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Sample records for temperature programmed desorption

  1. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  2. Reduction Kinetics of Graphene Oxide Determined by Temperature Programmed Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrice, Carl; Clark, Nicholas; Field, Daniel; Geisler, Heike; Jung, Inhwa; Yang, Dongxing; Piner, Richard; Ruoff, Rodney

    2009-10-01

    Graphene oxide, which is an electrical insulator, shows promise for use in several technological applications such as dielectric layers in nanoscale electronic devices or as the active region of chemical sensors. In principle, graphene oxide films could also be used as a precursor for the formation of large-scale graphene films by either thermal or chemical reduction of the graphene oxide. In order to determine the thermal stability and reduction kinetics of graphene oxide, temperature program desorption (TPD) measurements have been performed on multilayer films of graphene oxide deposited on SiO2/Si(100) substrates. The graphene oxide was exfoliated from the graphite oxide source material by slow-stirring in aqueous solution, which produces single-layer platelets with an average lateral size of ˜10 μm. From the TPD measurements, it was determined that the decomposition process begins at ˜80 ^oC. The primary desorption products of the graphene oxide films for temperatures up to 300 ^oC are H2O, CO2, and CO, with only trace amounts of O2 being detected. An activation energy of 1.4 eV/molecule was determined by assuming an Arrhenius dependence for the decomposition process.

  3. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1994-09-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials. In an attempt to determine the mechanism for this enhancement the authors have investigated the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and water from lithium oxide (a leading candidate for the breeder material) by temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy. The results from these studies indicate that several different types of hydroxide groups are formed on the lithium oxide surface. They also suggest that under certain conditions hydride species form on the surface. The role of these species in tritium release from lithium oxide is discussed.

  4. Temperature programmed desorption studies of water interactions with Apollo lunar samples 12001 and 72501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poston, Michael J.; Grieves, Gregory A.; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B.; Hibbitts, Charles A.; Dyar, M. Darby; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2015-07-01

    The desorption activation energies for water molecules chemisorbed on Apollo lunar samples 72501 (highlands soil) and 12001 (mare soil) were determined by temperature programmed desorption experiments in ultra-high vacuum. A significant difference in both the energies and abundance of chemisorption sites was observed, with 72501 retaining up to 40 times more water (by mass) and with much stronger adsorption interactions, possibly approaching 1.5 eV. The dramatic difference between the samples may be due to differences in mineralogy and surface exposure age. The distribution function of water desorption activation energies for sample 72501 was used as an initial condition to simulate water persistence through a temperature profile matching the lunar day.

  5. Analyte separation utilizing temperature programmed desorption of a preconcentrator mesh

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Bouchier, Frank A.; Theisen, Lisa; Arakaki, Lester H.

    2007-11-27

    A method and system for controllably releasing contaminants from a contaminated porous metallic mesh by thermally desorbing and releasing a selected subset of contaminants from a contaminated mesh by rapidly raising the mesh to a pre-determined temperature step or plateau that has been chosen beforehand to preferentially desorb a particular chemical specie of interest, but not others. By providing a sufficiently long delay or dwell period in-between heating pulses, and by selecting the optimum plateau temperatures, then different contaminant species can be controllably released in well-defined batches at different times to a chemical detector in gaseous communication with the mesh. For some detectors, such as an Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS), separating different species in time before they enter the IMS allows the detector to have an enhanced selectivity.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of temperature-programmed and isothermal desorption from single-crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, S.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-08-01

    The kinetics of temperature-programmed and isothermal desorption have been simulated with a Monte Carlo model. Included in the model are the elementary steps of adsorption, surface diffusion, and desorption. Interactions between adsorbates and the metal as well as interactions between the adsorbates are taken into account with the Bond-Order-Conservation-Morse-Potential method. The shape, number, and location of the TPD peaks predicted by the simulations is shown to be sensitive to the binding energy, coverage, and coordination of the adsorbates. In addition, the occurrence of lateral interactions between adsorbates is seen to strongly effect the distribution of adsorbates is seen to strongly effect the distribution of adsorbates on the surface. Temperature-programmed desorption spectra of a single type of adsorbate have been simulated for the following adsorbate-metal systems: CO on Pd(100); H{sub 2} on Mo(100); and H{sub 2} on Ni(111). The model predictions are in good agreement with experimental observation. TPD spectra have also been simulated for two species coadsorbed on a surface; the model predictions are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results for H{sub 2} coadsorbed with strongly bound atomic species on Mo(100) and Fe(100) surfaces as well as for CO and H{sub 2} coadsorbed on Ni(100) and Rh(100) surfaces. Finally, the desorption kinetics of CO from Pd(100) and Ni(100) in the presence of gas-phase CO have been examined. The effect of pressure is seen to lead to an increase in the rate of desorption relative to the rate observed in the absence of gas-phase CO. This increase arises as a consequence of higher coverages and therefore stronger lateral interactions between the adsorbed CO molecules.

  7. TEMPERATURE-PROGRAMMED DESORPTION: PRINCIPLES, INSTRUMENT DESIGN, AND DEMONSTRATION WITH NAALH4

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, A; Ragaiy Zidan, R

    2006-11-07

    This article is a brief introduction to temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), an analytical technique devised to analyze, in this case, materials for their potential as hydrogen storage materials. The principles and requirements of TPD are explained and the different components of a generic TPD apparatus are described. The construction of a modified TPD instrument from commercially available components is reported together with the control and acquisition technique used to create a TPD spectrum. The chemical and instrumental parameters to be considered in a typical TPD experiment and the analytical utility of the technique are demonstrated by the dehydrogenation of titanium-doped NaAlH{sub 4} by means of thermally programmed desorption.

  8. Effects of surface coordination on the temperature-programmed desorption of oxalate from goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Boily, Jean F.; Szanyi, Janos; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2007-11-15

    The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of weakly-bound, hydrogen-bonded and metal-bonded oxalate complexes at the goethite surface was investigated in the 300-900 K range with concerted Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) measurements (TPD-FTIR). These reactions took place with the concomitant dehydroxylation reaction of goethite to hematite and decarbonation of bulk-occluded carbonate. The measurements revealed three important stages of desorption. Stage I (300-440 K) corresponds to the desorption of weakly-and/or un-bound oxalate molecules in the goethite powder with a thermal decomposition reaction pathway characteristic of oxalic acid. Stage II (440-520 K) corresponds to a thermally-driven dehydration of hydrogen-bonded surface complexes, leading to a partial desorption via oxalic acid thermal decomposition pathways and to a partial conversion to metal-bonded surface complexes. This latter mechanism led to the increase in FTIR bands characteristic of these complexes. Finally, Stage III (520-660 K) corresponds to the thermal decomposition of the metal-bonded oxalate complex, proceeding through a 2 electron reduction pathway.

  9. Characterization of carbon surface chemistry by combined temperature programmed desorption with in situ X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and temperature programmed desorption with mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Brender, Patrice; Gadiou, Roger; Rietsch, Jean-Christophe; Fioux, Philippe; Dentzer, Joseph; Ponche, Arnaud; Vix-Guterl, Cathie

    2012-03-01

    The analysis of the surface chemistry of carbon materials is of prime importance in numerous applications, but it is still a challenge to identify and quantify the surface functional groups which are present on a given carbon. Temperature programmed desorption with mass spectrometry analysis (TPD-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with an in situ heating device (TPD-XPS) were combined in order to improve the characterization of carbon surface chemistry. TPD-MS analysis allowed the quantitative analysis of the released gases as a function of temperature, while the use of a TPD device inside the XPS setup enabled the determination of the functional groups that remain on the surface at the same temperatures. TPD-MS results were then used to add constraints on the deconvolution of the O1s envelope of the XPS spectra. Furthermore, a better knowledge of the evolution of oxygen functional groups with temperature during a thermal treatment could be obtained. Hence, we show here that the combination of these two methods allows to increase the reliability of the analysis of the surface chemistry of carbon materials. PMID:22242697

  10. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonks, James P.; Galloway, Ewan C.; King, Martin O.; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F.

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques.

  11. Note: A versatile mass spectrometer chamber for molecular beam and temperature programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Tonks, James P; Galloway, Ewan C; King, Martin O; Kerherve, Gwilherm; Watts, John F

    2016-08-01

    A dual purpose mass spectrometer chamber capable of performing molecular beam scattering (MBS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is detailed. Two simple features of this design allow it to perform these techniques. First, the diameter of entrance aperture to the mass spectrometer can be varied to maximize signal for TPD or to maximize angular resolution for MBS. Second, the mass spectrometer chamber can be radially translated so that it can be positioned close to the sample to maximize signal or far from the sample to maximize angular resolution. The performance of this system is described and compares well with systems designed for only one of these techniques. PMID:27587173

  12. The dissociation kinetics of NO on Rh(111) as studied by temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, H. J.; Reijerse, J. F. C.-J. M.; van Santen, R. A.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    1994-12-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSSIMS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) have been used to study the kinetics of adsorption, dissociation, and desorption of NO on Rh(111). At 100 K, NO adsorption is molecular and proceeds via mobile precursor state kinetics with a high initial sticking probability. SSIMS indicates the presence of two distinct NO adsorption states, indicative of threefold adsorption at low coverage, and occupation of bridge sites at higher coverages. Three characteristic coverage regimes appear with respect to NO dissociation. At low coverages θNO<0.25 ML, NO dissociates completely at temperatures between 275 and 340 K. If we neglect lateral interactions and assume pure first order dissociation kinetics, we find effective values for the activation barrier and preexponential factor of 40±6 kJ/mol and 106±1 s-1 for the dissociation of 0.15-0.20 ML NO. However, if we assume that a NO molecule needs an ensemble of three to four vacant sites in order to dissociate, the preexponential factor and activation energy are ˜1011 s-1 and 65 kJ/mol, in better agreement with transition state theory expectations. The Nads and Oads dissociation products desorb as N2 and O2, respectively, with desorption parameters Edes=118±10 kJ/mol and νdes=1010.1±1.0 s-1 for N2 in the zero coverage limit. At higher coverages, the desorption kinetics of N2 is strongly influenced by the presence of coadsorbed oxygen. In the medium coverage range 0.25<θNO<0.50 ML, part of the NO desorbs molecularly, with an estimated desorption barrier of 113±10 kJ/mol and a preexponential of 1013.5±1.0 s-1. Dissociation of NO becomes progressively inhibited due to site blocking, the onset shifting from 275 K at 0.25 ML to 400 K, coinciding with the NO desorption temperature, at a coverage of 0.50 ML. The accumulation of nitrogen and oxygen atoms on the highly covered surface causes a destabilization of the nitrogen atoms, which results in an

  13. Catalytic reduction of CO with hydrogen sulfide. 4. Temperature-programmed desorption of methanethiol on anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.D.; White, J.M.; Ratcliffe, C.T.

    1986-07-03

    The interaction of methanethiol with anatase, rutile, and sulfided rutile was studied by temperature-programmed desorption. Dissociative adsorption occurs on rutile but is insignificant on anatase. Decomposition products are dominated by H/sub 2/ on rutile and by CH/sub 4/ on sulfided rutile. In both cases desorption occurs between 500 and 775 K. The 5- and 4-coordinate sites on the (110) face of rutile are proposed as the active sites for decomposition. The dominance of methane on a sulfided surface is attributed to the relatively large supply of highly mobile surface hydrogen atoms.

  14. Interaction of D2 with H2O amorphous ice studied by temperature-programmed desorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Amiaud, L; Fillion, J H; Baouche, S; Dulieu, F; Momeni, A; Lemaire, J L

    2006-03-01

    The gas-surface interaction of molecular hydrogen D2 with a thin film of porous amorphous solid water (ASW) grown at 10 K by slow vapor deposition has been studied by temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD) experiments. Molecular hydrogen diffuses rapidly into the porous network of the ice. The D2 desorption occurring between 10 and 30 K is considered here as a good probe of the effective surface of ASW interacting with the gas. The desorption kinetics have been systematically measured at various coverages. A careful analysis based on the Arrhenius plot method has provided the D2 binding energies as a function of the coverage. Asymmetric and broad distributions of binding energies were found, with a maximum population peaking at low energy. We propose a model for the desorption kinetics that assumes a complete thermal equilibrium of the molecules with the ice film. The sample is characterized by a distribution of adsorption sites that are filled according to a Fermi-Dirac statistic law. The TPD curves can be simulated and fitted to provide the parameters describing the distribution of the molecules as a function of their binding energy. This approach contributes to a correct description of the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the surface of possibly porous grain mantles in the interstellar medium. PMID:16526867

  15. Temperature-programmed desorption study of NO reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1 × 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boseong; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Szanyi, János; Kay, Bruce D.; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2016-10-01

    Systematic temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies of NO adsorption and reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1 × 1 surface reveal several distinct reaction channels in a temperature range of 50-500 K. NO readily reacts on TiO2(110) to form N2O, which desorbs between 50 and 200 K (LT N2O channels), which leaves the TiO2 surface populated with adsorbed oxygen atoms (Oa) as a by-product of N2O formation. In addition, we observe simultaneous desorption peaks of NO and N2O at 270 K (HT1 N2O) and 400 K (HT2 N2O), respectively, both of which are attributed to reaction-limited processes. No N-derived reaction product desorbs from TiO2(110) surface above 500 K or higher, while the surface may be populated with Oa's and oxidized products such as NO2 and NO3. The adsorbate-free TiO2 surface with oxygen vacancies can be regenerated by prolonged annealing at 850 K or higher. Detailed analysis of the three N2O desorption yields reveals that the surface species for the HT channels are likely to be various forms of NO dimers.

  16. Temperature-programmed desorption study of NO reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1×1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Boseong; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Szanyi, Janos; Kay, Bruce D.; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2016-02-24

    In this study, systematic temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) studies of NO adsorption and reactions on rutile TiO2(110)-1 × 1 surface reveal several distinct reaction channels in a temperature range of 50–500 K. NO readily reacts on TiO2(110) to form N2O, which desorbs between 50 and 200 K (LT N2O channels), which leaves the TiO2 surface populated with adsorbed oxygen atoms (Oa) as a by-product of N2O formation. In addition, we observe simultaneous desorption peaks of NO and N2O at 270 K (HT1 N2O) and 400 K (HT2 N2O), respectively, both of which are attributed to reaction-limited processes. No N-derived reaction productmore » desorbs from TiO2(110) surface above 500 K or higher, while the surface may be populated with Oa's and oxidized products such as NO2 and NO3. The adsorbate-free TiO2 surface with oxygen vacancies can be regenerated by prolonged annealing at 850 K or higher. Detailed analysis of the three N2O desorption yields reveals that the surface species for the HT channels are likely to be various forms of NO dimers.« less

  17. Temperature Programmed Desorption of Quench-condensed Krypton and Acetone in Air; Selective Concentration of Ultra-trace Gas Components.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taku T; Sakaguchi, Isao

    2016-01-01

    Selective concentration of ultra-trace components in air-like gases has an important application in analyzing volatile organic compounds in the gas. In the present study, we examined quench-condensation of the sample gas on a ZnO substrate below 50 K followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) (low temperature TPD) as a selective gas concentration technique. We studied two specific gases in the normal air; krypton as an inert gas and acetone as a reactive gas. We evaluated the relationship between the operating condition of low temperature TPD and the lowest detection limit. In the case of krypton, we observed the selective concentration by exposing at 6 K followed by thermal desorption at about 60 K. On the other hand, no selectivity appeared for acetone although trace acetone was successfully concentrated. This is likely due to the solvent effect by a major component in the air, which is suggested to be water. We suggest that pre-condensation to remove the water component may improve the selectivity in the trace acetone analysis by low temperature TPD. PMID:27063719

  18. Improving of understanding of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) adsorption on activated carbons by temperature-programmed desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Passé-Coutrin, Nady; Maisonneuve, Laetitia; Durimel, Axelle; Dentzer, Joseph; Gadiou, Roger; Gaspard, Sarra

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the interactions between beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and chemical groups at activated carbon (AC) surface, the solid samples were hydrogenated aiming to decrease the amounts of oxygenated groups. Two AC samples designated by BagH2O and BagP1.5 were prepared by water vapor activation and phosphoric acid activation, respectively, of sugarcane bagasse used as an AC precursor. A more simple molecule 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) is used as a model of chlorinated compound. The AC were characterized by infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman resonance spectroscopies, as well as temperature-programmed desorption coupled with mass spectrometry (TPD-MS). BagP1.5 and BagH2O AC surface contained oxygenated groups. Upon hydrogenation, a decrease of most of these group amxounts was observed for both samples, while hydroxyl groups increased. On the basis of temperature-programmed desorption data obtained for AC samples contaminated with TCP or HCH, it was possible to determine the type of hydrogen bond formed between each AC and HCH. PMID:26018287

  19. Interaction between water molecules and zinc sulfide nanoparticles studied by temperature-programmed desorption and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengzhong; Rustad, James R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2007-06-14

    We have investigated the bonding of water molecules to the surfaces of ZnS nanoparticles (approximately 2-3 nm sphalerite) using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The activation energy for water desorption was derived as a function of the surface coverage through kinetic modeling of the experimental TPD curves. The binding energy of water equals the activation energy of desorption if it is assumed that the activation energy for adsorption is nearly zero. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water adsorption on 3 and 5 nm sphalerite nanoparticles provided insights into the adsorption process and water binding at the atomic level. Water binds with the ZnS nanoparticle surface mainly via formation of Zn-O bonds. As compared with bulk ZnS crystals, ZnS nanoparticles can adsorb more water molecules per unit surface area due to the greatly increased curvature, which increases the distance between adjacent adsorbed molecules. Results from both TPD and MD show that the water binding energy increases with decreasing the water surface coverage. We attribute the increase in binding energy with decreasing surface water coverage to the increasing degree of surface under-coordination as removal of water molecules proceeds. MD also suggests that the water binding energy increases with decreasing particle size due to the further distance and hence lower interaction between adsorbed water molecules on highly curved smaller particle surfaces. Results also show that the binding energy, and thus the strength of interaction of water, is highest in isolated nanoparticles, lower in nanoparticle aggregates, and lowest in bulk crystals. Given that water binding is driven by surface energy reduction, we attribute the decreased binding energy for aggregated as compared to isolated particles to the decrease in surface energy that occurs as the result of inter-particle interactions. PMID:17518448

  20. Quantitative Detection of Trace Explosive Vapors by Programmed Temperature Desorption Gas Chromatography-Electron Capture Detector

    PubMed Central

    Field, Christopher R.; Lubrano, Adam; Woytowitz, Morgan; Giordano, Braden C.; Rose-Pehrsson, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The direct liquid deposition of solution standards onto sorbent-filled thermal desorption tubes is used for the quantitative analysis of trace explosive vapor samples. The direct liquid deposition method yields a higher fidelity between the analysis of vapor samples and the analysis of solution standards than using separate injection methods for vapors and solutions, i.e., samples collected on vapor collection tubes and standards prepared in solution vials. Additionally, the method can account for instrumentation losses, which makes it ideal for minimizing variability and quantitative trace chemical detection. Gas chromatography with an electron capture detector is an instrumentation configuration sensitive to nitro-energetics, such as TNT and RDX, due to their relatively high electron affinity. However, vapor quantitation of these compounds is difficult without viable vapor standards. Thus, we eliminate the requirement for vapor standards by combining the sensitivity of the instrumentation with a direct liquid deposition protocol to analyze trace explosive vapor samples. PMID:25145416

  1. Dosimeter-Type NOx Sensing Properties of KMnO4 and Its Electrical Conductivity during Temperature Programmed Desorption

    PubMed Central

    Groβ, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jacobus H.; Tuller, Harry L.; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release. PMID:23549366

  2. Dosimeter-type NOx sensing properties of KMnO4 and its electrical conductivity during temperature programmed desorption.

    PubMed

    Groß, Andrea; Kremling, Michael; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J; Visser, Jacobus H; Tuller, Harry L; Moos, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    An impedimetric NOx dosimeter based on the NOx sorption material KMnO4 is proposed. In addition to its application as a low level NOx dosimeter, KMnO4 shows potential as a precious metal free lean NOx trap material (LNT) for NOx storage catalysts (NSC) enabling electrical in-situ diagnostics. With this dosimeter, low levels of NO and NO2 exposure can be detected electrically as instantaneous values at 380 °C by progressive NOx accumulation in the KMnO4 based sensitive layer. The linear NOx sensing characteristics are recovered periodically by heating to 650 °C or switching to rich atmospheres. Further insight into the NOx sorption-dependent conductivity of the KMnO4-based material is obtained by the novel eTPD method that combines electrical characterization with classical temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The NOx loading amount increases proportionally to the NOx exposure time at sorption temperature. The cumulated NOx exposure, as well as the corresponding NOx loading state, can be detected linearly by electrical means in two modes: (1) time-continuously during the sorption interval including NOx concentration information from the signal derivative or (2) during the short-term thermal NOx release. PMID:23549366

  3. Temperature-programmed desorption study of the selective oxidation of alcohols on silica-supported vanadium oxide.

    PubMed

    Feng, T; Vohs, J M

    2005-02-17

    The partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol on silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts was studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), Raman spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Methanol TPD results for V2O5/SiO2 samples as a function of vanadia loading in conjunction with X-ray diffraction data and Raman spectra indicated that dispersed vanadia on silica agglomerates into vanadia crystallites during a CH3OH TPD experiment. For ethanol-dosed samples, agglomeration of the dispersed vanadia was less severe, and it was possible to measure the activation energy for the dehydrogenation of adsorbed ethoxides to produce CH3CHO. Assuming a preexponential factor of 10(13) s(-1), the activation energy for this reaction was estimated to be 132 kJ/mol. The results of this study further demonstrate that there is a relatively weak interaction between vanadia and silica and suggest that adsorbed methoxide species help facilitate agglomeration of dispersed vanadia. PMID:16851203

  4. UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature programmed desorption studies of model and bulk heterogeneous catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tewell, Craig R.

    2002-08-19

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) have been used to investigate the surface structure of model heterogeneous catalysts in ultra-high vacuum (UHV). UV-Raman spectroscopy has been used to probe the structure of bulk model catalysts in ambient and reaction conditions. The structural information obtained through UV-Raman spectroscopy has been correlated with both the UHV surface analysis and reaction results. The present day propylene and ethylene polymerization catalysts (Ziegler-Natta catalysts) are prepared by deposition of TiCl{sub 4} and a Al(Et){sub 3} co-catalyst on a microporous Mg-ethoxide support that is prepared from MgCl{sub 2} and ethanol. A model thin film catalyst is prepared by depositing metallic Mg on a Au foil in a UHV chamber in a background of TiCl{sub 4} in the gas phase. XPS results indicate that the Mg is completely oxidized to MgCl{sub 2} by TiCl{sub 4} resulting in a thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x}, where x = 2, 3, and 4. To prepare an active catalyst, the thin film of MgCl{sub 2}/TiCl{sub x} on Au foil is enclosed in a high pressure cell contained within the UHV chamber and exposed to {approx}1 Torr of Al(Et){sub 3}.

  5. Investigation of the distribution of acidity strength in zeolites by temperature-programmed desorption of probe molecules. 2. Dealuminated Y-type zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Karge, H.G.; Dondur, V. ); Weitkamp, J. )

    1991-01-10

    The acidity of dealuminated hydrogen forms of Y-type zeolites (Si/Al = 2.4-8.6) is determined by temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia or pyridine, which is monitored through a mass spectrometer. Four types of acidic sites are indicated by ammonia, viz., weak Broensted and/or Lewis centers and medium and strong Broensted and strong Lewis sites. In contrast, pyridine, after sample activation at 675 K, probed only two types of sites, i.e., medium and strong Broensted sites. This difference is ascribed to different accessibility of sites for the two probe molecules. From the desorption spectra (i) the fractional coverage of the various sites, (ii) the most frequent energies of activation, {anti E}{sub d}, for desorption, and (iii) the probability functions of the activation energies are derived by using a previously described method of evaluation.

  6. Separation of adsorbed components by variable temperature desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Findley, M.E.

    1990-03-27

    This report covers the activities performed under the Department of Energy grant Separation of Absorbed Components by Variable Temperature Desorption'' to the University of Missouri-Rolla, with Project Director M. E. Findley. This grant is under DOE Energy Related Inventions Program, and originated with the discovery that multicomponent adsorption separations in some cases can be improved by carrying out a thermal desorption at increasing temperatures and separating low temperatures desorbed components from high temperatures desorbed components. The primary objective of this project was to promote the future industrial use of this invention in order to bring about energy savings for the country and if possible profits for the University and the inventors.

  7. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. PMID:26939077

  8. The analysis of temperature programmed desorption experiments of systems with lateral interactions; implications of the compensation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskens, D. L. S.; van Bavel, A. P.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    In this paper we have investigated problems that arise when analyzing TPD spectra of desorption processes in which lateral interactions between adsorbed species are present. Dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations are used to simulate the effect of adsorbate interactions on TPD spectra and we applied the most common methods to derive the activation energy and the pre-exponential factor. The extraction of the kinetic parameters in the zero-coverage limit works well for all methods. The extraction of the coverage dependent values on the other hand is quite difficult since a 'forced' compensation effect can occur, leading to false values for the pre-exponential factor as well as false values for the activation energy. Finally, we suggest a new approach that can be used to estimate the activation energy over the entire coverage range.

  9. Chemistry of L-proline on Pd(1 1 1): Temperature-programmed desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Yilin; Burkholder, Luke; Tysoe, W. T.

