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Sample records for temperature sodium chloride

  1. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yang, Hui; Shen, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries, also called as ZEBRA batteries, possess many merits such as low cost, high energy density and high safety, but their high operation temperature (270-350 °C) may cause several issues and limit their applications. Therefore, decreasing the operation temperature is of great importance in order to broaden their usage. Using a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) catholyte composed of sodium chloride buffered 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride-aluminum chloride and a dense β″-aluminates solid electrolyte film with 500 micron thickness, we report an intermediate temperature sodium copper chloride battery which can be operated at only 150 °C, therefore alleviating the corrosion issues, improving the material compatibilities and reducing the operating complexities associated with the conventional ZEBRA batteries. The RTIL presents a high ionic conductivity (0.247 S cm-1) at 150 °C and a wide electrochemical window (-2.6 to 2.18 vs. Al3+/Al). With the discharge plateau at 2.64 V toward sodium and the specific capacity of 285 mAh g-1, this intermediate temperature battery exhibits an energy density (750 mWh g-1) comparable to the conventional ZEBRA batteries (728-785 mWh g-1) and superior to commercialized Li-ion batteries (550-680 mWh g-1), making it very attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

  2. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg-1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.

  3. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density.

    PubMed

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg(-1), higher than that of conventional tubular sodium-nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium-nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs. PMID:26864635

  4. Co-doped sodium chloride crystals exposed to different irradiation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz-Morales, A.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Flores J, C.; Hernandez A, J.; Murrieta S, H.

    2013-07-03

    Monocrystals of NaCl:XCl{sub 2}:MnCl{sub 2}(X = Ca,Cd) at four different concentrations have been analyzed. The crystals were exposed to different irradiation temperature, such as at room temperature (RT), solid water (SW), dry ice (DI) and liquid nitrogen (LN). The samples were irradiated with photon from {sup 60}Co irradiators. The co-doped sodium chloride crystals show a complex structure of glow curves that can be related to different distribution of traps. The linearity response was analyzed with the F(D) index. The F(D) value was less than unity indicating a sub-linear response was obtained from the TL response on the function of the dose. The glow curves were deconvoluted by using the CGCD program based on the first, second and general order kinetics.

  5. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250-350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β″-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. The cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  6. Experimental evaluation of the performance of the sodium metal chloride battery below usual operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerovasili, Eirini; May, Johanna F.; Sauer, Dirk Uwe

    2014-04-01

    The high operating temperature of the sodium metal chloride battery limits the possible applications of this storage technology. In this study, the performance of a 3.65 kWh (80 Ah, 48 V) battery at temperatures as low as 240 °C is measured and the efficiency at different discharge currents, cycling frequencies and operating temperatures is examined. The total available capacity of a 40 Ah string at 240 °C when discharging with 0.1C is found to be just 1 Ah smaller compared to 275 °C, which is the nominal operating temperature of the battery. However it is shown that low temperatures have a big impact on the charge duration. Starting from 20% SOC (state-of-charge) the duration of charging until the fulfillment of the end-of-charge criterion at 240 °C is 25 h with the quickest charging regime (0.25C, 2.7 V/cell) whereas until 90% SOC 7.6 h are required. At a limited SOC operation window from 20% to 90% the total daily efficiency of the 3.65 kWh battery is higher at 240 °C compared to 275 °C and increases from 69% if one cycle is performed daily with 0.175C discharge current to 81% for two cycles with the same discharge rate.

  7. Solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of the single salts sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium chloride at temperatures from 313 to 393 K and total pressures up to 10 MPa

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, J.; Kamps, A.P.S.; Rumpf, B.; Maurer, G.

    2000-04-01

    New experimental results for the solubility of hydrogen sulfide in aqueous solutions of the single salts sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride, and ammonium chloride at temperatures from 313 to 393 K and total pressures up to 10 MPa are reported. As in the salt-free system, a second-hydrogen sulfide-rich--liquid phase is observed at high hydrogen sulfide concentrations. A model to describe the phase equilibrium is presented. Calculations are compared to the new experimental data.

  8. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  9. Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodium/nickel chloride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Coyle, Christopher A.; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-12-15

    The sodium–nickel chloride (ZEBRA) battery is operated at relatively high temperature (250–350 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. Reducing the operating temperature in the range of 150200 °C can not only lead to enhanced cycle life by suppressing temperature-related degradations, but also allow the use of lower cost materials for construction. To achieve adequate electrochemical performance at lower operating temperatures, reduction in ohmic losses is required, including the reduced ohmic resistance of β"-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) and the incorporation of low melting point secondary electrolytes. In present work, planar-type Na/NiCl2 cells with a thin BASE (600 μm) and low melting point secondary electrolyte were evaluated at reduced temperatures. Molten salts used as secondary electrolytes were fabricated by the partial replacement of NaCl in the standard secondary electrolyte (NaAlCl4) with other lower melting point alkali metal salts such as NaBr, LiCl, and LiBr. Electrochemical characterization of these ternary molten salts demonstrated improved ionic conductivity and sufficient electrochemical window at reduced temperatures. Furthermore, Na/NiCl2 cells with 50 mol% NaBr-containing secondary electrolyte exhibited reduced polarizations at 175 °C compared to the cell with the standard NaAlCl4 catholyte. Finally, the cells also exhibited stable cycling performance even at 150 °C.

  10. Viscosities of the ternary solution dimethyl sulfoxide/water/sodium chloride at subzero temperatures and their application in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaozhi; Yu, Xiaoyi; Chen, Zhaojie; Chen, Guangming

    2013-04-01

    Vitrification is considered as the most promising method for long-term storage of tissues and organs. An effective way to reduce the accompanied cryoprotectant (CPA) toxicity, during CPA addition/removal, is to operate at low temperatures. The permeation process of CPA into/out of biomaterials is affected by the viscosity of CPA solution, especially at low temperatures. The objective of the present study is to measure the viscosity of the ternary solution, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO)/water/sodium chloride (NaCl), at low temperatures and in a wide range of concentrations. A rotary viscometer coupled with a low temperature thermostat bath was used. The measurement was carried out at temperatures from -10 to -50°C. The highest mass fraction of Me2SO was 75% (w/w) and the lowest mass fraction of Me2SO was the value that kept the solution unfrozen at the measurement temperature. The concentration of NaCl was kept as a constant [0.85% (w/w), the normal salt content of extracellular fluids]. The Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model was employed to fit the obtained viscosity data. As an example, the effect of solution viscosity on modeling the permeation of Me2SO into articular cartilage was qualitatively analyzed. PMID:23376371

  11. A Fiber-Optic Sensor Using an Aqueous Solution of Sodium Chloride to Measure Temperature and Water Level Simultaneously

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Sim, Hyeok In; Shin, Sang Hun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Moon, Joo Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system using a multiplexed array of sensing probes based on an aqueous solution of sodium chloride (NaCl solution) and an optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) for simultaneous measurement of temperature and water level is proposed. By changing the temperature, the refractive index of the NaCl solution is varied and Fresnel reflection arising at the interface between the distal end of optical fiber and the NaCl solution is then also changed. We measured the modified optical power of the light reflected from the sensing probe using a portable OTDR device and also obtained the relationship between the temperature of water and the optical power. In this study, the water level was simply determined by measuring the signal difference of the optical power due to the temperature difference of individual sensing probes placed inside and outside of the water. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the temperature and water level can be obtained simultaneously by measuring optical powers of light reflected from sensing probes based on the NaCl solution. It is anticipated that the proposed fiber-optic sensor system makes it possible to remotely monitor the real-time change of temperature and water level of the spent fuel pool during a loss of power accident. PMID:25310471

  12. Chloride substitution in sodium borohydride

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnsbaek, Dorthe B.; Rude, Line H.; Jensen, Torben R.

    2011-07-15

    The dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. The dissolution reaction is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or combination of ball milling and annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples in molar ratios of 0.5:0.5 and 0.75:0.25. The degree of dissolution is studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD) data. The results show that dissolution of 10 mol% NaCl into NaBH{sub 4}, forming Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.9}Cl{sub 0.1}, takes place during ball milling. A higher degree of dissolution of NaCl in NaBH{sub 4} is obtained by annealing resulting in solid solutions containing up to 57 mol% NaCl, i.e. Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 0.43}Cl{sub 0.57}. In addition, annealing results in dissolution of 10-20 mol% NaBH{sub 4} into NaCl. The mechanism of the dissolution during annealing and the decomposition pathway of the solid solutions are studied by in situ SR-PXD. Furthermore, the stability upon hydrogen release and uptake were studied by Sieverts measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other resulting in formation of solid solutions of composition Na(BH{sub 4}){sub 1-x}Cl{sub x} is studied. Dissolution is facilitated by two methods: ball milling or annealing at 300 deg. C for three days of NaBH{sub 4}-NaCl samples. Sample compositions and dissolution mechanism are studied by Rietveld refinement of synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction data. Highlights: > Studies of dissolution of sodium chloride and sodium borohydride into each other. > Solid state diffusion facilitated by mechanical and thermal treatments. > Dissolution is more efficiently induced by heating than by mechanical treatment. > Mechanism for dissolution studied by Rietveld refinement of in situ SR-PXD data.

  13. Modeling the effects of temperature, sodium chloride and green tea and their interactions on the thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interactive effects of heating temperature (55 – 65C), sodium chloride (NaCl, 0-2%), and green tea 60% polyphenol extract (GTPE, 0-3%) on heat resistance of a five-strain mixture of Listeria monocytogenes in ground turkey were determined. Thermal death times were quantified in bags submerged in ...

  14. Sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1992-01-01

    It was concluded that rapid development in the technology of sodium metal chloride batteries has been achieved in the last decade mainly due to the: expertise available with sodium sulfur system; safety; and flexibility in design and fabrication. Long cycle lives of over 1000 and high energy densities of approx. 100 Wh/kg have been demonstrated in both Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 cells. Optimization of porous cathode and solid electrolyte geometries are essential for further enhancing the battery performance. Fundamental studies confirm the capabilities of these systems. Nickel dichloride emerges as the candidate cathode material for high power density applications such as electric vehicle and space.

  15. Copper Chloride Cathode For Liquid-Sodium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1990-01-01

    Rechargeable liquid-sodium cell with copper chloride cathode offers substantial increase in energy density over cells made with other cathode materials. Unit has theoretical maximum energy density of 1135 W.h/kg. Generates electricity by electrochemical reaction of molten sodium and solid copper chloride immersed in molten electrolyte, sodium tetrachloroaluminate at temperature of equal to or greater than 200 degrees C. Wall of alumina tube separates molten electrolyte from molten sodium anode. Copper chloride cathode embedded in pores of sintered nickel cylinder or directly sintered.

  16. Effect of temperature on the formation of creep substructure in sodium chloride single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, Sai V.; Pharr, George M.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the substructure morphology and the cell and subgrain size was investigated experimentally in NaCl single crystals under creep in the temperature range 573-873 K. It is found that the effect of temperature on the cell and subgrain sizes is weak in comparison with the effect of stress. However, there was a qualitative change in the substructure morphology with temperature, with the cells and subgrains better defined at higher temperatures. The volume fraction of the cell boundaries decreased with increasing temperature, thereby indicating a refinement of the microstructure at higher temperatures.

  17. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  18. Thermodynamic calculation of self-diffusion in sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baohua; Li, Chengbo; Shan, Shuangming

    2016-05-01

    Using the available pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of sodium chloride, we show that the self-diffusion coefficients of sodium and chloride in sodium chloride as a function of temperature and pressure can be successfully reproduced in terms of bulk elastic and expansivity data. We use a thermodynamic model that interconnects point-defect parameters with bulk properties. Our calculated diffusion coefficients and point-defect parameters, including activation enthalpy, activation entropy, and activation volume, well agree with reported experimental results when uncertainties are considered. Furthermore, the ionic conductivity of sodium chloride inferred from our predicted diffusivities of sodium through the Nernst-Einstein equation is compared with previous experimental data.

  19. Secondary electron emission from sodium chloride, glass and aluminum oxide at various temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shulman, A. R.; Makedonskiy, V. L.; Yaroshetskiy, I. D.

    1980-01-01

    The method of single impulses was used to measure the coefficients of the secondary electronic emission for 2 types of Al2O2, monocrystalline NaCl and glass at different temperatures and for different values of the energy of the primary electrons. The value of the secondary electron emission does not depend upon temperature. The effect of a gas film on the value of the secondary electron emission was detected.

  20. Slow Sodium: An Oral Slowly Released Sodium Chloride Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, E. M.; Curtis, J. R.; Jewkes, R. J.; Jones, B. E.; Luck, V. A.; de Wardener, H. E.; Phillips, N.

    1971-01-01

    The use of a slowly released oral preparation of sodium chloride is described. It was given to patients and athletes to treat or prevent acute and chronic sodium chloride deficiency. Gastrointestinal side effects were not encountered after the ingestion of up to 500 mEq in one day or 200 mEq in 10 minutes. PMID:5569979

  1. Slow sodium: an oral slowly released sodium chloride preparation.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, E M; Curtis, J R; Jewkes, R J; Jones, B E; Luck, V A; de Wardener, H E; Phillips, N

    1971-09-11

    The use of a slowly released oral preparation of sodium chloride is described. It was given to patients and athletes to treat or prevent acute and chronic sodium chloride deficiency. Gastrointestinal side effects were not encountered after the ingestion of up to 500 mEq in one day or 200 mEq in 10 minutes. PMID:5569979

  2. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium-nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee -Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-02-11

    Here we demonstrate for the first time that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190°C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh/kg, which is 3 times higher than that of conventional tubular Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 280°C, was obtained for planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at 190°C over a long-term cell test (1000 cycles). The high energy density and superior cycle stability are attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials (NaCl and Ni) at 190°C. The results reported in this work demonstrate that planar Na-NiCl2 batteries operated at anmore » intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs.« less

  3. The sodium chloride primary pressure gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, A. L.; Chhabildas, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    The failure of a central force model for sodium chloride is discussed. It is noted that it does not closely satisfy the Cauchy conditions at low temperatures, and that it fails the central force requirement of the Love condition. The available shock data for sodium chloride and its analysis is examined, and two reasons why the Hugoniot transformation pressure is likely to be less than 231 kbar are discussed. The important (but unjustified) theoretical assumptions made in converting Hugoniot to isothermal data is discussed; it is noted that serious error can enter for very large pressures for a given material and that at such high pressures the isothermal data should thus be considered only semiquantitative even if the Hugoniot data itself is accurate. An alternate method of estimating the isothermal transformation pressure from the Hugoniot transformation pressure is used. This method is based on the temperature derivative of the transformation pressure. On this basis it is concluded that an upper bound for the isothermal transformation of NaCl (to a CsCl-type structure) at room temperature is 257 kbar; it is noted that the actual value may be considerably less than this.

  4. Binary Nucleation of Water and Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, Thomas; Marsik, Frantisek; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    Nucleation processes in the binary water-sodium chloride system are investigated in the sense of the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The CNT is modified to be able to handle the electrolytic nature of the system and is employed to investigate the acceleration of the nucleation process due to the presence of sodium chloride in the steam. This phenomenon, frequently observed in the Wilson zone of steam turbines, is called early condensation. Therefore, the nucleation rates of the water-sodium chloride mixture are of key importance in the power cycle industry.

  5. Measuring Sodium Chloride Contents of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Amount of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles measured in real time by analyzer that includes mass spectrometer. Analyzer used to determine mass distributions of active agents in therapeutic or diagnostic aerosols derived from saline solutions and in analyzing ocean spray. Aerosol particles composed of sodium chloride introduced into oven, where individually vaporized on hot wall. Vapor molecules thermally dissociated, and some of resulting sodium atoms ionized on wall. Ions leave oven in burst and analyzed by spectrometer, which is set to monitor sodium-ion intensity.

  6. Sodium/metal chloride batteries: Summary of status

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, R.K.

    1988-09-01

    In 1972, there was an effort underway at ESB to try to develop a sodium/antimony trichloride battery that would operate at 200/degree/C or less. These cells, like their sodium/sulfur counterpart, used beta alumina electrolyte tubes, but with a second component in the electrolyte, namely molten sodium tetrachloroaluminate. The latter was used on the acid side, i.e., with an excess of aluminum chloride. Starting a little later, about 1975 it is rumored, workers at the Anglo American Company in South Africa began experimenting with positive electrodes consisting of iron or nickel chloride, using an electrolyte system that was similar to that of ESB except that the sodium tetrachloroaluminate was used on the basic side, i.e., with an excess of sodium chloride. The Anglo American work was focused on the high-temperature chlorination of the metal carbides as the means to form the porous iron or nickel chloride positive electrodes. Ultimately, the work at ESB was abandoned, while that at Anglo American blossomed, eventually leading to the formation of Zebra Power Systems S.A. in South Africa. The latter has been involved, since about 1980, in a number of collaborative programs with UKAEA Harwell and Beta RandD Ltd. in the UK to develop the sodium/metal chloride battery technology. The embodiment with iron chloride has become known as the Zebra battery, while the nickel chloride variant is known as the Cheetah battery. 17 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Louis

    2003-05-01

    Ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride (10 -30 g cm -3) have been irradiated by X- and γ-rays at 77 K, then progressively rewarmed to room temperature. During that phase, their thermoluminescence has been studied and it was found that, despite their dilution beyond the Avogadro number, the emitted light was specific of the original salts dissolved initially.

  8. [Sodium chloride 0.9%: nephrotoxic crystalloid?].

    PubMed

    Dombre, Vincent; De Seigneux, Sophie; Schiffer, Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Sodium chloride 0.9%, often incorrectly called physiological saline, contains higher concentration of chloride compared to plasma. It is known that the administration of sodium chloride 0.9% can cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in a reproducible manner. The elevated chloride concentration in 0.9% NaCl solution can also adversely affect renal perfusion. This effect is thought to be induced by hyperchloremia that causes renal artery vasoconstriction. For these reasons, the use of 0.9% NaCl solution is raising attention and some would advocate the use of a more "physiological" solution, such as balanced solutions that contain a level of chloride closer to that of plasma. Few prospective, randomized, controlled trials are available today and most were done in a perioperative setting. Some studies suggest that the chloride excess in 0.9% NaCl solution could have clinical consequences; however, this remains to be established by quality randomized controlled trials. PMID:26999998

  9. A Simple Quantitative Synthesis: Sodium Chloride from Sodium Carbonate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Marvin

    1988-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory procedure for changing sodium carbonate into sodium chloride by adding concentrated HCl to cause the reaction and then evaporating the water. Claims a good stoichiometric yield can be obtained in one three-hour lab period. Suggests using fume hood for the reaction. (ML)

  10. Mechanism for forming hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A molecular orbital study of sodium sulfate and hydrogen chloride formation from sulfur trioxide, water, and sodium chloride shows no activation barrier, in agreement with recent experimental work of Kohl, Fielder, and Stearns. Two overall steps are found for the process. First, gas-phase water reacts with sulfur trioxide along a pathway involving a linear O-H-O transition state yielding closely associated hydroxyl and bisulfite which rearrange to become a hydrogen sulfate molecule. Then the hydrogen sulfate molecule transfers a hydrogen atom to a surface chloride in solid sodium chloride while an electron and a sodium cation simultaneously transfer to yield sodium bisulfate and gas-phase hydrogen chloride. This process repeats. Both of these steps represent well-known reactions for which mechanisms have not been previously determined.

  11. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  12. Sodium-metal chloride battery research at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Sodium metal chloride batteries have certain distinct advantages over sodium sulfur batteries such as increased safety, inherent overcharge capability and lower operation temperatures. Two systems, i.e., Na/FeCl2 and Na/NiCl2 were developed extensively elsewhere and evaluated for various applications including electric vehicles and space. Their performance has been very encouraging and prompted a detailed fundamental study of these cathodes here at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A brief review of our studies on these new cathode materials is presented here. The initial efforts focussed on the methods of fabrication of the electrodes and their electrochemical characterization. Subsequent studies were aimed at establishing the reaction mechanism, determining the kinetics and identifying the rate limiting processes in the reduction of metal chloride cathodes. Nickel chloride emerged from these studies as the most promising candidate material and was taken up for further detailed study on its passivation - a rate limiting process - under different experimental conditions. Also, the feasibility of using copper chloride, which is expected to have higher energy density, has been assessed. Based on the criteria established from the voltammetric response of FeCl2, NiCl2, and CuCl2, several other transition metal chlorides were screened. Of these, molybdenum and cobalt chlorides appear promising.

  13. Solute rejection by porous glass membranes. I - Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solutions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wydeven, T.; Leban, M. I.

    1971-01-01

    Hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea was studied with porous glass membranes in closed-end capillary form, to determine the effect of pressure, temperature, and concentration variations, and lifetime rejection and flux characteristics. Rejection data for sodium chloride were consistent with the functioning of the porous glass as a low-capacity ion-exchange membrane.

  14. Interpretation of postmortem vitreous concentrations of sodium and chloride.

    PubMed

    Zilg, B; Alkass, K; Berg, S; Druid, H

    2016-06-01

    Vitreous fluid can be used to analyze sodium and chloride levels in deceased persons, but it remains unclear to what extent such results can be used to diagnose antemortem sodium or chloride imbalances. In this study we present vitreous sodium and chloride levels from more than 3000 cases. We show that vitreous sodium and chloride levels both decrease with approximately 2.2mmol/L per day after death. Since potassium is a well-established marker for postmortem interval (PMI) and easily can be analyzed along with sodium and chloride, we have correlated sodium and chloride levels with the potassium levels and present postmortem reference ranges relative the potassium levels. We found that virtually all cases outside the reference range show signs of antemortem hypo- or hypernatremia. Vitreous sodium or chloride levels can be the only means to diagnose cases of water or salt intoxication, beer potomania or dehydration. We further show that postmortem vitreous sodium and chloride strongly correlate and in practice can be used interchangeably if analysis of one of the ions fails. It has been suggested that vitreous sodium and chloride levels can be used to diagnose drowning or to distinguish saltwater from freshwater drowning. Our results show that in cases of freshwater drowning, vitreous sodium levels are decreased, but that this mainly is an effect of postmortem diffusion between the eye and surrounding water rather than due to the drowning process, since the decrease in sodium levels correlates with immersion time. PMID:27105154

  15. Modeling the effects of temperature, sodium chloride, and green tea and their interactions on the thermal inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in turkey.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Garcia-Dávila, Jimena; Lopez-Romero, Julio Cesar; Pena-Ramos, Etna Aida; Camou, Juan Pedro; Valenzuela-Melendres, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The interactive effects of heating temperature (55 to 65°C), sodium chloride (NaCl; 0 to 2%), and green tea 60% polyphenol extract (GTPE; 0 to 3%) on the heat resistance of a five-strain mixture of Listeria monocytogenes in ground turkey were determined. Thermal death times were quantified in bags that were submerged in a circulating water bath set at 55, 57, 60, 63, and 65°C. The recovery medium was tryptic soy agar supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract and 1% sodium pyruvate. D-values were analyzed by second-order response surface regression for temperature, NaCl, and GTPE. The data indicated that all three factors interacted to affect the inactivation of the pathogen. The D-values for turkey with no NaCl or GTPE at 55, 57, 60, 63, and 65°C were 36.3, 20.8, 13.2, 4.1, and 2.9 min, respectively. Although NaCl exhibited a concentration-dependent protective effect against heat lethality on L. monocytogenes in turkey, addition of GTPE rendered the pathogen more sensitive to the lethal effect of heat. GTPE levels up to 1.5% interacted with NaCl and reduced the protective effect of NaCl on heat resistance of the pathogen. Food processors can use the predictive model to design an appropriate heat treatment that would inactivate L. monocytogenes in cooked turkey products without adversely affecting the quality of the product. PMID:25285486

  16. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process. PMID:27374991

  17. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-01-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C); subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process. PMID:27374991

  18. Mechanism of sodium chloride in promoting reduction of high-magnesium low-nickel oxide ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Wei, Yonggang; Li, Bo; Wang, Hua; Ma, Baozhong; Wang, Chengyan

    2016-07-01

    Sodium chloride has been proved that it is an effective promoter for the reduction of high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore. The aim of current work is to clarify the promotion behavior of sodium chloride in the roasting reduction process. The influence of moisture on the reduction of ore in the presence of sodium chloride is studied to get clear comprehension of promotion process. In the presence of moisture, the HCl is produced by pyrohydrolysis of sodium chloride for chlorinating nickel and iron oxides, moreover, interactions between metallic oxides and sodium chloride are also a way for chlorination at high temperature (>802 °C) subsequently, the metal chloride would be reduced by reductant. In the absence of moisture, the magnetic separation results show that the recoveries of iron and nickel have a significant increase; moreover, olivine structure would be destroyed gradually with the increase of roasting temperature in the action of sodium chloride, and the sodium chloride existed in high-magnesium, low-nickel oxide ore could make the NiO isolate from NiO-bearing minerals. The NiO reacts with Fe2O3 at high temperature to form NiFe2O4, which is conductive to the formation of Ni-Fe alloy during the reduction process.

  19. Making Positive Electrodes For Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    High coulombic yields provided by sodium/metal chloride battery in which cathode formed by impregnating sintered nickel plaque with saturated solution of nickel chloride. Charge/discharge cycling of nickel chloride electrode results in very little loss of capacity. Used in spacecraft, electric land vehicles, and other applications in which high-energy-density power systems required.

  20. Investigation into the role of sodium chloride deposited on oxide and metal substrates in the initiation of hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birks, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sodium chloride is deposited on the surface of alumina substrates and exposed to air containing 1% SO2 at temperatures between 500 C and 700 C. In all cases the sodium chloride was converted to sodium sulfate. The volatilization of sodium chloride from the original salt particles was responsible for the development of a uniform coating of sodium sulfate on the alumina substrate. At temperatures above 625 C, a liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 autectic was formed on the substrate. The mechanisms for these reactions are given. One of the main roles of NaCl in low temperature hot corrosion lies in enabling a corrosive liquid to form.

  1. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  2. Commercial scale cucumber fermentations brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride instead of NaCl...

  3. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generation of waste water containing sodium chloride from cucumber fermentation tank yards could be eliminated if cucumbers were fermented in brines that did not contain this salt. To determine if this is feasible, cucumbers were fermented in brines that contained only calcium chloride to maintain f...

  4. Progress and recent developments in sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Significant strides have been made in the development of high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries utilizing transition metal chloride cathodes in the last decade, mainly due to the expertise available on Na/S batteries. These systems have already performed attractively in the various feasibility studies and have an excellent safety record. Despite the encouraging figures obtained for specific energies, certain design changes such as modifying the geometry of the beta alumina electrolyte and optimization of the porous cathodes for enhanced electrolyte flow need to be made to achieve high power densities required in applications such as electric vehicles and space. The chemistry of MCl2 cathodes, electrode fabrication, and design options are discussed, and performance data are examined.

  5. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.160 Applicability; description of the sodium... the production of sodium chloride by the solution brine-mining process and by the solar...

  6. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.160 Applicability; description of the sodium... the production of sodium chloride by the solution brine-mining process and by the solar...

  7. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.160 Applicability; description of the sodium... the production of sodium chloride by the solution brine-mining process and by the solar...

  8. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.160 Applicability; description of the sodium... the production of sodium chloride by the solution brine-mining process and by the solar...

  9. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion. [in gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, and laboratory experiments elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments, in the deposition process, and in reactions with certain oxides on the surfaces of superalloys are summarized. It was found that some of the ingested salt is separated out of the air stream by the compressor. However, sodium chloride does pass from the compressor to the combustor where numerous chemical reactions take place. Here some of the salt is vaporized to yield gaseous sodium chloride molecules. Hydrogen and oxygen atoms present in the combustion products react with some sodium chloride to yield other gaseous species such as sodium, and a fraction of the salt remains as particulates. Both the gas phase and condensed sodium chloride can lead to sodium sulfate formation by various routes, all of which involve reaction with sulfur oxides and oxygen. In addition to contributing to the formation of sodium sulfate, the sodium chloride can contribute to corrosion directly.

  10. Growth and physiological responses of five cotton genotypes to sodium chloride and sodium sulfate saline water irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to investigate the salt tolerance of five cotton genotypes [three Gossypium hirsutum L. (DN 1, DP 491, and FM 989) and two G. barbadense L. (Cobalt and Pima S-7)] under sodium chloride or sodium sulfate salinity conditions at similar osmotic potentials (100 mM sodium chlorid...

  11. Sodium chloride's effect on self-assembly of diphenylalanine bilayer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junpyo; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-07-15

    Understanding self-assembling peptides becomes essential in nanotechnology, thereby providing a bottom-up method for fabrication of nanostructures. Diphenylalanine constitutes an outstanding building block that can be assembled into various nanostructures, including two-dimensional bilayers or nanotubes, exhibiting superb mechanical properties. It is known that the effect of the ions is critical in conformational and chemical interactions of bilayers or membranes. In this study, we analyzed the effect of sodium chloride on diphenylalanine bilayer using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, and calculated the bending Young's modulus and the torsional modulus by applying normal modal analysis using an elastic network model. The results showed that sodium chloride dramatically increases the assembling efficiency and stability, thereby promising to allow the precise design and control of the fabrication process and properties of bio-inspired materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241039

  12. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  13. Alternate cathodes for sodium-metal chloride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Various metal chlorides were tested as possible cathode materials for sodium-metal batteries (in addition to Fe and Ni chlorides, which have been already developed to a stage of commercialization), using an electrochemical cell consisting of a pyrex tube, heated to 250 C, with the metal wire as working electrode, concentric Ni foil as counterelectrode, and high-purity Al as reference electrode. In particular, the aim of this study was to identify metal chlorides insoluble even in neutral melts, possible at the interface during overcharge, in order to eliminate the failure mode of the cell through a cationic exchange of the dissolved metal ions with sodium beta-double-prime alumina solid electrolyte. Results indicate that Mo and Co are likely alternatives to FeCl2 and NiCl2 cathodes in sodium batteries. The open circuit voltages of Na/CoCl(x) and Na/MoCl(x) cells at 250 C would be 2.55 V and 2.64 V, respectively.

  14. Recovery of acids and sodium hydroxide from solutions of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride with the use of bipolar membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrinskaya, G.A.; Pavlova, T.V.; Shatalov, A.Ya.

    1985-09-01

    The authors examined the kinetic laws governing the electrodialysis recovery of hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid, as well as sodium hydroxide, from 1M sodium chloride and 0.5 M sodium sulfate solutions and from a mixture of these salts with the use of the MB-1, MB-2, and MB-3 bipolar membranes. Kinetic plots of the current density and the concentration of the acid and the base in the chambers next to the bipolar membranes during the electrodialysis treatment of 1M sodium chloride, 0.5 M sodium sulfate, and solutions are presented. It was established that it is better to use the MB-3 membrane for the electrodialysis conversion of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate into acids and sodium hydroxide owing to the high rate and current efficiency and low expenditure of electrical energy and degree of contamination of the products obtained by the salts. It was also established that the resistance of the MB-1 and MB-2 bipolar membranes is almost an order of magnitude higher than that of the MB-3 membrane.

  15. The chemistry of sodium chloride involvement in processes related to hot corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium chloride is one of the primary contaminants that enter gas turbine engines and contribute, either directly or indirectly, to the hot corrosion degradation of hot-gas-path components. The paper surveys the results of laboratory experiments along with thermodynamic and mass transport calculations, intended for elucidating the behavior of sodium chloride in combustion environments. It is shown that besides being a source of sodium for the formation of corrosive liquid Na2SO4, the NaCl itself contributes in other indirect ways to the material degradation associated with the high-temperature environmental attack. In addition, the experimental results lend credence to the conceptual scheme presented schematically (behavior of NaCl in a turbine engine combustion gas environment) and resolve conflicting aspects of relevant NaCl misconceptions.

  16. Effect of chromuium, aluminum, and titanium on the corrosion resistance of nickel in molten sodium sulfate and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oryshich, I.V.

    1985-09-01

    The author reports on a study whose purpose was to determine the corrosion of binary nickel alloys, containing aluminum, titanium and chromium, in molten sodium sulfate and chloride. The work was undertaken because under operating conditions, gas-turbine materials are subject to oxidation and high-temperature corrosion caused by contact with molten salt based on sodium sulfate formed during fuel combustion. It is concluded that: on alloying nickel with chromium, resistance to sulfide corrosion increases, but with aluminum and titanium it is reduced; alloying nickel with aluminum, titanium (up to 6-8 %) and chromium (up to 10-12 %) leads to an increase in its resistance to the action of molten sodium chloride; and, binary Ni-Al, Ni-Ti and ternary Ni-Al-Ti alloys have a lower corrosion resistance in sodium solfate than in sodium chloride.

  17. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright, M. I.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  18. Hydrogen embrittlement of type 410 stainless steel in sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, and sodium hydroxide environments at 90 C

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G.; Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Martinez-Villafane, A.

    1997-06-01

    Susceptibility of martensitic type 410 (UNS S41000) stainless steel (SS) to environmental cracking was evaluated at 90 C in concentrated sodium chloride, sodium sulfate and sodium hydroxide solutions, all of which are environments related to steam turbine conditions, using the slow strain rate testing (SSRT) technique. In NaCl, the effects of solution pH, concentration, and anodic and cathodic polarization were investigated. Tests were supplemented by detailed electron fractography and hydrogen permeation measurements. A clear correlation was found between the degree of embrittlement and the amount of hydrogen permeating the steel, suggesting a hydrogen-induced cracking mechanism.

  19. Calibration of the On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) with ammonium chloride and sodium chloride aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Lucero, D.A.; Romero, T.; Pentecost, G.

    1993-12-01

    The On-Line Aerosol Monitor (OLAM) is a light attenuation device designed and built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by EG&G Idaho. Its purpose is to provide an on-line indication of aerosol concentration in the PHEBUS-FP tests. It does this by measuring the attenuation of a light beam across a tube through which an aerosol is flowing. The OLAM does not inherently give an absolute response and must be calibrated. A calibration has been performed at Sandia National Laboratories` (SNL) Sandia Aerosol Research Laboratory (SARL) and the results are described here. Ammonium chloride and sodium chloride calibration aerosols are used for the calibration and the data for the sodium chloride aerosol is well described by a model presented in this report. Detectable instrument response is seen over a range of 0.1 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas to 10 cm{sup 3} of particulate material per m{sup 3} of gas.

  20. Phase equilibrium of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate/water/n-heptane/sodium chloride microemulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Shioi, Akihisada; Harada, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keishi )

    1991-09-19

    The microemulsion phase diagram for the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (SDEHP)/water/n-heptane/sodium chloride system is reported. The salinity effects on the phase diagram are discussed in detail. Cylindrical aggregates were found to exist in the oil-rich region and disklike aggregates in the brine-rich region. The middle-phase microemulsion in equilibrium with both the excess brine and oil phases was concluded to be composed of these microstructures. Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate has a common hydrocarbon tail with sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), but the phase equilibrium and the structures of the microemulsion phases in SDEHP system were much different from those in the AOT case. The differences were attributed to those in the shapes of aggregates for the two cases.

  1. Repassivation Potential of Alloy 22 in Sodium and Calcium Chloride Brines

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Ilevbare, G O; Carranza, R M

    2007-08-11

    A comprehensive matrix of 60 tests was designed to explore the effect of calcium chloride vs. sodium chloride and the ratio R of nitrate concentration over chloride concentration on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22. Tests were conducted using the cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) technique at 75 C and at 90 C. Results show that at a ratio R of 0.18 and higher nitrate was able to inhibit the crevice corrosion in Alloy 22 induced by chloride. Current results fail to show in a consistent way a different effect on the repassivation potential of Alloy 22 for calcium chloride solutions than for sodium chloride solutions.

  2. Alternative Approach To Modeling Bacterial Lag Time, Using Logistic Regression as a Function of Time, Temperature, pH, and Sodium Chloride Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Junko

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  3. Alternative approach to modeling bacterial lag time, using logistic regression as a function of time, temperature, pH, and sodium chloride concentration.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shige; Nonaka, Junko

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  4. Effect of sodium chloride on growth and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471.

    PubMed

    Neysens, Patricia; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2003-11-15

    A kinetic investigation of the effect of sodium chloride on cell growth of Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 and amylovorin L471 production was carried out through in vitro experiments using a temperature and pH prevailing during sourdough fermentations. Sodium chloride interfered both with cell growth and bacteriocin production. Biomass formation and amylovorin L471 production decreased in the presence of increasing salt concentrations. Maximum bacteriocin activities were observed after the addition of 10 g l(-1) of NaCl, while the maximum specific growth rate reached an optimum at 5 g l(-1) of NaCl. High salt concentrations (20-40 g l(-1)) resulted in biphasic fermentation profiles. Based on these results, incorporation of 5-10 g l(-1) of sodium chloride in the water phase of type II sourdough preparations might be beneficial to enhance bacterial growth and amylovorin L471 production, and so contribute to the competitiveness of the strain in a sourdough environment. PMID:14527783

  5. Sodium Is Not Required for Chloride Efflux via Chloride/Bicarbonate Exchanger from Rat Thymic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stakišaitis, Donatas; Meilus, Vaidevutis; Juška, Alfonsas; Matusevičius, Paulius; Didžiapetrienė, Janina

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-dependent Cl−/HCO3− exchanger acts as a chloride (Cl−) efflux in lymphocytes. Its functional characterization had been described when Cl− efflux was measured upon substituting extracellular sodium (Na+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG). For Na+ and Cl− substitution, we have used D-mannitol or NMDG. Thymocytes of male Wistar rats aged 7–9 weeks were used and intracellular Cl− was measured by spectrofluorimetry using MQAE dye in bicarbonate buffers. Chloride efflux was measured in a Cl−-free buffer (Cl− substituted with isethionate acid) and in Na+ and Cl−-free buffer with D-mannitol or with NMDG. The data have shown that Cl− efflux is mediated in the absence of Na+ in a solution containing D-mannitol and is inhibited by H2DIDS. Mathematical modelling has shown that Cl− efflux mathematical model parameters (relative membrane permeability, relative rate of exchanger transition, and exchanger efficacy) were the same in control and in the medium in which Na+ had been substituted by D-mannitol. The net Cl− efflux was completely blocked in the NMDG buffer. The same blockage of Cl− efflux was caused by H2DIDS. The study results allow concluding that Na+ is not required for Cl− efflux via Cl−/HCO3− exchanger. NMDG in buffers cannot be used for substituting Na+ because NMDG inhibits the exchanger. PMID:25003116

  6. Nanoscale Periodic Modulations on Sodium Chloride Induced by Surface Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Kendal W; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Li, An-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along 110 crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 C); however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction.

  7. Sodium Chloride, NaCl/ϵ: New Force Field.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Azcatl, Raúl; Barbosa, Marcia C

    2016-03-10

    A new computational model for sodium chloride, the NaCl/ϵ, is proposed. The force field employed for the description of the NaCl is based on a set of radial particle-particle pair potentials involving Lennard-Jones (LJ) and Coulombic forces. The parametrization is obtained by fitting the density of the crystal and the density and the dielectric constant of the mixture of the salt with water at a diluted solution. Our model shows good agreement with the experimental values for the density and for the surface tension of the pure system, and for the density, the viscosity, the diffusion, and the dielectric constant for the mixture with water at various molal concentrations. The NaCl/ϵ together with the water TIP4P/ϵ models provide a good approximation for studying electrolyte solutions. PMID:26890321

  8. Evaluation of sodium-nickel chloride cells for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendel, B.; Dudley, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The status of the European Space Agency (ESA) program on sodium nickel chloride batteries is outlined. Additionally, the results of initial tests of two prototype space cells are reported. After 2800 cycles typical of a low-earth orbit (LEO) application without failure, the recharge ratio remained at unity, the round trip energy efficiency remained high (87 percent), and the increase in internal cell resistance was modest. Initial tear-down analysis data show no degradation whatsoever of the beta-alumina electrolyte tubes. The low-rate capacity did, however drop by some 40 percent, which needs further investigation, but overall results are encouraging for future use of this couple in geosynchronous (GEO) and LEO spacecraft.

  9. A Review of Sodium-Metal Chloride Battery Activity At JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A. I.; Halpert, G.

    1991-01-01

    Following the disclosures by Coetzer et al. on the use of transition metal chlorides in chloroaluminates as alternate cathodes to sulfur in rechargeable sodium batteries, several laboratories, including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, focused their attention on these systems. These systems have certain distinct advantages over sodium-sulfur batteries such as increased safety, inherent overcharge capability, and lower operating temperatures. Two systems, i.e., Na/FeCl2 and NaNiCl2, were developed extensively and evaluated in various applications including electric vehicles and space. Their performance has been very encouraging and warrants a detailed fundamental study on these cathodes. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory a program was initiated two years back to understand the electrochemical behavior of FeCl2 and NiCl2, and to identify and evaluate other transition metal chlorides of promise. The initial efforts focused on the methods of fabrication of the electrodes and their electrochemical characterization. Subsequent studies were aimed at establishing the reaction mechanism, determining the kinetics, and identifying the rate-limiting processes in te reduction of metal chloride cathodes. Nickel chloride emerged form these studies as the most promising candidate material and was taken up for further detailed study on its passivation- a rate limiting process-under different experimental conditions. Also, the feasibility of using copper chloride, which is expected to have a higher energy density, has been assessed. On the basis of the criteria established from the voltammetric response of FeCl2, NiCl2, and CuCl2, several other transition metal chlorides were screened. Of these, molybdenum and cobalt appear promising.

  10. 40 CFR 415.160 - Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Applicability; description of the sodium chloride production subcategory. 415.160 Section 415.160 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS INORGANIC CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Sodium Chloride...

  11. Mechanism of sodium and chloride transport in the thin ascending limb of Henle.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, M; Kokko, J P

    1976-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies have disclosed that the thin ascending limb of Henle (tALH) possesses some unique membrane characteristics. In those studies we failed to demonstrated active transport of sodium chloride by the tALH, although it was shown that the isotopic permeability to sodium and chloride was unusually high. However, we did not examine the mechanisms by which the apparent high permeation of sodium chloride occurs. Thus the purpose of the present studies was to elucidate the mechanism of sodium chloride transport across the isolated tALH of the rabbit by conducting four different types of studies: (1) comparison of the observed chloride and sodium flux ratios to those predicted by Ussing's equation under imposed salt concentration gradients; (2) kinetic evaluation of chloride and sodium fluxes; (3) examination of the effect of bromide on the kinetics of chloride transport; and (4) experiments to test for the existence of exchange diffusion of chloride. In the first set of studies the predicted and the theoretical flux ratios of sodium were identical in those experiments in which sodium chloride was added either to the perfusate or to the bath. However, the observed chloride flux ratio, lumen-to-bath/bath-to-lumen, was significantly lower than that predicted from Ussing's equation when 100 mM sodium chloride was added to the bath. In the second set of experiments the apparent isotopic permeability for sodium and for chloride was measured under varying perfusate and bath NaCl concentrations. There was no statistical change in the apparent sodium permeability coefficient when the NaCl concentration was raised by varying increments from 85.5 to 309.5 mM. However, permeation of 36Cl decrease significantly with an increase in Cl from 73.6 to 598.6 mM. These events could be explained by a two component chloride transport process consisting of simple diffusion and a saturable facilitated diffusion process with a Vmax = 3.71 neq mm-1 min-1. In the third set

  12. Crystal structures of superconducting sodium intercalates of hafnium nitride chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Oro-Sole, J.; Frontera, C.; Beltran-Porter, D.; Van Tendeloo, G.; Fuertes, A. . E-mail: amparo.fuertes@icmab.es

    2006-05-25

    Sodium intercalation compounds of HfNCl have been prepared at room temperature in naphtyl sodium solutions in tetrahydrofuran and their crystal structure has been investigated by Rietveld refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of two intercalates with space group R3-bar m and lattice parameters a=3.58131(6)A, c=57.752(6)A, and a=3.58791(8)A, c=29.6785(17)A is reported, corresponding to the stages 2 and 1, respectively, of Na{sub x}HfNCl. For the stage 2 phase an ordered model is presented, showing two crystallographically independent [HfNCl] units with an alternation of the Hf-Hf interlayer distance along the c-axis, according with the occupation by sodium atoms of one out of two van der Waals gaps. Both stages 1 and 2 phases are superconducting with critical temperatures between 20 and 24K, they coexist in different samples with proportions depending on the synthesis conditions, and show a variation in c spacing that can be correlated with the sodium stoichiometry. High-resolution electron microscopy images of the host and intercalated samples show bending of the HfNCl bilayers as well as stacking faults in some regions, which coexist in the same crystal with ordered domains.

  13. Oxidation of Borneol to Camphor Using Oxone and Catalytic Sodium Chloride: A Green Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Patrick T.; Harned, Andrew M.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2011-01-01

    A new green oxidation procedure was developed for the undergraduate organic teaching laboratories using Oxone and a catalytic quantity of sodium chloride for the conversion of borneol to camphor. This simple 1 h, room temperature reaction afforded high quality and yield of product, was environmentally friendly, and produced negligible quantities…

  14. Dietary Impact of Adding Potassium Chloride to Foods as a Sodium Reduction Technique

    PubMed Central

    van Buren, Leo; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; Seewi, Gila; Newson, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium chloride is a leading reformulation technology for reducing sodium in food products. As, globally, sodium intake exceeds guidelines, this technology is beneficial; however, its potential impact on potassium intake is unknown. Therefore, a modeling study was conducted using Dutch National Food Survey data to examine the dietary impact of reformulation (n = 2106). Product-specific sodium criteria, to enable a maximum daily sodium chloride intake of 5 grams/day, were applied to all foods consumed in the survey. The impact of replacing 20%, 50% and 100% of sodium chloride from each product with potassium chloride was modeled. At baseline median, potassium intake was 3334 mg/day. An increase in the median intake of potassium of 453 mg/day was seen when a 20% replacement was applied, 674 mg/day with a 50% replacement scenario and 733 mg/day with a 100% replacement scenario. Reformulation had the largest impact on: bread, processed fruit and vegetables, snacks and processed meat. Replacement of sodium chloride by potassium chloride, particularly in key contributing product groups, would result in better compliance to potassium intake guidelines (3510 mg/day). Moreover, it could be considered safe for the general adult population, as intake remains compliant with EFSA guidelines. Based on current modeling potassium chloride presents as a valuable, safe replacer for sodium chloride in food products. PMID:27110818

  15. Dietary Impact of Adding Potassium Chloride to Foods as a Sodium Reduction Technique.

    PubMed

    van Buren, Leo; Dötsch-Klerk, Mariska; Seewi, Gila; Newson, Rachel S

    2016-01-01

    Potassium chloride is a leading reformulation technology for reducing sodium in food products. As, globally, sodium intake exceeds guidelines, this technology is beneficial; however, its potential impact on potassium intake is unknown. Therefore, a modeling study was conducted using Dutch National Food Survey data to examine the dietary impact of reformulation (n = 2106). Product-specific sodium criteria, to enable a maximum daily sodium chloride intake of 5 grams/day, were applied to all foods consumed in the survey. The impact of replacing 20%, 50% and 100% of sodium chloride from each product with potassium chloride was modeled. At baseline median, potassium intake was 3334 mg/day. An increase in the median intake of potassium of 453 mg/day was seen when a 20% replacement was applied, 674 mg/day with a 50% replacement scenario and 733 mg/day with a 100% replacement scenario. Reformulation had the largest impact on: bread, processed fruit and vegetables, snacks and processed meat. Replacement of sodium chloride by potassium chloride, particularly in key contributing product groups, would result in better compliance to potassium intake guidelines (3510 mg/day). Moreover, it could be considered safe for the general adult population, as intake remains compliant with EFSA guidelines. Based on current modeling potassium chloride presents as a valuable, safe replacer for sodium chloride in food products. PMID:27110818

  16. Stability of methylprednisolone sodium succinate in small volumes of 5% dextrose and 0. 9% sodium chloride injections

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, R.J.; Puchala, A.H.; Nail, S.L.

    1981-09-01

    The stability of methylprednisolone sodium succinate in small volumes of 5% dextrose and 0.9% sodium chloride injections was studied. Vials of methylprednisolone sodium succinate (125-3000 mg) were reconstituted and added to 50- and 100-ml volumes of the two diluents. These piggyback solutions were visually inspected for the development of haze over a 24-hour period. A nephelometer was used to quantitate the development of turbidity with time. The effect of pH on haze formation was investigated, and infrared spectroscopy was used to identify the haze. Nephelometer readings were found to correlate well with visual inspections. The haze was identified as being formed by the precipitation of free methylprednisolone. The rate of change of turbidity was directly related to the pH. A 1.4-3.2 percentage-point increase in the free methylprednisolone concentration secondary to hydrolysis over the 24-hour period was noted. The duration of stability was variable among the investigated lots and concentrations. Nineteen of the 24 admixtures stored at room temperature remained stable and free of visible haze for at least 12 hours after preparation. For all dosage strengths of methylprednisolone sodium succinate studied, these data indicate that solutions can be made stable for at least 12 hours by selecting the appropriate volume of diluent.

  17. Kinematic Viscosity and Density of Binary and Ternary Mixtures Containing Hydrocolloids, Sodium Chloride, and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assis, Tassia F.; Rojas, Edwin E. Garcia; Guimarães, Guilherme C.; Coelho, Marcos C.; Ramos, Andresa V.; Costa, Bernardo S.; Coimbra, Jane S. R.

    2010-03-01

    The kinematic viscosity and density of binary aqueous solutions containing xanthan gum and ternary aqueous solutions containing carboxymethyl cellulose and sodium chloride have been measured from 303 K to 318 K at different values of pH. The viscosity and density for binary and ternary systems showed increases with a higher concentration of hydrocolloids (xanthan gum or carboxymethyl cellulose) and reductions with increasing temperature. The presence of NaCl in the ternary systems produced an electro-viscous effect that influenced the viscosity and density of the system. The models used to predict the viscosity, density, and apparent specific volume demonstrated satisfactory results in comparisons with experimental data.

  18. Activity coefficients of aqueous sodium chloride from 15° to 50°C measured with a glass electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1968-01-01

    Values of the mean activity coefficient of sodium chloride at 15°, 25°, 38° and 50°C were determined for aqueous NaCl solutions of 0.01 to 1.0 molal from electromotive force measurements on the cell: (sodium-sensitive glass electrode, aqueous sodium chloride, silver chloride-silver).

  19. High Power Planar Sodium-Nickel Chloride Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Coffey, Greg W; Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P

    2010-07-01

    Widespread penetration of renewable energy and increasing demands on reliability/security of the electrical grid require extensive advances in energy storage technologies. One most promising technology is the sodium-beta batteries (NBBs) based on a sodium-ion conducting β''-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE) and operated at elevated temperatures (300-350oC). Current NBBs, constructed on a 1-3 mm thick tubular electrolyte, have high capital cost, performance/safety issues and relatively high operating temperature that limit market penetration of the technology. In this work we report a new generation NBB that utilizes a planar design, incorporating a thinner BASE that reduces the area of specific resistance and may be operated at reduced temperatures. The lower operating temperatures allows for use of more cost-effective cell materials and decreases adverse temperature effects that impact cycle life and overall cost. We here present recent progress generated from planar NBB button cells, including initial cell performance, cathode design and chemistry.

  20. Regional analysis of the effect of paved roads on sodium and chloride in lakes.

    PubMed

    Kelting, Daniel L; Laxson, Corey L; Yerger, Elizabeth C

    2012-05-15

    Salinization of surface water from sodium chloride (road salt) applied to paved roads is a widely recognized environmental concern in the northern hemisphere, yet practical information to improve winter road management to reduce the environmental impacts of this deicer is lacking. The purpose of our study was to provide such information by developing baseline concentrations for sodium and chloride for lakes in watersheds without paved roads, and then determining the relationship between these ions and density, type, and proximity of paved roads to shoreline. We used average summer (June-September) sodium and chloride data for 138 lakes combined in a watershed based analysis of paved road networks in the Adirondack Park of New York, U.S.A. The watersheds used in our study represented a broad range in paved road density and type, 56 of which had no paved roads. Median lake sodium and chloride concentrations in these 56 watersheds averaged 0.55 and 0.24 mg/L, respectively. In contrast, the median sodium and chloride concentrations for the 82 lakes in watersheds with paved roads were 3.60 and 7.22 mg/L, respectively. Paved road density (lane-km/km(2)) was positively correlated with sodium and chloride concentrations, but only state roads were significantly correlated with sodium and chloride while local roads were not. State road density alone explained 84 percent of the variation in both ions. We also successfully modeled the relationship between road proximity to shoreline and sodium and chloride concentrations in lakes, which allowed us to identify sections of road that contributed more to explaining the variation in sodium and chloride in lakes. This model and our approach could be used as part of larger efforts to identify environmentally sensitive areas where alternative winter road management treatments should be applied. PMID:22406283

  1. The salt (sodium chloride) requirements of growing bobwhite quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestler, R.B.

    1949-01-01

    In the two experiments involving 452 bobwhite quail chicks, seven diets containing the following salt supplements, were compared: No additional salt; 0.25 per cent KaCl; 0.50 per cent NaC1; 0.75per cent NaCl; 1.00 per cent NaCl; 0.25 per cent Na2SO4; and 0.50 per cent KCl. All four diets containing sodium chloride gave about equal results in bird-growth, and produced better weights than the diet containing no additional salt. Survival was high on the 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 per cent levels, especially the 0.75 per cent level. Feed consumption increased directly as the salt level of the diet was raised.....The results on the Na2SO4 and KCl while better than those on no saline supplementation, and somewhat inferior to those on NaCl, nevertheless are inconclusive because of inconsistency.

  2. Tolerance Test of Eisenia Fetida for Sodium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, M.; Stewart, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Saltwater spills that make soil excessively saline often occur at petroleum exploration and production (E&P) sites and are ecologically damaging. Brine scars appear when produced water from an E&P site is spilled onto surrounding soil, causing loss of vegetation and subsequent soil erosion. Revegetating lands damaged by brine water can be difficult. The research reported here considers earthworms as a bioremedial treatment for increasing the salt mobility in this soil and encouraging plant growth and a healthy balance of soil nutrients. To determine the practical application of earthworms to remediate brine-contaminated soil, a 17-d test was conducted to establish salt tolerance levels for the common compost earthworm (Eisenia fetida) and relate those levels to soil salinity at brine-spill sites. Soil samples were amended with sodium chloride in concentrations ranging from 1 to 15 g/kg, which represent contamination levels at some spill sites. The survival rate of the earthworms was near 90% in all tested concentrations. Also, reproduction was noted in a number of the lower-concentration test replicates but absent above the 3-g/kg concentrations. Information gathered in this investigation can be used as reference in further studies of the tolerance of earthworms to salty soils, as results suggest that E. fetida is a good candidate to enhance remediation at brine-damaged sites.

  3. Identification of sodium chloride-regulated genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shantanu; Weingart, Christine L

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have elevated sodium chloride (NaCl) levels due to the malfunctioning of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein. For bacteria to survive in this high-salt environment, they must adjust by altering the regulation of gene expression. Among the different bacteria inhabiting the airways of CF patients is the opportunistic pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia. Previous studies have indicated that B. cenocepacia produces a toxin and cable pili under high osmolar conditions. We used transposon mutagenesis to identify NaCl-regulated genes in the clinical strain B. cenocepacia K56-2. Six transconjugants were induced with increasing NaCl concentration. The DNA flanking the transposon was sequenced and five distinct open reading frames were identified encoding the following putative proteins: an integrase, an NAD-dependent deacetylase, TolB, an oxidoreductase, and a novel hypothetical protein. The collective results of this study provide important information about the physiology of B. cenocepacia when faced with osmotic stress and suggest the identity of significant virulence mechanisms in this opportunistic pathogen. PMID:18288523

  4. Stability of Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride, Lorazepam, and Dexamethasone Sodium Phosphate in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Stored in Polypropylene Syringes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Collin R; Halford, Zachery; MacKay, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting is problematic for many patients undergoing chemotherapy. Multiple-drug treatments have been developed to mitigate chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. A patient-controlled infusion of diphenhydramine hydrochloride, lorazepam, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate has been studied in patients who are refractory to first-line therapy. Unfortunately, the physical and chemical compatibility of this three-drug combination is not available in the published literature. Chemical compatibility was evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Visual observation was employed to detect change in color, clarity, or gas evolution. Turbidity and pH measurements were performed in conjunction with visual observation at hours 0, 24, and 48. Results showed that diphenhydramine hydrochloride 4 mg/mL, lorazepam 0.16 mg/mL, and dexamethasone sodium phosphate 0.27 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride stored in polypropylene syringes were compatible, and components retained greater than 95% of their original concentration over 48 hours when stored at room temperature. PMID:26625573

  5. Commercial Scale Cucumber Fermentations Brined with Calcium Chloride Instead of Sodium Chloride.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F; Moeller, L; Johanningsmeier, S D; Hayes, J; Fornea, D S; Rosenberg, L; Gilbert, C; Custis, N; Beene, K; Bass, D

    2015-12-01

    Development of low salt cucumber fermentation processes present opportunities to reduce the amount of sodium chloride (NaCl) that reaches fresh water streams from industrial activities. The objective of this research was to translate cucumber fermentation brined with calcium chloride (CaCl2 ) instead of NaCl to commercial scale production. Although CaCl2 brined cucumber fermentations were stable in laboratory experiments, commercial scale trials using 6440 L open-top tanks rapidly underwent secondary cucumber fermentation. It was understood that a limited air purging routine, use of a starter culture and addition of preservatives to the cover brine aids in achieving the desired complete cucumber fermentation. The modified process was used for subsequent commercial trials using 12490 and 28400 L open-top tanks packed with variable size cucumbers and from multiple lots, and cover brines containing CaCl2 and potassium sorbate to equilibrated concentrations of 100 and 6 mM, respectively. Lactobacillus plantarum LA0045 was inoculated to 10(6) CFU/mL, and air purging was applied for two 2-3 h periods per day for the first 10 d of fermentation and one 2-3 h period per day between days 11 and 14. All fermentations were completed, as evidenced by the full conversion of sugars to lactic acid, decrease in pH to 3.0, and presented microbiological stability for a minimum of 21 d. This CaCl2 process may be used to produce fermented cucumbers intended to be stored short term in a manner that reduces pollution and waste removal costs. PMID:26512798

  6. Measurement of sodium chloride electrical conductivity under quasisentropic compression to 140 GPa

    SciTech Connect

    Postnov, V.I.; Dremin, A.N.; Nabatov, S.S.; Shunin, V.M.; Yakushev, V.V.

