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Sample records for temporomandibular joint disease

  1. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    ... feeds delivered directly to your desktop! more... Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Article Chapters Temporomandibular Joint Disorder What is ... Updated: November 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than ...

  3. [Dissertations 25 years after date 28. Degenerative diseases of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    de Bont, L G M

    2011-09-01

    In 1985, the dissertation 'Temporomandibular joint. Articular cartilage structure and function' was published. Much was known at the time concerning the (clinical) pathogenesis of osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibuIar joint, the associated radiographical characteristics and the results of non-surgical treatment. Little was known, however, concerning the processes that lead to the loss of bone tissue and other degenerative changes. The current idea that osteoarthrosis was histopathologically characterized by defects in the joint surfaces did not seem to apply to temporomandibular joints. In temporomandibular joints, the phenomenon was recognized of degenerative changes in the deeper layers of the articular cartilage and the subchondral bone, while the articular surface could be microscopically intact. A dislocated articular disc was seen as part of the disease osteoarthrosis. Clear insight into the origins of osteoarthrosis was not achieved. PMID:21957640

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  5. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation.

  6. Posttraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E.; Quinn, Peter D.; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  7. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  8. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Aimoni, Claudia; Ciorba, Andrea; Cappiello, Lucia; Giuriato, Roberto; Denes, Stefano A; Galiè, Manlio

    2012-03-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a benign lesion of unclear etiology involving the synovial membranes of joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. Its occurrence in the temporomandibular joint is particularly rare. Despite its benign nature, pigmented villonodular synovitis is described as being locally destructive to the surrounding structures. Imaging evaluation and histopathologic examination are crucial for correct diagnosis.The purposes of the surgical treatment are for relief of pain and swelling, improvement of joint function, and prevention of further joint damage.The authors report a case involving an adult male patient; complete excision of the temporomandibular joint lesion through an open arthroplasty approach was performed. To date, after 18 months of follow-up, the patient is disease free with an adequate preservation of function. PMID:22446460

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872...872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is...

  10. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD. PMID:26614951

  11. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  12. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death-receptor pathway. However, anti-TNF therapy does not prevent cartilage loss in this model of temporomandibular joint. PMID:26529096

  13. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis...temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  20. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  1. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  2. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    SciTech Connect

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  3. TRAIL, DR5 and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in vessels of diseased human temporomandibular joint disc. An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Almeida, L.E.; Migliore, M.R.; Caltabiano, M.; Leonardi, R.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the apoptosis involvement in the angiogenesis as a self-limiting process in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerated disc vessels, we assessed, by immunohistochemistry, the detection of TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3. TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3 expression were studied by immunohistochemistry in 15 TMJ discs displaced without reduction and in 4 unaffected discs. These apoptosis molecules were detected in the intima and media layers of newly formed vessels affected discs. In conclusion, vessels apoptosis activation in TMJ disc with ID could be regarded as a self-limiting process that try to leads to vessel regression; in this way an inhibition of angiogenic vessels may prove a key strategy in limiting pathological angiogenesis, by cutting off blood supply to tumors, or by reducing harmful inflammation. PMID:20839416

  4. On surgical intervention in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Widmark, G

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate the indications for and the results of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery in patients with long-standing severe orofacial pain and dysfunction as well as in patients with fractures of the condylar neck. The patients with long-standing pain and dysfunction had had symptoms for a mean time of 4 years, had been treated conservatively for a mean time of 2.5 years, and had undergone numerous conservative treatment methods without improvement except for a minor increase in mouth opening capacity. The indications for surgery were strict; only 1% or less of all the patients referred to the departments with a diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were prescribed surgery, which was considered to be the only remaining option. The TMJ surgery reduced pain, sleeping problems, and analgesic consumption and improved mouth opening capacity. The procedure showed low morbidity except for a facial nerve disturbance in three patients. Postoperatively, the bite force was observed to be normalised, and the radiographic examination showed moderate to severe osteoarthrotic changes. These changes, though extensive, were considered to be the normal outcome of diskectomy and without clinical significance, even though they resembled degenerative joint disease. In study V, surgery was performed on patients with a clear diagnosis of anterior disk displacement (ADD) with or without reduction. The preoperative pain and mouth opening capacity were markedly improved as well as other subjective symptoms. Although surgical morbidity was low, some radiographic changes were clearly detectable. In agreement with earlier reports, patients with a distinct diagnosis of ADD with or without reduction were clearly helped by diskectomy. In cases of ADD with or without reduction, it can be concluded that unsuccessful conservative treatment should not exceed 3-6 months but be discontinued in favour of the documented advantages of surgery in these cases. Patients with ankylosis should be treated surgically without delay. Unclear diagnoses such as arthralgia and osteoarthrosis with symptoms should be excluded from surgery unless overlapping muscular hyperactivity has been excluded as a major cause of the patients problem. Diskectomy is a useful surgical procedure for patients with severe long-standing TMD. It was shown in study VI that patients with dislocated fractures of the condylar neck can be successfully treated with open surgical reduction when the dislocation is large and associated with symptoms and limited function. When cognitive-behavioural profiles were measured psychometrically in study VII, a dysfunctional profile was more common in patients with myofascial pain and pain with an obscure origin than in other patients diagnosed with TMD. The dysfunctional profile was also common in patients in whom treatment of a conservative or surgical nature had failed. Among TMD patients with disk displacement, adaptive copers were most common in successfully diskectomized patients and least common in patients about to undergo invasive treatment. PMID:9352617

  5. [The temporomandibular joint in computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Pomaroli, A; Lener, M

    1988-03-01

    The first part describes details of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) which are of interest for the examination by computed tomography. In the second part three new planes of reference for scanning of the ventral, middle or dorsal part of the joint are presented. CT examinations were made of 14 TMJ of corpses to identify the medial or ventral parts of the articular disc, medial wall of the articular capsule and medial or triangular recessus to achieve this were scanned the corpses with opened and closed mouth, as well as with closed sets of teeth using a sort of hypomochlion in the molar region to distract the TMJ. More over we applicated different contrast mediums like air and niob. PMID:3383538

  6. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  7. Family Therapy in Complex Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Pamela G.; Mercuri, Louis G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a collaborative approach to the treatment of complex temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Through a positive relationship with a family therapist, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon in this case reports family therapy intervention as an additive solution to resolving apparent recurrent surgical failures. After three surgical procedures, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon noted continued muscle hyperactivity brought on by family environmental stress and arranged for family therapy treatment before a fourth surgical procedure. This paper presents a complicated TMJ case history, documentation for including the family in treatment of pain problems, collaborative efforts necessary for acceptance of referral for psychological intervention, and a family therapy approach to treatment in complex TMJ dysfunction. PMID:3166348

  8. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  9. Tuberculosis of the temporomandibular joint: a case of misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Jeong; Kim, Bong Chul; Choi, Eun-Joo; Samayoa, Sara Rebeca Kang; Kim, Hyung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, continues to be a major health problem worldwide. Primary TB infection is mostly pulmonary, but it may also occur in the lymph nodes, abdomen, skin, meninges, joints, and central nervous system. TB in the head and neck region usually occurs in the cervical lymph nodes, but is extremely rare in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This rarity increases the risk for not considering TB in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with TMJ pain. This article describes an unusual case of a 53-year-old man with painful swelling in the right preauricular area accompanied by difficulty in mouth opening. After surgical exploration, histopathologic findings revealed TB in the TMJ. The findings of this case highlight the importance of considering TB in the differential diagnosis of TMJ pain, especially for patients from endemic areas, patients who have lived or visited those areas, or patients with a preauricular swelling in the TMJ area. PMID:24822240

  10. Radiographic changes in the temporomandibular joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic, arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, B; Könönen, M; Kallenberg, A

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-one subjects with rheumatoid arthritis, 61 with psoriatic arthritis, 61 with ankylosing spondylitis, and 77 healthy controls were examined using orthopantomography to determine the frequency of radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint. Radiographic changes were found significantly more often in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (66%), psoriatic arthritis (38%), and ankylosing spondylitis (30%) than in controls (12%). Subjects with rheumatoid arthritis also had significantly more radiographic changes, especially cortical erosions and subcortical cysts, than subjects with psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis. It may be concluded that rheumatoid arthritis is a more severe disease than psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing arthritis regarding temporomandibular joint involvement. PMID:2098385

  11. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure ? DDwR ? DDwoR ? DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  12. Unilateral medial dislocation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, E; Rabin, A; Mejdan, M

    1997-08-01

    We present our experience of the rare condition of unilateral medial dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in 11 patients with head trauma who had received a direct lateral blow on the chin. The diagnosis was made by direct coronal CT of the TMJ performed from 6 h to 7 days following the injury. In 6 patients, subcondylar fracture of the ipsilateral mandibular ramus was also demonstrated. A second CT performed 11-16 months following the first one demonstrated pseudoarthrosis of the fractured ramus in these 6 patients. The second CT was identical to the first in the remaining 5 patients with pure dislocation of the condyle. All patients suffered from severe disability of the TMJ. The maximal vertical distance between the upper and lower incisors in patients with uncomplicated dislocation ranged between 8 and 12 mm. In cases with complicated medial condylar dislocation with fracture and pseudoarthrosis of the mandibular ramus, this distance ranged between 16 and 25 mm, probably because of additional movement in the area of the pseudoarthrosis. The maximal vertical distance between the incisors was compared with a control group of 20 normal adults who had values from 40 to 52 mm. Medial unilateral dislocation of the TMJ can appear in two forms: uncomplicated or complicated, with pseudoarthrosis of the ipsilateral mandibular ramus. PMID:9272501

  13. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis consequent to ear suppuration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Hota, Ashutosh; Sikka, Kapil; Thakar, Alok

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the complication of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis consequent to otitis media. The method applied is prospective case series and data collection done in tertiary referral centre from April 2012 to April 2013. Case description of three adolescent male patients with unilateral TMJ ankylosis consequent to ipsilateral chronic suppurative otitis media. Further literature review of TMJ ankylosis in relation to otitis media for evaluation for predisposing conditions. Surgical treatment by ipsilateral canal wall down mastoidectomy and concurrent TMJ gap arthroplasty. Surgical exposure confirmed ipsilateral bony ankylosis in all three. Two cases with long standing trismus had developed contralateral disuse fibrous ankylosis and required bilateral gap arthroplasty. Relief of trismus achieved in all three cases. Literature review indicated three similar cases secondary to otitis media. A universal feature among all previous case reports and the current case series was the age at onset of trismus, being at 10 years or less in all. TMJ ankylosis is a rare but potential complication of paediatric ear suppuration. Dehiscence along the tympanosquamosal fissure, tympanic plate and the foraminae of Huschke and Santorini in the paediatric population may predispose to extension of tympanic suppuration to the TMJ. PMID:24427727

  14. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Chuk, Raymond; Arvier, John; Laing, Barbara; Coman, David

    2015-01-01

    Infantile temporomandibular joint septic arthritis is an uncommon paediatric infection, but one which carries the potential for severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and possibly surgical management is indicated for the best outcomes. The presenting clinical features are non-specific in a neonate and an infant; as such a high degree of clinical suspicion is required. We present the case of an eleven-month-old boy who has made a full recovery from an acute temporomandibular joint septic arthritis and review the relevant literature. PMID:26236452

  15. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  16. MRI in a case of osteosarcoma in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Y; Matsumoto, K; Murakami, S; Kanesaki, T; Matsumoto, A; Kishino, M; Furukawa, S

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rare. We report a case of osteosarcoma in the TMJ of a 62-year-old female, pre-operatively diagnosed to have a benign tumour, and discuss the usefulness and limits of MRI using a TMJ coil as a diagnosis. PMID:24247589