    2007-09-01

    The surface chemistry of proline is explored on Pd(1 1 1) using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Proline adsorbs on Pd(1 1 1) at temperatures of 250 K and below into second and subsequent layers prior to the saturation of the first layer, where approximately 70% of the adsorbed proline is present in its zwitterionic form. Molecular proline desorbs between ˜315 K and ˜333 K depending on coverage. When adsorbed at ˜300 K, only the first monolayer is formed, and the proline is present as zwitterions, oriented such that all of the carbons are detected equally by XPS. Proline decomposes by scission of the C-COO bond, where the carboxylate moiety desorbs as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, while the nitrogen-containing moiety desorbs as to HCN, and evolves pyrrole at ˜390 K, pyrrolidine at ˜410 K, and final species that desorbs at ˜450 K that cannot be unequivocally assigned but may be 2-butenenitrile (CH 3-CH dbnd CH-CN), 3-butenenitrile (CH 2dbnd CH-CH 2-CN), 2-methyl-2-propenenitrile (CH 2dbnd C(CH 3)-CN) or cyclopropanecarbonitrile.

  10. Adsorption of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol on Pd(111): a combined infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption study.

    PubMed

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P; Mirabella, Francesca; Ivars-Barceló, Francisco; Schauermann, Swetlana

    2016-05-18

    Atomistic-level understanding of the interaction of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and their derivatives with late transition metals is of fundamental importance for the rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity towards C[double bond, length as m-dash]C vs. C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bond partial hydrogenation. In this study, we investigate the interaction of acrolein, and its partial hydrogenation products propanal and allyl alcohol, with Pd(111) as a prototypical system. A combination of infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments was applied under well-defined ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions to obtain detailed information on the adsorption geometries of acrolein, propanal, and allyl alcohol as a function of coverage. We compare the IR spectra obtained for multilayer coverages, reflecting the molecular structure of unperturbed molecules, with the spectra acquired for sub-monolayer coverages, at which the chemical bonds of the molecules are strongly distorted. Coverage-dependent IR spectra of acrolein on Pd(111) point to the strong changes in the adsorption geometry with increasing acrolein coverage. Acrolein adsorbs with the C[double bond, length as m-dash]C and C[double bond, length as m-dash]O bonds lying parallel to the surface in the low coverage regime and changes its geometry to a more upright orientation with increasing coverage. TPD studies indicate decomposition of the species adsorbed in the sub-monolayer regime upon heating. Similar strong coverage dependence of the IR spectra were found for propanal and allyl alcohol. For all investigated molecules a detailed assignment of vibrational bands is reported. PMID:27149902

  11. NH{sub 3} adsorption and decomposition on Ir(110): A combined temperature programmed desorption and high resolution fast x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Weststrate, C.J.; Bakker, J.W.; Rienks, E.D.L.; Lizzit, S.; Petaccia, L.; Baraldi, A.; Vinod, C.P.; Nieuwenhuys, B.E.

    2005-05-08

    The adsorption and decomposition of NH{sub 3} on Ir(110) has been studied in the temperature range from 80 K to 700 K. By using high-energy resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy it is possible to distinguish chemically different surface species. At low temperature a NH{sub 3} multilayer, which desorbs at {approx}110 K, was observed. The second layer of NH{sub 3} molecules desorbs around 140 K, in a separate desorption peak. Chemisorbed NH{sub 3} desorbs in steps from the surface and several desorption peaks are observed between 200 and 400 K. A part of the NH{sub 3ad} decomposes into NH{sub ad} between 225 and 300 K. NH{sub ad} decomposes into N{sub ad} between 400 K and 500 K and the hydrogen released in this process immediately desorbs. N{sub 2} desorption takes place between 500 and 700 K via N{sub ad} combination. The steady state decomposition reaction of NH{sub 3} starts at 500 K. The maximum reaction rate is observed between 540 K and 610 K. A model is presented to explain the occurrence of a maximum in the reaction rate. Hydrogenation of N{sub ad} below 400 K results in NH{sub ad}. No NH{sub 2ad} or NH{sub 3ad}/NH{sub 3} were observed. The hydrogenation of NH{sub ad} only takes place above 400 K. On the basis of the experimental findings an energy scheme is presented to account for the observations.

  12. Temperature-programmed decomposition desorption of mercury species over activated carbon sorbents for mercury removal from coal-derived fuel gas

    SciTech Connect

    M. Azhar Uddin; Masaki Ozaki; Eiji Sasaoka; Shengji Wu

    2009-09-15

    The mercury (Hg{sup 0}) removal process for coal-derived fuel gas in the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process will be one of the important issues for the development of a clean and highly efficient coal power generation system. Recently, iron-based sorbents, such as iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), supported iron oxides on TiO{sub 2}, and iron sulfides, were proposed as active mercury sorbents. The H{sub 2}S is one of the main impurity compounds in coal-derived fuel gas; therefore, H{sub 2}S injection is not necessary in this system. HCl is also another impurity in coal-derived fuel gas. In this study, the contribution of HCl to the mercury removal from coal-derived fuel gas by a commercial activated carbon (AC) was studied using a temperature-programmed decomposition desorption (TPDD) technique. The TPDD technique was applied to understand the decomposition characteristics of the mercury species on the sorbents. The Hg{sup 0}-removal experiments were carried out in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 80-300{sup o}C using simulated fuel gas and a commercial AC, and the TPDD experiments were carried out in a U-tube reactor in an inert carrier gas (He or N{sub 2}) after mercury removal. The following results were obtained from this study: (1) HCl contributed to the mercury removal from the coal-derived fuel gas by the AC. (2) The mercury species captured on the AC in the HCl{sup -} and H{sub 2}S-presence system was more stable than that of the H{sub 2}S-presence system. (3) The stability of the mercury surface species formed on the AC in the H{sub 2}S-absence and HCl-presence system was similar to that of mercury chloride (HgClx) species. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Plasma-assisted CuO/CeO2/TiO2-γ-Al2O3 catalysts for NO + CH4 reaction and NO temperature programmed desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan; Jiang, Xiaoyuan; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2013-09-01

    The removal of NO and CH4 has been studied with a hybrid system integrating plasma activation and four Cu-based catalysts. The best catalytic performance was observed for catalysts obtained from CuO/CeO2/TiO2/γ-Al2O3.The efficiency of NO removal decreased with the order: 12%CuO/10%CeO2/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 > 12%CuO/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 > 12%CuO/γ-Al2O3 > 12% CuO/TiO2. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD) Temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and NO temperature-programmed desorption (NO-TPD) experiments were carried out to gain insight into the synergetic effects with the catalysts. The results revealed that copper species existed as bulk CuO crystalline for all the catalysts, H2-TPR suggested that the Cu2+ incorporated TiO2 or CeO2 lattice and crystalline CuO might be the most active component for NO removal, and NO-TPD studies indicated that 12%CuO/10%CeO2/15%TiO2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst had lower NO desorption temperature and larger peak area, which seemed to be responsible for the better catalytic activity over NO + CH4 reactions than other catalysts.

  14. Optical detection of CO and CO2 temperature dependent desorption from carbon nanotube clusters.

    PubMed

    Chistiakova, M V; Armani, A M

    2014-10-01

    The development of new materials relies on high precision methods to quantify adsorption/desorption of gases from surfaces. One commonly used approach is temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy. While this approach is very accurate, it requires complex instrumentation, and it is limited to performing experiments under high vacuum, thus restricting experimental scope. An alternative approach is to integrate the surface of interest directly onto a detector face, creating an active substrate. One surface that has applications in numerous areas is the carbon nanotube (CNT). As such, an active substrate that integrates a CNT surface on a sensor and is able to perform measurements in ambient environments will have significant impact. In the present work, we have developed an active substrate that combines an optical sensor with a CNT cluster substrate. The optical sensor is able to accurately probe the temperature dependent desorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide gases from the CNT cluster surface. This active substrate will enable a wide range of temperature dependent desorption measurements to be performed from a scientifically interesting material system. PMID:25189292

  15. Thermal Programmed Desorption of C32 H 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisternas, M.; Del Campo, V.; Cabrera, A. L.; Volkmann, U. G.; Hansen, F. Y.; Taub, H.

    2011-03-01

    Alkanes are of interest as prototypes for more complex molecules and membranes. In this work we study the desorption kinetics of dotriacontane C32 adsorbed on Si O2 /Si substrate. We combine in our instrument High Resolution Ellipsometry (HRE) and Thermal Programmed Desorption (TPD). C32 monolayers were deposited in high vacuum from a Knudsen cell on the substrate, monitorizing sample thickness in situ with HRE. Film thickness was in the range of up to 100 AA, forming a parallel bilayer and perpendicular C32 layer. The Mass Spectrometer (RGA) of the TPD section was detecting the shift of the desorption peaks at different heating rates applied to the sample. The mass registered with the RGA was AMU 57 for parallel and perpendicular layers, due to the abundance of this mass value in the disintegration process of C32 in the mass spectrometers ionizer. Moreover, the AMU 57 signal does not interfere with other signals coming from residual gases in the vacuum chamber. The desorption energies obtained were ΔEdes = 11,9 kJ/mol for the perpendicular bilayer and ΔEdes = 23 ,5 kJ/mol for the parallel bilayer.

  16. Apparatus for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy of portable samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckenholz, S.; Büchner, C.; Ronneburg, H.; Thielsch, G.; Heyde, M.; Freund, H.-J.

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) integrated in an ultrahigh vacuum-chamber housing a high-end scanning probe microscope for comprehensive multi-tool surface science analysis is described. This setup enables the characterization with TDS at low temperatures (T > 22 K) of portable sample designs, as is the case for scanning probe optimized setups or high-throughput experiments. This combination of techniques allows a direct correlation between surface morphology, local spectroscopy, and reactivity of model catalysts. The performance of the multi-tool setup is illustrated by measurements of a model catalyst. TDS of CO from Mo(001) and from Mo(001) supported MgO thin films were carried out and combined with scanning tunneling microscopy measurements.

  17. Apparatus for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy of portable samples.

    PubMed

    Stuckenholz, S; Büchner, C; Ronneburg, H; Thielsch, G; Heyde, M; Freund, H-J

    2016-04-01

    An experimental setup for low temperature thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) integrated in an ultrahigh vacuum-chamber housing a high-end scanning probe microscope for comprehensive multi-tool surface science analysis is described. This setup enables the characterization with TDS at low temperatures (T > 22 K) of portable sample designs, as is the case for scanning probe optimized setups or high-throughput experiments. This combination of techniques allows a direct correlation between surface morphology, local spectroscopy, and reactivity of model catalysts. The performance of the multi-tool setup is illustrated by measurements of a model catalyst. TDS of CO from Mo(001) and from Mo(001) supported MgO thin films were carried out and combined with scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. PMID:27131703

  18. Water Vapor Adsorption - Desorption Behavior of a Small Piece of Desiccant Rotor in Temperature Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washio, Yasuko; Kodama, Akio

    This study aims to clarify the adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto / from a desiccant rotor in temperature swing. A magnetic suspension balance followed time variations of the weight of a small piece of desiccant rotor at various desorption temperature, adsorption / desorption time and their duration time ratio. Adsorption-desorption swing in steady state settled down at certain amplitude of the amount adsorbed keeping the balance of the adsorption and desorption rates averaged over each period. At low regeneration temperature around 40-50 oC, adsorption and desorption rates were affected considerably by the change of driving force of adsorption q*-q rather than the temperature dependence of the mass transfer coefficient. At constant adsorption and desorption air conditions, the adsorption /desorption rates could be summarized by the amount of adsorption and temperature, independently of the length of cycle time. Also, region of the amount of adsorption at which adsorption - desorption swing occurred was predicted considering the adsorption / desorption rates - amount adsorbed relationship and the adsorption / desorption duration ratio.

  19. Growth of an Ultrathin Zirconia Film on Pt3Zr Examined by High-Resolution X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Temperature-Programmed Desorption, Scanning Tunneling Microscopy, and Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin (∼3 Å) zirconium oxide films were grown on a single-crystalline Pt3Zr(0001) substrate by oxidation in 1 × 10–7 mbar of O2 at 673 K, followed by annealing at temperatures up to 1023 K. The ZrO2 films are intended to serve as model supports for reforming catalysts and fuel cell anodes. The atomic and electronic structure and composition of the ZrO2 films were determined by synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) (including depth profiling), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Oxidation mainly leads to ultrathin trilayer (O–Zr–O) films on the alloy; only a small area fraction (10–15%) is covered by ZrO2 clusters (thickness ∼0.5–10 nm). The amount of clusters decreases with increasing annealing temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO was utilized to confirm complete coverage of the Pt3Zr substrate by ZrO2, that is, formation of a closed oxide overlayer. Experiments and DFT calculations show that the core level shifts of Zr in the trilayer ZrO2 films are between those of metallic Zr and thick (bulklike) ZrO2. Therefore, the assignment of such XPS core level shifts to substoichiometric ZrOx is not necessarily correct, because these XPS signals may equally well arise from ultrathin ZrO2 films or metal/ZrO2 interfaces. Furthermore, our results indicate that the common approach of calculating core level shifts by DFT including final-state effects should be taken with care for thicker insulating films, clusters, and bulk insulators. PMID:25688293

  20. Coadsorbed species explain the mechanism of methanol temperature-desorption on CeO2(111)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutton, Jonathan E.; Steven H. Overbury; Beste, Ariana

    2016-03-24

    Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to investigate the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of methanol from CeO2(111). For the first time, low-temperature water formation and high-temperature methanol desorption are explained by our calculations. High coverages of methanol, which correspond to experimental conditions, are required to properly describe these features of the TPD spectrum. We identify a mechanism for the low-temperature formation of water involving the dissociation of two methanol molecules on the same surface O atom and filling of the resulting surface vacancy with one of the methoxy products. After water desorption, methoxy groups are stabilized on the surfacemore » and react at higher temperatures to form methanol and formaldehyde by a disproportionation mechanism. Alternatively, the stabilized methoxy groups undergo sequential C–H scission reactions to produce formaldehyde. Calculated energy requirements and methanol/formaldehyde selectivity agree with the experimental data.« less

  1. Effect of Temperature on the Desorption of Lithium from Molybdenum(110) Surfaces: Implications for Fusion Reactor First Wall Materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mohan; Roszell, John; Scoullos, Emanuel V; Riplinger, Christoph; Koel, Bruce E; Carter, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    Determining the strength of Li binding to Mo is critical to assessing the survivability of Li as a potential first wall material in fusion reactors. We present the results of a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into how Li desorbs from Mo(110) surfaces, based on what can be deduced from temperature-programmed desorption measurements and density functional theory (DFT). Li desorption peaks measured at temperatures ranging from 711 K (1 monolayer, ML) to 1030 K (0.04 ML), with corresponding desorption onsets from 489 to 878 K, follow a trend similar to predicted Gibbs free energies for Li adsorption. Bader charge analysis of DFT densities reveals that repulsive forces between neighboring positively charged Li atoms increase with coverage and thus reduce the bond strength between Mo and Li, thereby lowering the desorption temperature as the coverage increases. Additionally, DFT predicts that Li desorbs at higher temperatures from a surface with vacancies than from a perfect surface, offering an explanation for the anomalously high desorption temperatures for the last Li to desorb from Mo(110). Analysis of simulated local densities of states indicates that the stronger binding to the defective surface is correlated with enhanced interaction between Li and Mo, involving the Li 2s electrons and not only the Mo 4d electrons as in the case of the pristine surface, but also the Mo 5s electrons in the case with surface vacancies. We suggest that steps and kinks present on the Mo(110) surface behave similarly and contribute to the high desorption temperatures. These findings imply that roughened Mo surfaces may strengthen Li film adhesion at higher temperatures. PMID:27027820

  2. Room-temperature associative adsorption and thermal dissociative desorption of trifluorobenzene on Si(100)2x1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojing; Leung, K. T.

    2004-03-01

    Functionalization of Si(100) has been extensively investigated in ultra-high vacuum and in solutions for its potential applications in molecular devices and chemical sensors. Aromatic molecules are good candidates because of their rich chemical properties, low cost and widespread use in industry. In the present work, trifluorobenzene (TFB) is used to study the effects of halogen substitution on benchmark molecules such as benzene and ethylene. Unlike halogenated ethylenes that exhibit dissociative adsorption at room temperature (RT), TFB is found to adsorb on Si(100) 2x1 associatively at RT and to undergo partial dissociation at a higher substrate temperature. Molecular desorption states at 380 K, 430K and 520K have also been observed in our temperature programmed desorption experiment, which is consistent with the desorption patterns of benzene and toluene. Additional desorption species of C6H6, SiF2 and F2 occurring over the same temperature range indicate a thermally driven dissociation process. Furthermore, ab initio calculation (with full geometry optimization) shows that selective adsorption occurs at the 2,5 position of the ring , which may be used for patterning of molecular devices on Si(100).

  3. Reversibility, Dopant Desorption, and Tunneling in the Temperature-Dependent Conductivity of Type-Separated, Conductive Carbon Nanotube Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. M.; Blackburn, J. L.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Coutts, T. J.; Heben, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the effects of doping and temperature on the conductivity of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks. We investigated nearly type-pure networks as well as networks comprising precisely tuned mixtures of metallic and semiconducting tubes. Networks were studied in their as-produced state and after treatments with nitric acid, thionyl chloride, and hydrazine to explore the effects of both intentional and adventitious doping. For intentionally and adventitiously doped networks, the sheet resistance (R{sub s}) exhibits an irreversible increase with temperature above {approx}350 K. Dopant desorption is shown to be the main cause of this increase and the observed hysteresis in the temperature-dependent resistivity. Both thermal and chemical dedoping produced networks free of hysteresis. Temperature-programmed desorption data showed that dopants are most strongly bound to the metallic tubes and that networks consisting of metallic tubes exhibit the best thermal stability. At temperatures below the dopant desorption threshold, conductivity in the networks is primarily controlled by thermally assisted tunneling through barriers at the intertube or interbundle junctions.

  4. Low-Temperature, Vacuum-Aided Thermal Desorption Studies on a Simulated Organic Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Farnsworth; D. R. Peterman; Gary L. Anderson; T. G. Garn

    2002-12-01

    This report describes an initial set of small scale lab tests conducted on surrogate waste materials to investigate mass release behavior of volatile organics (VOC’s) from a solidified liquid organic sludge matrix under vacuumaided, low-temperature thermal desorption conditions. Low temperature thermal desorption is being considered as a potential processing technology alternative to incineration, to remove gas generation limitations affecting the transportation of transuranic (TRU) contaminated organic sludge wastes to a designated off-site repository (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). The lab-scale tests provide initial exploratory level information on temperature profiles and rates of volatile organic desorption for a range of initial VOC/oil liquid mixture concentrations in a calcium silicate matrix, under low temperature heating and vacuum boundary conditions that are representative of potentially desirable “in-drum desorption” conditions. The results of these tests indicate that reduced operating pressures have a potential for significantly enhancing the rate of thermal desorption experienced from a liquid organic/oil solidified “sludge” waste. Furthermore, the results indicate that in-drum thermal desorption can be performed on organic sludge wastes, at reduced pressures, while maintaining an operating temperature sufficiently low to prevent destruction of the waste drum packaging materials (confinement) surrounding the waste. The results also indicate that VOC release behavior/rates in the vacuum thermal desorption process cannot be represented by a simple liquid-liquid mass-diffusion model, since overall mass release rates observed are generally two orders of magnitude greater than predicted by simple liquid-liquid mass diffusion. This is partially attributed to the effects of the transient temperature profiles within the sludge during heat up; however, the primary cause is thought to be micro boiling of the volatile organics within the

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF MERCURY DESORPTION FROM SORBENTS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. (R822721C697)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the dynamic desorption characteristics of mercury during the thermal treatment of mercury-loaded sorbents at elevated temperatures under fixed-bed operations. Experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm ID quartz bed enclosed in an electric furnace. ...

  6. CHARACTERISTICS OF MERCURY DESORPTION FROM SORBENTS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES. (R826694C697)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the dynamic desorption characteristics of mercury during the thermal treatment of mercury-loaded sorbents at elevated temperatures under fixed-bed operations. Experiments were carried out in a 25.4 mm ID quartz bed enclosed in an electric furnace. ...

  7. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON TRICHLOROETHYLENE DESORPTION FROM SILICA GEL AND NATURAL SEDIMENTS. 2. KINETICS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isothermal desorption rates were measured at 15, 30, and 60 src="/ncer/pubs/images/deg.gif">C for trichloroethylene (TCE) on a silica gel,
    an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction, and a clay and silt fraction, all
    at 100% relative humidity. Temperature-st...

  8. Medium temperature thermal desorption soil remediation case study - Selfridge Air National Guard Base, Mt. Clemens, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Flemingloss, K. )

    1994-08-01

    Carlo Environmental Technologies, Inc., (CET) was contracted by the Selfridge Air National Guard base (SANG) to remove an abandoned underground storage tank (UST) farm and remediate the contaminated soil using thermal desorption technology. The first phase of this project was to remove fourteen 25,000 gal underground storage tanks that had been installed during the 1930's, including all ancillary equipment at the facility. The USTs had been used to store aviation fuels, including both av-gas and jet fuels. The tank-removal project disclosed over 5000 yd[sup 3] of contaminated soil in the tank excavation pit, and excavation continued until analytical sampling demonstrated that the perimeter was within the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) Act 307 Type B cleanup criteria (state superfund act). The contaminated soil was trucked to a remote location on the base property for the thermal remediation. CET employed its Cedarapids 64MT thermal desorption plant to treat the contaminated soils from the tank removal site. These soils were predominantly clays, and the contamination included BTEX compounds up to 5 parts per million (ppm), and PNA compounds per 100 ppm. The medium temperature thermal desorption process, which heats the contaminated soil to approximately 850[degrees]F was successful in removing BTEX and PNA contamination from the soil (to levels below MDNR Type B cleanup criteria). The vapor stream from the desorption process was then filtered to minimize particulate emissions, and the contaminant compounds were then destroyed in the thermal oxidizer section of the process, at temperatures up to 1800[degrees]F. The remediated soil was returned to the original excavation as clean compacted fill material. With the use of the thermal desorption technology, CET remediated the site to MDNR cleanup standards, recycled the soils from the site, and eliminated off-site disposal liability for SANG.

  9. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: LOW TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF CERCLA SOILS AND DEBRIS USING THE IT LABORATORY SCALE THERMAL DESORPTION FURNACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study report on laboratory experiments on low temperature treatment of soils using thermal desorption. The purpose of the study was to determine if thermal desorption could remove volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from a synthetically prepared soil spiked with pre...

  10. Thermal desorption of hydrogen from carbon and graphite at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-07-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) has been investigated to obtain fundamental information of hydrogen behavior in graphite and CFC especially at high temperatures. Thirteen brands of graphite and CFC materials charged with deuterium gas are tested up to the temperature of 1720 K with a heating rate of 0.1 K/s. TDS spectra have at least four peaks at 600-700 K, around 900 K, 1300-1450 K and 1600-1650 K. The change of TDS spectra is measured for the samples, which are charged with deuterium at 1273 K under a different pressure in the range of 83 Pa to 79 kPa. Physical and chemical states of deuterium in graphite and mechanisms of desorption are discussed.

  11. Low-temperature thermal desorption of diesel polluted soil: influence of temperature and soil texture on contaminant removal kinetics.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, P P; Giustra, M G; Vagliasindi, F G A

    2011-01-15

    Five soil size aggregate fractions, corresponding to coarse (500-840 μm), medium (200-350 μm), fine (75-200 μm) sand, silt (10-75 μm) and clay (<4 μm), were artificially contaminated with diesel, and thermally treated using a laboratory scale apparatus to investigate the effect of soil texture on contaminant adsorption and removal. Ex situ thermal process was simulated using helium as the carrier gas at a flow rate of 1.5 L min(-1), different temperatures (100-300 °C) and different treatment times (5-30 min). The amount of contaminant adsorbed on the soil and the residual amount after thermal treatment was determined by gas chromatography. Results showed that adsorption phenomena and desorption efficiency were affected by the soil texture and that temperature and time of treatment were key factors in remedial process. A temperature of 175 °C is sufficient to remedy diesel polluted sandy and silty soils, whereas a higher temperature (250 °C) is needed for clays. Thermal desorption of diesel polluted soil was shown to be governed by first-order kinetics. Results are of practical interest and may be used in scaling-up and designing desorption systems for preliminary cost and optimal condition assessment. PMID:20940088

  12. ON-SITE ENGINEERING REPORT FOR THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMAL DESORPTION PILOT-SCALE TEST ON CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance of the thermal desorption process for removal of organic contaminants, mostly polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), from soils was evaluated. The Superfund Site soil tested was a fine sandy soil contaminated with creosote. An optimum operating temperature of 550 C...

  13. ON-SITE ENGINEERING REPORT FOR THE LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMAL DESORPTION PILOT-SCALE TEST ON CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Performance of the thermal desorption process for removal of organic contaminants, mostly polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), from soils was evaluated. he Superfund Site soil tested was a fine sandy soil contaminated with creosote. n optimum operating temperature of 550 deg...

  14. Finite-Temperature Hydrogen Adsorption/Desorption Thermodynamics Driven by Soft Vibration Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Yong-Hyun, Kim

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured or porous materials requires enhanced dihydrogen adsorption. In this work we reveal that room-temperature hydrogen storage is possible not only by the enhanced adsorption, but also by making use of the vibrational free energy from soft vibration modes. These modes exist for example in the case of metallo-porphyrin-incorporated graphenes (M-PIGs) with out-of-plane ( buckled ) metal centers. There, the in-plane potential surfaces are flat because of multiple-orbital-coupling between hydrogen molecules and the buckled-metal centers. This study investigates the finite-temperature adsorption/desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on M-PIGs by employing first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations. Our results suggest that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified by explicitly taking finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  15. Isothermal-desorption-rate measurements in the vicinity of the Curie temperature for H2 chemisorbed on nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the isothermal desorption rate of H2 chemisorbed onto polycrystalline nickel films made for temperatures spanning the Curie temperature of the nickel film are presented. Desorption kinetics were followed by measuring the decay of the change in resistance of the nickel film brought about by hydrogen chemisorption after gas-phase H2 had been rapidly evacuated. The desorption rate is found to undergo an anomalous decrease in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, accompanied by an increase in the desorption activation energy and the equilibrium constant for the chemisorbed hydrogen. The results are interpreted in terms of anomalous variations in rate constants for the formation of the precursor molecular adsorbed state and the chemisorbed atomic state due to the phase transition in the nickel. The changes in rate constants are also considered to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on a spin coupling between the adatom and the magnetic substrate.

