synopsis of each PDDC event is presented to provide an overview of the plant response and consequence. 8 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. 40 CFR 86.129-94 - Road load power, test weight, inertia weight class determination, and fuel temperature profile.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test... resolving pressure to ±1.0 inch of water, and capable of resolving speed to ±1 mph. The temperature and... over the driving cycle specified in § 86.134-96(b) with the transmission operated in the same manner...

  8. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  9. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-07-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  10. Life Cycle Testing of Viscoelastic Material for Hubble Space Telescope Solar Array 3 Damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, Joseph R.; Reed, Benjamin B.; Viens, Michael J.; Parker, Bradford H.; Pendleton, Scott C.

    2003-01-01

    During the March 2002 Servicing Mission by Space Shuttle (STS 109), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was refurbished with two new solar arrays that now provide all of its power. These arrays were built with viscoelastic/titanium dampers, integral to the supporting masts, which reduce the interaction of the wing bending modes with the Telescope. Damping of over 3% of critical was achieved. To assess the damper s ability to maintain nominal performance over the 10-year on-orbit design goal, material specimens were subjected to an accelerated life test. The test matrix consisted of scheduled events to expose the specimens to pre-determined combinations of temperatures, frequencies, displacement levels, and numbers of cycles. These exposure events were designed to replicate the life environment of the damper from fabrication through testing to launch and life on-orbit. To determine whether material degradation occurred during the exposure sequence, material performance was evaluated before and after the accelerated aging with complex stiffness measurements. Based on comparison of pre- and post-life-cycle measurements, the material is expected to maintain nominal performance through end of life on-orbit. Recent telemetry from the Telescope indicates that the dampers are performing nominally.

  11. High-temperature, low-cycle fatigue of advanced copper-base alloys for rocket nozzles. Part 1: Narloy Z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Short-term tensile and low-cycle fatigue data are reported for Narloy Z, a centrifugally cast, copper-base alloy. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature in air and in argon at 482, 538 and 593 C using an axial strain rate of .002/sec to the -1 power. In addition tensile tests were performed at 538 C in an evaluation of tensile properties at strain rates of .004 and .01/sec to the -1 power. Ultimate and yield strength values of about 315 and 200 MN/sq m respectively were recorded at room temperature and these decreased to about 120 and 105 respectively as the temperature was increased to 593 C. Reduction in area values were recorded in the range from 40 to 50% with some indication of a minimum ductility point at 538 C.

  12. Elevated temperature fatigue testing of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, M. H.

    1981-01-01

    The major technology areas needed to perform a life prediction of an aircraft turbine engine hot section component are discussed and the steps required for life prediction are outlined. These include the determination of the operating environment, the calculation of the thermal and mechanical loading of the component, the cyclic stress-strain and creep behavior of the material required for structural analysis, and the structural analysis to determine the local stress-strain-temperature-time response of the material at the critical location in the components. From a knowledge of the fatigue, creep, and failure resistance of the material, a prediction of the life of the component is made. Material characterization and evaluation conducted for the purpose of calculating fatigue crack initiation lives of components operating at elevated temperatures are emphasized.

  13. The effect of temperature cycling typical of low earth orbit satellites on thin films of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogro-Campero, A.; Turner, L. G.; Bogorad, A.; Herschitz, R.

    1990-01-01

    The refrigeration of superconductors in space poses a challenging problem. The problem could be less severe if superconducting materials would not have to be cooled when not in use. Thin films of the YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) superconductor were subjected to thermal cycling, which was carried out to simulate a large number of eclipses of a low earth orbit satellite. Electrical measurements were performed to find the effect of the temperature cycling. Thin films of YBCO were formed by coevaporation of Y, BaF2, and Cu and postannealing in wet oxygen at 850 C for 3.5 h. The substrates used were (100) SrTiO3, polycrystalline alumina, and oxidized silicon; the last two have an evaporated zirconia layer. Processing and microstructure studies of these types of films have been published. THe zero resistance transition temperatures of the samples used in this study were 91, 82, and 86 K, respectively. The samples were characterized by four point probe electrical measurements as a function of temperature. The parameters measured were: the zero resistance transition temperature, the 10 to 90 percent transition width, and the room temperature resistance, normalized to that measured before temperature cycling. The results for two samples are presented. Each sample had a cumulative exposure. Cycling in atmospheric pressure nitrogen was performed at a rate of about 60 cycles per day, whereas in vacuum the rate was only about 10 cycles per day. The results indicate only little or no changes in the parameters measured. Degradation of superconducting thin films of YBCO has been reported due to storage in nitrogen. It is believed that the relatively good performance of films after temperature cycling is related to the fact that BaF2 was used as an evaporation source. The latest result on extended temperature cycling indicates significant degradation. Further tests of extended cycling will be carried out to provide additional data and to clarify this preliminary finding.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... between the feedback and reference cycle values, the entire engine speed and torque feedback signal... feedback signals are shifted, both speed and torque must be shifted the same amount in the same direction... engine feedback speed and torque values recorded. Also calculate the reference brake horsepower-hour...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... between the feedback and reference cycle values, the entire engine speed and torque feedback signal... feedback signals are shifted, both speed and torque must be shifted the same amount in the same direction... engine feedback speed and torque values recorded. Also calculate the reference brake horsepower-hour...

  16. Apparatus for elevated temperature compression or tension testing of specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Thomas S.

    1992-05-01

    In order to support materials selection for the next generation supersonic civilian passenger transport aircraft, a testing apparatus was developed to evaluate certain materials under conditions of high load and elevated temperature. In order to elevate the temperature of the material during standard tension and compression testing the test specimen is surrounded by a pair of supports which include internal heating means. These supports also prevent buckling of the specimen during compression testing.

  17. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  18. Reproduction cycle and tolerance to temperature and salinity of Amyloodinium ocellatum (Brown, 1931) (Dinoflagellida).

    PubMed

    Paperna, I

    1984-01-01

    Reproduction cycle and tolerance to temperature and salinity of Amyloodinium ocellatum (Brown, 1931) ( Dinoflagellida ) was investigated in the laboratory using postlarval Sparus aurata (L.) as fish host and by in vitro study of the parasite is reproductive stage. Trophont growth was linear by length and exponential by volume, continuous to detachment stage at the size of 50-90 microns in length. At 19-24 degrees C detachment occurred gradually during the 3-5th days after settlement. At 16 degrees C growth, as well as detachment, was delayed. However, by the 6-7th day trophonts still attached exceeded 100 microns in length. When detached, trophonts of any age and size were transformed into dividing tomonts . 24-hour old, less than 25 microns length trophonts , however, immediately sporulated with no division. The number of divisions to sporulation was related to the size at detachment. For reproduction, 18-30 degrees C was the optimal temperature range, although the minimal division time was at 23-27 degrees C. Divisions were delayed and sporulation was interrupted at 15 degrees C. Complete interruption of division and gradual mortality occurred at 8 degrees C. At 35 degrees C the reproduction process of the tomonts was severely damaged. Tolerance to salinity was dependent on ambient temperature and was the widest at 24-25 degrees C. Divisions occurred between 1-78 ppt, but uninterrupted division, full yield sporulation and effective infection of fish occurred only between 10 to 60 ppt. No division occurred above 80 ppt, however, short term incubation up to 4 days in salinities up to 180 ppt did not affect division potency. Wide variation in tolerance was, however, evident between tested population as well as individual tomont in each population. PMID:6539091

  19. Increased winter soil temperature variability enhances nitrogen cycling and soil biotic activity in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerings, J.; Jentsch, A.; Hammerl, V.; Lenz, K.; Henry, H. A. L.; Malyshev, A. V.; Kreyling, J.

    2014-12-01

    Winter air temperatures are projected to increase in the temperate zone, whereas snow cover is projected to decrease, leading to increased soil temperature variability, and potentially to changes in nutrient cycling. Here, we experimentally evaluated the effects of increased winter soil temperature variability on selected aspects of the N-cycle in mesocosms containing different plant community compositions. The experiment was replicated at two sites, a colder mountainous upland site with high snow accumulation and a warmer and drier lowland site. Increased soil temperature variability enhanced soil biotic activity for both sites during winter, as indicated by 35% higher nitrogen (N) availability in the soil solution, 40% higher belowground decomposition and a 25% increase in the potential activity of the enzyme cellobiohydrolase. The mobilization of N differed between sites, and the 15N signal in leaves was reduced by 31% in response to winter warming pulses, but only at the cold site, with significant reductions occurring for three of four tested plant species at this site. Furthermore, there was a trend of increased N leaching in response to the recurrent winter warming pulses. Overall, projected winter climate change in the temperate zone, with less snow and more variable soil temperatures, appears important for shifts in ecosystem functioning (i.e. nutrient cycling). While the effects of warming pulses on plant N mobilization did not differ among sites, reduced plant 15N incorporation at the colder temperate site suggests that frost damage may reduce plant N uptake in a warmer world, with important implications for nitrogen cycling and nitrogen losses from ecosystems.

  20. High temperature aqueous stress corrosion testing device

    DOEpatents

    Bornstein, A.N.; Indig, M.E.

    1975-12-01

    A description is given of a device for stressing tensile samples contained within a high temperature, high pressure aqueous environment, thereby permitting determination of stress corrosion susceptibility of materials in a simple way. The stressing device couples an external piston to an internal tensile sample via a pull rod, with stresses being applied to the sample by pressurizing the piston. The device contains a fitting/seal arrangement including Teflon and weld seals which allow sealing of the internal system pressure and the external piston pressure. The fitting/seal arrangement allows free movement of the pull rod and the piston.

  1. TOPICS ON EXPRESSING AND PREDICTING RESULTS OF LIFE-CYCLE TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In April 1967, Mount and Stephan published results of two life-cycle tests using the fathead minnow and introduced the terms 'Maximum Acceptable Toxicant Concentration' (MATC) and 'Laboratory Fish Production Index'. Life-cycle tests can now be conducted with a variety of fishes a...

  2. Organic fluids in a supercritical Rankine cycle for low temperature power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Vidhi, Rachana; Kuravi, Sarada; Goswami, Yogi D.; Stefanakos, Elias; Sabau, Adrian S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a performance analysis of a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (SORC) with various working fluids with thermal energy provided from a geothermal energy source. In the present study, a number of pure fluids (R23, R32, R125, R143a, R134a, R218, and R170) are analyzed to identify the most suitable fluids for different operating conditions. The source temperature is varied between 125 C and 200 C, to study its effect on the efficiency of the cycle for fixed and variable pressure ratios. The energy and exergy efficiencies for each working fluid are obtained and the optimum fluid is selected. It is found that thermal efficiencies as high as 21% can be obtained with 200 C source temperature and 10 C cooling water temperature considered in this study. For medium source temperatures (125 150 C), thermal efficiencies higher than 12% are obtained.

  3. A Physics-Based Temperature Stabilization Criterion for Thermal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft testing specifications differ greatly in the criteria they specify for stability in thermal balance tests. Some specify a required temperature stabilization rate (the change in temperature per unit time, dT/dt), some specify that the final steady-state temperature be approached to within a specified difference, delta T , and some specify a combination of the two. The particular values for temperature stabilization rate and final temperature difference also vary greatly between specification documents. A one-size-fits-all temperature stabilization rate requirement does not yield consistent results for all test configurations because of differences in thermal mass and heat transfer to the environment. Applying a steady-state temperature difference requirement is problematic because the final test temperature is not accurately known a priori, especially for powered configurations. In the present work, a simplified, lumped-mass analysis has been used to explore the applicability of these criteria. A new, user-friendly, physics-based approach is developed that allows the thermal engineer to determine when an acceptable level of temperature stabilization has been achieved. The stabilization criterion can be predicted pre-test but must be refined during test to allow verification that the defined level of temperature stabilization has been achieved.

  4. Distribution of radiocarbon as a test of global carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Kheshgi, H.S.

    1995-03-01

    Accurate global carbon cycle models are needed to estimate the future change of atmospheric CO{sub 2} for specified scenarios of CO{sub 2} emissions. Model accuracy cannot be tested directly because of the difficulty in estimating the carbon flux to the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere. However, one test of model consistency is the requirement that the model reproduce past changes and spatial distributions of {sup 14}C. A model for carbon exchange within and among the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial biosphere is found to satisfy this test. The ocean is modeled as an upwelling-diffusion column capped by a mixed layer with recirculation of the polar bottom water to complete the thermohaline circulation. This ocean advection scheme contains only two key dynamic parameters, the vertical eddy diffusivity {kappa} and the upwelling velocity w, which are calibrated to match the vertical distribution of preanthropogenic {sup 14}C. The thermocline depth scale {kappa}/w = 1343 m found by calibration is considerably deeper than that required to match the steady vertical temperature profile (500 m). This is consistent with the hypothesis that isopyncal mixing, which is much more rapid than diapyncal mixing, has a stronger effect on {sup 14}C than on temperature since isopyncals are nearly isothermal. This model is found to match measured values, within measurement error, of the prebomb decrease in {sup 14}C in the atmosphere and the mixed layer due to the Suess effect, the bomb {sup 14}C in the mixed layer, the bomb {sup 14}C penetration depth, the bomb {sup 14}C ocean inventory, and the vertical distribution of total carbon. Results are compared to those of other schematic carbon cycle models as well as those of ocean general circulation models. 95 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Application of high temperature air heaters to advanced power generation cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T R; Boss, W H; Chapman, J N

    1992-03-01

    Recent developments in ceramic composite materials open up the possibility of recuperative air heaters heating air to temperatures well above the feasible with metal tubes. A high temperature air heater (HTAH) has long been recognized as a requirement for the most efficient MHD plants in order to reach high combustor flame temperatures. The application of gas turbines in coal-fired plants of all types has been impeded because of the problems in cleaning exhaust gas sufficiently to avoid damage to the turbine. With a possibility of a HTAH, such plants may become feasible on the basis of air turbine cycles, in which air is compressed and heated in the HTAH before being applied to turbine. The heat exchanger eliminates the need for the hot gas cleanup system. The performance improvement potential of advanced cycles with HTAH application including the air turbine cycle in several variations such as the DOE program on ``Coal-Fired Air Furnace Combined Cycle...,`` variations originated by the authors, and the MHD combined cycle are presented. The status of development of ceramic air heater technology is included.

  6. Application of high temperature air heaters to advanced power generation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. R.; Boss, W. H.; Chapman, J. N.

    Recent developments in ceramic composite materials open up the possibility of recuperative air heaters heating air to temperatures well above that feasible with metal tubes. A high temperature air heater (HTAH) has long been recognized as a requirement for the most efficient MHD plants in order to reach high combustor flame temperatures. The application of gas turbines in coal-fired plants of all types has been impeded because of the problems in cleaning exhaust gas sufficiently to avoid damage to the turbine. With the possibility of a HTAH, such plants may become feasible on the basis of air turbine cycles, in which air is compressed and heated in the HTAH before being applied to turbine. The heat exchanger eliminates the need for the hot gas cleanup system. The performance improvement potential of advanced cycles with HTAH application including the air turbine cycle in several variations such as the DOE program on coal-fired air furnace combined cycle variations originated by the authors, and the MHD combined cycle are presented. The status of development of ceramic air heater technology is included.

  7. Split stream boilers for high-temperature/high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, I.G.

    1997-04-01

    Research and development work on high-temperature and high-pressure (up to 1,500 F TIT and 4,500 psia) topping steam turbines and associated steam generators for steam power plants as well as combined cycle plants is being carried forward by DOE, EPRI, and independent companies. Aeroderivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines both will require exhaust gas supplementary firing to achieve high throttle temperatures. This paper presents an analysis and examples of a split stream boiler arrangement for high-temperature and high-pressure topping steam turbine combined cycles. A portion of the gas turbine exhaust flow is run in parallel with a conventional heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). This side stream is supplementary fired opposed to the current practice of full exhaust flow firing. Chemical fuel gas recuperation can be incorporated in the side stream as an option. A significant combined cycle efficiency gain of 2 to 4 percentage points can be realized using this split stream approach. Calculations and graphs show how the DOE goal of 60 percent combined cycle efficiency burning natural gas fuel can be exceeded. The boiler concept is equally applicable to the integrated coal gas fuel combined cycle (IGCC).

  8. Solar cycle variation of exospheric temperatures Mars and venus: a prediction for mariner 6 and 7.

    PubMed

    Stewart, R W; Hogan, J S

    1969-07-25

    Calculations have been made to determine the effects of variations in the extreme ultraviolet solar radiation on the upper atmospheres of mars and Venus. The results indicate that the exospheric temperature from 300 degrees K to 600 degrees K during the solar cycle, with a corresponding range on Venus of 450 degrees K to 850 degrees K. At the present time, the temperature of the Martain exosphere should be approximately 500 degrees K. PMID:17809518

  9. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... must be met for both cold and hot cycles individually. Point deletions from the regression analyses are... to 1.030 0.83-1.03 (hot), 0.77-1.03 (cold) 0.89-1.03 (hot), 0.87-1.03 (cold). Coefficient of determination, r 2 1 0.9700 1 0.8800 (hot), 1 0.8500 (cold) 1 0.9100. Y intercept of the regression line, b...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1341-90 - Test cycle validation criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... must be met for both cold and hot cycles individually. Point deletions from the regression analyses are... to 1.030 0.83-1.03 (hot), 0.77-1.03 (cold) 0.89-1.03 (hot), 0.87-1.03 (cold). Coefficient of determination, r 2 1 0.9700 1 0.8800 (hot), 1 0.8500 (cold) 1 0.9100. Y intercept of the regression line, b...

  11. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate...) contained in 40 CFR part 86, subpart C. (c) For testing at temperatures of 50 °F (10 °C) or higher, the FTP... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES...

  12. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate...) contained in 40 CFR part 86, subpart C. (c) For testing at temperatures of 50 °F (10 °C) or higher, the FTP... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES...

  13. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate...) contained in 40 CFR part 86, subpart C. (c) For testing at temperatures of 50 °F (10 °C) or higher, the FTP... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES...

  14. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) contained in 40 CFR part 86, subpart C. (c) For testing at temperatures of 50 °F (10 °C) or higher, the FTP... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94...

  15. Graphite/Polyimide Tabs For High-Temperature Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Delamination from ceramic composite specimens prevented. Tabs made from composite of graphite and PMR-15 polyimide enable high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramic-matrix composites. Also used in high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramics, metals, and metal-matrix composites.

  16. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  17. Another round for noisy ocean temperature test

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.

    1993-03-05

    It's a deal a talk show host would kill for: $35 million to sound off for a while. But there's one other aspect of the bargain that might be a bit tough for the average radio personality: You've got to listen to your own noise and gauge whether the world is warming. Luckily, that's nothing new for oceanographer Walter Munk, who last week won funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to conduct a second trial of his underwater sonic thermometer of the world's oceans. Sound waves are pulsed form underwater loudspeakers to receivers thousands of miles away. By the measuring the elapsed time, Munk and his collaborators can precisely measure temperatures in entire ocean basins and watch for signs of global warming.

  18. Initial Test Results of a Dual Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.; Mason, Lee S.

    2007-01-01

    The dual Brayton power conversion system constructed for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was acceptance tested April 2007 at Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, Colorado. This uniquely configured conversion system is built around two modified commercial Capstone C30 microturbines and employs two closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) converters sharing a common gas inventory and common heat source. Because both CBCs share the gas inventory, behavior of one CBC has an impact on the performance of the other CBC, especially when one CBC is standby or running at a different shaft speed. Testing performed to date includes the CBCs operating at equal and unequal shaft speeds. A test was also conducted where one CBC was capped off and the other was operated as a single CBC converter. The dual Brayton configuration generated 10.6 kWe at 75 krpm and a turbine inlet temperature of 817 K. Single Brayton operation generated 14.8 kWe at 90 krpm and a turbine inlet temperature of 925 K.

  19. Temperature control in wafer-level testing of large multi-segment electromigration test structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamani, Nasser; Lin, Yu-Sang

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes two methods for maintaining a constant metallization temperature throughout a wafer-level isothermal electromigration test of large multisegment test structures where Joule-heating is high and chip to chuck thermal contact is poor. In the first method, an initial calibration of Joule heating versus metal temperature is carried out. During the isothermal electromigration test, the Joule heating is continuously monitored and the chuck temperature is adjusted based on the calibration results to maintain a constant metal temperature. In the second method, temperature sensors are fabricated on the chip and then the sensors are used to monitor the chip temperature directly. The chuck temperature is then adjusted as needed.

  20. Thermodynamic modeling and performance analysis of the variable-temperature heat reservoir absorption heat pump cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaoyong; Chen, Lingen; Ge, Yanlin; Sun, Fengrui

    2015-10-01

    For practical absorption heat pump (AHP) plants, not all external heat reservoir heat capacities are infinite. External heat reservoir heat capacity should be an effect factor in modeling and performance analysis of AHP cycles. A variable-temperature heat reservoir AHP cycle is modeled, in which internal working substance is working in four temperature levels and all irreversibility factors are considered. The irreversibility includes heat transfer irreversibility, internal dissipation irreversibility and heat leakage irreversibility. The general equations among coefficient of performance (COP), heating load and some key characteristic parameters are obtained. The general and optimal characteristics are obtained by using numerical calculations. Besides, the influences of heat capacities of heat reservoirs, internal dissipation irreversibility, and heat leakage irreversibility on cycle performance are analyzed. The conclusions can offer some guidelines for design and operation of AHP plants.