    1984-03-01

    In this paper the authors present the results of experiments on the measurement of resistivity of sodium chloride single crystals under quasiisentropic loading as compared with the data of Al'tshuler et al. obtained with shock compression.

  7. Influence of chloride on the chronic toxicity of sodium nitrate to Ceriodaphnia dubia and Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Soucek, David J; Dickinson, Amy

    2016-09-01

    While it has been well established that increasing chloride concentration in water reduces the toxicity of nitrite to freshwater species, little work has been done to investigate the effect of chloride on nitrate toxicity. We conducted acute and chronic nitrate (as sodium nitrate) toxicity tests with the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia dubia and the amphipod Hyalella azteca (chronic tests only) over a range of chloride concentrations spanning natural chloride levels found in surface waters representative of watersheds of the Great Lakes Region. Chronic nitrate toxicity test results with both crustaceans were variable, with H. azteca appearing to be one of the more sensitive invertebrate species tested and C. dubia being less sensitive. While the variability in results for H. azteca were to an extent related to chloride concentration in test water that was distinctly not the case for C. dubia. We concluded that the chloride dependent toxicity of nitrate is not universal among freshwater crustaceans. An additional sodium chloride chronic toxicity test with the US Lab strain of H. azteca in the present study suggested that when present as predominantly sodium chloride and with relatively low concentrations of other ions, there is a narrow range of chloride concentrations over which this strain is most fit, and within which toxicity test data are reliable. PMID:27386878

  8. How Sodium Chloride Salt Inhibits the Formation of CO2 Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Holzammer, Christine; Finckenstein, Agnes; Will, Stefan; Braeuer, Andreas S

    2016-03-10

    We present an experimental Raman study on how the addition of sodium chloride to CO2-hydrate-forming systems inhibits the hydrate formation thermodynamically. For this purpose, the molar enthalpy of reaction and the molar entropy of reaction for the reaction of weakly hydrogen-bonded water molecules to strongly hydrogen bonded water molecules are determined for different salinities from the Raman spectrum of the water-stretching vibration. Simultaneously, the influence of the salinity on the solubility of CO2 in the liquid water-rich phase right before the start of hydrate formation is analyzed. The results demonstrate that various mechanisms contribute to the inhibition of gas hydrate formation. For the highest salt concentration of 20 wt % investigated, the temperature of gas hydrate formation is lowered by 12 K. For this concentration the molar enthalpy and entropy of reaction become smaller by 50 and 20%, respectively. Concurrently, the solubility of carbon dioxide is reduced by 70%. These results are compared with data in literature for systems of sodium chloride in water (without carbon dioxide). PMID:26867107

  9. Modelling the effect of pH, sodium chloride and sodium pyrophosphate on the thermal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A fractional factorial design was used to assess the combined effects of four internal temperatures (55.0, 57.5, 60.0 and 62.5C) and five concentrations of sodium chloride (NaCl) (0.0, 1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 wt/wt%) and sodium pyrophosphate (SPP) (0.0, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.3 wt/wt%) on the heat resis...

  10. Apical membrane sodium and chloride entry during osmotic swelling of renal (A6) epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Crowe, W E; Ehrenfeld, J; Brochiero, E; Wills, N K

    1995-03-01

    To assess the role of chloride in cell volume and sodium transport regulation, we measured cell height changes (CH), transepithelial chloride and sodium fluxes, and intracellular chloride content during challenge with hyposmotic solutions under open circuit (OC) conditions. CH maximally increased following hyposmotic challenge within approximately 5 minutes. The change in CH was smaller under short circuit (SC) conditions or following replacement of chloride in the mucosal solution by gluconate or cyclamate (Cl(-)-freem). When corrected for the osmotically inactive cell volume (30 +/- 2%), delta CH for controls (OC) were greater than predicted for an ideal osmometer. In contrast, delta CH for Cl(-)-freem or SC conditions were similar to that predicted for an ideal osmometer. Na+ and Cl- mucosa-to-serosa fluxes increased following hyposmotic challenge. Chloride fluxes increased maximally within 5 min, then decreased. In contrast, the Na+ flux increased slowly and reached a steady state after approximately 25 min. Under isosmotic conditions, exposure to Cl(-)-freem solutions led to decreases in the transepithelial conductance, Na+ flux, and CH. Chloride permeabilities in the apical and basolateral membranes were detected using the fluorescent intracellular chloride indicator MQAE. The results indicate that during osmotic swelling, the entry of both sodium and chloride is increased. The time courses of these increases differ, suggesting distinct mechanisms for the osmotic regulation of these apical membrane transport processes. PMID:7541082

  11. Insecticide sensitivity of native chloride and sodium channels in a mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Lacey J; Anderson, Troy D; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of cultured Anopheles gambiae Sua1B cells for insecticide screening applications without genetic engineering or other treatments. Sua1B cells were exposed to the known insecticidal compounds lindane and DIDS, which inhibited cell growth at micromolar concentrations. In patch clamp studies, DIDS produced partial inhibition (69%) of chloride current amplitudes, and an IC50 of 5.1μM was determined for Sua1B cells. A sub-set of chloride currents showed no response to DIDS; however, inhibition (64%) of these currents was achieved using a low chloride saline solution, confirming their identity as chloride channels. In contrast, lindane increased chloride current amplitude (EC50=116nM), which was reversed when cells were bathed in calcium-free extracellular solution. Voltage-sensitive chloride channels were also inhibited by the presence of fenvalerate, a type 2 pyrethroid, but not significantly blocked by type 1 allethrin, an effect not previously shown in insects. Although no evidence of fast inward currents typical of sodium channels was observed, studies with fenvalerate in combination with veratridine, a sodium channel activator, revealed complete inhibition of cell growth that was best fit by a two-site binding model. The high potency effect was completely inhibited in the presence of tetrodotoxin, a specific sodium channel blocker, suggesting the presence of some type of sodium channel. Thus, Sua1B cells express native insect ion channels with potential utility for insecticide screening. PMID:27155485

  12. Temporal and spatial trends of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire, 1960–2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Data on concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire were assembled from various State and Federal agencies and organized into a database. This report provides documentation of many assumptions and limitations of disparate data that were collected to meet wide-ranging objectives and investigates temporal and spatial trends of the data. Data summaries presented in this report and analyses performed for this study needed to take into account the 27 percent of chloride and 5 percent of sodium data that were censored (less than a reporting limit) at multiple reporting limits that systematically decreased over time. Throughout New Hampshire, median concentrations of chloride were significantly greater during 2000-2011 than in every decade since the 1970s, and median concentrations of sodium were significantly greater during 2000-2011 than during the 1990s. Results of summary statistics showed that the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the median concentrations of chloride and sodium by source (well) from Rockingham and Strafford counties were the highest in the State; and the 75th and 90th percentiles from Carroll, Coos, and Grafton counties were the lowest. Large increases in median concentrations of chloride and sodium for individual wells after 1995 compared with concentrations for years before were found in parts of Belknap and Rockingham counties and in small clusters within Carroll, Hillsborough, and Merrimack counties.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  14. Long-term sodium and chloride surface water exports from the Dallas/Fort Worth region.

    PubMed

    Steele, M K; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J A

    2011-07-15

    Sodium and chloride in surface water are typically related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water sources and the subsequent salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on sodium and chloride concentrations has been found to occur in warmer climates. This study investigated long-term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the humid subtropical Dallas-Fort Worth region. We compared exports to characteristics of urbanization: urban land cover, impervious surface area, and calculated contributions from wastewater discharges. Long-term data (1980-2008) were obtained from five USGS gages located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalized for time and the watershed area. Grab samples were collected from June 2009 to May 2010 and sodium and chloride concentrations quantified. Our results show a strong positive relationship between the mean annual sodium and chloride exports from each watershed and the percent urban land cover and impervious surface area. Long-term increases in sodium and chloride fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percentage of urban land cover. The single largest contributor was wastewater effluent that was estimated to contribute approximately half of the total loads in the three urbanized watersheds. Atmospheric deposition and deicing salts accounted for small amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. The source of the remaining salt load is still unknown and may be a combination of non-point sources. Estimates of urban salt exports were similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts. PMID:21621814

  15. Electrochemical, galvanic, and mechanical responses of grade 2 titanium in 6% sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.F.; Briant, C.L.; Kumar, K.S.

    1999-02-01

    The electrochemical, galvanic, and mechanical responses of grade 2 titanium in 6% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution at different temperatures were investigated. The initial corrosion potential and cathodic reaction rate increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. The initial corrosion potential changed when titanium was coupled with other metals. Naval brass and alloy 600 (UNS N06600) anodically polarized titanium, while zinc and aluminum caused titanium to become a cathode. HY80 steel (UNS K31820), type 316 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S31600), and Monel K500 (UNS N05500, a copper-nickel alloy), polarized titanium anodically or cathodically depending upon temperature and pH. Hydrides formed on the titanium surface at potentials < {approximately} {minus}600 mV{sub SCE} to {minus}700 mV{sub SCE}. Zinc at all temperatures and HY80 at high temperatures caused hydride formation in titanium when coupled galvanically with titanium. Mechanical tests showed an {approx} 10% decrease in ductility under prior and dynamic hydrogen charging conditions.

  16. Current Status of Health and Safety Issues of Sodium/Metal Chloride (Zebra) Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Trickett, D.

    1998-12-15

    This report addresses environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues associated with sodium/ metal chloride batteries, in general, although most references to specific cell or battery types refer to units developed or being developed under the Zebra trademark. The report focuses on issues pertinent to sodium/metal chloride batteries and their constituent components; however, the fact that some ''issues'' arise from interaction between electric vehicle (EV) and battery design compels occasional discussion amid the context of EV vehicle design and operation. This approach has been chosen to provide a reasonably comprehensive account of the topic from a cell technology perspective and an applications perspective.

  17. Response of the Higher Basidiomycetic Ganoderma resinaceum to Sodium Chloride Stress

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Eman H. F. A.; Abd Elzaher, E. H. F.

    2007-01-01

    Ganoderma resinaceum tolerated sodium chloride salt stress within a range of 0 mM till 300 mM. It responded to salt stress with fluctuation in proline formation at different NaCl concentrations. However,the mycelial dry weight,total protein contents and exopolysaccharides did not changed considerably. Increasing sodium chloride concentration led to morphological alteration in fungal mycelia with disappearance of fungal cell wall,plasmolysis,and vacuolation as indicated with electron microscopic examination of the fungal growth. PMID:24015082

  18. Concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire from 1960 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Several studies from the 1970s and more recently (for example, Hall (1975), Daley and others (2009) and Mullaney (2009)) have found that concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire have increased during the past 50 years. Increases likely are related to road salt and other anthropogenic sources, such as septic systems, wastewater, and contamination from landfills and salt-storage areas. According to water-quality data reported to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES), about 100 public water systems (5 percent) in 2010 had at least one groundwater sample with chloride concentrations that were equal to or exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) secondary maximum contaminant level (SMCL) of 250 mg/L before the water was treated for public consumption. The SMCL for chloride is a measurement of potential cosmetic or aesthetic effects of chloride in water. High concentrations of chloride and sodium in drinking-water sources can be costly to remove. A new cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the NHDES (Medalie, 2012) assessed chloride and sodium levels in groundwater in New Hampshire from the 1960s through 2011. The purpose of the study was to integrate all data on concentrations of chloride and sodium from groundwater in New Hampshire available from various Federal and State sources, including from the NHDES, the New Hamsphire Department of Health and Human Services, the USGS, and the U.S. Environmental Protection SurveyAgency (USEPA), for public and private (domestic) wells and to organize the data into a database. Medalie (2012) explained the many assumptions and limitations of disparate data that were collected to meet wide-ranging objectives. This fact sheet summarizes the most important findings of the data.

  19. A Comparison of Taste and Odor Perception in Pediatric Patients Receiving a 0.9% Sodium Chloride Flush From 2 Different Brands of Prefilled 0.9% Sodium Chloride Syringes.

    PubMed

    Hamze, Benjamin; Vaillancourt, Régis; Sharp, Diane; Villarreal, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this randomized single-blind study is to compare taste and odor disturbances in patients receiving 0.9% sodium chloride flushes from 2 brands. Seventy-five patients from 6 to 18 years of age received intravenous 0.9% sodium chloride infusions, and 50 healthy volunteers who tasted the 2 brands of 0.9% sodium chloride from prefilled syringes were assessed for taste and/or odor disturbances. Taste or odor disturbances were equally present in patients flushed with MedXL and Becton-Dickinson 0.9% sodium chloride. Disturbances are more frequent when 0.9% sodium chloride is flushed through central venous access devices than through peripheral catheters. No difference between the brands was found when healthy volunteers tasted it orally. PMID:26714115

  20. The role of chlorides and alkalis in high temperature coal gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Feitelberg, A.S.; Ayala, R.E.; Hurley, J.P.; Toman, D.

    1994-12-31

    Reusable zinc-based mixed-metal oxide sorbents are being developed for high temperature (1,000 F) coal gas desulfurization applications. Bench scale and pilot scale tests reveal that zinc-based sorbents chemisorb HCl present in low Btu fuel. Volatile chlorides (ZnCl{sub 2} and HCl) are released when the sorbents are regenerated in a higher-temperature oxidizing atmosphere. As a result of these chloride/sorbent interactions, solid ZnSO{sub 4} and ZnCl{sub 2} deposit in downstream process equipment and degrade process operability. The HCI concentration in coal gas can be reduced to about 1 ppmv with sodium bicarbonate, which decomposes in hot coal gas and reacts with HCl to form solid sodium chloride. Models and laboratory scale tests indicate these low HCl concentrations can be achieved with reasonable reactor sizes. Equilibrium calculations and pilot plant measurements show that contacting hot coal gas with large quantities of sodium bicarbonate will result in fuel vapor phase sodium levels that are well below gas turbine limits.

  1. The interaction energies and polarizabilities of sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, and some alkali and halide ions pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounds, David G.; Hinchliffe, Alan

    1982-02-01

    Ab initio SCF pair potentials and polarizabilities for NaF, NaCl, F 2-2, Na 2-2, K 2-2, FCl 2-, LiNa 2+, LiK 2+, presented. Together with results reported previously, these values form a complete and consistent set of energy and polarizability data on the fluorides and chlorides of lithium, sodium and potassium.

  2. Exploring How Different Features of Animations of Sodium Chloride Dissolution Affect Students' Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Resa M.; Jones, Loretta L.

    2007-01-01

    Animations of molecular structure and dynamics are often used to help students understand the abstract ideas of chemistry. This qualitative study investigated how the features of two different styles of molecular-level animation affected students' explanations of how sodium chloride dissolves in water. In small group sessions 18 college-level…

  3. Sodium chloride methanol solution spin-coating process for bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong-Fang; Hu, Yu-Feng; Deng, Zhen-Bo; Li, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Jie; Wang, Yue; Lv, Long-Feng; Wang, Tie-Ning; Lou, Zhi-Dong; Hou, Yan-Bing; Teng, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The sodium chloride methanol solution process is conducted on the conventional poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. The device exhibits a power conversion efficiency of up to 3.36%, 18% higher than that of the device without the solution process. The measurements of the active layer by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) indicate a slight phase separation in the vertical direction and a sodium chloride distributed island-like interface between the active layer and the cathode. The capacitance–voltage (C–V) and impedance spectroscopy measurements prove that the sodium chloride methanol process can reduce the electron injection barrier and improve the interfacial contact of polymer solar cells. Therefore, this one-step solution process not only optimizes the phase separation in the active layers but also forms a cathode buffer layer, which can enhance the generation, transport, and collection of photogenerated charge carriers in the device simultaneously. This work indicates that the inexpensive and non-toxic sodium chloride methanol solution process is an efficient one-step method for the low cost manufacturing of polymer solar cells. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2014JBZ009) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274063, 61377028, 61475014, and 61475017).

  4. Crystallization of sodium chloride from a concentrated calcium chloride-potassium chloride-sodium chloride solution in a CMSMPR crystallizer: Observation of crystal size distribution and model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Byung Sang

    Compared to overwhelming technical data available in other advanced technologies, knowledge about particle technology, especially in particle synthesis from a solution, is still poor due to the lack of available equipment to study crystallization phenomena in a crystallizer. Recent technical advances in particle size measurement such as Coulter counter and laser light scattering have made in/ex situ study of some of particle synthesis, i.e., growth, attrition, and aggregation, possible with simple systems. Even with these advancements in measurement technology, to grasp fully the crystallization phenomena requires further theoretical and technical advances in understanding such particle synthesis mechanisms. Therefore, it is the motive of this work to establish the general processing parameters and to produce rigorous experimental data with reliable performance and characterization that rigorously account for the crystallization phenomena of nucleation, growth, aggregation, and breakage including their variations with time and space in a controlled continuous mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (CMSMPR) crystallizer. This dissertation reports the results and achievements in the following areas: (1) experimental programs to support the development and validation of the phenomenological models and generation of laboratory data for the purpose of testing, refining, and validating the crystallization process, (2) development of laboratory well-mixed crystallizer system and experimental protocols to generate crystal size distribution (CSD) data, (3) the effects of feed solution concentration, crystallization temperature, feed flow rate, and mixing speed, as well as different types of mixers resulting in the evolution of CSDs with time from a concentrated brine solution, (4) with statistically designed experiments the effects of processing variables on the resultant particle structure and CSD at steady state were quantified and related to each of those operating

  5. Predictive model for the reduction of heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef by the combined effect of sodium chloride and apple polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the combined effect of three internal temperatures (57.5, 60, and 62.5C) and different concentrations (0 to 3.0 wt/wt %) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and apple polyphenols (APP), individually and in combination, on the heat-resistance of a five-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes ...

  6. Nucleation and scattering properties of ice cloud due to seeding of sodium chloride as aqueous solution and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sahana; Biswas, L. N.; De, U. K.; Goswami, K.

    Sodium chloride in three forms, as aqueous solution and as dust of two size ranges are seeded in a cold room for heterogeneous ice nucleation in the temperature range between -24 °C and 0 °C. Maximum nucleation for all the three seeding agents occurs at -21.2 °C, which is the eutectic temperature of sodium chloride and water mixture. However, the number density of ice nucleation at the eutectic temperature is highest for the finer variety of dust and lowest for the solution. On the other hand, largest size crystals are produced by the solution and smallest size crystals are produced by the finer variety of dust, at the same temperature. It is observed that the optical properties of ice cloud depends more on the crystal size. The variation of scattering co-efficient, extinction co-efficient and optical depth with temperature are noted for the scattering angles of 30°, 36°, 144° and 150°. The duration of growth of crystals and the same for the subsequent falling down of crystals can be estimated from the time variation of scattering intensity. It is observed that ice crystals due to the solution take maximum time to grow and minimum time to fall down.

  7. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Georg; Szellas, Tanjef; Riordan, John R.; Friedrich, Thomas; Hartung, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of 22Na+ through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage– and patch–clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of 22Na+ uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  8. Non-specific activation of the epithelial sodium channel by the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G; Szellas, T; Riordan, J R; Friedrich, T; Hartung, K

    2001-03-01

    The genetic disease cystic fibrosis is caused by mutation of the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Controversial studies reported regulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by CFTR. We found that uptake of (22)Na(+) through ENaC is modulated by activation of CFTR in oocytes, coexpressing CFTR and ENaC, depending on extracellular chloride concentration. Furthermore we found that the effect of CFTR activation could be mimicked by other chloride channels. Voltage- and patch-clamp measurements, however, showed neither stimulation nor inhibition of ENaC-mediated conductance by activated CFTR. We conclude that the observed modulation of (22)Na(+) uptake by activated CFTR is due to the effect of CFTR-mediated chloride conductance on the membrane potential. These findings argue against the notion of a specific influence of CFTR on ENaC and emphasize the chloride channel function of CFTR. PMID:11266369

  9. The effects of temperature on the electrochemical performance of sodium–nickel chloride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Y.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-10-01

    Sodium–nickel chloride (ZEBRA) batteries are typically operated at relatively high temperatures (3 300 °C) to achieve adequate electrochemical performance. In the present study, the effects of operating temperature on the electrochemical performance of planar-type Na/NiCl2 batteries were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of battery operation at low temperatures (£200 °C). The planar-type cell was able to be cycled at C/3 rate at as low as 175 °C despite higher cell polarization. Overall, low operating temperature resulted in a considerable improvement in the stability of cell performance. Cell degradation was negligible at 175 °C, while 55% increase in end-of-charge polarization was observed at 280 °C after 60 cycles. SEM analysis indicated that the degradation at higher temperatures was related to the particle growth of both nickel and sodium chloride. The cells tested at lower temperatures (£200 °C), however, exhibited a sharp drop in voltage at the end of discharge due to the diffusion limitation, possibly caused by the limited ionic conductivity of catholyte or the poor wettability of sodium on the β"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte (BASE). FInally,, improvements in the ionic conductivity of catholyte and sodium wetting as well as reduction in the ohmic resistance of BASE are required to enhance the battery performance at low temperatures.

  10. Stability of tranexamic acid in 0.9% sodium chloride, stored in type 1 glass vials and ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, Susan V; Sztajnkrycer, Matthew D; Jenkins, Donald A; Zietlow, Scott P; Berns, Kathleen S; Park, Myung S

    2014-01-01

    Tranexamic acid has recently been demonstrated to decrease all-cause mortality and deaths due to hemorrhage in trauma patients. The optimal administration of tranexamic acid is within one hour of injury, but not more than three hours from the time of injury. To aid with timely administration, a premixed solution of 1 gram tranexamic acid and 0.9% sodium chloride was proposed to be stocked as a medication in both the aeromedical transport helicopters and Emergency Department at Mayo Clinic Hospital--Rochester Saint Marys Campus. Since no published stability data exists for tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride, this study was undertaken to determine the stability of tranexamic acid diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride while being stored in two types of containers. Stability was determined through the use of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid reverse phase chromatography assay, pH, and visual tests. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 65 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 90 days in ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers, protected from light, and at both controlled room and refrigerated temperatures. Tranexamic acid solutions of 1 gram in 0.9% sodium chloride 50 mL were studied at predetermined intervals for 180 days in clear Type 1 borosilicate glass vials sealed with intact elastomeric, Flourotec-coated stoppers, stored protected from light at controlled room temperature. Solutions stored in the ethylene/propylene copolymer plastic containers at both storage temperatures maintained at least 98% of initial potency throughout the 90-day study period. Solutions stored in glass vials at controlled room temperature maintained at least 92% of initial potency throughout the 180-day study period. Visual and pH tests revealed stable, clear, colorless, and particulate-free solutions throughout the respective study periods. PMID:25577894

  11. The effect of sodium reduction with and without potassium chloride on the survival of Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Hystead, E; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Schoenfuss, T C

    2013-10-01

    Sodium chloride (NaCl) in cheese contributes to flavor and texture directly and by its effect on microbial and enzymatic activity. The salt-to-moisture ratio (S/M) is used to gauge if conditions for producing good-quality cheese have been met. Reductions in salt that deviate from the ideal S/M range could result in changing culture acidification profiles during cheese making. Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis or Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris are both used as cultures in Cheddar cheese manufacture, but Lc. lactis ssp. lactis has a higher salt and pH tolerance than Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris. Both salt and pH are used to control growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes and salts such as KCl are commonly used to replace the effects of NaCl in food when NaCl is reduced. The objectives of this project were to determine the effects of sodium reduction, KCl use, and the subspecies of Lc. lactis used on L. monocytogenes survival in stirred-curd Cheddar cheese. Cheese was manufactured with either Lc. lactis ssp. lactis or Lc. lactis ssp. cremoris. At the salting step, curd was divided and salted with a concentration targeted to produce a final cheese with 600 mg of sodium/100 g (control), 25% reduced sodium (450 mg of sodium/100 g; both with and without KCl), and low sodium (53% sodium reduction or 280 mg of sodium/100 g; both with and without KCl). Potassium chloride was added on a molar equivalent to the NaCl it replaced to maintain an equivalent S/M. Cheese was inoculated with a 5-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes at different times during aging to simulate postprocessing contamination, and counts were monitored over 27 or 50 d, depending on incubation temperature (12 or 5 °C, respectively). In cheese inoculated with 4 log₁₀ cfu of L. monocytogenes/g 2 wk after manufacture, viable counts declined by more than 3 log₁₀ cfu/g in all treatments over 60 d. When inoculated with 5 log₁₀ cfu/g at 3mo of cheese age, L. monocytogenes counts in Cheddar cheese were also

  12. Effect of sulfate ions on corrosion inhibition of AA 7075 aluminum alloy in sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.I.; Wu, J.K.

    1995-03-01

    The effect of the addition of sulfate ions on corrosion inhibition of Aluminum Association (AA) 7075 aluminum (Al) alloy (UNS A97075) in aqueous solution was studied. Corrosion behavior was affected significantly by the addition of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. The corrosion morphology and corrosion rate changed with various thermomechanical treatment sand with the relative amount of sodium sulfate and sodium chloride in the immersion test solutions. However, the inhibitive effect of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} was evident with the increasing relative amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Corrosion data and morphologies obtained were illustrated by a competitive anion adsorption mechanism.

  13. Thermodynamics of aqueous borate solutions I. Mixture of boric acid with sodium or potassium borate and chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, J.M.; Roy, R.N.; Roy, L.N.; Johnson, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Potentials for the cell without liquid junction H/sub 2/, Ptlt. slashB(OH)/sub 3/(m/sub 1/),MB(OH)/sub 4/(m/sub 2/),MCl(m/sub 3/)lt. slashAgCl,Ag where M is sodium or potassium are reported over a range of ionic strength to I = 3 mol-kg/sup -1/ at 5 to 55/sup 0/C. Total boron concentration in the solutions was restricted to low levels to minimize formation of polynuclear boron species. Cell potentials are treated with the Pitzer ion interaction treatment for mixed electrolytes, with linear ionic strength dependence assumed for the activity coefficient of undissociated boric acid. Trace activity coefficients of sodium and potassium borates in chloride media are calculated at various temperatures.

  14. Concentrations of chloride and sodium in groundwater in New Hampshire from 1960 through 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura

    2013-01-01

    A new cooperative study between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the NHDES (Medalie, 2012) assessed chloride and sodium levels in groundwater in New Hampshire from the 1960s through 2011. The purpose of the study was to integrate all data on concentrations of chloride and sodium from groundwater in New Hampshire available from various Federal and State sources, including from the NHDES, the New Hamsphire Department of Health and Human Services, the USGS, and the U.S. Environmental Protection SurveyAgency (USEPA), for public and private (domestic) wells and to organize the data into a database. Medalie (2012) explained the many assumptions and limitations of disparate data that were collected to meet wide-ranging objectives. This fact sheet summarizes the most important findings of the data.

  15. Removal of sodium and chloride ions from aqueous solutions using fique fibers (Furcraea spp.).

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Nikolay; Hinestroza, Juan P; Husserl, Johana

    2016-01-01

    Fique fibers obtained from the leaves of Furcraea spp., a highly abundant plant in the mountains of South America, may offer an alternative as biosorbents in desalination processes as they exhibit high removal capacities (13.26 meq/g for chloride ions and 15.52 meq/g for sodium ions) up to four times higher than exchange capacities commonly observed in synthetic resins. The ion removal capacity of the fibers was also found to be a function of the pH of the solution with the maximum removal of ions obtained at pH 8. Unlike most commercial ion exchange resins, our results suggest that fique fibers allow simultaneous removal of chloride and sodium ions. PMID:26942543

  16. Stress anisotropy and concentration effects in high pressure measurements. [sodium chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A., Jr.; Ruoff, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Sodium chloride is used as an internal pressure standard in high pressure research. Possible corrections are discussed which are needed in the calibration of this standard due to the independent effects of stress anisotropy and stress concentration in pressure vessels. The first is due to the lack of a truly hydrostatic state of stress in solid state pressure vessels. The second is due to the difference in the compressibilities between the pressure transmitting substances (sodium chloride) and a stiffer test specimen. These two corrections are then combined and a total correction, as a function of measured pressure, is discussed for two systems presently in use. The predicted value of the combined effect is about 5-10% of the pressure at 30 GPa.

  17. Research on optical damage to sodium chloride by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavasheli, Yu. O.; Komarov, P. S.; Ashitkov, S. I.; Savintsev, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    Thresholds of optical damage to sodium chloride by ultrashort laser pulses with a duration of about 40 fs are determined. Experiments were carried out using a terawatt titanium-sapphire laser device. p-polarized laser radiation at a wavelength of 800 nm fell on the specimen surface at an angle of 60°. Optical damage to the surface was observed when the critical electric field strength attained 94 MV/cm.

  18. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  19. Density and Viscosity of Ternary Mixtures of kappa -Carrageenan, Sodium Chloride, and Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Andresa V.; Rojas, Edwin E. Garcia; Giraldo-Zuniga, Abraham D.

    2013-02-01

    The viscosity and density of ternary mixtures containing kappa -carrageenan, sodium chloride, and water have been measured from (303 to 318) K at different values of pH. The presence of NaCl in the ternary systems produced an electro-viscous effect that influenced the viscosity and density of the system. The polynomial models used to correlate the viscosity and density gave good fits to the experimental data.

  20. Confinement-induced vitrification of aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lishan; Pan, Liqing; Cao, Zexian; Wang, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    Bulk aqueous solution of NaCl is a poor glass former, it vitrifies only under high pressure. Here we report the investigation of glass transition of NaCl solutions confined in nanopores. By inspecting the dependence of glass transition temperature and heat flow jump at transition it is concluded that vitrification of confined NaCl solutions involves only the eutectic phase and the precipitated ice core may help furnish the demanded confinement strength. Ion-water interaction still plays a dominant role in determining vitrification of solutions even under nano-confinement, as under exactly the same confinement conditions vitrification of aqueous KCl solutions was not detected.

  1. Interaction of chloride and bicarbonate transport across the basolateral membrane of rabbit proximal straight tubule. Evidence for sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, S; Yoshiyama, N

    1988-01-01

    The existence of chloride/bicarbonate exchange across the basolateral membrane and its physiologic significance were examined in rabbit proximal tubules. S2 segments of the proximal straight tubule were perfused in vitro and changes in intracellular pH (pHi) and chloride activity (aCli) were monitored by double-barreled microelectrodes. Total peritubular chloride replacement with gluconate increased pHi by 0.8, and this change was inhibited by a pretreatment with an anion transport inhibitor, SITS. Peritubular bicarbonate reduction increased aCli, and most of this increase was lost when ambient sodium was totally removed. The reduction rates of pHi induced by a peritubular bicarbonate reduction or sodium removal were attenuated by 20% by withdrawal of ambient chloride. SITS application to the bath in the control condition quickly increased pHi, but did not change aCli. However, the aCli slightly decreased in response to SITS when the basolateral bicarbonate efflux was increased by reducing peritubular bicarbonate concentration. It is concluded that sodium coupled chloride/bicarbonate exchange is present in parallel with sodium-bicarbonate cotransport in the basolateral membrane of the rabbit proximal tubule, and it contributes to the basolateral bicarbonate and chloride transport. PMID:2450891

  2. Hyponatremia due to Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency Successfully Treated by Dexamethasone with Sodium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Itsuro; Tamada, Tsutomu; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Hyponatremia due to secondary adrenal insufficiency Symptoms: prolonged general fatigue and anorexia Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Successfully treated by dexamethasone with sodium chloride Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Patients who were surgically treated for Cushing’s syndrome postoperatively surrender to “primary” adrenal insufficiency. However, the preoperative over-secretion of cortisol or the postoperative administration of excessive glucocorticoids can cause “secondary” adrenal insufficiency, in which the prevalence of hyponatremia is usually lower than that of primary adrenal insufficiency. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman with a past medical history of Cushing’s syndrome developed hyponatremia with symptoms of acute glucocorticoid deficiency, such as prolonged general fatigue and anorexia, after upper respiratory tract infection. A decrease in the serum cortisol level and the lack of increase in the ACTH level, despite the increased demand for cortisol, enabled a diagnosis of “secondary” adrenal insufficiency. Although the initial fluid replacement therapy was not effective, co-administration of dexamethasone and sodium chloride quickly resolved her symptoms and ameliorated the refractory hyponatremia. Conclusions: In this case, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis of the patient was thought to have become suppressed long after the surgical treatment for Cushing’s syndrome. This case suggested a mechanism of refractory hyponatremia caused by secondary adrenal insufficiency, for which the administration of dexamethasone and sodium chloride exerted additional therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26319655

  3. Separation of sodium chloride from the evaporated residue of the reverse osmosis reject generated in the leather industry--optimization by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Boopathy, R; Sekaran, G

    2014-08-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate is being evaporated by solar/thermal evaporators to meet zero liquid discharge standards. The resulted evaporated residue (ER) is contaminated with both organic and inorganic mixture of salts. The generation of ER is exceedingly huge in the leather industry, which is being collected and stored under the shelter to avoid groundwater contamination by the leachate. In the present investigation, a novel process for the separation of sodium chloride from ER was developed, to reduce the environmental impact on RO concentrate discharge. The sodium chloride was selectively separated by the reactive precipitation method using hydrogen chloride gas. The selected process variables were optimized for maximum yield ofNaCl from the ER (optimum conditions were pH, 8.0; temperature, 35 degrees C; concentration of ER, 600 g/L and HCl purging time, 3 min). The recovered NaCl purity was verified using a cyclic voltagramm. PMID:24956779

  4. Low temperature sodium-beta battery

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C

    2013-11-19

    A battery that will operate at ambient temperature or lower includes an enclosure, a current collector within the enclosure, an anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, a cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower within the enclosure, and a separator and electrolyte within the enclosure between the anode and the cathode. The anode is a sodium eutectic anode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower. The cathode is a low melting ion liquid cathode that will operate at ambient temperature or lower and is made of a material that is in a liquid state at ambient temperature or lower.

  5. Stability of butorphanol-tropisetron mixtures in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for patient-controlled analgesia use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-02-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use.In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations.The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly.The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  6. Stability of Butorphanol–Tropisetron Mixtures in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection for Patient-Controlled Analgesia Use

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fu-Chao; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Li, Peng; Yang, Jin-Guo; Zhou, Ben-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tropisetron is an adjuvant for butorphanol used in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and has been reported to provide superior pain control. It is efficacious in reducing the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, this admixture is not available commercially and stability data applicable to hospital practice are limited. This study aimed to describe the drug compounding and evaluates the long-term (up to 14 days) stability of butorphanol and tropisetron in 0.9% sodium chloride injection for PCA use. In this study, commercial solutions of butorphanol tartrate and tropisetron hydrochloride were combined and further diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride injection to final concentrations of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL. The polyolefin bags and glass bottles were stored at 4°C and 25°C for up to 14 days. The drug stabilities were determined by visual inspection, pH measurement, and high-pressure liquid chromatography assay of drug concentrations. The data obtained for admixtures prepared and stored at temperatures of 25°C and 4°C show the drugs have maintained at least 98% of the initial concentration. All solutions remained clear and colorless over the 14-day period, and the pH value did not change significantly. The results indicate that admixtures of butorphanol tartrate 0.08 mg/mL and tropisetron hydrochloride 0.05 mg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride injection solution were stable for 14 days when stored in polyolefin bags or glass bottles at 4°C and 25°C and protected from light. The infusion is feasible for manufacturing in pharmacy aseptic units and can be stored for up to 14 days for routine use in PCA infusions. PMID:25674732

  7. Advanced intermediate temperature sodium–nickel chloride batteries with ultra-high energy density

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Y.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Chang, Hee Jung; Canfield, Nathan L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-metal halide batteries have been considered as one of the more attractive technologies for stationary electrical energy storage, however, they are not used for broader applications despite their relatively well-known redox system. One of the roadblocks hindering market penetration is the high-operating temperature. Here we demonstrate that planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries can be operated at an intermediate temperature of 190 °C with ultra-high energy density. A specific energy density of 350 Wh kg−1, higher than that of conventional tubular sodium–nickel chloride batteries (280 °C), is obtained for planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries operated at 190 °C over a long-term cell test (1,000 cycles), and it attributed to the slower particle growth of the cathode materials at the lower operating temperature. Results reported here demonstrate that planar sodium–nickel chloride batteries operated at an intermediate temperature could greatly benefit this traditional energy storage technology by improving battery energy density, cycle life and reducing material costs. PMID:26864635

  8. Effects of sodium chloride salting and substitution with potassium chloride on whey expulsion of Cheddar cheese.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; McMahon, D J

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in manufacturing reduced-sodium cheese is that whey expulsion after salting decreases when less salt is applied. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether changing the salting method would increase whey syneresis when making a lower sodium cheese and (2) to better understand factors contributing to salt-induced curd syneresis. Unsalted milled Cheddar curds were salted using different salting intervals (5 or 10 min), different salting levels (20, 25, or 30g/kg), different numbers of applications when using only 20g/kg salt (1, 2, or 3 applications), and salting with the equivalent of 30g/kg NaCl using a 2:1 molar ratio of NaCl and KCl. Whey from these curds was collected every 5 or 10 min until 30 or 40 min after the start of salting, and curds were subsequently pressed for 3h. Additional trials were conducted in which salted milled Cheddar cheese curd was immersed at 22°C for 6h in various solutions to determine how milled curd pieces respond to different levels of salt and Ca. The use of 10-min intervals delayed whey syneresis without influencing total whey expulsion or cheese composition after pressing. Lowering the salt level reduced whey expulsion, resulting in cheeses with higher moisture and slightly lower pH. Adding salt faster did not increase whey expulsion in reduced-salt cheese. Partial substitution with KCl restored the extent of whey expulsion. When salted milled curd was immersed in a 30g/L salt solution, there was a net influx of salt solution into the curd and curd weight increased. When curd was immersed in 60g/L salt solution, a contraction of curd occurred. Curd shrinkage was more pronounced as the salt solution concentration was increased to 90 and 120g/L. Increasing the Ca concentration in test solutions (such that both serum and total Ca in the curd increased) also promoted curd contraction, resulting in lower curd moisture and pH and less weight gain by the curd. The proportion of Ca in the curd that was bound to the para

  9. Effect of pH, sodium chloride and sodium pyrophosphate on the termal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Response to the Letter to the Editor: We have received with great satisfaction that our article “Modelling the effect of pH, sodium chloride and sodium pyrophosphate on the thermal resistance of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef” (Food Research International, 69:289-304; 2015) has awaken inte...

  10. Ambient temperature sodium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Yu, Xingwen

    2015-05-13

    Ambient- or room-temperature sodium-sulfur batteries (RT Na-S) are gaining much attention as a low-cost option for large-scale electrical energy storage applications. However, their adoption is hampered by severe challenges. This concept paper summarizes first the operating principles, history, recent progress, and challenges of RT Na-S battery technology, and then suggests future directions towards enhancing performance in order for it to be a viable technology. PMID:25565554

  11. Temporal changes in sulfate, chloride, and sodium concentrations in four eastern Pennsylvania streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Trend analyses of 20 years or more of chemical quality and streamflow data for four streams in eastern Pennsylvania indicate that sulfate has decreased significantly in three of the four basins studied, while sodium and chloride have generally increased. The majority of chemical quality changes occurred in the late 1950 's and early 1960 's coincident with significant cultural changes. It is believed that these chemical quality changes are presently of little or no environmental consequence, as the concentrations are well within the range of those found in natural waters. Decreases in sulfate follow a regional trend concurrent with the conversion of home and industrial heating units from high to low sulfur coal, gas, and oil. The most significant decreases were observed in those basins severely affected by mine-drainage where pumpage has decreased significantly in the past 25 years, thereby further reducing the sulfur content of the streams. The observed increases in chloride and sodium are attributed to population increases and shifts from rural to suburban communities with concurrent increase in the percentage of the population using municipal waste treatment facilities and the increased use of salt on roadways. The concentrations of dissolved chloride, which are from two to three times higher in recent years, reach a peak in January, coincident with the application of salt to melt ice on the roadways. (USGS)

  12. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt separates out at elevated temperatures, and ammonium chloride is recovered... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  16. Fermentation of cucumbers brined with calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    McFeeters, Roger F; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys

    2010-04-01

    Waste water containing high levels of NaCl from cucumber fermentation tank yards is a continuing problem for the pickled vegetable industry. A major reduction in waste salt could be achieved if NaCl were eliminated from the cucumber fermentation process. The objectives of this project were to ferment cucumbers in brine containing CaCl(2) as the only salt, to determine the course of fermentation metabolism in the absence of NaCl, and to compare firmness retention of cucumbers fermented in CaCl(2) brine during subsequent storage compared to cucumbers fermented in brines containing both NaCl and CaCl(2) at concentrations typically used in commercial fermentations. The major metabolite changes during fermentation without NaCl were conversion of sugars in the fresh cucumbers primarily to lactic acid which caused pH to decrease to less than 3.5. This is the same pattern that occurs when cucumbers are fermented with NaCl as the major brining salt. Lactic acid concentration and pH were stable during storage and there was no detectable production of propionic acid or butyric acid that would indicate growth of spoilage bacteria. Firmness retention in cucumbers fermented with 100 to 300 mM CaCl(2) during storage at a high temperature (45 degrees C) was not significantly different from that obtained in fermented cucumbers with 1.03 M NaCl and 40 mM CaCl(2). In closed jars, cucumber fermentations with and without NaCl in the fermentation brine were similar both in the chemical changes caused by the fermentative microorganisms and in the retention of firmness in the fermented cucumbers. PMID:20492282

  17. Long-term Sodium and Chloride Surface Water Exports from a Humid Subtropical Urban Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, M.; Aitkenhead-Peterson, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Increasing concentrations of sodium and chloride in surface water are strongly related to urbanization and population density and can have a significant impact on drinking water and salinity of aquatic ecosystems. While the majority of research has focused on the impact of deicing salts on urban surface waters in colder climates, the effect of urbanization on these exports has been found to occur in warmer climates as well. The purpose of this study is to investigate long term exports of sodium and chloride from watersheds with increasing urbanization in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex in a humid subtropical climate and compare exports to common characteristics of urbanization: urban land use, impervious surface area, and wastewater discharges. Long term data (1980 to 2008) was obtained from five USGS gauges located in and around the cities. Exports were calculated by regression analysis between concentrations and discharge and normalizing for time and the watershed area. In addition, grab samples were collected from the period of June 2009 to May 2010 and analyzed for Na and Cl. Results show a very strong positive relationship between urban land use, water fluxes, and impervious surface and the fluxes of both sodium and chloride from each watershed for the decades available. Long-term increases in fluxes were found for the three watersheds with the highest percent urban land use. Fluxes were not related to the estimates of wastewater discharge, nor could atmospheric deposition or deicing salts account for significant amounts of the total export for urbanized watersheds. Based on the results the most likely source of Na and Cl is impervious surface deposition and erosion from within the watershed. Estimates of urban fluxes were lower than but similar to estimates from northern watersheds affected by deicing salts and suggest that other mechanisms may contribute to the climbing salinity in northern states.

  18. Zero-gravity growth of a sodium chloride-lithium fluoride eutectic mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.; Yeh, C. W.; Yue, B. K.

    1982-01-01

    Continuous and discontinuous lithium fluoride fibers embedded in a sodium chloride matrix were produced in space and on Earth, respectively. The production of continuous fibers in a eutectic mixture was attributed to the absence of convective current in the liquid during solidification in space. Image transmission and optical transmittance measurements of transverse sections of the space-grown and Earth-grown ingots were made with a light microscope and a spectrometer. It was found that better optical properties were obtained from samples grown in space. This was attributed to a better alignment of lithium fluoride fibers along the growth direction.

  19. Methyl chloride emissions from halophyte leaf litter: dependence on temperature and chloride content.

    PubMed

    Derendorp, Leonie; Wishkerman, Asher; Keppler, Frank; McRoberts, Colin; Holzinger, Rupert; Röckmann, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Methyl chloride (CH(3)Cl) is the most abundant natural chlorine containing compound in the atmosphere, and responsible for a significant fraction of stratospheric ozone destruction. Understanding the global CH(3)Cl budget is therefore of great importance. However, the strength of the individual sources and sinks is still uncertain. Leaf litter is a potentially important source of methyl chloride, but factors controlling the emissions are unclear. This study investigated CH(3)Cl emissions from leaf litter of twelve halophyte species. The emissions were not due to biological activity, and emission rates varied between halophyte species up to two orders of magnitude. For all species, the CH(3)Cl emission rates increased with temperature following the Arrhenius relation. Activation energies were similar for all investigated plant species, indicating that even though emissions vary largely between plant species, their response to changing temperatures is similar. The chloride and methoxyl group contents of the leaf litter samples were determined, but those parameters were not significantly correlated to the CH(3)Cl emission rate. PMID:22225707

  20. Sodium nickel chloride battery technology for large-scale stationary storage in the high voltage network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benato, Roberto; Cosciani, Nicola; Crugnola, Giorgio; Dambone Sessa, Sebastian; Lodi, Giuseppe; Parmeggiani, Carlo; Todeschini, Marco

    2015-10-01

    The extensive application of Sodium-Nickel Chloride (Na-NiCl2) secondary batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles, in which the safety requirements are more restrictive than these of stationary storage applications, depicts the Na-NiCl2 technology as perfectly suitable for the stationary storage applications. The risk of fire is negligible because of the intrinsic safety of the cell chemical reactions, related to the sodium-tetrachloroaluminate (NaAlCl4) content into the cell, which acts as a secondary electrolyte (the primary one being the ceramic β″-alumina as common for Na-Beta batteries). The 3 h rate discharge time makes this technology very attractive for load levelling, voltage regulation, time shifting and the power fluctuation mitigation of the renewable energy sources in both HV and EHV networks.

  1. An empirical equation with tables of smoothed solubilities of methane in water and aqueous sodium chloride solutions up to 25 weight percent, 360 degrees C, and 138 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haas, John L.

    1978-01-01

    The total pressure for the system H2O-CH 4 is given by p(total) = P(H2O,t) + exp10[log x(CH 4) - a - b x(CH4)], where P(H2O,t) is the vapor pressure of H2O liquid at the temperature t (?C) and x(CH 4) is the molal concentration of methane in the solution. The terms a and b are functions of temperature only. Where the total pressure and temperature are known, the concentration of methane, x(CH4), is found by iteration. The concentration of methane in a sodium chloride brine, y(CH4), is estimated using the function log y(CH4) = log x(CH4) - A I, where A is the salting out constant and I is the ionic strength. For sodium chloride solutions, the ionic strength is equal to the molality of the salt. The equations are valid to 360?C, 138 MPa, and 25 weight percent sodium chloride.

  2. Ultrastructural alterations of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica caused by treatment with aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite.

    PubMed

    Yaganza, Elian-Simplice; Rioux, Danny; Simard, Marie; Arul, Joseph; Tweddell, Russell J

    2004-11-01

    Aluminum and bisulfite salts inhibit the growth of several fungi and bacteria, and their application effectively controls potato soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora. In an effort to understand their inhibitory action, ultrastructural changes in Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica after exposure (0 to 20 min) to different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 M) of these salts were examined by using transmission electron microscopy. Plasma membrane integrity was evaluated by using the SYTOX Green fluorochrome that penetrates only cells with altered membranes. Bacteria exposed to all aluminum chloride concentrations, especially 0.2 M, exhibited loosening of the cell walls, cell wall rupture, cytoplasmic aggregation, and an absence of extracellular vesicles. Sodium metabisulfite caused mainly a retraction of plasma membrane and cellular voids which were more pronounced with increasing concentration. Bacterial mortality was closely associated with SYTOX stain absorption when bacteria were exposed to either a high concentration (0.2 M) of aluminum chloride or prolonged exposure (20 min) to 0.05 M aluminum chloride or to a pH of 2.5. Bacteria exposed to lower concentrations of aluminum chloride (0.05 and 0.1 M) for 10 min or less, or to metabisulfite at all concentrations, did not exhibit significant stain absorption, suggesting that no membrane damage occurred or it was too weak to allow the penetration of the stain into the cell. While mortality caused by aluminum chloride involves membrane damage and subsequent cytoplasmic aggregation, sulfite exerts its effect intracellularly; it is transported across the membrane by free diffusion of molecular SO2 with little damage to the cellular membrane. PMID:15528547

  3. Long-term sodium chloride retention in a rural watershed: legacy effects of road salt on streamwater concentration.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Victoria R; Lovett, Gary M; Weathers, Kathleen C; Findlay, Stuart E G; Strayer, David L; Burns, David I; Likens, Gene E

    2008-01-15

    Sodium and chloride concentrations and export increased from 1986 to 2005 in a rural stream in southeastern New York. Concentrations increased 1.5 mg/L per year (chloride) and 0.9 mg/L per year (sodium), and export increased 33,000 kg/year (chloride) and 20,000 kg/year (sodium) during this period. We estimate that salt used for deicing accounted for 91% of the sodium chloride input to the watershed, while sewage and water softeners accounted for less than 10% of the input. Road salt use in the watershed did not increase during the study, but sodium and chloride from sewage and water softeners is likely to have increased slightly due to a small increase in population. Increased input from sewage and water softeners cannot account for the increase in concentration and export from the watershed. Model results suggest that the increase in streamwater concentration and export was likely due to a lag effect of long-term road salt use and subsurface buildup. PMID:18284139

  4. Melting point equations for the ternary system water/sodium chloride/ethylene glycol revisited.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D; Bagchi, Aniruddha; Han, Xu; Critser, John K; Woods, Erik J

    2010-12-01

    Partial phase diagrams are of considerable utility in the development of optimized cryobiological procedures. Recent theoretical predictions of the melting points of ternary solutions of interest to cryobiology have caused us to re-examine measurements that our group made for the ethylene-glycol-sodium chloride-water phase diagram. Here we revisit our previous experiments by measuring melting points at five ethylene-glycol to sodium chloride ratios (R values; R=5, 10, 15, 30, and 45) and five levels of concentration for each ratio. Melting points were averaged from three measurements and plotted as a function of total solute concentration for each R value studied. The new measurements differed from our original experimental values and agreed with predicted values from both theoretical models. Additionally, the data were fit to the polynomial described in our previous report and the resulting equation was obtained: T(m) = (38.3-2.145 x 10⁻¹ R)w + (81.19 - 2.909×10⁻¹ R)w², where w is the total solute mass fraction. This new equation provided good fits to the experimental data as well as published values and relates the determined polynomial constants to the R value of the corresponding isopleths of the three dimensional phase diagram, allowing the liquids curve for any R value to be obtained. PMID:20955693

  5. Changes in metabolites, antioxidant system, and gene expression in Microcystis aeruginosa under sodium chloride stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Mao, Feijian; Kirumba, George Chira; Jiang, Cheng; Manefield, Mike; He, Yiliang

    2015-12-01

    Microcystis (M.) aeruginosa, one of the most common bloom-forming cyanobacteria, occurs worldwide. The Qingcaosha (QCS) Reservoir is undergoing eutrophication and faces the problem of saltwater intrusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sudden salinity changes on physiological parameters and related gene transcription in M. aeruginosa under controlled laboratory conditions. The results showed that sodium chloride (50, 200 and 500 mg L(-1) NaCl) inhibited the algal growth and decreased pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a, carotenoid and phycocyanin). Sodium chloride increased both the intracellular and extracellular microcystin contents and elevated the mcyD transcript level in M. aeruginosa. It also increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and caused cytomembrane damage. This damage caused the release of intracellular toxins into the culture medium. In addition, NaCl decreased the maximum electron transport rate, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changed the cellular redox status. Consequently, NaCl inhibited the expression of cpcB, psbA and rbcL. Furthermore, NaCl increased the activities of superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and total glutathione peroxidase (GPx). The transcript levels of sod and reduced glutathione (gsh) were also increased after exposure to NaCl. Our results indicate that a sudden increase in salinity increases the production and excretion of microcystin, changes the cellular redox status, enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibits photosynthesis, and affects transcript levels of related genes in M. aeruginosa. PMID:26232039

  6. Self-aggregation of sodium dodecyl sulfate within (choline chloride + urea) deep eutectic solvent.

    PubMed

    Pal, Mahi; Rai, Rewa; Yadav, Anita; Khanna, Rajesh; Baker, Gary A; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-11-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown tremendous promise as green solvents with low toxicity and cost. Understanding molecular aggregation processes within DESs will not only enhance the application potential of these solvents but also help alleviate some of the limitations associated with them. Among DESs, those comprising choline chloride and appropriate hydrogen-bond donors are inexpensive and easy to prepare. On the basis of fluorescence probe, electrical conductivity, and surface tension experiments, we present the first clear lines of evidence for self-aggregation of an anionic surfactant within a DES containing a small fraction of water. Namely, well-defined assemblies of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) apparently form in the archetype DES Reline comprising a 1:2 molar mixture of choline chloride and urea. Significant enhancement in the solubility of organic solvents that are otherwise not miscible in choline chloride-based DESs is achieved within Reline in the presence of SDS. The remarkably improved solubility of cyclohexane within SDS-added Reline is attributed to the presence of spontaneously formed cyclohexane-in-Reline microemulsions by SDS under ambient conditions. Surface tension, dynamic light scattering (DLS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), density, and dynamic viscosity measurements along with responses from the fluorescence dipolarity and microfluidity probes of pyrene and 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane are employed to characterize these aggregates. Such water-free oil-in-DES microemulsions are appropriately sized to be considered as a new type of nanoreactor. PMID:25314953

  7. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  8. Elasticity and phase transitions of stishovite and sodium chloride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshtanov, Dmitry Leonidovich

    2007-12-01

    Knowledge of elastic properties of the phases constituting the Earth's mantle are of extreme importance for determination of Earth's chemical composition, the distribution of phases and the processes that result in such distribution. Data on elasticity of these constituent phases are critical not only for interpreting seismic observations, but are also essential for geochemical and geodynamical modeling. This dissertation is mainly devoted to determination of the elasticity and stability of stishovite, the high-pressure silica polymorph, as a major constituent of the MORB layer of subducting lithospheric slabs. These thin (˜10km thick) layers subducted into the Earth mantle create regions of thermal, compositional and, hence, rheological heterogeneity. Being a key component of the mantle convection system, subducting slabs may counteract compositional stratification of the Earth by acting to remix differentiated lithospheric material. In addition, there has recently been great interest in subducting slabs as possible carriers of volatiles - mainly water - back to the lower mantle. Stishovite is likely the primary water-bearing phase. The elastic properties and thermodynamic stability of water-bearing stishovite, and the effect of other impurities on these properties, is the main focus of this work. An important related issue I addressed is the establishment of a self-consistent (absolute) equation of state for the B2 phase of sodium chloride (NaCl). NaCl is a commonly-used pressure transmitting medium in high-pressure devices. Accurate knowledge of the NaCl equation of state therefore reduces errors in pressure determination resulting from the use of the secondary pressure calibrants. In order to perform these tasks I used Brillouin scattering and Raman spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron x-ray diffraction at standard conditions, and at high pressures and temperatures in the diamond anvil cell. Experiments were performed in Merrill-Bassett and piston

  9. Real-time measurement of sodium chloride in individual aerosol particles by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The method of particle analysis by mass spectrometry has been applied to the quantitative measurement of sodium chloride in individual particles on a real-time basis. Particles of known masses are individually introduced, in the form of a beam, into a miniature Knudsen cell oven (1600 K). The oven is fabricated from rhenium metal sheet (0.018 mm thick) and is situated in the ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A particle once inside the oven is trapped and completely volatilized; this overcomes the problem of partial volatilization due to particles bouncing from the filament surface. Individual particles are thermally volatilized and ionized inside the rhenium oven, and produce discrete sodium ion pulses whose intensities are measured with the quadrupole mass spectrometer. An ion pulse width of several milliseconds (4-12 ms) is found for particles in the mass range 1.3 x 10 to the -13th to 5.4 x 10 to the -11th g. The sodium ion intensity is found to be proportional to the particle mass to the 0.86-power. The intensity distribution for monodisperse aerosol particles possesses a geometric standard deviation of 1.09, showing that the method can be used for the determination of the mass distribution function with good resolution in a polydisperse aerosol.

  10. PGE2 MEDIATES OENOCYTOID CELL LYSIS VIA A SODIUM-POTASSIUM-CHLORIDE COTRANSPORTER.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sony; Park, Jiyeong; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Kim, Yonggyun

    2015-08-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) mediates immune responses of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, including oenocytoid cell lysis (a class of lepidopteran hemocytes: OCL) via its specific membrane receptor to release inactive prophenoloxidase (PPO) into hemolymph. PPO is activated into phenoloxidase in the plasma to play crucial roles in the immune responses of S. exigua. The mechanism of OCL has not been elucidated, however we posed the hypothesis that a rapid accumulation of sodium ions within the oenocytoids allows a massive influx of water by the ion gradient, which leads to the cell lysis. It remains unclear which sodium channel is responsible for the OCL in response to PGE2 . This study identified a specific sodium channel called sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 (Se-NKCC1) expressed in hemocytes of S. exigua and analyzed its function in the OCL in response to PGE2 . Se-NKCC1 encodes a basic membrane protein (pI value = 8.445) of 1,066 amino acid residues, which contains 12 putative transmembrane domains. Se-NKCC1 was expressed in all developmental stages and tissues. qPCR showed that bacterial challenge significantly induced its expression. A specific inhibitor of NKCC, bumetanide, prevented the OCL in a dose-dependent manner. When RNA interference (RNAi) using double-stranded RNA specific to Se-NKCC1 suppressed its expression, the OCL and PPO activation were significantly inhibited in response to PGE2 . The RNAi treatment also reduced nodule formation to bacterial challenge. These results suggest that Se-NKCC1 is associated with OCL by facilitating inward transport of ions in response to PGE2 . PMID:25845372

  11. Unusual electronic and mechanical properties of sodium chlorides at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Hongxia; Zhao, Mingwen; Zhou, Hongcai; Du, Yanling

    2016-04-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we performed systematic investigation on the electronic and mechanical properties of sodium chlorides with different stoichiometries at high pressures. It was found that most of the phases are metallic except the Pnma-NaCl3 with a gap of 2.155 eV. The extended Cl (or Na) sublattice at Cl-rich (or Na-rich) conditions contributes to the metallization. Accompanied by metallization, the NamCln crystals exhibit good ductility in contrast to the brittle NaCl crystal, due to the changes of binding features induced by high pressure. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the exotic properties of NaCl at high pressures.