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Saori; Kobayashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis, which is also called degenerative arthritis or degenerative joint disease, is primarily a disease that results from the breakdown and loss of cartilage in joints. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance images for the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Fifty patients (50 joints) with closed locking of the temporomandibular joint were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and then underwent arthroscopic surgery. The agreement of osteoarthritis between magnetic resonance images and arthroscopic findings was studied using the ? coefficient. Results The incidence of osteoarthritis on magnetic resonance images (38%) was significantly lower than that in arthroscopic findings (78%). There was no significant agreement between these two findings (p=.108). The ? coefficient was 0.154. Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance images for osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint was low; early osteoarthritis could not be diagnosed from magnetic resonance images. Clinicians should understand that the diagnostic accuracy of osteoarthritis without arthroscopy is not always high. PMID:26393215

  18. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  19. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Manisha; Pradhan, Gaurav; Gupta, Sunita; Kapoor, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The ectodermal dysplasias are a heterogenous group of diseases, which have one or more anomalies of the hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) is the most common type and is usually transmitted as an X-linked recessive trait. It is characterized by classical triad of hypotrichosis, anhidrosis/hypohidrosis, and hypodontia/anodontia. Here, we describe an Indian boy affected with HED and rare features including ankylosis of temporomandibular joint and cleft palate. PMID:25684924

  20. Effects of several temporomandibular disorders on the stress distributions of temporomandibular joint: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Qian, Yingli; Zhang, Yuanli; Fan, Yubo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate stress distributions in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) for comparison with healthy TMJs. A model of mandible and normal TMJs was developed according to CT images. The interfaces between the discs and the articular cartilages were treated as contact elements. Nonlinear cable elements were used to simulate disc attachments. Based on this model, seven models of various TMDs were established. The maximum stresses of the discs with anterior, posterior, medial and lateral disc displacement (ADD, PDD, MDD and LDD) were 12.09, 9.33, 10.71 and 6.07 times magnitude of the identically normal disc, respectively. The maximum stresses of the posterior articular eminences in ADD, PDD, MDD, LDD, relaxation of posterior attachments and disc perforation models were 21, 59, 46, 21, 13 and 15 times greater than the normal model, respectively. TMDs could cause increased stresses in the discs and posterior articular eminences. PMID:25587737

  1. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  3. Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint Successfully Treated by Surgery.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Aécio Abner Campos; Ferreira E Costa, Rafael; de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Chagas, Marcelo Roncalli Pinheiro; do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora Vieira; de Lacerda, Júlio César Tanos

    2015-12-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a chronic process, defined as a reactive cartilaginous proliferation, characterized by formation of cartilaginous nodules, usually loose in the joint space of the synovial membrane. It mainly affects large joints such as knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow, commonly in male patients. However, its manifestation in the Temporomandibular joint (TMJ), is a rare finding, occurring predominantly in females. This paper reports a case of a woman who presented to the service of Stomatology complaining of mouth opening limitations and pain in her left pre-auricular region. After clinical and radiographic analyses, the condition was diagnosed as SC of the TMJ. The loose bodies within the TMJ were removed under general anesthesia. Histological and follow-up features of this lesion are also discussed. To our knowledge, this is the second report of SC of the TMJ in Brazil. PMID:25912648

  4. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  5. [Radiographic scanning of the temporomandibular joint. Technic and results].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J L; Rives, J M; Cantaloube, D

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a prospective study involving investigation of the temporo-mandibular joints for algo-dysfunctional syndromes by gaseous arthroscanning. They propose a double articular compartment injection technique using CT scan localization. The CT scan study is performed using fine sagittal sections with the mouth both closed and open, and also Hirtz coronal sections. Early results directly demonstrate menisco-ligamentary structures, the position of the meniscus in the closed position and its displacement on mouth opening, these being of fundamental importance to the practitioner. The authors present normal results and the principal pathological results encountered in the investigation of algodysfunctional syndromes involving this joint (T.M.A.D.S.). CT scan allows more precise localization for joint injection than radioscopy, and while the images obtained are markedly better than those obtained on opaque arthrograms, they offer less dynamic information in view of the lack of radioscopy. PMID:2814320

  6. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  7. The incidence of osteo-arthritis of the temporomandibular joint in various cultures.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C J; Powers, R; Kruszynski, R

    1979-04-01

    Three hundred and forty-eight cranial remains from Bronze and Iron Age British, Romano-British, Anglo-Saxon, Eastern Coast Australian aborigines, Medieval Christian Norse, Medieval Scarborough, 17--20th century British and German cultures, were examined for the presence of osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joints. Cultures exposed to more stringent living conditions and with well-worn teeth had about twice the incidence of osteo-arthritis as the more sophisticated cultures. In general, loss of either molar support or occlusal imbalance were potent aetiological factors in this disease. PMID:380538

  8. Pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint. A review

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José V.; Sanchis, José M.; Margaix, María

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) published in journals included in Journal Citation Reports (JCR), and to evaluate whether there are clinical and radiological signs capable of differentiating between pseudotumors and tumors and between malignant and benign tumors. Material and Methods: A systematic Medline search was made of clinical cases of tumors and pseudotumors of the TMJ covering a 20-year period and published in journals included in JCR. Only cases with histological confirmation were included. A description is provided of the general characteristics of TMJ tumors, with comparison of the clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic and evolutive variables referred to pseudotumors, benign tumors and malignant tumors. Results: We identified 285 TMJ tumors published in 181 articles of 15 journals. The most frequent lesions were pseudotumors (synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, eosinophilic granuloma and osteochondroma). The mean age was 42 years and one month ± 16 years and two months. Tumors were more common in females. The mean time from symptoms onset to consultation was 30 months and 8 days ± 41 months and 9 days, and almost 19.6% of the cases initially had been diagnosed and treated as TMJ dysfunction. The most frequent clinical manifestations were pain, swelling and the limitation of joint movements. The most common radiological findings in the case of benign and malignant lesions were radiopacities and radiotransparencies, respectively. No panoramic X-ray alterations were observed in 14.6% of the benign tumors and in 7.7% of the malignant lesions. Surgery was the usual form of treatment. Sequelae were recorded in 18.2% of the cases, with tumor relapse in 9.1%. The four-year survival rate in the case of malignant tumors was 72.2%. Key words:Tumor, temporomandibular joint, metaplasia, pseudotumor, condyle. PMID:23385515

  9. Sleep deprivation induces abnormal bone metabolism in temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wei; Wu, Gaoyi; Huang, Fei; Zhu, Yong; Nie, Jia; He, Yuhong; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of experimental sleep deprivation (SD) on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats and the possible mechanism related to abnormal bone metabolism. Material and methods: SD was induced by a modified multiple platform method and assessed by serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. TMJs were detached and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Expression of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Compared with controls, SD significantly increased serum ACTH, indicating that the SD model was successful. In the SD group, H&E staining revealed greater vessel hyperplasia in the synovial membrane and thicker hypertrophic layers in condylar cartilages. Compared with controls, RNA and protein expression of the inflammatory factors IL-1? and TNF-? and the bone metabolism-related factor RANKL increased in condylar cartilage in the SD group, whereas OPG and the OPG/RANKL ratio decreased. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that OPG/RANKL immunopositive cells were mainly located in hypertrophic layers. Conclusions: These results suggest that sleep deprivation might play an important role in the occurrence and development of temporomandibular disorders, which may occur through abnormal secretion of inflammatory and bone metabolism-related factors. PMID:25785010

  10. Trps1 is necessary for normal temporomandibular joint development.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Ikumi; Fukushi, Toshiya; Honma, Shiho; Yoshioka, Seisuke; Itoh, Shunji; Muragaki, Yasuteru; Kurisu, Kojiro; Ooshima, Takashi; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Abe, Makoto

    2012-04-01

    Mutation of the human TRPS1 gene leads to trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS), which is characterized by an abnormal development of various organs including the craniofacial skeleton. Trps1 has recently been shown to be expressed in the jaw joints of zebrafish; however, whether Trps1 is expressed in the mammalian temporomandibular joint (TMJ), or whether it is necessary for TMJ development is unknown. We have analyzed (1) the expression pattern of Trps1 during TMJ development in mice and (2) TMJ development in Trps1 knockout animals. Trps1 is expressed in the maxillo-mandibular junction at embryonic day (E) 11.5. At E15.5, expression is restricted to the developing condylar cartilage and to the surrounding joint disc progenitor cells. In Trps1 knockout mice, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone forms relatively normally but the condylar process is extremely small and the joint disc and cavities do not develop. The initiation of condyle formation is slightly delayed in the mutants at E14.5; however, at E18.5, the flattened chondrocyte layer is narrowed and most of the condylar chondrocytes exhibit precocious chondrocyte maturation. Expression of Runx2 and its target genes is expanded toward the condylar apex in the mutants. These observations underscore the indispensable role played by Trps1 in normal TMJ development in supporting the differentiation of disc and synoviocyte progenitor cells and in coordinating condylar chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:22427063

  11. Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis as a Complication of Neonatal Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saadi, Noor J.; Bakathir, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Hashmi, Ahmed K.; Al-Ismaili, Mohammad I.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis as a complication of neonatal septic arthritis is rarely reported in the literature. We report two clinical cases of unilateral TMJ ankylosis occurring in paediatric patients subsequent to neonatal septic arthritis. The first case was a 15-month-old male infant who presented to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in May 2010. According to the published English scientific literature, he is the youngest person yet to be diagnosed with this condition. The second case was a five-year-old female who presented to the Al-Nahda Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in October 2011. Both cases presented with facial asymmetry and trismus. They subsequently underwent gap arthroplasty and interpositional temporalis muscle and fascia grafts which resulted in an immediate improvement in mouth opening. Postoperatively, the patients underwent active jaw physiotherapy which was initially successful. Both patients were followed up for a minimum of two years following their surgeries. PMID:26629387

  12. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and selected health parameters in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Harriman, L P; Snowdon, D A; Messer, L B; Rysavy, D M; Ostwald, S K; Lai, C H; Soberay, A H

    1990-10-01

    Little research has focused on temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the elderly. The present study describes relationships between TMJD and selected health parameters in a population of 75- to 94-year-old Roman Catholic sisters (nuns). Mental, physical, and oral assessments made on 117 sisters identified 26 with TMJD. Among all sisters, TMJD was not associated with age, education, mental impairments, hand coordination, handgrip strength, mobility, or use of walking aids. In 75- to 84-year-old sisters, TMJD was positively associated with self-reported arthritis (p = 0.12), edentulism (p = 0.09), and the presence of complete dentures (p = 0.05), and negatively associated with the number of teeth present (p = 0.05), especially the posterior teeth. These associations were weaker in 85- to 94-year-old sisters. This study suggests that TMJD is associated with the presence of complete dentures and a low number of teeth, especially the posterior teeth. PMID:2216377

  13. Three-dimensional animation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M; Gallo, L M; Airoldi, R L; Meier, D; Boesiger, P; Palla, S

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a method to reconstruct three-dimensionally the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by means of magnetic resonance (MR) tomograms and to combine this reconstruction with jaw motion data, recorded with six degrees of freedom by means of the opto-electronic system Jaws-3D, in order to analyse the movement of the whole condyle within the fossa during opening and closing, protrusive and laterotrusive movements. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the TMJ was calculated and animated on a graphics workstation. The condyle - fossa distance during jaw movements was computed for every condylar point and visualized by shading the surface of the condyle with pseudo colors. Furthermore, the location of the minimum condyle-fossa distance was calculated and displayed in a plane graph representing the condylar surface. For five subjects without any past or present history of myoarthropathies of the masticatory system the resulting patterns were analyzed and compared. PMID:25274083