  1. TEMPERATURE REQUIREMENTS OF SOME PERCIDS AND ADAPTATIONS TO THE SEASONAL TEMPERATURE CYCLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temperature requirements are reviewed for three North American percids (walleye, Stizostedion vitreum; sauger, S. canadense; and yellow perch, Perca flavescens), three Eurasian percids (perch, P. fluviatilis; pikeperch, S. lucioperca; and ruffe, Gymnocephalus cernua), and nine co...

  2. Preliminary low temperature tests of a digital signal processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zebulum, Ricardo S.; Ramesham, Rajeshuni; Stoica, Adrian; Keymeulen, Didier; Daud, Taher; Sekanina, Lukas

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an initial experiment performed to assess the electrical behavior of the Innovative Integration board containing a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) with its JTAG (Blackhawk) connector at low temperatures. The objective of the experiment is to determine the lowest temperature at which the DSP can operate. The DSP was tested at various low-temperatures and a Genetic Algorithm was used as the DSP test program.

  3. Phenobarbital effects on weight gain and circadian cycling of food intake and body temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Peraino, C.; Ehret, C.F.; Groh, K.R.; Meinert, J.C.; D'arcy-Gomez, G.

    1980-12-01

    Rats fed a diet supplemented with phenobarbital at a concentration of 0.25% gained less weight than rats fed the unsupplemented diet. The reduced weight gain in the phenobarbital-treated rats accompanied the induction of marked hepatomegaly. Circadian cycling of food consumption in control rats followed a biphasic pattern, with the first feeding episode occurring during the middle of the 12-h dark phase and the second occurring as the dark phase ended. In rats on phenobarbital, eating activity was confined to the first feeding episode, with the level of intake during this interval increasing to compensate for the absence of significant subsequent feeding, so that the daily levels of food consumption were similar in both groups. Measurements of circadian cycling of deep body temperature showed that ingestion of 0.25% dietary phenobarbital approximately doubled the amplitude of the temperature cycle and advanced the time at which peak temperature was attained by aproximately 2 h. It is suggested that the lower weight gain in rats chronically exposed to 0.25% dietary phenobarbital results primarily from alterations in hepatic metabolism, but phenobarbital-mediated changes in the circadian cycling of food intake and deep-body temperature may also contribute to the growth reduction.

  4. Timing of the diurmal temperature cycle in remote sensing and model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC) over land resulting from variations in measuring devise or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of lo...

  5. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and in some cases return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential. PARR installed and monitored the performance of one type of ALM controller, the M2G from Greffen Systems, at multifamily sites in the city of Chicago and its suburb Cary, IL, both with existing OTR control. Results show that energy savings depend on the degree to which boilers are over-sized for their load, represented by cycling rates. Also savings vary over the heating season with cycling rates, with greater savings observed in shoulder months. Over the monitoring period, over-sized boilers at one site showed reductions in cycling and energy consumption in line with prior laboratory studies, while less over-sized boilers at another site showed muted savings.

  6. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  7. The effect of skin temperature on performance during a 7.5-km cycling time trial.

    PubMed

    Levels, Koen; de Koning, Jos J; Foster, Carl; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-09-01

    Aerobic exercise performance is seriously compromised in the heat. Possibly, a high skin temperature causes a rating of perceived exertion (RPE)-mediated decrease in exercise intensity. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of skin temperature on power output during a 7.5-km cycling time trial. Thirteen well-trained male subjects performed a 7.5-km cycling time trial at 15°C and 50% relative humidity (CONTROL), with radiative heat stress during the time trial, and with (PRECOOL) or without (HEAT) precooling. Heat stress was applied by infrared heaters positioned in front of the cycle ergometer between 1.5 and 6.0 km. Skin, rectal, and pill temperature, power output, heart rate, and RPE were measured during the trial. Despite the lower mean skin temperature at the start of the time trial for PRECOOL compared to HEAT (-2.1 ± 0.7°C; P < 0.01) and CONTROL (-1.8 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.05), and a greater increase in mean skin temperature during the heat stress period for PRECOOL (4.5 ± 1.0°C) and HEAT (3.9 ± 0.8°C) than for CONTROL (-0.3 ± 0.6°C; P < 0.01), no differences in power output were found between HEAT (273 ± 45 W) and CONTROL (284 ± 43 W; P = 0.11) and between HEAT and PRECOOL (266 ± 50 W; P = 0.47). Power output during the time trial was greater for CONTROL than for PRECOOL (P < 0.05). Additionally, no differences were observed in core temperature measures, HR, and RPE. Skin temperature does not affect the selection and modulation of exercise intensity in a 7.5-km cycling time trial. PMID:22270485

  8. Chassis test cycles for assessing emissions from heavy duty trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, N.N.; McKain, D.L.; Messer, J.T.; Lyons, D.W.

    1994-10-01

    Emissions from internal combustion engines can be evaluated by testing the engine itself or testing a whole vehicle using a chassis dynamometer. Recent concerns over atmospheric pollution and the drive to examine alternative fuel technology have led to an interest in chassis testing of trucks and buses. In particular these chassis tests permit the examination of changing emissions over the life of the vehicle. Identification of the chassis test protocols for heavy duty vehicles remains inchoate, but this paper seeks to assuage part of the problem by offering a practical test schedule for Class 8 trucks and truck-tractors in the 15000 to 36,360 kg GVW range. 8 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characterization and cycle tests of lightweight nickel electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a high specific energy nickel electrode is the main goal of the lightweight nickel electrode program at NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach was to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen battery. High energy nickel electrodes suffer from having shorter lives than state-of-the-art electrode. However, these lightweight electrodes appear to be favorable for missions requiring moderate cycle lives and depth-of-discharge.

  10. ON THE CONSTANCY OF THE ELECTRON TEMPERATURE IN THE EXPANDING CORONA THROUGHOUT SOLAR CYCLE 23

    SciTech Connect

    Habbal, Shadia Rifai; Morgan, Huw; Druckmueller, Miloslav; Ding, Adalbert

    2010-03-10

    A recent analysis of Fe emission lines observed during the total solar eclipses of 2006 March 29 and 2008 August 1 established the first empirical link between the electron temperature in the expanding corona and Fe charge states measured in interplanetary space. In this Letter, we use this link to infer this temperature throughout solar cycle 23 from in situ charge state measurements from the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and on Ulysses. The distribution of the SWICS/ACE Fe charge states, which span cycle 23 from 1998 to 2009, is skewed with a peak centered on Fe{sup 8+}, Fe{sup 9+}, and Fe{sup 10+} and a tail spanning Fe{sup 12+} to Fe{sup 20+}. An iterative process based on this distribution and on the Fe ion fraction as a function of electron temperature yields a narrow peak at 1.1 x 10{sup 6} K. The tail in the measured charge state distribution is attributed to the sporadic release of material hotter than 2 x 10{sup 6} K from closed magnetic structures within the bulges of streamers. The Fe Ulysses charge state measurements between 1992 and 1997 from cycle 22 peaked at Fe{sup 11+}, indicative of a slightly higher temperature of 1.5 x 10{sup 6} K. The relative constancy of the electron temperature in the expanding corona throughout solar cycle 23 points to the presence of an unknown mechanism regulating the energy input to electrons in the acceleration region of the solar wind at all latitudes during this cycle.

  11. POWER CYCLE AND STRESS ANALYSES FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Davis, Cliff; Hawkes, Brian D; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. Many aspects of the NGNP must be researched and developed in order to make recommendations on the final design of the plant. Parameters such as working conditions, cycle components, working fluids, and power conversion unit configurations must be understood. Three configurations of the power conversion unit were demonstrated in this study. A three-shaft design with three turbines and four compressors, a combined cycle with a Brayton top cycle and a Rankine bottoming cycle, and a reheated cycle with three stages of reheat were investigated. An intermediate heat transport loop for transporting process heat to a High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HTSE) hydrogen production plant was used. Helium, CO2, and a 80% nitrogen, 20% helium mixture (by weight) were studied to determine the best working fluid in terms cycle efficiency and development cost. In each of these configurations the relative component size were estimated for the different working fluids. The relative size of the turbomachinery was measured by comparing the power input/output of the component. For heat exchangers the volume was computed and compared. Parametric studies away from the baseline values of the three-shaft and combined cycles were performed to determine the effect of varying conditions in the cycle. This gives some insight into the sensitivity of these cycles to various operating conditions as well as trade offs between efficiency and capital cost. Parametric studies were carried out on reactor outlet temperature, mass flow, pressure, and turbine cooling. Recommendations on the optimal working fluid for each configuration were made. Engineering analyses were performed for several configurations of the intermediate heat transport loop that transfers heat from the nuclear reactor to the hydrogen production plant. The analyses evaluated parallel and concentric piping arrangements and two different working fluids, including helium and a liquid salt. The thermal-hydraulic analyses determined the size and insulation requirements for the hot and cold leg pipes in the different configurations. Mechanical analyses were performed to determine hoop stresses and thermal expansion characteristics for the different configurations. Economic analyses were performed to estimate the cost of the various configurations.

  12. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and a corresponding development of a back stress due to a significant increase in the dislocation density during thermal cycling.

  13. Environmental degradation of 316 stainless steel in high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Manson, S. Stanford; Halford, Gary R.

    1987-01-01

    Procedures based on modification of the conventional Strainrange Partitioning method are proposed to characterize the time-dependent degradation of engineering alloys in high-temperature, low-cycle fatigue. Creep-fatigue experiments were conducted in air using different waveforms of loading on 316 stainless steel at 816 C (1500 F) to determine the effect of exposure time on cyclic life. Reductions in the partitioned cyclic lives were observed with an increase in the time of exposure (or with the corresponding decrease in the steady-state creep rate) for all the waveforms involving creep strain. Excellent correlations of the experimental data were obtained by modifying the Conventional Strainrange Partitioning life relationships involving creep strain using a power-law term of either: (1) time of exposure, or (2) steady-state creep rate of the creep-fatigue test. Environmental degradation due to oxidation, material degradation due to the precipitation of carbides along the grain boundaries and detrimental deformation modes associated with the prolonged periods of creep were observed to be the main mechanisms responsible for life reductions at long exposure times.

  14. Thermal cycle testing of Space Station Freedom solar array blanket coupons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, David A.; Schieman, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Lewis Research Center is presently conducting thermal cycle testing of solar array blanket coupons that represent the baseline design for Space Station Freedom. Four coupons were fabricated as part of the Photovoltaic Array Environment Protection (PAEP) Program, NAS 3-25079, at Lockheed Missile and Space Company. The objective of the testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array welded interconnect design within the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array welded interconnect design within a low earth orbit (LEO) thermal cycling environment. Secondary objectives include the observation and identification of potential failure modes and effects that may occur within the solar array blanket coupons as a result of thermal cycling. The objectives, test articles, test chamber, performance evaluation, test requirements, and test results are presented for the successful completion of 60,000 thermal cycles.

  15. High temperature, low cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 3: Zirconium-copper; thermal-mechanical strain cycling, hold-time and notch fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue characteristics of smooth bar and notched bar specimens (hourglass shape) of zirconium-copper, 1/2 Hard, material (R-2 Series) were evaluated at room temperature in axial strain control. Over the fatigue life range from about 300 to 3000 cycles the ratio of fatigue life for smooth bar to fatigue life for notched bar remained constant at a value of about 6.0. Some additional hold-time data for the R-2 alloy tested in argon at 538 C are reported. An analysis of the relaxation data obtained in these hold-time tests is also reported and it is shown that these data yield a fairly consistent correlation in terms of instantaneous stress rate divided by instantaneous stress. Two thermal-mechanical strain cycling tests were also performed using a cyclic frequency of 4.5 cycles per hour and a temperature cycling interval from 260 to 538 C. The fatigue life values in these tests were noticeably lower than that observed in isothermal tests at 538 C.

  16. A Fuzzy Heater Control System Stimulating Thermal Cycling of Flight Hardware for a Thermal Environmental Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Li; Chen, Yow-Hwa; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Cheng, Robert; Hsiao, Chiuder

    2004-08-01

    The flight hardware suffers thermal cycling in space environment. The temperature range of the hardware is controlled between -45 C and 85 C for the space-flight test environment in a thermal vacuum chamber on ground. A Heater Control System (HCS) provides thirty heating points to simulate the thermal status of flight hardware. The control is configured in traditional PD algorithm and implemented in a workstation of a control room. Since the thermal mass is different for the different articles, the pre-determined parameters of PD control cannot fit all articles. The fuzzy logics are then proposed to be adaptive to the different articles. The fuzzy control is implemented with LabVIEW in a PXI industrial computer. The remote GPIB instruments of hibay are interfaced to PXI computer via Ethernet communication. In summary, the overall system takes advantages of GPIB standardized component, increasing capabilities, adaptive control with a fuzzy algorithm, and distributed control architecture.

  17. Mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high temperature low cycle fatigue of Rene 80 and IN 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoski, G. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens tested for the AGARD strain range partitioning program were investigated. Rene 80 and IN 100 were tested in air and in vacuum; at 871 C, 925 C, and 1000 C; and in the coated and uncoated condition. The specimens exhibited a multiplicity of high-temperature low-cycle fatigue damage. Observations of the various forms of damage were consistent with material and testing conditions and were generally in agreement with previous studies. In every case observations support a contention that failure occurs at a particular combination of crack length and maximum stress. A failure criterion which is applicable in the regime of testing studied is presented. The predictive capabilities of this criterion are straight forward.

  18. High cycle fatigue behavior of Incoloy 800H in a simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.; Epel, L.G.; Hare, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to evaluate the high cycle fatigue strength of Incoloy 800H in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor helium environment containing significant quantities of moisture. As-heat-treated and thermally-aged materials were tested to determine the effects of long term corrosion in the helium test gas. Results from in-helium tests were compared to those from a standard air environment. It was found that the mechanisms of fatigue failure were very complex and involved recovery/recrystallization of the surface ground layer on the specimens, sensitization, hardness changes, oxide scale integrity, and oxidation at the tips of propagation cracks. For certain situations a corrosion-fatigue process seems to be controlling. However, for the helium environment studied, there was usually no aging or test condition for which air gave a higher fatigue strength.

  19. Testing the Goodwin growth-cycle macroeconomic dynamics in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, N. J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the empirical validity of Goodwin’s (1967) macroeconomic model of growth with cycles by assuming that the individual income distribution of the Brazilian society is described by the Gompertz-Pareto distribution (GPD). This is formed by the combination of the Gompertz curve, representing the overwhelming majority of the population (˜99%), with the Pareto power law, representing the tiny richest part (˜1%). In line with Goodwin’s original model, we identify the Gompertzian part with the workers and the Paretian component with the class of capitalists. Since the GPD parameters are obtained for each year and the Goodwin macroeconomics is a time evolving model, we use previously determined, and further extended here, Brazilian GPD parameters, as well as unemployment data, to study the time evolution of these quantities in Brazil from 1981 to 2009 by means of the Goodwin dynamics. This is done in the original Goodwin model and an extension advanced by Desai et al. (2006). As far as Brazilian data is concerned, our results show partial qualitative and quantitative agreement with both models in the studied time period, although the original one provides better data fit. Nevertheless, both models fall short of a good empirical agreement as they predict single center cycles which were not found in the data. We discuss the specific points where the Goodwin dynamics must be improved in order to provide a more realistic representation of the dynamics of economic systems.

  20. The application of probabilistic design theory to high temperature low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirsching, P. H.

    1981-01-01

    Metal fatigue under stress and thermal cycling is a principal mode of failure in gas turbine engine hot section components such as turbine blades and disks and combustor liners. Designing for fatigue is subject to considerable uncertainty, e.g., scatter in cycles to failure, available fatigue test data and operating environment data, uncertainties in the models used to predict stresses, etc. Methods of analyzing fatigue test data for probabilistic design purposes are summarized. The general strain life as well as homo- and hetero-scedastic models are considered. Modern probabilistic design theory is reviewed and examples are presented which illustrate application to reliability analysis of gas turbine engine components.

  1. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H.; Brandt, Randolph J.

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  2. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of...

  3. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of...

  4. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of...

  5. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1363-2007 - Steady-state testing with a discrete-mode cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a discrete... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1363-2007 Steady-state testing with a discrete-mode cycle. This section describes an alternate procedure for steady-state testing that manufacturers may use through the 2009...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1363-2007 - Steady-state testing with a discrete-mode cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a discrete... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1363-2007 Steady-state testing with a discrete-mode cycle. This section describes an alternate procedure for steady-state testing that manufacturers may use through the 2009...

  8. Inhomogeneous degradation of graphite anodes in automotive lithium ion batteries under low-temperature pulse cycling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, Daniel; Sergeeva, Kseniya; Calles, Simon; Schorb, Klaus; Börger, Alexander; Roth, Christina; Heitjans, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The aging of graphite anodes in prismatic lithium ion cells during a low temperature pulse charging regime was studied by electrical tests and post-mortem analysis. The capacity decrease and impedance increase mainly occurs in the beginning of cycling and lithium plating was identified as the major aging mechanism. The degradation and the local states of charge show an inhomogeneous distribution over the anode, which is confirmed from spatially resolved XRD studies and SEM combined with EDX performed on electrode cross sections. Comparing a charged cell with a discharged cell reveals that ca. 1/3 of the lithium is plated reversibly at the given SOH of 60%. It is proposed that high charge rates at low temperatures induce inhomogeneities of temperature and anode utilization resulting in inhomogeneous aging effects that accumulate over lifetime.

  9. Residual thermal effects in macro fiber composite actuators exposed to persistent temperature cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobeck, J. D.; Owen, R. B.; Inman, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the authors present results of an experimental investigation demonstrating how extreme persistent thermal cycling influences the performance of piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. More specifically, this research shows how repeated temperature cycling ranging from -60 °C to 90 °C and from -50 °C to 150 °C affects an MFCs ability to actuate while being driven at frequencies of 60 Hz to 90 Hz with a voltage of 20 Vpp. Experimental results show that thermal cycling causes MFC actuation characteristics to drift and eventually stabilize after approximately 20 cycles. In two cases presented here, thermal cycling alone caused a residual increase in actuation amplitude that exceeded the initial amplitude by 70%. This apparent thermal memory effect of MFCs may significantly impact the design and analysis of active structures where MFCs are used for vibration or displacement control in transient extreme temperature environments such as those encountered by aerospace structures, industrial equipment, automobiles, and civil infrastructure.

  10. Effect of programmed diurnal temperature cycles on plasma thyroxine level, body temperature, and feed intake of holstein dairy cows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, I. M.; Johnson, H. D.; Hahn, G. L.

    1983-03-01

    Holstein cows exposed to simulated summer diurnal ambient temperature cycles of Phoenix, Arizona and Atlanta, Georgia and diurnal modifications of these climates displayed daily cycles fluctuations in plasma thyroxine (T4) and rectal temperatures (Tre). There were daily diurnal changes in T4 and Tre under all simulated climate conditions. Maximal values generally occurred in the evening hours and minimum values in the morning. Although the diurnal rhythm was influenced by the various simulated climates (diurnal modifications) a diurnal rhythm was very evident even under constant conditions at thermoneutral (Tnc) and at cyclic thermoneutral conditions (TN). The major significance of the study is that the initiation of night cooling of the animals at a time when their Tre was highest was most beneficial to maintenance of a TN plasma T4 level. There was a highly significant negative relationship of average T4 and average Tre. There was also a significant negative relationship of feed consumption and average temperature-humidity index (THI). These data suggest that night cooling may be a most effective method to alleviate thermoregulatory limitations of a hot climate on optimal animal performance. Decreasing the night time air temperature (Ta) or THI or increasing the diurnal range allows the cows to more easily dissipate excess body heat accumulated during the day and minimize the thermal inhibition on feed intake, and alterations in plasma T4 and Tre.

  11. 30 CFR 7.47 - Deflection temperature test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deflection temperature test. 7.47 Section 7.47 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Battery Assemblies § 7.47...

  12. 30 CFR 7.101 - Surface temperature tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface temperature tests. 7.101 Section 7.101 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS TESTING BY APPLICANT OR THIRD PARTY Diesel Power Packages Intended for Use in Areas of Underground Coal Mines...

  13. Long-term changes of the diurnal temperature cycle: implications about mechanisms of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Ruedy, R.