  16. Deuterium desorption temperature of Mg-Ti composites prepared by the method of atom-by-atom component mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, O. M.; Kulish, V. G.; Zhurba, V. I.; Neklyudov, I. M.; Progolaieva, V. O.; Kuprin, A. S.; Lomino, N. S.; Ovcharenko, V. D.; Kolodiy, I. V.; Galitskiy, O. G.

    2013-12-01

    The plasma evaporation-sputtering method has been applied to obtain composite materials of the Mg-Ti system. Variations in the temperature of the ion-implanted deuterium desorption as a function of the component concentration are studied. It has been established, that introduction of titanium into magnesium leads to the significant decrease of deuterium desorption temperature, namely, to 400-450 K as compared to ~800 K in the case of deuterium release (desorption) from magnesium. The step-like shape of the deuterium desorption temperature curve evidences on the existence of two different structural states of the Mg-Ti composite depending on the ratio of components. The deuterium temperature drop can be caused by filamentary inclusions composed of titanium atoms in magnesium (insoluble component in magnesium) produced in the process of composite formation and providing the deuterium release from the sample at lower temperature (channels for deuterium diffusion and desorption through the surface barrier). The deuterium desorption data obtained on the example of Mg-Ti composites provide a support for further research into hydrogen storage materials containing not readily soluble chemical elements in the alloy components.

  17. Kinetics of desorption of KCL from polyvinyl alcohol-borate hydrogel in aqueous-alcoholic solvents at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Rehana; Abdeen, Zain Ul

    2015-11-01

    Desorption kinetics of adsorbed KCl from Polyvinyl alcohol borate hydrogel was studied by conductivity method in aqueous system and aqueous binary solvent system using 50% aqueous-methanol, aqueous- ethanol and aqueous-propanol at different temperature ranging from 293 to 313 K. Desorption process follows pseudo first order and intra particle diffusion kinetics was analyzed on the basis of linear regression coefficient R 2 and chi square test χ2 values. The process of desorption of KCl from hydrogel was favorable in aqueous system, the study reveals the fact that the polarity of solvent influenced the kinetics of desorption, on decrement of polarity of solvent rate, rate constant and intra particle rate constant decreases. Based on intra particle kinetic equation fitting it was concluded that desorption was initiated by removal of ions from surface of hydrogel later on ions interacted inside the cross linked unit was also become free. Temperature enhances the rate, rate constant and intra particle rate constant. Thermodynamic parameters attributed towards the fact that the process of desorption of KCl from hydrogel is non-spontaneous in nature.

  18. Effect of temperature on the desorption and decomposition of mustard from activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Karwacki, C.J.; Buchanan, J.H.; Mahle, J.J.; Buettner, L.C.; Wagner, G.W.

    1999-12-07

    Experimental data are reported for the desorption of bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, (a sulfur mustard or HD) and its decomposition products from activated coconut shell carbon (CSC). The results show that under equilibrium conditions changes in the HD partial pressure are affected primarily by its loading and temperature of the adsorbent. The partial pressure of adsorbed HD is found to increase by about a decade for each 25 C increase in temperature for CSC containing 0.01--0.1 g/g HD. Adsorption equilibria of HD appear to be little affected by coadsorbed water. Although complicated by its decomposition, the distribution of adsorbed HD (of known amount) appears to occupy pores of similar energy whether dry or in the presence of adsorbed water. On dry CSC adsorbed HD appears stable, while in the presence of water its decomposition is marked by hydrolysis at low temperature and thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures. The principal volatile products desorbed are 1,4-thioxane, 2-chloroethyl vinyl sulfide and 1,4-dithiane, with the latter favoring elevated temperatures.

  19. Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of amine desorption from a siliceous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, D.E.; Proctor, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Variable-temperature diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy was used in conjunction with pyridine desorption studies to assess the acidity of a siliceous surface. An amorphous, porous silica substrate was investigated. The results contribute to an understanding of the acidic strength and the distribution of acidic sites on this material. A hydrogen-bonding interaction was observed between pyridine and the surface. Isothermal rate constants and an activation energy for the desorption process are reported and can be used as direct measures of surface site acidity. 23 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Effects of temperature on trichloroethylene desorption from silica gel and natural sediments. 1. Isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, C.J.; Reinhard, M.

    1997-03-01

    Aqueous phase isotherms were calculated from vapor phase desorption isotherms measured at 15, 30, and 60{degree}C for trichloroethylene on a silica gel, an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction, and a clay and silt fraction, all at 100% relative humidity. Isosteric heats of adsorption (Q{sub st}(q)) were calculated as a function of the sorbed concentration, q, and examined with respect to the following mechanisms: adsorption on water wet mineral surfaces, sorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM), and adsorption in hydrophobic micropores. Silica gel, sand fraction, and clay and silt fraction 60{degree}C isotherms are characterized by a Freundlich region and a region at very low concentrations where isotherm points deviate from log-log linear behavior. The latter is designated the non-Freundlich region. For the silica gel, values of Q{sub st}(q) (9.5-45 kJ/mol) in both regions are consistent with adsorption in hydrophobic micropores. For the natural solids, values of Q{sub st}(q) in the Freundlich regions are less than or equal to zero and are consistent with sorption on water wet mineral surfaces and in AOM. In the non-Freundlich regions, diverging different temperature isotherms with decreasing q and Q{sub st}(q) value of 34 kJ/mol for the clay and silt fraction suggest that adsorption is occurring in hydrophobic micropores. The General Adsorption Isotherm is used to capture this adsorption heterogeneity. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  2. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON TRICHLOROETHYLENE DESORPTION FROM SILICA GEL AND NATURAL SEDIMENTS. 1. ISOTHERMS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous phase isotherms were calculated from vapor phase desorption isotherms
    measured at 15, 30, and 60 C for
    trichloroethylene on a silica gel, an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction,
    and a clay and silt fraction, all at...

  3. NaAlH4 Mixed with Carbon Nanotubes, Fullerene, and Titanium to Yield the Lowest Temperature for Hydrogen Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildebrand, Jennifer; McFadden, Patrick; Kim, Sanga; Dobbins, Tabbetha

    Recent research in hydrogen storage has improved dehydrogenation methods with solid-state compounds. NaAlH4 is a complex hydrides which release hydrogen at a lower temperature making the compound a great candidate for hydrogen storage. However, a catalyst should be combined with NaAlH4 to release the lowest desorption temperature. Prior research showed that interaction of NaAlH4 with nanotube or fullerene effectively weakens the Al-H bonds causing hydrogen desorption at lower temperatures. In the present study, NaAlH4 is ball milled with three of these catalysts: titanium, carbon nanotubes and fullerene and the milling time is varied from 10 to 30 minutes to compare the dehydrogenation rates in each setup. The phase structures were identified using the X-ray diffraction. Of these catalysts, the fullerene yielded the most interesting result showing nanostructuring of the hydride during ball milling. The possibility of ``shot peening'' of the NaAlH4 by the fullerenes is explored.

  4. Desorption Kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, Methane, Ethane, and Propane from Graphene and Amorphous Solid Water Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; May, R Alan; Kay, Bruce D

    2016-03-01

    The desorption kinetics for Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, methane, ethane, and propane from graphene-covered Pt(111) and amorphous solid water (ASW) surfaces are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The TPD spectra for all of the adsorbates from graphene have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent the zero-order desorption for all of the adsorbates. An Arrhenius analysis is used to obtain desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from graphene for all of the adsorbates. In contrast, the leading desorption edges for the adsorbates from ASW do not align (for coverages < 2 ML). The nonalignment of TPD leading edges suggests that there are multiple desorption binding sites on the ASW surface. Inversion analysis is used to obtain the coverage dependent desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from ASW for all of the adsorbates. PMID:26595145

  5. Chemometric optimization of a low-temperature plasma source design for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Anastasia; Engelhard, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Low-temperature plasmas (LTPs) are attractive sources for atomic and molecular mass spectrometry (MS). In the past, the LTP probe, which was first described by Harper et al., was used successfully for direct molecular mass spectrometric analysis with minimal sample pretreatment in a variety of applications. Unfortunately, the desorption/ionization source itself is commercially not available and custom-built LTP set-ups with varying geometry and operational configurations were utilized in the past. In the present study, a rapid chemometrics approach based on systematic experiments and multivariate data analysis was used to optimize the LTP probe geometry and positioning relative to the atmospheric-pressure inlet of a mass spectrometer. Several parameters were studied including the probe geometry, electrode configuration, quartz tube dimensions, probe positioning and operating conditions. It was found that the plasma-to-MS-inlet distance, the plasma-to-sample-plate distance, and the angle between the latter are very important. Additional effects on the analytical performance were found for the outer electrode width, the positioning of the electrodes, the inner diameter of the quartz tube, the quartz wall thickness, and the gas flow. All experiments were performed using additional heating of the sample to enhance thermal desorption and maximize the signal (T = 150 °C). After software-assisted optimization, attractive detection limits were achieved (e.g., 1.8 × 10- 7 mol/L for 4-acetamidothiophenol). Moreover, relative standard deviation (RSD) improved from values of up to 30% before optimization to < 15% RSD after the procedure was completed. This chemometrics approach for method optimization is not limited to LTP-MS and considered to be attractive for other plasma-based instrumentation as well.

  6. Low-Temperature Desorption of N2O from NO on Rutile TiO2(110)-1x1

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Boseong; Li, Zhenjun; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2014-05-08

    We find that NO dosed on rutile TiO2(110)-1×1 at substrate temperatures as low as 50 K readily reacts to produce N2O which desorbs promptly from the surface leaving an oxygen adatom behind. The desorption rate of N2O reaches a maximum value after 1 – 2 sec at an NO flux of 1.2 ×1014 NO/cm2∙sec and then decreases rapidly as the initially clean, reduced TiO2(110) surface with ~5% oxygen vacancies (VO’s) becomes covered with oxygen adatoms and unreacted NO. The maximum desorption rate is also found to increase as the substrate temperature is raised up to about 100 K. Interestingly, the N2O desorption during the low-temperature (LT) NO dose is strongly suppressed when molecular oxygen is predosed, whereas it persists on the surface with VO’s passivated by surface hydroxyls. Our results show that the surface charge, not the VO sites, plays a dominant role in the LT N2O desorption induced by a facile NO reduction at such low temperatures.

  7. N2 and CO Desorption Energies from Water Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Balfe, Jodi; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N2 are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N2 abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N2H+ anti-correlations in disks, protostars, and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N2 ice desorption, the difference between CO and N2 desorption energies is small; the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93 ± 0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of 13CO and 15N2 on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, 15N2 desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of 13CO desorption. The 15N2 and 13CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different submonolayer coverages on compact water ice, and 1435 and 1575 K for ˜1 ML of ice on top of porous water ice. For all equivalent experiments, the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is consistently 0.9. Whenever CO and N2 ice reside in similar ice environments (e.g., experience a similar degree of interaction with water ice) their desorption temperatures should thus be within a few degrees of one another. A smaller N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio may be present in interstellar and circumstellar environments if the average CO ice molecules interacts more with water ice compared to the average N2 molecules.

  8. N2 and CO Desorption Energies from Water Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Balfe, Jodi; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I.

    2016-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N2 are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N2 abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N2H+ anti-correlations in disks, protostars, and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N2 ice desorption, the difference between CO and N2 desorption energies is small; the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93 ± 0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of 13CO and 15N2 on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, 15N2 desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of 13CO desorption. The 15N2 and 13CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034–1143 K and 1155–1298 K for different submonolayer coverages on compact water ice, and 1435 and 1575 K for ∼1 ML of ice on top of porous water ice. For all equivalent experiments, the N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio is consistently 0.9. Whenever CO and N2 ice reside in similar ice environments (e.g., experience a similar degree of interaction with water ice) their desorption temperatures should thus be within a few degrees of one another. A smaller N2-to-CO desorption energy ratio may be present in interstellar and circumstellar environments if the average CO ice molecules interacts more with water ice compared to the average N2 molecules.

  9. Thermal Desorption of Au from W(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczyszyn, R.; Chrzanowski, J.; Godowski, P. J.

    2000-12-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au--Au and Au--W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment.

  10. Temperature-dependent phase transition and desorption free energy of sodium dodecyl sulfate at the water/vapor interface: approaches from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng; Lu, Xiancai; Liu, Xiandong; Hou, Qingfeng; Zhu, Youyi; Zhou, Huiqun

    2014-09-01

    Adsorption of surfactants at the water/vapor interface depends upon their chemical potential at the interface, which is generally temperature-dependent. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to reveal temperature influences on the microstructure of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) molecule adsorption layer. At room temperature, SDS molecules aggregate at the interface, being in a liquid-expanded phase, whereas they tend to spread out and probably transit to a gaseous phase as the temperature increases to above 318 K. This phase transition has been confirmed by the temperature-dependent changes in two-dimensional array, tilt angles, and immersion depths to the aqueous phase of SDS molecules. The aggregation of SDS molecules accompanies with larger immersion depths, more coordination of Na(+) ions, and less coordination of water. Desorption free energy profiles show that higher desorption free energy appears for SDS molecules at the aggregate state at low temperatures, but no energy barrier is observed. The shapes of desorption free energy profiles depend upon the distribution of SDS at the interface, which, in turn, is related to the phase state of SDS. Our study sheds light on the development of adsorption thermodynamics and kinetics theories. PMID:25127193

  11. Desorption of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on extracellular polymeric substances: effects of pH, EDTA, Ca(II) and temperature shocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daoyong; Lee, Duu-Jong; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) existed ubiquitously in biological systems affect the mobility and availability of heavy metals in the environments. The adsorption-desorption behaviors of Hg(II) and Sb(V) on EPS were investigated. The sorption rates follow Sb(V) > Hg(II), and the desorption rates follow reverse order. Applications of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), Ca(II) and pH shocks affect desorption rates and desorbed quantities of Hg(II) from EPS-Hg complex. Temperature shock minimally affects the desorption rate of Hg(II). Conversely, the EPS-Sb complex is stable subjected to EDTA, Ca(II), temperature or pH shocks. The excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and fast-Fourier (FT-IR) analysis showed that Hg(II) and Sb(V) principally interacted with polysaccharides and protein-like compounds in the EPS, respectively. The EPS-Hg complex presents a time bomb that may release high levels of Hg(II) in short time period under environmental shocks. PMID:23247408

  12. Hydrogen desorption kinetics for aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma processed silicon (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Carter, Richard J.; Schneider, Thomas P.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    The desorption kinetics of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from silicon (001) surfaces exposed to aqueous hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasmas were examined using temperature programmed desorption. Multiple H{sub 2} desorption states were observed and attributed to surface monohydride (SiH), di/trihydride (SiH{sub 2/3}), and hydroxide (SiOH) species, subsurface hydrogen trapped at defects, and hydrogen evolved during the desorption of surface oxides. The observed surface hydride species were dependent on the surface temperature during hydrogen plasma exposure with mono, di, and trihydride species being observed after low temperature exposure (150 °C), while predominantly monohydride species were observed after higher temperature exposure (450 °C). The ratio of surface versus subsurface H{sub 2} desorption was also found to be dependent on the substrate temperature with 150 °C remote hydrogen plasma exposure generally leading to more H{sub 2} evolved from subsurface states and 450 °C exposure leading to more H{sub 2} desorption from surface SiH{sub x} species. Additional surface desorption states were observed, which were attributed to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111) facets formed as a result of surface etching by the remote hydrogen plasma or aqueous hydrogen fluoride treatment. The kinetics of surface H{sub 2} desorption were found to be in excellent agreement with prior investigations of silicon surfaces exposed to thermally generated atomic hydrogen.

  13. An investigation of the desorption of hydrogen from lithium oxide using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.P.; Johnson, C.E.; Ortiz-Villafuerte, J.

    1995-04-01

    The addition of hydrogen to the purge stream has been shown to enhance tritium release from ceramic breeder materials; however, this added hydrogen can lead to increased costs in the tritium purification system. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the interactions between hydrogen and lithium oxide surfaces so that the authors can take full advantage of the observed enhancement of tritium release caused by hydrogen addition without incurring high costs in the tritium purification plant.

  14. Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption study of isopropanol and tert-butanol on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaehyun; Kim, Kwansoo; Yong, Kijung

    2002-09-01

    Thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of isopropanol (IPA) and tert-butanol on Si(100) were studied using temperature programed desorption. Adsorbed alcohols studied were decomposed into atomic hydrogen and alkoxy on the surface. During heating the sample up to 1000 K, acetone, propylene, and hydrogen were desorbed as decomposition products of IPA on Si(100). Desorption pathways of IPA on Si(100) were largely consistent with those on metal surfaces: beta-hydride elimination reaction to acetone and C-O scission to propylene. For tert-butanol, which has no beta-hydrogen, isobutene and hydrogen were observed as main desorption products. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  15. Adsorption and Desorption of Hydrogen by Gas-Phase Palladium Clusters Revealed by In Situ Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, Masato; Kudoh, Satoshi; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen by gas-phase Pd clusters, Pdn(+), were investigated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The desorption processes were examined by heating the clusters that had adsorbed hydrogen at room temperature. The clusters remaining after heating were monitored by mass spectrometry as a function of temperature up to 1000 K, and the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) curve was obtained for each Pdn(+). It was found that hydrogen molecules were released from the clusters into the gas phase with increasing temperature until bare Pdn(+) was formed. The threshold energy for desorption, estimated from the TPD curve, was compared to the desorption energy calculated by using DFT, indicating that smaller Pdn(+) clusters (n ≤ 6) tended to have weakly adsorbed hydrogen molecules, whereas larger Pdn(+) clusters (n ≥ 7) had dissociatively adsorbed hydrogen atoms on the surface. Highly likely, the nonmetallic nature of the small Pd clusters prevents hydrogen molecule from adsorbing dissociatively on the surface. PMID:26043808

  16. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Task 4. Third Contractor Information Meeting. [Adsorption-desorption on geological media

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The study subject of this meeting was the adsorption and desorption of radionuclides on geologic media under repository conditions. This volume contans eight papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for all eight papers. (DLC)

  17. Oxygen sorption and desorption properties of selected lanthanum manganites and lanthanum ferrite manganites.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Skou, Eivind M; Jacobsen, Torben

    2015-06-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) with a carrier gas was used to study the oxygen sorption and desorption properties of oxidation catalysts and solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode materials (La(0.85) Sr(0.15)0.95 MnO(3+δ) (LSM) and La(0.60) Sr(0.40) Fe(0.80) Mn(0.20) O(3-δ) (LSFM). The powders were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and BET surface adsorption. Sorbed oxygen could be distinguished from oxygen originating from stoichiometry changes. The results indicated that there is one main site for oxygen sorption/desorption. The amount of sorbed oxygen was monitored over time at different temperatures. Furthermore, through data analysis it was shown that the desorption peak associated with oxygen sorption is described well by second-order desorption kinetics. This indicates that oxygen molecules dissociate upon adsorption and that the rate-determining step for the desorption reaction is a recombination of monatomic oxygen. Typical problems with re-adsorption in this kind of TPD setup were revealed to be insignificant by using simulations. Finally, different key parameters of sorption and desorption were determined, such as desorption activation energies, density of sorption sites, and adsorption and desorption reaction order. PMID:25784205

  18. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    PubMed

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation. PMID:25702992

  19. Probing Electron Transfer Dynamics at MgO Surfaces by Mg-Atom Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Henyk, Matthias; Beck, Kenneth M.; Trevisanutto, P. E.; Sushko, Petr V.; Hess, Wayne P.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2006-08-14

    Desorption of a weakly bound adsorbate from a porous solid was studied for the case of N2 on amorphous solid water (ASW). Porous ASW films of different thickness were grown on Pt(111) by ballistic deposition. N2 adsorption and desorption kinetics were monitored mass-spectrometrically. Temperature programmed desorption spectra show that with the increasing film thickness, the N2 desorption peak systematically shifts to higher temperatures. The results are explained and quantitatively reproduced by a simple model, which assumes that the N2 transport within the film is faster than the depletion rate to vacuum. The local coverage at the pore mouth determines the desorption rate. For thick ASW films (>1 μm), the assumption of the fast equilibration within the film is shown to be no longer valid due to diffusion limitations. The mechanisms of the adsorbate transport are discussed.

  20. Thermal desorption of hydrogen from the diamond C(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Lin, J.-C.

    1998-05-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) is used to measure the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the C(100) surface. Two major desorption channels, attributed to hydrogen desorption from (2×1) domains ( α sites) and disordered domain boundaries sites ( β sites) were observed. The change in the morphology of the C(100) surface upon hydrogen adsorption/desorption leads to a variation in the intensity ratio between the two hydrogen desorption peaks. The degradation results in smaller (2×1) domains, as evidenced by deteriorated LEED patterns in which the characteristic (2×1) half-order spots disappear. The (2×1) LEED pattern can be restored on the degraded C(100) surface by repeated hydrogenation-annealing cycles in the temperature range 300-1100 K. Fitting the experimental TPD data with simulated curves from the two-site model shows that desorption from the α site obeys first-order kinetics with a prefactor of 1.4±0.9×10 13 s -1 and an activation energy of 80.3±1.3 kcal mol -1, whereas the process giving rise to the β peak follows second-order kinetics with a prefactor of 2.3±0.9×10 13 s -1 (expressed in first-order units) and an activation energy of 75.1±0.5 kcal mol -1. Possible mechanisms for first-order recombinative hydrogen desorption from the C(100)-(2×1) surface are also discussed.

  1. Characterization of Biochar using Temperature Programmed Oxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar from the fast pyrolysis of biomass was characterized by Temperature Programmed Oxidation. This technique can be used to assess the oxidative reactivity of carbonaceous solids where higher temperature reactivity indicates greater structural order. The samples examined include soy and barley...

  2. Kinetic plots for programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Sander; Roeleveld, Kevin; Lynen, Frederic; Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2016-06-10

    The applicability of the kinetic plot theory to temperature-programmed gas chromatography (GC) has been confirmed experimentally by measuring the efficiency of a temperature gradient separation of a simple test mixture on 15, 30, 60 and 120m long (coupled) columns. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent data needed for the kinetic plot calculation can be obtained from isothermal experiments at the significant temperature, a temperature that characterizes the entire gradient run. Furthermore, optimal flow rates have been calculated for various combinations of column length, diameter, and operating temperature (or significant temperature). The tabulated outcome of these calculations provide good starting points for the optimization of any GC separation. PMID:27179678

  3. Electron stimulated molecular desorption of a non-evaporable Zr-V-Fe alloy getter at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pimpec, F.; Gröbner, O.; Laurent, J. M.

    2002-10-01

    Electron stimulated molecular desorption (ESD) from a non-evaporable getters (NEG) St 707 ® (SAES Getters ™) sample after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide (cf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, CRC Press, 1994), 13C 18O, has been studied on a laboratory setup. Measurements were performed using an electron beam of 300 eV kinetic energy, with an average electron intensity of 1.6×10 15 electrons s -1. The electrons were impinging on the 15 cm 2 target surface at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields η (molecules/electron) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, water, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide) for a fully activated NEG as well as for a NEG fully saturated with 13C 18O are lower than for OFHC copper baked at 120 °C. A small fraction only of the gas which is required to saturate the getter surface can be re-desorbed and thus appears to be accessible to ESD.

  4. Program predicts reservoir temperature and geothermal gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M.

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that a Fortran computer program has been developed to determine static formation temperatures (SFT) and geothermal gradient (GG). A minimum of input data (only two shut-in temperature logs) is required to obtain the values of SFT and GG. Modeling of primary oil production and designing enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects requires knowing the undisturbed (static) reservoir temperature. Furthermore, the bottom hole circulating temperature (BHCT) is an important factor affecting a cement's thickening time, rheological properties, compressive strength, development, and set time. To estimate the values of BHCT, the geothermal gradient should be determined with accuracy. Recently we obtained an approximate analytical solution which describes the shut-in temperature behavior.

  5. Isomer-Selective Detection of Aromatic Molecules in Temperature-Programmed Desorption for Model Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Winbauer, Andreas; Kollmannsberger, Sebastian L; Walenta, Constantin A; Schreiber, Patrick; Kiermaier, Josef; Tschurl, Martin; Heiz, Ueli

    2016-05-17

    Based on three different molecules dosed on a Pt(111) single crystal the selectivity and sensitivity of REMPI-TPD in UHV is investigated for a potential application in heterogeneous catalysis. It is shown that the two structural isomers ethylbenzene and p-xylene can be discriminated by REMPI in a standard TPD experiment. The latter is not possible for the ionization with electrons in a Q-MS. It is further demonstrated by benzene TPD studies that the sensitivity of the REMPI-TOF-MS is comparable to commercial EI-Q-MS solutions and enables the detection of less than 0.6% molecules of a monolayer. PMID:27078611

  6. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  7. Investigation of mechanisms contributing to slow desorption of hydrophobic organic compounds from mineral solids

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, J.; Grassian, D.; Jones, M.

    1999-04-15

    Predicting the transport and fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants in underground aquifers requires a mechanistic understanding of sediment-contaminant interactions. This research investigates the mechanisms contributing to the slow desorption of hydrophobic organic compounds from water-saturated mineral solids. The mechanisms investigated were adsorption-retarded aqueous diffusion, micropore diffusion, high-energy micropore adsorption, and micropore blockage by precipitated minerals. To reduce the potential confounding effects of adsorbent heterogeneity, a set of homogeneous silica gel and glass bead adsorbents were used in the investigation. Desorption rates for the slow-desorbing fractions of chloroform (CF), trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE) from silica gel did not conform to the pore-diffusion model for adsorption-retarded aqueous diffusion. This indicated that diffusion through adsorbent mesopores was not responsible for slow desorption from silica gel. Micropore-diffusion modeling of TCE desorption from three silica gels and microporous glass beads indicated that pores less than 2 nm in diameter were responsible for slow desorption. Desorption rates of CF, TCE, and PCE from silica gel were also measured in methanol solutions. Under methanol extraction conditions, desorption rates for all three compounds were 1--2 orders of magnitude less than under water-saturated conditions. The activation energy for TCE desorption from water-saturated silica gel was measured using temperature-programmed desorption. The TCE desorption activation energy of 15 kJ/mol was close to the dissolution enthalpy for silica gel of 13 kJ/mol. This supported the hypothesis that micropore blockage by precipitated minerals may be limiting contaminant desorption rates under water-saturated conditions.