  14. Change of Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint after Correction of Mild Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongnam; Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to verify the change in range of motion of the temporomandibular joint on correction of scoliosis. [Subjects and Methods] This study examined 31 male and female participants in their 20s and 30s with a spinal curve degree of 10° or greater. The subjects performed therapeutic exercise based on the pilates exercise system, which is known to be effective in mitigating the spinal curve for patients with scoliosis. All participants completed an 8-week therapeutic exercise regimen to alleviate the scoliosis in which exercise was performed, the exercise was done three times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 60 minutes. Among them, 19 participants were selected as an experiment group, whose symptoms were mitigated significantly, and 12 participants who did not undergo the exercise were identified as a control group. All subject was assessed for spinal curve degree, apparent leg length discrepancy, and deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint before and after the study. [Results] In the experimental group, the apparent leg length discrepancy and the deviation of the temporomandibular joint were significantly decreased after the exercise, and the ROM in the temporomandibular joint was significantly increased. In intergroup comparisons, all variables showed a significant difference. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that as the spinal curve degree decreases significantly, the range of motion and deviation in the temporomandibular joint showed a significant change, indicating that mild scoliosis may be a negative factor affecting the deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:25202172

  15. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. PMID:23438215

  16. Proteomic signature of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD): Toward diagnostically predictive biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Demerjian, Garabed Gary; Sims, Anothony Benjamin; Stack, Brendan Curran

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articulates the mandible with the maxilla. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysfunctions of this joint, which range from acute to chronic inflammation, trauma and dislocations, developmental anomalies and neoplasia. TMD manifest as signs and symptoms that involve the surrounding muscles, ligaments, bones, synovial capsule, connective tissue, teeth and innervations proximal and distal to this joint. TMD induce proximal and distal, chronic and acute, dull or intense pain and discomfort, muscle spasm, clicking/popping sounds upon opening and closing of the mouth, and chewing or speaking difficulties. The trigeminal cranial nerve V, and its branches provide the primary sensory innervation to the TMJ. Our clinical work suggests that the auriculotemporal (AT) nerve, a branch of the mandibular nerve, the largest of the three divisions of the trigeminal nerve, plays a critical role in TMD sequelae. The AT nerve provides the somatosensory fibers that supply the joint, the middle ear, and the temporal region. By projecting fibers toward the otic ganglion, the AT nerve establishes an important bridge to the sympathetic system. As it courses posteriorly to the condylar head of the TMJ, compression, injury or irritation of the AT nerve can lead to significant neurologic and neuro-muscular disorders, including Tourette's syndrome,Torticolli, gait or balance disorders and Parkinson's disease. Here, we propose that a proteomic signature of TMD can be obtained by assessing certain biomarkers in local (e.g., synovial fluid at the joint) and distal body fluids (e.g., saliva, cerebrospinal fluid), which can aid TMD diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:21364835

  17. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  18. Effects of enzymatic degradation after loading in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y; Su, S; Kunimatsu, R; Hirose, N; Mitsuyoshi, T; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, E; Tanne, K; Tanimoto, K

    2015-02-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1?, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1? in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading. PMID:25503611

  19. Early treatment of unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Ataç, Mustafa Sancar; Çakir, Merve; Yücel, Ergun; Gazio?lu, Çagri; Akkaya, Sevil

    2014-05-01

    Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint is a condition in which partial or complete immobilization of mandible occurs because of fusion between mandibular condyle and skull base. This condition can be treated orthodontically, surgically, or therapeutically or by prosthodontic rehabilitation. A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry, with limited mouth opening. She got injury in the face when she was 5 years old. Extraoral and intraoral examination findings were facial asymmetry on the left side, micrognathic mandible, and 19-mm mouth opening. After radiographic examination, ankylosis (Shawney type I) on the left side was revealed, and the patient was referred to Department of Orthodontics. After orthodontic clinical examination, we create following multidisciplinary treatment approach: (1) acrylic posterior bite block with spring application, (2) interpositional arthroplasty operation, and (3) physiotherapy (passive mouth-opening exercises). After the follow-up of 9 months, significant improvement (5 mm) was noticed in the opening of the mouth, and we decided to remove appliance and operate on the patient. Surgical procedure was performed under general anesthesia via blinded nasotracheal intubation. To prevent postoperative relapse, temporal fascia was interpositioned and sutured. Passive mouth-opening exercises were started 10 days after the surgery. Thirty-one-millimeter mouth opening was reached after the surgery and passive mouth-opening exercises. Patient's routine controls have been continued for 2 years. PMID:24769608

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; MacBarb, Regina F.; Wong, Mark E.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology reports state temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) affect up to 25% of the population, yet their etiology and progression are poorly understood. As a result, treatment options are limited and fail to meet the long-term demands of the relatively young patient population. TMD are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphological and functional deformities. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the TMJ disc, termed “internal derangement.” Though onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Due to the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient’s disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches capable of restoring joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. Capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, one such approach, tissue engineering, carries significant potential in the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. Preceding the current trends in tissue engineering is an analysis of native tissue characterization, toward identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ. PMID:24278954

  1. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent. PMID:24809824

  2. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  3. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  4. Morphologic and Functional Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint and Stomatognathic System after

    E-print Network

    Alberta, University of

    after Transmandibular Surgery in Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancers: Systematic Review Mohammed Al) surgery for tumour resection in the oral cavity and oropharynx may alter oral and temporomandibular joint when it comes to oral functions.3 Transmandibular surgery to treat oral cavity and oropharyngeal

  5. Serum S100A12 and Temporomandibular Joint Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Egyptian Patients: Acase Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Aziez, Ola A. Abdul; Saber, Nayera Z.; El Bakry, Samah A.; Mohammad, Ahmed A.; Maksud, Sahar S. Abdel; Ali, Yaser

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to measure serum levels of the proinflammatory protein S100A12, investigate clinical as well as contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of temporomandibular joint inflammation among juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and to find out the correlation between each of them, moreover with different disease parameters as temporomandibular joint inflammation may occur without clinical manifestations; it is in need for thorough evaluation and S100A12 may be a future anti-inflammatory treatment in JIA. Twenty patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and 10 healthy control subjects underwent measurement of S100A12 serum concentrations by sandwich ELISA. Temporomandibular Joints (TMJs); clinical and post contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) examinations were performed. MRI findings were scored. Results showed that TMJ arthritis was detected in 80% of JIA patients using MRI. Serum S100A12 levels were significantly increased in patients compared to controls. Serum concentrations of S100A12 and total MRI scores were significantly higher in JIA patients with active disease compared to those without activity. Systemic and polyarticular JIA patients showed significant increase in S100A12 levels and total MRI scores compared to those with oligoarticular JIA. The MRI TMJ abnormalities revealed significant association with clinical signs of TMJ inflammation but not with symptoms. A significant correlation was found between serum S100A12 concentrations and MRI score as well as between each of them and different clinical, laboratory disease parameters. Serum S100A12 levels showed significant positive correlation with synovial enhancement score. To conclude TMJ arthritis could be detected in most cases of JIA patients using contrast enhanced MRI. Increased S100A12 levels may point to synovial inflammation. Clinical signs of TMJ arthritis may be used as filter for MRI examination. Further studies on larger scale of JIA patients are needed for monitoring TMJ inflammation and S100A12 may be a potential target of future anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:20437698

  6. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  7. Magnetic resonance images in patients with acute traumatic injury of the temporomandibular joint: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Takaku, S; Yoshida, M; Sano, T; Toyoda, T

    1996-06-01

    Condylar or subcondylar fractures are severe traumatic lesions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) but the damage to the intracapsular soft tissues is not fully defined. In this study, twelve joints in ten patients with condylar and subcondylar fractures of the TMJ between two and twelve days after injury, were examined by magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the damage to the intracapsular soft tissues in the acute phase. The joint capsule and the retrodiscal tissue were both swollen and showed increased signal intensity. Tears were recognized in the capsule of the eight joints and in the retrodiscal tissue of six joints. All discs were displaced in an anteromedial direction along with the fractured condylar fragments, but tear (rupture) was not recognized. In all cases, high signal intensity was seen in the joint spaces, and haemarthrosis was recognized in six joints during open reduction surgery. PMID:8842909

  8. In vitro application of optical transmission systems in erbium:YAG laser temporomandibular joint surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf

    1995-05-01

    The experimental setup of this study is focused on the changes in temporomandibular joint tissue after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser. Initially, the free-running beam from the laser was focused onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples, indicating an optimum average energy density and pulse duration for the purpose of temporomandibular joint surgery of about 15 - 60 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) - 240 microsecond(s) , respectively. Consecutively, an attempt was made to couple the Erbium:YAG laser beam on the one hand to optical fibers made of infrared-transmitting glasses (fluoride- and chalcogenide-based), on the other hand to a recently developed sapphire and liquid core fiber, respectively. From the preliminary observations of this investigation it appears that both the liquid core and the sapphire fiber are the most promising candidates for delivery of Erbium-YAG laser radiation in arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation.

  9. Reconstruction of Temporomandibular Joint With a Fibula Free Flap: A Case Report With a Histological Study.

    PubMed

    Fariña, Rodrigo; Campos, Pía; Beytía, Javiera; Martínez, Benjamín

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) for congenital or acquired deformities is a major challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. The alternatives for reconstructing the TMJ include free grafts (costochondral, iliac crest, clavicle, or metatarsus), free flaps (fibula), osteogenic distraction, and alloplastic grafts. The lack of biological knowledge of cartilaginous grafts and their reaction to the environment of the TMJ is largely responsible for the inability to predict growth. This report describes the use of a free flap for TMJ reconstruction. PMID:26342950

  10. Modified T-Plate Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A New and Versatile Option

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Bariar, Lalit Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Background This study has been conducted with the aim of evaluating modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty. Methods A prospective comparative study in patients admitted with temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Ankylotic temporomandibular joint arthroplasty included condylectomy gap arthroplasty in 7, temporalis muscle flap interpositional arthroplasty in 8, and modified T-plate interpositional arthroplasty in 13 cases. The patients were followed for three years. Collected data were tabulated and subjected to Fisher's exact test, chi-square test and probability estimation. Results A significant increase in interincisal distance of 32 mm was seen in 12 (92.31%) patients in the T-plate interposition group, in 2 (25%) cases of the temporalis muscle flap interposition group, and in 1 case (14.28%) of the condylectomy group at 12, 24, and 36 months. Re-ankylosis was observed in 1 case (9.69%) of the T-plate interposition group, while as it was observed in 4 (50%) cases in the temporalis muscle flap interposition group and 4 (57.14%) cases in the condylectomy group, and these differences were statistically significant. Conclusions Our clinical experience with the use of the T-plate over the past 5 years has been encouraging, and our physiotherapy technique is quite simple. Even illiterate parents can assess it easily. Hence, we recommend this easy technique that does not damage the temporalis muscle for the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. PMID:26618118

  11. Single stage treatment of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint using patient-specific total joint replacement and virtual surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Haq, Jahrad; Patel, Nishma; Weimer, Katherine; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-04-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a debilitating condition that can result in pain, trismus, and a poor quality of life. It can be caused by injury, infection, and rheumatoid disease. Current management includes gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and reconstruction. Traditionally, joints are reconstructed using stock implants, or the procedure is done in two stages with an additional computed tomography (CT) scan between the resective and reconstructive procedures and use of stereolithographic models to aid the design of the definitive prostheses. We describe a technique for the resection of ankylosis and reconstruction of the joint in a single operation using virtually designed custom-made implants. Five patients with ankylosis of the TMJ had a single stage operation with reconstruction between 2010 and 2012. All had preoperative high-resolution CT with contrast angiography. During an international web-based teleconference between the surgeon and the engineer a virtual resection of the ankylosis was done using the reconstructed CT images. The bespoke cutting guides and implants were designed virtually at the same time and were then manufactured precisely using computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD-CAM) over 6 weeks. After release of the ankylosis and reconstruction, the patients underwent an exercise regimen to improve mouth opening. Follow-up was for a minimum of 6 months. Four patients had one operation, and one patient had two. Median/Mean maximum incisal opening increased from 0.6mm before operation to 25 mm afterwards (range 23-27), and there was minimal surgical morbidity. This new method effectively treats ankylosis of the TMJ in a single stage procedure. Fewer operations and hospital stays, and the maintenance of overall clinical outcome are obvious advantages. PMID:24480620