    We use a global climate model to investigate the impact of a wide range of radiative forcing and feedback mechanisms on the diurnal cycle of surface air temperature. This allows us not only to rule out many potential explanations for observed diurnal changes, but to infer fundamental information concerning the nature and location of the principal global climate forcings of this century. We conclude that the observed changes of the diurnal cycle result neither from natural climate variability nor a globally-distributed forcing, but rather they require the combination of a (negative) radiative forcing located primarily over continental regions together with the known globally-distributed forcing due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Tropospheric aerosols can account for part of the continentally-located forcing, but alone they do not damp the diurnal cycle as observed. Only an increase of continental cloud cover, possibly a consequence of anthropogenic aerosols, can damp the diurnal cycle by an amount comparable to observations. A corollary of these results is quantitative confirmation of the widely held suspicion that anthropogenic greenhouse gas warming has been substantially counterbalanced by a forced cooling. Under the assumption that the cloud change is sulfate driven, a further implication is that the net rate of global warming is likely to increase substantially in coming years. We note that, on the long run, the daily maximum temperature will increase by an amount not much less than the increase of the mean temperature.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., a manual transmission engine shall be allowed to idle at whatever speed is required to target a... range at stabilized temperature conditions. (f) Clutch operation. Manual transmission engines may be... device operation, an automatic transmission engine shall be allowed to idle at whatever speed is...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., a manual transmission engine shall be allowed to idle at whatever speed is required to target a... range at stabilized temperature conditions. (f) Clutch operation. Manual transmission engines may be... device operation, an automatic transmission engine shall be allowed to idle at whatever speed is...

  16. Investigation of thermal fatigue in fiber composite materials. [(thermal cycling tests)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahmy, A. A.; Cunningham, T. G.

    1976-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy laminates were thermally cycled to determine the effects of thermal cycles on tensile properties and thermal expansion coefficients of the laminates. Three 12-ply laminate configurations were subjected to up to 5,000 thermal cycles. The cumulative effect of the thermal cycles was determined by destructive inspection (electron micrographs and tensile tests) of samples after progressively larger numbers of cycles. After thermal cycling, the materials' tensile strengths, moduli, and thermal expansion coefficients were significantly lower than for the materials as fabricated. Most of the degradation of properties occurred after only a few cycles. The property degradation was attributed primarily to the progressive development of matrix cracks whose locations depended upon the layup orientation of the laminate.

  17. A high temperature testing system for ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemann, John

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic composites are presently being developed for high temperature use in heat engine and space power system applications. The operating temperature range is expected to be 1090 to 1650 C (2000 F to 3000 F). Very little material data is available at these temperatures and, therefore, it is desirable to thoroughly characterize the basic unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic composite. This includes testing mainly for mechanical material properties at high temperatures. The proper conduct of such characterization tests requires the development of a tensile testing system includes unique gripping, heating, and strain measuring devices which require special considerations. The system also requires an optimized specimen shape. The purpose of this paper is to review various techniques for measuring displacements or strains, preferably at elevated temperatures. Due to current equipment limitations it is assumed that the specimen is to be tested at a temperature of 1430 C (2600F) in an oxidizing atmosphere. For the most part, previous high temperature material characterization tests, such as flexure and tensile tests, have been performed in inert atmospheres. Due to the harsh environment in which the ceramic specimen is to be tested, many conventional strain measuring techniques can not be applied. Initially a brief description of the more commonly used mechanical strain measuring techniques is given. Major advantages and disadvantages with their application to high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites are discussed. Next, a general overview is given for various optical techniques. Advantages and disadvantages which are common to these techniques are noted. The optical methods for measuring strain or displacement are categorized into two sections. These include real-time techniques. Finally, an optical technique which offers optimum performance with the high temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites is recommended.

  18. Analyses of mixed-hydrocarbon binary thermodynamic cycles for moderate-temperature geothermal resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuth, O. J.

    1981-02-01

    Both boiling and supercritical shell-and-tube cycles were considered. The performance of a dual-boiling isobutane cycle supplied by a 280 F hydrothermal resource (corresponding to the 5 MW pilot plant at the Raft River site in Idaho) was selected as a reference. To investigate the effect of resource temperature on the choice of working fluid, several analyses were conducted for a 360 F hydrothermal resource, which is representative of the Heber resource in California. The hydrocarbon working fluids analyzed included methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, isopentane, hexane, heptane, and mixtures of those pure hydrocarbons. For comparison, two fluorocarbon refrigerants were also analyzed.

  19. Ultrahigh vacuum, high temperature, low cycle fatigue of coated and uncoated Rene 80

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted on the ultrahigh vacuum strain controlled by low cycle fatigue behavior of uncoated and CODEP B-1 aluminide coated Rene' 80 nickel-base superalloy at 1000 C (1832 F) and 871 C (1600 F). The results indicated little effect of coating or temperature on the fatigue properties. There was, however, a significant effect on fatigue life when creep was introduced into the strain cycles. The effect of this creep component was analyzed in terms of the method of strainrange partitioning.

  20. The cycle life chemistry of ambient-temperature secondary lithium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somoano, R.; Carter, B. J.; Subba Rao, S.; Shen, D.; Yen, S. P. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is involved in a NASA-sponsored research program to demonstrate the feasibility of ambient-temperature secondary lithium batteries for geosynchronous space applications. Encouraging cycle life has been demonstrated in sealed, cathode-limited laboratory cells. However, the cell capacity declines with cycle life. The results of recent studies of the lithium electrode passivation chemistry, and of conductive diluents for TiS2 cathodes and their possible contribution to capacity decline, are here presented. Technical issues associated with the unique operational requirements of a geosynchronous mission are also described.

  1. Insect seasonality: circle map analysis of temperature-driven life cycles.

    PubMed

    Powell, James A; Logan, Jesse A

    2005-05-01

    Maintaining an adaptive seasonality, with life cycle events occurring at appropriate times of year and in synchrony with cohorts and ephemeral resources, is a basic ecological requisite for many cold-blooded organisms. There are many mechanisms for synchronizing developmental milestones, such as egg laying (oviposition), egg hatching, cocoon opening, and the emergence of adults. These are often irreversible, specific to particular life stages, and include diapause, an altered physiological state which can be reversed by some synchronizing environmental cue (e.g. photoperiod). However, many successful organisms display none of these mechanisms for maintaining adaptive seasonality. In this paper, we briefly review the mathematical relationship between environmental temperatures and developmental timing and discuss the consequences of viewing these models as circle maps from the cycle of yearly oviposition dates and temperatures to oviposition dates for subsequent generations. Of particular interest biologically are life cycles which are timed to complete in exactly 1 year, or univoltine cycles. Univoltinism, associated with reproductive success for many temperate species, is related to stable fixed points of the developmental circle map. Univoltine fixed points are stable and robust in broad temperature bands, but lose stability suddenly to maladaptive cycles at the edges of these bands. Adaptive seasonality may therefore break down with little warning with constantly increasing or decreasing temperature change, as in scenarios for global warming. These ideas are illustrated and explored in the context of Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) occurring in the marginal thermal habitat of central Idaho's Rocky Mountains. Applications of these techniques have not been widely explored by the applied math community, but are likely to provide great insight into the response of biological systems to climate change. PMID:15808334

  2. Test summary for advanced H2 cycle NI-CD cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Lee

    1987-01-01

    To improve operational tolerances and mass, the H2 gas recombination design provisions of the Ni-H2 system were incorporated into the sealed Ni-Cd system. Produced is a cell design capable of operating on the H2 cycle versus the normal O2 cycle. Three test cells have now completed approximately 4,330 LEO (90 minute) cycles at 20 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Performance remains stable although one cell exhibited a temporary pressure anomaly.

  3. Testing of a Miniature Loop Heat Pipe Using a Thermal Electrical Cooler for Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Jeong, Soeng-II; Butler, Dan

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the design and testing of a miniature LHP having a 7 mm O.D. evaporator with an integral CC. The vapor line and liquid line are made of 1.6mm stainless steel tubing. The evaporator and the CC are connected on the outer surface by a copper strap and a thermoelectric (TEC) is installed on the strap. The TEC is used to control the CC temperature by applying an electrical current for heating or cooling. Tests performed in ambient included start-up, power cycle, sink temperature cycle, and CC temperature control using TEC. The LHP demonstrated very robust operation in all tests where the heat load varied between 0.5W and 1OOW, and the sink temperature varied between 243K and 293K. The heat leak from the evaporator to the CC was extremely small. The TEC was able to control the CC temperature within +/-0.3K under all test conditions, and the required control heater power was less than 1W.

  4. PLUG-IN HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE AND HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE EMISSIONS UNDER FTP AND US06 CYCLES AT HIGH, AMBIENT, AND LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Seidman, M.R.; Markel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The concept of a Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) is to displace consumption of gasoline by using electricity from the vehicle’s large battery pack to power the vehicle as much as possible with minimal engine operation. This paper assesses the PHEV emissions and operation. Currently, testing of vehicle emissions is done using the federal standard FTP4 cycle on a dynamometer at ambient (75°F) temperatures. Research was also completed using the US06 cycle. Furthermore, research was completed at high (95°F) and low (20°F) temperatures. Initial dynamometer testing was performed on a stock Toyota Prius under the standard FTP4 cycle, and the more demanding US06 cycle. Each cycle was run at 95°F, 75°F, and 20°F. The testing was repeated with the same Prius retrofi tted with an EnergyCS Plug-in Hybrid Electric system. The results of the testing confi rm that the stock Prius meets Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements under current testing procedures, while the PHEV Prius under current testing procedures were greater than Super-Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements, but still met Ultra Low Emission Vehicle requirements. Research points to the catalyst temperature being a critical factor in meeting emission requirements. Initial engine emissions pass through with minimal conversion until the catalyst is heated to typical operating temperatures of 300–400°C. PHEVs also have trouble maintaining the minimum catalyst temperature throughout the entire test because the engine is turned off when the battery can support the load. It has been observed in both HEVs and PHEVs that the catalyst is intermittently unable to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, which causes further emission releases. Research needs to be done to combat the initial emission spikes caused by a cold catalyst. Research also needs to be done to improve the reduction of nitrogen oxides by the catalyst system.

  5. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-12-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, the cycle life of nickel electrodes was tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45 minute low Earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. It is shown that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength does not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. It is found that the best plaque is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has median pore size of 13 micron.

  6. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, the cycle life of nickel electrodes was tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45 minute low Earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. It is shown that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength does not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. It is found that the best plaque is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has median pore size of 13 micron.

  7. Field Test of Boiler Primary Loop Temperature Controller

    SciTech Connect

    Glanville, P.; Rowley, P.; Schroeder, D.; Brand, L.

    2014-09-01

    Beyond these initial system efficiency upgrades are an emerging class of Advanced Load Monitoring (ALM) aftermarket controllers that dynamically respond to the boiler load, with claims of 10% to 30% of fuel savings over a heating season. For hydronic boilers specifically, these devices perform load monitoring, with continuous measurement of supply and, in some cases, return water temperatures. Energy savings from these ALM controllers are derived from dynamic management of the boiler differential, where a microprocessor with memory of past boiler cycles prevents the boiler from firing for a period of time, to limit cycling losses and inefficient operation during perceived low load conditions. These differ from OTR controllers, which vary boiler setpoint temperatures with ambient conditions while maintaining a fixed differential.

  8. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential role of the dolomitic sorbent in enhancing the electric energy production efficiency of the plant, thanks to the better cleaning of the heat exchange surface that can be achieved. If such improvement is accounted for, all the potential impacts are considerably decreased (e.g. the Climate change by 28%), and in the comparison with the traditional operation 17 impact categories out of 19 are reduced.

  9. Development of a low cost, low temperature cryocooler using the Gifford McMahon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanayaka, A.; Mani, R.

    2008-03-01

    Although Helium is the second most abundant element, its concentration in the earth's atmosphere is fairly low and constant, as the portion that escapes from the atmosphere is replace by new emission. Historically, Helium was extracted as a byproduct of natural gas production, and stored in gas fields in a National Helium Reserve, in an attempt to conserve this interesting element. National policy has changed and the cost of liquid Helium has increased rapidly in the recent past. These new circumstances have created new interest in alternative eco-friendly methods to realizing and maintaining low temperatures in the laboratory. There have been number of successful attempts at making low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerators by modifying an existing closed cycle system, and usually the regenerator has been replaced in order to achieve the desired results. Here, we discus our attempt to fabricate a low cost, low temperature closed cycle Helium refrigerator starting from a 15K Gifford McMahon system. We reexamine the barriers to realizing lower temperature here and our attempts at overcoming them.

  10. Temperature and Cyanobacterial Bloom Biomass Influence Phosphorous Cycling in Eutrophic Lake Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mo; Ye, Tian-Ran; Krumholz, Lee R.; Jiang, He-Long

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms frequently occur in freshwater lakes, subsequently, substantial amounts of decaying cyanobacterial bloom biomass (CBB) settles onto the lake sediments where anaerobic mineralization reactions prevail. Coupled Fe/S cycling processes can influence the mobilization of phosphorus (P) in sediments, with high releases often resulting in eutrophication. To better understand eutrophication in Lake Taihu (PRC), we investigated the effects of CBB and temperature on phosphorus cycling in lake sediments. Results indicated that added CBB not only enhanced sedimentary iron reduction, but also resulted in a change from net sulfur oxidation to sulfate reduction, which jointly resulted in a spike of soluble Fe(II) and the formation of FeS/FeS2. Phosphate release was also enhanced with CBB amendment along with increases in reduced sulfur. Further release of phosphate was associated with increases in incubation temperature. In addition, CBB amendment resulted in a shift in P from the Fe-adsorbed P and the relatively unreactive Residual-P pools to the more reactive Al-adsorbed P, Ca-bound P and organic-P pools. Phosphorus cycling rates increased on addition of CBB and were higher at elevated temperatures, resulting in increased phosphorus release from sediments. These findings suggest that settling of CBB into sediments will likely increase the extent of eutrophication in aquatic environments and these processes will be magnified at higher temperatures. PMID:24682039

  11. USE OF THE GRASS SHRIMP 'PALAEMONETES PUGIO' IN A LIFE-CYCLE TOXICITY TEST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A methodology for using the estuarine grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) in life-cycle toxicity tests was successfully developed. Life-cycle exposures of juvenile shrimp (12 to 19 mm in rostrum-telson length) to the chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide endrin were begun in November 1...

  12. Field air injection tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle on the permeability of welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin

    1991-10-01

    As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization at Yucca Mountain, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives were to characterize the permeability of the highly fractured tuff around a horizontal heater emplacement borehole, and to determine the effect of a heating and cooling cycle on the rock-mass permeability. Air was injected into packed-off intervals along the heater borehole. The bulk permeability of the rock adjacent to the test interval was computed from the air-flow rate, temperature, and pressure at steady state. The permeability varied from a minimum of 0.08 D to a maximum of over 144 D. Higher permeabilities seemed to correlate spatially with the mapped fractures. The rock was then heated for a period of 6.5 months with an electrical-resistive heater installed in the borehole. After heating, the rock was allowed to cool down to the ambient temperature. the highest borehole wall temperature measured was 242{degrees}C. Air injection tests were repeated following the heating and cooling cycle, and the results showed significant increases in bulk permeability ranging from 10 to 1830% along the borehole.

  13. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2013-09-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  14. Raytheon low temperature RSP2 cryocooler airborne testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, B. R.; Bellis, L.; Ellis, M. J.; Conrad, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Raytheon Cryocooler Product Line tested the Low Temperature Stirling / Pulse Tube Hybrid 2-Stage (LTRSP2) cryocooler for an airborne application during 2012. Several tests were carried out to verify the ability of the machine to operate in an airborne environment. The vacuum level and heat rejection surface temperatures were varied to determine the performance over the excursions. Vibration testing was performed to prove that the LT-RSP2 cryocooler can operate on an airborne platform. This paper will present the results of the airborne characterization testing.

  15. High-temperature gas stream cleanup test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ontko, J.; Chiang, T.

    1995-12-01

    The high-temperature gas stream cleanup facility at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center will provide a versatile platform for testing novel hot gas cleanup filtration concepts. The facility will be available for joint ventures with CRADA partners.

  16. Space Station Cathode Ignition Test Status at 32,000 Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakany, James S.; Pinero, Luis R.

    1997-01-01

    A plasma contactor system has been baselined for the International Space Station for structural potential control. An ignition procedure was developed for the plasma contactor hollow cathode assembly (HCA). To demonstrate the required 99% HCA ignition reliability over 6,000 cycles, an ignition test was conducted. An accelerated test procedure was employed to rapidly accumulate ignition cycles. The test procedure minimized the differences between accelerated and non-accelerated test results. The development HCA used in this test has achieved 32,000 ignitions to date. The HCA has been qualified for cyclic operation, which could reduce xenon consumption and extend the life of the plasma contactor system.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test. The torque and rpm feedback signals may be filtered. (d) Idle Speed Enhancement Devices (e.g... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... longer, the average feedback torque must be within ±10 ft-lbs of zero. To allow for transition, up to...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test. The torque and rpm feedback signals may be filtered. (d) Idle Speed Enhancement Devices (e.g... feedback torque equal to zero (using, for example, clutch disengagement, speed to torque control switching... longer, the average feedback torque must be within ±10 ft-lbs of zero. To allow for transition, up to...

  19. Temperature measurement. [liquid monopropellant rocket engine performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, installation, checkout, calibration, and operation of a temperature measuring system to be used during tests of a liquid monopropellant rocket engine are discussed. Appendixes include: (1) temperature measurement system elemental uncertainties, and (2) tables and equations for use with thermocouples and resistance thermometers. Design guidelines are given for the critical components of each portion of the system to provide an optimum temperature measurement system which meets the performance criteria specified.

  20. E/O (Electro-Optical) augmentation environmental temperature test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papke, A.

    1983-09-01

    Determined were performance characteristics of the electro-optical automatic test equipment (ATE) at the operating temperature extremes of 65 F and 90 F. The most significant fact determined during testing was that the amount of optical path shifting and focus change experienced during temperature excursion between the two extremes was minimal and well within the capabilities of the built-in compensating adjustment features.

  1. High Temperature Evaluation of Tantalum Capacitors - Test 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-09-28

    Tantalum capacitors can provide much higher capacitance at high-temperatures than the ceramic capacitors. This study evaluates selected tantalum capacitors at high temperatures to determine their suitability for you in geothermal field. This data set contains results of the first test where three different types of capacitors were evaluated at 260C.

  2. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS... not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except that for service at or below −320 °F, the tests may be conducted at the service temperature in...

  3. Organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plant utilizing low temperature heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maizza, V.

    1980-03-01

    Utilizing and converting of existing low temperature and waste heat sources by the use of a high efficiency bottoming cycle is attractive and should be possible for many locations. This paper presents a theoretical study on possible combination of an organic Rankine-cycle turbine power plate with the heat pump supplied by waste energy sources. Energy requirements and system performances are analyzed using realistic design operating condition for a middle town. Some conversion systems employing working fluids other than water are being studied for the purpose of proposed application. Thermodynamic efficiencies, with respect to available resource, have been calculated by varying some system operating parameters at various reference temperature. With reference to proposed application equations and graphs are presented which interrelate the turbine operational parameters for some possible working fluids with computation results.

  4. Life cycle test results of a bipolar nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A history of low Earth orbit laboratory test data on a 6.5 Ah bipolar nickel hydrogen battery designed and built at the NASA Lewis Research Center is presented. During the past several years the Storage and Thermal Branch has been deeply involved in the design, development, and optimization of nickel hydrogen devices. The bipolar concept is a means of achieving the goal of producing an acceptable battery of higher energy density, able to withstand the demands of low Earth orbit regimes.

  5. Temperature dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, Brian DeVon; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip

    2010-08-01

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts.

  6. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065. 2 Advance from one mode to... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a ramped... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2007 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1362-2010 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Transition Linear Transition. 14 Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a ramped... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2010 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065. 2 Advance from one mode to... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a ramped... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2007 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1362-2010 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Transition Linear Transition. 14 Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Steady-state testing with a ramped... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1362-2010 Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle. This...

  10. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure.

  11. Cycle life test and failure model of nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Six ampere hour individual pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cells were charge/discharge cycled to failure. Failure as used here is defined to occur when the end of discharge voltage degraded to 0.9 volts. They were cycled under a low earth orbit cycle regime to a deep depth of discharge (80 percent of rated ampere hour capacity). Both cell designs were fabricated by the same manufacturer and represent current state of the art. A failure model was advanced which suggests both cell designs have inadequate volume tolerance characteristics. The limited existing data base at a deep depth of discharge (DOD) was expanded. Two cells of each design were cycled. One COMSAT cell failed at cycle 1712 and the other failed at cycle 1875. For the Air Force/Hughes cells, one cell failed at cycle 2250 and the other failed at cycle 2638. All cells, of both designs, failed due to low end of discharge voltage (0.9 volts). No cell failed due to electrical shorts. After cell failure, three different reconditioning tests (deep discharge, physical reorientation, and open circuit voltage stand) were conducted on all cells of each design. A fourth reconditioning test (electrolyte addition) was conducted on one cell of each design. In addition post cycle cell teardown and failure analysis were performed on the one cell of each design which did not have electrolyte added after failure. Previously announced in STAR as N83-25038

  12. Influence of thermal conditioning media on Charpy specimen test temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Swain, R.L.; Berggren, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    The Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact test is used extensively for determining the toughness of structural materials. Research programs in many technologies concerned with structural integrity perform such testing to obtain Charpy energy vs temperature curves. American Society for Testing and Materials Method E 23 includes rather strict requirements regarding determination and control of specimen test temperature. It specifies minimum soaking times dependent on the use of liquids or gases as the medium for thermally conditioning the specimen. The method also requires that impact of the specimen occur within 5 s removal from the conditioning medium. It does not, however, provide guidance regarding choice of conditioning media. This investigation was primarily conducted to investigate the changes in specimen temperature which occur when water is used for thermal conditioning. A standard CVN impact specimen of low-alloy steel was instrumented with surface-mounted and embedded thermocouples. Dependent on the media used, the specimen was heated or cooled to selected temperatures in the range {minus}100 to 100{degree}C using cold nitrogen gas, heated air, acetone and dry ice, methanol and dry ice, heated oil, or heated water. After temperature stabilization, the specimen was removed from the conditioning medium while the temperatures were recorded four times per second from all thermocouples using a data acquisition system and a computer. The results show that evaporative cooling causes significant changes in the specimen temperatures when water is used for conditioning. Conditioning in the other media did not result in such significant changes. The results demonstrate that, even within the guidelines of E 23, significant test temperature changes can occur which may substantially affect the Charpy impact test results if water is used for temperature conditioning. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Experimental Rankine cycle engine designed for utilization of low temperature, low pressure heat. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cipolla, G.; Margary, R.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a Rankine cycle engine using Freon 11 as working fluid, for the utilization of low temperature heat sources is described together with the results obtained. The experimental investigations showed that the engine performance is in good agreement with the calculated values; that the mechanical behavior of some components is not yet satisfactory; and that the working fluid (Freon 11) is not completely reliable in the higher temperatures range. An extension of the feasibility study dealing mainly with engine behavior and fluid suitability is envisaged, using either Freon 113 or a fluorine compound of the composition CmF(2m+2).