  12. Surfactant Behavior of Sodium Dodecylsulfate in Deep Eutectic Solvent Choline Chloride/Urea.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Jackson, A J; Sanchez-Fernandez, A; Magnone, D; Terry, A E; Edler, K J

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) resemble ionic liquids but are formed from an ionic mixture instead of being a single ionic compound. Here we present some results that demonstrate that surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remains surface-active and shows self-assembly phenomena in the most commonly studied DES, choline chloride/urea. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) suggest that the behavior is significantly different from that in water. Our SANS data supports our determination of the critical micelle concentration using surface-tension measurements and suggests that the micelles formed in DES do not have the same shape and size as those seen in water. Reflectivity measurements have also demonstrated that the surfactants remain surface-active below this concentration. PMID:26540438

  13. High throughput growth of zinc oxide nanowires from zinc powder with the assistance of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Wenzhong; Ma, Yi; Wang, D Z; Steeves, D; Kimball, B; Ren, Z F

    2006-07-01

    Sodium chloride (NaCl) was found to be very helpful in producing single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires in gram quantities. The growth involves heating the mixture of zinc powder and NaCl to 600-700 degrees C in flowing gases of oxygen and argon. A conversion efficiency of 70-80% (Zn to ZnO) was achieved when NaCl was used, and 5-10% without NaCl. The NaCl was completely removed by soaking and rinsing the mixture in water a few times. Photoluminescence spectra using excitation of 325 nm showed a very strong emission only in the visible frequency range, indicating that the surface states dominate the emission. PMID:17025149

  14. Nanoscale periodic modulations on sodium chloride surface revealed by tuning fork atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kendal W; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, X-G; Li, An-Ping

    2012-05-11

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along <110> crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 °C); however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction. PMID:22513484

  15. Nanoscale periodic modulations on sodium chloride surface revealed by tuning fork atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Kendal W.; Qin, Shengyong; Zhang, X.-G.; Li, An-Ping

    2012-05-01

    The sodium chloride surface is one of the most common platforms for the study of catalysts, thin film growth, and atmospheric aerosols. Here we report a nanoscale periodic modulation pattern on the surface of a cleaved NaCl single crystal, revealed by non-contact atomic force microscopy with a tuning fork sensor. The surface pattern shows two orthogonal domains, extending over the entire cleavage surface. The spatial modulations exhibit a characteristic period of 5.4 nm, along <110> crystallographic directions of the NaCl. The modulations are robust in vacuum, not affected by the tip-induced electric field or gentle annealing (<300 °C) however, they are eliminated after exposure to water and an atomically flat surface can be recovered by subsequent thermal annealing after water exposure. A strong electrostatic charging is revealed on the cleavage surface which may facilitate the formation of the observed metastable surface reconstruction.

  16. Removal of sodium chloride from human urine via batch recirculation electrodialysis at constant applied voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordils-Striker, Nilda E.; Colon, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    The removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) from human urine using a six-compartment electrodialysis cell with batch recirculation mode of operation for use in advanced life support systems (ALSS) was studied. From the results obtained, batch recirculation at constant applied voltage yields high values (approximately 94% of NaCl removal. Based on the results, the initial rate of NaCl removal was correlated to a power function of the applied voltage: -r=2.0 x 10(-4)E(3.8). With impedance spectroscopy methods, it was also found that the anion membranes were more affected by fouling with an increase of the ohmic resistance of almost 11% compared with 7.4% for the cationic ones.

  17. Aqueous sodium chloride induced intergranular corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Daeschner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two methods have been explored to assess the susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys to intergranular corrosion in aqueous sodium chloride solution. They are: (1) constant extension rate testing with and without alternate-immersion preexposure and (2) metallographic examination after exposure to a NaCl-H2O2 corrosive solution per Mil-H-6088F. Intergranular corrosion was found to occur in both powder and ingot metallurgy alloys of similar composition, using both methods. Underaging rendered the alloys most susceptible. The results correlate to stress-corrosion data generated in conventional time-to-failure and crack growth-rate tests. Alternate-immersion preexposure may be a reliable means to assess stress corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys.

  18. A potentiodynamic study of aluminum-lithium alloys in an aqueous sodium chloride environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, C.-H. T.; Pizzo, P. P.

    1985-01-01

    The characteristics of the potentiodynamic curves for Al-Li alloys in 3.5 percent NaCl aqueous solution are explained and the electrochemical parameters of the potentiodynamic technique are correlated to observed pitting and intergranular cracking behavior. It is shown that the oxygen content of the sodium chloride electrolyte plays an important role in the electrochemical behavior of Al-Li alloys. The potentiodynamic behavior of the alloys is found to be insensitive to variation in compositional content and heat treatment, both of which affect the stress-corrosion behavior. Stringer oxide particle attack and random pitting are observed. It is shown that alternate-immersion exposure prior to potentiodynamic polarization may offer a means of assessing susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking.

  19. Recent trends in chloride and sodium concentrations in the deep subalpine lakes (Northern Italy).

    PubMed

    Rogora, Michela; Mosello, Rosario; Kamburska, Lyudmila; Salmaso, Nico; Cerasino, Leonardo; Leoni, Barbara; Garibaldi, Letizia; Soler, Valentina; Lepori, Fabio; Colombo, Luca; Buzzi, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    A growing concern exists about the effects of chloride (Cl) on freshwater systems. Increasing Cl concentrations have been observed in the last few decades in several rivers and lakes, mainly in northern countries. In Italy, present levels and temporal changes of sodium (Na) and Cl in water bodies have rarely been assessed. Based on long-term data for the lakes of the subalpine district in Italy (Maggiore, Lugano, Como, Iseo, Garda), we analyzed trends affecting Cl and Na concentrations during the last 25 years, with the aim of identifying temporal changes and assessing possible causes. An in-depth analysis is presented for Lake Maggiore. Positive temporal Na and Cl trends were evident in all studied lakes, with the trends increasing since early 2000s. Data for Lake Maggiore tributaries showed a clear seasonality (higher values in winter and early spring). The NaCl used as road de-icing agent, together with Cl discharge from wastewater treatment plants, were identified as the main causes for the observed trends. Chloride concentrations in the lakes are below the threshold limit for reduced water quality and below concentrations known to harm aquatic biota. However, considering the relevance of deep subalpine lakes, representing almost 80% of the total freshwater volume in Italy, these trends indicate an important chemical change, which warrants further analysis. PMID:26233742

  20. Stability of buprenorphine, haloperidol and glycopyrrolate mixture in a 0.9% sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Jäppinen, A; Kokki, H; Naaranlahti, T J; Rasi, A S

    1999-12-01

    Combinations of opioids and adjuvant drug solutions are often used in clinical practice while little information is available on their microbiological or chemical stability. Currently there are no commercially available, prepacked, ready-to-use epidural or subcutaneous mixtures. Thus, epidural and subcutaneous analgesic mixtures must be prepared in the pharmacy on an as-needed basis. Such mixtures are typically used for the treatment of severe pain in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiological and chemical stability of a buprenorphine, haloperidol and glycopyrrolate mixture in a 0.9% sodium chloride solution. A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method and pH-meter were used to conduct the analyses. Antimicrobial activity of each component was studied by an agar dilution method. According to the results from the chemical and microbiological stability studies, this mixture can be stored in polypropylene (PP) syringes and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) medication cassettes for at least 30 days at either 21 degrees C or 4 degrees C, and for 16 days in PP syringes at 36 degrees C, and for 9 days in PVC medication cassettes at 36 degrees C. PMID:10658237

  1. Experimental evaluation of sodium silicate-based nanosilica against chloride effects in offshore concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hak-Young; Heo, Young-Sun; Jung, Sang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new pore filling material, named sodium silicate-based nanosilica (SS), on resisting the diffusion of the chloride ions. The proposed SS is chosen, mainly due to its smaller particle size, compared to the conventional ethyl silicate-based nanosilica. Each particle of SS is chemically treated to have the negative (-) charge on its surface. Four types of mixes with different amounts of partial replacement with fly ash and slag are prepared. Effect of water to binder ratios (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45) is also examined. Test results showed that the inclusion of SS was significantly beneficial for protecting the concrete from chloride attack. At a given strength, the SS inclusion in concrete was up to three times more effective than the control concrete without SS. It is believed that these excellent results are attributed to the small particle size and the chemical surface treatment of SS. In this study, experiments of compressive strength, hydration heat, accelerated neutralization, and sulfate erosion tests were also conducted to find the general effect of SS inclusion on the fundamental properties and durability of concrete. PMID:25574486

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Sodium Silicate-Based Nanosilica against Chloride Effects in Offshore Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Hak-Young; Heo, Young-Sun; Jung, Sang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new pore filling material, named sodium silicate-based nanosilica (SS), on resisting the diffusion of the chloride ions. The proposed SS is chosen, mainly due to its smaller particle size, compared to the conventional ethyl silicate-based nanosilica. Each particle of SS is chemically treated to have the negative (−) charge on its surface. Four types of mixes with different amounts of partial replacement with fly ash and slag are prepared. Effect of water to binder ratios (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45) is also examined. Test results showed that the inclusion of SS was significantly beneficial for protecting the concrete from chloride attack. At a given strength, the SS inclusion in concrete was up to three times more effective than the control concrete without SS. It is believed that these excellent results are attributed to the small particle size and the chemical surface treatment of SS. In this study, experiments of compressive strength, hydration heat, accelerated neutralization, and sulfate erosion tests were also conducted to find the general effect of SS inclusion on the fundamental properties and durability of concrete. PMID:25574486

  3. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial ins...

  4. Prolactin stimulates sodium and chloride ion channels in A6 renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Megan M.; Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D.; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Al-Khalili, Otor; Bao, Hui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Many hormonal pathways contribute to the regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function, a key process for maintaining blood volume and controlling blood pressure. In the present study, we examined whether the peptide hormone prolactin (PRL) regulates ENaC function in renal epithelial cells (A6). Basolateral application of several different concentrations of PRL dramatically stimulated the transepithelial current in A6 cells, increasing both amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) and amiloride-insensitive currents. Using cell-attached patch clamp, we determined that PRL increased both the number (N) and open probability (Po) of ENaC present in the apical membrane. Inhibition of PKA with H-89 abolished the effect of PRL on amiloride-sensitive and insensitive transepithelial currents and eliminated the increase in ENaC NPo with PRL exposure. PRL also increased cAMP in A6 cells, consistent with signaling through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. We also identified that PRL induced activity of a 2-pS anion channel with outward rectification, electrophysiological properties consistent with ClC4 or ClC5. RT-PCR only detected ClC4, but not ClC5 transcripts. Here, we show for the first time that PRL activates sodium and chloride transport in renal epithelial cells via ENaC and ClC4. PMID:25587116

  5. Ether-based nonflammable electrolyte for room temperature sodium battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinkui; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lifei; Yang, Jian; Xiong, Shenglin; Qian, Yitai

    2015-06-01

    Safety problem is one of the key points that hinder the development of room temperature sodium batteries. In this paper, four well-known nonflammable organic compounds, Trimethyl Phosphate (TMP), Tri(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TFEP), Dimethyl Methylphosphonate (DMMP), Methyl nonafluorobuyl Ether (MFE), are investigated as nonflammable solvents in sodium batteries for the first time. Among them, MFE is stable towards sodium metal at room temperature. The electrochemical properties and electrode compatibility of MFE based electrolyte are investigated. Both Prussian blue cathode and carbon nanotube anode show good electrochemical performance retention in this electrolyte. The results suggest that MFE is a promising option as nonflammable electrolyte additive for sodium batteries.

  6. Oscillatory chloride current evoked by temperature jumps during muscarinic and serotonergic activation in Xenopus oocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Parker, I; Sumikawa, K

    1987-01-01

    1. Membrane currents were recorded from voltage-clamped oocytes of Xenopus laevis, during temperature jumps imposed by a heating light. Resting oocytes usually showed little response, but large oscillatory membrane currents developed in response to cooling steps applied during activation of 'native' muscarinic receptors. 2. Similar temperature jump (Tjump) currents were seen during activation of oscillatory chloride currents mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh), serotonin, glutamate and noradrenaline receptors, expressed in the oocyte following injection with messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) from rat brain. The Tjump response during muscarinic activation was selectively blocked by atropine, and that during serotonergic activation by methysergide. In contrast, the 'smooth' membrane currents elicited by nicotinic ACh, kainate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were not accompanied by Tjump responses. 3. Rapid cooling of the oocyte gave larger Tjump currents than a gradual cooling over a few seconds. The size of the Tjump current elicited by a fixed cooling step increased linearly with the preceding time of warming, becoming maximal at intervals greater than about 100 s. 4. The Tjump current was inward at a clamp potential of -60 mV and reversed direction at about -22 mV, which corresponds to the chloride equilibrium potential in the oocyte. In low-chloride solution the reversal potential was shifted to more positive potentials, but it was almost unchanged by changes in potassium and sodium concentration. The size of the Tjump current decreased as the membrane potential was made more negative than about -40 mV. 5. The period of oscillation of the Tjump current increased with decreasing temperature, following a Q10 of 3.15. Depolarization also caused a small increase in period. 6. The Tjump current was not abolished in calcium-free solution, or by addition of manganese or lanthanum to the bathing solution. However, it was abolished by intracellular injection of

  7. The physical and chemical stability of cisplatin (Teva) in concentrate and diluted in sodium chloride 0.9%

    PubMed Central

    Szałek, Edyta; Urjasz, Hanna; Głęboka, Aleksandra; Mierzwa, Emilia; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The subject of study was the stability of cisplatin in concentrate in glass vials and diluted in polyethylene (PE) bags stored at 15–25°C for up to 30 days. Material and methods Original vials of cisplatin injection (1 mg/ml, Teva) were stored at room temperature and subjected to re-piercing after 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 30 days following the initial piercing. Cisplatin infusions at nominal concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml were prepared in 0.9% sodium chloride (1000 ml) in PE bags. Chemical stability was measured by means of a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. Physical stability was assessed by visual inspection in normal light. Results The concentration of cisplatin at each sampling time in the analysed solutions remained within 92.0–100.7% of initial concentration, regardless of the container. No changes in colour or turbidity were observed in any of the vials or prepared solutions. Conclusions Cisplatin, both undiluted in glass containers and diluted with NaCl 0.9% in PE bags, remains stable (< 10% degradation) for at least 30 days at room temperature when protected from light. PMID:23788924

  8. Insight into fractal self-assembly of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; An, Quanfu; Qian, Jinwen; Wang, Xuesan; Zhou, Yang

    2011-12-22

    Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-sodium carboxymethyl cellulose polyelectrolyte complexes (PDDA-CMCNa PECs) solids were prepared and dispersed in NaOH aqueous solution. Self-assembly of PECs nanoparticles during the solvent evaporation was examined by field emission electron microscopy (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and fractal dimension analysis. It was found that tree-shaped fractal patterns formed after the solvent (water) was dried at ambient temperatures, and the fractal pattern is composed of needle-shaped PEC aggregate (PECA) nanoparticles. Time-dependent FESEM observation revealed that the fractal pattern started with the formation of initial nucleon and it is growing, during which the diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) mechanism revealed and made the pattern branched. Physical insight into the DLA mechanism was discussed in detail. Effects of PEC concentrations, PEC compositions, solvent evaporation temperatures, pH of PEC dispersion, and chemical structures of PECs on the formation of self-assembled fractal pattern were studied. Generally, it was found that the morphologies, charge characters of PEC particles, and the solvent evaporation conditions play important roles during the fractal self-assembly process. PMID:22098094

  9. Generation of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) from sodium chloride solution using C/PbO2 and Pb/PbO2 electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalwa, Nasser Abu; Tamos, Hassan; ElAskalni, Mohamed; El Agha, Abed Rhman

    2012-06-01

    Two modified electrodes (Pb/PbO2 and C/PbO2) were prepared by electrodepositing a lead oxide layer on lead and carbon substrates. These modified electrodes were used as anodes for the generation of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) from sodium chloride solution. Different operating conditions and factors affecting the treatment process of NaOCl generation, including current density, pH values, conductive electrolytes, and electrolysis time, were studied and optimized. By comparison the C/PbO2 electrode shows a higher efficiency than the Pb/PbO2 electrode for the generation of NaOCl.

  10. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode.

    PubMed

    Seh, Zhi Wei; Sun, Jie; Sun, Yongming; Cui, Yi

    2015-11-25

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating-stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating-stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm(-2). The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  11. Expanding Spectrum of Sodium Potassium Chloride Co-transporters in the Pathophysiology of Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Kaur, Aalamjeet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Sodium potassium chloride co-transporter (NKCC) belongs to cation-dependent chloride co-transporter family, whose activation allows the entry of Na(+), K(+) and 2Cl(-) inside the cell. It acts in concert with K(+) Cl(-) co-transporter (KCC), which extrudes K(+) and Cl(-) ions from cell. NKCC1 is widely distributed throughout the body, while NKCC2 is exclusively present in kidney. Protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase, oxidative stress responsive kinases, With No K=lysine kinase and protein phosphatase type 1 control the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of key threonine residues of in regulatory domain of NKCC1. The selective inhibitors of NKCC1 including bumetanide and furosemide are conventionally employed as diuretics. However, recent studies have indicated that NKCC1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fragile X syndrome, autism and schizophrenia. The inhibitors of NKCC1 are shown to produce anxiolytic effects; attenuate cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury; produce antiepileptic effects and attenuate neuropathic pain. In the early developing brain, GABAA activation primarily produces excitatory actions due to high NKCC1/KCC2 ratio. However, as the development progresses, the ratio of NKCC1/KCC2 ratio reverses and there is switch in the polarity of GABAA actions and latter acquires the inhibitory actions. The recapitulation of developmental-like state during pathological state may be associated with increase in the expression and functioning of NKCC1, which decreases the strength of inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. The present review describes the expanding role and mechanism of NKCC1 in the pathophysiology of different diseases. PMID:26411965

  12. Expanding Spectrum of Sodium Potassium Chloride Co-transporters in the Pathophysiology of Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh; Kaur, Aalamjeet; Bali, Anjana; Singh, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Sodium potassium chloride co-transporter (NKCC) belongs to cation-dependent chloride co-transporter family, whose activation allows the entry of Na+, K+ and 2Cl- inside the cell. It acts in concert with K+ Cl- co-transporter (KCC), which extrudes K+ and Cl- ions from cell. NKCC1 is widely distributed throughout the body, while NKCC2 is exclusively present in kidney. Protein kinase A, protein kinase C, Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase, oxidative stress responsive kinases, With No K=lysine kinase and protein phosphatase type 1 control the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of key threonine residues of in regulatory domain of NKCC1. The selective inhibitors of NKCC1 including bumetanide and furosemide are conventionally employed as diuretics. However, recent studies have indicated that NKCC1 may be involved in the pathophysiology of anxiety, cerebral ischemia, epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fragile X syndrome, autism and schizophrenia. The inhibitors of NKCC1 are shown to produce anxiolytic effects; attenuate cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal injury; produce antiepileptic effects and attenuate neuropathic pain. In the early developing brain, GABAA activation primarily produces excitatory actions due to high NKCC1/KCC2 ratio. However, as the development progresses, the ratio of NKCC1/KCC2 ratio reverses and there is switch in the polarity of GABAA actions and latter acquires the inhibitory actions. The recapitulation of developmental-like state during pathological state may be associated with increase in the expression and functioning of NKCC1, which decreases the strength of inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. The present review describes the expanding role and mechanism of NKCC1 in the pathophysiology of different diseases. PMID:26411965

  13. Freeze-drying of mannitol-trehalose-sodium chloride-based formulations: the impact of annealing on dry layer resistance to mass transfer and cake structure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofeng; Pikal, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this article was to study the mechanism by which annealing increases the primary drying time in mannitol-trehalose-sodium chloride-based formulations. The thermal events occurring during annealing and the glass transition of the frozen solutions were monitored with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Manometric temperature measurement was used to evaluate the dry layer resistances during primary drying. The morphologies of the freeze-dried cakes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The degrees of crystallinity of mannitol and sodium chloride (NaCl) in freeze-dried cakes were determined by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). DSC results indicated that annealing during freezing did not increase the glass transition temperature (Tg') significantly, but there was a distinct decrease of deltaCp at Tg' with annealing, suggesting a decrease in amorphous content. SEM revealed that most mannitol crystallized as the delta-form during annealing at -23 degrees C, and further crystallized as the alpha-form, together with NaCl crystallization, during subsequent annealing at -33 degrees C. The powder XRD results demonstrated that annealing caused crystal growth of mannitol and NaCl, and thus prevented the partial collapse observed without annealing. However, the highly crystallized mannitol blocked the pathways for water vapor escape, contributing to the increase in the dry layer resistance and thus the longer times for primary drying. Freeze-dried cakes without annealing had lower dry layer resistances because partial collapse created larger channels for water vapor escape. Therefore, two-step annealing in freezing makes mannitol-trehalose-sodium chloride-based formulations robust in freeze-drying, but annealing increases the dry layer resistances, thereby extending primary drying. PMID:15000469

  14. Alloy 22 Localized Corrosion Susceptibility In Aqueous Solutions Of Chloride And Nitrate Salts Of Sodium And Potassium At 110 - 150?C

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, S; Hailey, P D; Lian, T; Staggs, K J; Gdowski, G E

    2006-01-17

    Alloy 22 (a nickel-chromium-molybdenum-tungsten alloy) is being investigated for use as the outer barrier of waste containers for a high-level nuclear waste repository in the thick unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Experiments were conducted to assess crevice corrosion of Alloy 22 in de-aerated aqueous solutions of chloride and nitrate salts of potassium and sodium in the temperature range 110-150 C (some limited testing was also conducted at 90 C). Electrochemical tests were run in neutral salt solutions without acid addition and others were run in salt solutions with an initial hydrogen ion concentration of 10{sup -4} molal. The Alloy 22 specimens were weld prism specimens and de-aeration was performed with nitrogen gas. No evidence of crevice corrosion was observed in the range 125-150 C. In the 120 to 160 C temperature range, the anionic concentration of stable aqueous solutions is dominated by nitrate relative to chloride. At nominally 120 C, the minimum nitrate to chloride ratio is about 4.5, and it increases to about 22 at nominally 155 C. The absence of localized corrosion susceptibility in these solutions is attributed to the known inhibiting effect of the nitrate anion. At 110 C, aqueous solutions can have dissolved chloride in excess of nitrate. Localized corrosion was observed at nitrate to chloride ratios up to 1.0, the highest ratio tested. The extent of localized corrosion was confined to the crevice region of the samples, and was limited for nitrate to chloride ratios greater than or equal to 0.3. Aqueous solution chemistry studies indicate that nitrate to chloride ratios of less than 0.5 are possible for temperatures up to nominally 116 C. However, the exact upper temperature limit is unknown and no electrochemical testing was done at these temperatures. Limited comparison between 8 m Cl aqueous solutions of Na + K on the one hand and Ca on the other indicated similar electrochemical E{sub crit} values and similar morphology of attack

  15. Evaluation of the discmini personal aerosol monitor for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Jessica Breyan

    This work evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103-104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 16% of those measured by the CPC for polydispersed aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (+/-35% for most tests and +101% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present.

  16. Effects of calcium chloride and sodium hexametaphosphate on certain chemical and physical properties of soymilk.

    PubMed

    Pathomrungsiyounggul, P; Grandison, A S; Lewis, M J

    2007-10-01

    Soymilks with sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) (0% to 1.2%) and calcium chloride (12.50, 18.75, and 25.00 mM Ca) were analyzed for total Ca, Ca ion concentration, pH, kinematic viscosity, particle diameter, and sediment after pasteurization. Higher added Ca led to significant (P

  17. Analysis of antibacterial efficacy of plasma-treated sodium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Mareike A. C.; Mann, Miriam; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the change of chemical composition of sodium chloride solutions (NaCl, 0.85%) induced by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment and subsequent effects on bacteria (Escherichia coli) are investigated. Besides acidification caused by APP, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitrite (\\text{NO}2- ), and nitrate (\\text{NO}3- ) are generated as stable end-products of various chemical reactions in APP-treated liquids. Inactivation kinetics and reduction factors were recorded for E. coli (K12). Almost identical antimicrobial effects were observed with both direct APP exposure to bacteria suspension and exposure of APP-treated liquids to bacteria (indirect treatment). Consequently, main bactericidal effects are caused by chemical reactions which are mediated via the liquid phase. Moreover, APP-treated liquids have shown long-term activity (30 min) that possibly correlates with the ratio of \\text{NO}2- /H2O2. Therefore, \\text{NO}2- and H2O2 are identified as key agents for antimicrobial short- and long-term effects, respectively. The antimicrobial stability observed is strongly dependent on the used treatment regime and correlates additionally with the altered chemical composition of APP-treated liquids. Besides these effects, it was also shown that bacteria do not acquire resistance to such APP-treated solutions.

  18. Ultrastructural alterations in Fusarium sambucinum and Heterobasidion annosum treated with aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite.

    PubMed

    Avis, T J; Rioux, D; Simard, M; Michaud, M; Tweddell, R J

    2009-02-01

    Aluminum chloride (AlCl(3)) and sodium metabisulfite (Na(2)S(2)O(5)) have received increasing attention as antifungal agents for the control of plant diseases. In an effort to understand their toxic action on fungi, ultrastructural changes and membrane damage in Fusarium sambucinum (Ascomycota) and Heterobasidion annosum (Basidiomycota) in response to salt exposure was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Conidial membrane damage was quantified using SYTOX Green stain, which only enters altered membranes. The results showed that mortality of the conidia was generally closely associated with SYTOX stain absorption in F. sambucinum treated with Na(2)S(2)O(5) and in H. annosum treated with AlCl(3) or Na(2)S(2)O(5), suggesting that these salts cause membrane alterations. For both fungi, ultrastructural alterations in conidia treated with AlCl(3) and Na(2)S(2)O(5) included membrane retraction, undulation, and invagination. At higher concentrations or exposure periods to the salts, loss of membrane integrity, cytoplasmic leakage, and cell rupture were observed. Ultrastructural alterations and increased SYTOX stain absorption in salt-treated conidia appear consistent with a mode of action where AlCl(3) and Na(2)S(2)O(5) alter membrane integrity and permeability. PMID:19159309

  19. Study on kinetics of cathodic reduction of dissolved oxygen in 3.5% sodium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongjuan; Zhang, Dun; Wu, Jiajia

    2010-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of dissolved oxygen in seawater on metals is of great importance for corrosion studies. The present paper studied cathodic reduction of dissolved oxygen on Q235 carbon steel in 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), rotating disk electrode (RDE) and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE). The cyclic voltammetric results demonstrated the cathodic process on Q235 carbon steel in O2-saturated 3.5% NaCl solution contains three reactions: dissolved oxygen reduction, iron oxides reduction and hydrogen evolution. The peak potential of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is -0.85 V vs Ag/AgCl, 3 molL-1 KCl. The EIS results indicated that the ORR occurring on Q235 carbon steel is a 4-electron process and that no finite diffusion is caused by the intermediate of H2O2 produced by ORR. The RDE and RRDE voltammograms confirmed the EIS results and it was found that the number of transferred electrons for ORR was nearly 4, i.e., dissolved oxygen reduced to water.

  20. Sodium chloride crystallization from thin liquid sheets, thick layers, and sessile drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Pietro; Pettit, Donald; Cristoforetti, Samantha

    2015-10-01

    Crystallization from aqueous sodium chloride solutions as thin liquid sheets, 0.2-0.7 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by a wire frame, thick liquid layers, 4-6 mm thick, with two free surfaces supported by metal frame, and hemispherical sessile drops, 20-32 mm diameter, supported by a flat polycarbonate surface or an initially flat gelatin film, were carried out under microgravity on the International Space Station (ISS). Different crystal morphologies resulted based on the fluid geometry: tabular hoppers, hopper cubes, circular [111]-oriented crystals, and dendrites. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG-3350) inhibited the hopper growth resulting in flat-faced surfaces. In sessile drops, 1-4 mm tabular hopper crystals formed on the free surface and moved to the fixed contact line at the support (polycarbonate or gelatin) self-assembling into a shell. Ring formation created by sessile drop evaporation to dryness was observed but with crystals 100 times larger than particles in terrestrially formed coffee rings. No hopper pyramids formed. By choosing solution geometries offered by microgravity, we found it was possible to selectively grow crystals of preferred morphologies.

  1. Modulation of cadmium bioaccumulation and enhancing cadmium tolerance in Pichia kudriavzevii by sodium chloride preincubation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Li, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dandan; Yu, Jinzhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Application of growing microorganisms for cadmium removal is limited by the sensitivity of living cells to cadmium. The effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) preincubation on the cadmium bioaccumulation and tolerance of Pichia kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in this study. NaCl preincubation significantly reduced the intracellular and cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of P. kudriavzevii at both 6 and 20 mg L(-1) cadmium, while no obvious effect was observed in S. cerevisiae except that the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation at 20 mg L(-1) cadmium was reduced obviously by 20-60 g L(-1)  NaCl. For both yeasts, the improved contents of protein and proline after NaCl preincubation contributed to the cadmium tolerance. The thiol contents in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress were alleviated by NaCl preincubation, which might be due to the decrease of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. NaCl preincubation enhanced the contents of glycerol and trehalose in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress, while no acceleration was observed in S. cerevisiae. The results suggested that NaCl preincubation could be applied in cadmium removal by growing P. kudriavzevii to increase the cadmium tolerance of the yeast. PMID:26753521

  2. Uncoupling of sodium and chloride to assist breeding for salinity tolerance in crops.

    PubMed

    Genc, Yusuf; Oldach, Klaus; Taylor, Julian; Lyons, Graham H

    2016-04-01

    The separation of toxic effects of sodium (Na(+)) and chloride (Cl(-)) by the current methods of mixed salts and subsequent determination of their relevance to breeding has been problematic. We report a novel method (Na(+) humate) to study the ionic effects of Na(+) toxicity without interference from Cl(-), and ionic and osmotic effects when combined with salinity (NaCl). Three cereal species (Hordeum vulgare, Triticum aestivum and Triticum turgidum ssp. durum with and without the Na(+) exclusion gene Nax2) differing in Na(+) exclusion were grown in a potting mix under sodicity (Na(+) humate) and salinity (NaCl), and water use, leaf nutrient profiles and yield were determined. Under sodicity, Na(+)-excluding bread wheat and durum wheat with the Nax2 gene had higher yield than Na(+)-accumulating barley and durum wheat without the Nax2 gene. However, under salinity, despite a 100-fold difference in leaf Na(+), all species yielded similarly, indicating that osmotic stress negated the benefits of Na(+) exclusion. In conclusion, Na(+) exclusion can be an effective mechanism for sodicity tolerance, while osmoregulation and tissue tolerance to Na(+) and/or Cl(-) should be the main foci for further improvement of salinity tolerance in cereals. This represents a paradigm shift for breeding cereals with salinity tolerance. PMID:26607560

  3. Sodium Chloride Diffusion in Low-Acid Foods during Thermal Processing and Storage.

    PubMed

    Bornhorst, Ellen R; Tang, Juming; Sablani, Shyam S

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at modeling sodium chloride (NaCl) diffusion in foods during thermal processing using analytical and numerical solutions and at investigating the changes in NaCl concentrations during storage after processing. Potato, radish, and salmon samples in 1% or 3% NaCl solutions were heated at 90, 105, or 121 °C for 5 to 240 min to simulate pasteurization and sterilization. Selected samples were stored at 4 or 22 °C for up to 28 d. Radish had the largest equilibrium NaCl concentrations and equilibrium distribution coefficients, but smallest effective diffusion coefficients, indicating that a greater amount of NaCl diffused into the radish at a slower rate. Effective diffusion coefficients determined using the analytical solution ranged from 0.2 × 10(-8) to 2.6 × 10(-8) m²/s. Numerical and analytical solutions showed good agreement with experimental data, with average coefficients of determination for samples in 1% NaCl at 121 °C of 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. During storage, food samples equilibrated to a similar NaCl concentration regardless of the thermal processing severity. The results suggest that sensory evaluation of multiphase (solid and liquid) products should occur at least 14 d after processing to allow enough time for the salt to equilibrate within the product. PMID:27060992

  4. Effect of sodium chloride on hydration structures of PMEA and P(MPC-r-BMA).

    PubMed

    Morita, Shigeaki; Tanaka, Masaru

    2014-09-01

    The hydration structures of two different types of biomaterials, i.e., poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and a random copolymer of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and n-butyl methacrylate (P(MPC-r-BMA)), were investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy. The effects of the addition of sodium chloride to liquid water in contact with the surfaces of the polymer films were examined. The neutral polymer of PMEA was easily dehydrated by NaCl addition, whereas the zwitterionic polymer of P(MPC-r-BMA) was hardly dehydrated. More specifically, nonfreezing water having a strong interaction with the PMEA chain and freezing bound water having an intermediate interaction were hardly dehydrated by contacting with normal saline solution, whereas freezing water having a weak interaction with the PMEA chain was readily dehydrated. In contrast, freezing water in P(MPC-r-BMA) is exchanged for the saline solution contacting with the material surface without dehydration. PMID:25133748

  5. Different effects of sodium chloride preincubation on cadmium tolerance of Pichia kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Li, Chunsheng; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Xu, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Application of growing microorganisms for cadmium removal is restricted by high cadmium toxicity. The effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) preincubation on the cadmium tolerance and removal ability of Pichia kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in this study. NaCl preincubation improved the biomass of P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress, while no obvious effect was observed in S. cerevisiae. The improved activities of peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) after NaCl preincubation might be an important reason for the decrease of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, cell death, and oxidative damage of proteins and lipids induced by cadmium, contributing to the improvement of the yeast growth. The cadmium bioaccumulation capacity of P. kudriavzevii decreased significantly after NaCl preincubation, which played an important role in mitigating the cadmium toxicity to the yeast. The cadmium removal rate of P. kudriavzevii was obviously higher than S. cerevisiae and was significantly enhanced after NaCl preincubation. The results suggested that NaCl preincubation improved the cadmium tolerance and removal ability of P. kudriavzevii. PMID:25721585

  6. A Highly Reversible Room-Temperature Sodium Metal Anode

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its low cost and high natural abundance, sodium metal is among the most promising anode materials for energy storage technologies beyond lithium ion batteries. However, room-temperature sodium metal anodes suffer from poor reversibility during long-term plating and stripping, mainly due to formation of nonuniform solid electrolyte interphase as well as dendritic growth of sodium metal. Herein we report for the first time that a simple liquid electrolyte, sodium hexafluorophosphate in glymes (mono-, di-, and tetraglyme), can enable highly reversible and nondendritic plating–stripping of sodium metal anodes at room temperature. High average Coulombic efficiencies of 99.9% were achieved over 300 plating–stripping cycles at 0.5 mA cm–2. The long-term reversibility was found to arise from the formation of a uniform, inorganic solid electrolyte interphase made of sodium oxide and sodium fluoride, which is highly impermeable to electrolyte solvent and conducive to nondendritic growth. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate a room-temperature sodium–sulfur battery using this class of electrolytes, paving the way for the development of next-generation, sodium-based energy storage technologies. PMID:27163006

  7. Comparative characteristics of MA-40 and MA-41 membranes under conditions of maximal concentration of sodium chloride solutions by electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grebenyok, V.D.; Lokota-Fabulyak, Y.G.; Ponomareu, M.I.

    1985-10-01

    This paper gives a quantitative assessment of salt diffusion from brine into the diluate, and osmotic and electro-osmotic transport of water into the brine compartments in concentration of sodium chloride with the use of commercially produced ion-exchange membranes MK-40, MA-40, and MA-41. A schematic diagram of the electrochemical cell, comprising electrode compartments, desalination compartments, and concentrating compartments is presented. It is shown that although brines of higher concentration can be obtained by the use of MA-41 membranes, it is economically preferable to use MA-40 membranes for concentrating sodium chloride. The higher electrical conductivity of MA-40 in comparison with MA-41 lowers the energy consumption for brine production in the former.

  8. Periarteritis nodosa in rats treated with chronic excess sodium chloride (NaCl) after X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Nakagawa, Y.; Ito, A.; Kajihara, H.

    1987-07-01

    Five-week-old male Crj:CD (SD) rats were treated with excess sodium chloride after abdominal X-irradiation. The gastric regions of the rats were irradiated with a total dose of 20 Gy given in two equal fractions separated by 3 days. After X-irradiation, animals were fed a diet containing 10% sodium chloride. Red blood cell anemia appeared 22 weeks after the last irradiation. By gross observation, the mesenteric arteries became reddish in color, and bead- or lead pipe-like nodular thickenings were present. Microscopically, these nodularly thickened mesenteric arteries showed fibrinoid necrosis with massive inflammatory infiltration including eosinophils and neutrophils. In more advanced lesions, elastica interna and externa and medial smooth muscle cells disappeared completely and were replaced by granulation tissue. In old lesions, arterial walls were markedly thickened with fibrous or fibromuscular tissue. These findings were quite similar to those of the human periarteritis nodosa. These arterial lesions could not be found in the rats with X-irradiation only, sodium chloride only, or in nontreated animals. This study demonstrates X-ray-induced, NaCl-promoted periarteritis nodosa-like lesions in rats.

  9. Periarteritis nodosa in rats treated with chronic excess sodium chlorides (NaCl) after X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, H.; Nakagawa, Y.; Ito, A.; Kajihara, H.

    1987-07-01

    Five-week-old male Crj:CD (SD) rats were treated with excess sodium chloride after abdominal X-irradiation. The gastric regions of the rats were irradiated with a total dose of 20 Gy given in two equal fractions separated by 3 days. After X-irradiation, animals were fed a diet containing 10% sodium chloride. Red blood cell anemia appeared 22 weeks after the last irradiation. By gross observation, the mesenteric arteries became reddish in color, and bead- or lead pipe-like nodular thickenings were present. Microscopically these nodularly thickened mesenteric arteries showed fibrinoid necrosis with massive inflammatory infiltration including eosinophils and neutrophils. In more advanced lesions, elastica interna and externa and medial smooth muscle cells disappeared completely and were replaced by granulation tissue. In old lesions, arterial walls were markedly thickened with fibrous or fibromuscular tissue. These findings were quite similar to those of the human periarteritis nodosa. These arterial lesions could not be found in the rats with X-irradiation only, sodium chloride only, or in nontreated animals. This study demonstrates X-ray-induced, NaCl-promoted periarteritis nodosa-like lesions in rats.

  10. Sodium chloride reduces production of curvacin A, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus curvatus strain LTH 1174, originating from fermented sausage.

    PubMed

    Verluyten, Jurgen; Messens, Winy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2004-04-01

    Lactobacillus curvatus LTH 1174, a strain originating in fermented sausage, produces the antilisterial bacteriocin curvacin A. Its biokinetics of cell growth and bacteriocin production as a function of various concentrations of salt (sodium chloride) were investigated in vitro during laboratory fermentations using modified MRS medium. A model was set up to describe the effects of different NaCl concentrations on microbial behavior. Both cell growth and bacteriocin activity were affected by changes in the salt concentration. Sodium chloride clearly slowed down the growth of L. curvatus LTH 1174, but more importantly, it had a detrimental effect on specific curvacin A production (k(B)) and hence on overall bacteriocin activity. Even a low salt concentration (2%, wt/vol) decreased bacteriocin production, while growth was unaffected at this concentration. The inhibitory effect of NaCl was mainly due to its role as an a(w)-lowering agent. Further, it was clear that salt interfered with bacteriocin induction. Additionally, when 6% (wt/vol) sodium chloride was added, the minimum biomass concentration necessary to start the production of curvacin A (X(B)) was 0.90 g (cell dry mass) per liter. Addition of the cell-free culture supernatant or a protein solution as a source of induction factor resulted in a decrease in X(B), an increase in k(B), and hence an increase in the maximum attainable bacteriocin activity. PMID:15066822

  11. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C. PMID:19056176

  12. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  13. The coprecipitation of strontium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride ions with gypsum. An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Jacob

    1980-10-01

    The coprecipitation of Sr 2+, Mg 2+, Na +, K + and Cl - into gypsum was studied as a function of temperature, brine concentration and growth rate. The concentrations of the studied cations in the gypsum increase with growth rate (kinetic effect), with a tendency to reach a limiting value at high growth rates. The partition coefficients of Sr tend to increase with brine concentration and decrease with temperature. The partition coefficients of the other cations also decrease with temperature but depend only very slightly on brine concentration. The concentrations of coprecipitated chloride are negligibly small. The coprecipitation behavior is explained in terms of the relation between the rate of desorption of the coprecipitating ions from the surface of the growing crystal, and the rate of growth. The studied cations may substitute for Ca 2+ in its normal lattice sites and/or reside in interstitial positions among the structural water molecules. The relative amount of foreign cations occupying interstitial positions increases with increasing growth rate. The elucidation of the behavior of coprecipitated ions in gypsum given here forms a basis for the utilization of these ions as geochemical indicators for the environment of deposition of gypsum. These indicators may help in reconstructing important parameters such as temperature, brine concentration and growth rate.

  14. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B; MacAulay, N; Fenton, R A

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antibodies targeting pS124-NCC demonstrated a band of 160 kDa in the kidney cortex, but not medulla, which was preabsorbed by a corresponding phosphorylated peptide. Confocal microscopy with kidney tubule segment-specific markers localized pS124-NCC to all distal convoluted tubule cells. Double immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that pS124-NCC co-localized with total NCC in the apical plasma membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells and intracellular vesicles. Acute treatment of Munich-Wistar rats or vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats with the vasopressin type 2 receptor-specific agonist dDAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and mTOR/FRAP) showed weak but significant phosphorylation activity at S124. In oocytes, (36)Cl uptake studies combined with biochemical analysis showed decreased activity of plasma membrane-associated NCC when replacing S124 with alanine (A) or aspartic acid (D). In novel tetracycline-inducible MDCKII-NCC cell lines, S124A and S124D mutants were able to traffic to the plasma membrane similarly to wildtype NCC. PMID:22966159

  15. Storage of platelets in additive solutions: a new method for storage using sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Gulliksson, H; Sallander, S; Pedajas, I; Christenson, M; Wiechel, B

    1992-06-01

    The in vitro effect of 6-day storage of platelets prepared from 6 pooled buffy coat (BC) units and stored in a platelet storage medium containing approximately 40 percent CPD-plasma and 60 percent platelet additive solution (PAS) was evaluated. PAS is composed of sodium and potassium chloride, citrate, phosphate, and mannitol. The total count of platelets per pooled unit included in the in vitro studies (n = 25) was 376 +/- 59 x 10(9) (mean +/- SD). The present study included three steps. 1. Evaluation of platelet storage in one (n = 7) and two (n = 6) 1000-mL polyolefin containers using PAS. During storage in one container, significantly lower values were found for pH, pO2, glucose, ATP, and the ratio of ATP to AMP+ADP+ATP. The values for mean platelet volume, pCO2, lactate, and extracellular adenylate kinase activity were significantly higher. These results indicate that storage in only one polyolefin container is not appropriate for maintaining satisfactory platelet quality. During storage in two polyolefin containers, a remarkably decreased lactate production (0.07 +/- 0.02 mmol/day/10(11) platelets) was noted. 2. PAS was substituted for saline during 6-day storage in two 1000-mL polyolefin containers (n = 12). The composition of the platelet preparations was the same in all other respects. Similar in vitro results were noted with PAS and saline, which indicated that PAS has no specific effect on the storage of platelets different from that of saline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1626346

  16. Inhibition of biosynthesis of metalloprotease of Aeromonas sobria by sodium chloride in the medium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eizo; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Arimoto, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2011-01-01

    The present authors have previously shown that the serine protease activity of Aeromonas sobria is markedly decreased when A. sobria is cultured in medium containing 3.0% sodium chloride (NaCl, concentration almost equivalent to sea water salinity), and that this occurs because, although the synthesis of ASP is not disturbed by the salt in the medium, the maturation pathway of serine protease of A. sobria (ASP) does not proceed successfully in such a medium. In this study, the effect of salt in the medium on the production of metalloprotease by A. sobria (AMP) was examined. A. sobria produced AMP in the milieu when the bacteria were cultured in medium containing (NaCl) at a concentration of 0.5%. However, AMP was not produced when the bacteria were cultured in salty medium containing 1.5% or more NaCl. To examine how NaCl reduces the production of metalloprotease by A. sobria, the amount of amp mRNA in the cell was measured and it was found that this decreased in proportion to the concentration of NaCl in the medium. The mRNA of amp was not detected in cells cultured in medium containing 1.5% or more NaCl. This means that the transcription of amp is inhibited in salty condition. As described, NaCl in the medium disturbs the maturation pathway of ASP. The mode of action whereby NaCl suppresses AMP activity in A. sobria differs from the mechanism for suppressing ASP activity. PMID:21175775

  17. Stabilization of the Serum Lithium Concentration by Regulation of Sodium Chloride Intake: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Takashi; Goto, Hidekazu; Sumiya, Kenji; Yoshida, Tadashi; Tanaka, Katsuya; Kohda, Yukinao

    2016-01-01

    To avoid fluctuation of the serum lithium concentration (CLi), sodium chloride (NaCl) intake was regulated in oral alimentation. A 62-year-old woman was hospitalized and orally administered 400 mg of lithium carbonate a day to treat her mania. Her CLi was found to be 0.75-0.81 mEq/L. Vomiting made it difficult for the patient to ingest meals orally, and therefore parenteral nutrition with additional oral intake of protein-fortified food was initiated. On day 22, parenteral nutrition was switched to oral alimentation to enable oral intake of food. The total NaCl equivalent amount was decreased to 1.2 g/d, and the CLi increased to 1.15 mEq/L on day 26. Oral alimentation with semi-solid food blended in a mixer was immediately initiated. Although the total NaCl equivalent amount was increased to 4.5-5.0 g/d, her CLi remained high at 1.14-1.17 mEq/L on days 33 and 49, respectively. We investigated oral administration of NaCl (1.8 g/d) on day 52. The total NaCl equivalent amount was increased to 6.3-6.8 g/d, and the CLi decreased to 1.08-0.97 mEq/L on days 63 and 104, respectively. After the start of the orally administered NaCl, her diet was changed to a completely blended diet on day 125. The total NaCl equivalent amount was increased to 9.0-14.5 g/d, and the CLi decreased to 0.53 mEq/L on day 152; therefore, the oral administration of NaCl was discontinued on day 166. The CLi was found to be 0.70-0.85 mEq/L on days 176 and 220. PMID:26935095

  18. Coulometric sodium chloride removal system with Nafion membrane for seawater sample treatment.

    PubMed

    Grygolowicz-Pawlak, Ewa; Sohail, Manzar; Pawlak, Marcin; Neel, Bastien; Shvarev, Alexey; de Marco, Roland; Bakker, Eric

    2012-07-17

    Seawater analysis is one of the most challenging in the field of environmental monitoring, mainly due to disparate concentration levels between the analyte and the salt matrix causing interferences in a variety of analytical techniques. We propose here a miniature electrochemical sample pretreatment system for a rapid removal of NaCl utilizing the coaxial arrangement of an electrode and a tubular Nafion membrane. Upon electrolysis, chloride is deposited at the Ag electrode as AgCl and the sodium counterions are transported across the membrane. This cell was found to work efficiently at potentials higher than 400 mV in both stationary and flow injection mode. Substantial residual currents observed during electrolysis were found to be a result of NaCl back diffusion from the outer side of the membrane due to insufficient permselectivity of the Nafion membrane. It was demonstrated that the residual current can be significantly reduced by adjusting the concentration of the outer solution. On the basis of ion chromatography results, it was found that the designed cell used in flow injection electrolysis mode reduced the NaCl concentration from 0.6 M to 3 mM. This attempt is very important in view of nutrient analysis in seawater where NaCl is a major interfering agent. We demonstrate that the pretreatment of artificial seawater samples does not reduce the content of nitrite or nitrate ions upon electrolysis. A simple diffusion/extraction steady state model is proposed for the optimization of the electrolysis cell characteristics. PMID:22703479

  19. Factors Affecting the Plasticity of Sodium Chloride, Lithium Fluoride, and Magnesium Oxide Single Crystals. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, Carl A.; Pack, Ann E.; Lad, Robert A.

    1959-01-01

    A study was made of the relative magnitude of the effects of various factors on the ductility of single crystals of sodium chloride (NaCl), lithium fluoride (LiF), and magnesium oxide (MgO). Specimen treatments included water-polishing, varying cleavage rate, annealing, quenching, X-irradiation, surface coating, aging, and combinations of some of these treatments. The mechanical behavior of the crystals was studied in flexure and in compression, the latter study being performed at both constant strain rate and constant load. Etch-pit studies were carried out to provide some pertinent information on the results of pretreatment on the dislocation concentration and distribution in the vicinity of the surface. The load deformation curves for these ionic single crystals show an initial region of very low slope which proved to be due to anelastic deformation. The extent of initial anelastic deformation is modified by specimen pretreatment in a way that suggests that this deformation is the result of expansion of cleaved-in dislocation loops, which can contract on the removal of the stress. The effects of the various pretreatments on the load and deflection at fracture are in accord with the prediction one might make with regard to their effect on the nucleation of fatal surface cracks. For NaCl, increases in ductility are always accompanied by increases in strength. The creep constants for NaCl are a function of treatments which affect the bulk structure but are not a function of treatments which only affect the surface.

  20. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri

    PubMed Central

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Experimental Approach Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2S with or without Cl− channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K+ channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca2+ channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Key Results Na2S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3−, suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. Conclusions and Implications The relaxant effects of Na2S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl−-pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca2+-dependent. PMID:25857480

  1. Sodium Chloride Drives Autoimmune Disease by the Induction of Pathogenic Th17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Manzel, Arndt; Titze, Jens; Kvakan, Heda; Yosef, Nir; Linker, Ralf A.; Muller, Dominik N.; Hafler, David A.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a marked increase in the incidence of autoimmune diseases in the last half-century. While the underlying genetic basis of this class of diseases has recently been elucidated implicating predominantly immune response genes1, changes in environmental factors must ultimately be driving this increase. The newly identified population of interleukin (IL)-17 producing CD4+ helper T cells (Th17 cells) plays a pivotal role in autoimmune diseases2. Pathogenic IL-23 dependent Th17 cells have been shown to be critical for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS), and genetic risk factors associated with MS are related to the IL23/Th17 pathway1, 2. However, little is known regarding the environmental factors that directly influence Th17 cells. Here we show that increased salt (sodium chloride; NaCl) concentrations found locally under physiological conditions in vivo dramatically boost the induction of murine and human Th17 cells. High-salt conditions activate the p38/MAPK pathway involving the tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP/NFAT5) and the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (SGK1) during cytokine-induced Th17 polarization. Gene silencing or chemical inhibition of p38/MAPK, NFAT5 or SGK1 abrogates the high-salt induced Th17 cell development. The Th17 cells generated under high-salt display a highly pathogenic and stable phenotype characterized by the up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines GM-CSF, TNFα and IL-2. Moreover, mice fed with a high-salt diet develop a more severe form of EAE, in line with augmented central nervous system infiltrating and peripherally induced antigen specific Th17 cells. Thus, increased dietary salt intake might represent an environmental risk factor for the development of autoimmune diseases through the induction of pathogenic Th17 cells. PMID:23467095

  2. Structure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma-nitrided alloy steels in 3% sodium chloride solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.K.; Shih, H.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Type 304 stainless steel (SS), type 410 SS, and type 4140 low-alloy steel were plasma nitrided in a commercial furnace at 560 C for 50 h. Microstructure and the composition of the nitrided layer were analyzed. The resistance to corrosive wear was evaluated by a tribotest in which the specimen was held under potentiostatic control at anodic and cathodic potentials in 3% sodium chloride solution (pH 6.8). Electrochemical polarization measurements were made, and the surface morphology and composition after corrosive wear were examined. Wear rates at cathodic potentials were very low, but significant weight losses were observed as the applied potentials were increased anodically. The coefficient of friction varied in a fashion similar to the wear rate. For the untreated alloys, the magnitude of the wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased as follows: type 4140 alloy > type 41 SS > type 304 SS. For the plasma-nitrided alloys, the ranking was: type 304 SS > type 410 SS. type 4140 alloy. Plasma nitriding was shown to be beneficial to the corrosive wear resistance of type 4140 alloy, but an adverse effect was obtained for types 304 and 410 SS. These findings could be interpreted in terms of the electrochemical polarization characteristics of a static specimen and were strongly related to the subtleties of the nitrided microstructures. The stable chromium nitride (CrN) segregated in the [gamma]-iron (type 304 SS) and [alpha]-Fe (type 41 SS) matrices and resulted in a pitting and spalling type of corrosive wear mechanism. The phases [epsilon]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 2-3]N and [gamma]-(Fe, Cr)[sub 4]N enriched in the surface layer of nitrided type 4140 alloy provided excellent corrosive wear resistance.

  3. [The use of potassium-magnesium-sodium chloride-sulfate mineral water and direct current (experimental research)].

    PubMed

    Mishchuk, A V; Gereliuk, I P

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate a therapeutic potential of a test treatment of chronic hepatitis with mineral water followed by hepatic galvanization, the authors have conducted an experimental study on 38 rats. The animals were divided into 4 experimental and 4 control groups. Experimental animals of groups 1 and 2 underwent galvanization of the liver 1 hour after the intake of mineral water in combination with 22Na-labelled sodium chloride, of group 3 in combination with 35S-labelled sodium sulfate, of group 4--with labelled rubidium. Control animals were treated according to the same schedule but galvanization. The study of the hepatic tissue of the sacrificed rats evidenced that oral administration of mineral water followed in an hour by hepatic galvanization results in a significant elevation of hepatic content of labelled sulphur and rubidium, whereas the level of labelled sodium remained unchanged. The data obtained by the authors need to be confirmed in further clinical trials. PMID:2800438

  4. Compatibility and Stability of Morphine Sulphate and Naloxone Hydrochloride in 0.9% Sodium Chloride for Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kistner, Charlotte; Ensom, Mary H H; Decarie, Diane; Lauder, Gillian; Carr, Roxane R

    2013-01-01

    Background Naloxone may be administered in conjunction with morphine to reduce the risk of opioid-induced pruritis. Combining these drugs for coadministration may be beneficial, but little is known about their physical compatibility and stability in combined solutions. Objective: To describe the physical compatibility and stability of morphine sulphate and naloxone hydrochloride (at various concentrations) in IV admixtures. Methods: The physical compatibility and stability of admixtures of morphine 1000 μg/mL and naloxone 4 μg/mL, 12.5 μg/mL, and 25 μg/mL in 0.9% sodium chloride were studied. For each concentration of naloxone, one bag was stored at room temperature (22°C) for 72 h and one bag was stored under refrigeration (4°C) for 30 days. For all preparations, physical characteristics, including pH, colour, and formation of precipitate, were evaluated. The samples were also analyzed by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method. Stability was defined as the retention of at least 90% of the initial concentration. Results: No notable changes in pH or colour and no macroprecipitation were observed in any of the preparations after storage at 22°C for up to 72 h or at 4°C for up to 30 days. All preparations maintained more than 90% of the initial concentrations of morphine and naloxone at the end of the respective study periods. The calculated lower limit of the 95% confidence interval also indicated that 90% or more of the initial concentration remained at the end of each study period. Conclusion: Admixtures of morphine sulphate and naloxone hydrochloride were stable for 72 h at room temperature and for 30 days with refrigeration. PMID:23814283

  5. Bromination of aromatic compounds by residual bromide in sodium chloride matrix modifier salt during heated headspace GC/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Fine, Dennis D; Ko, Saebom; Huling, Scott

    2013-12-15

    Analytical artifacts attributed to the bromination of toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes were found during the heated headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis of aqueous samples. The aqueous samples were produced from Fenton-like chemical oxidation reactions and contained aromatic compounds, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and ferric sulfate. Prior to GC/MS headspace analysis, the samples were acidified (pH<2), and sodium chloride was amended to the headspace vial as a matrix modifier. The brominated artifacts were generated during heated headspace analysis. Further, when samples were spiked with a mixture of volatile chlorinated and aromatic compounds (50 µg/L), poor spike recoveries of toluene and xylenes occurred, and in some cases complete loss of trimethylbenzenes and naphthalene resulted. Where poor recovery of aromatic spike compounds occurred, brominated aromatic compounds were found. The only significant source of bromine in the reaction scheme is the bromide typically present (<0.01% w/w) in the sodium chloride amended to the samples. Conversely, brominated artifacts were absent when a buffered salt mixture composed of sodium chloride and potassium phosphate dibasic/monobasic was used as a matrix modifier and raised the sample pH (pH~6). This indicated that the brominated artifacts resulted from the reaction of the aromatic compounds with BrCl, which was formed by the reaction of H2O2, chloride, and bromide under acidic conditions. An alternative matrix modifier salt is recommended that prevents the bromination reaction and avoids these deleterious effects on sample integrity during headspace analysis. PMID:24209304

  6. Chloride Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addison disease, or increased salt intake. If both chloride and sodium levels are high in a person on a ... anything else I should know? Drugs that affect sodium blood levels will also cause changes in chloride. In addition, swallowing large amounts of baking soda ...