  12. Do costochondral grafts have any growth potential in temporomandibular joint surgery? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study To assess the growth potential of costochondral graft in temporomandibular joint reconstruction in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia. Method Systematic review after inclusion of articles fulfilling the following criteria: (1) only human studies; (2) patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia; and (3) studies with minimum of five cases and with a minimum follow-up for a period of 5 years. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients with optimum growth of costochondral graft. Secondary outcomes were any abnormal growth and restoration of function. Delphi's criteria were used for assessing the quality of the included studies. Result Only three studies satisfied all the inclusion criteria. A total of 96 costochondral grafts were placed in the included studies. Optimum growth was reported in 54 grafts, undergrowth in 1 graft, overgrowth in 7 grafts, lateral overgrowth in 1 graft and no growth in 1 graft. Graft resorption, reankylosis and sequestration were seen in 21, 8 and 3 cases, respectively. When the Delphi's criteria were applied to the case series for the assessment of quality, majority of the studies could be considered as satisfying at least 50% of the criteria. Conclusion There are no randomised clinical trials and the only evidence is in the form of case series that is considered as the lowest level of evidence for any study. No inference can be interpreted regarding growth potential of costochondral graft. Thus, on the basis of available evidence, it can be concluded that use of costochondral graft for temporomandibular joint reconstruction lacks scientific evidence.

  13. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  14. Evaluation of the mechanism and principles of management of temporomandibular joint dislocation. Systematic review of literature and a proposed new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Virtually all the articles in literature addressed only a specific type of dislocation. The aim of this review was to project a comprehensive understanding of the pathologic processes and management of all types of dislodgement of the head of the mandibular condyle from its normal position in the glenoid fossa. In addition, a new classification of temporomandibular joint dislocation was also proposed. Method and materials A thorough computer literature search was done using the Medline, Cochrane library and Embase database. Key words like temporo-mandibular joint dislocation were used for the search. Additional manual search was done by going through published home-based and foreign articles. Case reports/series, and original articles that documented the type of dislocation, number of cases treated in the series and original articles. Treatment done and outcome of treatment were included in the study. Result A total of 128 articles were reviewed out which 79 were found relevant. Of these, 26 were case reports, 17 were case series and 36 were original articles. 79 cases were acute dislocations, 35 cases were chronic protracted TMJ dislocations and 311 cases were chronic recurrent TMJ dislocations. Etiology was predominantly trauma in 60% of cases and other causes contributed about 40%. Of all the cases reviewed, only 4 were unilateral dislocation. Various treatment modalities are outlined in this report as indicated for each type of dislocation. Conclusion The more complex and invasive method of treatment may not necessarily offer the best option and outcome of treatment, therefore conservative approaches should be exhausted and utilized appropriately before adopting the more invasive surgical techniques. PMID:21676208

  15. Innervation of the human temporomandibular joint capsule and disc as revealed by immunohistochemistry for neurospecific markers.

    PubMed

    Morani, V; Previgliano, V; Schierano, G M; Ramieri, G

    1994-01-01

    An immunohistochemical investigation for the neurospecific markers S-100 protein and protein gene product 9.5 was carried out on 12 healthy temporomandibular joint discs and capsules that were taken at autopsy from human adults. Large nerve trunks in the joint capsule and posterior disc ligament, as well as small nerve bundles and single nerves in almost all parts of the capsule, were heavily stained by anti-S-100 antiserum. The S-100 immunoreactive chondrocytes were also detected in the disc. Antiprotein gene product 9.5 similarly evidenced nerve fibers in the capsule and posterior disc ligament, and it also labeled a few small nerve bundles and a number of single fibers in the peripheral portions of the disc. No corpuscular or specialized endings were encountered in the specimens. These results give new support to the existence of a rich innervation of the human temporomandibular joint capsule and disc that should be further characterized with regard to type, function, and neuropeptide content. PMID:8032328

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER The temporomandibular joint disc of Asian elephant

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    , and differences in cranial morphology, mastication patterns, and diet are reflected in the material proprioceptive nerve endings in the capsule (Ten Cate 2003). In addition, extensions of the fibrous capsule role in the normal functioning of the joint, and differences in cranial morphology, mastication

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of collagen type IV antibody in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint of human fetuses.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Luís Otávio Carvalho; Lodi, Fábio Redivo; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Fernandes Junior, João Antão; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fijiyama; Alonso, Luís Garcia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the marker of type IV collagen in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human fetuses aging from 21 to 24 weeks of intrauterine life were studied. The TMJ were supplied by the Federal University of Uberaba. The ages of the fetuses were determined by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL). Macroscopically, the fetuses were fixed in a formalin solution at 10% and dissected by removing the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, exposing the deep structures. An immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen was used in order to characterize the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular joint disc. Analysis of the immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen showed the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular disc in human fetuses. PMID:18702236

  18. Differential Diagnostics of Pain in the Course of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Ze?czak-Wi?ckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  19. Simultaneous chin onlay bone graft using elongated coronoid in the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Jafarian, Mohammad; Dehghani, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a disabling condition that causes problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and hygiene. Treatment goals are to restore the joint function, to improve facial appearance, and to reestablish harmony among them. To achieve these goals, various strategies have been reported as 1-stage or multistage protocols. We describe a novel method to augment the chin structure with elongated coronoid process of the mandible, which is a sequence of TMJ ankylosis. By this 1-stage treatment that includes gap arthroplasty with interpositional temporalis fascia graft and chin augmentation with autogenous bone graft (elongated coronoid), functional disability and facial deformity of the patient with TMJ ankylosis were improved simultaneously. PMID:24336042

  20. Magnetic resonance evidence of joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint after fractures of the mandibular condyle: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsu; Ohtani, Maki; Sano, Tsukasa; Ohnuki, Takayoshi; Kondoh, Toshirou; Fukuda, Masayuki

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of magnetic resonance (MR) evidence of joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint after mandibular condylar fractures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 18 joints in 15 patients with either unilateral or bilateral mandibular condylar fractures using a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner (Signa, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI). MR evidence of joint effusion was evaluated and compared with the types and the positions of the fractures. MR evidence of joint effusion was observed in 11 of 18 TMJs, which was 61% of the condylar fractures. It appeared more frequently after fractures with dislocation than those without dislocation (p < 0.05). In addition, MR evidence of effusion appeared more frequently in TMJs after high condylar fractures (head to upper neck) than low condylar fractures (lower neck to subcondylar) (p < 0.05). These findings indicate that MR evidence of joint effusion may serve as a marker for the detection of severe intra-articular damage to the TMJ after mandibular condyle fractures. PMID:15134412

  1. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients. PMID:26681944

  2. Therapeutic effect of hyaluronic acid on experimental osteoarthrosis of ovine temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Lee, B J; Yoon, J; Seo, K M; Park, J H; Lee, J W; Cho, E S; Hong, J J; Lee, Y S; Park, J H

    2001-10-01

    A symptomatic relief by hyaluronic acid (HA, MW: 3.5 x 10(6)), which is synthesized by Streptococcus spp, was investigated in experimental ovine osteoarthrosis. Bilateral osteoarthrosis (OA) of the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJs) was induced by perforating discs and by scrapping subchondral condylar surface. HA was intra-articularly injected into the left joints of 6 sheep on 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days after the operation and physiological saline as the control was injected into the contralateral (right) joints on the same day. Three sheep were killed at I month post-operation (MPO) and the remaining three sheep were killed at 3 MPO. Various responses such as proliferation of fibrous tissue, denudation, erosion, osteophyte formation, subcortical cyst formation and ankylosis were observed radiographically and histopathologically. The treatment of HA ameliorated the degenerative changes and lowered the osteoarthrotic score in the left joints at I MPO (9.96 vs 5.81) and 3 MPO (10.86 vs 5.29) compared to the right joints. These results indicate that a repeated intra-articular injection of HA inhibits the progression of OA in ovine TMJs by inducing the development of articular cartilage and by reducing the proliferation of fibrotic tissue. PMID:11714023

  3. Engineered microporosity: enhancing the early regenerative potential of decellularized temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Juran, Cassandra M; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120??m through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm(2) and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  4. Engineered Microporosity: Enhancing the Early Regenerative Potential of Decellularized Temporomandibular Joint Discs

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Cassandra M.; Dolwick, M. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120??m through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm2 and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  5. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining. PMID:24485809

  6. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, Ö; Özgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  7. Radiographic manifestations of the temporomandibular joint in a case of Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, E; Kansu, O; Ozgen, B; Akçiçek, G; Kansu, H

    2013-01-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare disorder with progressive asymmetrical and disproportionate overgrowth of various tissues of the body. The syndrome is characterized by a wide range of malformations, including craniofacial deformities. Extraoral examination revealed several of the classical craniofacial features of Proteus syndrome: pronounced hemifacial hypertrophy, macrodactyly and hyperostosis. Intraoral examination revealed a high arched palate and gingival hyperplasia. Other findings were unilateral enlargement of the tongue, alveolar growth and dilaceration of the roots of the teeth. There were severe degenerative changes and deformities in the left temporomandibular joint but the oversized condyle was asymptomatic; there was no pain, limitation and deviation at mouth opening. Treatment was not necessary owing to the asymptomatic situation but periodic follow-up with clinical and radiographic examination was considered. The aim of this article is to describe the radiographic manifestations of an asymptomatic condyle malformation and other craniofacial, oral and dental findings in a 33-year-old female patient with known Proteus syndrome. PMID:22241876

  8. Transparotid Approach for the Treatment of Condylar Osteochondroma and Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Makiguchi, Takaya; Yokoo, Satoshi; Kosugi, Kensuke

    2015-10-01

    Among the methods to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ), preauricular, submandibular, retromandibular, and intraoral approaches have been described. These approaches, however, occasionally offer inadequate access, owing to the oblique course of the facial nerve, and access can be limited, especially to the medial and anterior part of the infratemporal fossa. The use of the transparotid approach can offer direct visualization of the facial nerves to prevent severe damage, and a wide work field can be achieved from the medial-anterior part of the infratemporal fossa to subcondylar region by retracting the mobilized facial nerves in either the superior or inferior direction.The 2 patients reported herein illustrate the addition of a transparotid approach to the standard procedures for the removal of an osteochondroma and condylectomy with displaced bone fragment for ankyloses of TMJ from the infratemporal fossa. PMID:26468828

  9. Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma of temporomandibular joint: atypical features of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Rath, Rachna; Das, B K; Baisakh, Manas; Das, S N

    2014-09-01

    Chondrosarcoma (CS) is an uncommon malignant mesenchymal tumour showing cartilaginous differentiation which rarely presents in the jaws. CS represents 10-20% of all malignant bone tumours and less than 5% of tumours in head and neck region. Among the infrequent subtypes of CS, dedifferentiated CS is a sinister variant that presents with singular features and has extremely poor prognosis. We report a unique case of dedifferentiated CS that presented in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with extra articular involvement of the infratemporal space. This high grade CS is reviewed due to its rarity and the dentist is implored to take this variant into account when considering the differential diagnosis of destructive TMJ lesions. PMID:25386536

  10. A rare case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome following temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Rushinek, H