  14. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-01-01

    Operation of the sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures below 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves cyclability. One of the main technical issues with operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on ”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE), which causes reduced active area and limits charging. In order to overcome the poor wettability of molten sodium on BASE at 175°C, a Pt grid was applied on the anode side of the BASE using a screen printing technique. Cells with their active area increased by metallized BASEs exhibited deeper charging and stable cycling behavior.

  15. Thermodynamic Analysis of Expansion Profile for Displacement-type Expander in Low-temperature Rankine Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musthafah, Mohd-Tahir; Yamada, Noboru

    Thermodynamic analysis of the isentropic and polytropic expansion profiles of typical working fluids was carried out in order to design a highly efficient displacement-type expander for a low-temperature Rankine cycle. First, expansion profiles were analyzed for three typical working fluids: HFC245fa, ammonia, and supercritical CO2. The hot-side temperature ranged from 60 ° to 120 °C, and the cold-side temperature was 10 °C. In the analysis, isentropic and polytropic expansion processes were assumed to behave thermodynamically. In the analysis results, we noted similarities among the expansion profiles for different hot-side temperatures. This similarity allowed us to introduce the unique concept of a variable mechanism for expansion profile fitting in displacement-type expanders. This variable expansion mechanism can be achieved by simply adjusting the position of the inlet and/or outlet port of the expander.

  16. Temperature and precipitation estimates through the last glacial cycle from Clear Lake, California, pollen data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, D.P.; James, West G.

    1983-01-01

    Modern pollen surface samples from six lake and marsh sites in the northern California Coast Ranges establish a linear relation between elevation and the oak/(oak + pine) pollen ratio. Modern temperature and precipitation lapse rates were used to convert variations in the pollen ratio into temperature and precipitation changes. Pollen data from two cores from Clear Lake, Lake County, California, spanning the past 40,000 and 130,000 years were used to estimate temperature and precipitation changes through the last full glacial cycle. The maximum glacial cooling is estimated to be 7?? to 8??C; the last full interglacial period was about 1.5??C warmer than the Holocene, and a mid-Holocene interval was warmer than the present. The estimated precipitation changes are probably less reliable than the estimated temperature changes.

  17. Thermal compensator for closed-cycle helium refrigerator. [assuring constant temperature for an infrared laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Hillman, J. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The wave length of an infrared, semiconductor laser diode having an output frequency that is dependent on the diode temperature is maintained substantially constant by maintaining the diode temperature constant. The diode is carried by a cold tip of a closed cycle helium refrigerator. The refrigerator has a tendency to cause the temperature of the cold tip to oscillate. A heater diode and a sensor diode are placed on a thermal heat sink that is the only highly conductive thermal path between the laser diode and the cold tip. The heat sink has a small volume and low thermal capacitance so that the sensing diode is at substantially the same temperature as the heater diode and substantially no thermal lag exists between them. The sensor diode is connected in a negative feedback circuit with the heater diode so that the tendency of the laser diode to thermally oscillate is virtually eliminated.

  18. Design, fabrication and testing of an optical temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Decker, R. O.; Mcclurg, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The laboratory breadboard optical temperature sensor based on the temperature dependent absorptive characteristics of a rare earth (europium) doped optical fiber. The principles of operation, materials characterization, fiber and optical component design, design and fabrication of an electrooptic interface unit, signal processing, and initial test results are discussed. Initial tests indicated that, after a brief warmup period, the output of the sensor was stable to approximately 1 C at room temperature or approximately + or - 0.3 percent of point (K). This exceeds the goal of 1 percent of point. Recommendations are presented for further performance improvement.

  19. Temperature measurements from the prototype engineered barrier system field test

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.; Ramirez, A.L.; Watwood, D.

    1991-07-01

    A horizontal heater test was conducted in G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, to study the hydrothermal response of the rock mass due to a thermal loading. The results of the temperature measurements are reported here. The maximum temperature on the surface of the heater can was about 340{degrees}C; the maximum temperature at the bottom of the heater borehole wall was about 240{degrees}C, which is similar to that expected in the rock adjacent to a real nuclear waste package. The measured temperatures agree with the results of a model, assuming heat conduction as the heat transfer mechanism. The measured temperatures also agree with a scoping calculation that was performed using a model which investigates the transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in fractured porous media. Our results indicate that the temperature field might be affected by the initial moisture content of the rock, the fractures in the rock, the distance from the free surface of the alcove wall, and the temperature distribution on the heater surface. Higher initial moisture content, higher fracture density, and cooling from the alcove wall tend to decrease the measured temperature. The temperature on top of the horizontal heater can was about 30{degrees}C greater than at the bottom throughout most of the heating phase, causing the rock temperatures above the heater to be greater than those below. Along a radius from the center of the heater, the heating created a dry zone, followed by a boiling zone and a condensation zone. Gravity drainage of the condensed water in the condensation zone had a strong effect on the boiling process in the test region. The temperatures below and to the side of the heater indicated a region receiving liquid drainage from an overlying region of condensation. We verified that a thermocouple in a thin-wall measures the same temperature as one grouted in a borehole. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  20. A simple-harmonic model for depicting the annual cycle of seasonal temperatures of streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele, Timothy Doak

    1978-01-01

    Due to economic or operational constraints, stream-temperature records cannot always be collected at all sites where information is desired or at frequencies dictated by continuous or near-continuous surveillance requirements. For streams where only periodic measurements are made during the year, and that are not appreciably affected by regulation or by thermal loading , a simple harmonic function may adequately depict the annual seasonal cycle of stream temperature at any given site. Resultant harmonic coefficients obtained from available stream-temperature records may be used in the following ways: (1) To interpolate between discrete measurements by solving the harmonic function at specified times, thereby filling in estimates of stream-temperature values; (2) to characterize areal or regional patterns of natural stream-temperature values; (2) to characterize areal or regional patterns of natural stream-temperature conditions; and (3) to detect and to assess any significant at a site brought about by streamflow regulation or basin development. Moreover, less-than-daily or sampling frequencies at a given site may give estimates of annual variation of stream temperatures that are statistically comparable to estimates obtained from a daily or continuous sampling scheme. The latter procedure may result in potential savings of resources in network operations, with negligible loss in information on annual stream-temperature variations. (Woodard -USGS)

  1. Simultaneous temperature and zonal wind measurements in the mesopause region over complete diurnal cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J.; Kawahara, T. D.; Williams, B. P.; Yuan, T.; Li, T.; Xu, L.; Krueger, D. A.; She, C.

    2001-12-01

    Lidar observation of the mesopause region has advanced our understanding of its counter-intuitive thermal structure greatly. Limited 24-hour observation on temperatures have been made, from which not only the profiles of diurnal mean temperature but also of diurnal and semi-diurnal temperature tides may be deduced. Since temperature and wind variations are correlated, their simultaneous observation would provide a more complete and robust understanding of the dynamics in the mesopause region. To this end, based on innovations supported by the CEDAR program, the Colorado State Lidar Group has recently upgraded its Sodium Lidar to a two-beam facility, permitting 24-hour continuous observation, weather permitting. In the month of August, 2001, the lidar was operated in the 3-frequency agile mode, permitting simultaneous temperature and line-of-sight wind measurements, with one beam pointing Zenith and the other pointing 30 degree East of Zenith. Three sets of (30 hours plus each) observations, believed to be the first simultaneous temperature and zonal wind measurement over complete diurnal cycles, have been completed. This paper will present the monthly mean as well as diurnal and semi-diurnal tides of temperature and zonal wind profiles in the mesopause region based on this data set, compare the results to model output, and discuss variability and consistency between observed tidal temperatures and wind.

  2. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  3. Effects of temperature on in situ toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowland, C.D.; Burton, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    With increasing concern over the impacts and perturbations to receiving waters as a result of storm water runoff and contaminated sediments, many investigators have turned towards in situ testing for direct response data. In situ testing has been shown to be an effective assessment tool. In order to further evaluate the limitations of this method, temperature effects were evaluated. There is concern that laboratory to stream transfer of test organisms may induce significant stress if water temperatures are too cool. This study was designed to specifically address the issue of temperature tolerance and attenuation of Hyalella azteca, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Pimephales promelas in in situ conditions. Temperature tolerance is of importance in areas where receiving waters are subject to low or fluctuating temperatures as well as areas of more temperate climates. In this study, the organisms where exposed to temperatures as low as 2 C for variable lengths of time, removed and allowed to come to ambient laboratory temperatures then monitored for acute or chronic responses. No effects on survival were observed after 48 h. at 5 C; however lower temperatures increased mortality.

  4. Thermocouples For High Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-11-01

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding and structural materials. Data are needed to characeterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed htat can survive proposed test conditions. Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project was intiated to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications (see Rempe and Wilkins, 2005). This paper summarizes efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate these specialized thermocouples.

  5. Toward a mechanistic understanding of the damage evolution of SnAgCu solder joints in accelerated thermal cycling test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahin Shirazi, Sam

    Accelerated thermal cycling (ATC) tests are the most commonly used tests for the thermo-mechanical performance assessment of microelectronics assemblies. Currently used reliability models have failed to incorporate the microstructural dependency of lead free solder joint behavior and its microstructure evolution during cycling. Thus, it is essential to have a mechanistic understanding of the effect of cycling parameters on damage evolution and failure of lead free solder joints in ATC. Recrystallization has been identified as the damage rate controlling mechanism in ATC. Usually it takes 1/3 of life for completion of recrystallization regardless of cycling parameters. Thus, the life of the solder joints can be predicted by estimating global recrystallization. The objective of the first part of the study was to examine whether the damage scenario applies in service is the same as the harsh thermal cycling tests (i.e. 0/100 °C and -40/125 °C) commonly used in industry. Microstructure analysis results on a variety of lead free solder SnAgCu assemblies subjected to the both harsh (0/100 °C) and mild (20/80 °C) ATC confirmed similar failure mechanism under the both testing conditions. Sn grain morphology (interlaced versus beach ball) has a significant effect on the thermo-mechanical performance (and thus the model) of the lead free solder joints. The longer thermal cycling lifetime observed in the interlaced solder joints subjected to the ATC compared to the beach ball structure was correlated to the different initial microstructure and the microstructure evolution during cycling. For the modeling proposes, the present study was focused on Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints with either a single Sn grain or beach ball structure. Microstructural analysis results of the simulated thermal cycling experiment revealed that, the life can be approximated as determined by the accumulation of a certain amount of work during the high temperature dwells. Finally the effect of precipitates spacing on acceleration factor was investigated. Results indicated that a smaller initial precipitate spacing would tend to result in a longer life in mild thermal cycling/service (where there is lower stresses). Accordingly, it is essential to incorporate the dependence of damage rate (i.e. recrystallization) on precipitate coarsening in any predictions.

  6. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, F. W.; Palmer, A. J.; Stites, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) for fusion materials irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. The ITV is capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and individual temperature control for up to 15 experiment capsules simultaneously. The test vehicle consists of three In-Pile Tubes (IPTs) running the length of the reactor vessel. These IPTs are kept dry and test trains with integral instrumentation are inserted and removed through a transfer shield plate above the reactor vessel head. The test vehicle is designed to irradiate specimens as large as 2.2 cm in diameter, at temperatures of 250-800°C, achieving neutron damage rates as high as 10 displacements per atom per year. The high fast to thermal neutron flux ratio required for fusion materials testing is accomplished by using an aluminum filler to displace as much water as possible from the flux trap and surrounding the filler piece with a ring of replaceable neutron absorbing material. The gas blend temperature control system remains in place from test to test, thus hardware costs for new tests are limited to the experiment capsule train and integral instrumentation.

  7. Cell cycle oscillators. Temperature compensation of the circadian rhythm of cell division in Euglena.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R W; Laval-Martin, D L; Edmunds, L N

    1985-03-01

    The effects of different constant temperatures ranging from 16 degrees to 32 degrees C on the free-running, circadian rhythm of cell division were examined in axenic, photoautotrophic batch cultures of the unicellular algal flagellate Euglena gracilis Klebs. A comparative study was undertaken on the wild-type (Z strain) and a diuron-(DCMU)-resistant (ZR) strain. Although the overall growth rate (g) of both strains was rather dependent on temperature, lengthening increasingly at temperatures both higher and lower than the optimum range (about 23 degrees-29 degrees C), the free-running period (tau) of the oscillator hypothesized to underlie the overt rhythmicity in the cell division cycle (CDC) was found to be temperature-compensated over at least a 10 degrees C range. The degree of temperature compensation was most striking in the Z strain (Q10 = 1.05) over the permissive temperature interval of 22 degrees-32 degrees C, where periodic growth could occur. This Z strain had a slightly faster growth rate and displayed a higher degree of synchrony than that observed in the ZR strain, whose circadian clock was not as well compensated (Q10 = 1.23) over the permissive temperature interval of 18 degrees-28 degrees C. These results imply that the CDC is regulated by a circadian oscillator sharing the same features as those generating the many other overt biochemical and physiological circadian periodicities that have been documented for Euglena. PMID:3918876

  8. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2004-02-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a ``partial energy conversion'' system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  9. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  10. Thermal cycle test for invar pipe with fixed ends and many welds

    SciTech Connect

    G.W. Foster and Tom Moreland; R.J. Walker

    1998-12-01

    This report discusses some work which was done to help insure the wisdom of using an invar ( 36 % Ni steel) cold tube as the vacuum containment for a transmission line type conductor for magnetizing warm iron for a very large hadron collider. The advantages of invar are that it has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion. The expansion is so low that the transmission line can be built without the use of bellows or other flexible sections, which would result in lower cost and increased reliability. The goal is to test whether the invar pipe can undergo many thermal cycles from 300 K to saturated liquid nitrogen temperature while the ends of the pipe are held fixed. A secondary goal is determine the cryogenic reliability of a large sample of invar welds. Ideally, the strain induced in the invar during a cool down is independent of the total length of the pipe. In a world with errors, such as bending of supports, one gets a more accurate test by using a long pipe. The use of a long pipe reduces the importance of end effects, where the undesirable bending occurs.

  11. Cycle life test. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells. [performance tests on silver zinc batteries, silver cadmium batteries, and nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harkness, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Considerable research is being done to find more efficient and reliable means of starting electrical energy for orbiting satellites. Rechargeable cells offer one such means. A test program is described which has been established in order to further the evaluation of certain types of cells and to obtain performance and failure data as an aid to their continued improvement. The purpose of the program is to determine the cycling performance capabilities of packs of cells under different load and temperature conditions. The various kinds of cells tested were nickel-cadmium, silver-cadmium, and silver-zinc sealed cells. A summary of the results of the life cycling program is given in this report.

  12. Changes in scores on the Mental Rotations Test during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Moody, M S

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine changes in performance on Vandenberg's Mental Rotations Test during the menstrual cycles of college women. Participants were 12 male and 34 female students recruited from undergraduate educational psychology and nursing classes at a large southeastern university. Each woman was tested once during the menstrual phase and once during the luteal phase of her menstrual cycle. Phases in which the testings occurred were counterbalanced. Men were also tested twice. For all participants, the two testing sessions were held exactly 14 days apart. Women who were contraceptive pill users did not perform significantly differently during either phase from women who were nonusers, and there was no interaction for pill use by phase. Therefore, users and nonusers were combined for a paired-sample t test which indicated that women scored significantly higher during the menstrual phase (Days 2-7) than during the luteal phase (Days 16-22 for 31 women and Days 24-26 for three women with longer cycles). The 12 men scored significantly higher than the 34 women during the initial testing; but not significantly higher than the 17 women who were in the menstrual phase during the first testing. Therefore, that the effect of the phase of menstrual cycle influences the sex difference in performance on the Mental Rotations Test was supported. PMID:9172209

  13. Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving VHTR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh

    2006-06-01

    Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase plant net efficiency.

  14. High temperature low-cycle fatigue mechanisms in single crystals of nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W.; Jayaraman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty three high temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200. Tests were conducted at 760 and 870 C. SEM fractography and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine mechanisms responsible for the observed orientation dependent fatigue behavior. It has been concluded that the plastic characteristics of the alloy lead to orientation-dependent strain hardening and fatigue lives at 760 C. At 870 C, the elastic characteristics of the alloy dominated the behavior, even though the plastic strain ranges were about the same as they were at 760 C. This led to orientation-dependent fatigue lives, but the trends were not the same as they were at 760 C.

  15. Non contact mechanical testing at high temperature using electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangireddy, Sindhura

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTCs) recently captured interest as potential materials for reusable thermal protection systems and other components in future generation supersonic and hypersonic vehicles where temperatures can reach > 2000 °C. A novel method for mechanical testing of UHTCs at such ultra high temperatures is developed utilizing electromagnetic force. Resistively heated and self-supported specimens in thin ribbon geometry under application of a transverse magnetic field undergo flexural stress from the electromagnetic Lorentz forces, which act as a distributed mechanical load and deform the specimen. This non-contact technique, termed Electro-Magnetic Mechanical Apparatus (EMMA), allows performing rapid tests in a low cost table-top apparatus at temperatures, as high as 2200 °C, otherwise impossible to achieve. The flexibility of this method offers ample opportunity to explore a wide range of mechanical properties. For example utilizing a DC current for resistive heating with a DC magnetic field creates constant loads for Creep testing; replacing with a AC current generates cyclic loads for Fatigue testing; larger magnetic fields can be used for Fast -- Fracture experiments; and impulse excitation of the magnetic field vibrates the specimens and enables the determination of the material's Elastic and Loss Modulus. Zirconium Diboride and Silicon Carbide (ZrB2-SiC) is a prominent member of UHTCs. The creep properties of this composite are explored using this technique in the temperature range 1600 -- 2200 °C under stress ranging from 20 -- 50 MPa in ambient air as well as non-reactive Nitrogen atmosphere. The kinetic parameters of creep, activation energy and stress exponent are established in the testing range. The creep response from the two environments is compared to understand the effect of the concomitant oxidation during high temperature testing in air. Comparison of creep data from conventional 3-pt, 4-pt flexure tests corroborate the results obtained from EMMA and validate the use of the technique to obtain comparable creep rates.

  16. Combined cycle electric power plant with feedforward afterburner temperature setpoint control

    SciTech Connect

    Uram, R.

    1982-06-08

    A combined cycle electric power plant includes gas and steam turbines and a steam generator for recovering the heat in the exhaust gases exited from the gas turbine and for using the recovered heat to produce and supply steam to the steam turbine. The steam generator includes a superheater tube through which a fluid, e.g. water, is directed to be additionally heated into superheated steam by the exhaust gas turbine gases. An afterburner further heats the exhaust gas turbine gases passed to the superheater tube. The temperature of the gas turbine exhaust gases is sensed for varying the fuel flow to the afterburner by a fuel valve, whereby the temperatures of the gas turbine exhaust gases and therefore of the superheated steam, are controlled. The afterburner fuel flow is controlled through a feedforward setpoint signal derived as a predetermined function of sensed gas turbine exhaust temperature.

  17. The temperature of quiescent streamers during solar cycles 23 and 24

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Testa, P.

    2014-05-20

    Recent in-situ determinations of the temporal evolution of the charge state distribution in the fast and slow solar wind have shown a general decrease in the degree of ionization of all the elements in the solar wind along solar cycles 23 and 24. Such a decrease has been interpreted as a cooling of the solar corona which occurred during the decline and minimum phase of solar cycle 23 from 2000 to 2010. In the present work, we investigate whether spectroscopic determinations of the temperature of the quiescent streamers show signatures of coronal plasma cooling during cycles 23 and 24. We measure the coronal electron density and thermal structure at the base of 60 quiescent streamers observed from 1996 to 2013 by SOHO/SUMER and Hinode/EIS and find that both quantities do now show any significant dependence on the solar cycle. We argue that if the slow solar wind is accelerated from the solar photosphere or chromosphere, the measured decrease in the in-situ wind charge state distribution might be due to an increased efficiency in the wind acceleration mechanism at low altitudes. If the slow wind originates from the corona, a combination of density and wind acceleration changes may be responsible for the in-situ results.