  8. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000 °C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550 °C) as well as higher temperatures (>700 °C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ∼750 °C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800 °C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700 °C remain terminated by some surface C–O and

  9. Temperature measurements during the CAMP program. [Cold Arctic Mesopause Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philbrick, C. R.; Barnett, J.; Gerndt, R.; Offermann, D.; Pendleton, W. R., Jr.; Schlyter, P.; Witt, G.; Schmidlin, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    The Cold Arctic Mesopause Program (CAMP) was conducted at ESRANGE, Sweden, in July/August 1982. During the time period of several weeks, the temperature was monitored by ground-based OH emission spectrometers and by satellite radiance measurements. Rocket launchings occurred on the nights of 3/4 and 11/12 August. On 3/4 August, seven rocket payloads were launched during a period of noctilucent cloud sighting over ESRANGE. The presence of the NLC was confirmed by several rocket-borne photometer profiles. The temperature measurements showed that the temperature profiles in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere were near the expected values of high latitude summer models. A large amplitude wave structure with three temperature minima of 139K, 114K and 111K were observed at altitudes between 83 and 94 km. The temperature minimum at 83 km was the location of the observed NLC. The temperature minima caused by the growth of the gravity wave amplitude in the highly stable mesosphere provide the regions for the growth of particles by nucleation to optical scattering size, as well as regions where the nuclei for condensation can be formed through ion chemistry paths.

  10. Model verification of thermal programmed desorption-mass spectrometry for estimation of release energy values for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on mineral sorbents.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Sara I; Talley, Jeffrey W; Silliman, Stephan

    2004-11-01

    The physical availability of organic compounds in soil and sediment strongly influences their bioavailability and toxicity. Previous work has indicated that physical availability changes throughout the processes of aging and treatment and that it can be linked to the energy required to release the compound from its sorbent matrix, with a higher energy indicating a more tightly bound compound. This study focused on determining release energy values for various mineral geosorbents (glass beads, sand, and kaolin) contaminated with a 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mixture. The sorbents were analyzed using thermal program desorption/mass spectrometry (TPD/MS) and the release energy values were calculated from the resulting thermograms utilizing a nonlinear fit of the analytical solution to a simplified version of the Polanyi-Wigner equation. This solution method resulted in a series of combinations of values for the pre-exponential factor (v) and release energy (E) that produced desorption rate curves with similar errors when fit to actual data sets. These combinations can be viewed as an error surface, which clearly shows a valley of minimum error values spanning the range of both E and v. This indicates that this method may not provide a unique set of E- and v-values and suggests that the simplified version of the Polanyi-Wigner equation cannot be used to determine release energy based on TPD data alone. PMID:15559267

  11. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. For wastes containing up to 10 percent orga...

  12. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an EX SITU means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludge, and filter cakes by heating them at temperatures high enough to volatilize the organic contaminants. or wastes containing up to 10 percent organ...

  13. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: II. “Bottom-Up” Induced Desorption Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper II) and the preceding companion paper (Paper I) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In Paper I, we focused on the low coverage (pressure) regime where the release mechanism is controlled by crystallization-induced cracks formed in the ASW overlayer. In that regime the results were largely independent of the particular gas underlayer. Here in Paper II, we focus on the high coverage (pressure) regime where new desorption pathways become accessible prior to ASW crystallization. In contrast to the results for the low coverage regime (Paper I), the release mechanism is a function of the multilayer thickness and composition, displaying dramatically different behavior between Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, and CO. Two primary desorption pathways are observed. The first occurs between 100 and 150 K and manifests itself as sharp, extremely narrow desorption peaks. Temperature programmed desorption is utilized to show that abrupt desorption bursts are due to pressure induced structural failure of the ASW overlyaer. The second pathway occurs at low temperature (typically <100 K) where broad desorption peaks are observed. Desorption through this pathway is attributed to diffusion through pores and connected pathways formed during ASW deposition. The extent of desorption and the lineshape of the low temperature desorption peak are dependent on the substrate on which the gas underlayer is deposited. Angle dependent ballistic deposition of the ASW is used vary the porosity of overlayer and confirm that the low temperature desorption pathway is due to porosity that is inherent in the ASW overlayer during deposition.

  14. Interfacial chemistry of a perfluoropolyether lubricant studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature desorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1993-01-01

    The interfacial chemistry of Fomblin Z25, a commercial perfluoropolyether used as lubricant for space applications was studied with different metallic surfaces: 440C steel, gold, and aluminum. Thin layers of Fomblin Z25 were evaporated onto the oxide-free substrates, and the interfacial chemistry was studied using XPS and TDS. The reactions were induced by heating the substrate and by rubbing the substrate with a steel ball. Gold was found to be completely unreactive towards Fomblin at any temperature. Reaction at room temperature was observed only in the case of the aluminum substrate, the most reactive towards Fomblin Z25 of the substrates studied. It was necessary to heat the 440C steel substrate to 190 C to induce decomposition of the fluid. The degradation of the fluid was indicated by the formation of a debris layer at the interface. This debris layer, composed of inorganic and organic reaction products, when completely formed, passivated the surface from further attack to the Fromblin on top. The tribologically induced reactions on 440C steel formed a debris layer of similar chemical characteristics to the thermally induced layer. In all cases, the degradation reaction resulted in preferential consumption of the difluoroformyl carbon (-OCF2O-).

  15. Protein adsorption on low temperature isotropic carbon. III. Isotherms, competitivity, desorption and exchange of human albumin and fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Andrade, J D

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we consider the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on low temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC). A subsequent paper considers the adsorption of other plasma proteins [Feng L, Andrade JD, Colloids and Surfaces (in press)]. Carbon fragments and silica plates were used as adsorbents. Adsorption was carried out by incubating the adsorbents in solutions of 125I-labelled and unlabelled proteins (single component system), or with buffer-diluted human plasma (multicomponent system). Adsorbed proteins then underwent displacement by buffer, by single protein solutions or by dilute plasma. Results show that the LTIC substrate adsorbs a large amount of proteins before saturation, which may be due to multilayer adsorption. LTIC also irreversibly holds adsorbed proteins against the exchange agents used; little adsorbed proteins can be displaced, even after a very short adsorption time. There is no preferential adsorption for either albumin or fibrinogen on LTIC from their binary solutions, suggesting that both proteins have high affinities for the surface. Such strong interactions between LTIC and proteins are not attributed to electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, protein adsorption on the silica surface is selective and reversible, with a much higher affinity for fibrinogen than albumin and an even higher affinity for some other plasma proteins. The paper also discusses the effect of sequential protein addition to a solution on the surface concentration and suppression of adsorption of both proteins in the presence of other plasma proteins. A very important conclusion is that the LTIC surface is very active towards proteins adsorption. PMID:8061122

  16. The NASA high temperature superconductivity program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokoloski, Martin M.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1990-01-01

    It has been recognized from the onset that high temperature superconductivity held great promise for major advances across a broad range of NASA interests. The current effort is organized around four key areas: communications and data, sensors and cryogenics, propulsion and power, and space materials technology. Recently, laser ablated YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on LaAIO produced far superior RF characteristics when compared to metallic films on the same substrate. This achievement has enabled a number of unique microwave device applications, such as low insertion loss phase shifters and high Q filters. Melt texturing and melt quenched techniques are being used to produce bulk materials with optimized magnetic properties. These yttrium enriched materials possess enhanced flux pinning characteristics and will lead to prototype cryocooler bearings. Significant progress has also occurred in bolometer and current lead technology. Studies are being conducted to evaluate the effect of high temperature superconducting materials on the performance and life of high power magneto-plasma-dynamic thrusters. Extended studies were also performed to evaluate the benefit of superconducting magnetic energy storage for LEO space station, lunar and Mars mission applications. The project direction and level of effort of the program are also described.

  17. Glycolaldehyde, methyl formate and acetic acid adsorption and thermal desorption from interstellar ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Daren J.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Brown, Wendy A.; Woods, Paul M.; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben

    2015-02-01

    We have undertaken a detailed investigation of the adsorption, desorption and thermal processing of the astrobiologically significant isomers glycolaldehyde, acetic acid and methyl formate. Here, we present the results of laboratory infrared and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of the three isomers from model interstellar ices adsorbed on a carbonaceous dust grain analogue surface. Laboratory infrared data show that the isomers can be clearly distinguished on the basis of their infrared spectra, which has implications for observations of interstellar ice spectra. Laboratory TPD data also show that the three isomers can be distinguished on the basis of their thermal desorption behaviour. In particular, TPD data show that the isomers cannot be treated the same way in astrophysical models of desorption. The desorption of glycolaldehyde and acetic acid from water-dominated ices is very similar, with desorption being mainly dictated by water ice. However, methyl formate also desorbs from the surface of the ice, as a pure desorption feature, and therefore desorbs at a lower temperature than the other two isomers. This is more clearly indicated by models of the desorption on astrophysical time-scales corresponding to the heating rate of 25 and 5 M⊙ stars. For a 25 M⊙ star, our model shows that a proportion of the methyl formate can be found in the gas phase at earlier times compared to glycolaldehyde and acetic acid. This has implications for the observation and detection of these molecules, and potentially explains why methyl formate has been observed in a wider range of astrophysical environments than the other two isomers.

  18. Implementation of New TPD Analysis Techniques in the Evaluation of Second Order Desorption Kinetics of Cyanogen from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    E Ciftlikli; E Lee; J Lallo; S Rangan; S Senanayake; B Hinch

    2011-12-31

    The interactions of cyanide species with a copper (001) surface were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorbed cyanide species (CN{sub (a)}) undergo recombinative desorption evolving molecular cyanogen (C{sub 2}N{sub 2}). As the adsorbed CN species charge upon adsorption, mutually repulsive dipolar interactions lead to a marked desorption energy reduction with increasing CN{sub (a)} coverages. Two new TPD analysis approaches were developed, which used only accurately discernible observables and which do not assume constant desorption energies, E{sub d}, and pre-exponential values, v. These two approaches demonstrated a linear variation of E{sub d} with instantaneous coverage. The first approach involved an analysis of the variations of desorption peak asymmetry with initial CN coverages. The second quantitative approach utilized only temperatures and intensities of TPD peaks, together with deduced surface coverages at the peak maxima, also as a function of initial surface coverages. Parameters derived from the latter approach were utilized as initial inputs for a comprehensive curve fit analysis technique. Excellent fits for all experimental desorption curves were produced in simulations. The curve fit analysis confirms that the activation energy of desorption of 170-180 kJ/mol at low coverage decreases by up to 14-15 kJ/mol at CN saturation.

  19. Implementation of New TPD Analysis Techniques in the Evaluation of Second Order Desorption Kinetics of Cyanogen from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Hinch, B.J.; Senanayake, S.; Ciftlikli, E.Z.; Lee, E.Y.M.; Lallo, J.; Rangan, S.

    2010-12-21

    The interactions of cyanide species with a copper (001) surface were studied with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Adsorbed cyanide species (CN{sub (a)}) undergo recombinative desorption evolving molecular cyanogen (C{sub 2}N{sub 2}). As the adsorbed CN species charge upon adsorption, mutually repulsive dipolar interactions lead to a marked desorption energy reduction with increasing CN{sub (a)} coverages. Two new TPD analysis approaches were developed, which used only accurately discernible observables and which do not assume constant desorption energies, E{sub d}, and pre-exponential values, v. These two approaches demonstrated a linear variation of E{sub d} with instantaneous coverage. The first approach involved an analysis of the variations of desorption peak asymmetry with initial CN coverages. The second quantitative approach utilized only temperatures and intensities of TPD peaks, together with deduced surface coverages at the peak maxima, also as a function of initial surface coverages. Parameters derived from the latter approach were utilized as initial inputs for a comprehensive curve fit analysis technique. Excellent fits for all experimental desorption curves were produced in simulations. The curve fit analysis confirms that the activation energy of desorption of 170-180 kJ/mol at low coverage decreases by up to 14-15 kJ/mol at CN saturation.

  20. THERMAL DESORPTION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption is an ex situ means to physically separate volatile and some semivolatile contaminants from soil, sediments, sludges, and filter cakes. or wastes containing up to 10% organics or less, thermal desorption can be used alone for site remediation. t also may find a...

  1. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460 °C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51 ± 3 and 87 ± 5 kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475 °C and E{sub d} of 110 ± 5 kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585 °C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62 ± 3 and 270 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited

  2. Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Some Components of Biomass by Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palianytsia, Borys; Kulik, Tetiana; Dudik, Olesia; Cherniavska, Tetiana; Tonkha, Oksana

    The investigation of thermal transformations of lignin samples have been carried out using temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry method (TPD-MS). Main stages and products of lignin pyrolysis have been identified. The first stages (Tmax = 230 °C and Tmax = 300 °C) are attributed to thermal transformations of lignin peripheral polysaccharide fragments such as hemicellulose and cellulose respectively. The second stage (Tmax = 335 °C) is associated with desorption of lignin structural elements in the molecular forms as a result of depolymerization processes of polymeric blocks of lignin. The third stage (Tmax = 370 °C) correspond to a deeper decomposition of lignin and characterized by desorption of smaller structural fragments in molecular forms (m/z = 110, pyrocatechol). Pressure-temperature curves of pyrolysis of lignin samples have been analyzed.

  3. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  4. The interaction of CO and Li at a Ru( 0 0 1 ) surface—a thermal desorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jänsch, H. J.; Polenz, C.; Bromberger, C.; Detje, M.; Ebinger, H. D.; Polivka, B.; Preyß, W.; Veith, R.; Fick, D.

    2001-12-01

    The interaction of carbon monoxide with the alkali metal lithium is studied on the single crystal substrate ruthenium surface Ru(0 0 1). The exceptionally strong interaction between CO and Li is investigated under various CO and Li coverages. Temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy shows the shift of the low coverage CO desorption peak ( θCO<0.05) from its initial desorption temperature at 520-840 K when the lithium coverage is increased from zero to 1/3 of a mono-layer. Above that, the CO desorption temperature does no longer shift, but the desorption is concentrated in a single sharp Li/CO codesorption feature. Even stronger interaction of CO and Li is seen on a gold covered Ru surface (Au/Ru(0 0 1)). Au blocks the adsorption of CO. In the presence of Li however CO adsorbs readily. The uptake is roughly half that of the bare Ru surface and the thermal desorption occurs only above 900 K with the strong codesorption feature of Li and CO at 1080 K. The formation of a Au/Li alloy on the Ru substrate is confirmed.

  5. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  6. Molecular desorption of a nonevaporable getter St 707 irradiated at room temperature with synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pimpec, F.; Gröbner, O.; Laurent, J. M.

    2003-05-01

    Photon stimulated molecular desorption from a nonevaporable getter (NEG) St 707® (SAES Getters™) surface after conditioning and after saturation with isotopic carbon monoxide [cf. nomenclature in Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 74th edition, edited by D. R. Lide (CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1994)] 13C18O, has been studied on a dedicated beamline at the EPA ring at CERN. The synchrotron radiation of 194 eV critical energy and with an average photon intensity of ~1×1017 photons s-1 was impinging on the sample at perpendicular incidence. It is found that the desorption yields ɛ (molecules/photon) of the characteristic gases in an UHV system (hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide) for a freshly activated NEG and for a NEG fully saturated with 13C18O are lower than that of 300 °C baked stainless steel.

  7. Hydrogen chemisorption and thermal desorption on the diamond C(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.; Song, K.-J.; Wang, Y. L.; Lu, H.-L.; Chuang, T. J.; Lin, J.-C.

    1997-11-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) were utilized to study the interaction of atomic hydrogen with single crystal diamond C(111) surface. From isotherm and isostere analysis of TPD spectra acquired at various sample heating rates ranging from 0.6 K/s to 30 K/s, the kinetic parameters were extracted. It is found that molecular hydrogen desorption from the C(111) surface exhibits the first-order kinetics. This result is confirmed by no apparent shift in peak temperatures of TPD spectra for hydrogen coverage above 0.2 ML. At lower coverage regime, the isothermal desorption experiment also indicates the first-order desorption kinetics. A nearly coverage-independent activation energy of (3.7±0.1) eV and a prefactor of (9.5±4.0)×1013s-1 are obtained except at relatively low coverages (below ˜0.2 ML). In addition, the half-order LEED spots intensity decreases linearly with increase of the hydrogen coverage and drops to zero at ˜0.5 ML. These results are interpreted with a model that during adsorption hydrogen atoms segregate to form metastable, highly hydrogenated domains from where hydrogen atoms recombine and desorb concertedly as the substrate surface is heated up. The comparison of this work with the hydrogen adsorption and desorption on silicon surfaces is also discussed.

  8. Rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs using thermal desorption - SALDI mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnikov, A. A.; Kubasov, A. E.; Georgieva, V. B.; Borodkov, A. S.; Nikiforov, S. M.; Simanovsky, Ya O.; Alimpiev, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach to the rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs by surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry with the rotating ball interface coupled with temperature programmed thermal desorption has been developed. Analytes were thermally desorbed and deposited onto the surface of amorphous silicon substrate attached to the rotating ball. The ball was rotated and the deposited analytes were analyzed using SALDI. The effectiveness of coupling SALDI mass spectrometry with thermal desorption was evaluated by the direct and rapid analysis of tablets containing lidocaine, diphenhydramine and propranolol without any sample pretreatment. The overall duration of the screening procedure was 30÷40 sec. Real urine samples were studied for drug analysis. It is shown that with simple preparation steps, urine samples can be quantitatively analyzed using the proposed technique with the detection limits in the range of 0.2÷0.5 ng/ml.

  9. Current-Driven Hydrogen Desorption from Graphene: Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Pal, Partha Pratim; Seideman, Tamar; Guisinger, Nathan P; Guest, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    Electron-stimulated desorption of hydrogen from the graphene/SiC(0001) surface at room temperature was investigated with ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy and ab initio calculations in order to elucidate the desorption mechanisms and pathways. Two different desorption processes were observed. In the high electron energy regime (4-8 eV), the desorption yield is independent of both voltage and current, which is attributed to the direct electronic excitation of the C-H bond. In the low electron energy regime (2-4 eV), however, the desorption yield exhibits a threshold dependence on voltage, which is explained by the vibrational excitation of the C-H bond via transient ionization induced by inelastic tunneling electrons. The observed current independence of the desorption yield suggests that the vibrational excitation is a single-electron process. We also observed that the curvature of graphene dramatically affects hydrogen desorption. Desorption from concave regions was measured to be much more probable than desorption from convex regions in the low electron energy regime (∼2 eV), as would be expected from the identified desorption mechanism. PMID:26787160

  10. First-principles study of water desorption from montmorillonite surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Meng, Yingfeng; Liu, Houbin; Yang, Mingli

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge about water desorption is important to give a full picture of water diffusion in montmorillonites (MMT), which is a driving factor in MMT swelling. The desorption paths and energetics of water molecules from the surface of MMT with trapped Li(+), Na(+) or K(+) counterions were studied using periodic density functional theory calculations. Two paths--surface and vacuum desorption--were designed for water desorption starting from a stationary structure in which water bonds with both the counterion and the MMT surface. Surface desorption is energetically more favorable than vacuum desorption due to water-surface hydrogen bonds that help stabilize the intermediate structure of water released from the counterion. The energy barriers of water desorption are in the order of Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+), which can be attributed to the short ionic radius of Li(+), which favors strong binding with the water molecule. The temperature dependence of water adsorption and desorption rates were compared based on the computed activation energies. Our calculations reveal that the water desorption on the MMT surface has a different mechanism from water adsorption, which results from surface effects favoring stabilization of water conformers during the desorption process. PMID:27083565

  11. Program for an improved hypersonic temperature-sensing probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reilly, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    Under a NASA Dryden-sponsored contract in the mid 1960s, temperatures of up to 2200 C were successfully measured using a fluid oscillator. The current program, although limited in scope, explores the problem areas which must be solved if this technique is to be extended to 10,000 R. The potential for measuring extremely high temperatures, using fluid oscillator techniques, stems from the fact that the measuring element is the fluid itself. The containing structure of the oscillator need not be brought to equilibrium temperature with with the fluid for temperature measurement, provided that a suitable calibration can be arranged. This program concentrated on review of high-temperature material developments since the original program was completed. Other areas of limited study included related pressure instrumentation requirements, dissociation, rarefied gas effects, and analysis of sensor time response.

  12. Surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, M. V.; Westre, E. D.; George, S. M.

    1991-03-01

    The surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were examined using laser-induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion displayed Arrhenius behavior and was coverage independent. The surface diffusion parameters for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were Edif=2.9±0.3 kcal/mol and D0=5.9×10-2±0.2 cm2/s. The desorption parameters for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001) were Edes=13.8±0.6 kcal/mol and νdes=2.8×1021±0.1 s-1. In comparison, the surface diffusion parameters for n-butane on Ru(001) were Edif=3.5±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=1.4×10-1±0.2 cm2/s. The desorption parameters for n-butane on Ru(001) were Edes=11.9±0.5 kcal/mol and νdes=3.6×1015±0.1 s-1. The corrugation ratio, defined as Ω≡Edif/Edes, was determined to be Ω=0.21 for perfluoro-n-butane on Ru(001). This corrugation ratio was substantially different than the corrugation ratio of Ω≊0.30 measured for n-butane and various other n-alkanes, cycloalkanes and branched alkanes on Ru(001). The comparison between perfluoro-n-butane and the other alkanes indicates that fluorination lowers the surface corrugation ratio on Ru(001). Likewise, fluorination significantly increases the preexponential for desorption from Ru(001). This study illustrates the magnitude of substituent effects on surface diffusion and desorption kinetics for a physisorbed molecule on a single-crystal metal surface.

  13. FINAL REPORT. HIGH TEMPERATURE CONDENSED PHASE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project was funded by the EM Science Program for the development of an integrated mass spectrometric analysis system capable of analyzing materials from room up to high temperatures, with the practical upper temperature limit to be experimentally determined. A primary object...

  14. High temperature static strain sensor development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C.; Lemkey, F.; Bailey, R.; Grant, H.

    1982-01-01

    The development of resistance strain gages which are useful for static strain measurements on nickel or cobalt superalloy parts inside a gas turbine engine on a test stand were examined. These measurements of a strain gage alloy development program which to be followed by an optional investigation of complete strain gage systems which will use the best of the alloys developed together with other system improvements is reviewed. The specific goal for the complete system is to make measurements to 2,000 micro epsilon with error of only + or - 10% over a 50 hour period. In addition to simple survival and stability, attaining a low thermal coefficient to resistivity, of order 100 ppm/K or less, is also a major goal. The first task was to select candidate alloys or alloy systems using a search of the literature and the available metallurgical theory. Alloy candidates were evaluated and compared by a grading system. Equipment and techniques were developed which are suitable for iterative studies of a variety of compositions. Many compositions were examined and significantly improved alloys were identified.

  15. Cyclic CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption behavior of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}: Structural, microstructural and kinetic variations produced as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-dlCruz, Lorena; Pfeiffer, Heriberto

    2013-08-15

    A structural, microstructural and kinetic analysis of the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–CO{sub 2} system was performed over 20 chemisorption–desorption cycles. Different cyclic experiments were performed between 500 and 800 °C. Although the best results were obtained in Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} sample treated at 550 °C, all the samples treated between 500 and 700 °C presented good CO{sub 2} chemisorption efficiencies and stabilities. On the contrary, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} sample treated at 800 °C presented a continuous decrement of the CO{sub 2} chemisorption. After 20 cycles all the samples presented a partial Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} decomposition, determined by the ZrO{sub 2} formation, which was associated to sodium sublimation. Additionally, the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} microstructural analysis showed a systematic morphological evolution. It was microscopically observed that Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} particles tend to fracture due to the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} formation. Later, after several cycles these tiny fractured particles sinter producing new polyhedral and dense Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–ZrO{sub 2} particles. Finally, an exhaustive kinetic analysis showed a high CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption stability at different temperatures. - Graphical abstract: A CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption analysis was performed in the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}–CO{sub 2} system. Different cyclic experiments were performed between 500 and 800 °C and the results showed high CO{sub 2} chemisorption efficiencies. Nevertheless the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} composition and microstructure evolved during the cycles. Highlights: • Different CO{sub 2} chemisorption–desorption cycles were performed in the Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} phase. • Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents interesting microstructural changes depending on temperature. • At T≤550 °C, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents the best cyclability due to microstructural factors. • At T≥600 °C, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} presents a partial decomposition after 20 cycles

  16. THERMAL DESORPTION...NOW YOU'RE COOKIN'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal desorption includes a number of ex situ processes that use either direct or indirect heat exchange to heat a waste material to volatilize organic materials. hermal desorption systems typically operate at soil treatment temperatures in the range of 400 to 600 degrees F to ...

  17. NASA's high-temperature engine materials program for civil aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Hugh R.; Ginty, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Engine Materials Technology Program is described in terms of its research initiatives and its goal of developing propulsion systems for civil aeronautics with low levels of noise, pollution, and fuel consumption. The program emphasizes the analysis and implementation of structural materials such as polymer-matrix composites in fans, casings, and engine-control systems. Also investigated in the program are intermetallic- and metal-matrix composites for uses in compressors and turbine disks as well as ceramic-matrix composites for extremely high-temperature applications such as turbine vanes.