  7. Intake and urinary excretion of sodium chloride under varying conditions of effort and environment heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, E.; Adar, R.; Tennenbaum, J.; Kesten, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intake and urinary excretion of sodium were investigated in a group of young, healthy and acclimated men. The sodium excretions of workers and of machinists in the engine rooms of a ship were also investigated.

  8. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  9. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, Wayne H.; Christiansen, David W.

    1987-05-05

    A method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  10. Evaluation of the maximum beyond-use-date stability of regular human insulin extemporaneously prepared in 0.9% sodium chloride in a polyvinyl chloride bag

    PubMed Central

    Rocchio, Megan A; Belisle, Caryn D; Greenwood, Bonnie C; Cotugno, Michael C; Szumita, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Background Regular human insulin 100 units added to a sufficient quantity of 0.9% sodium chloride, to yield a total volume of 100 mL within a polyvinylchloride bag, is accepted to be stable for 24 hours due to physical denaturation and chemical modification. The objective of this study was to evaluate the extended stability of such extemporaneously prepared regular human insulin, stored under refrigeration, to the maximum beyond-use-date allowed by United States Pharmacopeia chapter 797. Methods At time “0” three admixtures of regular human insulin were prepared by withdrawing 1 mL of regular human insulin with a concentration of 100 units/mL and adding it to a sufficient quantity of 0.9% sodium chloride for injection in a polyvinylchloride bag to yield a total volume of 100 mL. The three admixtures were stored under refrigeration (2°C–8°C [36°F–46°F]), and one sample of each admixture was withdrawn and tested in duplicate at 0, 6, 24, 48, 72, 144, 168, 192, 216, 240, 312, and 336 hours. Utilizing high performance liquid chromatography, each sample underwent immediate testing. The time points were stable if the mean concentration of the samples exceeded 90% of the equilibrium concentration at 6 hours. Results The equilibrium concentration was 0.89 units/mL. Time points were stable if the mean concentration was at least 0.80 units/mL. All time points retained at least 90% of the equilibrium concentration, with the exception of hour 168 (0.79 ± 0.03 units/mL). At 192 hours the mean concentration was 0.88 ± 0.03 units/mL. At 336 hours the mean concentration was 0.91 ± 0.02 units/mL. Conclusion Based on these results, regular human insulin 100 units added to 0.9% sodium chloride for injection in a polyvinylchloride bag to yield a total volume of 100 mL is stable for up to 336 hours when stored at 2°C–8°C (36°F–46°F). PMID:24143117

  11. Preparation of microfibrillated cellulose/chitosan-benzalkonium chloride biocomposite for enhancing antibacterium and strength of sodium alginate films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Lin, Xinxing; Chen, Lihui; Huang, Liulian; Cao, Shilin; Wang, Huangwei

    2013-07-01

    The nonantibacterial and low strength properties of sodium alginate films negatively impact their application for food packaging. In order to improve these properties, a novel chitosan-benzalkonium chloride (C-BC) complex was prepared by ionic gelation using tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a coagulant, and a biocomposite obtained through the adsorption of C-BC complex on microfibrillated cellulose, MFC/C-BC, was then incorporated into a sodium alginate film. The TEM image showed that the C-BC nanoparticles were spherical in shape with a diameter of about 30 nm, and the adsorption equilibrium time of these nanoparticles on the surface of MFC was estimated to be 6 min under the driving forces of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions. According to the disc diffusion method, the MFC/C-BC biocomposite-incorporated sodium alginate film exhibited remarkable antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and certain antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli . The strength tests indicated that the tensile strength of the composite sodium alginate film increased about 225% when the loading of MFC/C-BC biocomposite was 10 wt %. These results suggested that the MFC/C-BC biocomposite-incorporated sodium alginate film with excellent antibacterial and strength properties would be a promising material for food packaging, and the MFC/C-BC may also be a potential multifunctional biocomposite for other biodegradable materials. PMID:23750871

  12. Effect of sodium chloride on solute-solvent interactions in aqueous polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Nuno R; Ferreira, Luisa A; Madeira, Pedro P; Teixeira, José A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris Y

    2015-12-18

    Partition behavior of eight small organic compounds and six proteins was examined in poly(ethylene glycol)-8000-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems containing 0.215M NaCl and 0.5M osmolyte (sorbitol, sucrose, TMAO) and poly(ethylene glycol)-10000-sodium sulfate-0.215M NaCl system, all in 0.01M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The differences between the solvent properties of the coexisting phases (solvent dipolarity/polarizability, hydrogen bond donor acidity, and hydrogen bond acceptor basicity) were characterized with solvatochromic dyes using the solvatochromic comparison method. Differences between the electrostatic properties of the phases were determined by analysis of partitioning of sodium salts of dinitrophenylated (DNP-) amino acids with aliphatic alkyl side-chain. The partition coefficients of all compounds examined (including proteins) were described in terms of solute-solvent interactions. The results obtained in the study show that solute-solvent interactions of nonionic organic compounds and proteins in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase system change in the presence of NaCl additive. PMID:26615710

  13. A method of calculating quartz solubilities in aqueous sodium chloride solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    The aqueous silica species that form when quartz dissolves in water or saline solutions are hydrated. Therefore, the amount of quartz that will dissolve at a given temperature is influenced by the prevailing activity of water. Using a standard state in which there are 1,000 g of water (55.51 moles) per 1,000 cm3 of solution allows activity of water in a NaCl solution at high temperature to be closely approximated by the effective density of water, pe, in that solution, i.e. the product of the density of the NaCl solution times the weight fraction of water in the solution, corrected for the amount of water strongly bound to aqueous silica and Na+ as water of hydration. Generally, the hydration of water correction is negligible. The solubility of quartz in pure water is well known over a large temperature-pressure range. An empirical formula expresses that solubility in terms of temperature and density of water and thus takes care of activity coefficient and pressure-effect terms. Solubilities of quartz in NaCl solutions can be calculated by using that equation and substituting pe, for the density of pure water. Calculated and experimentally determined quartz solubilities in NaCl solutions show excellent agreement when the experiments were carried out in non-reactive platinum, gold, or gold plus titanium containers. Reactive metal containers generally yield dissolved silica concentrations higher than calculated, probably because of the formation of metal chlorides plus NaOH and H2. In the absence of NaOH there appears to be no detectable silica complexing in NaCl solutions, and the variation in quartz solubility with NaCl concentration at constant temperature can be accounted for entirely by variations in the activity of water. The average hydration number per molecule of dissolved SiO2 in liquid water and NaCl solutions decreases from about 2.4 at 200??C to about 2.1 at 350??C. This suggests that H4SiO4 may be the dominant aqueous silica species at 350??C, but other

  14. Individual effects of sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium chloride salts on Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae growth.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Durán-Quintana, M C; Garrido-Fernandez, A

    2008-07-01

    A quantitative investigation on the individual effects of sodium (NaCl), potassium (KCl), calcium (CaCl2), and magnesium (MgCl2) chloride salts against Lactobacillus pentosus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two representative microorganisms of table olives and other fermented vegetables, was carried out. In order to assess their potential activities, both the kinetic growth parameters and dose-response profiles in synthetic media (deMan Rogosa Sharpe broth medium and yeast-malt-peptone-glucose broth medium, respectively) were obtained and analyzed. Microbial growth was monitored via optical density measurements as a function of contact time in the presence of progressive chloride salt concentrations. Relative maximum specific growth rate and lag-phase period were modeled as a function of the chloride salt concentrations. Moreover, for each salt and microorganism tested, the noninhibitory concentrations and the MICs were estimated and compared. All chloride salts exerted a significant antimicrobial effect on the growth cycle; particularly, CaCl2 showed a similar effect to NaCl, while KCl and MgCl2 were progressively less inhibitory. Microbial susceptibility and resistance were found to be nonlinearly dose related. PMID:18680941

  15. Chemical oxygen demand analysis of wastewater using trivalent manganese oxidant with chloride removal by sodium bismuthate pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Miller, D G; Brayton, S V; Boyles, W T

    2001-01-01

    Current chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyses generate wastes containing hexavalent and trivalent chromium, mercury, and silver. Waste disposal is difficult, expensive, and poses environmental hazards. A new COD test is proposed that eliminates these metals and shortens analysis time, where trivalent manganese oxidant replaces hexavalent chromium (dichromate). A silver catalyst is not required. Optional pretreatment removes chloride via oxidation to chlorine using sodium bismuthate, eliminating the need for mercury. Sample aqueous and solid components are separated for chloride removal, then recombined for total COD measurement. Soluble and nonsoluble COD can be determined separately. Digestion at 150 degrees C is complete in 1 hour. Results are determined by titration or by spectrophotometric reading. Test wastes contain none of the metals regulated for disposal under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Results are shown for selected organic compounds and various wastewaters. Statistical comparisons are made with dichromate COD and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) test values. PMID:11558305

  16. Efficacy of formalin, hydrogen-peroxide, and sodium-chloride on fungal-infected rainbow-trout eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schreier, T.M.; Rach, J.J.; Howe, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    Antifungal agents are essential for the maintenance of healthy stocks of fish and their eggs in intensive aquaculture operations. In the usa, formalin is the only fungicide approved for use in fish culture, however, hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride have been granted low regulatory priority drug status by the united states food and drug administration (fda) and their use is allowed. We evaluated the efficacy of these fungicides for controlling fungal infections on rainbow trout eggs. A pilot study was conducted to determine the minimum water flow rate required to administer test chemicals accurately in heath incubators. A minimum water flow rate of 7.6 1 min(-1) was necessary to maintain treatment concentrations during flow-through chemical exposures, the antifungal activity of formalin, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium chloride was evaluated by treating uninfected and 10% fungal-infected (saprolegnia parasitica) rainbow trout eggs (oncorhynchus mykiss) for 15 min every other day until hatch. There were no significant differences among treatments in percent hatch or final infection for uninfected eggs receiving prophylactic chemical treatments, eggs of the negative control group (uninfected and untreated) had a mean hatch exceeding 86%, all chemical treatments conducted on the infected egg groups controlled the spread of fungus and improved hatching success compared with the positive control groups (infected and untreated), formalin treatments of 1000 and 1500 mu l 1(-1) and hydrogen peroxide treatments of 500 and 1000 mu l 1(-1) were the most effective. Sodium chloride treatments of 30000 mg 1(-1) improved fry hatch, but the compound was less effective at inhibiting fungal growths compared with hydrogen peroxide and formalin treatments.

  17. Shock Hugoniot and equations of states of water, castor oil, and aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, A. B.; Ohtani, K.; Takayama, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a result of experiments for the determination of reliable shock Hugoniot curves of liquids, in particular, at relatively low pressure region, which are needed to perform precise numerical simulations of shock wave/tissue interaction prior to the development of shock wave related therapeutic devices. Underwater shock waves were generated by explosions of laser ignited 10 mg silver azide pellets, which were temporally and spatially well controlled. Measuring temporal variation of shock velocities and over-pressures in caster oil, aqueous solutions of sodium chloride, sucrose and gelatin with various concentrations, we succeeded to determine shock Hugoniot curves of these liquids and hence parameters describing Tait type equations of state.

  18. The effect of reduced sodium chloride content on the microbiological and biochemical properties of a soft surface-ripened cheese.

    PubMed

    Dugat-Bony, E; Sarthou, A-S; Perello, M-C; de Revel, G; Bonnarme, P; Helinck, S

    2016-04-01

    Many health authorities have targeted salt reduction in food products as a means to reduce dietary sodium intake due to the harmful effects associated with its excessive consumption. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of reducing sodium chloride (NaCl) content on the microbiological and biochemical characteristics of an experimental surface-ripened cheese. A control cheese (1.8% NaCl) and a cheese with a reduced NaCl content (1.3% NaCl) were sampled weekly over a period of 27d. Reducing NaCl content induced microbial perturbations such as the lesser development of the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii and the greater development of the gram-negative bacterium Hafnia alvei. This was accompanied by changes in proteolytic kinetics and in profiles of volatile aroma compounds and biogenic amine production. Finally, the development of the spoilage microorganism Pseudomonas fragi was significantly higher in the cheese with a reduced salt content. PMID:26852809

  19. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, C.; Jacquemart, D.; Buldyreva, J.; Lacome, N.; Perrin, A.

    2012-07-01

    Methyl chloride is of interest for atmospheric applications, since this molecule is directly involved in the catalytic destruction of ozone in the lower stratosphere. In a previous work [Bray et al. JQSRT 2011;112:2446], lines positions and intensities of self-perturbed 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl have been studied into details for the 3.4 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurement and calculation of N2-broadening coefficients of the 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues. High-resolution Fourier Transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures at room-temperature have been recorded between 2800 and 3200 cm-1 at LADIR (using a classical source) and between 47 and 59 cm-1 at SOLEIL (using the synchrotron source on the AILES beamline). 612 mid-infrared transitions of the ν1 band and 86 far-infrared transitions of the pure rotational band have been analyzed using a multispectrum fitting procedure. Average accuracy on the deduced N2-broadening coefficients has been estimated to 5% and 10% in the mid- and far-infrared spectral regions, respectively. The J- and K-rotational dependences of these coefficients have been observed in the mid-infrared region and then a simulation has been performed using an empirical model for 0≤J≤50, K≤9. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line widths for 0≤J≤50 and K≤10 of the ν1 band and for 55≤J≤67 and K≤15 of the pure rotational band have been computed using a semi-classical approach involving exact trajectories and a real symmetric-top geometry of the active molecule. Finally, a global comparison with the experimental and theoretical data existing in the literature has been performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been appeared while no clear evidence for any vibrational or isotopic dependences have been pointed out.

  20. From lithium to sodium: cell chemistry of room temperature sodium-air and sodium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Adelhelm, Philipp; Hartmann, Pascal; Bender, Conrad L; Busche, Martin; Eufinger, Christine; Janek, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Research devoted to room temperature lithium-sulfur (Li/S8) and lithium-oxygen (Li/O2) batteries has significantly increased over the past ten years. The race to develop such cell systems is mainly motivated by the very high theoretical energy density and the abundance of sulfur and oxygen. The cell chemistry, however, is complex, and progress toward practical device development remains hampered by some fundamental key issues, which are currently being tackled by numerous approaches. Quite surprisingly, not much is known about the analogous sodium-based battery systems, although the already commercialized, high-temperature Na/S8 and Na/NiCl2 batteries suggest that a rechargeable battery based on sodium is feasible on a large scale. Moreover, the natural abundance of sodium is an attractive benefit for the development of batteries based on low cost components. This review provides a summary of the state-of-the-art knowledge on lithium-sulfur and lithium-oxygen batteries and a direct comparison with the analogous sodium systems. The general properties, major benefits and challenges, recent strategies for performance improvements and general guidelines for further development are summarized and critically discussed. In general, the substitution of lithium for sodium has a strong impact on the overall properties of the cell reaction and differences in ion transport, phase stability, electrode potential, energy density, etc. can be thus expected. Whether these differences will benefit a more reversible cell chemistry is still an open question, but some of the first reports on room temperature Na/S8 and Na/O2 cells already show some exciting differences as compared to the established Li/S8 and Li/O2 systems. PMID:25977873

  1. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A.

    2016-06-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g-1) with 600 mAh g-1 reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions.

  2. A stable room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuya; Xu, Shaomao; Agrawral, Akanksha; Choudhury, Snehashis; Lu, Yingying; Tu, Zhengyuan; Ma, Lin; Archer, Lynden A

    2016-01-01

    High-energy rechargeable batteries based on earth-abundant materials are important for mobile and stationary storage technologies. Rechargeable sodium-sulfur batteries able to operate stably at room temperature are among the most sought-after platforms because such cells take advantage of a two-electron-redox process to achieve high storage capacity from inexpensive electrode materials. Here we report a room-temperature sodium-sulfur battery that uses a microporous carbon-sulfur composite cathode, and a liquid carbonate electrolyte containing the ionic liquid 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium-chlorate tethered to SiO2 nanoparticles. We show that these cells can cycle stably at a rate of 0.5 C (1 C=1675, mAh g(-1)) with 600 mAh g(-1) reversible capacity and nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency. By means of spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis, we find that the particles form a sodium-ion conductive film on the anode, which stabilizes deposition of sodium. We also find that sulfur remains interred in the carbon pores and undergo solid-state electrochemical reactions with sodium ions. PMID:27277345

  3. Subzero-Temperature Cathode for a Sodium-Ion Battery.

    PubMed

    You, Ya; Yao, Hu-Rong; Xin, Sen; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zuo, Tong-Tong; Yang, Chun-Peng; Guo, Yu-Guo; Cui, Yi; Wan, Li-Jun; Goodenough, John B

    2016-09-01

    A subzero-temperature cathode material is obtained by nucleating cubic prussian blue crystals at inhomogeneities in carbon nanotubes. Due to fast ionic/electronic transport kinetics even at -25 °C, the cathode shows an outstanding low-temperature performance in terms of specific energy, high-rate capability, and cycle life, providing a practical sodium-ion battery powering an electric vehicle in frigid regions. PMID:27305570

  4. Chloride in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... found in table salt or sea salt as sodium chloride. It is also found in many vegetables. Foods ... Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. National Academy Press, Washington, DC: 2005. ...

  5. High dietary sodium chloride causes further protein loss during head-down tilt bed rest (HDBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehlmeier, Judith; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Baecker, Natalie; Stehle, Peter; Heer, Martina

    Human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein most likely caused by muscle degradation. Additionally astronauts tend towards a high dietary intake of sodium chloride (NaCl), which has recently been shown to induce low grade metabolic acidosis (Frings-Meuthen et al. JBMR, Epub 2007). In several patterns, e.g. chronical renal failure, metabolic acidosis is associated with protein catabolism. We therefore hypothesized that high dietary intake of NaCl enforces protein losses in HDBR, a model for physiological changes in microgravity (µG). Eight healthy male subjects (mean age 26.25 ± 3.5; mean body weight: 78.5 ± 4.1 kg) participated in a 14-day bed rest study in the metabolic ward of the DLR - Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Cologne, Germany. The study was carried out in a cross over design, consisting of two phases, each lasting 22 days (5 days adaptation, 14 days 6° HDBR and 3 days recovery). Both study phases were identical with respect to environmental conditions and study protocol. Subjects received an individually tailored, weight-maintaining diet containing 1.3 g protein/kg/day. The diet was identical in both study phases with the exception of NaClintake: Every subject received a low NaCl diet (0.7 mmol/kg/day) in one phase and a high NaCl diet (7.7 mmol/kg/day) in another one. Blood gas for analysis of acid-base balance was implemented at days 4 and 5 of adaptation, days 2, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14 of HDBR and days 2, 3 of recovery. Continuous urine collection started on the first day in the metabolic ward to analyze nitrogen excretion. Nitrogen balance was calculated from the difference between protein intake and urinary nitrogen excretion, determined by use of chemiluminescence (Grimble et al. JPEN, 1988). Plasma pH did not change significantly (p=0.285), but plasma bicarbonate and base excess decreased (p=0.0175; p=0.0093) with high NaCl intake in HDBR compared to the low NaCl diet. Nitrogen balance in HDBR was negative, as expected in

  6. Role of lipid composition and lipid peroxidation in the sensitivity of fungal plant pathogens to aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite.

    PubMed

    Avis, Tyler J; Michaud, Mélanie; Tweddell, Russell J

    2007-05-01

    Aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite have shown high efficacy at low doses in controlling postharvest pathogens on potato tubers. Direct effects of these two salts included the loss of cell membrane integrity in exposed pathogens. In this work, four fungal potato pathogens were studied in order to elucidate the role of membrane lipids and lipid peroxidation in the relative sensitivity of microorganisms exposed to these salts. Inhibition of mycelial growth in these fungi varied considerably and revealed sensitivity groups within the tested fungi. Analysis of fatty acids in these fungi demonstrated that sensitivity was related to high intrinsic fatty acid unsaturation. When exposed to the antifungal salts, sensitive fungi demonstrated a loss of fatty acid unsaturation, which was accompanied by an elevation in malondialdehyde content (a biochemical marker of lipid peroxidation). Our data suggest that aluminum chloride and sodium metabisulfite could induce lipid peroxidation in sensitive fungi, which may promote the ensuing loss of integrity in the plasma membrane. This direct effect on fungal membranes may contribute, at least in part, to the observed antimicrobial effects of these two salts. PMID:17337539

  7. Effect of divalent ions on electroosmotic transport in a sodium chloride aqueous solution confined in an amorphous silica nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.; Zambrano, Harvey; Cevheri, Necmettin; Yoda, Minami; Computational Micro-; Nanofluidics Lab Team; The Fluids, Optical; Interfacial Diagnostics Lab Team

    2012-11-01

    A critical enabling technology for the next generation of nanoscale devices, such as nanoscale ``lab on a chip'' systems, is controlling electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanochannels. In this work, we control EOF in an aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution confined in a silica nanochannel by systematically adding different amounts of divalent ions. Multivalent ions have a different affinity for the silica surface and different hydration characteristics in comparison to monovalent ions. Therefore by adding Mg++ and Ca++ to the sodium chloride solution, the electroosmotic velocity and the structure of the electrical double layer will be modified. The effects of adding Mg++ and Ca++ will be compared using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the EOF at different electric fields of a NaCl solution in a silica nanochannel with different fractions of Ca++ and Mg++ ions. In general, the wall zeta-potential magnitude, and hence the EOF velocity, decreases as the Ca++ or Mg++ concentration increases. The system responds linearly with electric field. We will compare the computational results with the experimental data of Cevheri and Yoda (2012). This work is supported by Army Research Office (ARO) grant number W911NF1010290.

  8. Fixation of lead chloride on kaolinite and bentonite at temperatures between 550 and 950 C

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Takarada, Takayuki

    2000-02-01

    Vaporization of lead chloride (PbCl{sub 2}) on sorbents was carried out at linearly rising temperatures in flowing nitrogen with the use of a thermogravimetric apparatus. A modeling method has been proposed to depict the vaporization rate of lead chloride and to calculate the fraction of lead chloride fixed on sorbents during heat-up. The results revealed that dehydrated kaolinite (metakaolinite) had a moderate ability to fix lead chloride while fresh kaolinite showed a significantly increased fixation ability. The lead component formed by reaction with kaolinite or dehydrated kaolinite could hardly volatilize, even at a temperature up to 1,200 C. Bentonite also showed the moderate effectiveness for capturing lead chloride. However, at least part of the components or reaction products adsorbed on bentonite appeared to be thermally unstable and could volatilize gradually with a prolonged heating time at elevated temperatures. It was seen that during dehydroxylation of kaolinite, part of the chloride was released in the form of hydrochloric acid. Chemically bound water in kaolinite appeared to dramatically promote its reaction with lead chloride.

  9. Effects of Road Density and Road-Salt Application Practices on Sodium and Chloride Loads to the Scituate Reservoir, Rhode Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldron, M. C.; Nimiroski, M.

    2001-05-01

    The Scituate Reservoir drainage basin is the drinking-water source area for two thirds of the population of Rhode Island. The effects of road density and road-salt-application practices on sodium and chloride concentrations in streams in the drainage basin were examined using concentration data collected at intervals of one to six months from January 1982 through June 2000 at 32 stream sites distributed throughout the basin. Median concentrations of sodium and chloride for individual streams during the period of data collection were related to 1995 road densities (road miles per square mile of subbasin) for roads maintained by the Rhode Island Department of Transportation (State-maintained roads) and for roads maintained by the four municipalities in the drainage basin (locally maintained roads). Nearly 60 percent of the variation in median stream sodium and chloride concentrations was accounted for by the variation in density of State-maintained roads (R2= 0.595, p < 0.0001). In contrast, no correlations could be identified between median concentrations of sodium and chloride in streams and the densities of locally maintained roads in the subbasins (R2 = 0.001, p = 0.8771). Also, there was no difference in the relations between median stream sodium concentrations and subbasin road densities for data collected before and after a 1990 State-mandated reduction in the rate of application of sodium during winter deicing of State-maintained roads. Analysis of data on sources of sodium and chloride in the Scituate Reservoir drainage basin during water year 2000 (October 1999 through September 2000) indicates that, while the lengths and densities of locally maintained roads were greater than those of State-maintained roads in most subbasins, the total amount of sodium applied during water year 2000 was nearly three times greater for State-maintained roads than for locally maintained roads. This would be expected, given that State-maintained roads carry more traffic at

  10. Assessing the effectiveness of 30% sodium chloride aqueous solution for the preservation of fixed anatomical specimens: a 5-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Fabrício Singaretti

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical specimens used in human or veterinary anatomy laboratories are usually prepared with formaldehyde (a cancerous and teratogenic substance), glycerin (an expensive and viscous fluid), or ethanol (which is flammable). This research aimed to verify the viability of an aqueous 30% sodium chloride solution for preservation of anatomical specimens previously fixed with formaldehyde. Anatomical specimens of ruminant, carnivorous, equine, swine and birds were used. All were previously fixed with an aqueous 20% formaldehyde solution and held for 7 days in a 10% aqueous solution of the same active ingredient. During the first phase of the experiment, small specimens of animal tissue previously fixed in formaldehyde were distributed in vials with different concentrations of formaldehyde, with or without 30% sodium chloride solution, a group containing only 30% sodium chloride, and a control group containing only water. During this phase, no contamination was observed in any specimen containing 30% sodium chloride solution, whether alone or in combination with different concentrations of formaldehyde. In the second phase of the experiment, the 30% sodium chloride solution, found to be optimal in the first phase of the experiment, was tested for its long-term preservation properties. For a period of 5 years, the preserved specimens were evaluated three times a week for visual contamination, odors, and changes in color and texture. There was no visual contamination or decay found in any specimen. Furthermore, no strange odors, or changes in color or softness were noted. The 30% sodium chloride solution was determined to be effective in the preservation of anatomic specimens previously fixed in formaldehyde. PMID:24762210

  11. The effect of initial tonicity on freeze/thaw injury to human red cells suspended in solutions of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Pegg, D E; Diaper, M P

    1991-02-01

    Human red blood cells, suspended in solutions of sodium chloride, have been frozen to temperatures between -2 and -14 degrees C and thawed, and the extent of hemolysis was measured. In parallel experiments, red cells were exposed to similar cycles of change in the composition of the suspending solution, but by dialysis at 21 degrees C. The tonicity of the saline in which the cells were initially suspended was varied between 0.6x isotonic and 4x isotonic; some samples from each experimental treatment were returned to isotonic saline before hemolysis was measured. It was found that the tonicity of the saline used to suspend the cells for the main body of the experiment affected the amount of hemolysis measured: raising the tonicity from 0.6x to 1x to 2x reduced hemolysis, both in the freezing and in the dialysis experiments, whereas raising the tonicity further to 4x reversed that trend. There was little difference between the freeze/thaw and the dialysis treatments for the cells suspended in 1x or 2x saline, whether or not the cells were returned to isotonic conditions. However, the cells suspended in 0.6x saline showed greater damage from freezing and thawing than from the comparable change in the composition of the solution, whether or not they were returned to isotonic conditions. Cells that were suspended in 4x saline and exposed to changes in salt concentration by dialysis showed less hemolysis when they were assayed in the 4x solution than cells that had received the comparable freezing/thaw treatment, but when the experiment included a return to isotonicity, the two treatments gave similar results. Returning the cells to isotonic saline had a negligible affect on the cells in 0.6x and 1x saline, but caused considerable hemolysis in the 2x and 4x samples, more so after dialysis than after freezing and thawing. We conclude that cells suspended in 0.6x and 4x saline behave differently from cells suspended in 1x and 2x saline and hence that cells suspended in a

  12. Chemistry of Frozen Sodium-Magnesium-Sulfate-Chloride Brines: Implications for Surface Expression of Europa's Ocean Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Tuan H.; Hodyss, Robert; Choukroun, Mathieu; Johnson, Paul V.

    2016-01-01

    The composition of Europa’s subsurface ocean is a critical determinant of its habitability. However, our current understanding of the ocean composition is limited to its expression on the surface. This work investigates experimentally the composition of mixed sodium-magnesium-sulfate-chloride solutions when frozen to 100 K, simulating conditions that likely occur as ocean fluids are emplaced onto Europa’s surface. Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to characterize phase composition of the frozen brines at 100 K. Our results show that solutions containing Na+, Cl-, Mg2+, and {{{SO}}4}2- preferentially crystallize into Na2SO4 and MgCl2 hydrated minerals upon freezing, even at elevated [Mg2+]/[Na+] ratios. The detection of epsomite (MgSO4•7H2O) on Europa’s surface, if confirmed, may thus imply a relatively sodium-poor ocean composition or a radiolytic process that converts MgCl2 to MgSO4 as suggested by Brown & Hand. The formation of NaCl on the surface, while dependent upon a number of factors such as freezing rate, may indicate an ocean significantly more concentrated in sodium than in magnesium.

  13. A Na(+) Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries.

    PubMed

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1). We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  14. A Na+ Superionic Conductor for Room-Temperature Sodium Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shufeng; Duong, Hai M.; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Hu, Ning; Lu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have ruled the consumer electronics market for the past 20 years and have great significance in the growing number of electric vehicles and stationary energy storage applications. However, in addition to concerns about electrochemical performance, the limited availability of lithium is gradually becoming an important issue for further continued use and development of lithium ion batteries. Therefore, a significant shift in attention has been taking place towards new types of rechargeable batteries such as sodium-based systems that have low cost. Another important aspect of sodium battery is its potential compatibility with the all-solid-state design where solid electrolyte is used to replace liquid one, leading to simple battery design, long life span, and excellent safety. The key to the success of all-solid-state battery design is the challenge of finding solid electrolytes possessing acceptable high ionic conductivities at room temperature. Herein, we report a novel sodium superionic conductor with NASICON structure, Na3.1Zr1.95Mg0.05Si2PO12 that shows high room-temperature ionic conductivity of 3.5 × 10−3 S cm−1. We also report successful fabrication of a room-temperature solid-state Na-S cell using this conductor. PMID:27572915

  15. Method of and apparatus for removing silicon from a high temperature sodium coolant

    DOEpatents

    Yunker, W.H.; Christiansen, D.W.

    1983-11-25

    This patent discloses a method of and system for removing silicon from a high temperature liquid sodium coolant system for a nuclear reactor. The sodium is cooled to a temperature below the silicon saturation temperature and retained at such reduced temperature while inducing high turbulence into the sodium flow for promoting precipitation of silicon compounds and ultimate separation of silicon compound particles from the liquid sodium.

  16. Effect of Polyvnylpyrrolidone (PVP) in Binary Solution on the Performance of Polyethersulfone Hollow Fibre Membrane for Sodium Chloride Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolong, N.; Ismail, A. F.; Salim, M. R.

    2010-03-01

    In membrane preparation, phase inversion is a versatile technique that allow polymer to be transformed from liquid to a solid state in a controlled manner. The preparation and process involves many factors and parameters specifically in fabricating hollow fibre membrane. In this study, dope solution factor in the process of fabricating hollow fibre membrane were explored. The effects of polymer concentration and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as additive in the dope solution on the morphology and separation performance were found able to produced high porous membranes, well interconnected pores and surface properties. Employing polyethersulfone (PES) as polymer, hollow fibre membranes were fabricated using N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as solvent and using water as the external coagulant. Finally the fabricated ultrafiltration membranes were characterized and evaluated based on solute transport concentration (sodium chloride) and pure water permeation properties.

  17. Norepinephrine-evoked salt-sensitive hypertension requires impaired renal sodium chloride cotransporter activity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathryn R; Kuwabara, Jill T; Shim, Joon W; Wainford, Richard D

    2016-01-15

    Recent studies have implicated a role of norepinephrine (NE) in the activation of the sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) to drive the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. However, the interaction between NE and increased salt intake on blood pressure remains to be fully elucidated. This study examined the impact of a continuous NE infusion on sodium homeostasis and blood pressure in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats challenged with a normal (NS; 0.6% NaCl) or high-salt (HS; 8% NaCl) diet for 14 days. Naïve and saline-infused Sprague-Dawley rats remained normotensive when placed on HS and exhibited dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide. NE infusion resulted in the development of hypertension, which was exacerbated by HS, demonstrating the development of the salt sensitivity of blood pressure [MAP (mmHg) NE+NS: 151 ± 3 vs. NE+HS: 172 ± 4; P < 0.05]. In these salt-sensitive animals, increased NE prevented dietary sodium-evoked suppression of peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide, suggesting impaired NCC activity contributes to the development of salt sensitivity [peak natriuresis to hydrochlorothiazide (μeq/min) Naïve+NS: 9.4 ± 0.2 vs. Naïve+HS: 7 ± 0.1; P < 0.05; NE+NS: 11.1 ± 1.1; NE+HS: 10.8 ± 0.4). NE infusion did not alter NCC expression in animals maintained on NS; however, dietary sodium-evoked suppression of NCC expression was prevented in animals challenged with NE. Chronic NCC antagonism abolished the salt-sensitive component of NE-mediated hypertension, while chronic ANG II type 1 receptor antagonism significantly attenuated NE-evoked hypertension without restoring NCC function. These data demonstrate that increased levels of NE prevent dietary sodium-evoked suppression of the NCC, via an ANG II-independent mechanism, to stimulate the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26608659

  18. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. M.; Iedema, M.; Yu, X.-Y.; Cowin, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium chloride (brine) particles was studied by utilizing a cross flow mini-reactor. The reaction kinetics were followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely CCSEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry's law solubility of H2O2 in brine solutions to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to, eventually, a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted using established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the dependence of the Henry's law constant of H2O2 on ionic strength.

  19. Shape-controlled synthesis of gold icosahedra and nanoplates using Pluronic P123 block copolymer and sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won-Ki; Cha, Sang-Ho; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Byung-Woo; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2009-12-15

    Gold icosahedra with an average diameter of about 600 nm were easily prepared by heating an aqueous solution of the amphiphilic block copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide){sub 20}-poly(propylene oxide){sub 70}-poly(ethylene oxide){sub 20} (Pluronic P123), and hydrogen tetrachloroaurate(III) trihydrate (HAuCl{sub 4}.3H{sub 2}O) at 60 deg. C for 25 min. When sodium chloride (NaCl:HAuCl{sub 4} molar ratio=10:1) was added to this aqueous solution, gold nanoplates were produced. The chloride ion was found to be a key component in the formation of the gold nanoplates by facilitating the growth of {l_brace}111{r_brace} oriented hexagonal/triangular gold nanoplates, because similar gold nanoplates were produced when LiCl or KCl was added to the aqueous solution instead of NaCl, while gold nanocrystals having irregular shapes were produced when NaBr or NaI was added. - Graphical abstract: Gold icosahedra were prepared by heating an aqueous solution of Pluronic P123 and HAuCl{sub 4}. When NaCl was added to this solution, gold nanoplates were produced.

  20. Temperature controlled icy dust reservoir of sodium: A possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shican; Tang, Yihuan; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-06-01

    Using seven years, from 2006 to 2013, sodium lidar observations over Hefei, China (31.80°N, 117.3°E), we attempt to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers (SSLs or NaS). We analyze the relationship between low temperature (<150 K) and SSL occurrence and detect a statistically significant link that the low temperature (<150 K) occur in three days before an SSL with an occurrence rate of 93.4% (57/61). The sharp decrease of water vapor concentration nearby before an SSL and the recover after the SSL are also detected frequently. Based upon these evidences and some case studies, we propose an icy dust reservoir in the formation of an SSL. The icy dust could form in the extremely cold mesopause region where the temperature falls below 150 K and it will absorb sodium atoms to form a solid sodium metal film as a sodium reservoir. The icy dust will then sublimate rapidly when meeting with warm air (e.g., 150 K < T < 190 K) and leave behind the solid metal atom film. The remanent sodium film might release vapor sodium atoms finally by some means through high temperature (e.g., >190 K and sometimes even >230 K) and form a sporadic sodium layer. Although not conclusive and highly uncertain, the icy dust reservoir model not only provides a good explanation for the observed characteristics of SSLs; it is also in good agreement with many other observations, such as the simultaneous sporadic sodium and iron layers, the behavior of SSLs on small time scale, the deviation of the sodium density profile of SSLs from the normal one, and the sharply decreased scale height above the peak of the sodium layer. These results further suggest that the icy dust might be a viable option of sodium reservoir for the formation of SSLs.

  1. Effects of sodium chloride on the properties of chlorophyll a submonolayer adsorbed onto hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces using broadband spectroscopy with single-mode integrated optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederkehr, Rodrigo S.; Hoops, Geoffrey C.; Mendes, Sergio B.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we experimentally investigated the effects of sodium chloride on the molar absorptivity and surface density of a submonolayer of chlorophyll a adsorbed onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic solid/liquid interfaces. Those investigations were made possible by a broadband spectroscopic platform based on single-mode, integrated optical waveguides, which allows for extremely sensitive spectroscopic detection of analytes immobilized at submonolayer levels. Chlorophyll a with a constant bulk concentration (1.4 μM) was dissolved in phosphate buffer solutions (7 mM) of neutral pH, but with different sodium chloride concentrations. For a buffer solution of 1 mM of sodium chloride, the measured surface density of chlorophyll a was 0.209 pmol/cm2 for a hydrophilic and 0.125 pmol/cm2 for a hydrophobic surface. For a phosphate buffer solution of 10 mM of sodium chloride, the measured surface density of chlorophyll a was 0.528 pmol/cm2 for a hydrophilic and 0.337 pmol/cm2 for a hydrophobic surface. Additionally, a hypsochromic shift of the Soret band was observed for the adsorbed pigment in correlation with an increase in buffer ionic strength. The adsorption of chlorophyll a onto different surfaces can play an important role to elucidate several processes found in nature and provide a rationale for bio-inspired new material technologies.

  2. Accumulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HSP32) in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells treated with sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride or proteasomal inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Music, Ena; Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2014-11-01

    The present study examined the effect of sodium arsenite, cadmium chloride, heat shock and the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, withaferin A and celastrol on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as HSP32) accumulation in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Immunoblot analysis revealed that HO-1 accumulation was not induced by heat shock but was enhanced by sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these metals induced HO-1 accumulation in a granular pattern primarily in the cytoplasm. Additionally, in 20% of the cells arsenite induced the formation of large HO-1-containing perinuclear structures. In cells recovering from sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride treatment, HO-1 accumulation initially increased to a maximum at 12h followed by a 50% reduction at 48 h. This initial increase in HO-1 levels was likely the result of new synthesis as it was inhibited by cycloheximide. Interestingly, treatment of cells with a mild heat shock enhanced HO-1 accumulation induced by low concentrations of sodium arsenite and cadmium chloride. Finally, we determined that HO-1 accumulation was induced in A6 cells by the proteasomal inhibitors, MG132, withaferin A and celastrol. An examination of heavy metal and proteasomal inhibitor-induced HO-1 accumulation in amphibians is of importance given the presence of toxic heavy metals in aquatic habitats. PMID:25064141

  3. Low-temperature diffusion of implanted sodium in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zastavnoi, A. V.; Korol', V. M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the low-temperature diffusion of sodium atoms implanted (at primary ion energy E = 300 keV to total doses within Φ = 5 × 1014-3 × 1015 cm-2) in single-crystalline silicon grown by the method of float-zone melting (fz-Si) with low oxygen concentration N O and by the Czochralski method in the presence of magnetic field (mCz- n-Si and mCz- p-Si) with N O ≈ 5 × 1017 cm-3. The diffusion was studied at annealing temperatures within T ann = 500-420°C for periods of time t ann = 72-1000 h. It is established that the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient D(103/ T) of sodium in fz-Si in a broad range of T ann = 900-420°C obeys the Arrhenius law with E fz = 1.28 eV and D 0 = 1.4 × 10-2 cm2/s. The same parameters are valid for the implanted sodium diffusion in mCz-Si in the interval of T ann = 900-700°C. However, at lower temperatures, the values of D in mCz-Si are lower than to those in fz-Si, which is related to the formation of more complicated Na-O n ( n > 1) complexes in the former case. Estimation of the diffusion activation energy of these complexes yields Δ E ≈ 2.3 eV.

  4. Geopolymer encapsulation of a chloride salt phase change material for high temperature thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Rhys; Trout, Neil; Raud, Ralf; Clarke, Stephen; Steinberg, Theodore A.; Saman, Wasim; Bruno, Frank

    2016-05-01

    In an effort to reduce the cost and increase the material compatibility of encapsulated phase change materials (EPCMs) a new encapsulated system has been proposed. In the current study a molten salt eutectic of barium chloride (53% wt.), potassium chloride (28% wt.) and sodium chloride (19% wt.) has been identified as a promising candidate for low cost EPCM storage systems. The latent heat, melting point and thermal stability of the phase change material (PCM) was determined by DSC and was found to be in good agreement with results published in the literature. To cope with the corrosive nature of the PCM, it was decided that a fly-ash based geopolymer met the thermal and economic constraints for encapsulation. The thermal stability of the geopolymer shell was also tested with several formulations proving to form a stable shell for the chosen PCM at 200°C and/or 600°C. Lastly several capsules of the geopolymer shell with a chloride PCM were fabricated using a variety of methods with several samples remaining stable after exposure to 600°C testing.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF DISPOSABLE SORBENTS FOR CHLORIDE REMOVAL FROM HIGH TEMPERATURE COAL-DERIVED GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Gopala Krishnan; Raghubir Gupta

    1999-09-01

    Advanced integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) and integrated-gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems require the development of high temperature sorbents for the removal of hydrogen chloride (HCl) vapor to less than 1 parts-per-million (ppm) levels. HCl is a highly reactive, corrosive, and toxic gas which must be removed to meet environmental regulations, to protect power generation equipment, and to minimize deterioration of hot gas desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this program was to develop disposable, alkali-based sorbents capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm in the temperature range from 400 to 750 C and pressures in the range from 1 to 20 atm. The primary areas of focus of this program were to investigate different methods of sorbent fabrication, testing their suitability for different reactor configurations, obtaining reaction kinetics data, and conducting a preliminary economic feasibility assessment. This program was a joint effort between SRI International (SRI), Research Triangle Institute (RTI), and General Electric Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). SRI, the prime contractor and RTI, a major subcontractor, performed most of the work in this program. Thermochemical calculations indicated that sodium-based sorbents were capable of reducing HCl vapor levels to less than 1 ppm at temperatures up to 650 C, but the regeneration of spent sorbents would require complex process steps. Nahcolite (NaHCO{sub 3}), a naturally-occurring mineral, could be used as an inexpensive sorbent to remove HCl vapor in hot coal gas streams. In the current program, nahcolite powder was used to fabricate pellets suitable for fixed-bed reactors and granules suitable for fluidized-bed reactors. Pilot-scale equipment were used to prepare sorbents in large batches: pellets by disk pelletization and extrusion techniques, and granules by granulation and spray-drying techniques. Bench-scale fixed- and fluidized-bed reactors were assembled at

  6. EFFECTS AND INTERACTIONS OF TEMPERATURE, SODIUM LACTATE, SODIUM DIACETATE AND PEDIOCIN ON THE STARVED CELLS OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects and interactions of temperature (55-60 degrees C), sodium lactate (SL; 0.0-4.8%), sodium diacetate (SDA; 0.0-0.4%) and pediocin (0.0-10000 AU) on the starved cells of L. monocytogenes inoculated on the surface of the frankfurters were investigated, and a predictive model was developed. C...

  7. Interim storage of sodium in ferritic steel tanks at ambient temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, L.D.

    1994-09-30

    Sodium tanks originally fabricated for elevated temperature service in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) will be used to store sodium removed from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in the Sodium Storage Facility (SSF) at ambient temperature. This report presents an engineering review to confirm that protection against brittle fracture of the ferritic steel tanks is adequate for the intended service.

  8. N2-broadening coefficients of methyl chloride: Measurements at room temperature and calculations at atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbouchi Ramchani, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Dhib, M.; Aroui, H.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopic study on methyl chloride is the first step for its accurate detection in the atmosphere. In our previous work [Barbouchi Ramchani et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2013;120:1-15], line positions, intensities and self-broadening coefficients of both 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl isotopologues have been studied in the 6.9 μm spectral region. The present work is focused on measurements of N2-broadening coefficients for transitions of 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl around 6.9 μm. For that, high-resolution Fourier transform spectra of CH3Cl-N2 mixtures have been recorded at room temperature using a rapid scan Bruker IFS 120 HR interferometer at LADIR. The N2-broadening coefficients have been retrieved using a Voigt profile and a multispectrum fitting procedure. The average accuracy of the N2-broadening obtained in this work has been estimated to be between 5% and 10% depending on the transitions. The rotational J- and K-dependences of the N2-broadening coefficients have been clearly observed and modeled using empirical polynomial expansions. The 12CH335Cl-N2 line-widths of the ν5 band have also been computed using a semi-classical approach for the PR, RR and QR sub-branches. A global comparison with the experimental data from this work but also existing in the literature was then performed. Similar J- and K-rotational dependences have been observed while no clear evidence of any vibrational or isotopic dependence has been pointed out. Finally, performing theoretical calculations of the N2-broadening coefficients at various temperatures of atmospheric interest between 200 and 296 K allowed deducing the temperature exponent of the 12CH335Cl-N2 line-widths.

  9. EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas L. Porter

    2011-02-01

    Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

  10. Toluene pyrolysis studies and high temperature reactions of propargyl chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Qin, Z.

    1993-12-01

    The main focus of this program is to investigate the thermal decompositions of fuels that play an important role in the pre-particle soot formation process. It has been demonstrated that the condition of maximum soot yield is established when the reaction conditions of temperature and pressure are sufficient to establish a radical pool to support the production of polyaromatic hydrocarbon species and the subsequent formation of soot particles. However, elevated temperatures result in lower soot yields which are attributed to thermolyses of aromatic ring structures and result in the bell-shaped dependence of soot yield on temperature. The authors have selected several acyclic hydrocarbons to evaluate the chemical thermodynamic and kinetic effects attendant to benzene formation. To assess the thermal stability of the aromatic ring, the authors have studied the pyrolyses of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, chlorobenzene and pyridine. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) is employed to analyze the reaction zone behind reflected shock waves. Reaction time histories of the reactants, products, and intermediates are constructed and mechanisms are formulated to model the experimental data. The TOF work is often performed with use of laser schlieren densitometry (LS) to measure density gradients resulting from the heats of various reactions involved in a particular pyrolytic system. The two techniques, TOF and LS, provide independent and complementary information about ring formation and ring rupture reactions.

  11. Sensory evaluation of sodium chloride-containing water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Rietberg, Matthew R; Rousseau, Dérick; Duizer, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    The sensory perception of water-in-oil emulsions containing a saline-dispersed aqueous phase was investigated. Manipulating saltiness perception was achieved by varying the mass fraction aqueous phase (MFAP), initial salt load, and surfactant concentration [(polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PgPr)] of the emulsions, with formulations based on a central composite design. Saltiness and emulsion thickness were evaluated using a trained sensory panel, and collected data were analyzed using response surface analysis. Emulsion MFAP was the most important factor correlated with increased salt taste intensity. Emulsifier concentration and interactions between NaCl and PgPr had only minor effects. Emulsions more prone to destabilization were perceived as saltier irrespective of their initial salt load. The knowledge gained from this study provides a powerful tool for the development of novel sodium-reduced liquid-processed foods. PMID:22463684

  12. Effect of algogenic organic matter (AOM) and sodium chloride on Nannochloropsis salina flocculation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Garzon-Sanabria, Andrea J; Ramirez-Caballero, Silvia S; Moss, Francesca E P; Nikolov, Zivko L

    2013-09-01

    This study evaluates the effect of polymer molecular weight and charge density, algogenic organic matter (AOM), and salt concentration on harvesting efficiency of marine microalgae. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), chitosan, and five synthetic cationic polymers of different molecular weights and charge density levels were used as flocculation agents. Polymer flocculation of marine microalgae was most efficient when using the highest charge density polymer (FO4990). The flocculant dosage irrespectively of the agent chemistry and charge density was affected by the amount of AOM secreted into the culture media. The presence of AOM increased the amount of required flocculant 7-fold when using synthetic cationic polymers; 10-fold with chitosan; and ~3-fold with AlCl3. Salt concentration of 5 or 35 g/L NaCl alone did not significantly affect removal efficiency, indicating that AOM were the main cause for the increased flocculant dosage requirement. The synthetic cationic polymer (FO4990) was the least expensive flocculation agent. PMID:23796606

  13. Physicochemistry of interaction between the cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and the anionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate in water and isopropyl alcohol-water media.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suvasree; Dan, Abhijit; Bhattacharya, Subhash C; Panda, Amiya K; Moulik, Satya P

    2011-05-01

    The physicochemistry of interaction of the cationic polymer poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) with the anionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, and sodium N-dodecanoylsarcosinate was studied in detail using tensiometry, turbidimetry, calorimetry, viscometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fair interaction initially formed induced small micelles of the surfactants and later on produced free normal micelles in solution. The interaction process yielded coacervates that initially grew by aggregation in the aqueous medium and disintegrated into smaller species at higher surfactant concentration. The phenomena observed were affected by the presence of isopropyl alcohol (IP) in the medium. The hydrodynamic sizes of the dispersed polymer and its surfactant-interacted species were determined by DLS measurements. The surface morphologies of the solvent-removed PDADMAC and its surfactant-interacted complexes from water and IP-water media were examined by the SEM technique. The morphologies witnessed different patterns depending on the composition and the solvent environment. The head groups of the dodecyl chain containing surfactants made differences in the interaction process. PMID:21466231

  14. Sodium (Salt or Sodium Chloride)

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the salt in your diet and for information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ... reduce the salt in your diet and get information, strategies, and tools you need to lead a healthier ...

  15. Densitometry and ultrasound velocimetry of hyaluronan solutions in water and in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Kargerová, A; Pekař, M

    2014-06-15

    The densities of hyaluronan solutions in water and 0.15M NaCl were measured in the temperature range from 25 to 50°C for the hyaluronan molecular weights from 10 to 1,750 kDa. The density increased linearly with concentration and decreased with temperature. The data were fitted by the equation describing the density as a linear function of concentration and a quadratic function of temperature. The effect of molecular weight was negligible and thus single equation was sufficient to describe all data. The apparent and partial specific volumes were calculated from the density data including their extrapolated values to infinite dilutions. The measurement of ultrasound speed in the same solutions under the same conditions enabled to calculate the compressibility and its dependence on concentration and temperature. The compressibility decreased with both the concentration and the temperature but the effect of the concentration was only slight mild. The compressibility was used to estimate the hydration numbers which slightly decreased with increasing temperature and concentration. The addition of NaCl changed only the numerical values of density and ultrasound velocity while not changing the character of their dependence on temperature and concentration. Measured and calculated data indicate that hyaluronan does not disturb the specific water structure in the studied concentration range and support the idea of the existence of water clusters or nanodroplets hydrating the hyaluronan chains in solution. PMID:24721101

  16. Effect of temperature gradient on the optical quality of mercurous chloride crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Davies, D. K.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Mazelsky, R.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown at temperature gradients of 8, 11 and 17 K/cm by the physical vapor transport method. The optical quality of these crystals was evaluated by measuring bulk scattering and inhomogeneity of refractive index by birefringence interferometry. It was observed that a high temperature gradient at the solid-vapor interface induced thermal stresses and crystals showed higher scattering and irregular fringes.

  17. LOW TEMPERATURE PROCESS FOR THE REMOVAL AND RECOVERY OF CHLORIDES AND NITRATES FROM AQUEOUS NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Savolainen, J.E.

    1963-01-29

    A method is described for reducing the chloride content of a solution derived from the dissolution of a stainless steel clad nuclear fuel element with an aqua regia dissolution medium. The solutlon is adjusted to a nitric acid concentration in the range 5 to 10 M and is countercurrently contacted at room temperature with a gaseous oxide of nitrogen selected from NO, NO/sub 2/, N/sub 2/ O/sub 3/, and N/sub 2/O/sub 4/. Chlo ride is recovered from the contacted solution as nitrosyl chloride. After reduction of the chloride content, the solution is then contacted with gaseous NO to reduce the nitric acid molarity to a desired level. (AEC)

  18. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection at ambient temperature and 4 deg C in polypropylene syringes.

    PubMed

    Storms, Meredith L; Stewart, James T; Warren, Flynn W

    2003-01-01

    The stability of 20-mg/mL succinylcholine chloride injection in 12-mL polypropylene syringes stored at ambient temperature and 4 deg C for up to 90 days was investigated. Concentration levels of succinylcholine chloride injection were determined at 0, 1, 4, 7, 15, 30, 45, 60, and 90 days after preparation of the syringes by means of a high-performance liquid chromatographic stability-indicating assay. Methylparaben, which was added as a preservative, did not interfere with the assay. The loss in potency was less than 10% after 45 days of storage at 25 deg C and less than 1% after 90 days of storage at 4 deg C. The pH of succinylcholine chloride injection did not change appreciably during the 90-day study period. PMID:23979509

  19. Some aspects of the atmospheric corrosion of copper in the presence of sodium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, H.; Johansson, L.G.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of NaCl in combination with O{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} on the atmospheric corrosion of copper was investigated. Corrosion products formed after 4 weeks exposure were characterized qualitatively by X-ray diffraction and quantitatively by gravimetry and ion chromatography of leaching solutions. Studies of SO{sub 2} deposition and O{sub 3} consumption were performed using on-line gas analysis. Large amounts of cuprite (Cu{sub 2}O) formed in all environments at 70 and 90% relative humidity. The corrosive effect of salt was strong in pure humid air and in air containing O{sub 3} or SO{sub 2}. Corrosion rate was correlated to the amount of chloride applied to the surface and to humidity. In an atmosphere containing a combination of SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} at 90% relative humidity, corrosion was rapid in the absence of NaCl. In this case, small additions of NaCl resulted in a marked decrease in corrosion rate. In the absence of SO{sub 2}, tenorite (CuO), nantokite (CuCl), clinoatacamite [Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}Cl], and malachite [Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}] were identified. In the presence of SO{sub 2}, brochantite [Cu{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}SO{sub 4}], soluble sulfate, and an unknown phase occurred, while no tenorite or malachite was formed. The combination of SO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} resulted in the formation of antlerite [Cu{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}SO{sub 4}] and Cu{sub 2.5}(OH){sub 3}SO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O as well.

  20. INS, DFT and temperature dependent IR investigations of dynamical properties of low temperature phase of choline chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlukojć, A.; Hetmańczyk, Ł.

    2014-12-01

    Within the framework of the research the inelastic neutron scattering and temperature dependent infra-red spectroscopy investigations of the low temperature phase of choline chloride were performed. The infra-red spectra in wavenumber region 4000-80 cm-1 and in a temperature range 9-300 K were collected. The density functional theory calculations with the periodic boundary conditions for determination and description of the normal modes in the vibration spectra of choline chloride were applied. Bands assigned to the CH3 torsional vibration were observed at 288 and 249 cm-1. From the analysis of the temperature dependence of the full-width-at-half-maximum the activation energy for CH3 group reorientation is found to be equal to 1.6 ± 0.2 kcal/mol.

  1. The unusual importance of activity coefficients for micelle solutions illustrated by an osmometry study of aqueous sodium decanoate and aqueous sodium decanoate + sodium chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poonam; MacNeil, Jennifer A; Bowles, Justine; Leaist, Derek G

    2011-12-28

    Freezing-point and vapor-pressure osmometry data are reported for aqueous sodium decanoate (NaD) solutions and aqueous NaD + NaCl solutions. The derived osmotic coefficients are analyzed with a mass-action model based on the micelle formation reaction qNa(+) + nD(-) = (Na(q)D(n))(q-n) and Guggenheim equations for the micelle and ionic activity coefficients. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of the NaD and NaCl components and the equilibrium constant for micelle formation are evaluated. Illustrating the remarkable but not widely appreciated nonideal behavior of ionic surfactant solutions, the micelle activity coefficient drops to astonishingly low values, below 10(-7) (relative to unity for ideal solutions). The activity coefficients of the Na(+) and D(-) ions, raised to large powers of q and n, reduce calculated extents of micelle formation by up to 15 orders of magnitude. Activity coefficients, frequently omitted from the Gibbs equation, are found to increase the calculated surface excess concentration of NaD by up to an order of magnitude. Inflection points in the extent of micelle formation, used to calculate critical micelle concentration (cmc) lowering caused by added salt, provide unexpected thermodynamic evidence for the elusive second cmc. PMID:22037556

  2. Predictive model for the reduction of heat resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef by the combined effect of sodium chloride and apple polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Juneja, Vijay K; Altuntaş, Evrim Güneş; Ayhan, Kamuran; Hwang, Cheng-An; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Friedman, Mendel

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the combined effect of three internal temperatures (57.5, 60, and 62.5°C) and different concentrations (0 to 3.0 wt/wt.%) of sodium chloride (NaCl) and apple polyphenols (APP), individually and in combination, on the heat-resistance of a five-strain cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in ground beef. A complete factorial design (3×4×4) was used to assess the effects and interactions of heating temperature, NaCl, and APP. All 48 combinations were tested twice, to yield 96 survival curves. Mathematical models were then used to quantitate the combined effect of these parameters on heat resistance of the pathogen. The theoretical analysis shows that compared with heat alone, the addition of NaCl enhanced and that of APP reduced the heat resistance of L. monocytogenes measured as D-values. By contrast, the protective effect of NaCl against thermal inactivation of the pathogen was reduced when both additives were present in combination, as evidenced by reduction of up to ~68% in D-values at 57.5°C; 65% at 60°C; and 25% at 62.5°C. The observed high antimicrobial activity of the combination of APP and low salt levels (e.g., 2.5% APP and 0.5% salt) suggests that commercial and home processors of meat could reduce the salt concentration by adding APP to the ground meat. The influence of the combined effect allows a reduction of the temperature of heat treatments as well as the salt content of the meat. Meat processors can use the predictive model to design processing times and temperatures that can protect against adverse effects of contaminated meat products. Additional benefits include reduced energy use in cooking, and the addition of antioxidative apple polyphenols may provide beneficial health affects to consumers. PMID:23587714

  3. Global protein-level responses of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 to prolonged changes in external sodium chloride concentrations.