  18. Low-temperature behaviour of haematite: susceptibility and magnetization increase on cycling through the Morin transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Cor B.; Mullender, Tom A. T.; Dekkers, Mark J.

    2001-07-01

    It has been realized previously (e.g. Borradaile 1994) that cycling through the Morin transition (Tm, occurring in ideal α-Fe2O3 at -10°C) may have implications for the NRM of some haematite-bearing rocks. We investigate the behaviour of the low-field susceptibility (χlf), several magnetizations (in fields of 5, 25, 100 and 1600mT) and SIRM on cycling through Tm of several well-characterized haematite types of varying crystallinity and particle shape. Before low-temperature treatment, χlf of the haematites varied between ~ 40 and ~ 235×10-8m3kg-1. Below Tm, where only haematite's defect moment resides, χlf was much more uniform at ~ 19 to ~ 28×10-8m3kg-1. After return to room temperature, increases in χlf of up to ~ 50 per cent were observed (when cycling in the Earth's magnetic field as well as in a field-free space), inferred to be a function of the domain state of the haematite. This was shown for one of the haematites (LH2 which occurs as small platelets and is particularly well crystalline) where a relation y=(8.60+/-1.01)ln(x)-2.98 was obtained, where x is the grain size (µm) and y is the percentage susceptibility increase. We suggest that transdomain changes induce the change in χlf. The nucleation of (additional) domain walls in `metastable' single-domain (SD) to pseudo-single-domain (PSD) grains is made possible by the low anisotropy at the Morin transition. In view of this mechanism, small stable SD haematite particles would not be affected and the grain size corresponding to y=0 (~1.5µm for LH2) would represent the `real' SD threshold size. Thermal cycling to over the Curie temperature (680°C) is needed to return to the original domain state before the LT treatment, as expressed by a return to the original χlf values. Measuring χlf between alternating field (AF) demagnetization steps shows that AF demagnetization gradually removes the χlf increase, which appears to be soft; 30mT is sufficient to erase 90 per cent. Thermal cycling in a 5mT field between temperatures above Tm showed that irreversible changes in domain structure are noticeable before the isotropic point is passed. After cycling, magnetization is added to PSD and multidomain (MD) grains that intriguingly appears to be remanence, probably induced by the broadening and subsequent irreversible displacement of loosely pinned domain walls. Complete cycling through the isotropic point considerably enhances the new remanence component in `metastable' SD to MD particles by an increase in the number of domains. If this behaviour can be extrapolated to the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field, this would imply that large `metastable' SD to MD specularite crystals with a well-developed Morin transition are susceptible to acquiring geologically irrelevant remanence components when subjected to low ambient temperatures. Fine-grained haematite pigment, on the other hand, would not be affected. Thermal demagnetization alone would not be able to separate these two remanences as the new domain structure persists up to close to the Curie temperature. Our findings indicate that a cleaning procedure consisting of an initial AF step followed by stepwise thermal demagnetization is preferable in order to isolate the original remanence component properly in haematite-bearing rocks.

  19. Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, O.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better blade cooling technology in topping cycle and enhanced heat recovery in bottoming cycle. The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperatures (TITs) of both gas turbine and steam turbine. Literature review shows that a combined cycle with transpiration cooled gas turbine has not been analyzed with varying gas/steam TITs. In view of above the present study has been undertaken for thermodynamic study of gas/steam combined cycle with respect to variation in TIT in both topping and bottoming cycles, for air transpiration cooled gas turbine. The performance of combined cycle with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator has been evaluated for different cycle pressure ratios (CPRs) varying from 11 to 23 and the selection diagrams presented for TIT varying from 1,600 to 1,900 K. Both the cycle efficiency and specific work increase with TIT for each pressure ratio. For each TIT there exists an optimum pressure ratio for cycle efficiency and specific work. For the CPR of 23 the best cycle performance is seen at a TIT of 1,900 K for maximum steam temperature of 570 °C, which gives the cycle efficiency of 60.9 % with net specific work of 909 kJ/kg.

  20. Modeling of Temperature Conditions Between Temperature Artifact and Black Test Corner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beges, G.

    2011-12-01

    The case study in this article is temperature condition modeling between a temperature artifact and a black test corner measuring instrument. The black test corner is an instrument which consists of two wooden walls and a floor, with build-in thermocouples fixed on the back side of the copper disks. The front of the disk is flush with the surface of the board. The black test corner is used for measuring how the temperature of a household appliance is influencing the surroundings in the real environment, e.g., in the kitchen, the living room, etc. The temperature artifact as presented in this article is a specially developed heating plate which is very stable and can be set to different temperatures. Technical standards for conformity assessment usually describe only what should be measured, in some cases also how accurate the measurement should be, but not what kind of measuring instrument should be used. Therefore, it sometimes happens that measurements are performed with improper equipment or in an improper way. For the same level of appliance conformance testing, laboratories shall use the same testing procedures and comparable measuring instruments. This article deals with the analysis of influencing parameters when measuring the temperature rise using the black test corner. Modeling of temperature conditions between a temperature artifact and a black test corner, using commercial modeling software, was performed to find out whether this modeling can be used for detailed evaluation of all possible influencing parameters of the mentioned testing procedure. A scheme and a list of influencing parameters that has to be modeled in the following research is prepared to arrange an optimal experiment.

  1. Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu

    2011-05-01

    In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

  2. Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu

    2011-05-04

    In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

  3. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  4. Brayton-Cycle Heat Recovery System Characterization Program. Glass-furnace facility test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-29

    The test plan for development of a system to recover waste heat and produce electricity and preheated combustion air from the exhaust gases of an industrial glass furnace is described. The approach is to use a subatmospheric turbocompressor in a Brayton-cycle system. The operational furnace test requirements, the operational furnace environment, and the facility design approach are discussed. (MCW)

  5. USER'S GUIDE FOR CONDUCTING LIFE-CYCLE CHRONIC TOXICITY TESTS WITH FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper represents the latest 'state-of-the-art' procedural guide for conducting life-cycle chronic toxicity tests with fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). These new procedures are based on recent evaluations of published toxicity tests and methods used by aquatic toxicologi...

  6. Control of continuous irradiation injury on potatoes with daily temperature cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Bennett, S. M.; Cao, W.

    1990-01-01

    Two controlled-environment experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature fluctuations under continuous irradiation on growth and tuberization of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Kennebec and Superior. These cultivars had exhibited chlorotic and stunted growth under continuous irradiation and constant temperatures. The plants were grown for 4 weeks in the first experiment and for 6 weeks in the second experiment. Each experiment was conducted under continuous irradiation of 400 micromoles per square meter per second of photosynthetic photon flux and included two temperature treatments: constant 18 degrees C and fluctuating 22 degrees C/14 degrees C on a 12-hour cycle. A common vapor pressure deficit of 0.62 kilopascal was maintained at all temperatures. Plants under constant 18 degrees C were stunted and had chlorotic and abscised leaves and essentially no tuber formation. Plants grown under the fluctuating temperature treatment developed normally, were developing tubers, and had a fivefold or greater total dry weight as compared with those under the constant temperature. These results suggest that a thermoperiod can allow normal plant growth and tuberization in potato cultivars that are unable to develop effectively under continuous irradiation.

  7. Control of continuous irradiation injury on potatoes with daily temperature cycling.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T W; Bennett, S M; Cao, W

    1990-01-01

    Two controlled-environment experiments were conducted to determine the effects of temperature fluctuations under continuous irradiation on growth and tuberization of two potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars, Kennebec and Superior. These cultivars had exhibited chlorotic and stunted growth under continuous irradiation and constant temperatures. The plants were grown for 4 weeks in the first experiment and for 6 weeks in the second experiment. Each experiment was conducted under continuous irradiation of 400 micromoles per square meter per second of photosynthetic photon flux and included two temperature treatments: constant 18 degrees C and fluctuating 22 degrees C/14 degrees C on a 12-hour cycle. A common vapor pressure deficit of 0.62 kilopascal was maintained at all temperatures. Plants under constant 18 degrees C were stunted and had chlorotic and abscised leaves and essentially no tuber formation. Plants grown under the fluctuating temperature treatment developed normally, were developing tubers, and had a fivefold or greater total dry weight as compared with those under the constant temperature. These results suggest that a thermoperiod can allow normal plant growth and tuberization in potato cultivars that are unable to develop effectively under continuous irradiation. PMID:11537703

  8. A short life-cycle test with the epibenthic copepod Nitocra spinipes for sediment toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Perez-Landa, Victor; Simpson, Stuart L

    2011-06-01

    A new short life-cycle test methodology is presented to evaluate sublethal effects of contaminated sediments to the harpacticoid copepod species Nitocra spinipes. The method combines a 4-d survival-gravidity test with a 7-d development test. For water-only Cu exposures, the sensitivity of the development test endpoints were compared with tests using nonexposed gravid females to initiate the 7-d development test phase, and also with a multiple generation test comprising three successive phases: 9-d development; 21-d survival-gravidity; second-generation 9-d development. The results indicated that the development endpoints were the most sensitive, with median effective concentration (EC50) values of 95 µg Cu/L for nauplii/gravid female and 101 µg Cu/L copepodites/gravid female endpoints, followed by the gravidity (144 µg Cu/L) and survival (347 µg Cu/L). The sensitivity of the short life-cycle test endpoints was similar to the multiple-generation test endpoints, and the shorter test had less variability in controls. The multiple-generation test showed a large amount of stimulation of reproduction and development at Cu concentrations of 50 to 100 µg/L. The suitability of the short life-cycle test for assessing sediment toxicity was demonstrated using Cu-spiked and naturally contaminated whole sediments. Although the small nauplii were more difficult to isolate from sediments, the small amounts of sediments used for the tests and the large effects of the contaminated sediments on nauplii and copepodite numbers resulted in significant differences to controls. For sediment exposures, the sensitivity of the endpoints was in the order development > gravidity > survival. The short life-cycle test was demonstrated to detect, within 11 d of exposure, similar levels of effects on reproduction and development to those detected using a 39-d multiple-generation exposure. PMID:21360580

  9. Preliminary tests of an advanced high-temperature combustion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wear, J. D.; Trout, A. M.; Smith, J. M.; Jacobs, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion system has been developed to operate efficiently and with good durability at inlet pressures to 4.05 MPa (40 atm), inlet air temperatures to 900 K, and exhaust gas temperatures to 2480 K. A preliminary investigation of this system was conducted at inlet pressures to 0.94 MPa (9 atm), a nominal inlet air temperature of 560 K, and exhaust gas temperatures to 2135 K. A maximum combustion efficiency of 98.5 percent was attained at a fuel-air ratio of 0.033; the combustion efficiency decreased to about 90 percent as the fuel-air ratio was increased to 0.058. An average liner metal temperature of 915 K, 355 kelvins greater than the nominal inlet air temperature, was reached with an average exhaust gas temperature of 2090 K. The maximum local metal temperature at this condition was about 565 kelvins above the nominal inlet air temperature and decreased to 505 kelvins above with increasing combustor pressure. Tests to determine the isothermal total pressure loss of the combustor showed a liner loss of 1.1 percent and a system loss of 6.5 percent.

  10. The sleep-wake cycle and motor activity, but not temperature, are disrupted over the light-dark cycle in mice genetically depleted of serotonin.

    PubMed

    Solarewicz, Julia Z; Angoa-Perez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M; Mateika, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role that serotonin has in the modulation of sleep and wakefulness across a 12-h:12-h light-dark cycle and determined whether temperature and motor activity are directly responsible for potential disruptions to arousal state. Telemetry transmitters were implanted in 24 wild-type mice (Tph2(+/+)) and 24 mice with a null mutation for tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2(-/-)). After surgery, electroencephalography, core body temperature, and motor activity were recorded for 24 h. Temperature for a given arousal state (quiet and active wake, non-rapid eye movement, and paradoxical sleep) was similar in the Tph2(+/+) and Tph2(-/-) mice across the light-dark cycle. The percentage of time spent in active wakefulness, along with motor activity, was decreased in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice at the start and end of the dark cycle. This difference persisted into the light cycle. In contrast, the time spent in a given arousal state was similar at the remaining time points. Despite this similarity, periods of non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and wakefulness were less consolidated in the Tph2(+/+) compared with the Tph2(-/-) mice throughout the light-dark cycle. We conclude that the depletion of serotonin does not disrupt the diurnal variation in the sleep-wake cycle, motor activity, and temperature. However, serotonin may suppress photic and nonphotic inputs that manifest at light-dark transitions and serve to shorten the ultraradian duration of wakefulness and non-rapid-eye-movement sleep. Finally, alterations in the sleep-wake cycle following depletion of serotonin are unrelated to disruptions in the modulation of temperature. PMID:25394829

  11. Description of a system for interlocking elevated temperature mechanical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Schmale, D.T.; Poulter, G.A.

    1995-07-01

    Long term mechanical creep and fatigue testing at elevated temperatures requires reliable systems with safeguards to prevent destruction of equipment, loss of data and negative environmental impacts. Toward this goal, a computer controlled system has been developed and built for interlocking tests run on elevated temperature mechanical test facilities. Sensors for water flow, water pressure, water leakage, temperature, power and hydraulic status are monitored to control specimen heating equipment through solid state relays and water solenoid valves. The system is designed to work with the default interlocks present in the RF generators and mechanical tests systems. Digital hardware consists of two National Instruments 1/0 boards mounted in a Macintosh IIci computer. Software is written in National Instruments LabVIEW. Systems interlocked include two MTS closed loop servo controlled hydraulic test frames, one with an RF generator and one with both an RF generator and a quartz lamp furnace. Control for individual test systems is modularized making the addition of more systems simple. If any of the supporting utilities fail during tests, heating systems, chill water and hydraulics are powered down, minimizing specimen damage and eliminating equipment damage. The interlock control is powered by an uninterruptible power supply. Upon failure the cause is documented in an ASCII file.

  12. Test pixels for high-temperature infrared scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredricksen, Christopher J.; Calhoun, Seth; Trewick, Stephen; Coffey, Aubrey; Dein, Edward; Coffey, Kevin R.; Peale, Robert E.; LaVeigne, Joseph D.; Franks, Gregory; Danielson, Tom; Lannon, John M.; Goodwin, Scott H.

    2015-05-01

    High pixel temperatures for IR scene projector arrays face materials challenges of oxidation, diffusion, and recrystallization. For cost effective development of new high-temperature materials, we have designed and fabricated simplified pixels for testing. These consist of resistive elements, traces, and bond pads sandwiched between dielectric layers on Si wafers. Processing involves a pad exposure etch, a pixel outline etch, and an undercut etch to thermally isolate the resistive element from the substrate. Test pixels were successfully fabricated by electron-beam lithography using a combination of wet and dry etching.

  13. Connecting Atlantic temperature variability and biological cycling in two earth system models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, Anand; Dunne, John P.; Msadek, Rym

    2014-05-01

    Connections between the interdecadal variability in North Atlantic temperatures and biological cycling have been widely hypothesized. However, it is unclear whether such connections are due to small changes in basin-averaged temperatures indicated by the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) Index, or whether both biological cycling and the AMO index are causally linked to changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). We examine interdecadal variability in the annual and month-by-month diatom biomass in two Earth System Models with the same formulations of atmospheric, land, sea ice and ocean biogeochemical dynamics but different formulations of ocean physics and thus different AMOC structures and variability. In the isopycnal-layered ESM2G, strong interdecadal changes in surface salinity associated with changes in AMOC produce spatially heterogeneous variability in convection, nutrient supply and thus diatom biomass. These changes also produce changes in ice cover, shortwave absorption and temperature and hence the AMO Index. Off West Greenland, these changes are consistent with observed changes in fisheries and support climate as a causal driver. In the level-coordinate ESM2M, nutrient supply is much higher and interdecadal changes in diatom biomass are much smaller in amplitude and not strongly linked to the AMO index.

  14. Temperature cycling periods affect growth and tuberization in potatoes under continuous irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Plants of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars Denali, Norland, Haig and Kennebec were grown for 42 days under three temperature cycling periods (thermoperiods) with continuous irradiation in two repeated experiments to help determine if temperature cycling might be varied to optimize tuber development of potatoes in controlled environments. Thermoperiods of 6/6 hours, 12/12 hours and 24/24 hours were established with the same temperature change of 22/14C and same controlled vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa. The thermoperiod of 24/24 hours significantly promoted tuber initiation but slowed tuber enlargement in all four cultivars, compared to the thermoperiods of 6/6 hours and 12/12 hours. Denali' produced the highest tuber and total dry weights under the 6/6 hours thermoperiod. Kennebec' produced the highest tuber dry weight under the 12/12 hours thermoperiod. Thermoperiods had no significant effect on shoot and root dry weights of any cultivars. The major effect of thermoperiods was on initiation and enlargement of tubers.

  15. North atlantic deepwater temperature change during late pliocene and late quaternary climatic cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, G.S.; Cronin, T. M.; Baker, P.A.; Raymo, M.E.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.; Correge, T.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) in fossil ostracodes from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 in the deep North Atlantic show that the change in bottom water temperature during late Pliocene 41,000-year obliquity cycles averaged 1.5??C between 3.2 and 2.8 million years ago (Ma) and increased to 2.3??C between 2.8 and 2.3 Ma, coincidentally with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. During the last two 100,000-year glacial-to-interglacial climatic cycles of the Quaternary, bottom water temperatures changed by 4.5??C. These results show that glacial deepwater cooling has intensified since 3.2 Ma, most likely as the result of progressively diminished deep-water production in the North Atlantic and of the greater influence of Antarctic bottom water in the North Atlantic during glacial periods. The ostracode Mg/Ca data also allow the direct determination of the temperature component of the benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope record from Site 607, as well as derivation of a hypothetical sea-level curve for the late Pliocene and late Quaternary. The effects of dissolution on the Mg/Ca ratios of ostracode shells appear to have been minimal.

  16. North Atlantic deepwater temperature change during late pliocene and late quaternary climatic cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, G.S.; Baker, P.A.; Cronin, T.M.

    1995-11-24

    Variations in the ratio of magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) in fossil ostracodes from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 in the deep North Atlantic show that the change in bottom water temperature during late Pliocene 41,000-year obliquity cycles averaged 1.5{degrees}C between 3.2 and 2.8 million years ago (Ma) and increased to 2.3{degrees}C between 2.8 and 2.3 Ma, coincidentally with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. During the last two 100,000-year glacial-to-interglacial climatic cycles of the Quaternary, bottom water temperatures changed by 4.5{degrees}C. These results show that glacial deepwater cooling has intensified since 3.2 Ma, most likely as the result of progressively diminished deepwater production in the North Atlantic and of the greater influence of Antarctic bottom water in the North Atlantic during glacial periods. The ostracode Mg/Ca data also allow the direct determination of the temperature component of the benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope record from Site 607, as well as derivation of a hypothetical sea-level curve for the late Pliocene and late Quaternary. The effects of dissolution on the Mg/Ca ratios of ostracode shells appear to have been minimal. 49 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Brayton cycle heat exchanger and duct assembly (HXDA, preliminary design and technology tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, M. G.; Morse, C. J.; Graves, R. F.; Gibson, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary design of the heat exchanger and duct assembly (HXDA) for a 60 kwe, closed loop, Brayton cycle space power system is presented. This system is weight optimized within the constraints imposed by the defined structural and operational requirements. Also presented are the results of several small scale tests, directed to obtaining specific design data and/or the resolution of a design approach for long life Brayton cycle heat exchanger systems.