  18. DESORPTION OF SORBATES FROM MST, MMST, AND CST UNDER VARIOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

    2011-06-10

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Program (formerly referred to as the Modular Salt Processing (MSP) Project) seeks to deploy equipment to remove the {sup 134,137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, and alpha-emitting radionuclides (principally {sup 238,239,240}Pu and {sup 237}Np) from the high level waste salt solutions. The equipment is installed within a high level waste tank to take advantage of the shielding provided by the waste tank. The process will involve adding monosodium titanate (MST) to the waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to sorb the Sr and select actinides, removing the MST and entrained sludge with in-riser rotary microfilters, and subsequently using ion-exchange columns containing crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to remove the Cs. After being loaded with Cs, the CST will be ground to reduce the particle size and then transferred into another waste tank (e.g., Tank 40H). The MST and sludge solids stream will be transported to a sludge batch preparation tank (i.e., Tank 42H or Tank 51H) once the SCIX batch is processed. Both streams, MST/solids and CST, will ultimately be transported into and vitrified inside the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). A series of experiments were performed to examine desorption from monosodium titanate (MST), modified monosodium titanate (mMST), and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) under various conditions. The first two experiments examined desorption from MST and CST under two different sludge treatment processes, aluminum dissolution and sludge washing. Desorption of all sorbates was observed to varying degrees under the aluminum dissolution conditions. The extent of desorption ranged from < 3% to about 50% after 4 weeks, with Pu exhibiting the lowest desorption. At the end of the experiment, the temperature was reduced from 65 C to 25 C and the tests monitored for an additional two weeks. After reducing the temperature, partial resorption of the sorbates was observed with both MST and CST. Under the sludge washing conditions, no

  19. Ice in space: surface science investigations of the thermal desorption of model interstellar ices on dust grain analogue surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burke, Daren J; Brown, Wendy A

    2010-06-21

    More than 140 different molecules have been identified in the interstellar medium (ISM) to date. Dust grain particles are also found in the ISM, and some of these molecules freeze out at the cold temperatures (10-20 K) to form molecular ices. Understanding the adsorption and desorption of these ices is crucially important in understanding the processes that lead to star and planet formation, and may even help to lead to an understanding of the origin of life itself. High sensitivity surface science techniques, including temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), are being increasingly used to investigate the interactions between dust grains and interstellar ices. This perspective provides an overview of the current level of understanding of the adsorption and desorption of astrophysically relevant molecules from a range of dust grain analogue surfaces. Whilst the focus of this review is on interstellar ices, the results discussed are equally valid to discussions of cometary and planetary ices. PMID:20520900

  20. Diffusion Analysis Of Hydrogen-Desorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1988-01-01

    Distribution of hydrogen in metal explains observed desorption rate. Report describes application of diffusion theory to anaylsis of experimental data on uptake and elimination of hydrogen in high-strength alloys of 25 degree C. Study part of program aimed at understanding embrittlement of metals by hydrogen. Two nickel-base alloys, Rene 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, studied. Desorption of hydrogen explained by distribution of hydrogen in metal. "Fast" hydrogen apparently not due to formation of hydrides on and below surface as proposed.

  1. Desorption-induced recombination-cationization of metal-adsorbate adducts from sulfur precovered Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocco, R. A.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1990-03-01

    Temperature programmed static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TPSS) studies of pyrrole, furan and water on sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveal significant increases in the coverage corrected adduct yield when these species desorb from the surface in an autocatalytic fashion. This effect has been attributed to an enhancement in the recombination-cationization rate which occurs when sputtered-ruthenium species contact desorbed organics just after leaving the surface. Adsorbates which do not undergo autocatalytic/explosive desorption do not exhibit this effect.

  2. Desorption from interstellar grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, A.; Jura, M.; Omont, A.

    1985-01-01

    Different desorption mechanisms from interstellar grains are considered to resolve the conflict between the observed presence of gaseous species in molecular clouds and their expected depletion onto grains. The physics of desorption is discussed with particular reference to the process of grain heating and the specific heat of the dust material. Impulsive heating by X-rays and cosmic rays is addressed. Spot heating of the grains by cosmic rays and how this can lead to desorption of mantles from very large grains is considered. It is concluded that CO depletion on grains will be small in regions with A(V) less than five from the cloud surface and n(H) less than 10,000, in agreement with observations and in contrast to expectations from pure thermal equilibrium. Even in very dense and obscured regions and in the absence of internal ultraviolet sources, the classical evaporation of CO or N2 and O2-rich mantles by cosmic rays is important.

  3. Modified adsorbate desorption energetics from platinum with sulfur pre-coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Valarie Denise

    At the forefront of heterogeneous catalysis and gas sensor research is the goal to tailor the chemisorptive properties of transition metal surfaces. Sulfur modifies platinum catalytic reaction product distributions which suggests that sulfur modifies the chemisorptive properties of platinum. The basic research reported in this dissertation improves the mechanistic understanding of sulfur modified chemisorption on platinum. Temperature programmed desorption has been used to study CO, H2, and O2 on clean polycrystalline platinum (Pt(Poly) and with sulfur pre-coverage (S/Pt(Poly)). Desorption from clean Pt(Poly) indicates that defects (500--600 K CO; 350--450 K H2; 200--275 K O2) and (111) sites (300--500 K CO; 200--350 K H2; 100--200 K, 600--1050 K O 2) generally comprise the surface. Both short range site blocking and long range electronic sulfur mechanisms are responsible for decreased chemisorption on S/Pt(Poly) surfaces. The 'saturation' sulfur coverage (via H2S decomposition) decreases the adsorption capacity of Pt(Poly) to 9.1% and 3.45% of maximum for CO and H2 respectively. Site blocking preferentially decreases desorption from defects. With increasing sulfur coverage, site blocking is the primary cause of decreased H2 desorption temperatures from (111) sites. However, both mechanisms significantly decrease CO desorption temperatures from (111) sites. In contrast, O2 desorption temperatures from (111) sites are not decreased. For adsorbate coverages from dilute to saturation, desorption peak maxima for CO shift continuously and gradually to lower temperature by 165 K and for H2 discretely by 120 K. The strongly decreased H2 and O2 adsorption on S/Pt(Poly) surfaces have been attributed to long sulfur effects that reduce the capability of Pt(Poly) to cause bond dissociation. Sulfur blocks about 4.5 times more O2 and 2.5 times more hydrogen adsorption sites than CO adsorption sites. Oxygen reacts with sulfur with SO2 (390, 480, 590 K) as the only oxidation

  4. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  5. Correlation between the processes of water desorption and tritium release from Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Guangming; Xiao, Chengjian; Chen, Xiaojun; Gong, Yu; Kang, Chunmei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2015-11-01

    The correlation between water desorption and tritium release from Li4SiO4 pebbles was studied by temperature programmed desorption. The released water and tritium from irradiated samples were monitored simultaneously. The main peak for tritium release from the irradiated samples that were exposed to air for more than a month, was shifted from 500 to about 250 °C, as compared to that from the unexposed samples. The peak temperatures for water desorption and tritium release overlapped very well, suggesting a strong correlation between the two processes. Accordingly, a two-step mechanism, involving isotope exchange between the tritium trapped on the grain surface and the surface hydroxyls (-OH), and subsequent desorption of tritiated water through recombination of the -OH/-OT groups, was proposed to explain the tritium release behavior for the air-exposed samples. It is believed that the formation and desorption of surface hydroxyl groups at 200-300 °C can affect the behavior of tritium release from Li4SiO4 significantly.

  6. Atomistic lattice-gas modeling of CO oxidation on Pd(100): temperature-programmed spectroscopy and steady-state behavior.

    PubMed

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, J W

    2006-04-21

    We have developed an atomistic lattice-gas model for the catalytic oxidation of CO on single-crystal Pd(100) surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. This model necessarily incorporates an detailed description of adlayer ordering and adsorption-desorption kinetics both for CO on Pd(100), and for oxygen on Pd(100). Relevant energetic parameters are determined by comparing model predictions with experiment, together with some guidance from density functional theory calculations. The latter also facilitates description of the interaction and reaction of adsorbed CO and oxygen. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of this reaction model are performed to predict temperature-programmed reaction spectra, as well as steady-state bifurcation behavior. PMID:16674249

  7. Hydrogenation of CO-bearing species on grains: unexpected chemical desorption of CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minissale, M.; Moudens, A.; Baouche, S.; Chaabouni, H.; Dulieu, F.

    2016-05-01

    The amount of methanol in the gas phase and the CO depletion from the gas phase are still open problems in astrophysics. In this work, we investigate solid-state hydrogenation of CO-bearing species via H-exposure of carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and methanol-thin films deposited on cold surfaces, paying attention to the possibility of a return to the gas phase. The products are probed via infrared spectroscopy (reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy), and two types of mass spectroscopy protocols: temperature-programmed desorption, and during-exposure desorption techniques. In the case of the [CO+H] reactive system, we have found that chemical desorption of CO is more efficient than H-addition reactions and HCO and H2CO formation; the studies of the [H2CO +H] reactive system show a strong competition between all surface processes, chemical desorption of H2CO, H-addition (CH3OH formation) and H-abstraction (CO formation); finally, [CH3OH + H] seems to be a non-reactive system and chemical desorption of methanol is not efficient. CO-bearing species present a see-saw mechanism between CO and H2CO balanced by the competition of H-addition and H2-abstraction that enhances the CO chemical desorption. The chemical network leading to methanol has to be reconsidered. The methanol formation on the surface of interstellar dust grain is still possible through CO+H reaction; nevertheless, its consumption of adsorbed H atoms should be higher than previously expected.

  8. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times.

  9. Estimating Arrhenius parameters using temperature programmed molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Imandi, Venkataramana; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-07-21

    Kinetic rates at different temperatures and the associated Arrhenius parameters, whenever Arrhenius law is obeyed, are efficiently estimated by applying maximum likelihood analysis to waiting times collected using the temperature programmed molecular dynamics method. When transitions involving many activated pathways are available in the dataset, their rates may be calculated using the same collection of waiting times. Arrhenius behaviour is ascertained by comparing rates at the sampled temperatures with ones from the Arrhenius expression. Three prototype systems with corrugated energy landscapes, namely, solvated alanine dipeptide, diffusion at the metal-solvent interphase, and lithium diffusion in silicon, are studied to highlight various aspects of the method. The method becomes particularly appealing when the Arrhenius parameters can be used to find rates at low temperatures where transitions are rare. Systematic coarse-graining of states can further extend the time scales accessible to the method. Good estimates for the rate parameters are obtained with 500-1000 waiting times. PMID:27448871

  10. The first layer of water on Rh(111): Microscopic structure and desorption kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Beniya, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Susumu; Mukai, Kozo; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2006-08-07

    The adsorption states and growth process of the first water (D{sub 2}O) layer on Rh(111) were investigated using infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programed desorption, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. Water molecules wet the Rh(111) surface intact. At the early stage of first layer growth, a ({radical}3x{radical}3)R30 deg. commensurate water layer grows where 'up' and 'down' species coexist; the up and down species represent water molecules which have free OD, pointing to a vacuum and the substrate, respectively. The up domain was a flatter structure than an icelike bilayer. Water desorption from Rh(111) was a half-order process. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of desorption are estimated to be 60 kJ/mol and 4.8x10{sup 16} ML{sup 1/}2/s at submonolayer coverage, respectively. With an increase in water coverage, the flat up domain becomes a zigzag layer, like an ice bilayer. At the saturation coverage, the amount of down species is 1.3 times larger than that of the up species. In addition, the activation energy and the preexponential factor of desorption decrease to 51 kJ/mol and 1.3x10{sup 14} ML{sup 1/2}/s, respectively.

  11. Programmed temperature vaporizing injector to filter off disturbing high boiling and involatile material for on-line high performance liquid chromatography gas chromatography with on-column transfer.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni

    2013-03-15

    Insertion of a programmed temperature vaporizing (PTV) injector under conditions of concurrent solvent recondensation (CSR) into the on-line HPLC-GC interface for on-column transfer (such as the retention gap technique with partially concurrent eluent evaporation) enables filtering off high boiling or involatile sample constituents by a desorption temperature adjusted to the required cut-off. Details of this technique were investigated and optimized. Memory effects, observed when transferred liquid was sucked backwards between the transfer line and the wall of the injector liner, can be kept low by a small purge flow rate through the transfer line at the end of the transfer and the release of the liquid through a narrow bore capillary kept away from the liner wall. The column entrance should be within the well heated zone of the injector to prevent losses of solute material retained on the liner wall during the splitless period. The desorption temperature must be maintained until an elevated oven temperature is reached to prevent peak broadening resulting of a cool inlet section in the bottom part of the injector. PMID:23394744

  12. Thermal desorption of metals from tungsten single crystal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Bonczek, F.; Poppa, H.; Todd, G.

    1975-01-01

    After a short review of experimental methods used to determine desorption energies and frequencies the assumptions underlying the theoretical analysis of experimental data are discussed. Recent experimental results on the flash desorption of Cu, Ag, and Au from clean, well characterized W (110) and (100) surfaces are presented and analyzed in detail with respect to the coverage dependence. The results obtained clearly reveal the limitations of previous analytical methods and of the experimental technique per se (such as structure and phase changes below and in the temperature region in which desorption occurs).

  13. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    PubMed

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption. PMID:15380409

  14. OTEC gas desorption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Golshani, A.

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on deaeration in packed columns and barometric intake systems, and with hydraulic air compression for open-cycle OTEC systems are reported. A gas desorption test loop consisting of water storage tanks, a vacuum system, a liquid recirculating system, an air supply, a column test section, and two barometric leg test sections was used to perform the tests. The aerated water was directed through columns filled with either ceramic Raschig rings or plastic pall rings, and the system vacuum pressure, which drives the deaeration process, was found to be dependent on water velocity and intake pipe height. The addition of a barometric intake pipe increased the deaeration effect 10%, and further tests were run with lengths of PVC pipe as potential means for noncondensibles disposal through hydraulic air compression. Using the kinetic energy from the effluent flow to condense steam in the noncondensible stream improved the system efficiency.

  15. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Chunshan; Schobert, H.H.

    1993-02-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on the development of novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed liquefaction. The ultimate goal of the present research is to develop novel catalytic hydroliquefaction process using highly active dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research is to develop novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular that can be used in low precursors concentrations (< 1 %) but exhibit high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. The major technical approaches are, first, to prepare the desired heteronuclear organometallic molecules as catalyst precursors that contain covalently bound, two different metal atoms and sulfur in a single molecule. Such precursors will generate finely dispersed bimetallic catalysts such as Fe-Mo, Co-Mo and Ni-Mo binary sulfides upon thermal decomposition. The second major technical approach is to perform the liquefaction of coals unpregnated with the organometallic precursors under temperature-programmed conditions, where the programmed heat-up serves as a step for both catalyst activation and coal pretreatment or preconversion. Two to three different complexes for each of the Fe-Mo, Co-Mo, and Ni-Mo combinations will be prepared. Initial catalyst screening tests will be conducted using a subbituminous coal and a bituminous coal. Effects of coal rank and solvents will be examined with the selected bimetallic catalysts which showed much higher activity than the dispersed catalysts from conventional precursors.

  16. [Desorption isotherms in amaranth flours].

    PubMed

    Alvarado, J D; Toaza, E; Coloma, G

    1990-09-01

    In milled seeds amaranth (Amaranthus hybridus) samples locally known as "ataco or sangoracha" and harvested in two consecutive years, the vapor pressure at four temperatures (15 degrees, 20 degrees, 25 degrees, 30 degrees C) was determined in samples obtained for drying in oven at different times, within a range between 60 g water/100 g dry matter for fresh seeds to 10 g water/100 g dry matter or below, as measured in a Brabender equipment. Vapor pressure of distilled water was also determined for water activity calculation. The isotherms for each temperature are presented. Application of the G.A.B. model (Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer) allowed to establish the water content of greater stability within a range of 9.9 to 7.6 g/100 g. The third degree polynomial equations presented, adjust satisfactorily with the experimental data, and can be used to calculate equilibrium moisture content from 0.15 to 0.95 water activity values. Water desorption isotherms of foods are important to determine the equilibrium relationship between the moisture content of foods and the water activity, information which permits to establish likely physical, chemical or biological changes. It is considered that the results obtained are useful in drying, milling or storing amaranth flour. PMID:2134142

  17. Thermal Decomposition and Desorption of Diethylamido of Tetrakis (Diethylamido)Zirconium (TDEAZr) on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Joonhee; Lim, Sungwon; Yong, Kijung

    The thermal decomposition pathway and desorption of diethylamido of tetrakis (diethylamido)zirconium [TDEAZr, Zr(N(C2H5)2) 4] on Si(100) were studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During TPD experiments, ethylethyleneimine (C2H5N=CHCH3), diethylamine [NH(C2H5)2], acetonitrile (CH3CN), ethylene (C2H4) and hydrogen (H2) desorbed as the main decomposition products of diethylamido, which was chemisorbed on Si(100) through the scission of the zirconium-diethylamido bond in TDEAZr. After TPD runs, the formation of silicon carbide and silicon nitride was observed on the surface by XPS, indicating that a complete decomposition of diethylamido proceeded. This could be a reaction pathway of C, N incorporation in the thin film growth using TDEAZr as a Zr precursor.

  18. Thermal desorption of deuterium implanted into beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Markin, A.V.; Chernikov, V.N.; Zakharov, A.P.

    1995-09-01

    By means of TDS measurements it is shown that the desorption of deuterium from Be implanted with 5 keV D ions to fluences, {Phi}, from 1x10{sup 20} D/m{sup 2} to 1x10{sup 21} D/m{sup 2} proceeds in one high temperature stage B, while at {Phi} {ge} 1.2x10{sup 21}D/m{sup 2} one more stage A is added. The desorption maximum A is narrow and consists of two peaks A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} at about 460 K and 490 K, respectively. Peak A{sub 1} is attributed to the desorption of deuterium from the walls of opened channels formed under D ion implantation. Peak {sub A}2 is a consequence of the opening of a part of closed bubbles/channels to the outer surface. The position of maximum B shifts noticeably and nonsteadily on the fluence in a range from 850 to 1050 K. The origin of this maximum is the liberation of D atoms bound at vacancy complexes discussed previously by Wampler. The dependence of Tm(B) on the fluence is governed by the interaction of freely migrating D atoms with partly opened or fully closed gas cavity arrangements which are created under temperature ramping, but differently in specimens implanted with D ions to different fluences.

  19. High temperature static strain gage alloy development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulse, C. O.; Bailey, R. S.; Lemkey, F. D.

    1985-01-01

    The literature, applicable theory and finally an experimental program were used to identify new candidate alloy systems for use as the electrical resistance elements in static strain gages up to 1250K. The program goals were 50 hours of use in the environment of a test stand gas turbine engine with measurement accuracies equal to or better than 10 percent of full scale for strains up to + or - 2000 microstrain. As part of this effort, a computerized electrical resistance measurement system was constructed for use at temperatures between 300K and 1250K and heating and cooling rates of 250K/min and 10K/min. The two best alloys were an iron-chromium-aluminum alloy and a palladium base alloy. Although significant progress was made, it was concluded that a considerable additional effort would be needed to fully optimize and evaluate these candidate systems.

  20. Cooled High-temperature Radial Turbine Program 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was the design and fabrication of a air-cooled high-temperature radial turbine (HTRT) intended for experimental evaluation in a warm turbine test facility at the LeRC. The rotor and vane were designed to be tested as a scaled version (rotor diameter of 14.4 inches diameter) of a 8.021 inch diameter rotor designed to be capable of operating with a rotor inlet temperature (RIT) of 2300 F, a nominal mass flow of 4.56 lbm/sec, a work level of equal or greater than 187 Btu/lbm, and efficiency of 86 percent or greater. The rotor was also evaluated to determine it's feasibility to operate at 2500 F RIT. The rotor design conformed to the rotor blade flow path specified by NASA for compatibility with their test equipment. Fabrication was accomplished on three rotors, a bladeless rotor, a solid rotor, and an air-cooled rotor.

  1. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  2. Desorption Dynamics, Internal Energies and Imaging of Organic Molecules from Surfaces with Laser Desorption and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2011-04-05

    There is enormous interest in visualizing the chemical composition of organic material that comprises our world. A convenient method to obtain molecular information with high spatial resolution is imaging mass spectrometry. However, the internal energy deposited within molecules upon transfer to the gas phase from a surface can lead to increased fragmentation and to complications in analysis of mass spectra. Here it is shown that in laser desorption with postionization by tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, the internal energy gained during laser desorption leads to minimal fragmentation of DNA bases. The internal temperature of laser-desorbed triacontane molecules approaches 670 K, whereas the internal temperature of thymine is 800 K. A synchrotron-based VUV postionization technique for determining translational temperatures reveals that biomolecules have translational temperatures in the range of 216-346 K. The observed low translational temperatures, as well as their decrease with increased desorption laser power is explained by collisional cooling. An example of imaging mass spectrometry on an organic polymer, using laser desorption VUV postionization shows 5 mu m feature details while using a 30 mu m laser spot size and 7 ns duration. Applications of laser desorption postionization to the analysis of cellulose, lignin and humic acids are briefly discussed.

  3. USGS Coal Desorption Equipment and a Spreadsheet for Analysis of Lost and Total Gas from Canister Desorption Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Charles E.; Dallegge, Todd A.; Clark, Arthur C.

    2002-01-01

    We have updated a simple polyvinyl chloride plastic canister design by adding internal headspace temperature measurement, and redesigned it so it is made with mostly off-the-shelf components for ease of construction. Using self-closing quick connects, this basic canister is mated to a zero-head manometer to make a simple coalbed methane desorption system that is easily transported in small aircraft to remote localities. This equipment is used to gather timed measurements of pressure, volume and temperature data that are corrected to standard pressure and temperature (STP) and graphically analyzed using an Excel(tm)-based spreadsheet. Used together these elements form an effective, practical canister desorption method.

  4. Desorption of hydrogen trapped in carbon and graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, H.; Takemura, Y.; Miyabe, T.; Konishi, T.; Tanabe, T.; Shikama, T.

    2013-11-01

    Thermal desorption behavior of deuterium (D2) from isotropic graphites and a carbon fiber carbon composite (CFC) charged with D2 gas has been investigated to obtain information concerning hydrogen recycling and tritium inventory in fusion experimental devices as well as a futuristic fusion reactor. After thermal desorption experiments were conducted at temperatures up to 1740 K, a desorption peak at approximately 1600 K (peak 4) was discovered. This is in addition to the previously known peak at approximately 1300 K (peak 3). Peak 3 can be attributed to the release of deuterium controlled by the diffusion process in a graphite filler grain and peak 4 can be attributed to the detrapping of deuterium released from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies of peaks 3 and 4 are estimated to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV, respectively. TDS spectra of D2 from graphite and CFCs had previously not been thoroughly investigated. A desorption peak at approximately 1600 K was discovered in the TDS spectra for all samples heated with a linear ramp rate of 0.1 K/s. For an isotropic graphite, ISO-880U, four desorption peaks were recognized in the TDS spectra at approximately 660 K, 900 K, 1300 K, and 1600 K. These peaks were named as peaks 1, 2, 3, and 4 in order of increasing temperature. Major desorption peaks (i.e., peaks 3 and 4) were analyzed and discussed in detail. The temperature of peak 3 was dependent on the size of a graphite filler grain. The desorption process is suggested to be controlled by deuterium diffusion within the filler grain with a strong influence of trapping sites, where the migration takes place as a sequence of detrapping and retrapping. The desorption for peak 4 can be ascribed to the detrapping reaction from an interstitial cluster loop edge site. Activation energies were estimated from the peak shift by varying the heating rate of TDS to be 3.48 and 6.93 eV for peaks 3 and 4, respectively. Theoretical desorption curves for peaks 3 and 4 with

  5. Treatment of Y-12 storm sewer sediments and DARA soils by thermal desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, M.I.; Shealy, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    The 1992 Oak Ridge Reservation Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) listed a number of mixed wastes, subject to land disposal restrictions (LDR), for which no treatment method had been identified, and required DOE to develop strategies for treatment and ultimate disposal of those wastes. This paper presents the results of a program to demonstrate that thermal desorption can remove both organics and mercury from two mixed wastes from the DOE Y-12 facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first waste, the Y-12 Storm Sewer Sediments (SSSs) was a sediment generated from upgrades to the plant storm sewer system. This material contained over 4 percent mercury, 2 percent uranium and 350 mg/kg polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Leachable mercury exceeded toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and LDR criteria. The second waste, the Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) Soils, are contaminated with uranium, mercury and PCBs. This treatability study included bench-scale testing of a thermal desorption process. Results of the testing showed that, for the SSSs, total mercury could be reduced to 120 mg/kg by treatment at 600{degrees}C, which is at the high end of the temperature range for typical thermal desorption systems. Leachable TCLP mercury was less than 50 {mu}g/L and PCBs were below 2 mg/kg. Treatment of the DARA Soils at 450{degrees}C for 10 minutes resulted in residual PCBs of 0.6 to 3.0 mg/kg. This is too high (goal < 2mg/kg) and higher treatment temperatures are needed. The testing also provided information on the characteristics and quantities of residuals from the thermal desorption process.

  6. Desorption of Mercury(II) on Kaolinite in the Presence of Oxalate or Cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio- uptake of Hg in aquatic systems. We studied the desorption of Hg(II) on kaolinite in the presence of oxalate or cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, 7), ligand concentration (0.25, 1.0 mM), and temperature (15, 25, 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH-dependant. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but it appeared to enhance the Hg(II) desorption afterwards. The effect of ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particles and in the solution probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  7. HYDROGEN AND ITS DESORPTION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    HSEUH,H.C.

    2002-11-11

    Hydrogen is the dominating gas specie in room temperature, ultrahigh vacuum systems of particle accelerators and storage rings, such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven. Rapid pressure increase of a few decades in hydrogen and other residual gases was observed during RHIC's recent high intensity gold and proton runs. The type and magnitude of the pressure increase were analyzed and compared with vacuum conditioning, beam intensity, number of bunches and bunch spacing. Most of these pressure increases were found to be consistent with those induced by beam loss and/or electron stimulated desorption from electron multipacting.