    PubMed

    Leuko, Stefan; Raftery, Mark J; Burns, Brendan P; Walter, Malcolm R; Neilan, Brett A

    2009-05-01

    Responses to changes in external salinity were examined in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. H. salinarum NRC-1 grows optimally at 4.3 M NaCl and is capable of growth between 2.6 and 5.1 M NaCl. Physiological changes following incubation at 2.6 M NaCl were investigated with respect to growth behavior and proteomic changes. Initial observations indicated delayed growth at low NaCl concentrations (2.6 M NaCl), and supplementation with different sugars, amino acids, or KCl to increase external osmotic pressure did not reverse these growth perturbations. To gain a more detailed insight into the adaptive responses of H. salinarum NRC-1 to changes in salinity, the proteome was characterized using iTRAQ (amine specific isobaric tagging reagents). Three hundred and nine differentially expressed proteins were shown to be associated with changes in the external sodium chloride concentration, with proteins associated with metabolism revealing the greatest response. PMID:19206189

  4. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Hashim M.; Iedema, Martin J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.

    2014-06-20

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium particles was studied by utilizing a crossflow-mini reactor. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely SEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry’s law solubility of H2O2 to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to eventually a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted rates using previously established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the Henry’s law constant of H2O2 dependence on ionic strength.

  5. Structural and functional studies on the sodium- and chloride-coupled. gamma. -aminobutyric acid transporter: Deglycosylation and limited proteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, B.I.; Keynan, S.; Radian, R. )

    1989-05-02

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled {gamma}-aminobutyric transporter, an 80-kDa glycoprotein, has been subjected to deglycosylation and limited proteolysis. The treatment of the 80-kDa band with endoglycosidase F results in its disappearance and reveals the presence of a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa, which is devoid of {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is nevertheless recognized by the antibodies against the 80-kDa band. Upon limited proteolysis with papain or Pronase, the 80-kDa band was degraded to one with an apparent molecular mass of about 60 kDa. This polypeptide still contains the {sup 125}I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin binding activity but is not recognized by the antibody. The effect of proteolysis on function is examined. The transporter was purified by use of all steps except that for the lectin chromatography. After papain treatment and lectin chromatography, {gamma}-aminobutyric transport activity was eluted with N-acetylglucosamine. The characteristics of transport were the same as those of the pure transporter, but the preparation contained instead of the 80-kDa polypeptide two fragments of about 66 and 60 kDa. The ability of the anti-80-kDa antibody to recognize these fragments was relatively low. The observations indicate that the transporter contains exposed domains which are not important for function.

  6. Mercuric chloride induced hepatotoxic and hematologic changes in rats: The protective effects of sodium selenite and vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Uzunhisarcikli, Meltem; Aslanturk, Ayse; Kalender, Suna; Apaydin, Fatma Gokce; Bas, Hatice

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on investigating the possible protective effect of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and/or vitamin E against mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced hepatotoxicity in rat. Male rats were given HgCl2 (1 mg/kg body weight (bw)) and HgCl2 plus Na2SeO3 (0.25 mg/kg bw) and/or vitamin E (100 mg/kg bw) daily via gavage for 4 weeks. HgCl2-treated groups had significantly higher white blood cell and thrombocyte counts than the control group. Serum activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, γ-glutamyl-transferase, and lactate dehydrogenase significantly increased and serum levels of total protein, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly decreased in the HgCl2-treated groups compared with control group. Malondialdehyde level significantly increased and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities decreased in liver tissue of HgCl2-treated rats. Also, HgCl2 exposure resulted in histopathological changes. Supplementation of Na2SeO3 and/or vitamin E provided partial protection in hematological and biochemical parameters that were altered by HgCl2 As a result, Na2SeO3 and/or vitamin E significantly reduced HgCl2-induced hepatotoxicity, but not protected completely. PMID:25757480

  7. Interactions and aggregations in aqueous and brine solutions of poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride)/sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peizhu; An, Xueqin; Peng, Xuhong; Shen, Weiguo

    2009-10-15

    The interactions between the anionic surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and the polycation poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride) (PDDAC), the aggregations of AOT and PDDAC-bound AOT in PDDAC/AOT aqueous solutions, and the influence of salt on the interactions and aggregations have been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorptions of AOT onto PDDAC and the formations of PDDAC-bound AOT micelles, free AOT micelles, and AOT vesicles were examined, and the corresponding critical concentrations were determined. Combining calculations of thermodynamic parameters with the above three experimental techniques, it was shown that the micellization of free AOT is driven by entropy gain, while the adsorption of AOT onto PDDAC and the micellization of PDDAC-bound AOT are driven by both enthalpy and entropy. It was also found that addition of salt enhances the binding of AOT onto PDDAC through the ion exchange and favors the formations of PDDAC/AOT micelles, free AOT micelles, and free AOT vesicles but prevents the transition of PDDAC/AOT micelles to the vesicles. Thermodynamic analysis suggested that the adsorption of AOT onto PDDAC and the micellization of PDDAC/AOT in PDDAC/AOT brine solutions are different in mechanism compared with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. PMID:19772316

  8. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  9. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  10. Effects of protein kinase C activation on sodium, potassium, chloride, and total CO2 transport in the rabbit cortical collecting tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, S R; Baum, M; Kokko, J P

    1987-01-01

    Several hormones induce phosphatidylinositol turnover in cell membranes and thus activate protein kinase C. Activation of protein kinase C can, in turn, have effects on epithelial transport. These experiments were designed to investigate the effects of two activators of protein kinase C, phorbol 12-myristate,13-acetate (PMA) and L-alpha-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (L-alpha-1,2-DOG), and two inactive analogues, 4 alpha-phorbol and 4-O-methyl phorbol 12-myristate,13-acetate, on sodium, potassium, chloride, and total CO2 transport in the rabbit cortical collecting tubule. Utilizing in vitro microperfusion techniques, we found that activation of protein kinase C with either PMA or L-alpha-1,2-DOG significantly inhibited net sodium absorption, net potassium secretion and transepithelial voltage in a dose-dependent manner. There was no effect on net chloride or total CO2 transport. In contrast, the inactive phorbol analogues did not alter either sodium or potassium transport. These studies demonstrate that in the rabbit cortical collecting tubule sodium and potassium transport can be inhibited by compounds known to activate proteins kinase C. Thus, hormones that induce phosphatidylinositol turnover in the rabbit cortical collecting tubule may lead to inhibition of sodium transport by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:3680514

  11. High temperature infrared spectrum of sodium iodide (NaI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Arthur G.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of sodium iodide vapor between 200 and 275 cm-1 has been measured with a resolution of 0.006 cm-1 at a temperature of 1096 K. The Δv = 1 transitions from v = 1 ← 0 to v = 13 ← 12 have been measured. Dunham constants are given from an least-squares analysis of 1285 fairly well resolved transitions. The band center for the fundamental band is ν0 = 257.2837 ± 0.0002 cm-1. The relative intensities of the Δv = 1 transitions from different vibrational states are studied and it is shown that the intensity is roughly proportional to v″ + 1 as expected from the harmonic oscillator approximation. From measurements of the Herman-Wallis constant, α1,0 = -0.0054 ± 0.0008, it is estimated that the transition moment must be μ1,0 ≈ 0.135 ± 0.020 debye.

  12. Effect of Sodium Chloride on α-Dicarbonyl Compound and 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural Formations from Glucose under Caramelization Conditions: A Multiresponse Kinetic Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-08-17

    This study aimed to investigate the kinetics of α-dicarbonyl compound formation in glucose and glucose-sodium chloride mixture during heating under caramelization conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF), glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and diacetyl were determined. A comprehensive reaction network was built, and the multiresponse model was compared to the experimentally observed data. Interconversion between glucose and fructose became 2.5 times faster in the presence of NaCl at 180 and 200 °C. The effect of NaCl on the rate constants of α-dicarbonyl compound formation varied across the precursor and the compound itself and temperature. A decrease in rate constants of 3-deoxyglucosone and 1-deoxyglucosone formations by the presence of NaCl was observed. HMF formation was revealed to be mainly via isomerization to fructose and dehydration over cyclic intermediates, and the rate constants increase 4-fold in the presence of NaCl. PMID:27477785

  13. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance measured with ion-selective sub-micro pipette probes in aqueous sodium and potassium chloride solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, J. W.; Takami, T.; Lee, J.-K.; Kawai, T.; Park, B. H.

    2011-07-01

    Selective ionic currents in aqueous sodium and potassium chloride solutions with concentrations from 0.01 M to 1.0 M were measured using sub-micro pipette probes in which a poly(vinyl chloride) film containing crown ethers selectively filtered sodium or potassium ions. The selective ionic currents were monitored with a sub-picoampere current measurement system developed from the techniques of TΩ-gap impedance scanning tunneling microscopy. The ionic currents increased with the concentration of the corresponding solution, and thus these sub-micro pipette probes can be applied to detect local ionic concentration of a specific ion in living cells with ionic concentration higher than 0.1 M.

  14. Effects of the Paradox Valley Unit on dissolved solids, sodium, and chloride in the Dolores River near Bedrock, Colorado, water years 1988-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth R.

    2000-01-01

    During 1999, a study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation to evaluate the effect of the Paradox Valley Unit on dissolved solids, sodium, and chloride in the Dolores River downstream from the Paradox Valley Unit. This report describes this evaluation and presents the results from this study. Daily mean flow and daily mean specific conductance, measured at gages upstream and downstream from the Paradox Valley Unit, and results from monthly water-quality samples are used to estimate changes in the dissolved-solids load and concentrations of sodium and chloride in the river as it crosses the valley and to correlate these changes with withdrawals of brine by the Paradox Valley Unit. The time period for this evaluation was restricted to October 1987?September 1998 (water years 1988?98) because regular collection of water-quality samples from the Dolores River in the valley gaban in 1987.

  15. Creep substructure formation in sodium chloride single crystals in the power law and exponential creep regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Pharr, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    Creep tests conducted on NaCl single crystals in the temperature range from 373 to 1023 K show that true steady state creep is obtained only above 873 K when the ratio of the applied stress to the shear modulus is less than or equal to 0.0001. Under other stress and temperature conditions, corresponding to both power law and exponential creep, the creep rate decreases monotonically with increasing strain. The transition from power law to exponential creep is shown to be associated with increases in the dislocation density, the cell boundary width, and the aspect ratio of the subgrains along the primary slip planes. The relation between dislocation structure and creep behavior is also assessed.

  16. Establishment of an activated peroxide system for low-temperature cotton bleaching using N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changhai; Hinks, David; Sun, Chang; Wei, Qufu

    2015-03-30

    Cotton bleaching is traditionally carried out in strongly alkaline solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at temperatures close to the boil. Such harsh processing conditions can result in extensive water and energy consumptions as well as severe chemical damage to textiles. In this study, an activated peroxide system was established for low-temperature cotton bleaching by incorporating a bleach activator, namely N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]butyrolactam chloride (TBBC) into an aqueous H2O2 solution. Experimental results showed that the TBBC-activated peroxide system exhibited the most effective bleaching performance in a pH range of 6-8 which could be approximated by adding sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). The TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system led to rapid bleaching of cotton at a temperature as low as 50°C. In comparison with the hot alkaline peroxide bleaching system, the TBBC/H2O2/NaHCO3 system provided cotton fabric with an equivalent degree of whiteness, higher degree of polymerization, and slightly lower water absorbency. The new activated peroxide system may provide a more environmentally benign approach to cotton bleaching. PMID:25563946

  17. Reactions occurring during the sulfation of sodium chloride deposited on alumina substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Birks, N.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction between solid NaCl and air containing 1 pct SO2 has been studied between 500 and 700 C. The reaction product, Na2SO4, forms not only on the surface of the NaCl but also on surrounding areas of the substrate due to the volatility of the NaCl at these temperatures. At the higher temperatures, the vapor pressure of NaCl is so high that the majority of the reaction product is distributed on the substrate. Above 625 C, the reaction product is a liquid solution of NaCl and Na2SO4 that exists only so long as NaCl is supplied from the original crystal source. Eventually, the liquid solidifies by constitutional solidification as the NaCl is converted to Na2SO4. While it exists, the liquid NaCl-Na2SO4 solution is shown to be highly corrosive to Al2O3 and, on a scale of Al2O3 growing on alloy HOS 875, particularly attacks the grain boundaries of the scale at preferred sites where chromium and iron oxides and sulfides rapidly develop. This is proposed as one mechanism by which NaCl deposition contributes to the initiation of low temperature hot corrosion.

  18. Test Your Sodium Smarts

    MedlinePlus

    ... You may be surprised to learn how much sodium is in many foods. Sodium, including sodium chloride ... foods with little or no salt. Test your sodium smarts by answering these 10 questions about which ...

  19. Effect of Sodium Chloride on the Intensity of the Spectral Lines of Elements During ARC Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strunina, N. N.; Baisova, B. T.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the carrier (NaCl) during arc discharge on the intensity of the lines for elements with various ionization potentials (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Si, Ti, Zn) was investigated. It was found that the intensity of the spectral lines of the elements increases with increase in the concentration of the carrier. The relative roles of the factors responsible for the increase in the intensity of the spectral lines (the plasma temperature, the intensity of the spectral lines of the elements, and the degree of ionization of the elements, the fl ow rate and residence time of the atoms in the plasma) were analyzed.

  20. Synergistic interaction between nitrogen dioxide and respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid or sodium chloride on rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Warren, D.L.

    1987-08-01

    We examined interactions in rats between NO/sub 2/ gas and respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) or sodium chloride (NaCl). Rats were exposed for 1, 3, or 7 days to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ gas, alone or in combination with 1 mg/m3 of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NaCl aerosols. The apparent rate of collagen synthesis by lung minces was measured after 7 days of exposure, and the protein content of whole lung lavage fluid was measured after 1 or 3 days of exposure. Responses from rats exposed to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ alone were significantly different from controls by these assays. A synergistic interaction was demonstrated between 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of either H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NaCl aerosol as evaluated by measurement of the rate of lung collagen synthesis. A synergistic interaction was also demonstrated by the criterion of increased protein content of lung lavage fluid in rats exposed to 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosol after 1 day of exposure and between 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ and 1 mg/m3 of NaCl aerosol after 3 days of exposure. These observations with 5 ppm of NO/sub 2/ alone and in combination with 1 mg/m3 of NaCl aerosol support the hypothesis that formation of nitrosyl chloride may contribute to a synergistic interaction between NO/sub 2/ gas and NaCl aerosol. These results suggest that, in general, combinations of oxidant gases with respirable acidic aerosols or with acidogenic gases will demonstrate interactive effects on rat lungs. Such a hypothesis is testable and makes specific predictions about effects of inhalation of pollutant mixtures.

  1. Furfural Synthesis from d-Xylose in the Presence of Sodium Chloride: Microwave versus Conventional Heating.

    PubMed

    Xiouras, Christos; Radacsi, Norbert; Sturm, Guido; Stefanidis, Georgios D

    2016-08-23

    We investigate the existence of specific/nonthermal microwave effects for the dehydration reaction of xylose to furfural in the presence of NaCl. Such effects are reported for sugars dehydration reactions in several literature reports. To this end, we adopted three approaches that compare microwave-assisted experiments with a) conventional heating experiments from the literature; b) simulated conventional heating experiments using microwave-irradiated silicon carbide (SiC) vials; and at c) different power levels but the same temperature by using forced cooling. No significant differences in the reaction kinetics are observed using any of these methods. However, microwave heating still proves advantageous as it requires 30 % less forward power compared to conventional heating (SiC vial) to achieve the same furfural yield at a laboratory scale. PMID:27416892

  2. High energy sodium based room temperature flow batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamie, Jack

    As novel energy sources such as solar, wind and tidal energies are explored it becomes necessary to build energy storage facilities to load level the intermittent nature of these energy sources. Energy storage is achieved by converting electrical energy into another form of energy. Batteries have many properties that are attractive for energy storage including high energy and power. Among many different types of batteries, redox flow batteries (RFBs) offer many advantages. Unlike conventional batteries, RFBs store energy in a liquid medium rather than solid active materials. This method of storage allows for the separation of energy and power unlike conventional batteries. Additionally flow batteries may have long lifetimes because there is no expansion or contraction of electrodes. A major disadvantage of RFB's is its lower energy density when compared to traditional batteries. In this Thesis, a novel hybrid Na-based redox flow battery (HNFB) is explored, which utilizes a room temperature molten sodium based anode, a sodium ion conducting solid electrolyte and liquid catholytes. The sodium electrode leads to high voltages and energy and allows for the possibility of multi-electron transfer per molecule. Vanadium acetylacetonate (acac) and TEMPO have been investigated for their use as catholytes. In the vanadium system, 2 electrons transfers per vanadium atom were found leading to a doubling of capacity. In addition, degradation of the charged state was found to be reversible within the voltage range of the cell. Contamination by water leads to the formation of vanadyl acetylacetonate. Although it is believed that vanadyl complex need to be taken to low voltages to be reduced back to vanadium acac, a new mechanism is shown that begins at higher voltages (2.1V). Vanadyl complexes react with excess ligand and protons to reform the vanadium complex. During this reaction, water is reformed leading to the continuous cycle in which vanadyl is formed and then reduced back

  3. Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of 316LN SS in Acidified Sodium Chloride Solution at Applied Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonguzhali, A.; Pujar, M. G.; Mallika, C.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2015-05-01

    The influence of acidified 1 M NaCl solution by addition of 2 ml/L of HCl on the cyclic plastic deformation of AISI Type 316LN SS containing 0.07 wt.% and 0.22 wt.% N was investigated as a function of the applied potentials. The corrosion fatigue (CF) behavior of stainless steel (SS) was explained vis-a-vis the dislocation behavior, the propensity to form microcracks, and the evolution of the current transients based on the studies carried out at both room-temperature and boiling conditions. CF experiments were conducted using round tensile specimens at a stress ratio of 0.5 and a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Two different kinds of damage mechanisms were observed (I) the damage mechanism in the stable-passive state was correlated with the localization of the anodic dissolution due to a depassivation-repassivation process, whereas (II) the cyclic stress induced pitting corrosion in the metastable pitting state, which resulted in formation of microcracks. The study of the microcracking process and its evolution is a key to the physical mechanism by which the fatigue life of stainless steels would be affected in an aqueous corrosive solution under the applied potential.

  4. Bubble Rising Velocity in Sodium Chloride Aqueous Solution under Horizontal DC High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Kazuhiko; Furuhashi, Ippei

    2008-02-01

    In a continuous casting of steel, argon bubbles are injected from a nozzle to prevent nozzle clogging. However, this sometimes causes a problem of the entrapment of inclusions in a solidifying metal front. On the other hand, an electromagnetic brake has been utilized to control molten metal flow in the continuous casting process. Therefore, the understanding of bubble behavior in molten steel under the electromagnetic brake in which inertial force, Lorentz force and buoyancy force play an important role is essential for the optimization of the continuous casting process of steel. A water model experiment is one of the typical methods for direct observation of bubble behavior while it is impossible to use the water model experiment for this purpose because the Lorentz force is not induced by the bubble motion in the water. The Lorentz force is excited when a molten metal with low melting temperature is used instead of the water, however, the direct observation of the bubble motion is impossible because of opaque nature of metals. In order to overcome this problem and to get useful information for the bubble behavior under the electromagnetic brake, the bubble behavior has been simulated by use of a strong electrolyte under a high magnetic field. The principle of the simulation is based on that the ratios among those forces in the simulation system are the nearly same as the ratios in a practical operation. New knowledge about the effect of Lorentz force on the bubble behavior is discussed in this manuscript.

  5. Dissociation quotient of benzoic acid in aqueous sodium chloride media to 250{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Kettler, R.M.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1995-04-01

    The dissociation quotient of benzoic acid was determined potentiometrically in a concentration cell fitted with hydrogen electrodes. The hydrogen ion molality of benzoic acid/benzoate solutions was measured relative to a standard aqueous HCl solution at seven temperatures from 5 to 250{degrees}C and at seven ionic strengths ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 molal (NaCl). The molal dissociation quotients and selected literature data were fitted in the isocoulombic (all anionic) form by a six-term equation. This treatment yielded the following thermodynamic quantities for the acid dissociation equilibrium at 25{degrees}C and 1 bar: logK{sub a} = -4.206{+-}0.006, {Delta}H{sub a}{sup 0} = 0.3{+-}0.3 kJ-mol{sup {minus}1}, {Delta}S{sub a}{sup 0} = -79.6{+-}1.0 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}, and {Delta}C{sub p;a}{sup 0} = -207{+-}5 J-mol{sup {minus}1}-K{sup {minus}1}. A five-term equation derived to describe the dependence of the dissociation constant on solvent density is accurate to 250{degrees}C and 200 MPa.

  6. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10−4 mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  7. Influence of salicylic acid on rubisco and rubisco activase in tobacco plant grown under sodium chloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Young; Damodaran, Puthanveettil Narayanankutty; Roh, Kwang Soo

    2014-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of salicylic acid (SA) on the growth of salt stress (sodium chloride) induced in tobacco plants. In addition, quantification of rubisco and rubisco activase contents of the plants was also determined in treatments with the control, 10(-4) mM SA, 50 mM NaCl, 100 mM NaCl, 150 mM NaCl, SA + 50 mM NaCl, SA + 100 mM NaCl and SA + 150 mM NaCl, respectively after in vitro culture for 5 weeks. The growth of the tobacco plant decreased in 50 mM and 100 mM NaCl when not treated with SA. However, the growth was accelerated by SA, and the growth retardation caused by NaCl was improved by SA. The content of rubisco was improved by SA only in plants treated with 50 mM NaCl, and the activity of rubisco was increased by SA resulting in the decreased effect of NaCl, but only in 50 mM NaCl treated plants. The content of rubisco activase decreased due to NaCl, and SA did not improve the effect caused by NaCl. The activity of rubisco activase was increased by SA resulting in decreased activity caused by NaCl, but increased effect by SA was not recovered to the level of NaCl untreated plants. The activity of rubisco and rubisco activase, which decreased due to denaturing agents, did not demonstrate significant improvement when compared to the control. PMID:25313276

  8. Using Fish Sauce as a Substitute for Sodium Chloride in Culinary Sauces and Effects on Sensory Properties.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Hue Linh; Danhi, Robert; Yan, See Wan

    2016-01-01

    Historically, fish sauce has been a standard condiment and ingredient in various Southeast Asian cuisines. Moreover, fish sauce imparts umami taste, which may enhance perceived saltiness in food. This quality suggests that fish sauce may be used as a partial substitute for sodium chloride (NaCl) in food preparation, which may present a valuable option for health-conscious and salt-restricted consumers. However, the degree to which NaCl can be decreased in food products without compromising taste and consumer acceptance has not been determined. We hypothesized that NaCl content in food may be reduced by partial replacement with fish sauce without diminishing palatability and consumer acceptance. Preparations of 3 types of food were assessed to test this hypothesis: chicken broth (n = 72); tomato sauce (n = 73); and coconut curry (n = 70). In the first session, the percentage of NaCl that could be replaced with fish sauce without a significant change in overall taste intensity was determined for each type of food using the 2-Alternative Forced Choice method. In the second session, subjects rated 5 samples for each food with varying NaCl and/or fish sauce content on 3 sensory attributes: deliciousness; taste intensity; and saltiness. Our results demonstrate that NaCl reduction was possible in chicken broth, tomato sauce, and coconut curry at 25%, 16%, and 10%, respectively, without a significant loss (P < 0.05) in deliciousness and overall taste intensity. These results suggest that it is possible to replace NaCl in foods with fish sauce without reducing overall taste intensity and consumer acceptance. PMID:26613570

  9. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  10. Hemodynamic, hematologic and eicosanoid mediated mechanisms in 7.5 percent sodium chloride treatment of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Rabinovici, R; Yue, T L; Krausz, M M; Sellers, T S; Lynch, K M; Feuerstein, G

    1992-10-01

    Hypertonic saline solution (HTS) (7.5 percent sodium chloride [NaCl]) treatment (5 milliliters per kilogram) of rats subjected to uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock (n = 7) caused an initial partial recovery of blood pressure (+38 +/- 5 percent, p<0.05) and cardiac index (+48 +/- 6 percent, p<0.01) followed by increased bleeding (+53 +/- 5 percent versus rats treated with 0.9 percent NaCl, p<0.05), secondary shock (mean arterial pressure [MAP] 23 +/- 7 millimeters of mercury, p<0.01) and decreased survival (-54 +/- 15 minutes versus control, p<0.05). The increased blood loss resulted from: 1, increased vascular pressure and vasodilatation (total peripheral resistance index -27 +/- 5 percent, p<0.05), as initial bleeding occurred when MAP and cardiac index are increased compared with the control group (+88 +/- 10 percent, p<0.05 and +82 +/- 7 percent, p<0.01, respectively) and as the concomitant infusion of angiotensin II, a potent vasoconstrictor, delayed the HTS-induced bleeding (resumed at 60 minutes), and 2, a defect in platelet aggregation reflected by decreased adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced maximal aggregation (-79 percent versus rats treated with 0.9 percent NaCl, p<0.05) and increased EC50 of ADP (+159 percent, p<0.05). These hemodynamic and hematologic responses might be mediated at least in part by prostacyclin, a vasodilator and antiplatelet aggregator, as HTS-treated rats markedly elevated the 6-keto-PGF1 alpha per thromboxane B2 ratio (+140 +/- 12 percent, p<0.01) and pretreatment with indomethacin decreased blood loss and improved MAP and survival. These data point out potential untoward hemodynamic and hematologic consequences of HTS treatment in traumatic injury in which control of bleeding cannot be confirmed. PMID:1411892

  11. Aldosterone modulates thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter abundance via DUSP6-mediated ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiuyan; Zhang, Yiqian; Shao, Ningjun; Wang, Yanhui; Zhuang, Zhizhi; Wu, Ping; Lee, Matthew J.; Liu, Yingli; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Delpire, Eric; Gu, Dingying

    2015-01-01

    Thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) plays an important role in maintaining blood pressure. Aldosterone is known to modulate NCC abundance. Previous studies reported that dietary salts modulated NCC abundance through either WNK4 [with no lysine (k) kinase 4]-SPAK (Ste20-related proline alanine-rich kinase) or WNK4-extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways. To exclude the influence of SPAK signaling pathway on the role of the aldosterone-mediated ERK1/2 pathway in NCC regulation, we investigated the effects of dietary salt changes and aldosterone on NCC abundance in SPAK knockout (KO) mice. We found that in SPAK KO mice low-salt diet significantly increased total NCC abundance while reducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation, whereas high-salt diet decreased total NCC while increasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Importantly, exogenous aldosterone administration increased total NCC abundance in SPAK KO mice while increasing DUSP6 expression, an ERK1/2-specific phosphatase, and led to decreasing ERK1/2 phosphorylation without changing the ratio of phospho-T53-NCC/total NCC. In mouse distal convoluted tubule (mDCT) cells, aldosterone increased DUSP6 expression while reducing ERK1/2 phosphorylation. DUSP6 Knockdown increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation while reducing total NCC expression. Inhibition of DUSP6 by (E)-2-benzylidene-3-(cyclohexylamino)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-one increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reversed the aldosterone-mediated increments of NCC partly by increasing NCC ubiquitination. Therefore, these data suggest that aldosterone modulates NCC abundance via altering NCC ubiquitination through a DUSP6-dependent ERK1/2 signal pathway in SPAK KO mice and part of the effects of dietary salt changes may be mediated by aldosterone in the DCTs. PMID:25761881

  12. Sodium Chloride Inhibits the Growth and Infective Capacity of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus and Increases Host Survival Rates

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Michelle Pirrie; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen that causes the infectious disease chytridiomycosis and has been implicated as a contributing factor in the global amphibian decline. Since its discovery, research has been focused on developing various methods of mitigating the impact of chytridiomycosis on amphibian hosts but little attention has been given to the role of antifungal agents that could be added to the host's environment. Sodium chloride is a known antifungal agent used routinely in the aquaculture industry and this study investigates its potential for use as a disease management tool in amphibian conservation. The effect of 0–5 ppt NaCl on the growth, motility and survival of the chytrid fungus when grown in culture media and its effect on the growth, infection load and survivorship of infected Peron's tree frogs (Litoria peronii) in captivity, was investigated. The results reveal that these concentrations do not negatively affect the survival of the host or the pathogen. However, concentrations greater than 3 ppt significantly reduced the growth and motility of the chytrid fungus compared to 0 ppt. Concentrations of 1–4 ppt NaCl were also associated with significantly lower host infection loads while infected hosts exposed to 3 and 4 ppt NaCl were found to have significantly higher survival rates. These results support the potential for NaCl to be used as an environmentally distributed antifungal agent for the prevention of chytridiomycosis in susceptible amphibian hosts. However, further research is required to identify any negative effects of salt exposure on both target and non-target organisms prior to implementation. PMID:22590639

  13. The impact of organic coatings on light scattering by sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ezell, Michael J.; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2011-08-01

    Light scattering by airborne particles plays a major role in visibility degradation and climate change. The composition and structure of particles in air can be complex, so that predictions of light scattering a priori have significant uncertainties. We report here studies of light scattering by NaCl, a model for airborne salt particles from the ocean and alkaline lakes, with and without an organic coating formed from the low volatility products of the reaction of α-pinene with ozone at room temperature at 1 atm in air. Light scattering at 450, 550 and 700 nm was measured using an integrating nephelometer on particles whose size distribution was independently determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). For comparison, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) of a known size and dioctylphthalate (DOP) particles generated with a narrow size distribution were also studied. The measured values were compared to those calculated using Mie theory. Although excellent agreement between experiment and theory was found for the PSL and DOP particles, there were large discrepancies for a polydisperse NaCl sample. These were traced to errors in the size distribution measurements. Despite the use of 85Kr neutralizers, the Boltzmann charge equilibrium distribution assumption used to derive particle size distributions from SMPS data was shown not to be valid, leading to an overestimate of the concentration of larger particles and their contribution to light scattering. Correcting for this, the combination of experiments and theory show that as salt takes up low volatility organics in the atmosphere and the geometric mean diameter increases, the effect on light scattering may be reasonably approximated from the change in size distribution under conditions where the organic coating is small relative to the core size. However, for a given particle diameter, light scattering decreases as the relative contribution of the organic component increases. Thus, light scattering by

  14. Aqueous Electrolyte Ionization over Extreme Ranges as Simple Fundamental Relation with Density and Believed Universal; Sodium Chloride Ionization for 0o to 1000oC and to 1000 MPa (10000 Atm.).

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William {Bill} L

    2008-01-01

    The chemical nature of aqueous electrolyte ionization is illustrated by a simple relationship with water as a reactant believed to correlate ionization of aqueous sodium chloride approaching infinite dilution over the entire range of temperature and pressure [0 to 1000oC; 0.1 to 1000 MPa (10000 Atm)]. The derived equation accurately and smoothly describes the ionization constant of sodium chloride [K(NaCl)] in both water and water strongly diluted by inert solvent. Effects of water density on ionization are quantitatively and simply described that oppose conventional theory that ionization is a function only of dielectric constant, and theorists should apply this simplicity with density in understanding aqueous electrolyte ionization. There appears to be no substantive evidence for Pitzer's earlier proposal (1983) that K(NaCl) with decreasing very low densities (if known) would diverge sharply downward by several orders of magnitude. Classical ionization theories are limited in universal application, and it seems that theory must adjust to this observed simple fundamental relationship.

  15. Development of Disposable Sorbents for Chloride Removal from High-Temperature Coal-Derived Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Canizales, A.; Gupta, R.; Ayala, R.

    1996-12-31

    The integrated coal-gasification combined-cycle approach is an efficient process for producing electric power from coal by gasification, followed by high-temperature removal of gaseous impurities, then electricity generation by gas turbines. Alternatively, molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) may be used instead of gas turbine generators. The coal gas must be treated to remove impurities such as hydrogen chloride (HCl), a reactive, corrosive, and toxic gas, which is produced during gasification from chloride species in the coal. HCl vapor must be removed to meet environmental regulations, to protect power generation equipments such as fuel cells or gas turbines, and to minimize deterioration of hot coal gas desulfurization sorbents. The objectives of this study are to: (1) investigate methods to fabricate reactive sorbent pellets or granules that are capable of reducing HCl vapor in high-temperature coal gas streams to less than 1 ppm in the temperature range 400{degrees}C to 650{degrees}C and the pressure range 1 to 20 atm; (2) testing their suitability in bench-scale fixed- or fluidized-bed reactors; (3) testing a superior sorbent in a circulating fluidized- bed reactor using a gas stream from an operating coal gasifier; and (4) updating the economics of high temperature HCl removal.

  16. Modelling of ultrasonic propagation in turbulent liquid sodium with temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Corneloup, G.

    2014-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic instrumentation in sodium-cooled fast reactors requires to understand and to predict how ultrasonic waves can be deflected, slowed down or speeded up, depending on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of the liquid sodium. These thermo-hydraulic characteristics are mainly the local temperature and flow speed of the sodium. In this study we show that ray theory can be used to simulate ultrasonic propagation in a medium similar to the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in order to study ultrasonic instrumentation and prepare it installation and utilisation in the sodium of the nuclear reactor. A suitable model has been developed and a set of thermo-hydraulics data has been created, taking account of the particularities of the sodium flow. The results of these simulations are then analysed within the framework of acoustic thermometry, in order to determine which disturbance must be taken into account for the correct operation of the temperature measurement.

  17. Modelling of ultrasonic propagation in turbulent liquid sodium with temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J. Ploix, M. A.; Corneloup, G.; Jeannot, J. P.

    2014-05-28

    The use of ultrasonic instrumentation in sodium-cooled fast reactors requires to understand and to predict how ultrasonic waves can be deflected, slowed down or speeded up, depending on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of the liquid sodium. These thermo-hydraulic characteristics are mainly the local temperature and flow speed of the sodium. In this study we show that ray theory can be used to simulate ultrasonic propagation in a medium similar to the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in order to study ultrasonic instrumentation and prepare it installation and utilisation in the sodium of the nuclear reactor. A suitable model has been developed and a set of thermo-hydraulics data has been created, taking account of the particularities of the sodium flow. The results of these simulations are then analysed within the framework of acoustic thermometry, in order to determine which disturbance must be taken into account for the correct operation of the temperature measurement.

  18. Effects of pH, sodium chloride, and curing salt on the infectivity of Toxoplasma gondii tissue cysts.

    PubMed

    Pott, S; Koethe, M; Bangoura, B; Zöller, B; Daugschies, A; Straubinger, R K; Fehlhaber, K; Ludewig, M

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most common zoonotic parasites in the world. The parasite causes no or mild symptoms in immunocompetent humans. However, a high potential hazard exists for seronegative pregnant women and immunocompromised patients. The consumption of meat containing tissue cysts or oocyst-contaminated vegetables and fruits or the handling of cat feces poses a high risk of infection with T. gondii. It is known that raw minced meat, raw fresh sausages, and locally produced raw meat products are possible causes of T. gondii infection. The infectivity of T. gondii tissue cysts in meat products depends, among other factors, on the pH and the salt concentration. Therefore, the impact of these two factors on the tissue cysts was examined. For this purpose, dissected musculature and brain from experimentally infected mice (donor mice) were placed in a cell culture medium (RPMI 1640). The medium was adjusted to different pH values (pH 5, 6, and 7) with lactic acid and to different salt concentrations (2.0, 2.5, and 3.0%) with sodium chloride (NaCl) or nitrite-enriched curing salt (NCS) for the various tests. After storage at 4°C for different time periods, the materials were fed to bioassay mice. Later, the brains were examined for presence of T. gondii to assess the infectivity. The data show that T. gondii tissue cysts have a high pH tolerance. Cysts were infectious in the muscle for up to 26 days (pH 5). In contrast to their tolerance to pH, cysts were very sensitive to salt. Muscle cysts survived at an NaCl concentration of up to 2.0% only, and for no longer than 8 days. At NaCl concentrations of 2.5 and 3.0%, the cysts lost their infectivity after 1 day. When NCS instead of NaCl was used under the same conditions, T. gondii muscle cysts retained infectivity for only 4 days at 2.0%. Consequently, NCS (NaCl plus 0.5% nitrite) has a stronger effect on T. gondii cysts than does common table salt. Sausages produced with low NaCl concentration and short

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ocular Surface Damage Induced by Benzalkonium Chloride Preserved Anti-glaucoma Medications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing; Yu, Fen-Fen; Zhong, Yi-Min; Guo, Xin-Xing; Mao, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term use of benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-preserved drugs is often associated with ocular surface toxicity. Ocular surface symptoms had a substantial impact on the glaucoma patients’ quality of life and compliance. This study aimed to investigate the effects of sodium hyaluronate (SH) on ocular surface toxicity induced by BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment. Methods: Fifty-eight patients (101 eyes), who received topical BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment and met the severe dry eye criteria, were included in the analysis. All patients were maintained the original topical anti-glaucoma treatment. In the SH-treated group (56 eyes), unpreserved 0.3% SH eye drops were administered with 3 times daily for 90 days. In the control group (55 eyes), phosphate-buffered saline were administered with 3 times daily for 90 days. Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, break-up time (BUT) test, corneal fluorescein staining, corneal and conjunctival rose Bengal staining, Schirmer test, and conjunctiva impression cytology were performed sequentially on days 0 and 91. Results: Compared with the control group, SH-treated group showed decrease in OSDI scores (Kruskal-Wallis test: H = 38.668, P < 0.001), fluorescein and rose Bengal scores (Wilcoxon signed-ranks test: z = −3.843, P < 0.001, and z = −3.508, P < 0.001, respectively), increase in tear film BUT (t-test: t = −10.994, P < 0.001) and aqueous tear production (t-test: t = −10.328, P < 0.001) on day 91. The goblet cell density was increased (t-test: t = −9.981, P < 0.001), and the morphology of the conjunctival epithelium were also improved after SH treatment. Conclusions: SH significantly improved both symptoms and signs of ocular surface damage in patients with BAC-preserved anti-glaucoma medications treatment. SH could be proposed as a new attempt to reduce ocular surface toxicity, and alleviate symptoms of ocular surface damage in BAC-preserved anti

  20. Effect of sodium fluoride and stannous chloride associated with Nd:YAG laser irradiation on the progression of enamel erosion.

    PubMed

    João-Souza, Samira Helena; Bezerra, Sávio José Cardoso; Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Aranha, Ana Cecília; Scaramucci, Tais

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the progression of enamel erosion after treatment with gels containing sodium fluoride (NaF; 9047 ppm F) and stannous chloride (SnCl2; 3000 ppm Sn), associated or not with Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Sixty enamel specimens were prepared from bovine incisors and protected by a tape, leaving an exposed surface area of 4 × 1 mm. The specimens were immersed in 1 % citric acid (pH = 2.3) for 10 min to create an initial erosion lesion. After, they were randomly divided into six groups: (C) control: gel without active ingredient; (F): NaF gel; (F + Sn): NaF + SnCl2 gel; (laser): Nd:YAG laser irradiation (0.5 W; 50 mJ; ∼41.66 J/cm(2); 10 Hz; 40 s); (F + laser): NaF gel + Nd:YAG; (F + Sn + laser): NaF + SnCl2 gel + Nd:YAG. All gels had pH = 4.5 and were applied for 1 min. Laser irradiation was performed after gel application. The specimens were then submitted to a 5-day erosion-remineralization cycling model using 1 % citric acid (pH = 2.3), six times per day. Enamel surface loss (SL) was analyzed by optical profilometry in the end of the cycling (in μm). Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Holm-Sidak tests (alpha = 0.05). The control and the laser groups presented the highest enamel loss (means ± SD = 53.52 ± 3.65 and 53.30 ± 2.73, respectively), followed by F + Sn (44.76 ± 2.83). The groups F (36.76 ± 2.28), F + laser (36.25 ± 3.59), and F + Sn + laser (39.83 ± 4.62) showed the lowest enamel loss, with no significant difference among them (p > 0.05). In conclusion, NaF by itself or associated with SnCl2 and Nd:YAG laser was able to reduce enamel erosion progression. Nd:YAG laser alone did not show a protective effect. PMID:26227298

  1. The neuroprotective action of the mood stabilizing drugs lithium chloride and sodium valproate is mediated through the up-regulation of the homeodomain protein Six1

    SciTech Connect

    Plant, Kathryn E.; Anderson, Elizabeth; Simecek, Nicole; Brown, Richard; Forster, Sam; Spinks, Jenny; Toms, Nick; Gibson, G. Gordon; Lyon, Jon; Plant, Nick

    2009-02-15

    The mood stabilizing agents lithium chloride (LiCl) and sodium valproate (VPA) have recently gained interest as potential neuroprotective therapeutics. However, exploitation of these therapeutic applications is hindered by both a lack of molecular understanding of the mode of action, and a number of sub-optimal properties, including a relatively small therapeutic window and variable patient response. Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were exposed to 1 mM lithium chloride or 1 mM sodium valproate for 6 h or 72 h, and transcriptomes measured by Affymetrix U133A/B microarray. Statistically significant gene expression changes were identified using SAM software, with selected changes confirmed at transcript (TaqMan) and protein (Western blotting) levels. Finally, anti-apoptotic action was measured by an in vitro fluorescent assay. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to therapeutically relevant concentrations of either lithium chloride or sodium valproate elicited 936 statistically significant changes in gene expression. Amongst these changes we observed a large (maximal 31.3-fold) increase in the expression of the homeodomain protein Six1, and have characterized the time- and dose-dependent up-regulation of this gene in response to both drugs. In addition, we demonstrate that, like LiCl or VPA treatment, Six1 over-expression protects SH-SY5Y cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis via the blockade of caspsase-3 activation, whereas removal of Six1 protein via siRNA antagonises the ability of LiCl and VPA to protect SH-SY5Y cells from STS-induced apoptosis. These results provide a novel mechanistic rationale underlying the neuroprotective mechanism of LiCl and VPA, suggesting exciting possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic agents against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinsonism.

  2. Methyl Chloride from Direct Methane Partial Oxidation: A High-Temperature Shilov-Like Catalytic System

    SciTech Connect

    Yongchun Tang; John Ma

    2012-03-23

    The intention of this study is to demonstrate and evaluate the scientific and economic feasibility of using special solvents to improve the thermal stability of Pt-catalyst in the Shilov system, such that a high reaction temperature could be achieved. The higher conversion rate (near 100%) of methyl chloride from partial oxidation of methane under the high temperature ({approx} 200 C) without significant Pt0 precipitation has been achieved. High concentration of the Cl- ion has been identified as the key for the stabilization of the Pt-catalysts. H/D exchange measurements indicated that the over oxidation will occur at the elevated temperature, developments of the effective product separation processes will be necessary in order to rationalize the industry-visible CH4 to CH3Cl conversion.

  3. In situ LIF temperature measurements in aqueous ammonium chloride solution during uni-directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafii, M. Behshad; Lum, Chee L.; Koochesfahani, Manoochehr M.

    2010-04-01

    We present in situ whole-field measurements of the temperature field using laser-induced fluorescence in a study of bottom-chilled uni-directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride. We utilize a two-color, two-dye, ratiometric approach to address the significant spatial and temporal variations of laser sheet intensity field due to refractive index variations caused by the evolving concentration and temperature fields. In our work we take advantage of two temperature sensitive fluorescent dyes with opposite temperature sensitivities in order to increase the overall sensitivity and temperature resolution of the measurements. The resulting temperature sensitivity (about 4% K-1) is more than a factor of two higher than the original work of Sakakibara and Adrian (Exp Fluids 26:7-15, 1999) with a sensitivity 1.7% K-1. In situ measurements of the temperature field during solidification are presented, along with temperature characteristics of some of the complex flow features, such as plumes and fingers.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of the oxide film on an aluminum-tin alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, A.; Selvam, P.; Raja, V.S.; Veluchamy, P.; Minoura, H.

    1997-10-01

    Oxide films on Al and an Al-Sn alloy were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after immersion in 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution. Results showed Sn exhibited both Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+} oxidation stats in the oxide film. It was proposed that incorporation of these cations in the film would result in generation of more anionic and cationic vacancies in aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), leading to active dissolution of Al.

  5. Quantitative Determination of Paraquat in Meconium by Sodium Borohydride-Nickel Chloride Chemical Reduction and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Posecion, Norberto C.; Ostrea, Enrique M.; Bielawski, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a procedure for the GC/MS assay of paraquat in meconium as a biomarker of fetal exposure to paraquat. The method involved a sodium borohydride-nickel chloride reduction procedure, liquid-liquid extraction of the perhydrogenated product, concentration, and GC/MS assay. The method demonstrated good overall recovery (102.56 %) with %CV (inter-assay) of less than 13%, and a limit of detection of 0.0156 μg/g. Analysis of meconium samples from a study population in the Philippines (n = 70) showed a 2.8% prevalence of fetal exposure to paraquat. PMID:18037033

  6. NiXantphos: A Deprotonatable Ligand for Room-Temperature Palladium-Catalyzed Cross-Couplings of Aryl Chlorides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although the past 15 years have witnessed the development of sterically bulky and electron-rich alkylphosphine ligands for palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings with aryl chlorides, examples of palladium catalysts based on either triarylphosphine or bidentate phosphine ligands for efficient room temperature cross-coupling reactions with unactivated aryl chlorides are rare. Herein we report a palladium catalyst based on NiXantphos, a deprotonatable chelating aryldiphosphine ligand, to oxidatively add unactivated aryl chlorides at room temperature. Surprisingly, comparison of an extensive array of ligands revealed that under the basic reaction conditions the resultant heterobimetallic Pd–NiXantphos catalyst system outperformed all the other mono- and bidentate ligands in a deprotonative cross-coupling process (DCCP) with aryl chlorides. The DCCP with aryl chlorides affords a variety of triarylmethane products, a class of compounds with various applications and interesting biological activity. Additionally, the DCCP exhibits remarkable chemoselectivity in the presence of aryl chloride substrates bearing heteroaryl groups and sensitive functional groups that are known to undergo 1,2-addition, aldol reaction, and O-, N-, enolate-α-, and C(sp2)–H arylations. The advantages and importance of the Pd–NiXantphos catalyst system outlined herein make it a valuable contribution for applications in Pd-catalyzed arylation reactions with aryl chlorides. PMID:24745758

  7. Purification of aqueous plutonium chloride solutions via precipitation and washing.

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, M. A.; Salazar, R. R.; Abney, Kent David; Bluhm, E. A.; Danis, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Pyrochemical operations at Los Alamos Plutonium Facility (TA-55) use high temperature melt s of calcium chloride for the reduction of plutonium oxide to plutonium metal and hi gh temperature combined melts of sodium chloride and potassium chloride mixtures for the electrorefining purification of plutonium metal . The remaining plutonium and americium are recovered from thes e salts by dissolution in concentrated hydrochloric acid followed by either solvent extraction or io n exchange for isolation and ultimately converted to oxide after precipitation with oxalic acid . Figur e 1 illustrates the current aqueous chloride flow sheet used for plutonium processing at TA-55 .

  8. [A Low-temperature Manganese Chloride Tetrahydrate Improves the Image Quality of Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kunihiro; Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Sakurai, Hitoshi; Iwai, Yuji; Miida, Kazuo; Kurita, Kouki

    2016-04-01

    Manganese chloride tetrahydrate (MCT) is one of the oral negative contrast agents which is indispensable for imaging of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). In this study, improvement of the image quality of MRCP by using low-temperature MCT is verified. All MR imagings were performed using 1.5 T scanner. The T(1) and T(2) values of the different temperature MCTs were measured in the phantom study. Different concentrations of MCT-doped water (30%, 50%, 70%, and 90%) were measured at several temperature conditions (10°C, 15°C, 23°C, 35°C, and 40°C). As a result, the T(1) and T(2) values became larger with a temperature rise. It was more remarkable in low-concentration MCT. Then, 17 healthy subjects were scanned two times with different temperatures of MCT. The MCT of the normal temperature (23°C) and low temperature (10°C) were taken at consecutive 2 days. The contrast between the stomach and the spleen were significantly higher in 2D half Fourier acquisition single shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images by use of the low-temperature MCT. The contrast between the common bile duct and the adjacent background were significantly higher in the source images of 3D MRCP by use of the low temperature MCT. In addition, 76% of subjects answered in the questionnaire that the low temperature MCT is easier to drink. The low temperature MCT improves the image quality of MRCP and contributes to performing noninvasive examination. PMID:27097992

  9. Leaching of lead slag component by sodium chloride and diluted nitric acid and synthesis of ultrafine lead oxide powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Yuehong; Ma, Cheng; Zhu, Longguan; Chen, Hongyu

    2015-05-01

    The compounds in lead slag are transformed into [PbCl4]2- in a mixed solution of HNO3 and NaCl, which is converted into PbC2O4 by the addition of sodium oxalate and polyethylene glycol dispersant. Novel lead oxides are prepared via a combustion-calcination process from lead oxalate precursor. Key properties of the new oxides, such as crystalline phases and morphology, have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that lead oxides synthesized at different calcination temperatures comprise mainly α-PbO and β-PbO phases. In battery testing, the results reveal that the α-PbO phase exhibits higher initial capacity as positive active material, discharging about 150 mAh g-1 at 20 mA g-1. While β-PbO yields a relatively improved cycle life, in 50 cycles, its capacity loss is 5%. Further work is being carried out with the aim to optimize the battery manufacturing process or to find out the optimum ratio of α-PbO to β-PbO in order to sustain high discharge capacity and acceptable cycle life.

  10. Catalytic liquefaction by zinc chloride melts at pre-pyrolysis temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, T.; Onu, C.; Joyce, P.J.; Hershkowitz, F.; Grens, E.A.

    1980-02-01

    Liquid-phase catalysts have proved effective for opening chemical linkages in subbituminous coal and capping the reactive segments with hydrogen atoms or other low-molecular-weight groups. The preferred temperature range is 275 to 325/sup 0/C (530 to 620/sup 0/F), so that the linkages are opened by controlled catalytic action rather than by thermal pyrolysis which requires appreciably higher temperatures. The best catalyst melt compositions used to date are zinc chloride with 10% water together with tetralin, and zinc chloride with 15% methanol and 3% of zinc metal. Useful residence times range from 30 minutes, or less, to as high as 90 minutes. The products of the treatment have predominately low (300) to medium (3000) molecular weights, analogous to syncrudes and solvent-refined coal. Conversions to pyridine-soluble products of 95% or better are achieved with Wyodak Roland Seam coal, and to date as much as 70% of that coal has been recovered as toluene-solubles (oils and asphaltenes). A major benefit of these conversion conditions is the almost complete absence of by-product char or gas. At these lower temperatures the hydrogen pressures used can be less than in conventional liquefaction; for example, 40 atm rather than 100 atm or more. Hydrogen consumption is significantly lower than in conventional liquefaction; the product yield is higher; and simpler procedures are foreseen for product recovery. The research performed so far clearly shows the industrial potential of homogeneous (liquid-phase) catalysts in penetrating and interacting with the mild temperature and pressure of these studies.

  11. Comparison of rhodomine-WT and sodium chloride tracer transport in a 4th order arctic river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smull, E. M.; Wlostowski, A. N.; Gooseff, M. N.; Bowden, W. B.; Wollheim, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    Conservative tracers are useful for tracking a parcel of water through a river reach and understanding tracer transport phenomena (i.e. advection, dispersion, and transient storage). Rhodomine- WT (RWT) and sodium chloride (NaCl) are two popular stream tracers. NaCl is considered to be conservative and relatively inexpensive, yet it cannot be detected at very low concentrations. On the other hand, RWT can be detected at very low concentrations (<0.1 ppb), but it is known to photo-degrade and sorb to organic materials. Previous work has compared these tracers with small-scale laboratory analyses and field experiments on small headwater streams. The limitations and advantages to each of these tracers, as applied to large river slug injections, are not clearly understood. This work seeks to answer the following questions: 1) Does RWT improve the tracer window of detection (time of tracer arrival to time of tracer non-detection), compared to NaCl? 2) Are there differences in the late-time tailing behavior of each tracer? More specifically, can we compare RWT and NaCl breakthrough curve tail shapes to understand processes contributing to late time solute transport (transient storage or sorption-desorption)? During the summer of 2012, combined slug additions of RWT and NaCl were injected into a 1.5-kilometer reach on the Kuparuk River, a 4th order tundra river underlain by continuous permafrost located on Alaska's North Slope. Fluorescence and electrical conductivity were continuously logged at the upstream and downstream ends of the reach. Preliminary results show that the window of detection is expanded when using RWT under both high and low flow conditions by 0.2 times the advective transport timescale. Tail shapes are more similar under higher discharge conditions and dissimilar under lower discharge conditions. For example, using an exponential regression model (c(t) = eat) to quantify tail shapes, at Q = 500 l/s the exponential coefficient ratio, aRWT:aNaCl, is 0

  12. Potential of salt-accumulating and salt-secreting halophytic plants for recycling sodium chloride in human urine in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Shklavtsova, E. S.; Balnokin, Yu. V.; Popova, L. G.; Myasoedov, N. A.; Gros, J.-B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    2011-07-01

    This study addresses the possibility of growing different halophytic plants on mineralized human urine as a way to recycle NaCl from human wastes in a bioregenerative life support system (BLSS). Two halophytic plant species were studied: the salt-accumulating Salicornia europaea and the salt-secreting Limonium gmelinii. During the first two weeks, plants were grown on Knop's solution, then an average daily amount of urine produced by one human, which had been preliminarily mineralized, was gradually added to the experimental solutions. Nutrient solutions simulating urine mineral composition were gradually added to control solutions. NaCl concentrations in the stock solutions added to the experimental and control solutions were 9 g/L in the first treatment and 20 g/L in the second treatment. The mineralized human urine showed some inhibitory effects on S. europaea and L. gmelinii. The biomass yield of experimental plants was lower than that of control ones. If calculated for the same time period (120 d) and area (1 m 2), the amount of sodium chloride taken up by S. europaea plants would be 11.7 times larger than the amount taken up by L. gmelinii plants (486 g/m 2 vs. 41 g/m 2). Thus, S. europaea is the better choice of halophyte for recycling sodium chloride from human wastes in BLSS.

  13. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natesan, K.; Li, Meimei; Chopra, O. K.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  14. Glass transition temperature and topological constraints of sodium borophosphate glass-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qi; Zeng, Huidan; Liu, Zhao; Ren, Jing; Chen, Guorong; Wang, Zhaofeng; Sun, Luyi; Zhao, Donghui

    2013-09-01

    Sodium borophosphate glasses exhibit intriguing mixed network former effect, with the nonlinear compositional dependence of their glass transition temperature as one of the most typical examples. In this paper, we establish the widely applicable topological constraint model of sodium borophosphate mixed network former glasses to explain the relationship between the internal structure and nonlinear changes of glass transition temperature. The application of glass topology network was discussed in detail in terms of the unified methodology for the quantitative distribution of each coordinated boron and phosphorus units and glass transition temperature dependence of atomic constraints. An accurate prediction of composition scaling of the glass transition temperature was obtained based on topological constraint model.

  15. Assessing the toxicity of sodium chloride to the glochidia of freshwater mussels: implications for salinization of surface waters.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Patricia L

    2011-06-01

    Chloride concentrations in surface waters have increased significantly, a rise attributed to road salt use. In Canada, this may be a concern for endangered freshwater mussels, many with ranges limited to southern Ontario, Canada's most road-dense region. The acute toxicity of NaCl was determined for glochidia, the mussel's larval stage. The 24h EC50s of four (including two Canadian endangered) species ranged from 113-1430 mg Cl L⁻¹ (reconstituted water, 100 mg CaCO₃ L⁻¹). To determine how mussels would respond to a chloride pulse, natural river water (hardness 278-322 mg CaCO₃ L⁻¹) was augmented with salt. Lampsilis fasciola glochidia were significantly less sensitive to salt in natural water (EC50s 1265-1559 mg Cl L⁻¹) than in reconstituted water (EC50 285 mg L⁻¹). Chloride data from mussel habitats revealed chloride reaches levels acutely toxic to glochidia (1300 mg L⁻¹). The increased salinization of freshwater could negatively impact freshwater mussels, including numerous species at risk. PMID:21429642

  16. Hyperosmolar sodium chloride is toxic to cultured neurons and causes reduction of glucose metabolism and ATP levels, an increase in glutamate uptake, and a reduction in cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Pettersen, Mi Nguyen; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2016-05-01

    Elevation of serum sodium, hypernatremia, which may occur during dehydration or treatment with sodium chloride, may cause brain dysfunction and damage, but toxic mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that exposure to excess NaCl, 10-100mmol/L, for 20h caused cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells (neurons). Toxicity was due to Na(+), since substituting excess Na(+) with choline reduced cell death to control levels, whereas gluconate instead of excess Cl(-) did not. Prior to cell death from hyperosmolar NaCl, glucose consumption and lactate formation were reduced, and intracellular aspartate levels were elevated, consistent with reduced glycolysis or glucose uptake. Concomitantly, the level of ATP became reduced. Pyruvate, 10mmol/L, reduced NaCl-induced cell death. The extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine, and GABA were concentration-dependently reduced by excess NaCl; high-affinity glutamate uptake increased. High extracellular [Na(+)] caused reduction in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], but a similar effect was seen with mannitol, which was not neurotoxic. We suggest that inhibition of glucose metabolism with ensuing loss of ATP is a neurotoxic mechanism of hyperosmolar sodium, whereas increased uptake of extracellular neuroactive amino acids and reduced intracellular [Ca(2+)] may, if they occur in vivo, contribute to the cerebral dysfunction and delirium described in hypernatremia. PMID:26994581

  17. Temporal response of hydraulic head, temperature, and chloride concentrations to sea-level changes, Floridan aquifer system, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. D.; Vacher, H. L.; Sanford, Ward E.