  18. Heat exchanger temperature response for duty-cycle transients in the NGNP/HTE.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-12

    Control system studies were performed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) interfaced to the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) plant. Temperature change and associated thermal stresses are important factors in determining plant lifetime. In the NGNP the design objective of a 40 year lifetime for the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) in particular is seen as a challenge. A control system was designed to minimize temperature changes in the IHX and more generally at all high-temperature locations in the plant for duty-cycle transients. In the NGNP this includes structures at the reactor outlet and at the inlet to the turbine. This problem was approached by identifying those high-level factors that determine temperature rates of change. First are the set of duty cycle transients over which the control engineer has little control but which none-the-less must be addressed. Second is the partitioning of the temperature response into a quasi-static component and a transient component. These two components are largely independent of each other and when addressed as such greater understanding of temperature change mechanisms and how to deal with them is achieved. Third is the manner in which energy and mass flow rates are managed. Generally one aims for a temperature distribution that minimizes spatial non-uniformity of thermal expansion in a component with time. This is can be achieved by maintaining a fixed spatial temperature distribution in a component during transients. A general rule of thumb for heat exchangers is to maintain flow rate proportional to thermal power. Additionally the product of instantaneous flow rate and heat capacity should be maintained the same on both sides of the heat exchanger. Fourth inherent mechanisms for stable behavior should not be compromised by active controllers that can introduce new feedback paths and potentially create under-damped response. Applications of these principles to the development of a plant control strategy for the reference NGNP/HTE plant can be found in the body of this report. The outcome is an integrated plant/control system design. The following conclusions are drawn from the analysis: (1) The plant load schedule can be managed to maintain near-constant hot side temperatures over the load range in both the nuclear and chemical plant. (2) The reactor open-loop response is inherently stable resulting mainly from a large Doppler temperature coefficient compared to the other reactivity temperature feedbacks. (3) The typical controller used to manage reactor power production to maintain reactor outlet temperature at a setpoint introduces a feedback path that tends to destabilize reactor power production in the NGNP. (4) A primary loop flow controller that forces primary flow to track PCU flow rate is effective in minimizing spatial temperature differentials within the IHX. (5) Inventory control in both the primary and PCU system during ramp load change transients is an effective means of maintaining high NGNP thermal efficiency while at reduced electric load. (6) Turbine bypass control is an effective means for responding to step changes in generator load when equipment capacity limitations prevent inventory control from being effective. (7) Turbine bypass control is effective in limiting PCU shaft over speed for the loss of generator load upset event. (8) The proposed control strategy is effective in limiting time variation of the differential spatial temperature distribution in the IHX during transients. Essentially the IHX can be made to behave in a manner where each point in the IHX experiences approximately the same temperature rate of change during a transient. (9) The stability of the closed-loop Brayton cycle was found to be sensitive to where one operates on the turbo-machine performance maps. There are competing interests: more stable operation means operating on the curves at points that reduce overall cycle efficiency. Future work should address in greater detail elements that came to light in the course of this work. Specifically: (1) A stability analysis should be performed to identify the phenomena that control reactor outlet temperature stability when operating with the Reactor Outlet Temperature Controller. The goal is to identify a better performing controller. (2) Future simulations should be performed with multiple axial nodes. The single axial node model for the core used in this work gives rise to an initial core reactor outlet temperature perturbation that is a numerical artifact. (3) The tradeoffs referred to above regarding the dependence of Brayton cycle stability and efficiency on performance curve characteristics and use need to be better understood. (4) The role of xenon was neglected in this work and needs to be included in future work.

  19. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  20. Predicting Seasonal Cycles of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide from Global Temperature Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangborn, W. V.

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in the concentration of atmospheric CO2 are produced by the growth and decay of vegetation in the biosphere, which is controlled by global temperature variations. A major change in the atmosphere-biosphere link, which occurred during the 1977-78 climate shift, is manifested by greater sensitivity of the daily change in CO2 to global temperature variations. The underlying cause for the change is thought to be higher sea-surface temperatures, which reduced the effectiveness of the oceans as a carbon sink, resulting in a critical change in the interaction between temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide. To examine the interaction, maximum and minimum daily temperature anomalies compiled by the Hadley Climate Center at 3000 global weather stations for 1950-2008, are used to predict daily changes in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide observations. Daily changes in atmospheric CO2 are derived from the monthly record of observations collected at Mauna Loa, Hawaii since 1958. During the past 50 years there has been a significant change in the influence of maximum and minimum temperature anomalies on the daily change in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Prior to the 1976-77 climate-shift, the correlation between daily changes in atmospheric CO2 and the temperature range for a single year are mostly positive (above normal temperatures tend to cause the daily change in atmospheric CO2 to be positive), while after 1978 correlations are strongly negative (above normal temperatures cause CO2 changes to become more negative). Figure 1 shows the dependency of the probable error on the correlation when determining the daily change in CO2 from temperature. Each point represents one year of regressing daily values. Generally, correlations are positive before the climate shift and negative after the shift. The exceptions are the eruptions of El Chichon in 1982 and Mt Pinatubo in 1991, which greatly weakened the CO2-temperature link for 4-5 years following each eruption by reducing both the growth and decay rates of vegetation. Observed versus simulated seasonal cycles of CO2 (the Keeling Curve) based on global temperature observations produce R2 as high as 0.90 for some years after 1978. Figure 1. Relationship of probable error and correlation when regressing daily change in atmospheric CO2 and temperature anomlies..

  1. Quantitative determination of the effect of temperature on mudstone decay during wet-dry cycles: A case study of 'purple mudstone' from south-western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Anqiang; Wang, Xuemei; Liu, Gangcai

    2015-10-01

    Although temperature is considered a key factor influencing rock decay, little is known about the quantitative relationship between a rock's decay rate and temperature, which makes it difficult to quantitatively predict the rate of rock decay under varied temperature during wetting-drying cycle conditions. Thus, the aim of the present paper was to observe the decay rate of various purple mudstones and to develop a model with which to calculate their decay rates under varied temperature conditions. Three types of purple mudstone were sampled from the Tuodian group (J3t), Matoushan group (K2m) and Lufeng group (J1l), located in the Chuxiong district of Yunnan province, south-western China. All samples were manually cut into cubes of 50 × 50 × 50 mm, before being subjected to 39 wetting-drying cycles in a 2 mm sieve under artificial constant temperature, natural daily temperature variation and artificial temperature alternation (minimum and maximum) treatments in the laboratory. Decay rates were calculated by weighing the mass remaining in the sieve after each treatment cycle. The results showed that the decay rates of the tested rocks rose with an increase in temperature and temperature difference (maximum-minimum), with the rank order of decay rate being J3t > K2m > J1l. Quantitative analysis revealed rock decay rate to be significantly related to temperature by a power function, and exponentially related to temperature difference. Our results suggested that temperature difference has a stronger effect on purple mudstone decay than that of temperature magnitude during the wetting-drying processes.

  2. Design and optimization of organic rankine cycle for low temperature geothermal power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barse, Kirtipal A.

    Rising oil prices and environmental concerns have increased attention to renewable energy. Geothermal energy is a very attractive source of renewable energy. Although low temperature resources (90°C to 150°C) are the most common and most abundant source of geothermal energy, they were not considered economical and technologically feasible for commercial power generation. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) technology makes it feasible to use low temperature resources to generate power by using low boiling temperature organic liquids. The first hypothesis for this research is that using ORC is technologically and economically feasible to generate electricity from low temperature geothermal resources. The second hypothesis for this research is redesigning the ORC system for the given resource condition will improve efficiency along with improving economics. ORC model was developed using process simulator and validated with the data obtained from Chena Hot Springs, Alaska. A correlation was observed between the critical temperature of the working fluid and the efficiency for the cycle. Exergy analysis of the cycle revealed that the highest exergy destruction occurs in evaporator followed by condenser, turbine and working fluid pump for the base case scenarios. Performance of ORC was studied using twelve working fluids in base, Internal Heat Exchanger and turbine bleeding constrained and non-constrained configurations. R601a, R245ca, R600 showed highest first and second law efficiency in the non-constrained IHX configuration. The highest net power was observed for R245ca, R601a and R601 working fluids in the non-constrained base configuration. Combined heat exchanger area and size parameter of the turbine showed an increasing trend as the critical temperature of the working fluid decreased. The lowest levelized cost of electricity was observed for R245ca followed by R601a, R236ea in non-constrained base configuration. The next best candidates in terms of LCOE were R601a, R245ca and R600 in non-constrained IHX configuration. LCOE is dependent on net power and higher net power favors to lower the cost of electricity. Overall R245ca, R601, R601a, R600 and R236ea show better performance among the fluids studied. Non constrained configurations display better performance compared to the constrained configurations. Base non-constrained offered the highest net power and lowest LCOE.

  3. Aquarius Reflector Surface Temperature Monitoring Test and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Jamie; Lee, Siu-Chun; Becker, Ray

    2008-01-01

    The presentation addresses how to infer the front side temperatures for the Aquarius L-band reflector based upon backside measurement sites. Slides discussing the mission objectives and design details are at the same level found on typical project outreach websites and in conference papers respectively. The test discussion provides modest detail of an ordinary thermal balance test using mockup hardware. The photographs show an off-Lab vacuum chamber facility with no compromising details.

  4. Triaxial testing of polymer concrete materials under different temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Salami, M.R.; Zhao, S.

    1995-06-01

    Since polymer mortar materials are used in construction, there is a need for an accurate material model to predict the behavior of the materials under various loading conditions. To make use of a material failure model, it is necessary to determine the material constants by conducting laboratory tests on material specimens. To find the constants for a failure model the material will be subjected to static load testing at different temperatures and loading rates.

  5. Study of a Liquid Plug-Flow Thermal Cycling Technique Using a Temperature Gradient-Based Actuator

    PubMed Central

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-use thermal cycling for performing rapid and small-volume DNA amplification on a single chip has attracted great interest in the area of rapid field detection of biological agents. For this purpose, as a more practical alternative to conventional continuous flow thermal cycling, liquid plug-flow thermal cycling utilizes a thermal gradient generated in a serpentine rectangular flow microchannel as an actuator. The transit time and flow speed of the plug flow varied drastically in each temperature zone due to the difference in the tension at the interface between temperature gradients. According to thermal distribution analyses in microfluidics, the plug flow allowed for a slow heating process, but a fast cooling process. The thermal cycle of the microfluid was consistent with the recommended temperature gradient for PCR. Indeed, amplification efficiency of the plug flow was superior to continuous flow PCR, and provided an impressive improvement over previously-reported flow microchannel thermal cycling techniques. PMID:25350508

  6. Study of a liquid plug-flow thermal cycling technique using a temperature gradient-based actuator.

    PubMed

    Fuchiwaki, Yusuke; Nagai, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-use thermal cycling for performing rapid and small-volume DNA amplification on a single chip has attracted great interest in the area of rapid field detection of biological agents. For this purpose, as a more practical alternative to conventional continuous flow thermal cycling, liquid plug-flow thermal cycling utilizes a thermal gradient generated in a serpentine rectangular flow microchannel as an actuator. The transit time and flow speed of the plug flow varied drastically in each temperature zone due to the difference in the tension at the interface between temperature gradients. According to thermal distribution analyses in microfluidics, the plug flow allowed for a slow heating process, but a fast cooling process. The thermal cycle of the microfluid was consistent with the recommended temperature gradient for PCR. Indeed, amplification efficiency of the plug flow was superior to continuous flow PCR, and provided an impressive improvement over previously-reported flow microchannel thermal cycling techniques. PMID:25350508

  7. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  8. Heat recovery steam generator outlet temperature control system for a combined cycle power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, A.; Myers, G.A.; McCarty, W.L.; Wescott, K.R.

    1986-04-01

    This patent describes a command cycle electrical power plant including: a steam turbine and at least one set comprising a gas turbine, an afterburner and a heat recovery steam generator having an attemperator for supplying from an outlet thereof to the steam turbine superheated steam under steam turbine operating conditions requiring predetermined superheated steam temperature, flow and pressure; with the gas turbine and steam turbine each generating megawatts in accordance with a plant load demand; master control means being provided for controlling the steam turbine and the heat recovery steam generator so as to establish the steam operating conditions; the combination of: first control means responsive to the gas inlet temperature of the heat recovery steam generator and to the plant load demand for controlling the firing of the afterburner; second control means responsive to the superheated steam predetermined temperature and to superheated steam temperature from the outlet for controlling the attemperator between a closed and an open position; the first and second control means being operated concurrently to maintain the superheated steam outlet temperature while controlling the load of the gas turbine independently of the steam turbine operating conditions.

  9. Treadmill and Cycle Ergometer Tests are Interchangeable to Monitor Triathletes Annual Training

    PubMed Central

    Basset, Fabien A.; Boulay, Marcel R.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify the use of a single test to obtain annual training guidelines applicable to multiple modes of training. Eight triathletes (4 females, 4 males) were tested 3 times during their training year (Phase I; Phase II; Phase III) on a treadmill and cycle ergometer. Cardio-respiratory variables were calculated at standardized percentages of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max; 50-100%). VO2max differences between tests reached 6% in every testing session (p ≤ 0.01). VO2max was stable for both tests throughout the season. The ANOVA (3 phases x 2 tests x 6 intensities) demonstrated that there was a significant difference for heart rate (HRs; p ≤ 0.05) between tests in Phase I only. However, the nonparametric sign test did not show any significant differences in any phase. These results demonstrated that triathletes could use the relationship between HR and % VO2max collected during a treadmill or a cycle ergometer test to obtain interchangeable reference HRs for monitoring their running and cycling training bouts in high volume and/or high intensity phases of their training year. PMID:24627663

  10. 42 CFR 84.98 - Tests during low temperature operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tests during low temperature operation. 84.98 Section 84.98 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES...

  11. Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle Zero Power Physics Tests Analysis with VERA-CS

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, Jess C; Godfrey, Andrew T; Evans, Thomas M; Hamilton, Steven P; Francheschini, F.

    2014-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications, including a core simulation capability called VERA-CS. A key milestone for this endeavor is to validate VERA against measurements from operating nuclear power reactors. The first step in validation against plant data is to determine the ability of VERA to accurately simulate the initial startup physics tests for Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (WBN1) cycle 1. VERA-CS calculations were performed with the Insilico code developed at ORNL using cross section processing from the SCALE system and the transport capabilities within the Denovo transport code using the SPN method. The calculations were performed with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections in 252 groups (collapsed to 23 groups for the 3D transport solution). The key results of the comparison of calculations with measurements include initial criticality, control rod worth critical configurations, control rod worth, differential boron worth, and isothermal temperature reactivity coefficient (ITC). The VERA results for these parameters show good agreement with measurements, with the exception of the ITC, which requires additional investigation. Results are also compared to those obtained with Monte Carlo methods and a current industry core simulator.

  12. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  13. Infrared thermography for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  14. Study of Room Temperature and Humidity Control Method on Dehumidification System Reheated by Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Funakoshi, Sunao; Yokoyama, Hidenori; Morimoto, Motoo; Saito, Kiyoshi

    The new ways to control the humidity and the temperature of the room accurately during the dehumidification operation reheated by refrigeration cycle on room air conditioners using R 410A was investigated. The indoor heat exchanger is divided into a condensing part and an evaporating part by a dehumidification valve which is located between these two heat exchangers. The indoor air cooled and dehumidified by the evaporating part is heated by the condensing part. The dehumidification capacity increased according to increasing the compressor rotational speed. And the reheating capacity increased according to decreasing the outdoor fan rotational speed. So the humidity and the temperature of the room was controlled to the setting values exactly by regulating the compressor rotational speed and the outdoor fan rotational speed alternately.

  15. Improved cycling behavior of ZEBRA battery operated at intermediate temperature of 175°C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-03-01

    Operation of sodium-nickel chloride battery at temperatures lower than 200°C reduces cell degradation and improves the cyclability. One of the main technical issues in terms of operating this battery at intermediate temperatures such as 175°C is the poor wettability of molten sodium on β”-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) causing reduced active area and limited charging . In order to overcome the problem related to poor wettability of Na melt on BASE at 175°C, Pt grid was applied on the anode side of BASE using a screen printing technique. Deeper charging and improved cycling behavior was observed on the cells with metalized BASEs due to extended active area.

  16. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  17. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Zinc Antimonide Thin Films for High Temperature Thermoelectric Power Generation Applications.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Woo, Chang-Su; Han, Seungwoo

    2015-08-19

    The zinc antimonide compound ZnxSby is one of the most efficient thermoelectric materials known at high temperatures due to its exceptional low thermal conductivity. For this reason, it continues to be the focus of active research, especially regarding its glass-like atomic structure. However, before practical use in actual surroundings, such as near a vehicle manifold, it is imperative to analyze the thermal reliability of these materials. Herein, we present the thermal cycling behavior of ZnxSby thin films in nitrogen (N2) purged or ambient atmosphere. ZnxSby thin films were prepared by cosputtering and reached a power factor of 1.39 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 321 °C. We found maximum power factor values gradually decreased in N2 atmosphere due to increasing resistivity with repeated cycling, whereas the specimen in air kept its performance. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy observations revealed that fluidity of Zn atoms leads to nanoprecipitates, porous morphologies, and even growth of a coating layer or fiber structures on the surface of ZnxSby after repetitive heating and cooling cycles. With this in mind, our results indicate that proper encapsulation of the ZnxSby surface would reduce these unwanted side reactions and the resulting degradation of thermoelectric performance. PMID:26226167

  18. The annual cycle of satellite-derived sea surface temperature in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podesta, Guillermo P.; Brown, Otis B.; Evans, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    The annual cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean was estimated using four years (July 1984-July 1988) of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer observations. High resolution satellite observations at 1-km space and daily time resolution were grided at 100-km space and 5-day time intervals to develop an analysis dataset for determination of low frequency SST variability. The integral time scale, a measure of serial correlation, was found to vary from 40 to 60 days in the domain of interest. The existence of superannual trends in the SST data was investigated, but conclusive results could not be obtained. The annual cycle (and, in particular, the annual harmonic) explains a large proportion of the SST variability. The estimated amplitude of the cycle ranges between 5 deg and 13 deg C throughout the study area, with minima in August-September and maxima in February. The resultant climatology is compared with an arbitrary 5-day satellite SST field, and with the COADS/ICE SST climatology. It was found that the higher resolution satellite-based SST climatology resolves boundary current structure and has significantly better structural agreement with the observed field.

  19. Effects of cure temperature, electron radiation, and thermal cycling on P75/930 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composites are candidates for future space structures due to high stiffness and dimensional stability requirements of these structures. Typical graphite/epoxy composites are brittle and have high residual stresses which often result in microcracking during the thermal cycling typical of the space environment. Composite materials used in geosynchronous orbit applications will also be exposed to high levels of radiation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of cure temperature and radiation exposure on the shear strength and thermal cycling-induced microcrack density of a high modulus, 275 F cure epoxy, P75/930. The results from the P75/930 are compared to previously reported data on P75/934 and T300/934 where 934 is a standard 350 F cure epoxy. The results of this study reveal that P75/930 is significantly degraded by total doses of electron radiation greater than 10(exp 8) rads and by thermally cycling between -250 F and 150 F. The P75/930 did not have improved microcrack resistance over the P75/934, and the 930 resin system appears to be more sensitive to electron radiation-induced degradation than the 934 resin system.

  20. Removing Diurnal Cycle Contamination in Satellite-Derived Tropospheric Temperatures: Understanding Tropical Tropospheric Trend Discrepancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Po-Chedley, S.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical mid-tropospheric temperature (TMT) time series have been constructed by several independent research teams using satellite microwave sounding unit (MSU) measurements beginning in 1978 and advanced MSU (AMSU) measurements since 1998. Despite careful efforts to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements, tropical TMT trends disagree by a factor of three even though each analysis uses the same basic data. Previous studies suggest that the discrepancy in tropical TMT temperature trends is largely caused by differences in both the NOAA-9 warm target factor and diurnal drift corrections used by various teams to homogenize the MSU/AMSU measurements. This work introduces a new observationally-based method for removing biases related to satellite diurnal drift. The method relies on minimizing inter-satellite and inter-node drifts by subtracting out a common diurnal cycle determined via linear regression. It is demonstrated that this method is effective at removing intersatellite biases and biases between the ascending (PM) and descending (AM) node of individual satellites in the TMT time series. After TMT bias correction, the ratio of tropical tropospheric temperature trends relative to surface temperature trends is in accord with the ratio from global climate models. It is shown that bias corrections for diurnal drift based on a climate model produce tropical trends very similar to those from the observationally-based correction, with a trend differences smaller than 0.02 K decade-1. Differences among various TMT datasets are explored further. Tropical trends from this work are comparable to those from the Remote Sensing System (RSS) and NOAA datasets despite small differences. Larger differences between this work and UAH are attributed to differences in the treatment of the NOAA-9 target factor and the UAH diurnal cycle correction.

  1. Testing of molded high temperature plastic actuator road seals for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterman, A. W.; Huxford, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Molded high temperature plastic first and second stage rod seal elements were evaluated in seal assemblies to determine performance characteristics. These characteristics were compared with the performance of machined seal elements. The 6.35 cm second stage Chevron seal assembly was tested using molded Chevrons fabricated from five molding materials. Impulse screening tests conducted over a range of 311 K to 478 K revealed thermal setting deficiencies in the aromatic polyimide molding materials. Seal elements fabricated from aromatic copolyester materials structurally failed during impulse cycle calibration. Endurance testing of 3.85 million cycles at 450 K using MIL-H-83283 fluid showed poorer seal performance with the unfilled aromatic polyimide material than had been attained with seals machined from Vespel SP-21 material. The 6.35 cm first stage step-cut compression loaded seal ring fabricated from copolyester injection molding material failed structurally during impulse cycle calibration. Molding of complex shape rod seals was shown to be a potentially controllable technique, but additional molding material property testing is recommended.

  2. The 5200 cycle test of an 8-cm diameter Hg ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantenieks, M. A.; Wintucky, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    An accelerated cycle test was conducted in which an 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster (EMT) prototype successfully completed 5200 on-off cycles and a total of more than 1300hours of thruster operation at a 4.5 mN thrust level. Cathode tip heater powers required for starting and keeper voltages remained well within acceptable limits. The discharge chamber utilization and electrical efficiency were nearly constant over the duration of the test. It was concluded that on-off cyclic operation by itself does not appreciably degrade starting capability or performance of the 8-cm EMT.

  3. 40 CFR 1045.505 - How do I test engines using discrete-mode or ramped-modal duty cycles?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-modal duty cycles? (a) This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. We... specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm that the test is valid. (2) For ramped-modal testing, start sampling... emissions and cycle statistics the same as for transient testing as specified in 40 CFR part 1065....