  8. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.

    1995-05-29

    In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains

  9. Air stability of low-temperature dehydrogenation of Pd-decorated Mg blades.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Wang, Gwo-Ching

    2012-01-20

    We demonstrated that Pd-decorated Mg blades are air-stable for hydrogen storage with a low desorption temperature of 373 K. Pd-catalyst-decorated Mg blades were prepared by 64° oblique incident angle thermal deposition on a rotatable substrate with the rotation axis perpendicular to the substrate. The hydrogen desorption from Pd-decorated Mg blades was performed and recorded by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) for repeated hydrogenation–dehydrogenation cycles. The near-surface structural and compositional changes were characterized in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The Mg blades were intentionally exposed to air at elevated temperatures (333 or 358 K) between certain cycles. It was found that the degradation of the storage capacity was affected weakly by the air exposure at moderate temperatures. The kinetics of the hydrogen desorption was sensitive to air exposure but recoverable through a replenishment of fresh catalyst Pd on the surface of the oxidized Mg blades. PMID:22166731

  10. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on Forsterite, Mg2SiO4(011)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-12-18

    We have examined the adsorbate-substrate interaction kinetics of CO2 and H2O on a natural forsterite crystal surface, Mg2SiO4(011), with 10-15% of substitutional Fe2+. We use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques to determine the adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics for H2O and CO2. Neither CO2 nor H2O has distinct sub-monolayer desorption peaks but instead both have a broad continuous desorption feature that evolve smoothly into multilayer desorption. Inversion of the monolayer coverage spectra for both molecules reveals that the corresponding binding energies for H2O are greater than that for CO2 on all sites. The relative strength of these interactions is the dominant factor in the competitive adsorption/displacement kinetics. In experiments where the two adsorbates are co-dosed, H2O always binds to the highest energy binding sites available and displaces CO2. The onset of CO2 displacement by H2O occurs between 65 and 75 K.

  11. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  12. Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources, Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    This document highlights the applications of low-temperature geothermal resources and the potential for future uses as well as current Geothermal Technologies Program-funded projects related to low-temperature resources.

  13. Method of enhancing selective isotope desorption from metals

    DOEpatents

    Knize, Randall J.; Cecchi, Joseph L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of enhancing the thermal desorption of a first isotope of a diatomic gas from a metal comprises the steps of (a) establishing a partial pressure of a second isotope of the diatomic gas in vicinity of the metal; heating the metal to a temperature such that the first isotope is desorbed from the metal; and reducing the partial pressure of the desorbed first isotope while maintaining the partial pressure of the second isotope substantially constant. The method is especially useful for enhancing the desorption of tritium from the Zr-Al getter in a plasma confinement device.

  14. Revisited reaction-diffusion model of thermal desorption spectroscopy experiments on hydrogen retention in material

    SciTech Connect

    Guterl, Jerome Smirnov, R. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2015-07-28

    Desorption phase of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) experiments performed on tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion relevant conditions is analyzed using a reaction-diffusion model describing hydrogen retention in material bulk. Two regimes of hydrogen desorption are identified depending on whether hydrogen trapping rate is faster than hydrogen diffusion rate in material during TDS experiments. In both regimes, a majority of hydrogen released from material defects is immediately outgassed instead of diffusing deeply in material bulk when the evolution of hydrogen concentration in material is quasi-static, which is the case during TDS experiments performed with tungsten samples exposed to flux of hydrogen isotopes in fusion related conditions. In this context, analytical expressions of the hydrogen outgassing flux as a function of the material temperature are obtained with sufficient accuracy to describe main features of thermal desorption spectra (TDSP). These expressions are then used to highlight how characteristic temperatures of TDSP depend on hydrogen retention parameters, such as trap concentration or activation energy of detrapping processes. The use of Arrhenius plots to characterize retention processes is then revisited when hydrogen trapping takes place during TDS experiments. Retention processes are also characterized using the shape of desorption peaks in TDSP, and it is shown that diffusion of hydrogen in material during TDS experiment can induce long desorption tails visible aside desorption peaks at high temperature in TDSP. These desorption tails can be used to estimate activation energy of diffusion of hydrogen in material.

  15. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  16. Hydrogen retention in tungsten materials studied by Laser Induced Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Reinhart, M.; Möller, S.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.; 't Hoen, M. H. J.; Manhard, A.; Schmid, K.; Textor Team

    2013-07-01

    Development of methods to characterise the first wall in ITER and future fusion devices without removal of wall tiles is important to support safety assessments for tritium retention and dust production and to understand plasma wall processes in general. Laser based techniques are presently under investigation to provide these requirements, among which Laser Induced Desorption Spectroscopy (LIDS) is proposed to measure the deuterium and tritium load of the plasma facing surfaces by thermal desorption and spectroscopic detection of the desorbed fuel in the edge of the fusion plasma. The method relies on its capability to desorb the hydrogen isotopes in a laser heated spot. The application of LID on bulk tungsten targets exposed to a wide range of deuterium fluxes, fluences and impact energies under different surface temperatures is investigated in this paper. The results are compared with Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS), Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) and a diffusion model.

  17. Infrared Laser Desorption: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, Claude Ricketts

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of two-step laser mass spectrometry (L^2MS), a combination of infrared (IR) laser desorption with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry, to investigate (1) the mechanism of IR laser desorption, (2) the composition of aromatic molecules in extraterrestrial samples, and (3) the measurement of compound-specific carbon isotope ratios. First, a description of the mechanism of IR laser desorption of monolayer and submonolayer coverages of molecules adsorbed to an insulator surface is presented. The vibrational and translational energy distributions of aniline-d7 molecules desorbed from single-crystal sapphire (Al_2 O_3) are recorded using L ^2MS. The energy distributions are found to be in equilibrium with each other and with the temperature of the surface at the time of desorption. The translational and angular distributions of monolayer coverages are altered by the collisions of desorbing molecules with each other. Second, spatial and chemical analyses of the carbonaceous components in chondritic meteorites are presented. A microprobe L^2MS instrument (mu L^2MS) capable of analyzing samples with a spatial resolution of 40 mu m and zeptomole (10^{-21} mole) sensitivity is described and used to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in small particles and heterogeneous samples. PAH distributions are used to distinguish between samples from different meteorite classes, and the effects of thermal processing within a given meteorite class are observed. Sliced wafers of meteorite are found to contain an inhomogeneous distribution of PAHs. muL^2MS studies of meteorite samples are coordinated with scanning electron microscopy studies, and the abundances of aromatic compounds across the surface of a sample are consistent with gross structural features but not with elemental or mineralogical features. Third, a description of a method for performing compound-specific carbon isotope

  18. Space exploration with a solar sail coated by materials that undergo thermal desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2015-12-01

    For extrasolar space exploration it is suggested to use space environmental effects such as solar radiation heating to accelerate a solar sail coated by materials that undergo thermal desorption at a particular temperature. The developed approach allows the perihelion of the solar sail orbits to be determined based on the temperature requirement for the solar sail materials. Our study shows that the temperature of a solar sail increases as r - 2 / 5 when the heliocentric distance r decreases. The proposed sail has two coats of the materials that undergo desorption at different solar sail temperatures depending on the heliocentric distance. The first desorption occurs at the Earth orbit and provides the thrust needed to propel the solar sail toward the Sun. When the solar sail approaches the Sun, its temperature increases, and the second coat undergoes desorption at the perihelion of the heliocentric escape orbit. This provides a second thrust and boosts the solar sail to its escape velocity.

  19. Adsorption and desorption studies of cesium on sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, K.R.; Ing, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption were studied using combined surface analytical techniques. An approximate initial sticking coefficient for Cs on sapphire was measured using reflection mass spectrometry and found to be 0.9. Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometry (TDMS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) were used to verify that a significant decrease in sticking coefficient occurs as the Cs coverage reaches a critical submonolayer value. TDMS analysis demonstrates that Cs is stabilized on a clean sapphire surface at temperatures (1200 K) in excess of the temperatures experienced by sapphire in a TOPAZ-2 thermionic fuel element (TFE). Surface contaminants on sapphire can enhance Cs adsorption relative to the clean surface. C contamination eliminates the high temperature state of Cs desorption found on clean sapphire but shifts the bulk of the C desorption from 400 to 620 K. Surface C is a difficult contaminant to remove from sapphire, requiring annealing above 1400 K. Whether Cs is stabilized on sapphire in a TFE environment will most likely depend on relation between surface contamination and surface structure.

  20. Material evaluation program, high-temperature nitriding environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcy, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a program conducted to evaluate materials for construction of a space shuttle hydrazine monopropellant gas generator are presented. The program was designed to select those materials that maintain the properties of strength and ductility after exposure to an 1800 F nitriding environment for 1000 hours.

  1. Tunneling effects in the kinetics of helium and hydrogen isotopes desorption from single-walled carbon nanotube bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Danilchenko, B. A. Yaskovets, I. I.; Uvarova, I. Y.; Dolbin, A. V.; Esel'son, V. B.; Basnukaeva, R. M.; Vinnikov, N. A.

    2014-04-28

    The kinetics of desorption both helium isotopes and molecules of hydrogen and deuterium from open-ended or γ-irradiated single-walled carbon nanotube bundles was investigated in temperature range of 10–300 K. The gases desorption rates obey the Arrhenius law at high temperatures, deviate from it with temperature reduction and become constant at low temperatures. These results indicate the quantum nature of gas outflow from carbon nanotube bundles. We had deduced the crossover temperature below which the quantum corrections to the effective activation energy of desorption become significant. This temperature follows linear dependence against the inverse mass of gas molecule and is consistent with theoretical prediction.

  2. Changes induced on the surfaces of small Pd clusters by the thermal desorption of CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doering, D. L.; Poppa, H.; Dickinson, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The stability and adsorption/desorption properties of supported Pd crystallites less than 5 nm in size were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and repeated flash thermal desorption of CO. The Pd particles were grown epitaxially on heat-treated, UHV-cleaved mica at a substrate temperature of 300 C and a Pd impingement flux of 10 to the 13th atoms/sq cm s. Auger analysis allowed in situ measurement of relative particle dispersion and contamination, while FTD monitored the CO desorption properties. The results show that significant changes in the adsorption properties can be detected. Changes in the Pd Auger signal and the desorption spectrum during the first few thermal cycles are due to particle coalescence and facetting and the rate of this change is dependent on the temperature and duration of the desorption. Significant reductions in the amplitude of the desorptions peak occur during successive CO desorptions which are attributed to increases of surface carbon, induced by the desorption of CO. The contamination process could be reversed by heat treatment in oxygen or hydrogen

  3. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Chen, Long; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-07-17

    The adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110) are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques. The TPD spectra for both H2O and CO2 have well-resolved peaks corresponding to desorption from bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Ti, and oxygen vacancies (VO) sites in order of increasing peak temperature. Analysis of the saturated monolayer peak for both species reveals that the corresponding adsorption energies on all sites are greater for H2O and for CO2. Sequential dosing of H2O and CO2 reveals that, independent of the dose order, H2O molecules will displace CO2 in order to occupy the highest energy binding sites available. Isothermal experiments show that the displacement of CO2 by H2O occurs between 75 and 80 K. Further analysis shows that a ratio of 4 H2O to 3 CO2 molecules is needed to displace CO2 from the TiO2(110) surface.

  4. A Non-linear Temperature-Time Program for Non-isothermal Kinetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hong Yong

    2016-04-01

    A new temperature-time program for non-isothermal measurements of chemical reaction rates has been developed. The major advantages of the proposed temperature-time function are twofold: Firstly, the analysis of kinetic information in the high temperature range of the measurement is improved over the conventional linear temperature program by slowing the rate of temperature increase in the high temperature range and secondly, the new temperature program greatly facilitates the data analysis by providing a closed-form solution of the temperature integral and allows a convenient way to obtain the kinetic parameters by eliminating the need for the approximate evaluation of the temperature integral. The procedures for applying the new temperature-time program to the analysis of experimental data are demonstrated in terms of the determination of the kinetic parameters based on the selection of a suitable conversion function in the rate equation as well as the direct determination of activation energy at different conversion extents without the need for a conversion function. The rate analysis based on the new temperature program is robust and does not appear to be sensitive to errors in experimental measurements.

  5. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART I.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-07-10

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I will discuss the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  6. DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2006-08-17

    Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

  7. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of materials program

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1980-03-01

    Research progress is reported in the behavior of metals and alloys in gas mixtures at high temperature, corrosion mechanisms in complex environments of low oxidizing potential, hot corrosion of nickel-base alloys at intermediate temperatures, corrosion of solid sulfate deposits, adherence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide films, oxidation behavior of a two-phase alloy Fe-44% Cu, and formation of subscales of varying composition. (FS)

  8. Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

  9. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  10. A soil-column gas chromatography (SCGC) approach to explore the thermal desorption behavior of hydrocarbons from soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Liu, Liang; Shao, Ziying; Ju, Tianyu; Sun, Bing; Benadda, Belkacem

    2016-01-01

    A soil-column gas chromatography approach was developed to simulate the mass transfer process of hydrocarbons between gas and soil during thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (T-SVE). Four kinds of hydrocarbons-methylbenzene, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane-were flowed by nitrogen gas. The retention factor k' and the tailing factor T f were calculated to reflect the desorption velocities of fast and slow desorption fractions, respectively. The results clearly indicated two different mechanisms on the thermal desorption behaviors of fast and slow desorption fractions. The desorption velocity of fast desorption fraction was an exponential function of the reciprocal of soil absolute temperature and inversely correlated with hydrocarbon's boiling point, whereas the desorption velocity of slow desorption fraction was an inverse proportional function of soil absolute temperature, and inversely proportional to the log K OW value of the hydrocarbons. The higher activation energy of adsorption was found on loamy soil with higher organic content. The increase of carrier gas flow rate led to a reduction in the apparent activation energy of adsorption of slow desorption fraction, and thus desorption efficiency was significantly enhanced. The obtained results are of practical interest for the design of high-efficiency T-SVE system and may be used to predict the remediation time. PMID:26335523

  11. Superior hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of Mg thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianglan; Wang, Yuntao; Xie, Lei; Zheng, Jie; Liu, Yang; Li, Xingguo

    Pd-capped Mg films prepared by magnetron sputtering achieved complete dehydrogenation in air at room temperature and behaved as favorable gasochromic switchable mirrors. Their cyclic hydrogen absorption and desorption kinetics in air were investigated by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The overall activation energy was 80 kJ mol -1, while the reaction orders controlling desorption were deduced to be n = 2 at 328 K and n = 1 at lower temperatures by analyzing the transmittance data. The hydrogen diffusion coefficient and the corresponding activation energy were calculated by electrochemical measurements. Mg thin films exhibited the smaller activation energy and remarkable diffusion kinetics at room temperature which implied potential applications in smart windows.

  12. DESORPTION OF PYRETHROIDS FROM SUSPENDED SOLIDS

    PubMed Central

    Fojut, Tessa L.; Young, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides have been widely detected in sediments at concentrations that can cause toxicity to aquatic organisms. Desorption rates play an important role in determining the bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds, such as pyrethroids, because these compounds are more likely to be sorbed to solids in the environment and times to reach sorptive equilibrium can be long. In this study, sequential Tenax desorption experiments were performed with three sorbents, three aging times, and four pyrethroids. A biphasic rate model was fit to the desorption data with r2 > 0.99 and the rapid and slow compartment desorption rate constants and compartment fractions are reported. Suspended solids from irrigation runoff water collected from a field that had been sprayed with permethrin one day prior were used in the experiments to compare desorption rates for field-applied pyrethroids to those for laboratory-spiked materials. Suspended solids were used in desorption experiments because suspended solids can be a key source of hydrophobic compounds to surface waters. The rapid desorption rate parameters of field-applied permethrin were not statistically different than those of laboratory spiked permethrin, indicating that the desorption of the spiked pyrethroids is comparable to those added and aged in the field. Sorbent characteristics had the greatest effect on desorption rate parameters; as organic carbon content of the solids increased, the rapid desorption fractions and rapid desorption rate constants both decreased. The desorption rate constant of the slow compartment for sediment containing permethrin aged for 28 d was significantly different from those aged 1 d and 7 d, while desorption in the rapid and slow compartments did not differ between these treatments. PMID:21538493

  13. Desorption behavior of zinc atoms from zinc-sulfate solution irradiated with pulsed DC plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaba, Takafumi; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2016-07-01

    A DC pulsed plasma ignited between a metal needle and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) solution electrode was used to investigate Zn metal desorption from an electrolyte solution. Using an ICCD camera and optical band-pass filter, 2D atomic absorption spectroscopy was carried out during irradiation of pulsed plasma to the surface of the solution. The time-resolved measurement of Zn atoms released to the gas phase revealed that the Zn desorption rate monotonically increased with increasing number of discharge repetitions. The surface temperature of the electrolyte solution was observed with a thermographic camera, and correlations between the H2O and Zn desorption rate were inspected. The correlation between the H2O and Zn desorption rate suggested that Zn desorption is assisted not only by the electric field of the discharge but also by H2O evaporating from the solution.

  14. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-03-15

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  15. Synthesis of 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene copolymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing Bo; Yang, Go-Su; Lee, Youn-Sik

    2012-02-29

    Reports on the development of polymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are rare. In this study, we synthesized macroporous polymeric adsorbents with hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar VOCs. The benzene adsorption and desorption properties of the adsorbents were investigated under both dry and humid conditions. Under humid conditions, as the content of the hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units in the adsorbents increased from 0 to 20%, the adsorption capacity of benzene decreased from about 21 to 7 mg/g, while the desorption efficiency of benzene increased significantly from 48 to 87%. The maximum concentration of desorbate also increased significantly as the content of the hydrophilic units was increased under humid conditions. We attributed the enhanced desorption efficiency mainly to more adsorbed moisture, which indirectly allowed heating of the polymer adsorbents to higher temperatures upon irradiation with 600 W microwaves. PMID:22236950

  16. A study of the kinetics of isothermal nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnadjevic, Borivoj; Lazarevic, Natasa; Jovanovic, Jelena

    2010-12-01

    The isothermal kinetics of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide (SiO 2) was investigated. The isothermal thermogravimetric curves of nicotine at temperatures of 115 °C, 130 °C and 152 °C were recorded. The kinetic parameters ( Ea, ln A) of desorption of nicotine were calculated using various methods (stationary point, model constants and differential isoconversion method). By applying the "model-fitting" method, it was found that the kinetic model of nicotine desorption from silicon dioxide was a phase boundary controlled reaction (contracting volume). The values of the kinetic parameters, Ea,α and ln Aα, complexly change with changing degree of desorption and a compensation effect exists. A new mechanism of activation for the desorption of the absorbed molecules of nicotine was suggested in agreement with model of selective energy transfer.

  17. A Spreadsheet Program for Steady-State Temperature Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, G.J.

    2000-11-01

    A desktop program is developed in Microsoft EXCEL using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to solve a two-dimensional steady state heat conduction problem with a radiation boundary condition. The resulting partial differential equation and boundary conditions are solved using finite difference techniques and the results are compared with a finite element solution using the commercially available software package MSC/THERMAL. The results from the two methods are found to be within 1 percent. The VBA solution demonstrates how spreadsheet programs, like EXCEL, can be used to solve practical engineering problems with good accuracy.

  18. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  19. Low-temperature resource assessment program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Ross, H.

    1996-02-01

    The US Department of Energy - Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Resource Assessment project to update the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources and to encourage development of these resources. A database of 8,977 thermal wells and springs that are in the temperature range of 20{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C has been compiled for ten western states, an impressive increase of 82% compared to the previous assessments. The database includes location, descriptive data, physical parameters, water chemistry and references for sources of data. Computer-generated maps are also available for each state. State Teams have identified 48 high-priority areas for near-term comprehensive resource studies and development. Resources with temperatures greater than 50{degrees}C located within 8 km of a population center were identified for 271 collocated cities. Geothermal energy cost evaluation software has been developed to quickly identify the cost of geothermally supplied heat to these areas in a fashion similar to that used for conventionally fueled heat sources.

  20. 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal assessment program, Colorada

    SciTech Connect

    Cappa, J.A.; Hemborg, H.T.

    1995-01-01

    Previous assessments of Colorado`s low-temperature geothermal resources were completed by the Colorado Geological Survey in 1920 and in the mid- to late-1970s. The purpose of the 1992--1993 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment is to update the earlier physical, geochemical, and utilization data and compile computerized databases of the location, chemistry, and general information of the low-temperature geothermal resources in Colorado. The main sources of the data included published data from the Colorado Geological Survey, the US Geological Survey WATSTOR database, and the files of the State Division of Water Resources. The staff of the Colorado Geological Survey in 1992 and 1993 visited most of the known geothermal sources that were recorded as having temperatures greater than 30{degrees}C. Physical measurements of the conductivity, pH, temperature, flow rate, and notes on the current geothermal source utilization were taken. Ten new geochemical analyses were completed on selected geothermal sites. The results of the compilation and field investigations are compiled into the four enclosed Quattro Pro 4 databases. For the purposes of this report a geothermal area is defined as a broad area, usually less than 3 sq mi in size, that may have several wells or springs. A geothermal site is an individual well or spring within a geothermal area. The 1992-1993 assessment reports that there are 93 geothermal areas in the Colorado, up from the 56 reported in 1978; there are 157 geothermal sites up from the 125 reported in 1978; and a total of 382 geochemical analyses are compiled, up from the 236 reported in 1978. Six geothermal areas are recommended for further investigation: Trimble Hot Springs, Orvis Hot Springs, an area southeast of Pagosa Springs, the eastern San Luis Valley, Rico and Dunton area, and Cottonwood Hot Springs.

  1. Effect of carboxylic and thiol ligands (oxalate, cysteine) on the kinetics of desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Senevirathna, W. U.; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Baohua

    2010-01-01

    Sorption and desorption of Hg(II) on clay minerals can impact the biogeochemical cycle and bio-uptake of Hg in the environment. We studied the kinetics of the desorption of Hg(II) from kaolinite as affected by oxalate and cysteine, representing the ligands with carboxylic and thiol groups of different affinities for Hg(II). The effects of pH (3, 5, and 7), ligand concentration (0.25 and 1.0 mM), and temperature (15 C, 25 C, and 35 C) on the Hg(II) desorption were investigated through desorption kinetics. Our study showed that the Hg(II) desorption was pH dependent. In the absence of any organic ligand, >90% of the previously adsorbed Hg(II) desorbed at pH 3 within 2 h, compared to <10% at pH 7. Similar results were observed in the presence of oxalate, showing that it hardly affected the Hg(II) desorption. Cysteine inhibited the Hg(II) desorption significantly at all the pH tested, especially in the first 80 min with the desorption less than 20%, but the inhibition of the desorption appeared to be less prominent afterwards. The effect of the ligand concentration on the Hg(II) desorption was small, especially in the presence of oxalate. The effect of temperature on the Hg(II) desorption was nearly insignificant. The effect of the organic acids on the Hg(II) sorption and desorption is explained by the formation of the ternary surface complexes involving the mineral, ligand, and Hg(II). The competition for Hg(II) between the cysteine molecules adsorbed on the particle surfaces and in the solution phase probably can also affect the Hg(II) desorption.

  2. Desorption kinetics of cesium from Fukushima soils.

    PubMed

    Murota, Kento; Saito, Takumi; Tanaka, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the behaviors of Cs(+) in soils is crucial for evaluation of the impacts of disposal of soils contaminated by radiocesium, (137)Cs. The desorption rate of Cs(+) evaluated in relatively short periods of time may not be adequate for such a purpose. In this study, we investigated long-term desorption kinetics of (137)Cs and (133)Cs from soils collected in Fukushima Prefecture by batch desorption experiments in the presence of cation exchange resin as a sorbent. The sorbent can keep the concentration of Cs(+) in the aqueous phase low and prevent re-sorption of desorbed Cs(+). Up to 60% of (137)Cs was desorbed after 139 d in dilute KCl media, which was larger than the desorption by conventional short-term extraction with 1 M ammonium acetate. Desorption of (137)Cs continued even after this period. It was also found that high concentration of K(+) prevented desorption of Cs(+) in the initial stage of desorption, but the effect was alleviated with time. The desorbed fraction of stable Cs was smaller than that of (137)Cs. This indicated that (137)Cs may gradually move to more stable states in soils. The half-life of (137)Cs desorption from the slowest sorption site was estimated to be at least two years by a three-site desorption model. PMID:26773507

  3. Programming Enhancements for Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition Workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Igou, R.E.

    1998-10-01

    This report describes a new control-and-measurement system design for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's Low Temperature Thermal Decomposition (LTTD) process. The new design addresses problems with system reliability stemming from equipment obsolescence and addresses specific functional improvements that plant production personnel have identified, as required. The new design will also support new measurement techniques, which the Y-12 Development Division has identified for future operations. The new techniques will function in concert with the original technique so that process data consistency is maintained.

  4. Kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from sterilized materials.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Gisela C; Brandão, Teresa R S; Silva, Cristina L M

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene oxide gas is commonly used to sterilize medical devices, and concerns about using this agent on biological systems are well-established. Medical devices sterilized by ethylene oxide must be properly aerated to remove residual gas and by-products. In this work, kinetics of ethylene oxide desorption from different sterilized materials were studied in a range of aeration temperatures. The experimental data were well-described by a Fickian diffusion mass transfer behavior, and diffusivities were estimated for two textile and two polymeric materials within the temperature range of 1.5 to 59.0 degrees C. The results will allow predictions of ethylene oxide desorption, which is a key step for the design of sterilization/aeration processes, contributing to an efficient removal of residual ethylene oxide content. PMID:23513954

  5. High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program: 19th Annual Report, October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, Arvid

    2007-08-01

    Annual Report contains overview of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program and includes selected highlights of user activities for FY2006. Report is submitted to individuals within sponsoring DOE agency and to other interested individuals.