    2009-06-01

    Three-dimensional density-dependent flow and transport modeling of the Floridan aquifer system, USA shows that current chloride concentrations are not in equilibrium with current sea level and, second, that the geometric configuration of the aquifer has a significant effect on system responses. The modeling shows that hydraulic head equilibrates first, followed by temperatures, and then by chloride concentrations. The model was constructed using a modified version of SUTRA capable of simulating multi-species heat and solute transport, and was compared to pre-development conditions using hydraulic heads, chloride concentrations, and temperatures from 315 observation wells. Three hypothetical, sinusoidal sea-level changes occurring over 100,000 years were used to evaluate how the simulated aquifer responds to sea-level changes. Model results show that hydraulic head responses lag behind sea-level changes only where the Miocene Hawthorn confining unit is thick and represents a significant restriction to flow. Temperatures equilibrate quickly except where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick and the duration of the sea-level event is long (exceeding 30,000 years). Response times for chloride concentrations to equilibrate are shortest near the coastline and where the aquifer is unconfined; in contrast, chloride concentrations do not change significantly over the 100,000-year simulation period where the Hawthorn confining unit is thick.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg. No. 12125-02-9) is produced by the reaction of sodium chloride and an ammonium salt in solution. The less soluble sodium salt... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138...

  19. Pessimum effect of externally applied chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation: Proposed mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ekolu, S.O. . E-mail: s.ekolu@utoronto.ca; Thomas, M.D.A.; Hooton, R.D.

    2006-04-15

    Mortars and concretes were subjected to a heat treatment cycle consisting of a pre-set period of 4 h at 23 deg. C followed by accelerated curing at 95 deg. C prior to storage at room temperature in water or limewater, 0.5 M, 2.8 M sodium chloride solutions. It was found that the specimens stored in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution gave a much greater expansion than those stored in limewater or 2.8 M sodium chloride solution. This pessimum influence of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation deviates from the commonly held view that chlorides mitigate sulphate attack in concretes. The mechanism of the pessimum effect of chlorides on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation, and the final products of the associated phase transformations have been proposed. X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis techniques were used to follow phase transformations.

  20. Solvatochromic probe behavior within choline chloride-based deep eutectic solvents: effect of temperature and water.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ashish; Pandey, Siddharth

    2014-12-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have shown potential as promising environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional solvents. Many common and popular DESs are obtained by simply mixing a salt and a H-bond donor. Properties of such a DES depend on its constituents. Change in temperature and addition of water, a benign cosolvent, can change the physicochemical properties of DESs. The effect of changing temperature and addition of water on solvatochromic probe behavior within three DESs formed from choline chloride combined with 1,2-ethanediol, glycerol, and urea, respectively, in 1:2 mol ratios termed ethaline, glyceline, and reline is presented. Increase in temperature results in reduced H-bond donating acidity of the DESs. Dipolarity/polarizability and H-bond accepting basicity do not change with changing temperature of the DESs. The response of the fluorescence probe pyrene also indicates a decrease in the polarity of the DESs as temperature is increased. Addition of water to DES results in increased dipolarity/polarizability and a decrease in H-bond accepting basicity. Except for pyrene, solvatochromic probes exhibit responses close to those predicted from ideal-additive behavior with slight preferential solvation by DES within the aqueous mixtures. Pyrene response reveals significant preferential solvation by DES and/or the presence of solvent-solvent interactions, especially within aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline, the DESs constituted of H-bond donors with hydroxyl functionalities. FTIR absorbance and Raman spectroscopic measurements of aqueous DES mixtures support the outcomes from solvatochromic probe responses. Aqueous mixtures of ethaline and glyceline possess relatively more interspecies H-bonds as compared to aqueous mixtures of reline, where interstitial accommodation of water within the reline molecular network appears to dominate. PMID:25418894

  1. Combustion-engine Temperatures by the Sodium Line-reversal Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brevoort, Maurice J

    1936-01-01

    The sodium line-reversal method has been used in some preliminary measurements of flame temperature. Improvements in the method involving a photographic recorder and a means of correcting for the dirtiness of the windows are described. The temperatures so obtained are compared with those calculated from pressure diagrams.

  2. Effect of grain-boundary corrosion on impedance characteristics of an aluminum-zinc-indium alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopal, A.; Angal, R.D.; Raja, V.S.

    1996-02-01

    Applications of Al alloy sacrificial anodes for cathodic protection (CP) of steel structures in marine environments are well known. Small changes in composition and heat treatment can affect the corrosion behavior of the alloy substantially. However, characterization of the alloy anodes in relation to such changes is lacking in the literature. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to understand the dissolution behavior of an Al-Zn-In alloy in 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as a function of time after the alloy was subjected to galvanostatic dissolution. Compared to optical microscopy, the changing trend in impedance spectra reflected the preferential dissolution of the alloy along the grain boundaries. The usefulness of EIS as a tool to indicate the current efficiency loss from grain-boundary attack was illustrated.

  3. Production of concentrated caustic soda and hydrochloride acid solutions from sodium chloride by electrodialysis with the aid of bipolar ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Greben', V.P.; Pivovarov, N.Ya.; Latskov, V.L.

    1988-10-20

    This paper gives a comparative analysis of the action of electrodialyzers containing three and five compartments in the structural unit, and equipped with bipolar, cation-exchange, and anion-exchange membranes, used for production of hydrochloric acid and caustic soda from sodium chloride solutions. It was shown that an electrodialyzer with five compartments gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda for 2.5-3 M concentration with 0.2-0.3 current efficiency, whereas an electrodialyzer with three compartments in the structural unit gives hydrochloric acid and caustic soda concentrations of about 1.2 M at the same current efficiency. The performance of the electrodialyzers was analyzed and equations were derived for calculating the current efficiencies for acid and alkali under conditions of acidification of the salt solution; this was based on determination of the transport numbers of ions passing through the membranes.

  4. 3D solid supported inter-polyelectrolyte complexes obtained by the alternate deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate).

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Eduardo; Maestro, Armando; Llamas, Sara; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Jesús; Ortega, Francisco; Maroto-Valiente, Ángel; Rubio, Ramón G

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the formation and the internal morphology of polyelectrolyte layers obtained by the layer-by-layer method. A multimodal characterization showed the absence of stratification of the films formed by the alternate deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate). Indeed the final organization might be regarded as three-dimensional solid-supported inter-polyelectrolyte films. The growth mechanism of the multilayers, followed using a quartz crystal microbalance, evidences two different growth trends, which show a dependency on the ionic strength due to its influence onto the polymer conformation. The hydration state does not modify the multilayer growth, but it contributes to the total adsorbed mass of the film. The water associated with the polyelectrolyte films leads to their swelling and plastification. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has allowed for deeper insights on the internal structure and composition of the polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:26977377

  5. 3D solid supported inter-polyelectrolyte complexes obtained by the alternate deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Armando; Llamas, Sara; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Jesús; Ortega, Francisco; Maroto-Valiente, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Summary This work addresses the formation and the internal morphology of polyelectrolyte layers obtained by the layer-by-layer method. A multimodal characterization showed the absence of stratification of the films formed by the alternate deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate). Indeed the final organization might be regarded as three-dimensional solid-supported inter-polyelectrolyte films. The growth mechanism of the multilayers, followed using a quartz crystal microbalance, evidences two different growth trends, which show a dependency on the ionic strength due to its influence onto the polymer conformation. The hydration state does not modify the multilayer growth, but it contributes to the total adsorbed mass of the film. The water associated with the polyelectrolyte films leads to their swelling and plastification. The use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has allowed for deeper insights on the internal structure and composition of the polyelectrolyte multilayers. PMID:26977377

  6. Sodium chloride induces an NhaA/NhaR-independent acid sensitivity at neutral external pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rowbury, R J; Goodson, M; Humphrey, T J

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli previously grown in low-salt broth, pH 7.0, produced organisms which were markedly more acid sensitive when subsequently cultured in the same broth with 200 mM or more salt (NaCl) added. Induction of acid sensitivity occurred rapidly at both 37 and 30 degrees C, with a substantial effect within 15 min. Sensitization was partially inhibited by chloramphenicol and tetracycline and may depend on both protein synthesis-dependent and -independent physiological changes in the NaCl-induced organisms; sensitization did not result from osmotic shocking on transfer to challenge medium. Induction of acid sensitivity was affected by neither the sodium ion pore inhibitor amiloride nor the DNA synthesis inhibitor nalidixic acid; rifampin had a small effect, similar to that of chloramphenicol. Chlorides of other monovalent cations, especially Li+ and NH4+, also produced sensitization to acid, although CsCl was ineffective but did not interfere with sensitization by NaCl. Other sodium salts were also active as sensitizers, as were chlorides of divalent cations, but although sucrose (but not glycerol) was a good inducer, the results were not fully in accord with triggering of induction solely by the NaCl-associated increase in osmotic pressure. Sensitization was not prevented by deletion of the nhaA, nhaR, or nhaB gene. Acid sensitivity of NaCl-induced cells was slightly reduced after 90 min of growth at 37 degrees C in low-salt broth but was completely lost after 240 min. For NaCl-induced cells, acid killing in challenge media was not inhibited by amiloride. The NaCl-induced sensitization is distinct from the phenomenon of acid sensitivity induction in E. coli at alkaline external pH. PMID:8017942

  7. Double opposite end injection capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductometric detection for simultaneous determination of chloride, sodium and potassium in cystic fibrosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kubáň, Petr; Greguš, Michal; Pokojová, Eva; Skřičková, Jana; Foret, František

    2014-09-01

    A novel approach for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis is presented. A simple and fast procedure to obtain sweat sample was developed. It consists of repeatedly wiping the skin of the forearm with deionized water moisturized cotton swab and extraction in 1mL of deionized water. Double opposite end injection capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductometric detection is used for the analysis of the extract. Chloride, sodium and potassium as the three target ions that participate in the ion transfer across the cellular membranes, and are affected by CF, are simultaneously determined in approximately 3min in a background electrolyte containing 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid, 20mM l-histidine and 2mM 18-crown-6. By using the target ion ratios rather than the concentrations of each individual ion combined with principal component analysis, the diagnosis of CF can be made more accurately and greatly reduce the number of false positive or negative results as is often the case when single ion (chloride) is analyzed. PMID:25039067

  8. Microscale chemistry-based design of eco-friendly, reagent-saving and efficient pharmaceutical analysis: a miniaturized Volhard's titration for the assay of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Rojanarata, Theerasak; Sumran, Krissadecha; Nateetaweewat, Paksupang; Winotapun, Weerapath; Sukpisit, Sirarat; Opanasopit, Praneet; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait

    2011-09-15

    This work demonstrates the extended application of microscale chemistry which has been used in the educational discipline to the real analytical purposes. Using Volhard's titration for the determination of sodium chloride as a paradigm, the reaction was downscaled to less than 2 mL conducted in commercially available microcentrifuge tubes and using micropipettes for the measurement and transfer of reagents. The equivalence point was determined spectrophotometrically on the microplates which quickened the multi-sample measurements. After the validation and evaluation with bulk and dosage forms, the downsized method showed good accuracy comparable to the British Pharmacopeial macroscale method and gave satisfactory precision (intra-day, inter-day, inter-analyst and inter-equipment) with the relative standard deviation of less than 0.5%. Interestingly, the amount of nitric acid, silver nitrate, ferric alum and ammonium thiocyanate consumed in the miniaturized titration was reduced by the factors of 25, 50, 50 and 215 times, respectively. The use of environmentally dangerous dibutyl phthalate was absolutely eliminated in the proposed method. Furthermore, the release of solid waste silver chloride was drastically reduced by about 25 folds. Therefore, microscale chemistry is an attractive, facile and powerful green strategy for the development of eco-friendly, safe, and cost-effective analytical methods suitable for a sustainable environment. PMID:21807190

  9. The high-temperature sodium coolant technology in nuclear power installations for hydrogen power engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Alekseev, V. V.; Konovalov, M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In the case of using high-temperature sodium-cooled nuclear power installations for obtaining hydrogen and for other innovative applications (gasification and fluidization of coal, deep petroleum refining, conversion of biomass into liquid fuel, in the chemical industry, metallurgy, food industry, etc.), the sources of hydrogen that enters from the reactor plant tertiary coolant circuit into its secondary coolant circuit have intensity two or three orders of magnitude higher than that of hydrogen sources at a nuclear power plant (NPP) equipped with a BN-600 reactor. Fundamentally new process solutions are proposed for such conditions. The main prerequisite for implementing them is that the hydrogen concentration in sodium coolant is a factor of 100-1000 higher than it is in modern NPPs taken in combination with removal of hydrogen from sodium by subjecting it to vacuum through membranes made of vanadium or niobium. Numerical investigations carried out using a diffusion model showed that, by varying such parameters as fuel rod cladding material, its thickness, and time of operation in developing the fuel rods for high-temperature nuclear power installations (HT NPIs) it is possible to exclude ingress of cesium into sodium through the sealed fuel rod cladding. However, if the fuel rod cladding loses its tightness, operation of the HT NPI with cesium in the sodium will be unavoidable. Under such conditions, measures must be taken for deeply purifying sodium from cesium in order to minimize the diffusion of cesium into the structural materials.

  10. Effect of sodium chloride on glassy and crystalline transitions of wheat starch treated with high hydrostatic pressure: Prediction of solute-induced barostability from nonmonotonic solute-induced thermostability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat starch was high hydrostatic pressure (HHP)-treated in various sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (0 to near-saturation), in order to explore the effects of salt on glassy and crystalline transitions of starch during the treatment, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). For wheat st...

  11. Materials Issues in High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers for Under-Sodium Viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Harris, Robert V.; Baldwin, David L.

    2012-06-12

    Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970's, and, over the intervening 30+ years the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased array 2 MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

  12. Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L.

    2012-05-01

    Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260°C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260°C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

  13. Materials issues in high temperature ultrasonic transducers for under-sodium viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, L. J.; Griffin, J. W.; Posakony, G. J.; Harris, R. V.; Baldwin, D. L.

    2012-05-17

    Liquid sodium is used as the coolant in some fast spectrum nuclear reactors. This material is optically opaque. To facilitate operations and maintenance activities, an ultrasonic under-sodium viewing system has been developed. In the USA, the technology was successfully demonstrated in the 1970s and, over the intervening 30+ years, the capability was lost. This paper reports materials challenges encountered in developing both single-element and linear phased-array 2-MHz transducers that must operate at temperatures up to 260 deg. C. The critical issues are fundamentally material selection: the ability of a transducer to be immersed into liquid sodium and function at 260 deg. C, to achieve wetting and transmission of ultrasound into the sodium, and to be able to be removed and re-used.

  14. Effects of temperature and pressure on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 310S stainless steel in chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yunpan; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Songying; Wang, Ruiyan

    2016-06-01

    310S is an austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications, having strong resistance of oxidation, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) is the main corrosion failure mode for 310S stainless steel. Past researched about SCC of 310S primarily focus on the corrosion mechanism and influence of temperature and corrosive media, but few studies concern the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride. For a better understanding of temperature and pressure's effects on SCC of 310S stainless steel, prepared samples are investigated via slow strain rate tensile test(SSRT) in different temperature and pressure in NACE A solution. The result shows that the SCC sensibility indexes of 310S stainless steel increase with the rise of temperature and reach maximum at 10MPa and 160°C, increasing by 22.3% compared with that at 10 MPa and 80 °C. Instead, the sensibility decreases with the pressure up. Besides, the fractures begin to transform from the ductile fracture to the brittle fracture with the increase of temperature. 310S stainless steel has an obvious tendency of stress corrosion at 10MPa and 160°C and the fracture surface exists cleavage steps, river patterns and some local secondary cracks, having obvious brittle fracture characteristics. The SCC cracks initiate from inclusions and tiny pits in the matrix and propagate into the matrix along the cross section gradually until rupture. In particular, the oxygen and chloride play an important role on the SCC of 310S stainless steel in NACE A solution. The chloride damages passivating film, causing pitting corrosion, concentrating in the cracks and accelerated SSC ultimately. The research reveals the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride on the SCC of 310S, which can be a guide to the application of 310S stainless steel in super-heater tube.

  15. [Inhibition of growth of E. coli cells by anolites of sodium and potassium chloride after processing solutions in a diaphragmatic electrolyzer].

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, A I

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the inhibitory effect of sodium chloride and potassium anolites, obtained in a diaphragm electrolyser, and the physicochemical parameters of solutions was compared with that between the inhibitory effect and physicochemical properties of hypochlorites obtained after treating the solutions in an electrolyser having no diaphragm was compared. The biological activity of solutions containing molecular chlorine, hypochlorous acid, and hypochlorite ions was determined by their effect on the growth of E. coli cells. After a 5-min incubation of cells with each of the oxidizers, the bacterial growth stopped and was not restored during one day. The conclusion is made that the oxidizers irreversibly disturb the barrier properties of cell membranes and, in some cases, destroy cells. In model solutions, as well as in solutions treated after heating on a water bath or after the addition of sodium thiosulfate, a delay in the start of E. coli growth occurs. After the lag-phase, the repair of cells sets on, and after a day the optical density of cells increases and approaches the control. PMID:10079921

  16. Sodium instead of potassium and chloride is an important macronutrient to improve leaf succulence and shoot development for halophyte Sesuvium portulacastrum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongyang; Wang, Haiyan; Han, Bing; Wang, Bin; Guo, Anping; Zheng, Dong; Liu, Chongjing; Chang, Lili; Peng, Ming; Wang, Xuchu

    2012-02-01

    Soil salinity is contributed largely by NaCl but some halophytes such as Sesuvium portulacastrum have evolved to adapt salinity environment and demonstrate optimal development under moderate salinity. To elucidate the detail mechanisms of the great salt tolerance and determine the respective contributions of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) on the development of S. portulacastrum, morphological and physiological analysis were performed using plants supplied with 200 mM of different ions including cations (Na(+), K(+), Li(+)) and anions (Cl(-), NO(3)(-), Ac(-)) respectively. The results revealed that the salt-treated plants accumulated large amounts of sodium in both leaf and stem. There was a greater shoot growth in presence of external Na(+) compared to K(+) and Cl(-). Na(+) was found more effective than K(+) and Cl(-) in cell expansion, leaf succulence, and shoot development. Flame emission and X-Ray microanalysis revealed the relative Na(+) content was much higher than K(+) and Cl(-) in both leaf and stem of well developed S. portulacastrum, leading to a higher Na(+)/K(+) ratio. The effects of different ions on the development of S. portulacastrum were listed as the following: Na(+) > NO(3)(-) > CK > Cl(-) > K(+) > Ac(-) > Li(+). These results demonstrated NaCl toxicity is attributable largely to the effect of Cl(-) but rarely to Na(+), and thus sodium is concluded as a more important macronutrient than potassium and chloride for improving leaf succulence and shoot development of halophyte S. portulacastrum. PMID:22153240

  17. Effects of aluminum chloride on sodium current, transient outward potassium current and delayed rectifier potassium current in acutely isolated rat hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Nie, Aifang; Bai, Wei; Meng, Ziqiang

    2004-09-01

    The effects of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) on sodium current (INa), the transient outward potassium (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats were studied using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. AlCl3 decreased INa, IA, and IK in a partly reversible, dose and voltage-dependent manner. AlCl3 prolonged the time to peak of INa, and increased the inactivation time constants of INa and IA . In addition, 1000 microM AlCl3 shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation of INa, IA and IK toward positive potential, and the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation of INa, IA toward negative potential. These results imply that AlCl3 could affect the activation and inactivation courses of sodium current and potassium current of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, which may contribute to damage of the central nervous system by aluminum. PMID:15234075

  18. The effects of sodium oxybate on core body and skin temperature regulation in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Pijl, Hanno; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert J; Van Someren, Eus J W; Fronczek, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    Patients suffering from narcolepsy type 1 show altered skin temperatures, resembling the profile that is related to sleep onset in healthy controls. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of sodium oxybate, a widely used drug to treat narcolepsy, on the 24-h profiles of temperature and sleep-wakefulness in patients with narcolepsy and controls. Eight hypocretin-deficient male narcolepsy type 1 patients and eight healthy matched controls underwent temperature measurement of core body and proximal and distal skin twice, and the sleep-wake state for 24 h. After the baseline assessment, 2 × 3 g of sodium oxybate was administered for 5 nights, immediately followed by the second assessment. At baseline, daytime core body temperature and proximal skin temperature were significantly lower in patients with narcolepsy (core: 36.8 ± 0.05 °C versus 37.0 ± 0.05 °C, F = 8.31, P = 0.01; proximal: 33.4 ± 0.26 °C versus 34.3 ± 0.26 °C, F = 5.66, P = 0.03). In patients, sodium oxybate administration increased proximal skin temperature during the day (F = 6.46, P = 0.04) to a level similar as in controls, but did not affect core body temperature, distal temperature or distal-proximal temperature gradient. Sodium oxybate administration normalised the predictive value of distal skin temperature and distal-proximal temperature gradient for the onset of daytime naps (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sodium oxybate administration resulted in a partial normalisation of the skin temperature profile, by increasing daytime proximal skin temperature, and by strengthening the known relationship between skin temperature and daytime sleep propensity. These changes seem to be related to the clinical improvement induced by sodium oxybate treatment. A causal relationship is not proven. PMID:25913575

  19. Effect of ambient temperature and sodium bicarbonate supplementation on water and electrolyte balances in dry and lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Khelil-Arfa, H; Faverdin, P; Boudon, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of the interaction between 2 constant ambient temperatures [thermoneutrality (TN; 15°C) and high temperature (HT; 28°C)] and 2 levels of Na bicarbonate supplementation [calculated to provide diet Na contents of 0.20%DM (Na-) and 0.50%DM (Na+)] on water partitioning in dairy cows. Treatments were compared on 4 dry and 4mid-lactation Holstein cows according to 2 Latin squares (1 for each physiological stage) over the course of 4 periods of 15d. Diets consisted of a total mixed ration based on maize silage. Dry cows were restricted to their protein and energy requirements, whereas lactating cows were fed ad libitum. The daily average temperature-humidity index was 59.4 for TN and 73.2 for HT. Lactating and dry cows had higher vaginal temperatures at HT than at TN, but the increase was more pronounced in lactating cows (+1.05 vs. +0.12°C for vaginal temperature, respectively). Dry matter intake (DMI) of lactating cows decreased by 2.3kg/d at HT. Free water intake (FWI) and estimated volume of water lost to evaporation increased at HT in both lactating and dry cows; no interactions were observed between temperature and physiological stage. When expressed as a proportion of DMI, the increase in evaporation that occurred with increasing temperature was completely compensated for by an increase in FWI for both physiological stages. The urinary water excretion increased slightly at HT in lactating cows but not in dry cows, which may be related to the low chloride content of the offered diet. High Na supplementation increased DMI slightly in lactating cows, but milk yield was not affected. Sodium supplementation did not limit the decrease in DMI observed in lactating cows at HT; this observation is likely due to the high diet electrolyte balance of the offered diets. Sodium supplementation increased FWI in lactating cows and urinary flow in both physiological states. The interaction between ambient temperature and Na

  20. Design of High Temperature Ultrasonic Linear Arrays for Under-Sodium Viewing

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Bond, Leonard J.; Jones, Anthony M.; Peters, Timothy J.

    2010-11-07

    This paper summarizes the design process for high temperature ultrasonic phased array transducers for imaging in liquid sodium at temperatures up to 260C. The project is funded by the USDOE Generation IV Reactor Program and includes collaboration with the Japanese Atomic Energy Agency. The transducer system is being designed to be able to provide images inside a sodium cooled fast reactor, to support operation and maintenance activities including potentially location of looseor damaged parts during service outages. The prototype transducer array is being designed for 8 to 16, 3MHz rectangular lead niobate (K-81) or bismuth titanate (K-15) piezoelectric elements spaced at λ/2 (wavelength in sodium). A nickel or nickel alloy faceplate serves as the sodium wetting surface. Scan angle of the focused ultrasonic beam is ±30 degrees. Imaging spatial resolution is ≤ 1mm. The array is designed to be operated using a commercial phased array control system and it is planned that array testing will be performed in room temperature water, hot oil (260C), and molten sodium (260C).

  1. Narrowband sodium lidar for the measurements of mesopause region temperature and wind.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Fang, Xin; Liu, Wei; Gu, Sheng-Yang; Dou, Xiankang

    2012-08-01

    We report here a narrowband high-spectral resolution sodium temperature/wind lidar recently developed at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in Hefei, China (31.5 °N, 117 °E). Patterned after the Colorado State University (CSU) narrowband sodium lidar with a dye laser-based transmitter, the USTC sodium temperature/wind lidar was deployed with a number of technical improvements that facilitate automation and ease of operation; these include a home constructed pulsed dye amplifier (PDA), a beam-steering system, a star-tracking program, and an electronic timing control. With the averaged power of ∼1.2 W output from PDA and the receiving telescope diameter of 0.76 m, our lidar system has a power aperture product of ∼0.55 Wm(2) and is comparable to the CSU and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) sodium lidar systems. The uncertainties of typical measurements induced by photon noise and laser locking fluctuation for the temperature and wind with a 2 km vertical and 15 min temporal resolutions under the nighttime clear sky condition are estimated to be ∼1.0 K and ∼1.5 m/s, respectively, at the sodium peak (e.g., 91 km), and 8 K and 10 m/s, respectively, at both sodium layer edges (e.g., 81 km and 105 km). The USTC narrowband sodium lidar has been operated regularly during the night since November 2011. Using the initial data collected, we demonstrate the reliability and suitability of these high resolution and precision datasets for studying the wave perturbations in the mesopause region. PMID:22859028

  2. Electrochemical studies of hydrogen chloride gas in several room temperature ionic liquids: mechanism and sensing.

    PubMed

    Murugappan, Krishnan; Silvester, Debbie S

    2016-01-28

    The electrochemical behaviour of highly toxic hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas has been investigated in six room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) containing imidazolium/pyrrolidinium cations and range of anions on a Pt microelectrode using cyclic voltammetry (CV). HCl gas exists in a dissociated form of H(+) and [HCl2](-) in RTILs. A peak corresponding to the oxidation of [HCl2](-) was observed, resulting in the formation of Cl2 and H(+). These species were reversibly reduced to H2 and Cl(-), respectively, on the cathodic CV scan. The H(+) reduction peak is also present initially when scanned only in the cathodic direction. In the RTILs with a tetrafluoroborate or hexafluorophosphate anion, CVs indicated a reaction of the RTIL with the analyte/electrogenerated products, suggesting that these RTILs might not be suitable solvents for the detection of HCl gas. This was supported by NMR spectroscopy experiments, which showed that the hexafluorophosphate ionic liquid underwent structural changes after HCl gas electrochemical experiments. The analytical utility was then studied in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C2mim][NTf2]) by utilising both peaks (oxidation of [HCl2](-) and reduction of protons) and linear calibration graphs for current vs. concentration for the two processes were obtained. The reactive behaviour of some ionic liquids clearly shows that the choice of the ionic liquid is very important if employing RTILs as solvents for HCl gas detection. PMID:26697927

  3. Reaction of Chlorine Nitrate with Hydrogen Chloride and Water at Antarctic Stratospheric Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-11-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and hydrogen chloride (HCl) on surfaces that simulate polar stratospheric clouds [ice and nitric acid (HNO3)--ice and sulfuric acid] are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The reaction of ClONO2 on ice and certain mixtures of HNO3 and ice proceeded readily. The sticking coefficient of ClONO2 on ice of 0.009 ± 0.002 was observed. A reaction produced gas-phase hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and condensed-phase HNO3; HOCl underwent a secondary reaction on ice producing dichlorine monoxide (Cl2O). In addition to the reaction with H2O, ClONO2 reacted with HCl on ice to form gas-phase chlorine (Cl2) and condensed-phase HNO3. Essentially all of the HCl in the bulk of the ice can react with ClONO2 on the ice surface. The gaseous products of the above reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  4. Temperature-dependent subconducting states and kinetics of deltamethrin-modified sodium channels of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chinn, K; Narahashi, T

    1989-04-01

    The effects of temperature on the properties of sodium channels from mouse neuroblastoma cells modified by the pyrethroid insecticide deltamethrin were investigated using the patch-clamp technique. The study was aimed at determining various states of modified channels which were expected to be revealed by raising the temperature as a result of an increase in channel activity. After exposure to 10 microM deltamethrin, the decay of whole cell sodium current at -30 mV was drastically slowed. It is expressed by two exponential functions at 11 degrees C and by three exponential functions at room temperature (22 +/- 1 degree C). Thus, raising the temperature reveals a new process. Whole cell sodium tail currents associated with step repolarization from -30 mV to -100 mV were best fit by the sum of two exponential functions both at 11 degrees C and at room temperature. The decay of the summed modified single sodium channel currents at -30 mV was expressed by a single exponential function at 11 degrees C, and by two exponential functions at room temperature. In keeping with these results, the open time histograms show the single (11 degrees C) and double (room temperature) exponential distributions. Thus, raising the temperature allows a new single channel process to be revealed. Other modified open states observed previously at 11 degrees C were also found at room temperature including a flickering state and a subconducting state. In addition, several new subconducting states were found at room temperature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2542881

  5. The detection of μm and sub-μm droplets of aqueous solutions of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Yasuo; Williams, Alan

    μm and sub-μm droplets of aqueous NaCl and Na 2SO 4 solutions were quantitatively identified by a chemical spot technique using thin and ultra-thin films of polyvinyl alcohol-reagent mixture. A comparison has been made between theoretical and experimental calibration curves under various conditions with respect to the thickness of the film and different reagent concentration for the detection of chloride or sulfate. Droplets generated by the atomization of aqueous NaCl or Na 2SO 4 solution were collected on these polyvinyl alcohol-reagent films. The spots impressed on the films were measured by an optical microscope. Calibration curves relating the spot and droplet diameters were experimentally measured. It was found that each of the calibration curves could be expressed by a relation Dd3 = Kd2s, where Dd is the volume average diameter of the droplets, ds the surface average diameter of the spots and K is a calibration curve constant. The meaning of K is discussed. A linear relationship has been found between the ratio of an experimental calibration curve constant to a theoretical one and the concentration of the reagent in the film. Then the following equation was obtained: K (exptl)/K (theor.) = 0.29A , where A is the concentration of the reagent in the film (molℓ -1). This equation is useful in estimating the values of different experimental calibration curve constants. The minimum diameter of the droplets that can be identified by this technique is 0.2 μm.

  6. Shuttle suppression in room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries using ion selective polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Bauer, I; Kohl, M; Althues, H; Kaskel, S

    2014-03-25

    A sodiated Nafion-coating on a porous polypropylene backbone was used as a cation selective separator for room temperature sodium-sulfur batteries. The capacity of the cells after 20 cycles could be enhanced by 75% to 350 mA h g(sulfur)(-1) using the new separator. PMID:24522659

  7. Sodium Line Reversal Plasma Temperature Measurement System. Topical report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, T.; Bauman, L.; Benton, R.

    1993-09-01

    The Sodium Line Reversal System is one of the advanced optical diagnostic instruments developed at DIAL to measure temperatures in the coal combustion environments of large scale facilities. The principles of operation, a description of the system and its capabilities, and the operational details of this instrument are presented in this report.

  8. Corrosion-electrochemical properties of the anodic oxide films formed on aluminum in a chloride-nitrate melt in a 0.5 M Aqueous NaCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshina, L. A.; Malkov, V. B.; Kudyakov, V. Ya.; Gnedenkov, S. V.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Egorkin, V. S.; Mashtalyar, D. V.

    2014-02-01

    The corrosion-electrochemical behavior of aluminum is studied in a chloride-nitrate melt containing 50 wt % eutectic mixture of cesium and sodium chlorides and 50 wt % sodium nitrate in the temperature range 790-900 K in an argon atmosphere.

  9. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  10. Influence of Temperature and Chloride Concentration on Passivation Mechanism and Corrosion of a DSS2209 Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachemi, Hania; Azzaz, Mohamed; Djeghlal, Mohamed Elamine

    2016-08-01

    The passivity behavior of a 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, Mott-Schottky analysis and EIS measurements. In order to evaluate the contribution of temperature, chloride concentration and microstructure, a sequence of polarization tests were carried out in aerated NaCl solutions selected according to robust design of a three level-three factors Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. Analysis of signal-to-noise ratio and ANOVA were achieved on all measured data, and the contribution of every control factor was estimated. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 2209 duplex stainless steel welded joint is related to the evolution of the passive film formed on the surface. It was found that the passive film on the welded zone possessed n- and p-type semiconductor characteristics. With the increase of solution temperature and chlorides concentration, the corrosion resistance of the passive film is more affected in the weldment than in the base metal.

  11. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb 2+) with chloride Pb+nCl↔PbCln2-nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO 4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0-6 m) and temperature (15-45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations:

  12. Catalytic destruction of perchlorate in ferric chloride and hydrochloric acid solution with control of temperature, pressure and chemical reagents

    DOEpatents

    Gu, Baohua; Cole, David R.; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2004-10-05

    A method is described to decompose perchlorate in a FeCl.sub.3 /HCl aqueous solution such as would be used to regenerate an anion exchange resin used to remove perchlorate. The solution is mixed with a reducing agent, preferably an organic alcohol and/or ferrous chloride, and can be heated to accelerate the decomposition of perchlorate. Lower temperatures may be employed if a catalyst is added.

  13. Temperature and density dependence of the shear viscosity of liquid sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N.; Xu, H.; Wax, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    The density and temperature dependence of the shear viscosity of liquid sodium is studied. The stress autocorrelation function is calculated by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which allow us to obtain the value of shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formula. The Fiolhais potential is used to calculate the interionic interactions, which are validated by comparison between simulation and experimental data along the liquid-gas coexistence curve. The behavior of viscosity over a wide range of the liquid phase of the phase diagram is studied. Along isochoric lines, it presents a minimum, while it monotonically increases along isotherms. An expression is proposed for the viscosity as a function of temperature and density which reproduces our data for liquid sodium at any density in the range [1000-2000 kg m-3 ] and any temperature in the range [700-7000 K]. The validity of the Stokes-Einstein relation over the investigated state points is discussed.

  14. Penetration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Sodium Chloride and Its Relation to the Mechanism of Optical Effects1

    PubMed Central

    Matula, Tibor I.; Macleod, Robert A.

    1969-01-01

    When cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were suspended in solutions containing increasing concentrations of NaCl, the optical density (OD) of the suspensions measured within 30 sec was found to increase in proportion to the increase in salt concentration. Measurement of intracellular fluid volumes indicated that the volume of the cells decreased roughly in proportion to the increase in salt concentration. After the initial increase in optical density, there was a slow decrease at all concentrations of NaCl tested except the highest, 500 mm. Metabolic inhibitors such as sodium azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol prevented the decrease. Direct analysis showed that the Na+ and Cl− concentrations in the cells were 86 and 77%, respectively, of the concentrations of the ions in the suspending medium after 1 hr. Measurement of the 22Na space in packed cells showed that Na+ penetrated the total fluid space in the packed cells. The penetration of 22Na was not prevented by the presence of metabolic inhibitors or by 500 mm NaCl in the suspending medium. The results indicate that the OD increases produced in suspensions of P. aeruginosa by NaCl are not due to the osmotic action of the salt. The subsequent optical density decreases observed are under metabolic control. PMID:4981061

  15. PREDICTIVE MODEL FOR THE COMBINED EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, SODIUM LACTATE, AND SODIUM DIACETATE ON THE HEAT RESISTANCE OF LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN BEEF

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects and interactions of heating temperature (60 - 73.9C), sodium lactate (NaL; 0.0 - 4.8%, w/w) and/or sodium diacetate SDA; 0.0 - 0.25%, w/w) on the heat resistance of a five-strain mixture of Listeria monocytogenes in 75% lean ground beef were examined. Thermal death times were determined...

  16. Sodium blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods. The most common form of sodium is sodium chloride, which is table salt. This test is usually done as part of an electrolyte or basic metabolic panel blood test . Your blood sodium level represents a balance between the sodium and ...

  17. Evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in an alkaline NaCl solution with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and lanthanum chloride inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Biner; Wang, Yishan; Zuo, Yu

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in 0.58 g L-1 NaCl solution (pH 10) with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS) and lanthanum chloride inhibitors was studied with electrochemical and surface analysis methods. With the addition of the compounded LaCl3 and SDBS inhibitors, in the early stage the polarization behavior of AA 2024-T3 changed from active corrosion to passivation, and both the general corrosion and pitting corrosion were inhibited. However, with the immersion time extended, the passive behavior gradually disappeared and pitting happened at the Cu-rich phases. After 24 h immersion, the compounded inhibitors still showed good inhibition for general corrosion, but the polarization curve again presented the characteristic similar to active polarization. The compounded inhibitors also inhibited the pitting corrosion to some extent. The acting mechanism of the inhibitors SDBS and La3Cl on the corrosion process of AA 2024-T3 in the test solution was discussed.

  18. The study of the varying characteristics of cathodic regions for defective coating in 3.5% sodium chloride solution by EIS and WBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haijie; Wang, Jia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The current distributions over carbon steel under iron red alkyd primer exposed to 3.5% sodium chloride solution were mapped using the wire beam electrode (WBE). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) of the WBE was carried out to analyze the performance of coating delamination and corrosion behavior of carbon steel beneath defective coating. The EIS data revealed that protective capability of coating decreased with immersion time and the degree of cathodic delamination showed a rapid rise. The current density distribution of WBE indicated that cathodic sites was located at the defect at the beginning of immersion and gradually spread into the intact coating. The cathodic regions were distinguished from the anodic area and distributed over the WBE. The changes of cathodic sites could reflect the deterioration process of defective coating. The cathodic area ratio was a more useful parameter than the cathodic delamination degree to evaluate the coating cathodic delamination. The polarity reversals of electrodes at the defect and beneath coating were observed. A simple discussion of relationship between the blister and the polarity reversal was made from a standpoint of electrochemical distribution. WBE method was able to map and record the changes of local cathodic sites beneath defective coating in real time, which could provide more detailed information about the local degradation of coating.

  19. Effect of chlorine, sodium chloride, trisodium phosphate, and ultraviolet radiation on the reduction of Yersinia enterocolitica and mesophilic aerobic bacteria from eggshell surface.

    PubMed

    Favier, G L; Escudero, M E; de Guzman, A M

    2001-10-01

    Eggshell sanitizing practices are necessary to improve microbiological safety of fresh hen eggs and their products. In this work, the effects of 100 mg/liter free chlorine (chl), 3% sodium chloride (NaCl), 1, 5, and 12% trisodium phosphate (TSP) in wash solutions, and UVR (ultraviolet radiation; 4.573 microW/cm2) were studied at different times on uninoculated and Yersinia enterocolitica-inoculated eggs. On uninoculated eggs, the best results were obtained with 100 mg/liter chlorine and UV exposure for >25 min, with reductions of 1.28 and 1.60 log cycles, respectively, compared to the average bacterial count (4.55 log CFU/egg) on the control (untreated eggs). On Y. enterocolitica-inoculated eggs, highest reductions of the average bacterial count (7.35 log CFU/egg) were obtained with 5 and 12% TSP and 100 mg/liter chl. The decrease obtained with 12% TSP (3.74-log reduction) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those obtained with the remaining treatments. Y. enterocolitica was more resistant to UVR than the eggshell natural mesophilic aerobic microflora, except when low inoculum (4.39 log CFU/egg) was assayed. Changes in eggshell microstructure were measured by the blue lake staining method. The presence of Yersinia and Salmonella in eggshell natural flora was also investigated. PMID:11601717

  20. Hypotonicity Stimulates Potassium Flux through the WNK-SPAK/OSR1 Kinase Cascade and the Ncc69 Sodium-Potassium-2-Chloride Cotransporter in the Drosophila Renal Tubule*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yipin; Schellinger, Jeffrey N.; Huang, Chou-Long; Rodan, Aylin R.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to osmoregulate is fundamental to life. Adult Drosophila melanogaster maintain hemolymph osmolarity within a narrow range. Osmolarity modulates transepithelial ion and water flux in the Malpighian (renal) tubules of the fly, which are in direct contact with hemolymph in vivo, but the mechanisms causing increased transepithelial flux in response to hypotonicity are unknown. Fly renal tubules secrete a KCl-rich fluid. We have previously demonstrated a requirement for Ncc69, the fly sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC), in tubule K+ secretion. Mammalian NKCCs are regulated by a kinase cascade consisting of the with-no-lysine (WNK) and Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich (SPAK)/oxidative stress response (OSR1) kinases. Here, we show that decreasing Drosophila WNK activity causes a reduction in K+ flux. Similarly, knocking down the SPAK/OSR1 homolog fray also decreases K+ flux. We demonstrate that a hierarchical WNK-Fray signaling cascade regulates K+ flux through Ncc69, because (i) a constitutively active Fray mutant rescues the wnk knockdown phenotype, (ii) Fray directly phosphorylates Ncc69 in vitro, and (iii) the effect of wnk and fray knockdown is abolished in Ncc69 mutants. The stimulatory effect of hypotonicity on K+ flux is absent in wnk, fray, or Ncc69 mutant tubules, suggesting that the Drosophila WNK-SPAK/OSR1-NKCC cascade is an essential molecular pathway for osmoregulation, through its effect on transepithelial ion flux and fluid generation by the renal tubule. PMID:25086033

  1. The effect of Perasafe and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) against spores of Clostridium difficile and Bacillus atrophaeus on stainless steel and polyvinyl chloride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Block, C

    2004-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important cause of nosocomial diarrhoea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential for Perasafe, a recently introduced biocide, to contribute to control of C. difficile spores in the patient environment, in comparison with the chlorine-releasing agent sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC). These agents were evaluated against a water control, in a surface test on stainless steel and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) floor covering, materials commonly found in the hospital environment. The organisms studied were a toxigenic clinical isolate of C. difficile, and Bacillus atrophaeus (formerly B. subtilis var niger). The data indicate that in our in vitro system, Perasafe was significantly more active than NaDCC (1000 ppm available chlorine) against C. difficile spores dried on stainless steel surfaces, and against B. atrophaeus on PVC floor covering material, achieving mean log10 reduction factors in viable counts of 6 and 5.5, respectively, at 10 min exposures. Perasafe appeared to be less lethal in 10 min exposures to C. difficile spores fixed on PVC floor covering material. In general, 1000 ppm chlorine generated from NaDCC showed lower log10 reduction factors in viable counts at 10 min, ranging from 0.7 to 1.5, than Perasafe which ranged from 2.7 to 6.0. The potential efficacy of Perasafe in reducing the density of C. difficile spores in the patient environment in hospitals, nursing homes or other long-stay facilities should be evaluated in field studies. PMID:15183245

  2. Corrosion resistance of AA6063-Type Al-Mg-Si alloy by silicon carbide in sodium chloride solution for marine application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayomi, Ojo Sunday Isaac; Abdulwahab, Malik; Popoola, Abimbola Patricia Idowu; Asuke, Ferdinand

    2015-12-01

    The present work focused on corrosion inhibition of AA6063 type (Al-Mg-Si) alloy in sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with a silicon carbide inhibitor, using the potentiodynamic electrochemical method. The aluminium alloy surface morphology was examined, in the as-received and as-corroded in the un-inhibited state, with scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The results obtained via linear polarization indicated a high corrosion potential for the unprotected as-received alloy. Equally, inhibition efficiency as high as 98.82% at 10.0 g/v silicon carbide addition was obtained with increased polarization resistance ( R p), while the current density reduced significantly for inhibited samples compared to the un-inhibited aluminium alloy. The adsorption mechanism of the inhibitor aluminium alloy follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. This shows that the corrosion rate of aluminium alloy with silicon carbide in NaCl environment decreased significantly with addition of the inhibitor.

  3. Comparison of the DiSCmini aerosol monitor to a handheld condensation particle counter and a scanning mobility particle sizer for submicrometer sodium chloride and metal aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Jessica B.; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the robust, lightweight DiSCmini (DM) aerosol monitor for its ability to measure the concentration and mean diameter of submicrometer aerosols. Tests were conducted with monodispersed and polydispersed aerosols composed of two particle types (sodium chloride, NaCl, and spark generated metal particles, which simulate particles found in welding fume) at three different steady-state concentration ranges (Low, <103; Medium, 103–104; and High, >104 particles/cm3). Particle number concentration, lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration, and mean size measured with the DM were compared to those measured with reference instruments, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). Particle number concentrations measured with the DM were within 21% of those measured by reference instruments for polydisperse aerosols. Poorer agreement was observed for monodispersed aerosols (±35% for most tests and +130% for 300-nm NaCl). LDSA concentrations measured by the DM were 96% to 155% of those estimated with the SMPS. The geometric mean diameters measured with the DM were within 30% of those measured with the SMPS for monodispersed aerosols and within 25% for polydispersed aerosols (except for the case when the aerosol contained a substantial number of particles larger than 300 nm). The accuracy of the DM is reasonable for particles smaller than 300 nm but caution should be exercised when particles larger than 300 nm are present. PMID:23473056

  4. Experimental evidence for the participation of deep eutectic solvents in silver chloride crystal formation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Jitkumar; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-05-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) obtained by the complexation of choline chloride (ChoCl) as hydrogen bond acceptor and hydrogen bond donors such as ethylene glycol (ChoCl-EG 1:2) and glycerol (ChoCl-Gly 1:2) were used as media for the formation of AgCl crystals. Although formation of AgCl crystals was observed in both the solvents but the rate of formation of crystals was faster in ChoCl-EG 1:2 at low temperature (4-5 °C). In the crystals, cholinium cations were found to be present with chloride ions bridged with Ag ions resulting generation of 1D network of AgCl2 anions.

  5. Stability of succinylcholine chloride injection.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, C W; Mühlebach, S F

    1991-03-01

    The stability of succinylcholine chloride injection prepared by a hospital pharmacy was studied under a wide variety of conditions. Batches of succinylcholine chloride injection 10 mg/mL containing sodium chloride, methyl-4-hydroxybenzoate, hydrochloric acid, and water were prepared. Samples were tested for the effect of initial pH (3.0 and 4.2) and sterilization (steam treatment at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes and 121 degrees C for 20 minutes) on stability after three weeks; long-term stability under refrigeration (12, 17, and 23 months of storage at 4 degrees C); and the effect of storage temperature (4-6 degrees C, 20-26 degrees C, 35 degrees C, and 70 degrees C) and light exposure at various intervals up to 12 months. Samples were analyzed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Unlike heating at 121 degrees C, heating at 100 degrees C produced no significant loss of succinylcholine chloride, independent of the initial pH. Succinylcholine chloride was hydrolyzed only minimally over 23 months if the solution was stored at 4-6 degrees C. A 10% loss of drug content occurred if solutions were kept at 20-26 degrees C for five months, at 35 degrees C for one month, or at 70 degrees C for one day. Initial degradation was slowed if the solution was protected from light. The assessments by TLC proved to be more sensitive than the HPLC measurements. Succinylcholine chloride injection sterilized at 100 degrees C for 30 minutes can be stored for up to five months at room temperature if protected from light. The preparation is stable for at least two years under refrigeration. PMID:2028996

  6. Molecular structure and dynamics of an aqueous sodium chloride solution in nano-pores between portlandite surfaces: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Dongshuai, Hou; Zeyu, Lu; Peng, Zhang; Qingjun, Ding

    2016-01-21

    Portlandite plays an important role in the hydration phase of cement-based materials and influences the strength and durability of such materials. This study describes a molecular dynamics study of the structure and dynamics of water and ions confined at ambient temperature in calcium hydroxyl nanopores with widths of 35 Å. Strong layering of water in the vicinity of the (001) surface of portlandite demonstrates special structural features such as large density, good orientation preference, ordered interfacial organization and low diffusion rate. Due to the fixed vibration and rotation of the hydroxyl groups at the interface, water molecules within the first adsorbed layer adopt both H-downward and H-upward orientations by donating H-bonds and accepting H-bonds from the OH groups in the solid surface. Regarding the interaction of the ions and portlandite, Na(+) ions, deeply rooted in spaces in the surface hydroxyl groups, are significantly slowed and remain near the surface for long periods of time. On the other hand, due to the weak H-bonds formed by chloride ions and hydroxyl groups, adsorbed chloride ions near the surface cannot remain for longer times. In addition, when water and ions are confined in the nano-pores, the residence time for the ion-water and ion-ion clusters is lengthened so that the ion adsorption capability of the porlandite surface is enhanced due to the stable Na-Cl connections in the electrolyte solution. PMID:26687688

  7. Elasticity and structure of sodium disilicate glass at high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, T.; Kono, Y.; Sakamaki, T.; Jing, Z.; Wang, Y.; Shen, G.

    2012-12-01

    Studying the structures and physical properties of silicate melts under extreme conditions is essential for understanding the dynamics of the earth's interior. A complete understanding of physical and thermodynamic properties of melts at high pressures requires systematic studies from low temperature (super-cooled state - glass) to high temperature (liquid state - melt). In this study, we focus on the super-cooled liquid. Sodium disilicate (Na2Si2O5) glass is a good model material for studying basalt magma since they have similar ratios of non-bridging oxygen to tetrahedrally coordinated cations (NBO/T). Synthesized sodium disilicate glass was loaded into a Paris-Edinburgh (PE) cell and pressed up to 4.5GPa and heated up to 1000oC at the HPCAT beamline 16-BM-B of the Advanced Photon Source. Elastic wave travel times of the amorphous sample were collected using the ultrasonic pulse reflection method with a 10o Y-cut LiNbO3 transducer. X-ray radiographs were used to determine the elastic wave travel distance. Room temperature velocity results show minimum velocity values between 2-3 GPa for both the longitudinal wave velocity (Vp) and the transverse wave velocity (Vs), similar pressure dependence of elastic wave velocities at ambient temperature have also been observed in pure SiO2 from previous studies. Under high pressure (3 GPa), both Vp and Vs for sodium disilicate glass remain nearly constant with increasing temperature before the glass transition temperature (~700oC at ambient pressure). An 8.7% drop in Vp and a 11.9% drop in Vs were observed above the glass transition temperature. Structure information of the glass sample has recently been collected and the results will be presented in the context of observed velocity drops. We acknowledge the supports of COMPRES on facility development, of GSECARS for the Paris-Edinburgh press system, and of HPCAT for elastic wave velocity measurement developments.

  8. Organic electrolytes for sodium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestergaard, B.

    1992-09-01

    A summary of earlier given status reports in connection with the project on organic electrolytes for sodium batteries is presented. The aim of the investigations was to develop new room temperature molten salts electrolytes mainly with radical substituted heterocyclic organic chlorides mixed with aluminum chloride. The new electrolytes should have an ionic conductivity comparable with MEIC1:AlCl3 or better. A computer model program MOPAC (Molecular Orbital Package) was to be included to calculate theoretically reduction potentials for a variety of organic cations. Furthermore, MOPAC could be utilized to predict the electron densities, and then give a prediction of the stability of the organic cation.

  9. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Suresh, K. G.

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300 K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} was observed near 300 K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300 K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300 K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62 K at 280 K.

  10. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of β"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  11. Temperature dependent structural and spectroscopic studies of sodium gallosilicate nitrite sodalite

    SciTech Connect

    Gesing, Thorsten M.; Schmidt, Burkhard C.; Murshed, M. Mangir

    2010-11-15

    We report on temperature dependent crystal structures of sodium gallosilicate nitrite sodalite Na{sub 8}[GaSiO{sub 4}]{sub 6}(NO{sub 2}){sub 2} between 293 and 973 K. The crystal structures were refined from X-ray powder data Rietveld refinements in the space group P4-bar 3n. The gallium and silicon atoms on the tetrahedral framework positions are totally ordered. The nitrite anion was found slightly away from the center of the sodalite cage, which is tetrahedrally surrounded by four sodium atoms. The linear thermal expansion coefficient was calculated from the lattice expansion data. The change of the geometries of the framework has been observed on heating the polycrystalline sample, that is, T-O bond lengths slightly decreased, T-O-T angle non-linearly increased, tilt of the TO{sub 4} tetrahedra decreased (framework untwist) and their tetragonal tetrahedral distortion decreased with some scatterings. Of particular note, the tetragonal tetrahedra distortion of GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra approached close to zero at higher temperatures, which points to a distortion direction to a relaxed state of GaO{sub 4} tetrahedra on heating. The mobility of sodium atoms above 600 K leads to different sodium content in some sodalite cages and results in the appearance of different domains. The consequence of this domain formation to the strain of the crystalline system and to the average crystals size have been explained. Both Fourier transform infrared and micro-Raman spectra showed typical absorption bands of nitrite sodalite. The change of the frequency shift and full-width at half-maximum of some selected bands has been studied as function of temperature.

  12. Solubility of some alkali and alkaline earth chlorides in water at moderate temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clynne, M.A.; Potter, R.W., II

    1979-01-01

    Solubilities for the binary systems, salt-H2O, of the chlorides of lithium, rubidium, cesium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, and barium from near 0??C to the saturated boiling point are reported. The experimental data and coefficients of an equation for a smoothed curve describing each system are listed in the tables. The data are improvements on those previously reported in the literature, having a precision on the average of ??0.09%.

  13. Selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue to levulinic acid in an aluminum trichloride-sodium chloride system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianmei; Jiang, Zhicheng; Hu, Libin; Hu, Changwei

    2014-09-01

    Increased energy consumption and environmental concerns have driven efforts to produce chemicals from renewable biomass with high selectivity. Here, the selective conversion of cellulose in corncob residue, a process waste from the production of xylose, to levulinic acid was carried out using AlCl3 as catalyst and NaCl as promoter by a hydrothermal method at relatively low temperature. A levulinic acid yield of 46.8 mol% was obtained, and the total selectivity to levulinic acid with formic acid was beyond 90%. NaCl selectively promoted the dissolution of cellulose from corncob residue, and significantly improved the yield and selectivity to levulinic acid by inhibiting lactic acid formation in the subsequent dehydration process. Owing to the salt effect of NaCl, the obtained levulinic acid could be efficiently extracted to tetrahydrofuran from aqueous solution. The aqueous solution with AlCl3 and NaCl could be recycled 4 times. Because of the limited conversion of lignin, this process allows for the production of levulinic acid with high selectivity directly from corncob residue in a simple separation process. PMID:25045141

  14. Vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + calcium chloride, + ammonium iodide, and + sodium iodide at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Terano, Tamotsu; Nishi, Yasuharu; Tokunaga, Junji

    1995-03-01

    Recently, an alternative extractive distillation using a salt as extractive solvent has attracted attention. Vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + CaCl{sub 2}, + NH{sub 4}I, and + NaI were measured at 298.15 {+-} 0.05 K using a static method. The data obtained in this apparatus were confirmed by comparison with the literature data of ethanol + water and ethanol + water + CaCl{sub 2} and tested for thermodynamic consistency. Any salt used in this work exerted salting-in effect on the methanol + ethanol system, the magnitude of which was CaCl{sub 2} > NaI > NH{sub 4}I. The observed data were correlated by use of Hala`s equation, and {beta} was determined for each system. The calculated result of each system reproduced experimental data within an accuracy of {+-}2.12% in vapor-phase mole fraction. From the results of comparison of {beta} obtained in this work with the kind of salt additive for methanol + ethanol and ethanol + water systems, it was found that {beta} depended mainly on the kind of salt but not on the kind of solvent mixture. The application of Hala`s model for an alcohol + alcohol + salt system was confirmed at a temperature of 298.15 K.