  4. 40 CFR 1045.505 - How do I test engines using discrete-mode or ramped-modal duty cycles?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-modal duty cycles? (a) This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. We... specified in 40 CFR 1065.514 to confirm that the test is valid. (2) For ramped-modal testing, start sampling... emissions and cycle statistics the same as for transient testing as specified in 40 CFR part 1065....

  5. High-Speed, High-Temperature Finger Seal Test Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2003-01-01

    A finger seal, designed and fabricated by Honeywell Engines, Systems and Services, was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center at surface speeds up to 1200 ft/s, air temperatures up to 1200 F, and pressures across the seal of 75 psid. These are the first test results obtained with NASA s new High-Temperature, High-Speed Turbine Seal Test Rig (see the photograph). The finger seal is an innovative design recently patented by AlliedSignal Engines, which has demonstrated considerably lower leakage than commonly used labyrinth seals and is considerably cheaper than brush seals. The cost to produce finger seals is estimated to be about half of the cost to produce brush seals. Replacing labyrinth seals with fingers seals at locations that have high-pressure drops in gas turbine engines, typically main engine and thrust seals, can reduce air leakage at each location by 50 percent or more. This directly results in a 0.7- to 1.4-percent reduction in specific fuel consumption and a 0.35- to 0.7-percent reduction in direct operating costs . Because the finger seal is a contacting seal, this testing was conducted to address concerns about its heat generation and life capability at the higher speeds and temperatures required for advanced engines. The test results showed that the seal leakage and wear performance are acceptable for advanced engines.

  6. Cryogenic testing and analysis associated with Tevatron lower temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Theilacker, J.C.

    1996-09-01

    An upgrade of the Tevatron cryogenic system was installed and commissioned in 1993 to allow lower temperature operation. As a result, higher energy operation is possible. Following the installation and initial commissioning, it was decided to continue the current colliding beam physics at the previous energy of 900 GeV. This has allowed us to perform parasitic lower temperature tests in the Tevatron over the last year and a half. This paper presents the results of operational experiences and thermal and hydraulic testing which has taken place. The primary goal of the testing is to better understand the operation of the cold compressor system, associated instrumentation, and the performance of the existing magnet system during lower temperature operation. This will lead to a tentatively scheduled higher energy test run in the fall of 1995. The test results have shown that more elaborate controlling methods are necessary in order to achieve reliable system operation. Fortunately, our new satellite refrigerator controls system is capable of the expansion necessary to reach our goal. New features are being added to the control system which will allow for more intelligent control and better diagnostics for component monitoring and trending.

  7. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  8. 40 CFR 1048.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures § 1048.505 How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for an engine. In...

  9. 40 CFR 1048.505 - How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Test Procedures § 1048.505 How do I test engines using steady-state duty cycles, including ramped-modal testing? This section describes how to test engines under steady-state conditions. In some cases, we allow you to choose the appropriate steady-state duty cycle for an engine. In...

  10. Cold shock CspA and CspB protein production during periodic temperature cycling in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Temperature is an important environmental factor which can dramatically affect biochemical processes in bacteria. Temperatures above optimal cause heat shock, while low temperatures induce cold shock. Since the physiological response of the bacterium Escherichia coli to slow temperature fluctuation is not well known, we investigated the effect of periodic temperature cycling between 37° and 8°C with a period of 2 h on proteome profile, cold shock CspA and CspB protein and gene production. Results Several proteins (i.e. succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit alpha, periplasmic oligopeptide-binding protein, maltose-binding periplasmic protein, outer membrane porin protein, flavodoxin-1, phosphoserine aminotransferase) were up or down regulated during temperature cycling, in addition to CspA and CspB production. The results indicate that transcription of cspA and cspB increased during each temperature downshift and consistently decreased after each temperature upshift. In sharp contrast CspA-FLAG and CspB-FLAG protein concentrations in the cell increased during the first temperature down-shift and remained unresponsive to further temperature fluctuations. The proteins CspA-FLAG and CspB-FLAG were not significantly degraded during the temperature cycling. Conclusion The study demonstrated that slow periodic temperature cycling affected protein production compared to cells constantly incubated at 37°C or during classical cold shock. Bacterial cspA and cspB mRNA transcript levels fluctuated in synchrony with the temperature fluctuations. There was no corresponding pattern of CspA and CspB protein production during temperature cycling. PMID:23815967

  11. Air-injection field tests to determine the effect of a heat cycle on the permeability of welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.H.; Ueng, Tzou-Shin

    1991-10-01

    As part of a series of prototype tests conducted in preparation for site characterization of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, air-injection tests were conducted in the welded tuffs in G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives were to characterize the permeability of the highly fractured tuff around a horizontal heater emplacement borehole, and to determine the effect of a heating and cooling cycle on the rock-mass permeability. Air was injected into packed-off intervals along the heater borehole. The bulk permeability of the rock adjacent to the test interval and the aperture of fractures intersecting the interval were computed from the air-flow rate, temperature, and pressure at steady state. The bulk permeability of intervals along with borehole varied from a minimum of 0.08 D to a maximum of over 144 D and the equivalent parallel-plate apertures of fractures intersecting the borehole varied from 70 to 589 {mu}m. Higher permeabilities seemed to correlate spatially with the mapped fractures. The rock was then heated for a period of 6.5 months with an electrical-resistive heater installed in the borehole. After heating, the rock was allowed to cool down to the ambient temperature. The highest borehole wall temperature measured was 242{degree}C. Air injection tests were repeated following the heating and cooling cycle, and the results showed significant increases in bulk permeability ranging from 10 to 1830% along the borehole. 8 ref., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. High-temperature low cycle fatigue behavior of a gray cast iron

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, K.L. He, G.Q.; She, M.; Liu, X.S.; Lu, Q.; Yang, Y.; Tian, D.D.; Shen, Y.

    2014-12-15

    The strain controlled low cycle fatigue properties of the studied gray cast iron for engine cylinder blocks were investigated. At the same total strain amplitude, the low cycle fatigue life of the studied material at 523 K was higher than that at 423 K. The fatigue behavior of the studied material was characterized as cyclic softening at any given total strain amplitude (0.12%–0.24%), which was attributed to fatigue crack initiation and propagation. Moreover, this material exhibited asymmetric hysteresis loops due to the presence of the graphite lamellas. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that cyclic softening was also caused by the interactions of dislocations at 423 K, such as cell structure in ferrite, whereas cyclic softening was related to subgrain boundaries and dislocation climbing at 523 K. Micro-analysis of specimen fracture appearance was conducted in order to obtain the fracture characteristics and crack paths for different strain amplitudes. It showed that the higher the temperature, the rougher the crack face of the examined gray cast iron at the same total strain amplitude. Additionally, the microcracks were readily blunted during growth inside the pearlite matrix at 423 K, whereas the microcracks could easily pass through pearlite matrix along with deflection at 523 K. The results of fatigue experiments consistently showed that fatigue damage for the studied material at 423 K was lower than that at 523 K under any given total strain amplitude. - Highlights: • The low cycle fatigue behavior of the HT250 for engine cylinder blocks was investigated. • TEM investigations were conducted to explain the cyclic deformation response. • The low cycle fatigue cracks of HT250 GCI were studied by SEM. • The fatigue life of the examined material at 523 K is higher than that at 423 K.

  13. Buckling analysis and test correlation of high temperature structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teare, Wendy P.; Fields, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on the design, analysis, and test of a high temperature structural panel, constructed of Ti-6-4, subjected to a variety of thermal and mechanical load conditions. A follow-on panel, constructed of TMC, is also discussed in less detail. The design constraints and test set-up are discussed, as well as the test methods that were used: the grid shadow moire method and a single gage force stiffness method. The agreement between the test data and analysis for this test program provides confidence in the methods that are currently being used to design structures for hypersonic vehicles. The agreement also suggests that postbuckled strength may potentially be used to reduce the vehicle weight.

  14. Modeled Seasonal Variations of Firn Density Induced by Steady State Surface Air Temperature Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Li; Zwally, H. Jay; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Seasonal variations of firn density in ice-sheet firn layers have been attributed to variations in deposition processes or other processes within the upper firn. A recent high-resolution (mm scale) density profile, measured along a 181 m core from Antarctica, showed small-scale density variations with a clear seasonal cycle that apparently was not-related to seasonal variations in deposition or known near-surface processes (Gerland and others 1999). A recent model of surface elevation changes (Zwally and Li, submitted) produced a seasonal variation in firn densification, and explained the seasonal surface elevation changes observed by satellite radar altimeters. In this study, we apply our 1-D time-dependent numerical model of firn densification that includes a temperature-dependent formulation of firn densification based on laboratory measurements of grain growth. The model is driven by a steady-state seasonal surface temperature and a constant accumulation rate appropriate for the measured Antarctic ice core. The modeled seasonal variations in firn density show that the layers of snow deposited during spring to mid-summer with the highest temperature history compress to the highest density, and the layers deposited during later summer to autumn with the lowest temperature history compress to the lowest density. The initial amplitude of the seasonal difference of about 0.13 reduces to about 0.09 in five years and asymptotically to 0.92 at depth, which is consistent with the core measurements.

  15. Effects of temperature on testicular cycle of wild birds Black headed munia and Spotted munia.

    PubMed

    Bar, Malabika S

    2005-01-01

    A long term investigation was made on the effects of temperature in the reproduction of tropical wild birds, Black headed munia, Munia malacca and Spotted munia, Lonchura punctulata. In Spotted munia delayed gonadal development as well as regression were observed in 12 degrees C treated group. In 20 degrees C treated birds the testicular volume was significantly less in the month of September and October and was significantly more in November compared to the corresponding control values. In 27 degrees C treated birds delay in testicular development was observed. In Black headed munia delayed gonadal development and regression was observed in 12 degrees C and 20 degrees C treated groups. But maximum gonadal development Delayed regression was also noticed in 20 degrees C group. In 27 degrees C treated group an inhibition of the testicular development was noticed during progressive phase (September). Present findings suggest that neither temperature nor continuous illumination could alter the circannual nature of testicular cycle in spotted munia indicating that temperature acts only as supplementary factor in the reproduction of these two bird models. We further suggest that temperature effects are mediated through changes in thyroxine levels. PMID:16114474

  16. Evaluation of Electromyographic Frequency Domain Changes during a Three-Minute Maximal Effort Cycling Test

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ran; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Robinson, Edward H.; Miramonti, Amelia A.; Fragala, Maren S.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the time course of EMG frequency changes during a three-minute maximal effort cycling test (3MT) session and to examine which parameter between mean (MNF) and median (MDF) frequency is more suitable for evaluation of changes in neuromuscular function throughout a 3MT. Eighteen recreationally-active men volunteered to participate in this study. Maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured using a dynamometer to determine maximal EMG frequency of the vastus lateralis (VL) of the kicking leg during isometric knee extension. A maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) on a cycle ergometer was performed to establish the appropriate load profile for the 3MT which was completed after a period of at least 48 hours. MNF, MDF and power output (PO) values were measured at 10-second epochs throughout the duration of the 3MT. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare the changes in EMG frequency, relative to maximal values from the MVC, and change in PO during the testing procedure. MNF, Root Mean Square (RMS), and PO significantly decreased during the 3MT, while MDF did not change significantly. Statistically, EMG frequency and PO decreased at first and remained constant in response to the 3MT, which may be reflective of differing patterns of muscle fiber type fatigue throughout the testing session. Due to decreased variability, changes in neuromuscular function during this protocol may be better evaluated using MNF than MDF. Key points EMG frequency decreased initially and remained constant in response to all-out cycling test. The change in EMG frequency and power output were similar during all-out cycling test. MNF may be better than MDF for neuromuscular function evaluation during all-out cycling test due to decreased variability. PMID:25983596

  17. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-09-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, cycle life tests of nickel electrodes were carried out in Hi/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45-minute low earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. The results show that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength did not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. The best plaque type appears to be one which is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has a median pore size of 13 micron.

  18. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for a Nickel-hydrogen Cell: Cycle Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, cycle life tests of nickel electrodes were carried out in Hi/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45-minute low earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. The results show that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength did not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. The best plaque type appears to be one which is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has a median pore size of 13 micron.

  19. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  20. Results of deep DoD life cycle tests at high rates on 12Ah NiCd cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panneton, Paul E.; Meyer, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A 12 Ah Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) life cycle test that induced 47 percent more deep Depth Of Discharge cycles by mixing them with shallow DOD cycles is discussed. The test showed how aggressive recharging to a C/D ratio of 1.15 nearly doubled performance over cycling below a C/D of 1.11.

  1. Comparison Testings between Two High-temperature Strain Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, J.-F.; Castelli, M. G.; Androjna, D.; Blue, C.; Blue, R.; Lin, R. Y.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental evaluation was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center to compare and contrast the performance of a newly developed resistance strain gage, the PdCr temperature-compensated wire strain gage, to that of a conventional high-temperature extensometry. The evaluation of the two strain measurement systems was conducted through the application of various thermal and mechanical loading spectra using a high-temperature thermomechanical uniaxial testing system equipped with quartz lamp heating. The purpose of the testing was not only to compare and contrast the two strain sensors but also to investigate the applicability of the PdCr strain gage to the testing environment typically employed when characterizing the high-temperature mechanical behavior of structural materials. Strain measurement capabilities to 8OO C were investigated with a nickel base superalloy IN100 substrate material, and application to titanium matrix composite (TMC) materials was examined with the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 08 system. PdCr strain gages installed by three attachment techniques, namely, flame spraying, spot welding and rapid infrared joining were investigated.

  2. Solar Cycle and Anthropogenic Forcing of Surface-Air Temperature at Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of 10-yr moving average (yma) values of Armagh Observatory (Northern Ireland) surface-air temperatures with selected solar cycle indices (sunspot number (SSN) and the Aa geomagnetic index (Aa)), sea-surface temperatures in the Nino 3.4 region, and Mauna Loa carbon dioxide (CO2) (MLCO2) atmospheric concentration measurements reveals a strong correlation (r = 0.686) between the Armagh temperatures and Aa, especially, prior to about 1980 (r = 0.762 over the interval of 1873-1980). For the more recent interval 1963-2003, the strongest correlation (r = 0.877) is between Armagh temperatures and MLCO2 measurements. A bivariate fit using both Aa and Mauna Loa values results in a very strong fit (r = 0.948) for the interval 1963-2003, and a trivariate fit using Aa, SSN, and Mauna Loa values results in a slightly stronger fit (r = 0.952). Atmospheric CO2 concentration now appears to be the stronger driver of Armagh surface-air temperatures. An increase of 2 C above the long-term mean (9.2 C) at Armagh seems inevitable unless unabated increases in anthropogenic atmospheric gases can be curtailed. The present growth in 10-yma Armagh temperatures is about 0.05 C per yr since 1982. The present growth in MLCO2 is about 0.002 ppmv, based on an exponential fit using 10-yma values, although the growth appears to be steepening, thus, increasing the likelihood of deleterious effects attributed to global warming.

  3. Near-surface temperature cycling of stone and its implications for scales of surface deterioration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. J.; Srinivasan, S.; Gomez-Heras, M.; Basheer, P. A. M.; Viles, H. A.

    2011-07-01

    Many previous studies into internal temperature gradients within stone have assumed smooth, exponential increases and decreases in sub-surface temperatures in response, for example, to diurnal patterns of heating and cooling and these have been used to explain phenomena such as large-scale contour scaling. This high-resolution experimental study, in which a porous limestone block was subjected to alternate surface heating and cooling using an infrared lamp, demonstrates that internal temperature gradients in response to short-term environmental cycles (measured in minutes) can in fact be complex and inconsistent. Results confirm the significance of very steep temperature/stress gradients within the outer 10 mm or less of exposed stone. Below this the data indicate complex patterns of temperature reversals, the amplitudes of which are attenuated with depth and which are influenced in their intensity and location by variations in the relative duration of heating and cooling phases. It is suggested that the reversals might represent 'interference patterns' between incoming and outgoing thermal waves, but whatever their origin they are potentially important because they occur within the zone in which many stone decay processes, especially salt weathering, operate. These processes invariably respond to temperature and moisture fluctuations, and short-term interruptions to insolation could, for example, trigger these fluctuations on numerous occasions over a day. In particular, the reversals occur at a scale that is commensurate with decay by multiple flaking and could indicate an underlying control on this previously little-researched pattern of weathering. In the context of this publication, however, the main lesson to be learned from this study is that differing scales of behaviour require different scales of enquiry.

  4. Hanford coring bit temperature monitor development testing results report

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, D.

    1995-05-01

    Instrumentation which directly monitors the temperature of a coring bit used to retrieve core samples of high level nuclear waste stored in tanks at Hanford was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Monitoring the temperature of the coring bit is desired to enhance the safety of the coring operations. A unique application of mature technologies was used to accomplish the measurement. This report documents the results of development testing performed at Sandia to assure the instrumentation will withstand the severe environments present in the waste tanks.

  5. Simulated Lunar Testing of Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Sebastian A.; Bower, Chad; Iacomini, Christie S.; Paul, H.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic heat regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption (MTSA) technology is being developed for thermal and carbon dioxide (CO2) control for a Portable Life Support System (PLSS), as well as water recycling. An Engineering Development Unit (EDU) of the MTSA subassembly was designed and assembled for optimized Martian operations, but also meets system requirements for lunar operations. For lunar operations the MTSA sorption cycle is driven via a vacuum swing between suit ventilation loop pressure and lunar vacuum. The focus of this effort is operations and testing in a simulated lunar environment. This environment was simulated in Paragon s EHF vacuum chamber. The objective of this testing was to evaluate the full cycle performance of the MTSA Subassembly EDU, and to assess CO2 loading and pressure drop of the wash coated aluminum reticulated foam sorbent bed. The lunar testing proved out the feasibility of pure vacuum swing operation, making MTSA a technology that can be tested and used on the Moon prior to going to Mars. Testing demonstrated better than expected CO2 loading on the sorbent and nearly replicates the equilibrium data from the sorbent manufacturer. This had not been achieved in any of the previous sorbent loading tests performed by Paragon. Subsequently, the increased performance of the sorbent bed design indicates future designs will require less mass and volume than the current EDU rendering MTSA as very competitive for Martian PLSS applications.

  6. A High Temperature Cyclic Oxidation Data Base for Selected Materials Tested at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation test results for some 1000 high temperature commercial and experimental alloys have been collected in an EXCEL database. This database represents over thirty years of research at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The data is in the form of a series of runs of specific weight change versus time values for a set of samples tested at a given temperature, cycle time, and exposure time. Included on each run is a set of embedded plots of the critical data. The nature of the data is discussed along with analysis of the cyclic oxidation process. In addition examples are given as to how a set of results can be analyzed. The data is assembled on a read-only compact disk which is available on request from Materials Durability Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  7. Isoprene emissions track the seasonal cycle of canopy temperature, not primary production: evidence from remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, P. N.; Prentice, I. C.; Morfopoulos, C.; Siddall, M.; van Weele, M.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene is important in atmospheric chemistry, but its seasonal emission pattern - especially in the tropics, where most isoprene is emitted - is incompletely understood. We set out to discover general, biome-independent relationships between large-scale isoprene emission and a series of potential predictor variables, including both observed and model-estimated variables related to gross primary production (GPP) and canopy temperature. To this end we used remotely sensed atmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde, an intermediate oxidation product of isoprene, as a proxy for isoprene emission in 22 regions selected to span high to low latitudes, to sample major biomes, and to minimize interference from pyrogenic sources of volatile organic compounds that could interfere with the isoprene signal. Formaldehyde concentrations showed the highest average seasonal correlations with remotely sensed (r = 0.85) and model-estimated (r = 0.80) canopy temperatures. Both variables predicted formaldehyde concentrations better than air temperature (r = 0.56) and a "reference" isoprene model that includes both temperature and GPP (r = 0.49), and far better than either remotely sensed green vegetation cover (r = 0.25) or model-estimated GPP (r = 0.14). GPP in tropical regions was anti-correlated with formaldehyde concentration (r = -0.30), which peaks during the dry season. We conjecture that the positive correlations of isoprene emission with primary production, and with air temperature, found in temperate forest regions arise simply because all three peak during the relatively short growing season. In most tropical regions, where the seasonal cycles of GPP and canopy temperature are very different, isoprene emission is revealed to depend on canopy temperature but not at all on GPP. The lack of a general correlation between GPP and formaldehyde concentration is consistent with experimental evidence that isoprene emission is decoupled from photosynthesis, and with the likely adaptive significance of isoprene emission in protecting leaves against heat damage and oxidative stress. In contrast, the high correlation between canopy temperature and formaldehyde concentration indicates the importance of including canopy temperature explicitly in large-scale models.