  6. Surface Structure Dependence in Desorption and Crystallization of Thin Interfacial Water Films on Platinum.

    PubMed

    Badan, Cansin; Heyrich, Yasmine; Koper, Marc T M; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2016-05-01

    We study the influence of substrate structure on desorption and crystallization of water deposited at 100 K on platinum. We use ultrathin water films adsorbed to well-defined but highly corrugated Pt(211) and Pt(221) surfaces. Desorption spectra reveal variations in the wetting and subsequent layers that critically depend on step type. Crystallization is induced at much lower substrate temperatures as compared to Pt(111). The crystalline ice (CI)-like layer is also significantly more stable on stepped surfaces as evidenced by a higher desorption energy. Crystallinity of the CI-like layers is maintained over a thickness that varies strongly with step type. PMID:27093477

  7. Thermal desorption of oxygen from near-stoichiometric cationic vanadium oxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Hodaka; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2016-05-01

    Oxygen desorption from cationic vanadium oxide clusters, VnOm+ (n = 2-10), composed of a near-stoichiometric (n:m = 2:5) frame with excess oxygen attached was investigated in a thermal energy region by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and thermal desorption spectrometry. Oxygen molecules were observed to desorb from the clusters during heating. The activation energy for desorption was estimated from the temperature dependence of different clusters and exhibited an even-odd alternation with respect to the cluster size, n. This alternation can be explained in terms of oxidation states of the vanadium atoms.

  8. Desorption of CO{sub 2} from MDEA and activated MDEA solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.W.; Zhang, C.F.; Qin, S.J.; Zhu, B.C.

    1995-03-01

    A packed column was used for investigating the desorption rate of CO{sub 2} from aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and activated MDEA solutions. Experiments were conducted within the temperature range 30--70 C, the concentration of MDEA was 4.28 kmol/m{sup 3}, and the concentration of piperazine (PZ) was 0.10 kmol/m{sup 3} for aqueous activated MDEA solutions. Experimental data confirmed that the kinetics model of absorption CO{sub 2} into aqueous MDEA and activated MDEA solutions can be applicable to the situations in which desorption occurs, and the desorption rate of model predictions agree well with that of experimental determination.

  9. Water Vapor Desorption Characteristics of Honeycomb Type Sorption Element Composed of Organic Sorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Hideo; Kida, Takahisa; Horibe, Akihiko; Kaneda, Makoto; Okamoto, Tamio; Seo, Jeong-Kyun

    This paper describes the water vapor desorption characteristics of honeycomb shape type sorbent element containing new organic sorbent of the bridged complex of sodium polyacrylate. The transient experiments in which the dry air was passed into the honeycomb type sorbent element sorbed water vapor were carried out under various conditions of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity and honeycomb length. The obtained data for desorption process were compared with those for sorption process. Finally, Sherwood number of mass transfer of the organic sorbent for desorption process was derived in terms of Reynolds number, modified Stefan number and non-dimensional honeycomb length.

  10. Air separation with temperature and pressure swing

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A chemical absorbent air separation process is set forth which uses a temperature swing absorption-desorption cycle in combination with a pressure swing wherein the pressure is elevated in the desorption stage of the process.

  11. Low energy electron stimulated desorption from DNA films dosed with oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Massey, Sylvain; Sanche, Leon

    2012-06-21

    Desorption of anions stimulated by 1-18 eV electron impact on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of single DNA strands is measured as a function of film temperature (50-250 K). The SAMs, composed of 10 nucleotides, are dosed with O{sub 2}. The OH{sup -} desorption yields increase markedly with exposure to O{sub 2} at 50 K and are further enhanced upon heating. In contrast, the desorption yields of O{sup -}, attributable to dissociative electron attachment to trapped O{sub 2} molecules decrease with heating. Irradiation of the DNA films prior to the deposition of O{sub 2} shows that this surprising increase in OH{sup -} desorption, at elevated temperatures, arises from the reaction of O{sub 2} with damaged DNA sites. These results thus appear to be a manifestation of the so-called 'oxygen fixation' effect, well known in radiobiology.

  12. Low energy electron stimulated desorption from DNA films dosed with oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Massey, Sylvain; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    Desorption of anions stimulated by 1–18 eV electron impact on self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of single DNA strands is measured as a function of film temperature (50–250 K). The SAMs, composed of 10 nucleotides, are dosed with O2. The OH− desorption yields increase markedly with exposure to O2 at 50 K and are further enhanced upon heating. In contrast, the desorption yields of O−, attributable to dissociative electron attachment to trapped O2 molecules decrease with heating. Irradiation of the DNA films prior to the deposition of O2 shows that this surprising increase in OH− desorption, at elevated temperatures, arises from the reaction of O2 with damaged DNA sites. These results thus appear to be a manifestation of the so-called “oxygen fixation” effect, well known in radiobiology. PMID:22779623

  13. Computer program simplifies transient and steady-state temperature prediction for complex body shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giebler, K. N.

    1966-01-01

    Computer program evaluates heat transfer modes and calculates either the transient or steady-state temperature distributions throughout an object of complex shape when heat sources are applied to specified points on the object. It uses an electrothermal model to simulate the conductance, heat capacity, and temperature potential of the object.

  14. Diurnal Soil Temperature Effects within the Globe[R] Program Dataset

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witter, Jason D.; Spongberg, Alison L.; Czajkowski, Kevin P.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term collection of soil temperature with depth is important when studying climate change. The international program GLOBE[R] provides an excellent opportunity to collect such data, although currently endorsed temperature collection protocols need to be refined. To enhance data quality, protocol-based methodology and automated data logging,…

  15. Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E.; Kelson, I. ); Doan, N.V. )

    1991-09-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption are carried out for a palladium crystal containing radioactive palladium atoms. The total desorption probability from various sites are computed, as well as the angular distribution of the desorbing atoms. The implications of the results to different experimental scenarios are discussed.

  16. High temperature thermocouple development program, part A and part B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toenshoff, D. A.; Zysk, E. D.; Fleischner, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of extending the useful life of thermocouples intended for in-core and out-of-core thermionic applications in a vacuum environment at temperatures up to 2273 K for periods of time up to 10,000 hours was investigated. Many factors that may influence this useful life were examined, and a basic probe design was developed. With a few modifications, twenty-three thermocouple assemblies were fabricated. Generally the finished thermocouple consisted of solid doped W-3% Re and W-25% Re wires and high purity and high density BeO insulators, and was sheathed in a high purity tantalum tube. In a few probes, stranded thermocouple wires were substituted; commercial grade BeO was used; and in two cases, CVD W-22% Re tubing was used. Each of the components was made of the highest purity materials available; was subjected to special cleaning steps, and was assembled in a class 10,000 clean room. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were determined on each of the components. Special processing techniques were used in the fabrication of the high purity (99.95%), high density (over 95% of theoretical) BeO.

  17. Spiral Surface Growth without Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain; Plapp, Mathis

    1998-11-01

    Spiral surface growth is well understood in the limit where the step motion is controlled by the local supersaturation of adatoms near the spiral ridge. In epitaxial thin-film growth, however, spirals can form in a step-flow regime where desorption of adatoms is negligible and the ridge dynamics is governed by the nonlocal diffusion field of adatoms on the whole surface. We investigate this limit numerically using a phase-field formulation of the Burton-Cabrera-Frank model, as well as analytically. Quantitative predictions, which differ strikingly from those of the local limit, are made for the selected step spacing as a function of the deposition flux, as well as for the dependence of the relaxation time to steady-state growth on the screw dislocation density.

  18. Research and development program for the development of advanced time-temperature dependent constitutive relationships. Volume 2: Programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassenti, B. N.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a 10-month research and development program for nonlinear structural modeling with advanced time-temperature constitutive relationships are presented. The implementation of the theory in the MARC nonlinear finite element code is discussed, and instructions for the computational application of the theory are provided.

  19. Desorption kinetics of {H}/{Mo(211) }

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, G. P.; Prybyla, J. A.; Estrup, P. J.

    1994-08-01

    The desorption kinetics of the {H}/{Mo(211) } chemisorption system were studied by thermal desorption and measurement of adsorption isobars. Analysis of the steady-state measurements permits the independent determination of the desorption energy ( Ed) and prefactor ( v). These quantities are found to depend strongly on coverage, with ( Ed) varying continuously from 145 {kJ}/{mol} at low coverage to 65 {kJ}/{mol} near saturation. Three regions of hydrogen adsorption are clearly indicated by the isobars as well as the thermal desorption traces. These regions can be correlated with structural changes observed previously with HREELS and LEED. The coverage dependence of the kinetic parameters is attributed to hydrogen-induced local distortions of the substrate structure. By relating the desorption energy to the isosteric heat the partial molar entropy is also extracted from the data and indicates localized adsorption as well as significant adsorbate-induced changes in the substrate degrees of freedom.

  20. Fortran computer programs to plot and process aquifer pressure and temperature data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Two FORTRAN computer programs have been written to process water-well temperature and pressure data recorded automatically by a datalogger on magnetic tape. These programs process the data into tabular and graphical form. Both programs are presented with documentation. Sample plots of temperature versus time, water levels versus time, aquifer pressure versus log time , log drawdown versus log 1/time, and log drawdown versus log time/radius squared are presented and are obtained using standard CALCOM directives. Drawdown plots may be used directly to obtain aquifer transmissivities and storage coefficients as well as leakance coefficients.

  1. Dissociative and molecular adsorption and recombinative desorption of methylchlorosilanes at the Cu (001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallo, J.; Goncharova, L. V.; Ermakov, A. V.; Hinch, B. J.; Strongin, D.

    2007-03-01

    The Direct Synthesis of dichlorodimethylsilane above Cu/Si containing surfaces, is central to the commercial manufacture of many silicone materials. The atomic scale mechanisms responsible for the high selectivity for dichlorodimethylsilane, vs. other chloromethylsilanes, is poorly understood. As part of a more extensive program we report here on the interactions of chloromethylsilanes with copper. Adsorption of dichlorodimethylsilane on Cu(001) is, at least in part, dissociative. Yet AES indicates non-stoichiometric surface concentrations of Cl and C. This observation, which is apparent in both low (140K) and room temperature exposures, is indicative of a facile recombinative desorption process. Subsequent TPD spectra also indicate the desorption of not only the parent adsorbate, but other species also. Indeed the combined cracking patterns, of simultaneously desorbing species, are inconsistent with solely (CH3)xSiCly species. We report on the TPD, AES, and high-resolution helium atom scattering studies of (i) adsorption of methylchlorosilanes, and (ii) their coadsorption with added SiH4, CH3 and Cl species, on Cu(001). Evidence for methyl cracking, and disilane production will discussed.

  2. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Iion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F; Prost, L; Seidl, P; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-03-25

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 degrees from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86 degrees, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88 degrees. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub 0} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub 0} = 10{sub 4}. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to {approx}220 degrees had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  3. Gas Desorption and Electron Emission from 1 MeV Potassium Ion Bombardment of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Covo, M K; Bieniosek, F M; Prost, L; Seidl, P A; Baca, D; Coorey, A; Sakumi, A

    2004-07-19

    Gas desorption and electron emission coefficients were measured for 1 MeV potassium ions incident on stainless steel at grazing angles (between 80 and 88 from normal incidence) using a new gas-electron source diagnostic (GESD). Issues addressed in design and commissioning of the GESD include effects from backscattering of ions at the surface, space-charge limited emission current, and reproducibility of desorption measurements. We find that electron emission coefficients {gamma}{sub e} scale as 1/cos({theta}) up to angles of 86, where {gamma}{sub e} = 90. Nearer grazing incidence, {gamma}{sub e} is reduced below the 1/cos({theta}) scaling by nuclear scattering of ions through large angles, reaching {gamma}{sub e} = 135 at 88. Electrons were emitted with a measured temperature of {approx}30 eV. Gas desorption coefficients {gamma}{sub sigma} were much larger, of order {gamma}{sub sigma} = 104. They also varied with angle, but much more slowly than 1/cos({theta}). From this we conclude that the desorption was not entirely from adsorbed layers of gas on the surface. Two mitigation techniques were investigated: rough surfaces reduced electron emission by a factor of ten and gas desorption by a factor of two; a mild bake to 230 had no effect on electron emission, but decreased gas desorption by 15% near grazing incidence. We propose that gas desorption is due to electronic sputtering.

  4. THERMTRAJ: A FORTRAN program to compute the trajectory and gas film temperatures of zero pressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J.; Carlson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called THERMTRAJ is presented which can be used to compute the trajectory of high altitude scientific zero pressure balloons from launch through all subsequent phases of the balloon flight. In addition, balloon gas and film temperatures can be computed at every point of the flight. The program has the ability to account for ballasting, changes in cloud cover, variable atmospheric temperature profiles, and both unconditional valving and scheduled valving of the balloon gas. The program was verified for an extensive range of balloon sizes (from 0.5 to 41.47 million cubic feet). Instructions on program usage, listing of the program source deck, input data and printed and plotted output for a verification case are included.

  5. State resolved desorption measurements as a probe of surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface reactions which lead directly to gas phase products can be investigated by using state resolved techniques to measure the energy released into the newly formed molecules. This technique has been used extensively to explore oxidation of CO and the dynamics of H 2 recombinative desorption at surfaces, but so far has been applied to few other reactions. Here we review the application of final state measurements and discuss the conditions under which dynamical information can be obtained for Langmuir-Hinshelwood type surface reactions. Combining resonance enhanced multiphoton ionisation with ion time of flight detection allows translational energy distributions to be measured for a wide range of products, with full quantum state resolution. The energy release reflects scattering from a thermally populated transition state, with the recombination dynamics determining how the product state distributions depart from a thermal distribution at the surface temperature. Using the principle of detailed balance the desorption dynamics can be related to the reverse process, dissociative chemisorption. Making the link between adsorption and desorption has two benefits. Firstly, it allows us to discuss quantitatively the influence of surface temperature on the product state distributions formed by surface reactions, allowing us to avoid naive models, which treat the transition state as having a unique, well-defined energy. Secondly, the desorption results can be used to obtain relative sticking probabilities with full quantum state and translational energy resolution, providing a way to determine how internal energy influences dissociation for both hydrogen and for heavy molecules, such as nitrogen. The conditions necessary to apply detailed balance successfully are discussed and the desorption distributions expected for different types of adsorption behaviour illustrated. The recombination/dissociation dynamics of hydrogen are summarised briefly and the energy

  6. Modeling of the adsorption and desorption of CO2 on Cu/ZrO2 and ZrO2 catalysts.

    PubMed

    Keskitalo, Tuomo J; Niemelä, Marita K Veringa; Krause, A Outi I

    2007-07-01

    The interaction between carbon dioxide and two zirconia catalysts-a Cu/ZrO2 catalyst containing 34% copper and a pure ZrO2 catalyst-was studied by pulse adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption methods. Kinetic modeling by nonlinear regression was applied to acquire information on the adsorption and desorption of CO2 relevant in the synthesis of methanol from carbon dioxide. A model that included three types of adsorption sites described well the experimental data for both Cu/ZrO2 and ZrO2. The model assumed first-order kinetics and a Freundlich-type logarithmic dependence of adsorption enthalpy on surface coverage. The parameters of the model were well identified and were in the physically meaningful range. The results indicate that, at 30 degrees C, on both catalysts, carbon dioxide adsorbs reversibly on one type of site and irreversibly on two other types of sites. PMID:17539669

  7. Flight summaries and temperature climatology at airliner cruise altitudes from GASP (Global Atmospheric Sampling Program) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Jasperson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Temperature data obtained by the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program (GASP) during the period March 1975 to July 1979 are compiled to form flight summaries of static air temperature and a geographic temperature climatology. The flight summaries include the height and location of the coldest observed temperature and the mean flight level, temperature and the standard deviation of temperature for each flight as well as for flight segments. These summaries are ordered by route and month. The temperature climatology was computed for all statistically independent temperture data for each flight. The grid used consists of 5 deg latitude, 30 deg longitude and 2000 feet vertical resolution from FL270 to FL430 for each month of the year. The number of statistically independent observations, their mean, standard deviation and the empirical 98, 50, 16, 2 and .3 probability percentiles are presented.

  8. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of arsenic onto ceria nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qinzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuhui; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2012-01-01

    The rapid increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles [ENPs] has resulted in an increasing concern over the potential impacts of ENPs on the environmental and human health. ENPs tend to adsorb a large variety of toxic chemicals when they are emitted into the environment, which may enhance the toxicity of ENPs and/or adsorbed chemicals. The study was aimed to investigate the adsorption and desorption behaviors of arsenic on ceria NPs in aqueous solution using batch technique. Results show that the adsorption behavior of arsenic on ceria NPs was strongly dependent on pH and independent of ionic strength, indicating that the electrostatic effect on the adsorption of these elements was relatively not important compared to surface chemical reactions. The adsorption isotherms fitted very well to both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The thermodynamic parameters (Δ H 0 , Δ S 0 , and Δ G 0 ) for the adsorption of arsenic were determined at three different temperatures of 283, 303, and 323 K. The adsorption reaction was endothermic, and the process of adsorption was favored at high temperature. The desorption data showed that desorption hysteresis occurred at the initial concentration studied. High adsorption capacity of arsenic on ceria NPs suggests that the synergistic effects of ceria NPs and arsenic on the environmental systems may exist when they are released into the environment.

  9. Patterning graphene at the nanometer scale via hydrogen desorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Sessi, P.; Guest, J. R.; Bode, M.; Guisinger, N.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Politecnico di Milano

    2009-12-01

    We have demonstrated the reversible and local modification of the electronic properties of graphene by hydrogen passivation and subsequent electron-stimulated hydrogen desorption with an scanning tunneling microscope tip. In addition to changing the morphology, we show that the hydrogen passivation is stable at room temperature and modifies the electronic properties of graphene, opening a gap in the local density of states. This insulating state is reversed by local desorption of the hydrogen, and the unaltered electronic properties of graphene are recovered. Using this mechanism, we have 'written' graphene patterns on nanometer length scales. For patterned regions that are roughly 20 nm or greater, the inherent electronic properties of graphene are completely recovered. Below 20 nm we observe dramatic variations in the electronic properties of the graphene as a function of pattern size. This reversible and local mechanism for modifying the electronic properties of graphene has far-reaching implications for nanoscale circuitry fabricated from this revolutionary material.

  10. Behaviour of neutron irradiated beryllium during temperature excursions up to and beyond its melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajuste, Elina; Kizane, Gunta; Avotiņa, Līga; Zariņš, Artūrs

    2015-10-01

    Beryllium pebble behaviour has been studied regarding the accidental operation conditions of tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactors. Structure evolution, oxidation and thermal properties have been compared for nonirradiated and neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles during thermal treatment in a temperature range from ambient temperature to 1600 K. For neutron irradiated pebbles tritium release process was studied. Methods of temperature programmed tritium desorption (TPD) in combination with thermogravimetry (TG) and temperature differential analysis (TDA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) have been used. It was found that there are strong relation between tritium desorption spectra and structural evolution of neutron irradiated beryllium. The oxidation rate is also accelerated by the structure damages caused by neutrons.

  11. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  12. The desorption of toluene from a montmorillonite clay adsorbent in a rotary kiln environment

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.D.; Silcox, G.D.; Lighty, J.S.; Xiao Xue Deng; Pershing, D.W. ); Cundy, V.A.; Leger, C.B.; Jakway, A.L. )

    1992-05-01

    The vaporization of toluene from pre-dried, 3 mm montmorillonite clay particles was studied in a 130 kW pilot-scale rotary kiln with inside dimensions of 0.61 by 0.61 meters. Vaporization rates were obtained with a toluene weight fraction of 0.25 percent as a function of kiln fill fractions from 3 to 8 percent, rotation rates from 0.1 to 0.9 rpm, and kiln wall temperatures from 189 to 793 C. Toluene desorption rates were obtained from gas-phase measurements and interpreted using a desorption model that incorporates the slumping frequency of the solids, the fill fraction of the kiln, the diffusion of toluene in the bed, and the rate of particle desorption using an Arrhenius-type expression that is a function of bed temperature and average bed concentration. The model included three adjustable desorption parameters which were obtained by fitting the experimental data at one set of conditions with a least squares technique. Solid and kiln-wall temperatures were continuously recorded and used in the model at predicting the effects of fill fraction and rotation rate over a range of temperatures. A methodology for predicting full-scale performance was developed. Full-scale toluene desorption predictions were completed for different operating temperatures.

  13. Selective thermal desorption of ultrathin aluminum oxide layers induced by electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Manisha; Miyata, Noriyuki; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2001-08-06

    The mechanism of electron-beam-induced selective thermal desorption of ultrathin aluminum-oxide layer ({approx}0.4 nm) on Si(001) surface was investigated by using scanning reflection electron microscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and Auger electron spectroscopy. We found that the change in the aluminum-oxide layer composition induced by electron-stimulated oxygen desorption accounted for the selective thermal desorption of the oxide layer. A systematic increase in the vacuum-annealing temperature to 500{sup o}C, 600{sup o}C and 720{sup o}C resulted in the formation of three-dimensional metal aluminum clusters, desorption of these clusters, and creation of a nanometer-scale clean Si(001)-2 x 1 open window in the selected electron-beam-irradiated area. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Collision-induced desorption of CO from Ru(0001) by hyperthermal argon and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiang; Lou, Yuanfu; Kleyn, Aart W.; Zaharia, Teodor; Gleeson, Michael A.

    2016-08-01

    Collision-induced desorption of CO from Ru(0001) by hyperthermal (5-9 eV) effusive beams of Ar and N + N2 has been studied at a sample temperature of 400 K. Prompt desorption occurs with cross sections on the order of 4 Å2. Based on post-exposure thermal desorption measurements, ~ 1/3 of the initial CO coverage cannot be desorbed by Ar on the time scale of the current experiments. In contrast, exposure to the mixed N + N2 beam appears to remove all CO from the irradiated region. This is attributed to a lowering of the CO binding energy by adsorbed N-atoms. While there is no evidence of a large influence of surface diffusion on the time scale of these exposure, desorption simulations suggest that local diffusion in the periphery of the exposed region influences the measured decay.

  15. Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry: Coming of Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the history and development of Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry to determine molecular weights and structures of proteins and polymers. Outlines theory, instrumentation, and sample preparation commonly used. Gives several examples of resulting spectra. (ML)

  16. Treating high-mercury-containing lamps using full-scale thermal desorption technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, T C; You, S J; Yu, B S; Chen, C M; Chiu, Y C

    2009-03-15

    The mercury content in high-mercury-containing lamps are always between 400 mg/kg and 200,000 mg/kg. This concentration is much higher than the 260 mg/kg lower boundary recommended for the thermal desorption process suggested by the US Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. According to a Taiwan EPA survey, about 4,833,000 cold cathode fluorescent lamps (CCFLs), 486,000 ultraviolet lamps and 25,000 super high pressure mercury lamps (SHPs) have been disposed of in the industrial waste treatment system, producing 80, 92 and 9 kg-mercury/year through domestic treatment, offshore treatment and air emissions, respectively. To deal with this problem we set up a full-scale thermal desorption process to treat and recover the mercury from SHPs, fluorescent tube tailpipes, fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder, and CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder and monitor the use of different pre-heating temperatures and desorption times. The experimental results reveal that the average thermal desorption efficiency of SHPs and fluorescent tube tailpipe were both 99.95%, while the average thermal desorption efficiencies of fluorescent tubes containing mercury-fluorescent powder were between 97% and 99%. In addition, a thermal desorption efficiency of only 69.37-93.39% was obtained after treating the CCFLs containing mercury-fluorescent powder. These differences in thermal desorption efficiency might be due to the complexity of the mercury compounds contained in the lamps. In general, the thermal desorption efficiency of lamps containing mercury-complex compounds increased with higher temperatures. PMID:18603361

  17. Thermal Desorption Analysis of Hydrogen in High Strength Martensitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, M.; Hirakami, D.; Tarui, T.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal desorption analyses (TDA) were conducted in high strength martensitic steels containing carbon from 0.33 to 1.0 mass pct, which were charged with hydrogen at 1223 K (950 °C) under hydrogen of one atmospheric pressure and quenched to room temperature. In 0.33C steel, which had the highest M s temperature, only one desorption peak was observed around 373 K (100 °C), whereas two peaks, one at a similar temperature and the other around and above 573 K (300 °C), were observed in the other steels, the height of the second peak increasing with carbon content. In 0.82C steel, both peaks disappeared during exposure at room temperature in 1 week, whereas the peak heights decreased gradually over 2 weeks in specimens electrolytically charged with hydrogen and aged for varying times at room temperature. From computer simulation, by means of the McNabb-Foster theory coupled with theories of carbon segregation, these peaks are likely to be due to trapping of hydrogen in the strain fields and cores of dislocations, and presumably to a lesser extent in prior austenite grain boundaries. The results also indicate that carbon atoms prevent and even expel hydrogen from trapping sites during quenching and aging in these steels.

  18. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts: Temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, A.C.M. van den; Grondelle, J. van; Santen, R.A. van

    1999-07-25

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity measurements that both catalysts lose activity as a function of time on stream due to inhibition of the surface by reaction intermediates. The used catalysts were studied by XPS and temperature programmed techniques. It was found that the surface of the catalysts had a high coverage of NH and OH and some additional NH{sub 2}. It seems most likely that the reaction mechanism proceeds through a stepwise dehydrogenation of the ammonia molecule. It appears that the last dehydrogenation step (NH by OH to N and water) is the rate determining step. The high selectivity of iridium to nitrogen can be explained by the higher activity of iridium in dissociating NO.

  19. Surface Electronic Spectra Detected by Atomic Desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Henyk, Matthias; Hess, Wayne P.; Sushko, Petr V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2003-10-10

    Using continuously tunable laser excitation of KI we measure the velocity profiles and the yield of desorbing hyperthermal iodine atoms as a function of photon energy. Based on the theoretical model of desorption we demonstrate that these spectra display a signature of a surface exciton and constitute a new sensitive method of surface specific desorption spectroscopy. Our results demonstrate that creation of surface excitions can be a much more general phenomenon than was previously thought based on extant spectroscopic measurements.