    2015-08-01

    Surgical approaches to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have been designed specifically to minimize injury to the temporal branch of the facial nerve. In spite of this, facial nerve dysfunction occurs in 1-32% of patients undergoing TMJ surgery. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by peripheral facial paralysis that often involves other cranial nerves, mostly cranial nerve VIII. The pathology is attributed to the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion. The diagnosis is based mostly on history and physical findings. Surgical procedures have been known to reactivate varicella zoster virus, but Ramsay Hunt syndrome subsequent to TMJ surgery has not been described yet. This report describes a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with TMJ surgery. Because of the relatively high incidence of facial nerve dysfunction associated with TMJ surgery, patients with varicella zoster virus reactivation may initially be misdiagnosed with iatrogenic facial palsy, or vice versa. PMID:25864001

  11. Cytokine profile in the synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Vohra, Fahim; Ghanem, Alexis; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E; Javed, Fawad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the cytokine profiles in the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD). Databases were searched from 1965 till September 2015 using different combinations of the following key words: "Temporomandibular joint"; "Cytokine"; "disorder"; and "synovial fluid" and "inflammation". Titles and abstracts of studies identified using the above-described protocol were screened and checked for agreement. Full-texts of articles judged by title and abstract to be relevant were read and independently evaluated. Hand-searching of the reference lists of potentially relevant original and review articles was also performed. The pattern of the present systematic review was customized to mainly summarize the relevant data. Fifteen studies were included. In 12 studies, cytokine profile of patients with TMJD was assessed using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and in 2 studies, histological analysis was performed to assess the cytokine profile of patients with TMJD. Patients with TMJD presented raised levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in 8 studies, IL-1beta (1?) in 5 studies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) in 5 studies. Two studies showed no significant difference in TNF-? levels in patients with and without TMJD; and IL-1? levels were comparable in patients with and without TMJD in 2 studies. Raised levels of IL-6, TNF-?, IL-1?, IL-8, and IFN-? in the SF have been associated with inflammation in patients with TMJD. Cytokines IL-10, osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor/osteoprotegerin (OCIF/OPG), and VEGF found in the SF of TMJs could have an anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26556103

  12. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. PMID:25737135

  13. Intra-articular injection of tenoxicam following temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aktas, I; Yalcin, S; Sencer, S

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the clinical and radiological effects of intra-articular tenoxicam injection following arthrocentesis and compared them with arthrocentesis alone in patients with disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR). 24 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in 21 patients with DDwoR were studied. Patients were divided randomly into Group A in which only arthrocentesis was performed (14 TMJs in 14 patients) and Group AT which received arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of tenoxicam (10 TMJs in 7 patients). Patients were evaluated before the procedure, on postoperative day 7, then 2, 3, 4 weeks, and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of joint pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Maximum mouth opening was recorded at each follow-up. TMJ sounds and palpation scores were noted as positive or negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed before and 6 months after treatment in both groups. Disc form, disc location during neutral position, reduction with movement, joint effusion, structures of the articular surfaces, and bone marrow anomalies were evaluated all in MRIs. Both treatments succesfully increased maximum mouth opening and reduced TMJ pain; there were no complications. Difference between the groups was not statistically significant and a larger controlled study is necessary to clarify this use of tenoxicam. PMID:20211542

  14. Clinical and electromyographic assessment of facial nerve function after temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Elmadawy, A; Hegab, A; Alahmady, H; Shuman, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors that may cause alterations in facial nerve function during temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgeries. Forty-six patients were included (66 joints) between the years 2000 and 2007. Study patients were those undergoing various surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJ disorders. Patients who had made an incomplete recovery from a facial nerve injury resulting from a previous operation and patients who presented with facial palsy after a previous TMJ surgery were excluded. The facial nerve function of all patients was evaluated at different time intervals using a facial nerve grading system, motor unit action potentials of the frontalis and orbicularis oculi muscles, and a facial nerve latency test. Various degrees of facial nerve affliction were initially noticed in 71% of the study cases (47 of 66 joints). Statistical analyses (?(2) goodness-of-fit) revealed that several factors could lead to facial nerve injury following TMJ surgery, including the design of the skin incision, prior surgeries, type of surgery, and duration of surgery. Facial nerve injury during TMJ surgery is multifactorial. Electromyographic studies are non-invasive and valuable diagnostic and prognostic tools for assessing facial nerve function. PMID:26027728

  15. Comparison of Serum and Salivary Antioxidants in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lawaf, Shirin; Tabarestani, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a group of disorders in the facial region and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Biomarkers are assumed to play a role in pain and early detection of destruction. The aim of this study was to compare the saliva and serum antioxidant levels in patients with TMD and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 28 TMD patients without pain, 28 TMD patients with pain and 28 healthy controls. The total antioxidant capacity of saliva and serum of patients was measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane’s test. Results: The mean (±SD) total antioxidant capacity of serum (plasma TAC) was 0.8900 (±0.11627) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.2717 (±0.18711) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.7500(±0.18711) mmol/L in the control group. Based on ANOVA, the difference in this regard among the three groups was statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean salivary TAC was 1.34 (±0.06721) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.42 (±0.16677) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.35 (±0.11627) mmol/L in the control group. The difference in this respect among the three groups was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The mean plasma TAC in TMD patients with/without pain was significantly lower than that in the control group but no significant difference was detected in salivary TAC among the three groups.

  16. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    Skulls from 145 northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria. The museum specimens were acquired from strandings along the west coast of the USA between 1896 and 2008. Seventy-one skulls (49.0%) were from male animals, 56 (38.6%) from female animals and 18 (12.4%) from animals of unknown sex. Their age varied from juvenile to adult, with 58 adult animals (40.0%) and 87 juvenile animals (60.0%). The majority of teeth were available for examination (95.1%); 3.4% of teeth were artefactually absent, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 0.6% were deemed congenitally absent. Males were no more likely than females to have either acquired tooth loss (P = 0.054) or congenitally absent teeth (P = 0.919). Adults had significantly more acquired tooth loss than juveniles (P = 0.0099). Malformations were seen in 11 teeth (0.2% of all 4,699 teeth available for examination). Two roots, instead of the typical one root, were found on 14 teeth (0.3%). Supernumerary teeth were associated with 14 normal teeth (0.3%) in eight specimens (5.5% of the total number of specimens). A total of 22 persistent deciduous teeth were found, 19 of which were associated with the maxillary canine teeth. Attrition/abrasion was seen on 194 teeth (3.9%); the canine teeth were most often affected, accounting for 39.7% of all abraded teeth. Adults were found to have a greater prevalence of abraded teeth than juveniles (P <0.0001). No significant difference was found in the appearance of attrition/abrasion between males and females (P = 0.072). Tooth fractures were found in 24 specimens (16.6%), affecting a total of 54 teeth (1.1%). Periapical lesions were found in two skulls (1.4%). None of the specimens showed signs of enamel hypoplasia. About a fifth (18.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, showed signs of alveolar bony changes consistent with periodontitis. A total of 108 specimens (74.5%) had at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality. PMID:25824117

  17. 1,25(OH)2D deficiency induces temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis via secretion of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Luo, Yuqian; Niu, Yuming; Chen, Lulu; Yuan, Xiaoqin; Goltzman, David; Chen, Ning; Miao, Dengshun

    2013-08-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] insufficiency appears to be associated with several age-related diseases. Insufficient levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D has been shown to lead to the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether 1,25(OH)(2)D deficiency has a direct effect on the process of murine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA in 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1?-hydroxylase knockout [1?(OH)ase(-/-)] mice that had been fed a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning until 6 or 18 months of age. Our results showed that the bone mineral density and subchondral bone volume were reduced in mandibular condyles, articular surfaces were collapsed, the thickness of articular cartilage and cartilage matrix protein abundance were progressively decreased and eventually led to an erosion of articular cartilage of mandibular condyles. We also found that DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were increased significantly in 1?(OH)ase(-/-) mice. This study demonstrates that 1,25(OH)(2)D deficiency causes an erosive TMJ OA phenotype by inducing DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D plays an important role in preventing the development and progression of OA. PMID:23624390

  18. Relationship between activity of gluthatione peroxidase and nitric oxide in synovial fluid and the progression of temporomandibular joint internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Güven, Orhan; Tozo?lu, Sinan; Tekin, Umut; Salmano?lu, Berrin; Güne?, Onur

    2015-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to measure the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and nitric oxide (NO) in the synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID) and to indicate the relationship between the activity of GPX and NO and the progress of the ID. Twenty-six patients with TMJ ID were identified and classified according to Wilkes staging through clinical and radiologic examinations. Levels of GPX were determined indirectly by a coupled reaction with glutathione reductase. Levels of NO were measured colorimetrically. The activity of GPX and NO was observed to be progressively increasing as the stage of the TMJ ID progressed. There were significant correlations between the 2 substances and the Wilkes stages. Oxidative stress may have a role in the pathogenesis of TMJ ID. In synovial fluid, GPX and NO activities are increased as the stage of the disease increased. Increase in the activities of GPX might not be enough to prevent progression of the TMJ ID. PMID:25974819

  19. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. Results: The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P < 0.0001). Clicking noise during mouth chewing was significantly different between groups (P = 0.01). And, there was significant difference in the frequencies of maximum opening of the mouth between groups (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that subjects’ war veterans with PTSD have significantly poorer TMJ functional status than the control subjects. PMID:25077153

  20. Correlation between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with temporomandibular joint internal derangement

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Wook; Park, Sung-Hoon; On, Sung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify which findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are good predicators of pain and mouth opening limitation in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID). Materials and Methods Clinical examinations for pain and mouth opening limitation were conducted for suspected TMJ ID. MRI scans were taken within a week of clinical examinations. On the oblique-sagittal plane image, readings were obtained in terms of the functional aspect of disc position, degree of displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion, and osteoarthrosis. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of pain and mouth opening limitation. Results A total of 48 patients (96 TMJs) were studied, including 39 female patients and 9 male patients whose ages ranged from 10 to 65 years. The resultant data showed significant correlations between pain and the MR imaging of the degree of disc displacement (P<0.05). The probability of there being pain in moderate to significant cases was 9.69 times higher than in normal cases. No significant correlation was found between mouth opening limitation and MRI findings. Conclusion We identified a significant correlation between clinical symptoms and MRI findings of ID. The degree of anterior disc displacement may be useful for predicting pain in patients with TMJ ID. PMID:26131429

  1. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  2. Characterization of Degenerative Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M. K.; Arzi, B.; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N.; Athanasiou, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  3. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30?years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  4. Pre-arthroplastic and simultaneous mandibular distraction for correction of facial deformity in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, A.L.; Mehrotra, D.; Vishwakarma, K.; Mahajan, N.; Bhutia, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, interposition arthroplasty allows return of functional jaw movements. In order to improve the facial appearance, distraction osteogenesis is the treatment of choice, and may be timed either as a pre-arthroplastic, simultaneous or post-arthroplastic procedure. This study was planned to compare the treatment outcomes of pre-arthroplastic distraction (PAD) and simultaneous arthroplastic distraction (SAD) to establish the better treatment modality in terms of improvement in function and aesthetics. Materials and methods This prospective randomized experimental study included 20 children and adolescents suffering from facial deformity due to long standing unilateral TMJ ankylosis. They were randomly allocated to the two surgical groups with ten in each group. Result Both groups resulted in good facial symmetry and aesthetics. Initially, during the distraction period, mouth opening of SAD group scored less than that of PAD group but became comparable in 30 days. More pain at the distraction site and over the normal TMJ was observed in PAD group. The excursive movements were almost comparable in both the groups. Conclusion We conclude that both procedures are effective in correcting the post-ankylotic deformity and improving function. Although PAD has better control over movement of the distracting segment, the contralateral TMJ may experience pain. SAD requires a shorter management period but is associated with a temporary decrease in function. Also, control of distraction may be difficult and chances of reankylosis are always there. PMID:26587380