  8. Temperature test of photorefractive materials using light speed slowdown method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanmin; Li, Mengchao; Zheng, Gang; Zhuang, Songlin

    2007-12-01

    In the paper, we propose one new type sensor with light modulation method. Having learned to delay a light signal by means of optical fibers, the temperature field may be detected by this way. According to the light speed which can be modulated in a photorefractive material in which written steady volume-index grating by two laser beams in opposite direction, the light signal may transmit with phase modulating due to intervening of another frequency shifting laser beam. In the experiment, the inner grating would be written in an optical fiber in which suitable Stannum has been doped. The periodic structure in the fiber can make the light signal reflect and the value of phase shift corresponds to the effective length of the periodic grating. According to magneto-optical Faraday effect, temperature may changes polarization direction by shifting Verdet constant. During testing period, a Sn-doped fiber is exposed to measured temperature environment and certain uniform steady field. Under this environment, the more the temperature increases, the shorter the effective interference area is in the fiber. Comparing with light delayed signal that transmits through fiber with different temperature, the delaying value may be corresponded to temperature. This research work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under grant No.60472023.

  9. EFFECTS OF TEST TEMPERATURE ON FLOW OF METALLIC GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. NOURI; Y. LIU; P. WESSELING; J. LEWANDOWSKI

    2006-04-12

    Micro-hardness experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures using a Nikon QM micro-hardness machine on a number of metallic glass (e.g. Zr-, Fe-, Al-) systems. Although high micro-hardness was exhibited at room temperature, significant hardness reductions were exhibited near the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. The effects of changes in test temperature on the micro-hardness will be reported. The effects of exposure time on the hardness evolution at a given temperature will also be summarized to illustrate some of the differences in behavior of the systems shown. The extreme softening near T{sub g}, characteristic of bulk metallic glass systems, enables the exploration of novel deformation processing. In order to develop deformation processing windows, the evaluation of bulk metallic glass mechanical properties under quasi-static conditions and the determination of flow properties at different temperatures and strain rates are reported. The use of such information to create layered/composite bulk metallic glasses will be summarized.

  10. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE AND THE 22-YEAR QUASICYCLE IN THE EARTH'S ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Qu Weizheng; Zhao Jinping; Huang Fei; Deng Shenggui

    2012-07-15

    According to the variation pattern of the solar magnetic field polarity and its relation to the relative sunspot number, we established the time series of the sunspot magnetic field polarity index and analyzed the strength and polarity cycle characteristics of the solar magnetic field. The analysis showed the existence of a cycle with about a 22-year periodicity in the strength and polarity of the solar magnetic field, which proved the Hale proposition that the 11-year sunspot cycle is one-half of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. By analyzing the atmospheric temperature field, we found that the troposphere and the stratosphere in the middle latitude of both the northern and southern hemispheres exhibited a common 22-year quasicycle in the atmospheric temperature, which is believed to be attributable to the 22-year solar magnetic cycle.

  11. Problem-Based Test: Replication of Mitochondrial DNA during the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setalo, Gyorgy, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cell cycle, generation time, S-phase, cell culture synchronization, isotopic pulse-chase labeling, density labeling, equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation, buoyant density, rate-zonal centrifugation, nucleoside, nucleotide, kinase enzymes, polymerization of nucleic acids,…

  12. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart S of... - Transient Test Driving Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Transient Test Driving Cycle E Appendix E to Subpart S of Part 51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS REQUIREMENTS FOR PREPARATION, ADOPTION, AND SUBMITTAL OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Inspection/Maintenance Program Requirements Pt. 51, Subpt....

  13. Problem-Based Test: Replication of Mitochondrial DNA during the Cell Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setalo, Gyorgy, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cell cycle, generation time, S-phase, cell culture synchronization, isotopic pulse-chase labeling, density labeling, equilibrium density-gradient centrifugation, buoyant density, rate-zonal centrifugation, nucleoside, nucleotide, kinase enzymes, polymerization of nucleic acids,

  14. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 1037 - Heavy-Duty Transient Chassis Test Cycle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Heavy-Duty Transient Chassis Test Cycle I Appendix I to Part 1037 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW HEAVY-DUTY MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 1037, App. I Appendix I to Part 1037—Heavy-Duty Transient...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... maximum test torque. (d) (e) See 40 CFR part 1065 for detailed specifications of tolerances and... in 40 CFR 1065.650 and cycle statistics as described in 40 CFR 1065.514. (b) Measure emissions by... Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065. 2 Advance from one mode...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1362-2007 - Steady-state testing with a ramped-modal cycle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... maximum test torque. (d) (e) See 40 CFR part 1065 for detailed specifications of tolerances and... in 40 CFR 1065.650 and cycle statistics as described in 40 CFR 1065.514. (b) Measure emissions by... Steady-state 168 Warm Idle 0 1 Speed terms are defined in 40 CFR part 1065. 2 Advance from one mode...

  17. High-temperature acoustic test facilities and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1994-09-01

    The Wright Laboratory is the Air Force center for air vehicles, responsible for developing advanced technology and incorporating it into new flight vehicles and for continuous technological improvement of operational air vehicles. Part of that responsibility is the problem of acoustic fatigue. With the advent of jet aircraft in the 1950's, acoustic fatigue of aircraft structure became a significant problem. In the 1960's the Wright Laboratory constructed the first large acoustic fatigue test facilities in the United States, and the laboratory has been a dominant factor in high-intensity acoustic testing since that time. This paper discusses some of the intense environments encountered by new and planned Air Force flight vehicles, and describes three new acoustic test facilities of the Wright Laboratory designed for testing structures in these dynamic environments. These new test facilities represent the state of the art in high-temperature, high-intensity acoustic testing and random fatigue testing. They will allow the laboratory scientists and engineers to test the new structures and materials required to withstand the severe environments of captive-carry missiles, augmented lift wings and flaps, exhaust structures of stealth aircraft, and hypersonic vehicle structures well into the twenty-first century.

  18. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  19. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  20. EVALUATING AND TESTING EMERGENCY TESTING MONITORING DEVICES IN EXTREME COLD TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P11070
    Title: Evaluating and Testing Emergency Testing Monitoring Devices in Extreme Cold Temperatures
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Tyler S. ODell
    Institution: Lake Superior State University
    EPA GRANT Represent...

  1. EVALUATING AND TESTING EMERGENCY TESTING MONITORING DEVICES IN EXTREME COLD TEMPERATURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Identifier: F8P11070
    Title: Evaluating and Testing Emergency Testing Monitoring Devices in Extreme Cold Temperatures
    Fellow (Principal Investigator): Tyler S. O’Dell
    Institution: Lake Superior State University
    EPA GRANT Represent...

  2. The rebirth of the Rankine cycle - Energy production on the basis of low- and medium-temperature heat sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaumotte, A.

    1981-04-01

    It is noted that there is renewed interest in the Rankine cycle for energy production on the basis of low- and medium-temperature heat sources. The organic-fluid Rankine cycle is shown to be promising for power outputs less than or of the order of 1 MW; in particular, the use of freon at temperatures below 150 C is considered. A free-piston refrigerating machine operating on the basis of nonconcentrated solar energy according to the double Rankine cycle is noted as a simple, reliable, low-cost machine. At power outputs higher than 1 MW, ammonia is a working fluid of interest at low temperatures; the binary water-ammonia cycle for nuclear or fossil-fuel power plants is especially noteworthy.

  3. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim storage, packaging, transportation, waste forms, waste treatment, decontamination and decommissioning issues; and low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) disposal.

  4. Southeast Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures During the Last Full Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriver, M. C.; Sachs, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    Sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) were determined in Cape Basin core TN057-6-PC4 (42°55'S, 8°54'E, 3751 m) over the last glacial cycle using the alkenone paleotemperature technique. Sedimentation rates at the site averaged approximately 3 cm/kyr. SSTs at the top of the core, which is dated at about 9 ka, are 11.2 deg C, similar to mean annual atlas temperatures above the site at 0 m water depth. Maximum SSTs of 16.5 deg C were reached in MIS 5e, while minimum temperatures of 6 deg C occurred during MIS 3. Two of the most prominent and surprising features of the record are (1) a 6 degree warming trend between approximately 55 and 28 ka, and (2) last interglacial SSTs that were 5 degrees higher than early Holocene temperatures. Neither of these two features is evident in global oxygen isotope records. However, they are observed in alkenone paleotemperature records from nearby drift sites in the Cape Basin. Indeed, the alkenone paleotemperature records from the drift (TN057-21 and ODP 1089) and non-drift (TN057-6) sites are remarkably similar during the last 130 kyr, providing support for the fidelity of alkenone paleotemperature reconstructions in the Cape Basin. Close co-variation is observed betweeen the Cape Basin SST records and the record of deuterium excess in the Vostok (Antarctica) ice core. The latter is believed to represent the temperature history of the moisture source for Vostok snow, the middle latitudes of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. The climate forcing for changes in deuterium excess has been attributed to obliquity (Vimeux et al., Nature, 398:410, 1999). Co-variation between Cape Basin SSTs and Vostok deuterium excess may imply that southern mid-latitude SSTs changed in concert, perhaps forced by obliquity, or that a common forcing influenced the proxy records through different mechanisms.

  5. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wexler, D. B.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function.

  6. Resynchronization of circadian sleep-wake and temperature cycles in the squirrel monkey following phase shifts of the environmental light-dark cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, D.B.; Moore-ede, M.C.

    1986-12-01

    Circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions gradually resynchronize after phase shifts in environmental time cues. In order to characterize the rate of circadian resynchronization in a diurnal primate model, the temperature, locomotor activity, and polygraphically determined sleep-wake states were monitored in squirrel monkeys before and after 8-h phase shifts of an environmental light-dark cycle of 12 h light and 12 h dark (LD 12:12). For the temperature rhythm, resynchronization took 4 d after phase delay shift and 5 d after phase advance shift; for the rest-activity cycle, resynchronization times were 3 d and 6 d, respectively. The activity acrophase shifted more rapidly than the temperature acrophase early in the post-delay shift interval, but this internal desynchronization between rhythms disappeared during the course of resynchronization. Further study of the early resynchronization process requires emphasis on identifying evoked effects and measuring circadian pacemaker function. 13 references.

  7. Closed Cycle Engine Program Used in Solar Dynamic Power Testing Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clint B., III; McKissock, David B.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is testing the world's first integrated solar dynamic power system in a simulated space environment. This system converts solar thermal energy into electrical energy by using a closed-cycle gas turbine and alternator. A NASA-developed analysis code called the Closed Cycle Engine Program (CCEP) has been used for both pretest predictions and post-test analysis of system performance. The solar dynamic power system has a reflective concentrator that focuses solar thermal energy into a cavity receiver. The receiver is a heat exchanger that transfers the thermal power to a working fluid, an inert gas mixture of helium and xenon. The receiver also uses a phase-change material to store the thermal energy so that the system can continue producing power when there is no solar input power, such as when an Earth-orbiting satellite is in eclipse. The system uses a recuperated closed Brayton cycle to convert thermal power to mechanical power. Heated gas from the receiver expands through a turbine that turns an alternator and a compressor. The system also includes a gas cooler and a radiator, which reject waste cycle heat, and a recuperator, a gas-to-gas heat exchanger that improves cycle efficiency by recovering thermal energy.

  8. The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) field test facility -- system description, aquifer characterization, and results of short-term test cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, M.; Hoyer, M.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Holm, N.L.; Holm, T.R.; Kanivetsky, R.; Jirsa, M.A.; Lee, H.C.; Lauer, J.L.; Miller, R.T.; Norton, J.L.; Runke, H. )

    1991-06-01

    Phase 1 of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) Project at the University of Minnesota was to test the feasibility, and model, the ATES concept at temperatures above 100{degrees}C using a confined aquifer for the storage and recovery of hot water. Phase 1 included design, construction, and operation of a 5-MW thermal input/output field test facility (FTF) for four short-term ATES cycles (8 days each of heat injection, storage, and heat recover). Phase 1 was conducted from May 1980 to December 1983. This report describes the FTF, the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville (FIG) aquifer used for the test, and the four short-term ATES cycles. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are all included. The FTF consists of monitoring wells and the source and storage well doublet completed in the FIG aquifer with heat exchangers and a fixed-bed precipitator between the wells of the doublet. The FIG aquifer is highly layered and a really anisotropic. The upper Franconia and Ironton-Galesville parts of the aquifer, those parts screened, have hydraulic conductivities of {approximately}0.6 and {approximately}1.0 m/d, respectively. Primary ions in the ambient ground water are calcium and magnesium bicarbonate. Ambient temperature FIG ground water is saturated with respect to calcium/magnesium bicarbonate. Heating the ground water caused most of the dissolved calcium to precipitate out as calcium carbonate in the heat exchanger and precipitator. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water, suggesting dissolution of some constituents of the aquifer during the cycles. Further work on the ground water chemistry is required to understand water-rock interactions.

  9. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  10. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  11. Extracellular matrix remodeling of the testes through the male reproductive cycle in Teleostei fish.

    PubMed

    Santana, Julio Cesar de Oliveira; Quagio-Grassiotto, Irani

    2014-12-01

    During the fish reproductive cycle, testes undergo morphological changes related to germinal epithelium and remodeling of extracellular matrix components (ECM). ECM is degraded mainly by action of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Due to the natural renewal of ECM in fish testes, we choose Pimelodus maculatus to study remodeling of ECM throughout reproductive cycle, using picrosirius (to identify type I, II, III collagen) and reticulin (type III collagen), and to immunolocalize MT1-MMP (membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase) and MMP-2 in testis cells. Testes were classified in four reproductive phases: regenerating, development, spawning capable and regressing. Picrosirius and reticulin demonstrated a differential distribution of total collagen fibers during the reproductive cycle. Immunohistochemistry showed MT1-MMP only in acidophilic granulocyte cells mainly inside blood vessels, in connective tissue of capsule close to the germinal compartment, and also infiltrated in interstitial connective tissue. MMP-2 was detected in fibroblast and endothelial cells of interstitial and capsule blood vessels, in epithelial cells of capsule, and in acidophilic granulocyte cells at same description for MT1-MMP. The fish testes ECM were remodeled throughout reproductive cycle in according to morphophysiological alterations. During reproductive season (spawning capable), the interstitium increased in total collagen fibers (type I, II, III). After spermiation period (regression and regenerating), the amount of collagen fibers decreased in response to action of MMPs on collagen degradation and other interstitial components (not assessed in this study). MMPs seem to be indispensable components for natural cyclic events of ECM remodeling of fish testes and for guarantee tissue homeostasis throughout reproductive cycle. PMID:25142725

  12. CARS temperature measurements in a hypersonic propulsion test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Smith, M. W.; Antcliff, R. R.; Northam, G. B.; Cutler, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Static-temperature measurements performed in a reacting vitiated air-hydrogen Mach-2 flow in a duct in Test Cell 2 at NASA LaRC by using a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system are discussed. The hypersonic propulsion Test Cell 2 hardware is outlined with emphasis on optical access ports and safety features in the design of the Test Cell. Such design considerations as vibration, noise, contamination from flow field or atmospheric-borne dust, unwanted laser- and electrically-induced combustion, and movement of the sampling volume in the flow are presented. The CARS system is described, and focus is placed on the principle and components of system-to-monochromator signal coupling. Contour plots of scramjet combustor static temperature in a reacting-flow region are presented for three stations, and it is noted that the measurements reveal such features in the flow as maximum temperature near the model wall in the region of the injector footprint.

  13. Evolution of Dst index, cosmic rays and global temperature during solar cycles 20-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biktash, L. Z.

    2014-12-01

    We have studied conditions in interplanetary space, which can have an influence on galactic cosmic ray (CR) and climate change. In this connection the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters and cosmic ray variations have been compared with geomagnetic activity represented by the equatorial Dst index from the beginning 1965 to the end of 2012. Dst index is commonly used as the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction characteristic. The important drivers in interplanetary medium which have effect on cosmic rays as CMEs (coronal mass ejections) and CIRs (corotating interaction regions) undergo very strong changes during their propagation to the Earth. Because of this CMEs, coronal holes and the solar spot numbers (SSN) do not adequately reflect peculiarities concerned with the solar wind arrival to 1 AU. Therefore, the geomagnetic indices have some inestimable advantage as continuous series other the irregular solar wind measurements. We have compared the yearly average variations of Dst index and the solar wind parameters with cosmic ray data from Moscow, Climax, and Haleakala neutron monitors during the solar cycles 20-23. The descending phases of these solar cycles (CSs) had the long-lasting solar wind high speed streams occurred frequently and were the primary contributors to the recurrent Dst variations. They also had effects on cosmic rays variations. We show that long-term Dst variations in these solar cycles were correlated with the cosmic ray count rate and can be used for study of CR variations. Global temperature variations in connection with evolution of Dst index and CR variations is discussed.

  14. Performances of the mixed-gases Joule-Thomson refrigeration cycles for cooling fixed-temperature heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Luo, E. G.

    2004-12-01

    Numerous mixed-gases refrigeration cycle configurations based on Joule-Thomson effects were developed in the past several decades. In this paper, comprehensive thermodynamic analyses were made on two typical cycle configurations to learn their performance for cooling fixed-temperature heat loads. One is the single-stage cycle without phase separators; the other is the auto-cascade refrigeration cycle which has at least one phase separator. An exergy model was developed to analyze the thermodynamic performance of those refrigeration cycles. Comprehensive comparisons were made on the performance of the recuperative throttling cycles using multicomponent mixture as refrigerant, including extensive simulations and optimizations of mixtures and cycle configurations. The results show that the auto-cascade cycle can improve thermodynamic performance in the case of using mixtures with increased fraction of high-boiling components, however, degrade the performance when using mixtures with increased fraction of low-boiling components. The results also show that the mixed refrigerant is the most important designing parameter in the design of such mixed-gases refrigeration system. Different cycle configuration has different optimal mixture composition. When using optimal mixtures, both cycles (separation and non-separation) can provide approximately equal performance.

  15. High-temperature nuclear closed Brayton cycle power conversion system for the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, D.J. )

    1991-01-05

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has stated goals of colonizing the moon and conducting manned exploration of the planet Mars. Unlike previous ventures into space, both manned and unmanned, large quantities of electrical power will be required to provide the energy for lunar base sustenance and for highly efficient propulsion systems for the long trip to mars and return. Further, the requirement for electrical power of several megawatts will necessitate the use of nuclear reactor driven power conversion systems. This paper discusses a particle bed reactor closed Brayton cycle space power system that uses advanced materials technology to achieve a high-temperature, low-specific-weight modular system capable of providing the requisite electrical power for both a lunar base and a Mars flight vehicle propulsion system.

  16. High temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell power cycle: Preliminary design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model of a high temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell, hydrogen/oxygen, thermally regenerative power cycle is developed and used to simulate system performance for varying system parameters. Initial estimates of system efficiency, weight, and volume are provided for a one KWe module assuming specific electrolyzer and fuel cell characteristics, both current and future. Specific interest is placed on examining the system responses to changes in device voltage versus current density operating curves, and the associated optimum operating ranges. The performance of a solar-powered, space based system in low earth orbit is examined in terms of the light-dark periods requiring storage. The storage design tradeoffs between thermal energy, electrical energy, and hydrogen/oxygen mass storage are examined. The current technology module is based on the 1000 C solid oxide electrolyzer cell and the alkaline fuel cell. The Future Technology system examines benefits involved with developing a 1800K electrolyzer operating with an advanced fuel cell.

  17. Low cycle fatigue behavior of new heat-resistant steel HCM2S at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lihui; Zhao Qinxin; Gu Haicheng; Lu Yansun

    1999-07-01

    Low cycle fatigue behavior of new low alloy, heat-resistant steel HCM2S (2.25Cr-1.6W-V-Nb-B-N) at high temperature has been investigated. The cyclic stress response curve of HCM2S exhibits rapid initial cyclic softening followed by gradual softening until macroscopic crack growth occurs. The initial softening of HCM2S steel is due to the recovery of martensite laths in carbon-rich austenitic islands, the formation of stable dislocation cells and M{sub 6}C particles. Fatigue life equation of HCM2S as a function of strain range at 580 C is also given in this paper.

  18. High temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell power cycle: Preliminary design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morehouse, Jeffrey H.

    1987-06-01

    A model of a high temperature electrolyzer/fuel cell, hydrogen/oxygen, thermally regenerative power cycle is developed and used to simulate system performance for varying system parameters. Initial estimates of system efficiency, weight, and volume are provided for a one KWe module assuming specific electrolyzer and fuel cell characteristics, both current and future. Specific interest is placed on examining the system responses to changes in device voltage versus current density operating curves, and the associated optimum operating ranges. The performance of a solar-powered, space based system in low earth orbit is examined in terms of the light-dark periods requiring storage. The storage design tradeoffs between thermal energy, electrical energy, and hydrogen/oxygen mass storage are examined. The current technology module is based on the 1000 C solid oxide electrolyzer cell and the alkaline fuel cell. The Future Technology system examines benefits involved with developing a 1800K electrolyzer operating with an advanced fuel cell.

  19. 40 CFR 86.1360-2007 - Supplemental emission test; test cycle and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... manufacturer to conduct the test using, up to three discrete test points within the control area defined in... procedures defined in § 86.1332. (d) Determining the control area. The control area extends from the engine... engine. The control area extends from the 25% to the 75% engine speeds, at engine loads of 25% to...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1360 - Supplemental emission test; test cycle and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... procedures defined in 40 CFR 1065.510. (d) Determining the control area. The control area extends from the... manufacturer to conduct the test using, up to three discrete test points within the control area defined in... engine. The control area extends from the 25% to the 75% engine speeds, at engine loads of 25% to...