  20. Laser-desorption mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry and the mechanism of desorption ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zakett, D.; Schoen, A.E.; Cooks, R.G.; Hemberger, P.H.

    1981-03-11

    This paper reports sucrose mass spectra obtained by combining laser desorption with mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. Remarkable similarities in fragmentation behavior with secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) provide evidence for mechanistic similarities between SIMS and laser desorption (LD). Attachment of alkali metals to organic molecules (cationization) is a common feature of desorption ionization. This process also occurs during laser desorption of involatile compounds which further indicates the existence of underlying similarities between LD and SIMS. Steady ion currents (several thousand ions per laser pulse) of cationized sucrose are obtained for relatively long periods (minutes).

  1. Modelling of discrete TDS-spectrum of hydrogen desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodchenkova, Natalia I.; Zaika, Yury V.

    2015-12-01

    High concentration of hydrogen in metal leads to hydrogen embrittlement. One of the methods to evaluate the hydrogen content is the method of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). As the sample is heated under vacuumization, atomic hydrogen diffuses inside the bulk and is desorbed from the surface in the molecular form. The extraction curve (measured by a mass-spectrometric analyzer) is recorded. In experiments with monotonous external heating it is observed that background hydrogen fluxes from the extractor walls and fluxes from the sample cannot be reliably distinguished. Thus, the extraction curve is doubtful. Therefore, in this case experimenters use discrete TDS-spectrum: the sample is removed from the analytical part of the device for the specified time interval, and external temperature is then increased stepwise. The paper is devoted to the mathematical modelling and simulation of experimental studies. In the corresponding boundary-value problem with nonlinear dynamic boundary conditions physical- chemical processes in the bulk and on the surface are taken into account: heating of the sample, diffusion in the bulk, hydrogen capture by defects, penetration from the bulk to the surface and desorption. The model aimed to analyze the dynamics of hydrogen concentrations without preliminary artificial sample saturation. Numerical modelling allows to choose the point on the extraction curve that corresponds to the initial quantity of the surface hydrogen, to estimate the values of the activation energies of diffusion, desorption, parameters of reversible capture and hydride phase decomposition.

  2. Desorption of oxygen from alloyed Ag/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Maciej; Wormeester, Herbert Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2014-06-21

    We have investigated the interaction of oxygen with the Ag/Pt(111) surface alloy by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The surface alloy was formed during the deposition of sub-monolayer amounts of silver on Pt(111) at 800 K and subsequent cooling to 300 K. The low-temperature phase of the surface alloy is composed of nanometer-sized silver rich stripes, embedded within platinum-rich domains, which were characterized with spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction. The TDS measurements show that oxygen adsorption is blocked on Ag sites: the saturation coverage of oxygen decreases with increasing Ag coverage. Also, the activation energy for desorption (E{sub des}) decreases with Ag coverage. The analysis of the desorption spectra from clean Pt(111) shows a linear decay of E{sub des} with oxygen coverage, which indicates repulsive interactions between the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, adsorption on alloyed Ag/Pt(111) leads to an attractive interaction between adsorbed oxygen atoms.

  3. Enhanced thermal desorption -- Facile removal of PCBs from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Krabbenhoft, H.O.; Webb, J.L.; Gascoyne, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The use of certain organic and inorganic materials, when admixed with soils contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), greatly facilitates the removal of the PCBs by means of an ex situ thermal desorption process. Thus, for example, heating a soil (with an initial PCB concentration of {approximately}700 ppm A-1260) from 25 C to 300 C over a 30-minute period provided remediated soil with a residual PCB level of 53 ppm (92.4% PCB removal). When the experiment was repeated using a sweep of steam (corresponding to a water delivery rate of 1.0 mL/min), the residual PCB level was 10 ppm (98.6% PCB removal). And when steam was passed through the soil admixed with 5% sodium formate, the residual PCB level was only 0.9 ppm (99.9% PCB removal). Several other additives (such as sodium acetate, ammonium carbamate, formic acid) have been shown to be efficacious for enhanced PCB removal via thermal desorption. A design of experiments study was carried out to optimize the process parameters of temperature, time, additive level, and steam flow. A logarithmic transformation of the data afforded a mathematical model (correlation coefficient 0.96) that allows one to employ the enhanced thermal desorption process in a cost-effective manner to remediate contaminated soil (with an initial PCB level of {approximately}8,000 ppm A-1260) such that residual PCB levels of {<=}2 ppm (99.98% PCB removal) are routinely achieved.

  4. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 6 of 6: Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel

    SciTech Connect

    S.W. Allison; D.L. Beshears; W.W. Manges

    1999-06-30

    This report describes the successful completion of the development of an accurate in-process measurement instrument for galvanneal steel surface temperatures. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is a part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S> Department of Energy and fifteen North American Steelmakers. This three-year project entitled ''Temperature Measurement of Galvanneal Steel'' uses phosphor thermography, and outgrowth of Uranium enrichment research at Oak Ridge facilities. Temperature is the controlling factor regarding the distribution of iron and zinc in the galvanneal strip coating, which in turn determines the desired product properties

  5. Determination of the Arrhenius Activation Energy Using a Temperature-Programmed Flow Reactor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Kit-ha C.; Tse, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a novel method for the determination of the Arrhenius activation energy, without prejudging the validity of the Arrhenius equation or the concept of activation energy. The method involves use of a temperature-programed flow reactor connected to a concentration detector. (JN)

  6. An Application of Trimethylsilyl Derivatives with Temperature Programmed Gas Chromatography to the Senior Analytical Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelter, Paul B.; Carr, James D.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to teach temperature programed gas chromatography (TPGC) techniques and importance of derivatizing many classes of substrated to be separated. Includes equipment needed, procedures for making trimethylsilyl derivatives, applications, sample calculations, and typical results. Procedure required one, three-hour…

  7. Computer program determines thermal environment and temperature history of lunar orbiting space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, D. E.; Mitchell, K. L.

    1967-01-01

    Program computes the thermal environment of a spacecraft in a lunar orbit. The quantities determined include the incident flux /solar and lunar emitted radiation/, total radiation absorbed by a surface, and the resulting surface temperature as a function of time and orbital position.

  8. Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, David; Carella, John

    1999-01-01

    This document, submitted by AlliedSignal Engines (AE), a division of AlliedSignal Aerospace Company, presents the program final report for the Advanced High Temperature Polymer Matrix Composites for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion in compliance with data requirements in the statement of work, Contract No. NAS3-97003. This document includes: 1 -Technical Summary: a) Component Design, b) Manufacturing Process Selection, c) Vendor Selection, and d) Testing Validation: 2-Program Conclusion and Perspective. Also, see the Appendix at the back of this report. This report covers the program accomplishments from December 1, 1996, to August 24, 1998. The Advanced High Temperature PMC's for Gas Turbine Engines Program Expansion was a one year long, five task technical effort aimed at designing, fabricating and testing a turbine engine component using NASA's high temperature resin system AMB-21. The fiber material chosen was graphite T650-35, 3K, 8HS with UC-309 sizing. The first four tasks included component design and manufacturing, process selection, vendor selection, component fabrication and validation testing. The final task involved monthly financial and technical reports.

  9. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS PROGRAM AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY: OBSERVATIONS ON PERFORMANCE DEGRADATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; K. G. Condie; G. K. Housley

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the high-temperature electrolysis research and development program at the Idaho National Laboratory, with selected observations of electrolysis cell degradation at the single-cell, small stack and large facility scales. The objective of the INL program is to address the technical and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for hydrogen production from steam. In the envisioned application, high-temperature electrolysis would be coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor for efficient large-scale non-fossil non-greenhouse-gas hydrogen production. The program supports a broad range of activities including small bench-scale experiments, larger scale technology demonstrations, detailed computational fluid dynamic modeling, and system modeling. A summary of the current status of these activities and future plans will be provided, with a focus on the problem of cell and stack degradation.

  10. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  11. Photon-stimulated desorption as a substantial source of sodium in the lunar atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Yakshinskiy, B V; Madey, T E

    1999-08-12

    Mercury and the Moon both have tenuous atmospheres that contain atomic sodium and potassium. These chemicals must be continuously resupplied, as neither body can retain the atoms for more than a few hours. The mechanisms proposed to explain the resupply include sputtering of the surface by the solar wind, micrometeorite impacts, thermal desorption and photon-stimulated desorption. But there are few data and no general agreement about which processes dominate. Here we report laboratory studies of photon-stimulated desorption of sodium from surfaces that simulate lunar silicates. We find that bombardment of such surfaces at temperatures of approximately 250 K by ultraviolet photons (wavelength lambda < 300 nm) causes very efficient desorption of sodium atoms, induced by electronic excitations rather than by thermal processes or momentum transfer. The flux at the lunar surface of ultraviolet photons from the Sun is sufficient to ensure that photon-stimulated desorption of sodium contributes substantially to the Moon's atmosphere. On Mercury, solar heating of the surface implies that thermal desorption will also be an important source of atmospheric sodium. PMID:10458159

  12. Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwarno, Hadi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Ono, Futaba; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Yamawaki, Michio

    1997-08-01

    Hydrogen desorption properties of hydrogenated UThZr alloys of varied compositions were investigated using a hydrogen absorption-desorption experimental system, TG-DTA and DSC analyzers. Isothermal desorption at 900°C of elemental ratio U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 exhibited that there were two distinct plateau regions identified as ZrH 1.4-ZrH and ThZr 2H 7- x - ThZr 2 systems. TG-DTA and DSC measurements under the temperature range from room temperature to 1000°C have shown that there were three endothermic peaks identified as dehydrogenation reactions of ZrH 2 - x - ZrH and ThZr 2H 7-x. The DTA curve identified the first peak area as the ZrH 1.4-ZrH system, while the DSC curves identified that the second peak is the decomposition of ZrH and the third peak is the decomposition of ThZr 2H 7 - x. It was also shown that both ZrH 2 - x and ThZr 2H 7 - x are more stable in the alloy than the pure ones. Measured enthalpy changes during decomposition of the hydrogenated UThZr alloy are similar to the theoretical calculation. Oxidation during measurement of the U:Th:Zr:H = 2:1:6:13.1 resulted in a different measured enthalpy change and calculation. Isothermal decomposition of the U:Th:Zr:H = 1:1:4:9.5 without any disintegration indicates stability of the alloy against powdering on hydriding-dehydriding cycles. Stability of the samples at high temperature similar to that of UZrH 1.6 for TRIGA fuel can be maintained after the decomposition.

  13. Analytical solution and computer program (FAST) to estimate fluid fluxes from subsurface temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Irvine, Dylan J.

    2016-02-01

    This study details the derivation and application of a new analytical solution to the one-dimensional, transient conduction-advection equation that is applied to trace vertical subsurface fluid fluxes. The solution employs a flexible initial condition that allows for nonlinear temperature-depth profiles, providing a key improvement over most previous solutions. The boundary condition is composed of any number of superimposed step changes in surface temperature, and thus it accommodates intermittent warming and cooling periods due to long-term changes in climate or land cover. The solution is verified using an established numerical model of coupled groundwater flow and heat transport. A new computer program FAST (Flexible Analytical Solution using Temperature) is also presented to facilitate the inversion of this analytical solution to estimate vertical groundwater flow. The program requires surface temperature history (which can be estimated from historic climate data), subsurface thermal properties, a present-day temperature-depth profile, and reasonable initial conditions. FAST is written in the Python computing language and can be run using a free graphical user interface. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution and FAST using measured subsurface temperature and climate data from the Sendia Plain, Japan. Results from these illustrative examples highlight the influence of the chosen initial and boundary conditions on estimated vertical flow rates.

  14. A genetic program promotes C. elegans longevity at cold temperatures via a thermosensitive TRP channel.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Rui; Zhang, Bi; Dong, Yongming; Gong, Jianke; Xu, Tao; Liu, Jianfeng; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2013-02-14

    Both poikilotherms and homeotherms live longer at lower body temperatures, highlighting a general role of temperature reduction in lifespan extension. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. One prominent model is that cold temperatures reduce the rate of chemical reactions, thereby slowing the rate of aging. This view suggests that cold-dependent lifespan extension is simply a passive thermodynamic process. Here, we challenge this view in C. elegans by showing that genetic programs actively promote longevity at cold temperatures. We find that TRPA-1, a cold-sensitive TRP channel, detects temperature drop in the environment to extend lifespan. This effect requires cold-induced, TRPA-1-mediated calcium influx and a calcium-sensitive PKC that signals to the transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Human TRPA1 can functionally substitute for worm TRPA-1 in promoting longevity. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized function for TRP channels, link calcium signaling to longevity, and, importantly, demonstrate that genetic programs contribute to lifespan extension at cold temperatures. PMID:23415228

  15. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Scherwitzl, Boris Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-14

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  16. Film growth, adsorption and desorption kinetics of indigo on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Resel, Roland; Winkler, Adolf

    2014-05-01

    Organic dyes have recently been discovered as promising semiconducting materials, attributable to the formation of hydrogen bonds. In this work, the adsorption and desorption behavior, as well as thin film growth was studied in detail for indigo molecules on silicon dioxide with different substrate treatments. The material was evaporated onto the substrate by means of physical vapor deposition under ultra-high vacuum conditions and was subsequently studied by Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS), Auger Electron Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction, and Atomic Force Microscopy. TDS revealed initially adsorbed molecules to be strongly bonded on a sputter cleaned surface. After further deposition a formation of dimers is suggested, which de-stabilizes the bonding mechanism to the substrate and leads to a weakly bonded adsorbate. The dimers are highly mobile on the surface until they get incorporated into energetically favourable three-dimensional islands in a dewetting process. The stronger bonding of molecules within those islands could be shown by a higher desorption temperature. On a carbon contaminated surface no strongly bonded molecules appeared initially, weakly bonded monomers rather rearrange into islands at a surface coverage that is equivalent to one third of a monolayer of flat-lying molecules. The sticking coefficient was found to be unity on both substrates. The desorption energies from carbon covered silicon dioxide calculated to 1.67 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer desorption from the islands and 0.84 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption. Corresponding values for desorption from a sputter cleaned surface are 1.53 ± 0.05 eV for multilayer and 0.83 ± 0.05 eV for monolayer desorption.

  17. Laser-induced iodine desorption from impregnated polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Filho, A.; Leite, N. F.; Miranda, L. C. M.; Stempniak, R. A.

    1989-07-01

    The Ar+ laser-stimulated desorption of iodine molecules from an impregnated polystyrene film was investigated. The photoprocess induces a color change (from red to the transparent) and leaves in the film a marked print, which is related to the laser beam characteristics. The experimental data was fitted using a set of differential equations relating the time dependence of the film temperature and absorption coefficient. At low-power levels (<25 mW), the time evolution of the laser transmitted power could be well matched to the experimental data. The wavelength dependence of the marking process was also studied and the relative contribution of photodissociative and photothermal processes was inferred.

  18. The Adsorption and Desorption of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in Freeze-Thaw Treated Soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Linhui; Ma, Jincai; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Tao, Jiahui; Wang, Guanzhu; Yu, Jitong; Guo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption are important processes that influence the potential toxicity and bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. However, information regarding adsorption and desorption behavior of heavy metals in soils subjected to freeze-thaw cycles is poorly understood. In the current study, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles with different freezing temperature (-15, -25, -35°C) on soil properties was investigated. Then the adsorption and desorption behavior of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils was studied. The adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than those in unfrozen soils (p < 0.05), due to the fact that pH, cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, free iron oxide content, and CaCO3 content in freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than those in unfrozen soils. The adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in soils treated with lower freezing temperatures were higher than those in soils treated with higher freezing temperatures. Desorption percentages of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in unfrozen soils were smaller than those in freeze-thaw treated soils (p < 0.05). The desorption percentages of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) were smaller in soils treated with lower freezing temperatures than those in soils treated with higher freezing temperatures. The results obtained highlight the change of the adsorption and desorption behavior of typical heavy metals in freeze-thaw treated soils located in seasonal frozen soils zone in northeast China. PMID:26644028

  19. Adsorption and desorption of uranium (VI) in aerated zone soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Wu, Jiaojiao; Liao, Jiali; Zhang, Dong; Yang, Jijun; Feng, Yue; Zeng, Junhui; Wen, Wei; Yang, Yuanyou; Tang, Jun; Liu, Ning

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the adsorption and desorption behavior of uranium (VI) in aerated zone soil (from Southwest China) was systematically investigated using a static experimental method in order to provide useful information for safety assessment of the disposal of (ultra-)low uraniferous radioactive waste, as well as a potential remediation method for uranium-contaminated soils. The adsorption behavior of uranium (VI) was firstly studied by batch experiments as functions of contact time, pH, liquid/solid ratio, temperature, colloids, minerals and coexistent ions. The results indicated that the adsorption of uranium (VI) by natural soil was efficient at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L uranium (VI) nitrate solution with 100 mg natural soil at room temperature when pH is about 7.0. The adsorption was strongly influenced by the solution pH, contact time, initial concentration and colloids. The adsorption equilibrium for uranium (VI) in soil was obtained within 24 h and the process could be described by the Langmuir adsorption equation. For uranium (VI) desorption, EDTA, citric acid and HNO(3) were evaluated under different conditions of temperature, concentration and proportion of liquid to solid. The adsorbed uranium (VI) on natural soil could be easily extracted by all these agents, especially by HNO(3), implying that the uranium-contaminated soils can be remedied by these reagents. PMID:22939949

  20. Thermal desorption of PCBs from contaminated soil with copper dichloride.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Qi, Zhifu; Li, Xiaodong; Chen, Tong; Buekens, Alfons; Yan, Jianhua; Ni, Mingjiang

    2015-12-01

    Copper dichloride is an important catalyst both in the dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the formation of PCDD/Fs. The effect of copper dichloride on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) was studied in treated soil and off gas after thermal desorption of PCB-contaminated soil at 300, 400, 500, 600 °C. The presence of copper dichloride clearly enhances thermal desorption by promoting PCBs removal, destruction, and dechlorination. After thermal treatment at 600 °C for 1 h, the removal efficiency and destruction efficiency for PCBs reached 98.1 and 93.9%, respectively. Compared with the positive influence on PCBs, copper dichloride catalyzed large amount of PCDFs formation at 300 °C, with the concentration ratio of 2.35. The effect of CuCl2 on PCDFs formation weakened with the rising temperature since PCDFs destruction became dominant under higher temperature. Different from PCDFs, PCDDs concentration in treated soil and off gas decreased continuously with the increasing temperature. PMID:26233752

  1. Thermal desorption spectra from cavities in helium-implanted silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Calzolari, G.; Corni, F.; Frabboni, S.; Nobili, C.; Ottaviani, G.; Tonini, R.

    2000-04-01

    Thermal desorption spectra at constant ramp rate have been determined after helium implantation into bare silicon prepared for a large set of experimental conditions. The spectra can phenomenologically be classified as composed by two peaks: the α peak, centered on a temperature of 750-800°C with a shoulder extending to lower temperature (down to 550°C), and the β peak, centered on a lower temperature depending on the implantation-annealing conditions. The α peak is attributed to the emission from cavities, while the β peak is attributed to the emission from vacancylike defects. A detailed theory describing helium effusion from stable cavities as controlled by the interatomic helium-helium potential is proposed and found to reproduce accurately most of the α peaks. The postimplantation of hydrogen into samples displaying a pure β emission results in an α peak which can be described by the same model as above provided that the cavities are unstable and shrink during desorption in such a way as to maintain constant the concentration of contained helium.

  2. Incorporation and desorption of sulphur In InP grown by MBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Airaksinen, V. M.; Cheng, T. S.; Stanley, C. R.

    1987-02-01

    Sulphur doped InP has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an electrochemical cell as a source of sulphur dimer S 2. At growth temperatures of over 500°C sulphur is lost from the layers as a volatile indium sulphide which desorbs with an activation energy of 4.5 eV. The concentration of incorporated sulphur ( C S) is linearly proportional to the incident sulphur flux both at low ( T s < 500°C) and high ( T s > 500°C) growth temperatures, indicating first order kinetics of incorporation and desorption f sulphur. The desorption cannot be suppressed by increasing the P 2: In flux ratio. The desorption rate is also independent of the incident indium flux. A thermodynamic analysis shows that the most likely desorbing species is In 2S.

  3. Dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 2: Operation and program manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purpura, P. T.

    1983-01-01

    The hot section technology (HOST) dynamic gas temperature measurement system computer program acquires data from two type B thermocouples of different diameters. The analysis method determines the in situ value of an aerodynamic parameter T, containing the heat transfer coefficient from the transfer function of the two thermocouples. This aerodynamic parameter is used to compute a fequency response spectrum and compensate the dynamic portion of the signal of the smaller thermocouple. The calculations for the aerodynamic parameter and the data compensation technique are discussed. Compensated data are presented in either the time or frequency domain, time domain data as dynamic temperature vs time, or frequency domain data.

  4. Further development of the dynamic gas temperature measurement system. Volume 2: Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, Dana R.

    1986-01-01

    The Dynamic Gas Temperature Measurement System compensation software accepts digitized data from two different diameter thermocouples and computes a compensated frequency response spectrum for one of the thermocouples. Detailed discussions of the physical system, analytical model, and computer software are presented in this volume and in Volume 1 of this report under Task 3. Computer program software restrictions and test cases are also presented. Compensated and uncompensated data may be presented in either the time or frequency domain. Time domain data are presented as instantaneous temperature vs time. Frequency domain data may be presented in several forms such as power spectral density vs frequency.

  5. Prenatal acoustic communication programs offspring for high posthatching temperatures in a songbird.

    PubMed

    Mariette, Mylene M; Buchanan, Katherine L

    2016-08-19

    In many species, embryos can perceive and learn external sounds. Yet, the possibility that parents may use these embryonic capacities to alter their offspring's developmental trajectories has not been considered. Here, we demonstrate that zebra finch parents acoustically signal high ambient temperatures (above 26°C) to their embryos. We show that exposure of embryos to these acoustic cues alone adaptively alters subsequent nestling begging and growth in response to nest temperature and influences individuals' reproductive success and thermal preferences as adults. These findings have implications for our understanding of maternal effects, phenotypic plasticity, developmental programming, and the adaptation of endothermic species to a warming world. PMID:27540172

  6. Final report of comprehensive testing program for concrete at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Naus, D.J.; Robinson, G.C.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this program was to define the variations in physical (thermal) and mechanical (strength) properties of limestone aggregate concrete and lightweight insulating concrete exposed to elevated temperatures that could occur as a result of a postulated large sodium spill in a lined LMFBR equipment cell. To meet this objective, five test series were conducted: (1) unconfined compression, (2) shear, (3) rebar bond, (4) sustained loading (creep), and (5) thermal properties. Mechanical property results are presented for concretes subjected to temperature up to 621{sup 0}C (1150{sup 0}F).

  7. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    SciTech Connect

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-21

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53–75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  8. Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid on Cu(111): The importance of hydrogen bonding between adsorbed species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Yuichiro; Koitaya, Takanori; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of desorption and decomposition kinetics of formic acid (HCOOH) on Cu(111) was performed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-resolved infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy. The activation energy for desorption is estimated to be 53-75 kJ/mol by the threshold TPD method as a function of coverage. Vibrational spectra of the first layer HCOOH at 155.3 K show that adsorbed molecules form a polymeric structure via the hydrogen bonding network. Adsorbed HCOOH molecules are dissociated gradually into monodentate formate species. The activation energy for the dissociation into monodentate formate species is estimated to be 65.0 kJ/mol at a submonolayer coverage (0.26 molecules/surface Cu atom). The hydrogen bonding between adsorbed HCOOH species plays an important role in the stabilization of HCOOH on Cu(111). The monodentate formate species are stabilized at higher coverages, because of the lack of vacant sites for the bidentate formation.

  9. Investigation of water and hydroxyl groups associated with coal fly ash by thermal desorption and fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Seaverson, L.M.; McClelland, J.F.; Burnet, G.; Anderegg, J.W.; Iles, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) and Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FT-IR/PAS) have been used in combination to analyze the water and hydroxyl groups associated with four coal fly ashes. Measurements using the former technique on these ashes resulted in identification of three water desorption regions in the temperature range from 25/sup 0/ to 1100/sup 0/C. The regions consisted of a small desorption peak at 50/sup 0/, a broad band from 180/sup 0/ to 400/sup 0/, and an intense peak from 400/sup 0/ to 590/sup 0/. No additional water desorption was observed up to 1100/sup 0/. A fourth ash gave a similar spectrum except that it lacked the intense last peak. The TDS spectra together with FT-IR/PAS spectra taken on samples exposed to pre- and post-desorption peak temperatures allowed the first TDS peak to be assigned to the desorption of physically adsorbed water, the broad band to desorption of hydrogenbonded surface hydroxyls, and the intense last peak to the decomposition of Ca(OH)/sub 2/.

  10. Desorption of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, mustard agent, from the surface of hardened cement paste (HCP) wafers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Zhou, Xuezhi; Guan, Yingqiang; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Xinming; Yan, Huijuan

    2013-05-01

    The decontamination of surfaces exposed to chemical warfare agents is an interesting scientific topic. The desorption behavior of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) from the surface of the HD-contaminated hardened cement paste (HCP) was investigated under different weather conditions, which should provide scientific reference data for protection and decontamination projects involving HD-contaminated HCP in different conditions. The desorption of HD from the surface of HCP wafers was studied, and the effects of the purge air flow rate, water content, sorption temperature, and substrate age were investigated. HD desorption was detected from the surface of HD-contaminated HCP, but the desorption velocity was relatively slow. The desorption quantity remained within an order of magnitude throughout a time span of 36h (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), and the amount of HD that was desorbed from each square meter of HCP surface was approximately 1.1g (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), which was approximately 5.5 percent of the total HD that was initially applied. A higher flow rate of the purge air, increased water content, and longer substrate age of HCP all increased the HD desorption. In contrast, increased temperatures suppressed HD desorption. PMID:23395389