  5. Incremental increase in percentage mouth opening after coronoidectomy in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Singh, V; Agrawal, A; Bhagol, A; Bali, R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental improvement in mouth opening following coronoidectomy. Twenty-three patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis (Sawhney types I-III) were assessed preoperatively; physical and radiological examinations were done (panoramic radiography and computed tomography). Data including demographic and clinical parameters were recorded. Patients with bilateral ankylosis, recurrent cases, and those with Sawhney type IV TMJ ankylosis were not included. The improvement in mouth opening was measured after ostectomy, after ipsilateral coronoidectomy, and after contralateral coronoidectomy. The improvements in mouth opening at each stage were analysed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a marked improvement in maximal incisal opening (MIO) from 5.7 ± 4.2mm to 23.7 ± 5.9 mm after removal of the ankylotic bony mass. MIO was significantly increased after ipsilateral coronoidectomy (31.6 ± 7.4mm), and after contralateral coronoidectomy, a mean MIO of 39.4 ± 11.2mm was achieved. At more than 1 year of follow-up, all patients showed improved mouth opening. In conclusion, coronoidectomy plays an important role in improving mouth opening in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25801011

  6. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50??L) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50??L). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  7. Surface electromyographic assessment of patients with long lasting temporomandibular joint disorder pain.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Lodetti, Gianluigi; Paiva, Guiovaldo; De Felicio, Claudia Maria; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-08-01

    The normalized electromyographic characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and healthy controls were compared. Thirty TMD patients (15 men, 15 women, mean age 23 years) with long lasting pain (more than 6 months), and 20 control subjects matched for sex and age were examined. All patients had arthrogenous TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Surface electromyography of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Standardized EMG indices and the median power frequency were obtained, and compared between the two groups and sexes using ANOVAs. During clenching, the TMD patients had larger asymmetry in their temporalis muscles, larger temporalis activity relative to masseter, and reduced mean power frequencies than the control subjects (p<0.05, ANOVA). In both groups, the mean power frequencies of the temporalis muscles were larger than those of the masseter muscles (p<0.001). No sex related differences, and no sex × group interactions were found. In conclusion, young adult patients with long lasting TMD have an increased and more asymmetric standardized activity of their temporalis anterior muscle, and reduced mean power frequencies, relative to healthy controls. PMID:21463956

  8. Biomechanical analysis of a temporomandibular joint condylar prosthesis during various clenching tasks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Heng-Li; Su, Kuo-Chih; Fuh, Lih-Jyh; Chen, Michael Y C; Wu, Jay; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of clenching tasks on the stress and stability of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condylar prosthesis, as well as on the stress and strain in the whole mandible and bone surrounding three screws. Three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible and a TMJ condylar prosthesis using three screws were established. Six static clenching tasks were simulated in this study: incisal clench (INC), intercuspal position (ICP), right unilateral molar clench (RMOL), left unilateral molar clench (LMOL), right group function (RGF), and left group function (LGF). Based on the simulation of the six clenching tasks, none of the inserted screws or the TMJ condylar prosthesis were broken. In addition, the stability of the TMJ condylar prosthesis was sufficiently high for bone ongrowth. For the whole mandibular bone, the maximum von Mises stress and von Mises strain observed in the cortical bone and cancellous bone were yielded by the ICP and RMOL, respectively. For the bone surrounding the inserted screws, the maximum von Mises stress and von Mises strain in both the cortical bone and cancellous bone were yielded by the LMOL. Clenching tasks had significant effects on the stress distribution of the TMJ condylar prosthesis, as well as on the stress and strain distribution of the whole mandible and the bone surrounding the inserted screws. PMID:26027864

  9. A new method for three-dimensional reconstruction and animation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Krebs, M; Gallo, L M; Airoldi, R L; Palla, S

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a new method for the three-dimensional reconstruction and animation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Magnetic resonance (MR) tomograms of the TMJ were combined, using an extraorally placed reference system, with jaw motion data, recorded with six degrees of freedom, by means of the opto-electronic tracking system Jaws-3D. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the TMJ was calculated and animated on a graphics workstation by means of kinematic transformations. A subject without any past or present history of myoarthropathies of the masticatory system, performed jaw opening and closing and chewed chewing gum. The animation provided a three-dimensional visualisation of the movements of the entire condyle within the fossa. The condyle-fossa distance was computed for every condylar point and represented by shading the surface of the condyle with pseudo-colours. The position of the minimum distance between condyle and fossa was calculated and displayed in a plane graph representing the condylar surface. PMID:7605078

  10. Inhibition of Fibrous Adhesion Formation in the Temporomandibular Joint of Tenascin-C Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Goh, Y.; Kiga, N.; Tojyo, I.; Fujita, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a large hexameric extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is expressed in developing organs and tumors. It has been reported that TNC is expressed in inflamed synovial membranes and deformed discs of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. However, the role of TNC in TMJ is not fully known. In this study, the role of TNC in fibrous adhesion formation of TMJ was examined using TNC knockout (TNCKO) mice. Hypermobility was produced by excessive mouth opening method on the TMJ of both wild-type (WT) and TNCKO mice. TMJ wound healing was compared histologically, and the expression of TNC, fibronectin (FN), and ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) in the wounded TMJ was examined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. Based on histologic analysis, fibrous adhesions were observed in the TMJ of both TNCKO and wild-type (WT) mice after excessive mouth opening. However, fibrous adhesion formation in TNCKO mice occurred later than in WT mice. TNC was expressed in the wounded TMJ disc and mandibular fossa. Although FN and ?-SMA expression in the TMJ of TNCKO and WT mice was up-regulated after excessive mouth opening, FN and ?-SMA protein levels were higher in WT mice at the same time points. In the wounded TMJ, TNC appears to enhance the expression of FN and ?-SMA, and a lack of TNC may reduce fibrous adhesion formation in the TMJ. TNC plays an important role in TMJ wound healing, especially for wounds generated by mechanical stress. PMID:25578971

  11. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective?To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods?A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results?Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p?=?0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio?=?2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion?These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  12. RANKL, OPG and CTR mRNA expression in the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEI-WEI; XU, ZHI-MIN; LI, ZHENG-QIANG; ZHANG, YAN; HAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    The calcitonin receptor (CTR) and receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand (RANKL) have been found to be involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts. The association between the RANKL:osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression ratio and the pathogenesis of bone-destructive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in several joints, but the available data for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are limited. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of osteoclasts at sites of bone erosion by determining the CTR expression and the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the TMJ in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: Control group, injected with saline solution for 6 weeks; and CIA group, injected with emulsion. The RANKL and OPG mRNA expression was significantly increased in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats. The RANKL:OPG expression ratio on the trabecular bone surface was 9.0 and 6.4 in the CIA group at weeks 4 and 6, respectively, while the RANKL:OPG expression ratio in the controls was 1.0:2. CTR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in immunized rats compared with that in non-immunized rats; the level of CTR mRNA in the CTR-positive osteoclasts on the trabecular bone surface was 10.9- and 7.8-fold higher in the CIA rats than that in the control rats at weeks 4 and 6, respectively. In conclusion, focal bone destruction in an experimental model of arthritis in the TMJ can be attributed to cells expressing CTR, a defining feature of osteoclasts. The expression of RANKL and OPG mRNA within the inflamed synovium provides an insight into the mechanism of osteoclast differentiation and function at the border of bone erosion in arthritis.

  13. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n?=?8) and females (n?=?8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  14. Transcriptional regulation of Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) by 17?-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jennifer S.; Babu, Ramya Akula Suresh; Navarro, Mary M.; LeBaron, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the U.S. population with the majority seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Due to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that there is a role for sex hormones in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints, however its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5? flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and mRNA expression in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients. PMID:24621258

  15. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p?

  16. Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face with exophytic temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sahai, S; Rajan, S; Singh, N; Arora, H

    2013-01-01

    Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CIL-F) is a rare lipomatous lesion with diffuse fatty infiltration of tissues and hyperplasia of underlying bone. We report clinical and CT findings in an unusual case of CIL-F presenting with progressive hemifacial asymmetry, manifesting as severely restricted mouth opening owing to exophytic temporomandibular joint ankylosis. The role of imaging in diagnosis is presented with a review of the literature. Differential diagnosis of CIL-F and its exclusion as a cause of hemifacial hyperplasia are also discussed. PMID:22241871

  17. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity – Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Sunil, VSB; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means “failure of development” is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported. PMID:25738097

  18. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, RJ; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint Design We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2 day-old mice Results Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions (FGF-13 (6.4X), FGF-18 (4X), NCAM (2X); PGDF receptors, TGF-?, and IGF-1), the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands, or structural proteins/ proteoglycans (collagen XIV (21X), collagen XVIII (4X), decorin (2.5X)). Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes (aggrecan (11X), procollagens X (33X), XI (14X), IX (4.5X), Sox 9 (4.4X), and Indian hedgehog (6.7X)). However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear (myogenic factor 9 (9X), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5X) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6X), VEGF–B (2X) and its receptors (3–4X), and sclerostin (1.7X)). Conclusions FGF, Notch, and TGF-? signaling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as myogenic factor 6 and VEGF–B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  19. Reducing dietary loading decreases mouse temporomandibular joint degradation induced by anterior crossbite prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.-D.; Liao, L.-F.; Zhang, H.-Y.; Lu, L.; Jiao, K.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, J.; He, J.-J.; Wu, Y.-P.; Chen, D.; Wang, M.-Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dietary loading has been reported to have an effect on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) remodeling via periodontal-muscular reflex. We therefore examined whether reducing dietary loading decreased TMJ degradation induced by the unilateral anterior crossbite prosthesis as we recently reported. Methods Forty 6-week-old female C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups. One experimental and one control group received small-size diet and the other two groups received large-size diet. Unilateral anterior crossbite prosthesis was created in the two experimental groups. The TMJ samples were collected 3 weeks after experimental operation. Histological changes in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone were assessed by Hematoxylin & Eosin, toluidine blue, Safranin O and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or immunohistochemistry were performed to evaluate the expression levels of Collagen II, Aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) and RANKL/RANK/OPG in TMJ condylar cartilage and/or subchondral bone. Results Thinner and degraded cartilage, reduced cartilage cellular density, decreased expression levels of Collagen II and Aggrecan, loss of subchondral bone and enhanced osteoclast activity were observed in TMJs of both experimental groups. However, the cartilage degradation phenotype was less severe and cartilage ADAMTS-5 mRNA was lower while OPG/RANKL ratio in cartilage and subchondral bone was higher in the small-size than large-size diet experimental group. No differences of histomorphology and the tested molecules were found between the two control groups. Conclusions The current findings suggest that a lower level of functional loading by providing small-size diet could reduce TMJ degradation induced by the biomechanical stimulation from abnormal occlusion. PMID:24316289

  20. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p < 0.001) in T1 values after i.v. CA administration. The T1 drop of 50% was reached 60 minutes after bolus injection in the TMJ disc. The 3D GRE dual flip-angle sequences confirmed these results and show plateau of T1 after 60 minutes. Conclusions T1(Gd) maps calculated from dGEMRIC data allow in vivo assessment of the fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  1. [Algodystrophic syndrome of the temporo-mandibular joint: a clinical experience].