  15. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacret, N.; Moysan, J.; Ploix, M. A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Corneloup, G.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the French R&D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 °C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlabin order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  16. Analysis of Environmental Effects on Leaf Temperature under Sunlight, High Pressure Sodium and Light Emitting Diodes

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jacob A.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The use of LED technology is commonly assumed to result in significantly cooler leaf temperatures than high pressure sodium technology. To evaluate the magnitude of this effect, we measured radiation incident to and absorbed by a leaf under four radiation sources: clear sky sunlight in the field, sunlight in a glass greenhouse, and indoor plants under either high pressure sodium or light emitting diodes. We then applied a common mechanistic energy-balance model to compare leaf to air temperature difference among the radiation sources and environments. At equal photosynthetic photon flux, our results indicate that the effect of plant water status and leaf evaporative cooling is much larger than the effect of radiation source. If plants are not water stressed, leaves in all four radiation sources were typically within 2°C of air temperature. Under clear sky conditions, cool sky temperatures mean that leaves in the field are always cooler than greenhouse or indoor plants-when photosynthetic photon flux, stomatal conductance, wind speed, vapor pressure deficit, and leaf size are equivalent. As water stress increases and cooling via transpiration decreases, leaf temperatures can increase well above air temperature. In a near-worst case scenario of water stress and low wind, our model indicates that leaves would increase 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12°C above air temperature under field, LED, greenhouse, and HPS scenarios, respectively. Because LED fixtures emit much of their heat through convection rather than radiative cooling, they result in slightly cooler leaf temperatures than leaves in greenhouses and under HPS fixtures, but the effect of LED technology on leaf temperature is smaller than is often assumed. Quantifying the thermodynamic outputs of these lamps, and their physiological consequences, will allow both researchers and the horticulture industry to make informed decisions when employing these technologies. PMID:26448613

  17. Analysis of Environmental Effects on Leaf Temperature under Sunlight, High Pressure Sodium and Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jacob A; Bugbee, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The use of LED technology is commonly assumed to result in significantly cooler leaf temperatures than high pressure sodium technology. To evaluate the magnitude of this effect, we measured radiation incident to and absorbed by a leaf under four radiation sources: clear sky sunlight in the field, sunlight in a glass greenhouse, and indoor plants under either high pressure sodium or light emitting diodes. We then applied a common mechanistic energy-balance model to compare leaf to air temperature difference among the radiation sources and environments. At equal photosynthetic photon flux, our results indicate that the effect of plant water status and leaf evaporative cooling is much larger than the effect of radiation source. If plants are not water stressed, leaves in all four radiation sources were typically within 2°C of air temperature. Under clear sky conditions, cool sky temperatures mean that leaves in the field are always cooler than greenhouse or indoor plants-when photosynthetic photon flux, stomatal conductance, wind speed, vapor pressure deficit, and leaf size are equivalent. As water stress increases and cooling via transpiration decreases, leaf temperatures can increase well above air temperature. In a near-worst case scenario of water stress and low wind, our model indicates that leaves would increase 6°, 8°, 10°, and 12°C above air temperature under field, LED, greenhouse, and HPS scenarios, respectively. Because LED fixtures emit much of their heat through convection rather than radiative cooling, they result in slightly cooler leaf temperatures than leaves in greenhouses and under HPS fixtures, but the effect of LED technology on leaf temperature is smaller than is often assumed. Quantifying the thermodynamic outputs of these lamps, and their physiological consequences, will allow both researchers and the horticulture industry to make informed decisions when employing these technologies. PMID:26448613

  18. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow in the sodium chloride-water system with applications to seafloor hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kayla C.

    simulation results, and is shown to be largely in agreement with those results. Additionally, code output from an approximately one-dimensional scenario is compared to the analytic solution of the classical one-dimensional thermal advection-diffusion equation, and it is found that the numerical output and analytic solution are in strong agreement. A number of simulation results are presented in the context of two-phase flow and phase separation within the framework of the single pass model, a model that has been shown to be useful in the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. It is found that a quasi-stable two-phase (liquid + vapor) zone at depth below the hydrothermal discharge outlet gives rise to vent fluid with lower than normal seawater salinity. Additionally, it is shown that increasing the spatial extent of the two-phase zone can lower vent fluid salinity, even with the average temperature of the two-phase zone held constant. As the two-phase zone evolves, brine of high salinity and density collects at the bottom of the system and is held there primarily via the effect of vapor on the liquid phase's relative permeability; however, it is found that lowering the temperature of the heat source until the two-phase zone vanishes and allowing the system to evolve for some time results in the flushing of this brine from the system. The resulting pattern of vent fluid salinities resembles that described in a widely held conceptual model of vent fluid salinity variation in seafloor hydrothermal systems, where low salinity fluids emerge from venting systems during early stages, and high salinity fluids emerge at later stages as brine is flushed from the system. The effect of varying the permeability is investigated, and it is found that peaks in vent fluid salinities occur later in time for lower permeabilities than one might expect for a simple linear relationship. Finally, it is argued that the numerical approach used in this thesis may be able to explain the vent fluid

  19. Concomitant administration of sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulphonate (DMPS) and diphenyl diselenide reduces effectiveness of DMPS in restoring damage induced by mercuric chloride in mice.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Ricardo; Borges, Lysandro Pinto; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2009-08-01

    The effect of combined therapy with diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)(2) and sodium 2,3-dimercapto-propane-1-sulphonate (DMPS) against alterations induced by mercury (Hg(2+)) was evaluated. Mice were exposed to mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) (1mg/kg, subcutaneously) for two weeks. After that, mice received (PhSe)(2) (15.6 mg/kg), or DMPS (12.6 mg/kg), or a combination of both for one week. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), ascorbic acid and Hg(2+) levels and glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities were carried out in kidney. Hematological parameters, plasmatic bilirubin, uric acid, urea and creatinine levels as well as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. (PhSe)(2) or DMPS restored the increase in LDH activity and TBARS, bilirubin, uric acid, urea and creatinine levels caused by HgCl(2). The levels of erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit reduced by HgCl(2) exposure were restored by (PhSe)(2) or DMPS administration in mice. Leukocyte and platelet counts modified by HgCl(2) exposure were restored by (PhSe)(2) or DMPS therapy. DMPS restored the increase in Hg(2+) levels induced by exposure to HgCl(2). Concomitant administration of (PhSe)(2) and DMPS reduced the effectiveness of DMPS in restoring damage induced by HgCl(2). Combined therapy with (PhSe)(2) and DMPS was less effective than isolated therapies in restoring the damage induced by HgCl(2) in mice. PMID:19406194

  20. Effects of a mouthwash containing potassium nitrate, sodium fluoride, and cetylpyridinium chloride on dentin hypersensitivity: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the efficacy of a mouthwash containing potassium nitrate (KNO3) as its main component, along with sodium fluoride (NaF) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). The primary endpoint was the relief of dentin hypersensitivity (DH) against the cold stimuli. The effects on other DH tests and periodontal inflammation were also evaluated. Methods We used a single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized design. A total of 82 patients with DH (40 in the test group, 42 placebo controls) were analyzed using visual analog scales (VASs) for a cold test, a tactile test, a compressive air test, and self-reported pain during daily activities, as well as clinical parameters including plaque index, gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index (mSBI), gingival recession, and probing depth, which were collected at baseline and after four and six weeks of mouthwash use. Results VAS scores for cold sensations, tactile sensations, the compressive air test, and self-reported pain significantly decreased from baseline during the six weeks in both groups (P<0.01), and no significant differences between the groups were found. In male patients (10 in the test group and 7 in the control group), both groups showed significant reductions in VAS scores for the cold test over the six weeks, and greater reductions were found in the test group than in the control group between four and six weeks (P=0.01) and between baseline and six weeks (P<0.01). In addition, the mSBI in the test group significantly decreased from baseline during the six weeks (P<0.01), and the changes at four and six weeks from baseline were significantly greater in the test group compared to the control group (P=0.03 and P=0.02, respectively). Conclusions A mouthwash containing a mixture of KNO3, NaF, and CPC reduced DH and gingival inflammation, however, the efficacy was comparable to the control group. PMID:26937293

  1. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-02-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  2. Effect of bicarbonate ion additives on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride solution

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.J.; Pyun, S.I.; Lee, W.J.; Kim, H.P.

    1999-04-01

    The effect of bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) on pitting corrosion of type 316L stainless steel (SS, UNS S3 1603) was investigated in aqueous 0.5 M sodium chloride (NaCl) solution using potentiodynamic polarization, the abrading electrode technique, alternating current (AC) impedance spectroscopy combined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions extended the passive potential region in width and, at the same time, raised the pitting potential in value on the potentiodynamic polarization curve. Potentiostatic current transients obtained from the moment just after interrupting the abrading action showed the repassivation rate of propagating pits increased and that the pit growth rate decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Over the whole applied potential, the oxide film resistance was higher in the presence of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions. The pit number density decreased with increasing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ion concentration. Moreover, addition of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions to NaCl solutions retarded lateral pit growth, while promoting downward pit growth from the surface. The bare surface of the specimen repassivated preferentially along the pit mouth and walls, compared to the pit bottom, as a result of formation of a surface film with a high content of protective mixed ferrous-chromous carbonate ([Fe,Cr]CO{sub 3}) that formed from preferential adsorption of HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ions.

  3. The effect of different topical agents (silver sulfadiazine, povidone-iodine, and sodium chloride 0.9%) on burn injuries in rats.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Emir Burak; Yıldırım, Alpagan Mustafa; Bal, Ali; Kuloglu, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    It was aimed to comparatively evaluate the effects of dressing methods with silver sulfadiazine, povidone-iodine, and saline which have a common use in routine practices for burn injuries. Twenty-eight Sprague Dawley adult female rats were used in this study. All the rats were divided into 4 groups: the control group, the povidone-iodine group, the saline group, and the silver sulfadiazine group. On each rat, a second degree burn which covered less than 10% of the body surface area was created under general anesthesia by a metal comb including four probes with 2 × 1 cm area. The control group did not have any treatment during the experiment. Povidone-iodine, saline, and silver sulfadiazine administrations were performed under ether anesthesia every day. On 0, 7th, 14th, and 21st days of the study, tissue samples were taken for histological analyses. The sections taken from the paraffin blocks were stained and avidin-biotin-peroxidase method was used for collagen immune-reactivity. In the light microscope analyses, number of inflammatory cells, vascularization, fibroblast proliferation, collagen formation and epithelialization were evaluated histologically in all groups and analysed statistically. The agents that we used for injury healing in the treatment groups did not show any significant better results in comparison with the control group. In conclusion, further studies with the use of sodium chloride, silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine by creating deeper and/or larger burn injury models are needed in order to accept these agents in routine treatment. PMID:25328700

  4. Synergistic bactericidal action of phytic acid and sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells protected by a biofilm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Hee; Rhee, Min Suk

    2016-06-16

    The food industry must prevent the build-up of strong Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilms in food processing environments. The present study examined the bactericidal action of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran and the hulls/peels of legumes, against E. coli O157:H7 biofilms. The synergistic bactericidal effects of PA plus sodium chloride (NaCl) were also examined. E. coli O157:H7 biofilms were allowed for form on stainless steel coupons by culture in both rich (tryptic soy broth, TSB) and minimal (M9) medium at 22°C for 6days. Bacterial cells within biofilms grown in M9 medium were significantly more resistant to PA than those grown in TSB (p<0.05); thus M9 medium was selected for further experiments. The anti-biofilm effect of PA was significantly increased by addition of NaCl (2-4%) (p<0.05); indeed, the combination of 0.4% PA plus 3-4% NaCl completely inactivated E. coli O157:H7 biofilms without recovery (a>6.5logCFU/cm(2) reduction). Neither PA nor NaCl alone were this effective (PA, 1.6-2.7logCFU/cm(2) reduction; NaCl, <0.5logCFU/cm(2) reduction). Confocal laser scanning microscopy images of propidium iodide-treated cells showed that PA (0.4%) plus NaCl (2-4%) had marked membrane permeabilizing effects. These results suggest that a sanitizer that combines these two naturally occurring antimicrobial agents may be useful to food safety managers who encounter thick biofilm formation in food processing environments. PMID:27043385

  5. The Effect of Different Topical Agents (Silver Sulfadiazine, Povidone-Iodine, and Sodium Chloride 0.9%) on Burn Injuries in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Emir Burak; Yıldırım, Alpagan Mustafa; Kuloglu, Tuncay

    2014-01-01

    It was aimed to comparatively evaluate the effects of dressing methods with silver sulfadiazine, povidone-iodine, and saline which have a common use in routine practices for burn injuries. Twenty-eight Sprague Dawley adult female rats were used in this study. All the rats were divided into 4 groups: the control group, the povidone-iodine group, the saline group, and the silver sulfadiazine group. On each rat, a second degree burn which covered less than 10% of the body surface area was created under general anesthesia by a metal comb including four probes with 2 × 1 cm area. The control group did not have any treatment during the experiment. Povidone-iodine, saline, and silver sulfadiazine administrations were performed under ether anesthesia every day. On 0, 7th, 14th, and 21st days of the study, tissue samples were taken for histological analyses. The sections taken from the paraffin blocks were stained and avidin-biotin-peroxidase method was used for collagen immune-reactivity. In the light microscope analyses, number of inflammatory cells, vascularization, fibroblast proliferation, collagen formation and epithelialization were evaluated histologically in all groups and analysed statistically. The agents that we used for injury healing in the treatment groups did not show any significant better results in comparison with the control group. In conclusion, further studies with the use of sodium chloride, silver sulfadiazine, and povidone-iodine by creating deeper and/or larger burn injury models are needed in order to accept these agents in routine treatment. PMID:25328700

  6. Phytic Acid and Sodium Chloride Show Marked Synergistic Bactericidal Effects against Nonadapted and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strains

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam Hee

    2015-01-01

    The synergistic antimicrobial effects of phytic acid (PA), a natural extract from rice bran, plus sodium chloride against Escherichia coli O157:H7 were examined. Exposure to NaCl alone at concentrations up to 36% (wt/wt) for 5 min did not reduce bacterial populations. The bactericidal effects of PA alone were much greater than those of other organic acids (acetic, citric, lactic, and malic acids) under the same experimental conditions (P < 0.05). Combining PA and NaCl under conditions that yielded negligible effects when each was used alone led to marked synergistic effects. For example, whereas 0.4% PA or 3 or 4% NaCl alone had little or no effect on cell viability, combining the two completely inactivated both nonadapted and acid-adapted cells, reducing their numbers to unrecoverable levels (>7-log CFU/ml reduction). Flow cytometry confirmed that PA disrupted the cell membrane to a greater extent than did other organic acids, although the cells remained viable. The combination of PA and NaCl induced complete disintegration of the cell membrane. By comparison, none of the other organic acids acted synergistically with NaCl, and neither did NaCl-HCl solutions at the same pH values as the test solutions of PA plus NaCl. These results suggest that PA has great potential as an effective bacterial membrane-permeabilizing agent, and we show that the combination is a promising alternative to conventional chemical disinfectants. These findings provide new insight into the utility of natural compounds as novel antimicrobial agents and increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antibacterial activity of PA. PMID:26637600

  7. Renal Blood Flow Response to Angiotensin 1-7 versus Hypertonic Sodium Chloride 7.5% Administration after Acute Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Maryam; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Angiotensin 1-7 (Ang1-7) plays an important role in renal circulation. Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may cause kidney circulation disturbance, and this study was designed to investigate the renal blood flow (RBF) response to Ang1-7 after HS. Methods. 27 male Wistar rats were subjected to blood withdrawal to reduce mean arterial pressure (MAP) to 45 mmHg for 45 min. The animals were treated with saline (group 1), Ang1-7 (300 ng·kg−1 min−1), Ang1-7 in hypertonic sodium chloride 7.5% (group 3), and hypertonic solution alone (group 4). Results. MAP was increased in a time-related fashion (Ptime < 0.0001) in all groups; however, there was a tendency for the increase in MAP in response to hypertonic solution (P = 0.09). Ang1-7, hypertonic solution, or combination of both increased RBF in groups 2-4, and these were significantly different from saline group (P = 0.05); that is, Ang1-7 leads to a significant increase in RBF to 1.35 ± 0.25 mL/min compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mL/min in saline group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Although Ang1-7 administration unlike hypertonic solution could not elevate MAP after HS, it potentially could increase RBF similar to hypertonic solution. This suggested that Ang1-7 recovers RBF after HS when therapeutic opportunities of hypertonic solution are limited. PMID:27073699

  8. Combined effect of concentrations of algal food (Chlorella vulgaris) and salt (sodium chloride) on the population growth of Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus patulus (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Peredo-Alvarez, Víctor M; Sarma, S S; Nandini, S

    2003-06-01

    Salinity is an important variable influencing the density and diversity of rotifers. Studies on salt tolerance of rotifers have so far concentrated on euryhaline species while very little information is available on non-euryhaline taxa. In the present work, we have evaluated the combined effects of Chlorella vulgaris and sodium chloride on the population growth of two freshwater rotifers B. calyciflorus and B. patulus. A 24 hr acute tolerance test using NaCl revealed that B. calyciflorus was more resistant (LC50 = 3.75 +/- 0.04 g l-1) than B. patulus (2.14 +/- 0.09 g l-1). The maximal population density (mean +/- standard error) for B. calyciflorus in the control at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 (algal level) was 80 +/- 5 ind. ml-1, which was nearly a fifth of the one for B. patulus (397 +/- 7 ind. ml-1) under comparable conditions. Data on population growth revealed that regardless of salt concentration, the density of B. calyciflorus increased with increasing food levels, while for B. patulus, this trend was evident only in the controls. Regardless of salt concentration and algal food level, the day of maximal population density was lower (4 +/- 0.5 days) for B. calyciflorus than for B. patulus (11 +/- 1 day). The highest rates of population increase (r values) for B. calyciflorus and B. patulus were 0.429 +/- 0.012 and 0.367 +/- 0.004, respectively, recorded at 4.5 x 10(6) cells ml-1 of Chlorella in the controls. The protective role of algae in reducing the effect of salt stress was more evident in B. calyciflorus than B. patulus. PMID:15162733

  9. Effect of temperature and chloride on steady-state inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme by enalaprilat and ramiprilat.

    PubMed Central

    Skoglof, A; Göthe, P O; Deinum, J

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of the steady-state inhibition of angiotension I-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) at 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C with enalaprilat and ramiprilat can be simulated, assuming only one inhibitor-binding site, consistent with a 1:1 stoichiometry if the protein concentration was determined by amino acid analysis. In this temperature range the apparent inhibition constants for ramiprilat and enalaprilat were roughly doubled by a decrease in the chloride concentration from 0.300 M to 0.120 M. PMID:2176463

  10. Effect of temperature on accumulation of methylmercuric chloride and p,p'DDT by rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinert, Robert E.; Stone, Linda J.; Willford, Wayne A.

    1974-01-01

    Amounts of mercury and DDT residues accumulated from water by yearling rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in the laboratory increased as water temperature increased. Fish exposed to methylmercuric chloride at concentrations of 234–263 parts per trillion for 12 wk at 5, 10, and 15 C accumulated 1.19, 1.71, and 1.96 ppm; fish exposed to p,p′DDT at concentrations of 133–176 parts per trillion accumulated 3.76, 5.93, and 6.82 ppm. Concentrations of mercury accumulated by the fish were significantly different (P < 0.01) at each of the three temperatures, and the concentrations of DDT were significantly different at 5 and 10 and 5 and 15 C. Throughout the period of exposure, the concentration factors (concentration of contaminant in the fish/concentration in water) at each of the three temperatures were far higher for p,p′DDT than for methylmercuric chloride.

  11. Deep formation waters of Western Europe, Russia and North America characterised by sodium, calcium, magnesium and chloride concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozau, Elke; Hemme, Christina; Sattler, Carl-Diedrich; van Berk, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Deep formation water can be classified according to depth, temperature, and salinity (e.g., Graf et al. 1966, Kharaka & Hanor 2007). Most of the deep formation waters contain dissolved solids in excess of sea water. The hydrogeochemical development of formation water has been discussed for a long time. It is widely accepted that deep aquifers are influenced by the meteoric cycle and geochemical processes within the crust (e.g., Hebig et al. 2012). Similar hydrogeochemical signatures are found in deep formation waters of all continents and can be explained by general geochemical processes within the deep reservoirs (e.g., Land 1995). Therefore, data of deep formation waters from Western Europe, Russia, and North America are collected and classified by the major water components. The data are used to identify important hydrogeochemical processes (e.g., halite dissolution and albitisation) leading to different compositions of formation water. Two significant water types are identified: Na-Cl water and Na-Ca-Cl water. Based on the collected hydrogeochemical data, development trends are stated for the formation waters, and albitisation is favoured as the main process for calcium enrichment. Furthermore, differences of formation water according to stratigraphical units are shown for deep reservoirs of the North German Basin and the North Sea. References: Graf, D.L., 1982. Chemical osmosis, reverse chemical osmosis, and the origin of subsurface brines. Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta 46, 1431-1448. Hebig, K.H., Ito, N., Scheytt, T., Marui, A., 2012. Review: Deep groundwater research with focus on Germany. Hydrogeology Journal 20, 227-243. Kharaka, Y.K., Hanor, J.S., 2007. Deep fluids in continents: I. Sedimentary Basins. Treatise on Geochemistry 5, 1-48. Land, L.S., 1995. The role of saline formation water in the crustal cycling. Aquatic Geochemistry 1, 137-145. Acknowledgements: The presented data are results of the collaborative research program "gebo" (Geothermal energy

  12. DOE STI Product/Final Report Number 3 Electrochemical Investigation of Novel Electrolytes for Ambient Temperature Sodium Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ketack; Lang, Christopher M.; Doyle, Kevin; Kohl, Paul A.

    2005-12-01

    The need for low-cost, high-energy density, durable, secondary batteries continues to rise with the demands of the electronics and automobile industries. A room-temperature version of the (high-temperature) ''Zebra Cell'' may provide an interesting technology for portable electronics and transportation. Sodium-based batteries have received attention as an alternative to the lithium-based batteries due to several factors including the absence of dendrite formation during sodium deposition and the abundance of sodium. This work focused on (1) the development of room-temperature ionic liquids (IL) for use in electrochemical devices, including batteries, (2) development and evaluation of secondary sodium batteries using room-temperature ILs, and (3) advancing the fundamental understanding of the electrochemical processes involving ILs and battery technology. Several objectives were accomplished during this program.

  13. A room-temperature sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based nonflammable inorganic liquid catholyte

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Hansu; Sug Lee, Hyo; Han, Young-Kyu; Hwan Park, Jong; Hwan Jeon, Jae; Song, Juhye; Lee, Keonjoon; Yim, Taeeun; Jae Kim, Ki; Lee, Hyukjae; Kim, Young-Jun; Sohn, Hun-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Sodium rechargeable batteries can be excellent alternatives to replace lithium rechargeable ones because of the high abundance and low cost of sodium; however, there is a need to further improve the battery performance, cost-effectiveness, and safety for practical use. Here we demonstrate a new type of room-temperature and high-energy density sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based inorganic molten complex catholyte, which showed a discharge capacity of 153 mAh g−1 based on the mass of catholyte and carbon electrode with an operating voltage of 3 V, good rate capability and excellent cycle performance over 300 cycles. In particular, non-flammability and intrinsic self-regeneration mechanism of the inorganic liquid electrolyte presented here can accelerate the realization of commercialized Na rechargeable battery system with outstanding reliability. Given that high performance and unique properties of Na–SO2 rechargeable battery, it can be another promising candidate for next generation energy storage system. PMID:26243052

  14. A room-temperature sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based nonflammable inorganic liquid catholyte.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Hansu; Lee, Hyo Sug; Han, Young-Kyu; Park, Jong Hwan; Jeon, Jae Hwan; Song, Juhye; Lee, Keonjoon; Yim, Taeeun; Kim, Ki Jae; Lee, Hyukjae; Kim, Young-Jun; Sohn, Hun-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Sodium rechargeable batteries can be excellent alternatives to replace lithium rechargeable ones because of the high abundance and low cost of sodium; however, there is a need to further improve the battery performance, cost-effectiveness, and safety for practical use. Here we demonstrate a new type of room-temperature and high-energy density sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based inorganic molten complex catholyte, which showed a discharge capacity of 153 mAh g(-1) based on the mass of catholyte and carbon electrode with an operating voltage of 3 V, good rate capability and excellent cycle performance over 300 cycles. In particular, non-flammability and intrinsic self-regeneration mechanism of the inorganic liquid electrolyte presented here can accelerate the realization of commercialized Na rechargeable battery system with outstanding reliability. Given that high performance and unique properties of Na-SO2 rechargeable battery, it can be another promising candidate for next generation energy storage system. PMID:26243052

  15. A room-temperature sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based nonflammable inorganic liquid catholyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Goojin; Kim, Hansu; Sug Lee, Hyo; Han, Young-Kyu; Hwan Park, Jong; Hwan Jeon, Jae; Song, Juhye; Lee, Keonjoon; Yim, Taeeun; Jae Kim, Ki; Lee, Hyukjae; Kim, Young-Jun; Sohn, Hun-Joon

    2015-08-01

    Sodium rechargeable batteries can be excellent alternatives to replace lithium rechargeable ones because of the high abundance and low cost of sodium; however, there is a need to further improve the battery performance, cost-effectiveness, and safety for practical use. Here we demonstrate a new type of room-temperature and high-energy density sodium rechargeable battery using an SO2-based inorganic molten complex catholyte, which showed a discharge capacity of 153 mAh g-1 based on the mass of catholyte and carbon electrode with an operating voltage of 3 V, good rate capability and excellent cycle performance over 300 cycles. In particular, non-flammability and intrinsic self-regeneration mechanism of the inorganic liquid electrolyte presented here can accelerate the realization of commercialized Na rechargeable battery system with outstanding reliability. Given that high performance and unique properties of Na-SO2 rechargeable battery, it can be another promising candidate for next generation energy storage system.

  16. Temperature dependence of non-electrolyte and sodium permeability in giant axon of squid

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Latorre, Ramón

    1970-01-01

    1. The efflux of [14C]urea was measured in micro-injected axons at 18° C. A permeability constant for urea of (0·55 ± 0·18) × 10-6 cm/sec was calculated from these experiments. 2. The influxes of urea, thiourea, ethylene glycol, urethane and toluene were measured in perfused axons at 18 ± 1° C. The permeability constants obtained from these determinations increased in the order listed, from (0·76 ± 0·19) × 10-6 cm/sec for urea to 0·80 × 10-4 cm/sec for toluene. 3. The influxes of tritiated water and sodium ions at 18° C were measured in perfused axons. An average permeability of (0·78 ± 0·22) × 10-4 cm/sec for titriated water and an average influx of 23 ± 6 p-mole/cm2 sec for sodium were obtained. 4. Lowering the temperature of the external sea-water bathing the axon from 18 to 5° C produced a decrease of 12% in the permeability of toluene, 30% for tritiated water and urethane, 55% for ethylene glycol and urea and 60% for thiourea. There was a 50% reduction in the influx of sodium for this same temperature change. 5. The results obtained with the effect of temperature on permeabilities suggest that the axonal membrane has a non-homogeneous composition. A model based on the assumption of structured aqueous channels in the membrane is postulated. PMID:5500990

  17. Role of second-sphere coordination in anion binding: Synthesis, characterization and X-ray structure of hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride hydrogen phthalate trihydrate and sodium hexaamminecobalt(III) benzoate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Bala, Ritu; Sharma, Rajni; Kariuki, B. M.; Rychlewska, Urszula; Warżajtis, Beata

    2005-06-01

    In an effort to utilize [Co(NH 3) 6] 3+cation as a new host for carboxylate ions, orange coloured crystalline solids of composition [Co(NH 3) 6]Cl(C 8H 5O 4) 2·3H 2O ( 1) and Na[Co(NH 3) 6](C 7H 5O 2) 4·H 2O ( 2) were obtained by reacting hot aqueous solutions of hexaamminecobalt(III) chloride with potassium hydrogen phthalate and sodium benzoate in 1:3 molar ratio, respectively. The title complex salts were characterized by elemental analyses and spectroscopic studies (IR, UV/Visible and NMR). Single crystal X-ray structure determinations revealed the formation of second-sphere coordination complexes based on hydrogen bond interactions. In complex salt 1 only two out of three ionisable chloride ions present in [Co(NH 3) 6]Cl 3 were replaced by two CHO4- ions whereas in complex salt 2 all the three ionisable chloride ions present in [Co(NH 3) 6]Cl 3 were replaced and the final product was an adduct with another mole of sodium benzoate in solid state. The crystal lattice is stabilized by electrostatic forces of attraction and predominantly N-H⋯O interactions.

  18. Effect of photodynamic therapy combined with torasemide on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 in rat peritumoral edema and glioma

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; MENG, CHAO; ZHANG, XUFENG; CONG, DAMIN; GAO, XIN; GAO, WANLONG; JU, DONGHUI; HU, SHAOSHAN

    2016-01-01

    Peritumoral edema is a key stage in the infiltration and recurrence of glioma. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) increases the extent of peritumoral edema, which leads to a decrease in the effectiveness of PDT in treating glioma. The present study evaluated the effects of PDT combined with torasemide on the levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter (NKCC) 1 in peritumoral edema regions of rat glioma. Adult male Wistar rats were inoculated with rat glioma C6 cells, and the presence of glioma was confirmed using magnetic resonance imaging 7 days subsequent to injection. The rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=15): Control group, the rats received no treatment; PDT group, the rats received PDT at 80 J/cm2 for 10 min; torasemide group, the rats received 5 mg/kg torasemide intraperitoneally; and PDT + torasemide group, the rats received 5 mg/kg torasemide intraperitoneally for 3 days following PDT at 80 J/cm2 for 10 min. A total of 5 rats from each group were sacrificed 21 days following injection and the peritumoral edema tissues were harvested. MMP2 and NKCC1 expression levels were detected in the tissues using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The mRNA expression levels of MMP2 and NKCC1 were observed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Peritumoral edema was measured using a wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, and survival times of the remaining 10 rats in each group were evaluated. Compared with the control group, tumor growth was significantly suppressed in the PDT group and the survival time was prolonged through a reduction in the expression of MMP2 (P<0.05), and an increased W/D ratio resulted in significantly increased expression of NKCC1 (P<0.05). Compared with the PDT group, the expression of NKCC1 and the W/D ratio in the PDT + torasemide group were significantly decreased (P<0.05), while no significant difference was observed in the expression levels of MMP2. In conclusion

  19. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a Sulfuric Acid and Sodium Sulfate Blend, Peroxyacetic Acid, and Cetylpyridinium Chloride against Salmonella on Inoculated Chicken Wings.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brittney R; Yang, Xiang; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Delmore, Robert J; Woerner, Dale R; Reagan, James O; Morgan, J Brad; Belk, Keith E

    2015-11-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial blend of sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate (SSS) in reducing Salmonella on inoculated whole chilled chicken wings and to compare its efficacy to peroxyacetic acid (PAA) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). Wings were spot inoculated (5 to 6 log CFU/ml of sample rinsate) with a five-strain mixture of novobiocin- and nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella and then left untreated (control) or treated by immersing individual wings in 350 ml of antimicrobial solution. An initial study evaluated two treatment immersion times, 10 and 20 s, of SSS (pH 1.1) and compared cell recoveries following rinsing of treated samples with buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth. In a second study, inoculated wings were treated with SSS (pH 1.1; 20 s), PAA (700 ppm, 20 s), or CPC (4,000 ppm, 10 s) and analyzed for survivors immediately after treatment (0 h) and after 24 h of aerobic storage at 4°C. Color and pH analyses were also conducted in the latter study. Recovery of Salmonella survivors following treatment with SSS (10 or 20 s) was not (P ≥ 0.05) affected by the type of cell recovery rinse solution (buffered peptone water or Dey/Engley neutralizing broth), but there was an effect (P < 0.05) of SSS treatment time. Immersion of samples for 10 or 20 s in SSS resulted in pathogen reductions of 0.8 to 0.9 and 1.1 to 1.2 log CFU/ml, respectively. Results of the second study showed that there was an interaction (P < 0.05) between antimicrobial type and storage time. Efficacy against Salmonella at 0 h increased in the order CPC , SSS , PAA; however, after 24 h of aerobic storage, pathogen counts of SSS- and PAA-treated wings did not differ (P ≥ 0.05). Overall, the results indicated that SSS applied at pH 1.1 for 20 s was an effective antimicrobial intervention to reduce Salmonella contamination on chicken wings. PMID:26555519

  20. Solvation of sodium chloride in the 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Wipff, Georges

    2007-06-28

    We report molecular dynamics studies on the solvation of sodium chloride in the 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid ([BMI][Tf2N] IL). We first consider the potential of mean force for dissociating a single Na+Cl- ion pair, showing that the latter prefers to be undissociated rather than dissociated (by ca. 9 kcal/mol), with a free energy barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol (at d approximately 5.2 A) for the association process. The preference for Na+Cl- association is also observed from a 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation of a concentrated solution, where the Na+Cl- ions tend to form oligomers and microcrystals in the IL. Conversely, the simulation of Na13Cl14- and Na14Cl13+ cubic microcrystals (with, respectively, Cl- and Na+ at the vertices) does not lead to dissolution in the IL. Among these, Na14Cl13+ is found to be better solvated than Na13Cl14-, mainly due to the stronger Na+...Tf2N- interactions as compared to the Cl-...BMI+ interactions at the vertices of the cube. We finally consider the solid/liquid interface between the 100 face of NaCl and the IL, revealing that, in spite of its polar nature, the crystal surface is solvated by the less polar IL components (CF3(Tf2N) and butyl(BMI) groups) rather than by the polar ones (O(Tf2N) and imidazolium(BMI) ring). Specific ordering at the interface is described for both Tf2N- anions and BMI+ cations. In the first IL layer, the ions are rather parallel to the surface, whereas in the second "layer" they are more perpendicular. A similar IL structure is found at the surface of the all-neutral Na0Cl0 solid analogue, confirming that the solvation of the crystal is rather "apolar", due to the mismatch between the IL and the crystal ions. Several comparisons with water, methanol, or different BMI+-based ILs as solvents are presented, allowing us to better understand the specificity of the ionic liquid-NaCl interactions. PMID:17550283

  1. Effect of Azadirachta indica (neem), sodium thiosulphate and calcium chloride on changes in nitrogen transformations and inhibition of nitrification in soil incubated under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, M Kaleem; Hina, Munazza; Tahir, Majid Mahmood

    2011-03-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the effects of nitrification inhibitors (NIs) neem seed-cake (Azadirachta indica) (NSC), sodium thiosulphate (Na₂S₂O₃) and calcium chloride (CaCl₂) on changes in NH₄(+)⁻N, inhibition of nitrification and recovery of applied nitrogen (N) in soil. Surface soil samples of 0-15 cm were collected from an arable field, amended with urea N (UN) at the rate 200 mg N kg⁻¹, UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃ and UN+CaCl₂ and incubated at 22°C periodically over 50 d. Soil without any amendment was used as check (control). Results indicated that more than 58% of N applied as NH₄⁻ disappeared over a period of 50 d from the soil mineral-N pool. Some of this N (21%) was accumulated as NO₃⁻-N while the remaining N was unaccounted for. Addition of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ resulted in a decrease in the extent of NH₄(+) disappearance by 35%, 44% and 30%, respectively. In the treatment receiving UN alone, 56 mg NO₃⁻-N kg⁻¹ was accumulated over 50 d (maximum 93 mg kg⁻¹) indicated an active nitrification. Application of nitrification inhibitors NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ with UN inhibited nitrification by 54%, 64%, and 59%, respectively. Apparent N recovery (ANR) in the treatment receiving UN alone was 63% that substantially increased to 83%, 89% and 76% in the treatments receiving UN+NSC, UN+Na₂S₂O₃, and UN+CaCl₂, respectively indicating 32%, 41% and 20% increase in N recovery. Among three NIs tested, Na₂S₂O₃ proved superior in inhibiting nitrification and increasing ANR. The study demonstrated that application of NSC, Na₂S₂O₃, and CaCl₂ which are cheap and easily available NIs inhibited nitrification and improved N recovery efficiency of applied N in an arable soil very effectively. It is suggested that these inhibitors should be tested under field conditions for increasing NUE and improving crop productivity. PMID:21146192

  2. Structure and Spectroscopy of Hydrated Sodium Ions at Different Temperatures and the Cluster Stability Rules.

    PubMed

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Agmon, Noam

    2016-04-12

    The sodium cation plays an important role in several physiological processes. Understanding its solvation may help understanding ion selectivity in sodium channels that are pivotal for nerve impulses. This paper presents a thorough investigation of over 75 isomers of gas-phase Na(+)(H2O)(n=1-8) clusters, whose optimized structures, energies, and (harmonic) vibrational frequencies were computed quantum mechanically at the full MP2/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. From these data, we have calculated the temperature effects on the cluster thermodynamic functions, and thus the equilibrium Boltzmann distribution for each n. For a selected number of isomers, we have corrected the calculations for basis set superposition error (BSSE) to obtain accurate clustering energies, in excellent agreement with experiment. The computed clusters are overwhelmingly 4-coordinated, as opposed to bulk liquid water, where sodium cations are believed to be mostly 5- or 6-coordinated. To explain this, we suggest the "cluster stability rules", a set of coordination-number-dependent hydrogen-bond (HB) strengths that can be obtained using a single BSSE correction. Assuming additivity and transferability, these reproduce the relative stability of most of our computed isomers. These rules enable us to elucidate the trends in HB strengths, outlining the major determinants of cluster stability. For n = 4 and 5, we have also performed anharmonic vibrational calculations (VPT2) to compare with available photodissociation infrared spectra of these gas-phase clusters. The comparison suggests that the experiments actually monitor a mixture of predominantly 3-coordinated isomers, which is quite remote from the computed Boltzmann distribution, particularly at low temperatures. Surprisingly, for these experiments, water evaporation pathways can rationalize the non-equilibrium isomer distribution. The equilibrium isomer distribution is, in turn, rationalized by the entropy of internal rotations of "dangling

  3. Temperature dependent van der Pauw-Hall measurements on sodium doped single crystalline cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, results of the temperature dependent electrical conductivity measurements conducted on single crystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe), containing sodium (Na) impurities are presented and discussed. The electrical conductivity measurements were conducted using an apparatus that allowed the implementation of a standard van der Pauw-Hall effect technique through which the electrical resistivity, concentration of majority carriers, as well as the carrier mobility were determined for temperatures ranging between 24 K and 350 K. Over this temperature range, the electrical resistivity was observed to change by 7 orders of magnitude. Hall measurements showed that the hole concentration at 300 K was ˜3 × 1015 cm-3 and the hole mobility at the same temperature was ˜80 cm2/V s. Measuring the concentration of holes as a function of the sample temperature enabled the estimation of the acceptor energy level with respect to the valence band maximum to be ˜60 meV. The same data also revealed the potential presence of a compensating donor level. Furthermore, the hole mobility was also analyzed over the entire temperature range and the data revealed that above 100 K, the carrier mobility was dominated by the scattering of holes from lattice vibrations.

  4. Temperature dependent van der Pauw-Hall measurements on sodium doped single crystalline cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-03-21

    In this report, results of the temperature dependent electrical conductivity measurements conducted on single crystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe), containing sodium (Na) impurities are presented and discussed. The electrical conductivity measurements were conducted using an apparatus that allowed the implementation of a standard van der Pauw-Hall effect technique through which the electrical resistivity, concentration of majority carriers, as well as the carrier mobility were determined for temperatures ranging between 24 K and 350 K. Over this temperature range, the electrical resistivity was observed to change by 7 orders of magnitude. Hall measurements showed that the hole concentration at 300 K was ∼3 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup –3} and the hole mobility at the same temperature was ∼80 cm{sup 2}/V s. Measuring the concentration of holes as a function of the sample temperature enabled the estimation of the acceptor energy level with respect to the valence band maximum to be ∼60 meV. The same data also revealed the potential presence of a compensating donor level. Furthermore, the hole mobility was also analyzed over the entire temperature range and the data revealed that above 100 K, the carrier mobility was dominated by the scattering of holes from lattice vibrations.

  5. Discontinuous variation of the surface plasmon linewidth of small sodium nanoparticles with electron temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhong; Zheng, Yizhuang; Zi, Jian

    2015-05-01

    We found a novel behavior of the surface plasmon linewidth of small sodium nanoparticles, which monotonically decreases with the electron temperature and bears a sudden drop or rise at high electron temperatures. Our calculation is based on the model constructed by splitting the total Hamiltonian of all valence electrons of a metallic nanoparticle into two sub-Hamiltonians and the coupling between them. This novel behavior of the surface plasma resonance linewidth can be verified by pump-probe femtosecond spectroscopy experiments and is able to take place for metallic particles with sizes less than few nanometers. In addition, we propose that it is the size uncertainty of small nanoparticles that yields the intrinsic linewidth of the surface plasmon resonance, which is supported by experimental and theoretical results of nanoparticles Na8 and Na20.

  6. New layered metal oxides as positive electrode materials for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin-Qin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Quan

    2015-03-01

    In order to achieve better Na storage performance, most layered oxide positive electrode materials contain toxic and expensive transition metals Ni and/or Co, which are also widely used for lithium-ion batteries. Here we report a new quaternary layered oxide consisting of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ti transition metals with O3-type oxygen stacking as a positive electrode for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries. The material can be simply prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route and delivers a reversible capacity of 94 mAh/g with an average storage voltage of 3.2 V. This paves the way for cheaper and non-toxic batteries with high Na storage performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210 and 11234013) and the One Hundred Talent Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Characterizing W-2 SLSF experiment temperature oscillations using computer graphics. [Sodium Loop Safety Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.E.

    1983-06-23

    The W-2 SLSF (Sodium Loop Safety Facility) experiment was an instrumented in-reactor test performed to characterize the failure response of full-length, preconditioned LMFBR prototypic fuel pins to slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions. Although the test results were expected to confirm analytical predictions of upper level failure and fuel expulsion, an axial midplane failure was experienced. Extensive post-test analyses were conducted to understand all of the unexpected behavior in the experiment. (1) The initial post-test effort focused on the temperature oscillations recorded by the 54 thermocouples used in the experiment. In order to synthesize the extensive data records and identify patterns of behavior in the data records, a computer-generated film was used to present the temperature data recorded during the experiment.

  8. Influence of temperature on the myocardial cells death by an extracellular talaporfin sodium-induced photosensitization reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Takenoya, Hiromi; Arai, Tsunenori

    2016-03-01

    We have proposed to apply the photosensitization reaction in myocardium interstitial fluid using talaporfin sodium to realize less-heated electrical conduction block for a tachyarrhythmia treatment: PD Ablation®. The cytotoxicity of the extracellular photosensitization reaction efficiency may change by the talaporfin sodium binding with serum proteins. These binding would change with solution temperature. We investigated the binding behavior of talaporfin sodium with human serum albumin (HSA), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) changing solution temperature from 17 to 37°C. We also studied the photocytotoxicity change by solution temperature of 17 and 37°C measuring cell lethality by WST assay using fetal bovine serum. The binding ratio of talaporfin sodium with HDL and LDL decreased 6.3% and 12.8% with temperature increasing from 17 to 37°C. There was no significant difference in the case of HSA. The cell lethality was increased about 30% with temperature increasing from 17 to 37°C. The myocardium tissue temperature increase was reported that less than 5°C in the case of our PD Ablation®. We think that the photocytotoxicity change by these temperature increasing would be negligible in our PD Ablation®. We suggest that the temperature maintaining would be necessary to keep the photocytotoxicity efficiency in the case of the open surgery that would cause the tissue surface temperature decreasing.

  9. Crevice Corrosion of Titanium in High Temperature-Concentrated Chloride Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulsalam, Mohammed I.

    2007-12-01

    Crevice corrosion of titanium is activated in concentrated chloride media at 100 °C. This was possible only with the tightest gap (0.005 cm) between Ti-Ti surfaces. No crevice corrosion was observed with greater gap dimensions. The design of the crevice led to the occurrence of two concentric circular rings of corroded areas, with many pits on them. After potentiostating in the passive region for 5 h in 25% NaCl (pH = 4.7)—where hydrogen evolution is thermodynamically prohibited—hydrogen gas bubbles were observed to egress out of the crevice mouth during ongoing crevice corrosion. This indicates that hydrogen evolution occurs within the crevice. The results are compatible with the occurrence of gradually increasing ohmic potential shift and localized acidification in the crevice electrolyte as judged by the measured gradual increase of the crevice corrosion current. The high acidity of the bulk electrolyte does not seem to be sufficient or even a necessary condition for crevice corrosion to occur.

  10. High-temperature oxidation and corrosion of structural materials in molten chlorides.

    SciTech Connect

    Indacochea, J. E.; Smith, J. L.; Litko, K. R.; Karell, E. J.; Raraz, A. G.; Chemical Engineering

    2001-02-01

    A molten salt-based process for treatment of spent oxide fuels is under development at the Argonne National Laboratory. A major part of the development effort involves identification of corrosion-resistant structural materials for the process vessels. Coupons of two stainless steels, tantalum, and two Inconel alloys were submitted to a corrosion test in an argon atmosphere with 10% oxygen. The coupons were partially immersed in molten lithium chloride salt containing small amounts of lithium metal, lithium oxide, and lithium nitride. Two sets of coupons were tested, the first at 750{sup o}C for 30 days and the second at 650{sup o}C for 6 days. Coupons of the first set corroded completely. In the second set of coupons, all corroded to some extent, but Inconel 600 showed the best performance overall. The salt-exposed region generally showed the greatest corrosion in the other coupons. One of the 316L SS coupons was welded and the weld area was severely attacked.

  11. Zinc chloride catalysis in coal and biomass liquefaction at prepyrolysis temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Onu, C.O.; Vermeulen, T.

    1980-06-01

    Coal liquefaction processes currently under development operate with thermal decomposition of coal. This step is nonselective, and wastefully forms light hydrocarbon gases and refractory char as byproducts. It requires severe operating conditions (over 400/sup 0/C and 100 atm.), giving rise to high capital costs, and relatively low thermal efficiencies. In the present study, coal liquefaction has been investigated under milder, more selective conditions, utilizing a zinc chloride-methanol melt as a liquid-phase catalyst. Operating at 275/sup 0/C with 35 to 55 atm. of H/sub 2/, this catalytic medium has been found to give over 95% conversion of Wyodak subbituminous coal to solvent-extractible, but not yet truly liquid, products. The products are identified in a standard manner as oils, asphaltenes, and preasphaltenes, with hydrogen-to-carbon atomic ratios in the ranges of 1.2 to 1.4, 1.0 to 1.1, and 0.8 to 0.9, respectively.

  12. Electrolytic Deposition and Diffusion of Lithium onto Magnesium-9 Wt Pct Yttrium Bulk Alloy in Low-Temperature Molten Salt of Lithium Chloride and Potassium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hanwu; Wu, Yaoming; Wang, Lidong; Wang, Limin

    2009-10-01

    The electrolytic deposition and diffusion of lithium onto bulk magnesium-9 wt pct yttrium alloy cathode in molten salt of 47 wt pct lithium chloride and 53 wt pct potassium chloride at 693 K were investigated. Results show that magnesium-yttrium-lithium ternary alloys are formed on the surface of the cathodes, and a penetration depth of 642 μm is acquired after 2 hours of electrolysis at the cathodic current density of 0.06 A·cm-2. The diffusion of lithium results in a great amount of precipitates in the lithium containing layer. These precipitates are the compound of Mg41Y5, which arrange along the grain boundaries and hinder the diffusion of lithium, and solid solution of yttrium in magnesium. The grain boundaries and the twins of the magnesium-9 wt pct yttrium substrate also have negative effects on the diffusion of lithium.

  13. Liquid-metal electrode to enable ultra-low temperature sodium-beta alumina batteries for renewable energy storage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Y; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P; Sprenkle, Vincent L; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Commercial sodium-sulphur or sodium-metal halide batteries typically need an operating temperature of 300-350 °C, and one of the reasons is poor wettability of liquid sodium on the surface of beta alumina. Here we report an alloying strategy that can markedly improve the wetting, which allows the batteries to be operated at much lower temperatures. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that addition of caesium to sodium can markedly enhance the wettability. Single cells with Na-Cs alloy anodes exhibit great improvement in cycling life over those with pure sodium anodes at 175 and 150 °C. The cells show good performance even at as low as 95 °C. These results demonstrate that sodium-beta alumina batteries can be operated at much lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a strategy to use liquid metals in advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation. PMID:25081362

  14. Liquid-metal electrode to enable ultra-low temperature sodium-beta alumina batteries for renewable energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Y.; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Commercial sodium-sulphur or sodium-metal halide batteries typically need an operating temperature of 300-350 °C, and one of the reasons is poor wettability of liquid sodium on the surface of beta alumina. Here we report an alloying strategy that can markedly improve the wetting, which allows the batteries to be operated at much lower temperatures. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that addition of caesium to sodium can markedly enhance the wettability. Single cells with Na-Cs alloy anodes exhibit great improvement in cycling life over those with pure sodium anodes at 175 and 150 °C. The cells show good performance even at as low as 95 °C. These results demonstrate that sodium-beta alumina batteries can be operated at much lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a strategy to use liquid metals in advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation.

  15. Low-temperature transformations of sodium sulfate and sodium selenite in the presence of pre-reduced palladium modifier in graphite furnaces for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynsky, Anatoly B.; Stakheev, Alexandr Yu.; Telegina, Natalia S.; Senin, Valery G.; Kustov, Leonid M.; Wennrich, Rainer

    2001-08-01

    The low-temperature interaction (up to 550°C) of a pre-reduced palladium modifier with sodium sulfate and sodium selenite on the pyrolytic graphite platform was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron microprobe analysis. The equipment applied allowed the introduction of samples heated in an argon flow into the analytical chamber of the XPS spectrometer without contact with the air. Electron microprobe analysis showed that palladium and sulfur preferably occupy different areas on the platform surface. On the contrary, selenium from sodium selenite tends to occupy areas of the graphite surface covered with palladium. The most probable reason for this is the chemisorption of selenium (IV) on the palladium surface at the drying stage. No changes in the XPS spectra of metallic Pd and S 6+ were observed when Na 2SO 4 and Pd were heated together on the graphite platform in the range 100-550°C. The reduction of sodium selenite on the graphite surface already starts during drying. Pre-reduced palladium intensifies this process. The rate of the reduction is proportional to the amount of palladium, and in the presence of palladium at an atomic ratio of Pd/Se=7.5, the transformation of Se 4+ into Se 0 completes at 250°C.

  16. Chemical and mechanical stability of sodium sulfate activated slag after exposure to elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rashad, A.M.; Bai, Y.; Basheer, P.A.M.; Collier, N.C.; Milestone, N.B.

    2012-02-15

    The chemical and mechanical stability of slag activated with two different concentrations of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) after exposure to elevated temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 Degree-Sign C with an increment of 200 Degree-Sign C has been examined. Compressive strengths and pH of the hardened pastes before and after the exposure were determined. The various decomposition phases formed were identified using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} activated slag has a better resistance to the degradation caused by exposure to elevated temperature up to 600 Degree-Sign C than Portland cement system as its relative strengths are superior. The finer slag and higher Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration gave better temperature resistance. Whilst the pH of the hardened pastes decreased with an increase in temperature, it still maintained a sufficiently high pH for the protection of reinforcing bar against corrosion.

  17. Effects of temperature, concentration, and uranium chloride mixture on zirconium electrochemical studies in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Robert O.; Yoon, Dalsung; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2016-08-01

    Experimental studies were performed to provide measurement and analysis of zirconium (Zr) electrochemistry in LiClsbnd KCl eutectic salt at different temperatures and concentrations using cyclic voltammetry (CV). An additional experimental set with uranium chloride added into the system forming UCl3sbnd ZrCl4sbnd LiClsbnd KCl was performed to explore the general behavior of these two species together. Results of CV experiments with ZrCl4 show complicated cathodic and anodic peaks, which were identified along with the Zr reactions. The CV results reveal that diffusion coefficients (D) of ZrCl4 and ZrCl2 as the function of temperature can be expressed as DZr(IV) = 0.00046exp(-3716/T) and DZr(II) = 0.027exp(-5617/T), respectively. The standard rate constants and apparent standard potentials of ZrCl4 at different temperatures were calculated. Furthermore, the results from the mixture of UCl3 and ZrCl4 indicate that high concentrations of UCl3 hide the features of the smaller concentration of ZrCl4 while Zr peaks become prominent as the concentration of ZrCl4 increases.

  18. Temperature dependence of the rate and activation parameters for tert-butyl chloride solvolysis: Monte Carlo simulation of confidence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Dae Dong; Kim, Jong-Youl; Lee, Ikchoon; Chung, Sung Sik; Park, Kwon Ha

    2004-07-01

    The solvolysis rate constants ( kobs) of tert-butyl chloride are measured in 20%(v/v) 2-PrOH-H 2O mixture at 15 temperatures ranging from 0 to 39 °C. Examination of the temperature dependence of the rate constants by the weighted least squares fitting to two to four terms equations has led to the three-term form, ln kobs= a1+ a2T-1+ a3ln T, as the best expression. The activation parameters, ΔH ‡ and ΔS ‡, calculated by using three constants a1, a2 and a3 revealed the steady decrease of ≈1 kJ mol -1 per degree and 3.5 J K -1 mol -1 per degree, respectively, as the temperature rises. The sign change of ΔS ‡ at ≈20.0 °C and the large negative heat capacity of activation, ΔC p‡=-1020 J K -1 mol -1, derived are interpreted to indicate an S N1 mechanism and a net change from water structure breaking to electrostrictive solvation due to the partially ionic transition state. Confidence intervals estimated by the Monte Carlo method are far more precise than those by the conventional method.

  19. The effects of inorganic chloride on the partitioning and speciation of heavy metals in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, K.Y.; Wang, K.S.

    1997-12-31

    The effects of inorganic chloride on the partitioning and speciation of heavy metals during waste incineration, considering different chloride contents, combustion temperatures, and metal concentrations in the wastes were examined using a tube furnace. The results indicated that heavy metal partitioning was fundamentally affected by the sodium chloride content, combustion temperature, and the volatility of the heavy metals and their compounds. The volatility was enhanced by increasing the combustion temperature and sodium chloride content in the waste. A higher combustion temperature and sodium chloride content in the waste tended to partition the metals into the fly ash or flue gases by forming volatile metal chlorides. The analysis of heavy metal species analysis for the incinerator ashes showed that most metal compounds were formed as oxides. Crystalline phase identification identified, the compounds, PbO, NaCl and KCl, in the fly ash, and ZnO, Zn(OH){sub 2}, NaCl, KCl, Pb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as elemental copper, lead, and zinc in the bottom ash. The formation of NaCl and KCl in both the fly and bottom ash may be explained by the stronger affinity of Na and K to the spiked chloride.

  20. Sodium sulfate - Vaporization thermodynamics and role in corrosive flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.; Fryburg, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mass spectrometer experiments were conducted to determine the thermodynamic properties of gaseous Na2SO4, and these data were used in a computer program to calculate equilibrium flame compositions and temperatures for representative turbine engine and burner rig flames. The work is important in that sodium sulfate is the major phase recovered from turbine surfaces after instances of corrosion, due to the presence of sulfur in fuels and sodium chloride in intake air.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation study of ionic hydration and ion association in dilute and 1 molal aqueous sodium chloride solutions from ambient to supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driesner, T.; Seward, T. M.; Tironi, I. G.

    1998-09-01

    The increasing demand for accurate equations of state of fluids under extreme conditions and the need for a detailed microscopic picture of aqueous fluids in some areas of geochemistry (e.g., mineral dissolution/precipitation kinetics) potentially make molecular dynamics (MD) simulations a powerful tool for theoretical geochemistry. We present MD simulations of infinitely dilute and 1 molal aqueous NaCl solutions that have been carried out in order to study the systematics of hydration and ion association over a wide range of conditions from ambient to supercritical and compare them to the available experimental data. In the dilute case, the hydration number of the Na + ion remains essentially constant around 5.5 from ambient to supercritical temperatures when the density is kept constant at 1 g cm -3 but decreases to below 5 along the liquid-vapor curve. In both cases, the average ion-first shell water distance decreases by about 0.03 Å from ambient to near critical temperatures. The Cl - ion shows a slight expansion of the first hydration shell by about 0.02 Å from ambient to near critical temperatures. The geometric definition of the first hydration shell becomes ambiguous due to a shift of the position of the first minimum of the Cl-O radial distribution function. In the case of the 1 molal solution, the contraction of the Na + first hydration shell is similar to that in the dilute case whereas the hydration number decreases drastically from 4.9 to 2.8 due to strong ion association. The released waters are replaced on a near 1:1 basis by chloride ions. Polynuclear clusters as predicted by Oelkers and Helgeson (1993b) are observed in the high temperature systems. The hydration shell of the Cl --ion shows significant deviation from the behavior in dilute systems, that is, at near vapor saturated conditions, the expansion of the hydration shell is significantly larger (0.12 Å from ambient to near critical temperatures). Due to a very large shift of the first

  2. Simplified modeling of liquid sodium medium with temperature and velocity gradient using real thermal-hydraulic data. Application to ultrasonic thermometry in sodium fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Massacret, N.; Jeannot, J. P.

    2013-01-25

    In the framework of the French R and D program for the Generation IV reactors and specifically for the sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR), studies are carried out on innovative instrumentation methods in order to improve safety and to simplify the monitoring of fundamental physical parameters during reactor operation. The aim of the present work is to develop an acoustic thermometry method to follow up the sodium temperature at the outlet of subassemblies. The medium is a turbulent flow of liquid sodium at 550 Degree-Sign C with temperature inhomogeneities. To understand the effect of disturbance created by this medium, numerical simulations are proposed. A ray tracing code has been developed with Matlab Copyright-Sign in order to predict acoustic paths in this medium. This complex medium is accurately described by thermal-hydraulic data which are issued from a simulation of a real experiment in Japan. The analysis of these results allows understanding the effects of medium inhomogeneities on the further thermometric acoustic measurement.

  3. Effects of water hardness and temperature on the acute toxicity of mercuric chloride on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ertugrul; Verep, Bulent

    2012-07-01

    In this study, the toxicity of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)), an important pollutant threatening water resources for many years, and the effects of water temperature and hardness on the toxicity in cultured rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (4.79 ± 0.16 g; 7.38 ± 0.24 cm; mean ± SD) were investigated at different temperatures (12 and 17°C) and hardness concentrations (35, 70 and 120 mg l(-1) as calcium carbonate, CaCO(3)). For this purpose, the acute toxicity tests were performed by 96-h static tests in different water temperatures and water hardness concentrations. For acute toxicity tests, solutions ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 mg l(-1) were used at 12°C and solutions ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 mg l(-1) at 17°C. The LC(50) values of HgCl(2) that killed 50% of rainbow trout within 96 h in the hardness concentrations of 35, 70 and 120 mg l(-1) CaCO(3) were calculated using probit analysis, and were found to be 0.725, 0.788, 0.855 mg l(-1) at 12°C and 0.670, 0.741, 0.787 mg l(-1) at 17°C, respectively. Consequently, the toxicity of HgCl(2) on rainbow trout decreased when the temperature decreased from 17 to 12°C. Toxicity increased when the hardness decreased from 120 to 35 mg l(-1) CaCO(3). In contrast to temperature, water hardness presents a negative effect on the toxicity of HgCl(2). PMID:22033427

  4. Supported palladium catalysts for the reduction of sodium bicarbonate to sodium formate in aqueous solution at room temperature and one atmosphere of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stalder, C.J.; Chao, S.; Summers, D.P.; Wrighton, M.S.