    PubMed

    de Filippis, C; Osti, L; Osti, R; Marioni, G; Pedace, E

    1998-04-01

    Algo-dysfunctional syndrome (ADS) of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is frequently encountered and, since its clinical expression is extremely polymorphic, it is often misdiagnosed. As there are many causes for ADS, even in a single patient, in line with the most recent interpretations found in the literature, an attempt was made to determine how important the lack of muscular coordination is in the onset of clinical symptoms. The study was conducted on 48 patients (32 females, 16 males, age range 17-68 years, average age 41.7 years) with ADS, clinically diagnosed according to the criteria defined by Rendell et al. The patients belonged to three distinct groups: -Group 1: patients with ADS of articular origin (9 cases); -Group 2: patients with ADS of dental and/or periodontal origin (18 cases); -Group 3: patients with ADS for which there was no apparent cause (21 cases). All patients were treated with a rehabilitation protocol aimed at eliminating the muscle spasm and restoring correct coordination. The results obtained showed that conservative treatment to resolve the muscle spasm gave positive results in 69% of the cases. The patients with concomitant articular pathology proved the least responsive to treatment. It was, therefore, considered likely that the main cause for clinical expression of this pathology is the muscle spasm itself. On this basis it can be concluded that muscular rehabilitation of the TMJ is valid in the treatment of ADS as it has proved able to break the vicious cycle of symptoms at the base of this pathology. PMID:9844222

  2. Temporomandibular joint pain: A critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H.; McNulty, Amy L.; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Parekh, Puja K.; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert; Taylor, Andrea B.; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, and “therapy-refractoriness” of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background we sought to investigate pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation evoked pain behavior in mice, and that trigeminal ganglion pro-nociceptive changes are Trpv4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4?/? mice with TMJ-inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in WT mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ-inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after CFA injections, but remarkably independent of Trpv4 genotype. Intriguingly, as a result of TMJ-inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant up-regulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated ERK in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, absent in Trpv4?/? mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed a similar resistance to reduction of bite-force as Trpv4?/? mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ-inflammation, and likely functions up-stream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in-vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pro-nociceptive target in TMJ inflammation, and should be considered a target-of-interest in human TMJD. PMID:23726674

  3. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  4. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication. PMID:23851865

  5. Infliximab partially alleviates the bite force reduction in a mouse model of temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hyon; Son, Chang-Nam; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Jung, Sung-Won; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Won-Ki; Jung, Hye Ra; Hong, Ji Hee

    2015-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder is clinically important because of its prevalence, chronicity, and therapy-refractoriness of the pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of infliximab in a mouse model of TMJ pain using a specially-engineered transducer for evaluating the changes in bite force (BF). The mice were randomly divided into three groups (7 mice per group): the control group, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) group, and the infliximab group. BF was measured at day 0 (baseline BF). After measuring the baseline BF, CFA or incomplete Freund's adjuvant was injected into both TMJs and then the changes in BF were measured at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 after the TMJ injection. For measuring the BF, we used a custom-built BF transducer. Control, CFA, and infliximab groups showed similar baseline BF at day 0. From day 1, a significant reduction in BF was observed in the CFA group, and this reduction in BF was statistically significant compared to that in the control group (P < 0.05). This reduction in BF was maintained until day 7, and BF started to recover gradually from day 9. In the infliximab group also, the reduction in BF was observed on day 1, and this reduction was maintained until day 7. However, the degree of reduction in BF was less remarkable compared to that in the CFA group. The reduction in BF caused by injection of CFA into the TMJ could be partially alleviated by the injection of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, infliximab. PMID:25931785

  6. Modulation of paratrigeminal nociceptive neurons following temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Yoko; Ren, Ke; Shimada, Masahiko; Iwata, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the involvement of paratrigeminal nucleus (Pa5) nociceptive neurons in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation-induced pain and its autonomic correlates, we conducted behavioral, single unit recording and Fos immunohistochemical studies in anesthetized rats. Nocifensive behaviors to mechanical, heat or cold stimulation of the lateral face over the TMJ region were significantly enhanced in the TMJ-inflamed rats for 10–14 days after injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the TMJ and gradually decreased at the end of the 14-day observation period. Lowering of the nocifensive threshold in TMJ-inflamed rats lasted longer in vagus nerve-transected rats than vagus nerve-intact rats. A large number of Fos-like immunoreactive (LI) cells were observed in the Pa5, and half of them were retrogradely labeled with Fluorogold (FG) injected into the parabrachial nucleus. Background activity of Pa5 wide dynamic range and nociceptive specific neurons was significantly higher in the TMJ-inflamed rats when compared with controls. Responses to mechanical stimuli were significantly higher in NS neurons in the TMJ-inflamed rats. All thermal responsive Pa5 neurons were exclusively sensitive to cold and the response to cold was significantly higher in the TMJ-inflamed rats compared with control rats. Vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased responses to mechanical and cold stimuli as well as the background activity in TMJ-treated rats but not in TMJ-untreated rats. The present findings suggest that populations of Pa5 neurons are nociceptive and involved in TMJ inflammation-induced pain as well as in autonomic processes related to TMJ pain. PMID:18778706

  7. Otitis interna, media, and externa with destruction of the left tympanic bulla and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Noe; Middleton, John R.; Cook, Cristi; Britt, Lisa G.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old, 37.7 kg, female alpaca was evaluated for a 2-week history of weight loss, left ear droop, and deviation of the rostral mandible to the right. Antemortem radiography and postmortem examination revealed otitis interna, media, and externa, destruction of the left tympanic bulla, and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint. PMID:23997267

  8. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of ?-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with ?-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate ?-catenin conditional activation mice, ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5?/? mice to generate ?-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5?/? double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (?-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5?/? double mutant mice. In summary, we found that ?-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing ?-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in ?-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  9. Upregulation of cystathionine-?-synthetase expression contributes to inflammatory pain in rat temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous gaseotransmitter/modulator, is becoming appreciated that it may be involved in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. However, the role for H2S in nociceptive processing in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron remains unknown. The aim of this study was designed to investigate whether endogenous H2S synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-?-synthetase (CBS) plays a role in inflammatory pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods TMJ inflammatory pain was induced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into TMJ of adult male rats. Von Frey filaments were used to examine pain behavioral responses in rats following injection of CFA or normal saline (NS). Whole cell patch clamp recordings were employed on acutely isolated TG neurons from rats 2 days after CFA injection. Western blot analysis was carried out to measure protein expression in TGs. Results Injection of CFA into TMJ produced a time dependent hyperalgesia as evidenced by reduced escape threshold in rats responding to VFF stimulation. The reduced escape threshold was partially reversed by injection of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor for CBS, in a dose-dependent manner. CFA injection led to a marked upregulation of CBS expression when compared with age-matched controls. CFA injection enhanced neuronal excitability as evidenced by depolarization of resting membrane potentials, reduction in rheobase, and an increase in number of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase current stimulation and by a ramp current stimulation of TG neurons innervating the TMJ area. CFA injection also led to a reduction of IK but not IA current density of TG neurons. Application of AOAA in TMJ area reduced the production of H2S in TGs and reversed the enhanced neural hyperexcitability and increased the IK currents of TG neurons. Conclusion These data together with our previous report indicate that endogenous H2S generating enzyme CBS plays an important role in TMJ inflammation, which is likely mediated by inhibition of IK currents, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying pain and sensitization in TMJ inflammation. PMID:24490955

  10. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  11. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  12. A Study of the Association Between Sleep Bruxism, Low Quality of Sleep, and Degenerative Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glaucia Marques; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Silva, Jesca Neftali Nogueira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in individuals suffering from sleep bruxism (SB), associating these characteristics with the quality of sleep. For this, we followed the International Classification of Sleep Disorders for the diagnosis of SB, in addition to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the classification of TMD and cone beam computed tomography. It was found that 97.7% of the individuals with bruxism had at least 1 RDC/TMD group III diagnosis, 75.6% of the subjects considered their sleep quality as poor, and the largest group (23%) had centric bruxism. There was no significant association between the pattern of sleep quality (P?=?0.36), the type of SB (P?=?0.277), and the presence of degenerative changes of the TMJ. Regardless of the quality of sleep and the type of bruxism presented, the prevalence of degenerative bone disorders was high (67%) among women with a mean age of 46 years and a clinical diagnosis of SB. PMID:26501968

  13. Integration of rehabilitation and acupuncture in the treatment of a professional musician with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emma K

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes the use of acupuncture in a professional musician with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction. The 3-year history of symptoms was associated with persistent episodic tension-type headaches. Acupuncture was used for trigger point release, primarily of the masticatory muscles, in conjunction with exercise therapy. After 8 weekly acupuncture sessions, the patient's pain had completely resloved, headaches had resolved and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale showed significant improvements. PMID:21685109

  14. [Craniofacial architecture and temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome. The possibility of orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Blanchard, P; Scheffer, P; Lerondeau, J C; Nurit, Y

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the results of cephalographic studies in 65 cases of temporo-mandibular algo-dysfunctional syndromes. Cephalometric analysis according to the method described by Delaire allows specific cranio-facial morphotypic criteria to be defined. These results warrant presentation since they are frequently encountered but do not constitute a pathognomonic presentation. Statistical analysis of dento-maxillo-facial orthopedic abnormalities underlines their very frequent occurrence. The indications for maxillo-facial orthopedic surgery should therefore be widened. PMID:2130435

  15. Prospective analysis of the incidence of metal allergy in patients listed for total replacement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, A J; Mistry, K

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively analysed the incidence of metal allergies in patients listed for total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the efficacy of patch testing to prevent rejection phenomena. All patients (n=101) that required a prosthetic TMJ between March 2004 and August 2012 were tested preoperatively. A total of 39% had an allergy to one or more metals and they were given all-titanium prostheses. Following the introduction of this protocol no patients have shown signs of an allergic rejection within 6 months of operation. We suggest that all patients listed for total TMJ replacement should have patch tests for metal allergies and that all-titanium prostheses are used when allergy is detected. PMID:23850381

  16. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  17. The next step in the treatment of persistent temporomandibular joint pain following arthrocentesis: a retrospective study of 18 cases.

    PubMed

    Emes, Y; Arp?nar, I ?; Oncü, B; Aybar, B; Akta?, I; Al Badri, N; Atalay, B; I?sever, H; Yalç?n, S

    2014-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders affect a big portion of the population. There are a variety of treatment methods currently in use. Conservative treatment modalities are followed by more invasive approaches like arthrocentesis or arthroscopy. The aim of the study is to compare the effects of intra-articular tenoxicam injection and arthrocentesis plus viscosupplementation on patients in which a previous arthrocentesis plus viscosupplementation has failed to relieve pain and restore function. The study group consists of 18 TMJs in 16 patients (15 female and 1 male) and the patients were randomly divided into two groups as the arthrocentesis plus viscosupplementation group (n: 8) and tenoxicam injection (n: 10). 20 mg of tenoxicam was injected to the upper compartments of 10 joints without arthrocentesis. The other 8 joints were treated with a second arthrocentesis and sodium hyaluronate injection. VAS scores and maximum mouth opening with and without assistance were recorded in the post operative first week, first month and third month. The results show that there is little benefit in using relatively conservative methods once an arthrocentesis together with viscosupplementation has failed to relieve the patients pain. It is concluded that more invasive procedures should be considered for the patients who do not benefit from arthrocentesis. PMID:23932198

  18. ?2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of ?-adrenergic receptors (?-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their ?-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and ?2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. ?-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while ?-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of ?2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of ?2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that ?2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  19. Lateral cephalometric analysis of mandibular morphology: discrimination among subjects with and without temporomandibular joint disk displacement and osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, S; Moriggl, A; Neunteufel, N; Rudisch, A; Emshoff, R

    2012-02-01

    To assess whether in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia cephalometric variables of mandibular morphology may discriminate among the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based TMJ groups of 'bilateral presence of disk displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and osteoarthrosis (OA)' and 'bilateral absence of bilateral DDwoR and OA'. Bilateral MR imaging of the TMJ was performed in 45 consecutive TMJ arthralgia patients to identify individuals with the specific structural characteristics of bilateral TMJ DDwoR associated with OA. Linear and angular cephalometric measurements were taken from lateral cephalograms to apply selected criteria of mandibular morphology. A discriminant function analysis was used to investigate how cephalometric parameters discriminate among the TMJ groups of 'bilateral presence of DDwoR with OA' and 'bilateral absence of DDwoR and OA'. Ramus height (Ar-Go) and effective mandibular length (Ar-Pog) produced a significant discriminant function that predicted TMJ group membership (P?