    1983-10-05

    The reduction has been effected by using a variety of Pd (palladium)-based catalysts. The typical procedure was to suspend 0.25 g of catalyst in 25 cc of an aqueous solution of sodium bicarbonate purged slowly with hydrogen gas. The sodium formate concentration was followed by withdrawing aliquots for formate determination by /sup 13/C, /sup H/NMR. The reduction may be quite rapid; an initial rate of reduction after 1 h reaction produces a turnover rate of 35 formate anions produced/ palladium atom/h. All forms of Pd used appear to be active. The overall results indicate that carbon dioxide may be reduced at room temperature near its thermodynamic potential. 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Sodium-promoted Pd/TiO2 for catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changbin; Li, Yaobin; Wang, Yafei; He, Hong

    2014-05-20

    Catalytic oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO) to CO2 at ambient conditions is of great interest for indoor HCHO purification. Here, we report that sodium-doped Pd/TiO2 is a highly effective catalyst for the catalytic oxidation of HCHO at room temperature. It was observed that Na doping has a dramatic promotion effect on the Pd/TiO2 catalyst and that nearly 100% HCHO conversion could be achieved over the 2Na-Pd/TiO2 catalyst at a GHSV of 95000 h(-1) and HCHO inlet concentration of 140 ppm at 25 °C. The mechanism of the Na-promotion effect was investigated by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), CO chemisorption, Temperature-programmed reduction by H2 (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed desorption of O2 (O2-TPD) methods. The results showed that Na species addition can induce and further stabilize a negatively charged and well-dispersed Pd species, which then facilitates the activation of H2O and chemisorbed oxygen, therefore resulting in the high performance of the 2Na-Pd/TiO2 catalyst for the ambient HCHO destruction. PMID:24738832

  6. Chloride inhibition of nitrite-induced methemoglobinemia in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomasso, J.R.; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fingerlings for 24?h to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite (pH?=?7; hardness?=?40?mg/L; temperature?=?22–25 °C) produced methemoglobin levels of 20.7?±?1.9%, 59.8?±?1.9%, and 77.4?±?1.4% (SE), respectively. However, methemoglobin levels were not elevated when fish were simultaneously exposed to 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0?mg/L nitrite and 25, 50, and 100?mg/L sodium chloride, respectively. Acclimation to sodium chloride for 24?h before exposure to nitrite did not enhance the inhibitory action of sodium chloride. Fish exposed to 5?mg/L nitrite for 5?h developed 42.5?±?3.8% methemoglobin. When transferred to water containing 5?mg/L nitrite and 250?mg/L sodium chloride, methemoglobin levels returned to normal within 24?h. Environmental chloride probably inhibits methemoglobin formation by competing with nitrite for entrance into the gills of the fish. An ionic ratio of 16 Cl- to 1 NO2- is capable of complete suppression of nitrite-induced methemoglobin formation. Bicarbonate ion present in the test water (1?meq/L) may also have contributed to the inhibitive action of chloride.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Thermodynamic Properties of Thallium Chloride and Thallium Bromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavanoz, H. B.

    2015-02-01

    Thermodynamic properties as lattice parameters, thermal expansion, heat capacities Cp and Cv, bulk modulus, and Gruneisen parameter of ionic halides TlCl and TlBr in solid and liquid phases were studied using classical molecular dynamics simulation (MD) with interionic Vashistha-Rahman (VR) model potential. In addition to the static and transport properties which have been previously reported by the author [13], this study further confirms that temperature dependence of the calculated thermophysical properties of TlCl and TlBr are in agreement with the available experimental data at both solid and liquid phases in terms of providing an alternative rigid ion potential. The results give a fairly good description of TlCl and TlBr in the temperature range 10-1000 K.

  8. A Novel Flexible Room Temperature Ethanol Gas Sensor Based on SnO2 Doped Poly-Diallyldimethylammonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Shuang; Li, Dongmei; Liang, Shengfa; Chen, Xin; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    A novel flexible room temperature ethanol gas sensor was fabricated and demonstrated in this paper. The polyimide (PI) substrate-based sensor was formed by depositing a mixture of SnO2 nanopowder and poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDAC) on as-patterned interdigitated electrodes. PDDAC acted both as the binder, promoting the adhesion between SnO2 and the flexible PI substrate, and the dopant. We found that the response of SnO2-PDDAC sensor is significantly higher than that of SnO2 alone, indicating that the doping with PDDAC effectively improved the sensor performance. The SnO2-PDDAC sensor has a detection limit of 10 ppm at room temperature and shows good selectivity to ethanol, making it very suitable for monitoring drunken driving. The microstructures of the samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), and the sensing mechanism is also discussed in detail. PMID:23549363

  9. Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahey, J.J.

    1937-01-01

    A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

  10. Development of disposal sorbents for chloride removal from high-temperature coal-derived gases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.; Canizales, A.

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this program is to develop alkali-based disposable sorbents capable of reducing HCl vapor concentrations to less than 1 ppmv in coal gas streams at temperatures in the range 400{degrees} to 750{degrees}C and pressures in the range 1 to 20 atm. The primary areas of focus of this program are investigation of different processes for fabricating the sorbents, testing their suitability for different reactor configurations, obtaining kinetic data for commercial reactor design, and updating the economics of the process.

  11. Development of disposal sorbents for chloride removal from high-temperature coal-derived gases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.; Canizales, A.; Gupta, R.; Sheluker, S.D.; Ayala, R.

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this program is to develop alkali-based disposable sorbents capable of reducing HCl vapor concentrations to less than 1 ppm in coal gas streams at temperatures in the 480 degree C to 750 degree C range and pressures in the range 1 to 20 atm. The primary areas of focus of this program are investigation of different processes for fabricating the sorbents, testing their suitability for different reactor configurations (fixed-, moving-, and fluidized-bed reactors), obtaining kinetic data for commercial reactor design, and updating the economics of the process.

  12. Reaction of chlorine nitrate with hydrogen chloride and water at Antarctic stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Margaret A.; Rossi, Michel J.; Malhotra, Ripudaman; Golden, David M.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory studies of heterogeneous reactions important for ozone depletion over Antarctica are reported. The reaction of chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) with H2O and HCl on surfacers that simulate polar stratospheric clouds are studied at temperatures relevant to the Antarctic stratosphere. The gaseous products of the resulting reactions, HOCl, Cl2O, and Cl2, could readily photolyze in the Antarctic spring to produce active chlorine for ozone depletion. Furthermore, the additional formation of condensed-phase HNO3 could serve as a sink for odd nitrogen species that would otherwise scavenge the active chlorine.

  13. Interaction of hydrogen chloride with alumina. [influence of outgas and temperature conditions on adsorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of outgas conditions and temperature on the adsorptive properties of two aluminas Alon-c and Al6sG were studied using adsorption isotherm measurements. Alon-C and Al6SG were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET nitrogen surface areas. Some of these techniques were applied to two other aluminas but no isotherm data was obtained. Isotherm data and techniques applied to each alumina are summarized in tabular form.

  14. Design, Analysis and Implementation of an Experimental System to Harvest Energy From Atmospheric Temperature Variations Using Ethyl Chloride Filled Bellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Gibran

    The increase in global warming and the dwindling supplies of fossil fuels have shifted the focus from traditional to alternate sources of energy. This has resulted in a concerted effort towards finding new energy sources as well as better understanding traditional renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. In addition to the shift in focus towards alternate energy, the last two decades have offered a dramatic rise in the use of digital technologies such as wireless sensor networks that require small but isolated power supplies. Energy harvesting, a method to gather energy from ambient sources including sunlight, vibrations, heat, etc., has provided some success in powering these systems. One of the unexplored areas of energy harvesting is the use of atmospheric temperature variations to obtain usable energy. This thesis investigates an innovative mechanism to extract energy from atmospheric variations using ethyl chloride filled mechanical bellows. The energy harvesting process was divided into two parts. The first part consisted of extracting energy from the temperature variations and converting it into the potential energy stored in a linear coil spring. This was achieved by designing and fabricating an apparatus that consisted of an ethyl chloride filled bellows working against a mechanical spring in a closed and controlled environment. The bellows expanded/contracted depending upon the ambient temperature and the energy harvested was calculated as a function of the bellows' length. The experiments showed that 6 J of potential energy may be harvested for a 23°C change in temperature. The numerical results closely correlated to the experimental data with an error magnitude of 1%. In regions with high diurnal temperature variation, such an apparatus may yield approximately 250 microwatts depending on the diurnal temperature range. The second part of the energy harvesting process consisted of transforming linear expansion of the bellows into electric

  15. Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) Temperature Control and Data Acquisition System for Faraday Filter based Sodium Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerjyan, Vardan; Yuan, Tao

    2011-04-01

    Sodium (Na) Faraday filters based spectrometer is a relatively new instrument to study sodium nightglow as well as sodium and oxygen chemistry in the mesopause region. Successful spectrometer measurement demands highly accurate control of filter temperature. The ideal, long-term operation site for the Na spectrometer is an isolated location with minimum nocturnal sky background. Thus, the remote control of the filter temperature is a requirement for such operation, whereas current temperature controllers can only be operated manually. The proposed approach is aimed to not only enhance the temperature control, but also achieve spectrometer's remote and autonomous operation. In the meantime, the redesign should relief the burden of the cost for multi temperature controllers. The program will give to the operator flexibility in setting the operation temperatures of the Faraday filters, monitoring the temperature variations, and logging the data during the operation. Research will make diligent efforts to attach preliminary data analysis subroutine to the main control program. The real-time observation results will be posted online after the observation is completed. This approach also can be a good substitute for the temperature control system currently used to run the Lidar system at Utah State University (USU).

  16. Exothermic-Endothermic Transition in the Titration of Poly(allylamine chloride) with Sodium Hexametaphoshate Associated with a Change in the Proton Release Regime.

    PubMed

    Maechling, Clarisse; Ball, Vincent

    2016-05-26

    The formation of complexes (aggregates) between oppositely charged macromolecular species or between macromolecular species and multivalent ions is a fascinating fundamental research topic that allows one to understand fundamental processes in biology and in polymer science. In addition interpolyelectrolyte complexes hold by strong interactions and polyelectrolyte coacervates in which the stabilizing interactions are weaker find many applications in food and in colloidal science. The interactions between oppositely charged species are usually investigated as a function of intensive variables like the temperature, the pH, the ionic strength, and parameters related to the charged species themselves (molecular mass, charge density, charge distribution, and so forth). It appeared however in the past few years that the interaction kinetics is also of fundamental importance; a fast mixing of the interacting species can lead to the formation of frozen and out-of-equilibrium structures. The present investigation is aimed to study the interactions between a small polyphosphate (sodium hexametaphosphate) (HMP) and a linear polyamine (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) (PAH) from both a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view as a function of the ionic strength (in NaCl solutions). It is found, unexpectedly, that the interaction is of biphasic nature with a first exothermic regime followed by an endothermic regime. The transition between both regimes is ionic strength independent between 10 and 2000 mM emphasizing the strong interactions between both species. It occurs at a charge ratio of about 0.4 between the number of negative and positive charges and is correlated with proton release in the exothermic regime and a proton uptake in the endothermic regime. When HMP solutions are titrated in PAH solutions the turbidity of the mixtures is not the same as that obtained during the reverse titration at a given charge ratio, emphasizing the difficulty to establish an "equilibrium

  17. Molybdenum chloride incorporated sol-gel materials for oxygen sensing above room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, D. J., III

    Maximizing the efficiency of the combustion process requires the ability to sense oxygen levels over a broad range of concentrations with fast response times under rapidly varying conditions of pressure and temperature to maintain the correct fuel/oxygen ratio in real-time. Quenching of the luminescence from organometallic compounds by oxygen has been used to develop a number of fiber-based sensors. A major drawback of these organometallic indicators for combustion applications is that the chromophores degrade with time, have a limited operational temperature range, typically room temperature +/-25°C, and lack long-term reliability. This work investigates luminescent molybdenum clusters based on Mo6Cl12 were as replacements for organometallic indicators. A study of the high temperature stability of Mo6Cl 12 in air revealed irreversible changes in the optical absorption spectrum at T >250°C and a loss of the red luminescence characteristic of the pristine clusters. Thermal aging experiments run in air and under nitrogen point to oxidation of the clusters as the cause of the change in optical properties. X-ray powder diffraction measurements on samples annealed at 300°C under controlled conditions are consistent with oxidation of Mo6Cl 12 to form MoO3. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that K2Mo6Cl14•1H2O, the alkali metal salt of Mo6Cl12, has higher thermal stability and remains luminescent after long-term aging in air at 280°C. Methods were developed for depositing K2Mo6Cl14•1H 2O-incorporated sol--gel films on planar and optical fiber substrates by dip coating and spray coating. The mechanical properties of the films depended on the film thickness; thin films were stable, but cracks often formed in the thicker films needed for sensors. This problem was addressed using two strategies: altering the components of the sol--gel solutions used to embed the clusters and by devising a composite approach to sensing layers where a slurry of fully cured sol

  18. Furnace System Testing to Support Lower-Temperature Stabilization of High Chloride Plutonium Oxide Items at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Gerber, Mark A.; Fischer, Christopher M.; Elmore, Monte R.

    2003-04-16

    High chloride content plutonium (HCP) oxides are impure plutonium oxide scrap which contains NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and/or CaCl2 salts at potentially high concentrations and must be stabilized at 950 C per the DOE Standard, DOE-STD-3013-2000. The chlorides pose challenges to stabilization because volatile chloride salts and decomposition products can corrode furnace heating elements and downstream ventilation components. Thermal stabilization of HCP items at 750 C (without water washing) is being investigated as an alternative method for meeting the intent of DOE STD 3013-2000. This report presents the results from a series of furnace tests conducted to develop material balance and system operability data for supporting the evaluation of lower-temperature thermal stabilization.

  19. Effects of interleukin-1 beta injections into the subfornical organ and median preoptic nucleus on sodium appetite, blood pressure and body temperature of sodium-depleted rats.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Diana R; Ferreira, Hilda S; Moiteiro, Andrei L B B; Fregoneze, Josmara B

    2016-09-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) appears to be the mediator of the reciprocal communication between the brain and the immune system. IL-1β has been shown to modulate homeostatic functions including fever, feeding, drinking and cardiovascular control. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of IL-1β injections directly into the subfornical organ (SFO) and the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) on salt appetite, hedonic response, locomotion, body temperature and blood pressure in sodium-depleted rats. IL-1β injections into the SFO and MnPO at the doses of 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6ng/0.2μl promoted a dose-dependent inhibition of salt intake in sodium-depleted rats. Results of the "dessert" test and the "open field" test suggested that the inhibition of salt appetite is not due to any changes in the hedonic aspect of ingestive behavior or to changes in locomotor activity. As expected, IL-1β injections into the SFO and MnPO promoted an increase in body temperature. However, the fever induced by IL-1β injected into the SFO was slower than the increase in body temperature obtained following IL-1β injection into the MnPO. Furthermore, IL-1β at a dose of 1.6ng/0.2μl directly injected into the MnPO led to a significant increase in blood pressure, while injection of the same concentration of IL-1β into the SFO caused no significant change in blood pressure or heart rate. The action of pro-inflammatory cytokines may interfere with the normal control of body temperature, blood pressure and fluid homeostasis, producing the adjustment required to cope with infection and inflammation. Further studies are required to clarify the mechanisms involved in fever, blood pressure increase and inhibition of sodium appetite induced by injections of IL-1β into the SFO and MnPO in sodium-depleted rats. PMID:27163523

  20. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298. 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S. ); Rard, J.A. )

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Thermodynamics of aqueous sodium sulfate from the temperatures 273 K to 373 K and mixtures of aqueous sodium sulfate and sulfuric acid at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hovey, J.K.; Pitzer, K.S.; Rard, J.A.

    1991-07-01

    New isopiestic vapor-pressure measurements on the aqueous system {l_brace}(1{minus}y)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}+yNA{sub 2}SO{sub 4}{r_brace} along with earlier experimental investigations that span the range from y=0 to y=1 and infinitely dilute to supersaturated molalities have been analyzed in terms of the Pitzer ion-interaction model. Refined ion-interaction parameters for aqueous sodium sulfate valid over the temperature range 273 K to 373 K have been calculated and used for analyzing results for mixtures containing sulfuric acid and sodium sulfate at 298.15 K. Analysis of experimental results for these aqueous mixtures required explicit consideration of the dissociation reaction of bisulfate ion. Previous treatments of aqueous sulfuric acid and subsequently the bisulfate dissociation equilibrium valid in the range 273 K to 343 K were employed as a first approximation in representing the mixed solutions. Two sets of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters are presented for (sodium sulfate + sulfuric acid). The validity of the first set is limited in ionic strength and molality to saturated solutions of pure aqueous sodium sulfate (4 mol{center_dot}kg{sup {minus}1}). The second set of parameters corresponds to a slightly less precise representation but is valid over the entire range of experimental results considered. Both sets of parameters provide a more complete description of pure sulfuric acid solutions because of the removal of various redundancies of ion-interaction parameters. The specific ion-interaction terms used and the overall fitting procedure are described as well as selected examples of relevant thermodynamic calculations in the mixed system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-H{sub 2}O. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. A High Temperature Electrochemical Energy Storage System Based on Sodium Beta-Alumina Solid Electrolyte (Base)

    SciTech Connect

    Anil Virkar

    2008-03-31

    AlO{sub 2} is never formed. Conversion occurs by a coupled transport of Na{sup +} through BASE formed and of O{sup 2-} through YSZ to the reaction front. Transport to the reaction front is described in terms of a chemical diffusion coefficient of Na{sub 2}O. The conversion kinetics as a function of microstructure is under investigation. The mechanism of conversion is described in this report. A number of discs and tubes of BASE have been fabricated by the vapor phase process. The material was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), before and after conversion. Conductivity (which is almost exclusively due to sodium ion transport at the temperatures of interest) was measured. Conductivity was measured using sodium-sodium tests as well as by impedance spectroscopy. Various types of both planar and tubular electrochemical cells were assembled and tested. In some cases the objective was to determine if there was any interaction between the salt and BASE. The interaction of interest was mainly ion exchange (possible replacement of sodium ion by the salt cation). It was noted that Zn{sup 2+} did not replace Na+ over the conditions of interest. For this reason much of the work was conducted with ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode salt. In the case of Sn-based, Sn{sup 2+} did ion exchange, but Sn{sup 4+} did not. This suggests that Sn{sup 4+} salts are viable candidates. These results and implications are discussed in the report. Cells made with Na as the anode and ZnCl{sub 2} as the cathode were successfully charged/discharged numerous times. The key advantages of the batteries under investigation here over the Na-S batteries are: (1) Steel wool can be used in the cathode compartment unlike Na-S batteries which require expensive graphite. (2) Planar cells can be constructed in addition to tubular, allowing for greater design flexibility and integration with other devices such as planar SOFC. (3) Comparable or higher open circuit

  3. An Ambient Temperature Molten Sodium-Vanadium Battery with Aqueous Flowing Catholyte.

    PubMed

    Liu, Caihong; Shamie, Jack S; Shaw, Leon L; Sprenkle, Vincent L

    2016-01-20

    In this study, we have investigated the key factors dictating the cyclic performance of a new type of hybrid sodium-based flow batteries (HNFBs) that can operate at room temperature with high cell voltages (>3 V), multiple electron transfer redox reactions per active ion, and decoupled design of power and energy. HNFBs are composed of a molten Na-Cs alloy anode, flowing aqueous catholyte, and a Na-β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte as the separator. The surface functionalization of graphite felt electrodes for the flowing aqueous catholyte has been studied for its effectiveness in enhancing V(2+)/V(3+), V(3+)/V(4+), and V(4+)/V(5+) redox couples. The V(4+)/V(5+) redox reaction has been further investigated at different cell operation temperatures for its cyclic stability and how the properties of the solid electrolyte membrane play a role in cycling. These fundamental understandings provide guidelines for improving the cyclic performance and stability of HNFBs with aqueous catholytes. We show that the HNFB with aqueous V-ion catholyte can reach high storage capacity (∼70% of the theoretical capacity) with good Coulombic efficiency (90% ± 1% in 2-30 cycles) and cyclic performance (>99% capacity retention for 30 cycles). It demonstrates, for the first time, the potential of high capacity HNFBs with aqueous catholytes, good capacity retention and long cycling life. This is also the first demonstration that Na-β″-Al2O3 solid electrolyte can be used with aqueous electrolyte at near room temperature for more than 30 cycles. PMID:26720551

  4. A polytetrafluoroethylene porous membrane and dimethylhexadecylamine quaternized poly (vinyl benzyl chloride) composite membrane for intermediate temperature fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Xu, Chenxi; Zou, Linling; Scott, Keith; Liu, Jiyan

    2015-10-01

    A composite material for phosphoric acid (PA) loaded membrane was prepared using a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin film. N, N-Dimethylhexadecylamine partially quaternized poly (vinyl benzyl chloride) (qPVBzCl-) was synthesized as the substrate for the phosphoric acid loaded polymer membrane. SEM observation indicated that the pores were filled with the qPVBzCl-. The maximum PA loading level was calculated to be 4.67-5.12 per repeat unit on average. TGA results showed that resultant composite membrane was stable in the intermediate temperature from 100 °C to 200 °C. The composite membrane tensile stress was 56.23 MPa, and the Young's Modulus was 0.25 GPa, and the fractured elongation was 23%. The conductivity of the composite membrane after the PA addition (H3PO4@PTFE/qPVBzCl-) increased from 0.085 S cm-1 to 0.11 S cm-1 from 105 °C to 180 °C. The peak power density of the H2/O2 at 175 °C under low humidity condition (<1%) for H3PO4@PTFE/qPVBzCl- membranes was 360 mW cm-2.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  6. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  8. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... empirical formula is NaOH. Sodium hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg....

  9. Ion exchange in a zeolite-molten chloride system

    SciTech Connect

    Woodman, R.H.; Pereira, C.

    1997-07-01

    Electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel results in a secondary waste stream of radioactive fission products dissolved in chloride salt. Disposal plans include a waste form that can incorporate chloride forms featuring one or more zeolites consolidated with sintered glass. A candidate method for incorporating fission products in the zeolites is passing the contaminated salt over a zeolite column for ion exchange. To date, the molten chloride ion-exchange properties of four zeolites have been investigated for this process: zeolite A, IE95{reg_sign}, clinoptilolite, and mordenite. Of these, zeolite A has been the most promising. Treating zeolite 4A, the sodium form of zeolite A , with the solvent salt for the waste stream-lithium-potassium chloride of eutectic melting composition, is expected to provide a material with favorable ion-exchange properties for the treatment of the waste salt. The authors constructed a pilot-plant system for the ion-exchange column. Initial results indicate that there is a direct relationship between the two operating variable of interest, temperature, and initial sodium concentration. Also, the mass ratio has been about 3--5 to bring the sodium concentration of the effluent below 1 mol%.

  10. Mixed Micelles of Sodium Cholate and Sodium Dodecylsulphate 1:1 Binary Mixture at Different Temperatures – Experimental and Theoretical Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Jójárt, Balázs; Poša, Mihalj; Fiser, Béla; Szőri, Milán; Farkaš, Zita; Viskolcz, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Micellisation process for sodium dodecyl sulphate and sodium cholate in 1∶1 molar ratio was investigated in a combined approach, including several experimental methods and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of mixed micelle was determined by spectrofluorimetric and surface tension measurements in the temperature range of 0–50°C and the values obtained agreed with each other within the statistical error of the measurements. In range of 0–25°C the cmc values obtained are temperature independent while cmc values were increased at higher temperature, which can be explained by the intensive motion of the monomers due to increased temperature. The evidence of existing synergistic effect among different constituent units of the micelle is indicated clearly by the interaction parameter (β1,2) calculated from cmc values according to Rubingh. As the results of the conductivity measurements showed the negative surface charges of the SDS-NaCA micelle are not neutralized by counterions. Applying a 10 µs long coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation for system including 30-30 SDS and CA (with appropriate number of Na+ cations and water molecules) we obtained semi-quantitative agreement with the experimental results. Spontaneous aggregation of the surfactant molecules was obtained and the key steps of the micelle formation are identified: First a stable SDS core was formed and thereafter due to the entering CA molecules the size of the micelle increased and the SDS content decreased. In addition the size distribution and composition as well as the shape and structure of micelles are also discussed. PMID:25004142

  11. Mixed micelles of sodium cholate and sodium dodecylsulphate 1:1 binary mixture at different temperatures--experimental and theoretical investigations.

    PubMed

    Jójárt, Balázs; Poša, Mihalj; Fiser, Béla; Szőri, Milán; Farkaš, Zita; Viskolcz, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Micellisation process for sodium dodecyl sulphate and sodium cholate in 1∶1 molar ratio was investigated in a combined approach, including several experimental methods and coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of mixed micelle was determined by spectrofluorimetric and surface tension measurements in the temperature range of 0-50°C and the values obtained agreed with each other within the statistical error of the measurements. In range of 0-25°C the cmc values obtained are temperature independent while cmc values were increased at higher temperature, which can be explained by the intensive motion of the monomers due to increased temperature. The evidence of existing synergistic effect among different constituent units of the micelle is indicated clearly by the interaction parameter (β1,2) calculated from cmc values according to Rubingh. As the results of the conductivity measurements showed the negative surface charges of the SDS-NaCA micelle are not neutralized by counterions. Applying a 10 µs long coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation for system including 30-30 SDS and CA (with appropriate number of Na+ cations and water molecules) we obtained semi-quantitative agreement with the experimental results. Spontaneous aggregation of the surfactant molecules was obtained and the key steps of the micelle formation are identified: First a stable SDS core was formed and thereafter due to the entering CA molecules the size of the micelle increased and the SDS content decreased. In addition the size distribution and composition as well as the shape and structure of micelles are also discussed. PMID:25004142

  12. From lithium to sodium: cell chemistry of room temperature sodium–air and sodium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Pascal; Bender, Conrad L; Busche, Martin; Eufinger, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Summary Research devoted to room temperature lithium–sulfur (Li/S8) and lithium–oxygen (Li/O2) batteries has significantly increased over the past ten years. The race to develop such cell systems is mainly motivated by the very high theoretical energy density and the abundance of sulfur and oxygen. The cell chemistry, however, is complex, and progress toward practical device development remains hampered by some fundamental key issues, which are currently being tackled by numerous approaches. Quite surprisingly, not much is known about the analogous sodium-based battery systems, although the already commercialized, high-temperature Na/S8 and Na/NiCl2 batteries suggest that a rechargeable battery based on sodium is feasible on a large scale. Moreover, the natural abundance of sodium is an attractive benefit for the development of batteries based on low cost components. This review provides a summary of the state-of-the-art knowledge on lithium–sulfur and lithium–oxygen batteries and a direct comparison with the analogous sodium systems. The general properties, major benefits and challenges, recent strategies for performance improvements and general guidelines for further development are summarized and critically discussed. In general, the substitution of lithium for sodium has a strong impact on the overall properties of the cell reaction and differences in ion transport, phase stability, electrode potential, energy density, etc. can be thus expected. Whether these differences will benefit a more reversible cell chemistry is still an open question, but some of the first reports on room temperature Na/S8 and Na/O2 cells already show some exciting differences as compared to the established Li/S8 and Li/O2 systems. PMID:25977873

  13. Predictive Thermal Inactivation Model for Effects of Temperature, Sodium Lactate, NaCl, and Sodium Pyrophosphate on Salmonella Serotypes in Ground Beef

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Vijay K.; Marks, Harry M.; Mohr, Tim

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of survival data of a mixture of Salmonella spp. at fixed temperatures between 55°C (131°F) and 71.1°C (160°F) in ground beef matrices containing concentrations of salt between 0 and 4.5%, concentrations of sodium pyrophosphate (SPP) between 0 and 0.5%, and concentrations of sodium lactate (NaL) between 0 and 4.5% indicated that heat resistance of Salmonella increases with increasing levels of SPP and salt, except that, for salt, for larger lethalities close to 6.5, the effect of salt was evident only at low temperatures (<64°C). NaL did not seem to affect the heat resistance of Salmonella as much as the effects induced by the other variables studied. An omnibus model for predicting the lethality for given times and temperatures for ground beef matrices within the range studied was developed that reflects the convex survival curves that were observed. However, the standard errors of the predicted lethalities from this models are large, so consequently, a model, specific for predicting the times needed to obtained a lethality of 6.5 log10, was developed, using estimated results of times derived from the individual survival curves. For the latter model, the coefficient of variation (CV) of predicted times range from about 6 to 25%. For example, at 60°C, when increasing the concentration of salt from 0 to 4.5%, and assuming that the concentration of SPP is 0%, the time to reach a 6.5-log10 relative reduction is predicted to increase from 20 min (CV = 11%) to 48 min (CV = 15%), a 2.4 factor (CV = 19%). At 71.1°C (160°F) the model predicts that more than 0.5 min is needed to achieve a 6.5-log10 relative reduction. PMID:12957896

  14. Distributed temperature monitoring for liquid sodium leakage detection using OFDR-based Rayleigh backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyreva, E.; Cotillard, R.; Laffont, G.; Ferdinand, P.; Cambet, D.; Jeannot, J.-P.; Charvet, P.; Albaladéjo, S.; Rodriguez, G.

    2014-05-01

    For the first time, a gold coated single mode optical fiber has been used to detect a liquid sodium leakage on a pipe of secondary circuit pipe mock-up of nuclear fast reactor (Gen IV) by means of Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry-based on Rayleigh backscattering. During 150 min of the experiment we were able to detect and monitor the evolution of a liquid sodium leakage on the surface of the pipe.

  15. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb2+) with chloride Pb2+=nCl−↔PbCln2−nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0–6 m) and temperature (15–45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations: logβ1∗=logβ1+0.21I−8.61I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)+1927.40[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ2∗=logβ2+0.32I−4.67I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)+594.54[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ3∗=logβ3+0.40I−2.68I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)−43.98[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕T with standard errors of 0.05, 0.04 and 0.06, respectively. The thermodynamic values of log β1, logβ2 and logβ3 at 25.0 °C and the enthalpies of formation of PbCl+, PbCl20 and PbCl3− are in good agreement with literature values. We have combined our results with the earlier work of Seward (1984) to yield thermodynamic constants that are valid from 15 to 300 °C: logβ1=44.82+0.031T−21.21logTlogβ2=61.42+0.046T−29.51logTlogβ3=107.97+0.071T−51.46logT with standard errors of 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10, respectively. PMID:26937043

  16. Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H.

    2012-07-01

    The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

  17. Coagulation behavior and floc properties of compound bioflocculant-polyaluminum chloride dual-coagulants and polymeric aluminum in low temperature surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Sun, Shenglei; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Qian

    2015-04-01

    This study was intended to compare coagulation behavior and floc properties of two dual-coagulants polyaluminum chloride-compound bioflocculant (PAC-CBF) (PAC dose first) and compound bioflocculant-polyaluminum chloride (CBF-PAC) (CBF dose first) with those of PAC alone in low temperature drinking water treatment. Results showed that dual-coagulants could improve DOC removal efficiency from 30% up to 34%. Moreover, CBF contributed to the increase of floc size and growth rate, especially those of PAC-CBF were almost twice bigger than those of PAC. However, dual-coagulants formed looser and weaker flocs with lower breakage factors in which fractal dimension of PAC-CBF flocs was low which indicates a looser floc structure. The floc recovery ability was in the following order: PAC-CBF>PAC alone>CBF-PAC. The flocculation mechanism of PAC was charge neutralization and enmeshment, meanwhile the negatively charged CBF added absorption and bridging effect. PMID:25872730

  18. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1763 - Sodium hydroxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... hydroxide is prepared commercially by the electrolysis of sodium chloride solution and also by reacting... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium hydroxide. 184.1763 Section 184.1763 Food... GRAS § 184.1763 Sodium hydroxide. (a) Sodium hydroxide (NaOH, CAS Reg. No. 1310-73-2) is also known...

  20. Potential use of the facultative halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. as substrate for biogas production cultivated with different concentrations of sodium chloride under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Turcios, Ariel E; Weichgrebe, Dirk; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2016-03-01

    This project analyses the biogas potential of the halophyte Chenopodium quinoa Willd. In a first approach C. quinoa was grown with different concentrations of NaCl (0, 10 and 20 ppt NaCl) and the crop residues were used as substrate for biogas production. In a second approach, C. quinoa was grown with 0, 10, 20 and 30 ppt NaCl under hydroponic conditions and the fresh biomass was used as substrate. The more NaCl is in the culture medium, the higher the sodium, potassium, crude ash and hemicellulose content in the plant tissue whereas the calcium, sulfur, nitrogen and carbon content in the biomass decrease. According to this study, it is possible to produce high yields of methane using biomass of C. quinoa. The highest specific methane yields were obtained using the substrate from the plants cultivated at 10 and 20 ppt NaCl in both experiments. PMID:26744800

  1. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of (acetamide + sodium/potassium thiocyanates) molten mixtures: composition and temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Guchhait, Biswajit; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Kashyap, Hemant K; Biswas, Ranjit

    2010-04-22

    Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques have been used to explore the Stokes' shift dynamics and rotational relaxation of a dipolar solute probe in molten mixtures of acetamide (CH(3)CONH(2)) with sodium and potassium thiocyanates (Na /KSCN) at T approximately 318 K and several other higher temperatures. The dipolar solute probe employed for this study is coumarin 153 (C153). Six different fractions (f) of KSCN of the following ternary mixture composition, 0.75 CH(3)CONH(2) + 0.25[(1 - f)NaSCN + fKSCN], have been considered. The estimated experimental dynamic Stokes' shift for these systems ranges between 1800 and 2200 cm(-1) (+/-250 cm(-1)), which is similar to what has been observed with the same solute probe in several imidazolium cation based room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL) and in pure amide solvents. Interestingly, this range of estimated Stokes' shift, even though not corresponding to the megavalue of static dielectric constant reported in the literature for a binary mixture of molten CH(3)CONH(2) and NaSCN, exhibits a nonmonotonic KSCN concentration dependence. The magnitudes of the dynamic Stokes' shift detected in the present experiments are significantly less than the estimated ones, as nearly 40-60% of the total shift is missed due to the limited time resolution employed (full-width at half-maximum of the instrument response function approximately 70 ps). The solvation response function, constructed from the detected shifts in these systems, exhibits triexponential decay with the fastest time constant (tau(1)) in the 10-20 ps range, which might be much shorter if measured with a better time resolution. The second time constant (tau(2)) lies in the 70-100 ps range, and the third one (tau(3)) ranges between 300 and 800 ps. Both these time constants (tau(2) and tau(3)) show alkali metal ion concentration dependence and exhibit viscosity decoupling at higher viscosity in the NaSCN-enriched region. Time dependent rotational

  2. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? 3511.11 Section 3511.11... mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in... lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride. You must already have authorization, under part 3800...

  3. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? 3511.11 Section 3511.11... mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in... lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride. You must already have authorization, under part 3800...

  4. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? 3511.11 Section 3511.11... mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in... lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride. You must already have authorization, under part 3800...

  5. 43 CFR 3511.11 - If I am mining calcium chloride, may I obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... obtain a noncompetitive mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? 3511.11 Section 3511.11... mineral lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride? Yes. If you are producing calcium chloride in... lease to produce the commingled sodium chloride. You must already have authorization, under part 3800...

  6. Fabrication and icing property of superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces derived from anodizing aluminum foil in a sodium chloride aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meirong; Liu, Yuru; Cui, Shumin; Liu, Long; Yang, Min

    2013-10-01

    An aluminum foil with a rough surface was first prepared by anodic treatment in a neutral aqueous solution with the help of pitting corrosion of chlorides. First, the hydrophobic Al surface (contact angle around 79°) became superhydrophilic (contact angle smaller than 5°) after the anodizing process. Secondly, the superhydrophilic Al surface became superhydrophobic (contact angle larger than 150°) after being modified by oleic acid. Finally, the icing property of superhydrophilic, untreated, and superhydrophobic Al foils were investigated in a refrigerated cabinet at -12 °C. The mean total times to freeze a water droplet (6 μL) on the three foils were 17 s, 158 s and 1604 s, respectively. Thus, the superhydrophilic surface accelerates the icing process, while the superhydrophobic surface delays the process. The main reason for this transition might mainly result from the difference of the contact area of the water droplet with Al substrate: the increase in contact area with Al substrate will accelerate the heat conduct process, as well as the icing process; the decrease in contact area with Al substrate will delay the heat conduct process, as well as the icing process. Compared to the untreated Al foil, the contact area of the water droplet with the Al substrate was higher on superhydrophilic surface and smaller on the superhydrophobic surface, which led to the difference of the heat transfer time as well as the icing time.

  7. Modelling the effect of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and sodium chloride on the kinetic responses of lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in table olive storage using a specifically implemented Quasi-chemical primary model.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, R; Bautista-Gallego, J; Arroyo-López, F N; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2010-04-15

    The goal of this work was to apply the Quasi-chemical primary model (a system of four ordinary differential equations that derives from a hypothetical four-step chemical mechanism involving an antagonistic metabolite) in the study of the evolution of yeast and lactic acid bacteria populations during the storage of Manzanilla-Aloreña table olives subjected to different mixtures of ascorbic acid, sodium metabisulphite and NaCl. Firstly, the Quasi-chemical model was applied to microbial count data to estimate the growth-decay biological parameters. The model accurately described the evolution of both populations during storage, providing detailed information on the microbial behaviour. Secondly, these parameters were used as responses and analysed according to a mixture design experiment (secondary model). The contour lines of the corresponding response surfaces clearly disclosed the relationships between growth and environmental conditions, showing the stimulating and inhibitory effect of ascorbic acid and sodium metabisulphite, respectively, on both populations of microorganisms. This work opens new possibilities for the potential use of the Quasi-chemical primary model in the study of table olive fermentations. PMID:20185187

  8. A relationship between the occurrence of sporadic sodium layers and temperatures over Hefei (31.8°N, 117.3°E)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, S.; Dou, X.

    2011-12-01

    A sporadic sodium layer is a narrow layer in which a sudden increase of sodium (Na) is occurring. The mechanism of sporadic sodium layers(SSLs) is unclear although several theories have been proposed. In our study, we compare the sodium density data of the Rayleigh-Sodium fluorescence lidar system of the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) at Hefei, China (31.8N,117.3E) with the temperature data of the SABER satellite. We find that there is a strong correlation between the occurrence of sporadic sodium layers and low temperatures below 150K generally two or three days before the SSLs. A few hours before the an SSL event there is always an unusual heating process detected at the altitude where the SSL occurs. From Jan 2006 to Dec 2009, 29 typical SSL events are clearly identified , 22 of which occur following low temperatures below 150K and another 6 of which have no temperature data over night. We also present a new possible mechanism of SSLs called the low-and-high temperature model: in the altitude between 95~100km, the sodium bicarbonate clusters are absorbed by the cold vapour particles for nucleation and the ice grains also adsorb sodium atoms as a thin metal film, then the heavy ice grains sink to down altitudes near 93km. When the temperature is high enough the ice grains vapour, and the NaHCO3 break down to Na to create a sudden increase of the sodium layer.

  9. In-situ temperature field measurements and direct observation of crystal/melt at vertical Bridgman growth of lead chloride under stationary and dynamic arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Robert; Nitsch, Karel

    2015-10-01

    Influence of growth conditions, i.e. temperature gradient in the furnace and the pulling rate, on the position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface during vertical Bridgman growth was studied. The position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface are a key factor for describing the final quality of growing crystal. Following two methods for characterization of its position and shape were used: (i) direct observation and (ii) direct temperature field measurement during simulated vertical Bridgman growth. As a model compound a lead chloride is used. Three different ampoule positions in two different temperature gradients in the furnace and two experimental arrangements - stationary (0 mm/h pulling rate) and dynamic (3 mm/h pulling rate) were analyzed. Obtained temperature data were projected as 2D planar cut under radial symmetry and denoted as isolevels. Their further conversion by linear approximation into isotherms allowed detail analysis of heat conditions in the system during simulated growth by comparison of isotherms 500 °C (m.p. of lead chloride) at different growth conditions.

  10. 21 CFR 101.61 - Nutrient content claims for the sodium content of foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sodium chloride or is generally understood by consumers to contain sodium, unless the listing of the... “salt” is not synonymous with “sodium.” Salt refers to sodium chloride. However, references to salt... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nutrient content claims for the sodium content...

  11. 21 CFR 101.61 - Nutrient content claims for the sodium content of foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... sodium chloride or is generally understood by consumers to contain sodium, unless the listing of the... “salt” is not synonymous with “sodium.” Salt refers to sodium chloride. However, references to salt... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nutrient content claims for the sodium content...

  12. 21 CFR 101.61 - Nutrient content claims for the sodium content of foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... sodium chloride or is generally understood by consumers to contain sodium, unless the listing of the... “salt” is not synonymous with “sodium.” Salt refers to sodium chloride. However, references to salt... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nutrient content claims for the sodium content...

  13. 21 CFR 101.61 - Nutrient content claims for the sodium content of foods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... sodium chloride or is generally understood by consumers to contain sodium, unless the listing of the... “salt” is not synonymous with “sodium.” Salt refers to sodium chloride. However, references to salt... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nutrient content claims for the sodium content...

  14. Probing crystalline insulator surfaces with neutral helium atom scattering: A study of mixed potassium tantalate/niobate and thin films of potassium chloride and p-quaterphenyl on sodium chloride(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trelenberg, Thomas Walter

    Results from experiments using a thermal-energy beam of helium atoms as a probe in studying three crystalline insulator surfaces are presented. The primary focus is the simple ferroelectric perovskite, KTa1- xNbxO3 (or KTN when not specifying an Nb concentration) with x = 0.06, 0.10, 0.20, 0.30, and 0.52. Thin films of KCl and p-quaterphenyl grown onto NaCl(001) were also studied. Extending an earlier work on potassium tantalate (KTaO3), freshly cleaved (001) surfaces of niobium-doped potassium tantalate (KTN) were studied. While KTaO3 is an incipient ferroelectric undergoing no bulk phase changes, KTN, with Nb concentration greater than ˜1.5%, is a tunable ferroelectric, existing in several bulk phases depending on the temperature of the material. A metastable feature observed in KTN immediately after cleaving results in satellite peaks around the specular peak which decay over time. Also, small, broad half-order peaks were observed when the surface temperature was cycled between 50 K and 270 K for the first time. Surface hysteresis effects and responses to electric fields were also studied. Surface dispersion curves for the two high-symmetry directions are given for various Nb doping levels and substrate temperatures. This work compares the above phenomena to similar occurrences observed previously in KTaO3, and notes how the responses differ as a function of niobium doping. Also building on previous experience, the growth of KCl on NaCl was studied. Several recent works have focused on the physical interpretation of 3/4-order peaks observed during LEED investigations of this system. A HAS study of this system revealed, at best, a weak indication of several n/4-order peaks, but at film thicknesses well above those reported. In our first attempt to examine the surfaces of films of large organic molecules using HAS, p-quaterphenyl (p-4P) was deposited onto an NaCl surface held at 300K. Diffraction intensities from the NaCl were reduced but produced no other

  15. Copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of sodium sulfinates at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haibo; Shen, Yajing; Deng, Qinyue; Tu, Tao

    2015-11-28

    By using O-benzoyl hydroxylamines as amine sources, the first convenient copper-catalyzed electrophilic amination of sodium sulfinates has been realized. Even with 2 mol% catalyst loading, the protocol provided an efficient and straightforward synthesis of a broad range of functional sulfonamides under ambient reaction conditions without an additional base and ligand. Based on the control experiments, a plausible mechanism was proposed. PMID:26419424

  16. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  17. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  18. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress. PMID:15833625

  19. Evaluation of Phenylephrine Stability in Polyvinyl Chloride Bags

    PubMed Central

    Oldland, Alan R.; Kiser, Tyree H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Phenylephrine hydrochloride (HCl) is commonly used to maintain adequate blood pressure during shock and shocklike states. Phenylephrine is prepared in concentrated stock vials that require further dilution prior to administration. This study evaluated the physical and chemical stability of phenylephrine in extemporaneously prepared polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags. Methods: Phenylephrine HCl 10 mg/mL solution was diluted with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection to final concentrations of 200 µg/mL and 400 µg/mL and stored at room temperature (23°C-25°C) exposed to fluorescent light. Stability of phenylephrine HCl was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, 45, and 60. Results: Phenylephrine HCl 200 and 400 µg/mL solutions in PVC bags were physically stable during the entire 60-day study period. Phenylephrine HCl retained > 95% of the original concentration. Conclusion: Phenylephrine HCl diluted to 200 or 400 µg/mL with 0.9% sodium chloride for injection is both physically and chemically stable for a period of 60 days with ≤5% degradation when stored at room temperature and exposed to fluorescent lighting. PMID:24958958

  20. Thermodynamic properties of aqueous-alcoholic solutions of sodium chloride. H2O-2-C3H7OH-NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryaeva, E. S.; Konstantinova, N. M.; Mamontov, M. N.; Uspenskaya, I. A.

    2010-11-01

    The temperature-concentration dependences of the NaCl activity coefficient in aqueous solutions of isopropanol (propanol-2) at temperatures of 298.15 and 323.15 K (solution ionic force, 0.01 to 3 m; alcohol content, 10-60 wt %) were determined through the electromotive force method with an ion-selective electrode. A Pitzer model was used to mathematically describe the thermodynamic properties. The integral Gibbs energy of the solution formation of the H2O-2-C3H7OH-NaCl ternary system was performed according to Darken's method. The dissociation degree of salt in the investigated solutions was estimated using the literature data on the association constant of NaCl in aqueous-isopropanol solution.

  1. Photopolymer Electrolytes for Sustainable, Upscalable, Safe, and Ambient-Temperature Sodium-Ion Secondary Batteries.

    PubMed

    Bella, Federico; Colò, Francesca; Nair, Jijeesh R; Gerbaldi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    The first example of a photopolymerized electrolyte for a sodium-ion battery is proposed herein. By means of a preparation process free of solvents, catalysts, purification steps, and separation steps, it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional polymeric network capable of efficient sodium-ion transport. The thermal properties of the resulting solid electrolyte separator, characterized by means of thermogravimetric and calorimetric techniques, are excellent for use in sustainable energy systems conceived for safe large-scale grid storage. The photopolymerized electrolyte shows a wide electrochemical stability window up to 4.8 V versus Na/Na(+) along with the highest ionic conductivity (5.1 mS cm(-1) at 20 °C) obtained in the field of Na-ion polymer batteries so far and stable long-term constant-current charge/discharge cycling. Moreover, the polymeric networks are also demonstrated for the in situ fabrication of electrode/electrolyte composites with excellent interfacial properties, which are ideal for all-solid-state, safe, and easily upscalable device assembly. PMID:26437583

  2. 21 CFR 101.74 - Health claims: sodium and hypertension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... distinguished from sodium chloride, or salt, which is 39 percent sodium by weight. (2) The scientific evidence... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Health claims: sodium and hypertension. 101.74... claims: sodium and hypertension. (a) Relationship between sodium and hypertension (high blood...

  3. Long-term inactivation of bacteriophage PRD1 as a function of temperature, pH, sodium and calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Schijven, Jack F; Sadeghi, Gholamreza; Hassanizadeh, S Majid

    2016-10-15

    The two most significant processes controlling virus mobility in the subsurface environment are virus attachment and inactivation. In particular, models that predict subsurface virus transport are highly sensitive to inactivation. Virus inactivation is known to depend on temperature as well as hydrochemical conditions. The aim of the current work was to study the effects of temperature and hydrochemical conditions on the inactivation of bacteriophage PRD1 as a model virus, and to develop a quantitative relation for these effects. Series of batch experiments under controlled temperature were conducted, for a range of conditions: 9.5 °C and 12 °C, pH4 - pH8, sodium concentrations of 1, 10 and 20 mM, and calcium concentrations of 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mM. By multivariate regression analysis, a joint log-square model was developed that describes the inactivation rate of PRD1 as a function of these hydrochemical conditions. This model approximates two rate and Weibull models and accounts for the observed non-linear inactivation at increased pH and salt concentrations. Model predictions are within ±0.4 log10 (0.4-2.5 times) virus concentration reduction. The nature of the log-square model does not allow extrapolation of virus inactivation beyond the experimental conditions. Inactivation rate of PRD1 was found to increase with increasing temperature and increasing sodium and calcium concentrations, and to be lowest between pH 6.5 and pH 7.5. Within the studied conditions, the developed log-square model may be applied at field scale for predicting inactivation during subsurface transport of viruses. PMID:27438901

  4. Vinyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Vinyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 01 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  5. Methyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl chloride ; CASRN 74 - 87 - 3 ( 07 / 17 / 2001 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for

  6. Ethyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Ethyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 00 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  7. Benzyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzyl chloride ; CASRN 100 - 44 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  8. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  9. Mepiquat chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mepiquat chloride ; CASRN 24307 - 26 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  10. Allyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Allyl chloride ; CASRN 107 - 05 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  11. Acetyl chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acetyl chloride ; CASRN 75 - 36 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  12. Implications of salt and sodium reduction on microbial food safety.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Excess sodium consumption has been cited as a primary cause of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Salt (sodium chloride) is considered the main source of sodium in the human diet, and it is estimated that processed foods and restaurant foods contribute 80% of the daily intake of sodium in most of the Western world. However, ample research demonstrates the efficacy of sodium chloride against pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms in a variety of food systems. Notable examples of the utility and necessity of sodium chloride include the inhibition of growth and toxin production by Clostridium botulinum in processed meats and cheeses. Other sodium salts contributing to the overall sodium consumption are also very important in the prevention of spoilage and/or growth of microorganisms in foods. For example, sodium lactate and sodium diacetate are widely used in conjunction with sodium chloride to prevent the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and lactic acid bacteria in ready-to-eat meats. These and other examples underscore the necessity of sodium salts, particularly sodium chloride, for the production of safe, wholesome foods. Key literature on the antimicrobial properties of sodium chloride in foods is reviewed here to address the impact of salt and sodium reduction or replacement on microbiological food safety and quality. PMID:20301012

  13. Effect of Temperature, Concentration and Contact Time of Sodium Hypochlorite on the Treatment and Revitalization of Oral Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    del Carpio-Perochena, Aldo; Monteiro Bramante, Clovis; Hungaro Duarte, Marco; Bombarda de Andrade, Flaviana; Zardin Graeff, Marcia; Marciano da Silva, Marina; Cavalini Cavenago, Bruno; Lucas Fernandes, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Increasing the temperature of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) enhances its dissolution and antibacterial properties. However, the high resistance of multi-species biofilms could restrict the effect of the solution regardless of its temperature, enabling the long-term recovery of the surviving bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate if the increase of temperature of NaOCl improves its antibacterial and dissolution ability on oral biofilms and if the post-treatment remaining bacteria were capable of growing in a nutrient-rich medium. Materials and methods. Forty dentin blocks were infected intra-orally for 48 hours. Then, the specimens were treated with 1% and 2.5% NaOCl at room temperature (22ºC) and body temperature (37ºC) for 5 and 20 min. The percentage of live cells and the biovolume were measured pre- (control) and post-treatment and after the biofilm revitalization. Four confocal ‘stacks’ were chosen from random areas of each sample. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. Statistical significance was defined at P <0.05. Results. All the NaOCl groups were effective in dissolving the biofilm at any temperature, concentration and contact time without statistical differences among them (P >0.05). The 1%-NaOCl for 5min was not able to significantly kill the bacteria, regardless of its temperature and contact time (P >0.05). Conclusion. The temperature variation of the NaOCl was not relevant in killing or dissolving bacterial biofilms. Twenty-four hours of reactivation did not appear to be enough time to induce a significant bacterial growth. PMID:26889356

  14. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  15. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, S.J.; Thomas, T.R.

    1975-11-14

    A method is described for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel, and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  16. Method for the abatement of hydrogen chloride

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Steven J.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for reducing the amount of hydrogen chloride contained in a gas stream by reacting the hydrogen chloride with ammonia in the gas phase so as to produce ammonium chloride. The combined gas stream is passed into a condensation and collection vessel and a cyclonic flow is created in the combined gas stream as it passes through the vessel. The temperature of the gas stream is reduced in the vessel to below the condensation temperature of ammonium chloride in order to crystallize the ammonium chloride on the walls of the vessel. The cyclonic flow creates a turbulence which breaks off the larger particles of ammonium chloride which are, in turn, driven to the bottom of the vessel where the solid ammonium chloride can be removed from the vessel. The gas stream exiting from the condensation and collection vessel is further cleaned and additional ammonium chloride is removed by passing through additional filters.

  17. Barium borohydride chlorides: synthesis, crystal structures and thermal properties.

    PubMed

    Grube, Elisabeth; Olesen, Cathrine H; Ravnsbæk, Dorthe B; Jensen, Torben R

    2016-05-10

    Here we report the synthesis, mechanism of formation, characterization and thermal decomposition of new barium borohydride chlorides prepared by mechanochemistry and thermal treatment of MBH4-BaCl2, M = Li, Na or K in ratios 1 : 1 and 1 : 2. Initially, orthorhombic barium chloride, o-BaCl2 transforms into o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.15. Excess LiBH4 leads to continued anion substitution and a phase transformation into hexagonal barium borohydride chloride h-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, which accommodates higher amounts of borohydride, possibly x ∼ 0.85 and resembles h-BaCl2. Thus, two solid solutions are in equilibrium during mechano-chemical treatment of LiBH4-BaCl2 (1 : 1) whereas LiBH4-BaCl2 (2 : 1) converts to h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15. Upon thermal treatment at T > ∼200 °C, h-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15 transforms into another orthorhombic barium borohydride chloride compound, o-Ba(BH4)0.85Cl1.15, which is structurally similar to o-BaBr2. The samples with M = Na and K have lower reactivity and form o-Ba(BH4)xCl2-x, x ∼ 0.1 and a solid solution of sodium chloride dissolved in solid sodium borohydride, Na(BH4)1-xClx, x = 0.07. The new compounds and reaction mechanisms are investigated by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectroscopy (MS) and temperature programmed photographic analysis (TPPA). PMID:27109871

  18. Photoinduced, Copper-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation with Alkyl Electrophiles: Cyanation of Unactivated Secondary Alkyl Chlorides at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ratani, Tanvi S; Bachman, Shoshana; Fu, Gregory C; Peters, Jonas C

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported that, in the presence of light and a copper catalyst, nitrogen nucleophiles such as carbazoles and primary amides undergo C-N coupling with alkyl halides under mild conditions. In the present study, we establish that photoinduced, copper-catalyzed alkylation can also be applied to C-C bond formation, specifically, that the cyanation of unactivated secondary alkyl chlorides can be achieved at room temperature to afford nitriles, an important class of target molecules. Thus, in the presence of an inexpensive copper catalyst (CuI; no ligand coadditive) and a readily available light source (UVC compact fluorescent light bulb), a wide array of alkyl halides undergo cyanation in good yield. Our initial mechanistic studies are consistent with the hypothesis that an excited state of [Cu(CN)2](-) may play a role, via single electron transfer, in this process. This investigation provides a rare example of a transition metal-catalyzed cyanation of an alkyl halide, as well as the first illustrations of photoinduced, copper-catalyzed alkylation with either a carbon nucleophile or a secondary alkyl chloride. PMID:26491957

  19. Volatile Single-Source Precursors for the Low-Temperature Preparation of Sodium-Rare Earth Metal Fluorides.

    PubMed

    Barry, Matthew C; Wei, Zheng; He, Tianyu; Filatov, Alexander S; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2016-07-20

    Heterometallic single-source precursors for the preparation of sodium-rare earth metal fluorides are reported. Fluorinated β-diketonates NaRE(hfac)4 (RE = Y (1), Er (2), and Eu (3); hfac = hexafluoroacetylacetonate) have been obtained on a large scale, in high yield, via one-pot reaction that utilizes commercially available starting reagents. The solid-state structures of the title complexes consist of 1D polymeric chains with alternating [Na] and [RE(hfac)4] units. Compounds 1-3 are highly volatile and exhibit a fair stability in open air. Mass spectrometric investigation indicates the presence of heterometallic fragments in the gas phase. The presence of heterometallic species in solutions of coordinating solvents has also been confirmed. Decomposition of heterometallic precursors in argon atmosphere was shown to yield phase-pure sodium-rare earth metal fluorides. Low decomposition temperature effectively allows for a high degree of control over the formation of both kinetic α-phases and thermodynamic β-phases of target NaREF4 (RE = Y, Er, and Eu) materials. PMID:27232230

  20. [Effects of sodium naphthalene acetate on growth and physiological characteristics of tomato seedlings under suboptimal temperature and light condition].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun-na; Li, Yan-su; He, Chao-xing; Yu, Xian-chang

    2015-10-01

    Taking tomato 'Zhongza 105' as test material, the influences of sodium naphthalene acetate (SNA) on growth and physiological characteristics of tomato seedlings under suboptimal temperature and light condition were investigated. The results showed that the dry mass, vigorous seedling index, root activity, total nitrogen content, net photosynthesis rate (Pn) of tomato seedlings were significantly decreased by suboptimum temperature and light treatment. In addition, the catalase activity and zeatin riboside (ZR) concentration were also reduced. However, the superoxide dismutase, peroxidase activity and the content of abscisic acid (ABA) were increased. Compared with treatment of the same volume distilled water on tomato seedlings under suboptimum temperature and light condition, the dry mass of whole plant and vigorous seedling index of tomato seedlings were significantly increased by 16.4% and 22.9%, as the total N contents in roots and leaves and Pn were also increased by 8.5%, 28.5%and 37.0%, respectively, with the treatment of root application of 10 mg . L-1 SNA. Besides protective enzyme activity and the root activity were improved, the indole acetic acid (IAA) and ZR concentration of tomato were raised, and ABA concentration was reduced. The results indicated that root application of certain concentration of SNA could promote the growth of tomato seedlings by increasing the tomato root activity, protective enzymes activity, Pn and regulating endogenous hormone concentration under suboptimum temperature and light condition. PMID:26995913