  20. Effect of Stomatognathic Alignment Exercise on Temporomandibular Joint Function and Swallowing Function of Stroke Patients with Limited Mouth Opening

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Duck-Won; Kang, Tae-Woo; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of stomatognathic alignment exercise on temporomandibular joint function and swallowing function of stroke patients presenting limited mouth opening. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects with post-stroke hemiparesis presenting limited mouth opening were randomly assigned to either the experimental group or the control group, with 7 subjects in each group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group participated in a stomatognathic alignment exercise program that consisted of mobility exercises of the TMJ and neck and postural correction. Main outcome measures were neck mobility, the active maximum range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index (CMI), and the Mann assessment of swallowing ability (MASA) score. [Results] The changes in the values of the range of mouth opening, CMI, MASA, and all the parameters of neck mobility were significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, post-test values appeared to be significantly different for the range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index, and the MASA scores between the groups (p>0.05). [Conclusion] Stomatognathic alignment exercise may improve TMJ function and swallowing function of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis. PMID:24259786

  1. Experimental investigations of the use of an erbium:YAG laser on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) structures: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Hering, Peter; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf; Behr, M.

    1995-04-01

    The following paper introduces the results of an interdisciplinary research project. With the aid of photomacroscopic examination, light and scanning electron microscope investigations, changes to temporomandibular joint structures were detected in vitro after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser system. The solid-state Erbium:YAG laser, operating at a wavelength of 2.94 micrometers was used in the normal- spiking mode. The free-running laser beam was focussed onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples using a 108-mm sapphire lens. In this study the output was generally pulsed at a repetition rate of 4 Hz, with a pulse duration varying from 120 microsecond(s) to 500 microsecond(s) . Between 50 mJ and 500 mJ per pulse were applied to create pinpoint lesions. The optimum average energy density and pulse duration of the Erbium:YAG laser radiation for the purpose of TMJ-surgery (as far as it concerns meniscus and articulating facets) - which means efficient etch rate and minimal adjacent injury - seems to be about 24-42 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) -240 microsecond(s) , respectively.

  2. Strain induced in the condyle by self-tapping screws in the Biomet alloplastic temporomandibular joint: a preliminary experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Duarte, R J; Mesnard, M

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study was to analyze how screws affect the strain concentration induced on the mandibular condyle during implantation, screwing, and drilling, as well as after condylar loading. A clean cadaveric mandible was analyzed experimentally in the intact state and was then implanted with a Biomet/Lorenz Microfixation temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implant with seven bicortical self-tapping screws. The external surface of the mandible was instrumented with three strain gauges. A load of 500N on the TMJ was applied to the condyle before and after implantation. The results showed a strain concentration of -1500?? near the screws due to their implantation on the external surface of the mandible. The drilling process induced up to 80?? near the hole. The strain concentration did not change when there were more than six screws. Loading on the TMJ before and after implantation presented only a 10% difference in maximum principal strain. This study demonstrates the importance of the strain concentration induced by the screws. The process of implanting screws shows the importance of lateral surface preparation for a good fit in the condyle. Strain distribution after implantation and loading of the Biomet implant was found to be similar to that in the intact condyle. PMID:26194773

  3. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  4. Distribution and coexistence of neuropeptides in nerve fibres in the temporomandibular joint of late gestation fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    TAHMASEBI-SARVESTANI, A.; TEDMAN, R.; GOSS, A. N.

    1997-01-01

    The density and distribution of nerve fibres immunoreactive to antisera for PGP 9.5 (general neuronal marker), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) (markers for sensory neurons), as well as neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) (markers for autonomic fibres), were examined in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of late gestation fetal sheep. This work formed part of a project investigating the influence of age and osteoarthritis on the innervation of the TMJ, and was undertaken to determine whether the innervation of the joint at 140 d gestation (17 d before birth) differed from that in the mature adult. Immunofluorescence microscopy was applied to serial sections of the capsule, disc and synovial membrane of 10 joints from 5 fetuses and image analysis was used for the quantitative assessment. The capsule, synovial membrane and the disc contained fibres immunoreactive (IR) to antisera for PGP 9.5, SP and CGRP. NPY-IR fibres were only visible in the loose connective tissue of the capsule. No VIP- or TH-IR nerve fibres were detected in the fetal TMJ. There was no statistically detectable difference between the density of nerve fibres immunoreactive to CGRP or PGP9.5 antisera in the capsule or disc. Substance P-immunoreactivity (IR) was relatively weak in all samples examined. Scattered branches of CGRP-IR fibres were found deep in the disc proper. The lack of receptor endings, other than free nerve endings in the TMJ of the late fetal sheep, might be a reflection of the functional and anatomical immaturity of the TMJ, as reflected in the immature, gross and microscopic appearance of the disc, the inferior joint compartment and articular surface of the condyle at this stage. These results demonstrate that the capsule, synovial membrane and disc in the TMJ of fetal sheep at 140 d gestation age are innervated with sensory fibres, while autonomic fibres are located in the capsule only. The findings also support the view that the disc is innervated at an early stage of life but at a later stage the density of innervation in the central part of the disc regresses and the innervation remains only peripherally in the adult TMJ disc. Further work is required to determine (1) at what stage sympathetic fibres innervate the disc and the synovium, and (2) when the mechanoreceptive nerve endings develop. PMID:9306200

  5. Effects of tissue-engineered articular disc implants on the biomechanical loading of the human temporomandibular joint in a three-dimensional finite element model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Penttila, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical loading of the temporomandibular joint when using a biodegradable laminate implant to replace the articular disc and to test the hypothesis that the use of the implant reduces stress distribution in the condyle, implant, and glenoid fossa. A finite element model of a female human mandible, including the temporomandibular joint, which had two standard endosseous implants inserted bilaterally in the premolar region, was constructed from computed tomography scan images using a commercially available finite element software. The disc, condyle, and glenoid fossa were arbitrarily divided into five regions: the anterior, posterior, medial, lateral, and central. The disc was then replaced with a poly-L/DL-lactide biodegradable laminate. The finite element model was then used to predict principal and Von Mises stresses. The use of poly-L/DL-lactide implant resulted in remarkable reduction in Von Mises stresses (approximately threefold) in the anterior, central, and medial regions of the mandibular condyle in comparison with slight to moderate stress reductions in the corresponding regions of the implant and glenoid fossa. The mandibular condyle also demonstrated the largest total displacement in all directions followed by the implant and glenoid fossa. The use of an alloplastic implant such as the bioresorbable, poly-L/DL-lactide laminate to replace the articular disc reduces loading of the mandibular condyle rather than the implant and glenoid fossa. These findings lead to support the hypothesis that the mandibular condyle more likely functions as a shock absorber than the disc. The use of bioresorbable laminate implants might prove an efficient technique to replace the articular disc and promote normal function of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:17667665

  6. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls. PMID:26114704

  7. Differences in skeletal components of temporomandibular joint of an early medieval and contemporary Croatian population obtained by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kranjcic, Josip; Slaus, Mario; Persic, Sanja; Vodanovic, Marin; Vojvodic, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The anatomical configuration of the TMJ allows for a large range of mandibular movements as well as transmission of masticatory forces and loads to the skull base. The measurements of the TMJ's anatomical structures and their interpretations contribute to the understanding of how pathological changes, tooth loss, and the type of diet (changing throughout human history) can affect biomechanical conditions of the masticatory system and the TMJ. The human TMJ and its constituent parts are still the subject of extensive investigation and comparisons of measurement methods are being made in order to determine the most precise and suitable measurement methods. The aim of this study has been to examine the morphology of skeletal components of TMJ of an early medieval population (EMP) in Croatia and to compare measured values with TMJ values of the contemporary Croatian population (CP) using various methods of measurement. The study was performed on 30 EMP specimens - human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 55 years, and 30 CP human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 65 years. Only fully preserved specimens (in measured areas) were included. The articular eminence (AE) inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal using two methods. Also, the AE height (glenoid fossa depth) and the length of the curved line - highest to the lowest point of the AE were measured. Measurements were performed on lateral skull photographs, panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms using VistaMetrix software on skull images. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical software. No statistically significant differences were obtained for AE parameters between the EMP and CP populations independent of age and gender. However, statistically significant (p<0.05) differences were revealed when comparing results of three different measuring methods. It could not be determined which of the used measurement methods is the most accurate due to the different results obtained as well as the presence of possible shortcomings and limitations of the various methods (measuring points are difficult to determine and/or they are not clearly observed in the investigated images to be precisely marked and measured; distortion and magnification of structures on radiographic images are present). Therefore, due to the limitations of this study, the obtained results could serve only as orienting information. PMID:25899341

  8. Cephalometric Analysis of the Facial Skeletal Morphology of Female Patients Exhibiting Skeletal Class II Deformity with and without Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Lei, Jie; Fu, Kai-Yuan; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the differences in the facial morphological characteristics of female patients exhibiting skeletal class II deformity with and without temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Methods Eighty-three female patients with skeletal class II deformity were included in this study; these patients were classified into three groups on the basis of the condylar features shown in cone-beam computed tomography scans: normal group, indeterminate for osteoarthrosis group, and osteoarthrosis group. The cephalometric differences among the three groups were evaluated through one-way ANOVA. Results Of the 83 patients, 52.4% were diagnosed with osteoarthrosis, as indicated by the changes in the condylar osseous component. The cephalometric measurements that represented skeletal characteristics, including mandibular position relative to the cranial base, mandibular plane angle (MP-SN), posterior facial height (S-Go), and facial height ratio, were significantly different among the three groups (p < 0.05). The patients in the osteoarthrosis group yielded the smallest S-Go, the highest MP-SN, and the most retruded mandible. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis is commonly observed in female patients with skeletal class II deformity. The morphological characteristics of the facial skeleton in patients with bilateral condylar osteoarthrosis may be altered. PMID:26474490

  9. Estrogen status and psychophysical stress modify temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in a lamina-specific manner in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen status and psychological stress contribute to the expression of several chronic pain conditions including temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD). Sensory neurons that supply the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region terminate in laminae I and V of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc/C1-2 region); however, little is known about lamina specificity and environmental influences on the encoding properties of TMJ brainstem neurons. To test the hypothesis that Vc/C1-2 neurons integrate both interoceptive and exteroceptive signals relevant for TMJ nociception, we recorded TMJ-evoked activity in superficial and deep laminae of ovariectomized rats under high and low estradiol (E2) and stress conditions. Rats received daily injections of low (LE) or high (HE) dose E2 and were subjected to forced swim (FS) or sham swim conditioning for 3 days. The results revealed marked lamina specificity in that HE rats displayed enhanced TMJ-evoked activity in superficial, but not deep, laminae independent of stress conditioning. By contrast, FS conditioned rats displayed increased background firing and TMJ-evoked activity of neurons in deep, but not superficial, laminae independent of E2 status. FS also enhanced TMJ-evoked masseter muscle activity and suggested the importance of deep dorsal horn neurons in mediating evoked jaw muscle activity. In conclusion, E2 status and psychophysical stress play a significant role in modifying the encoding properties of TMJ-responsive medullary dorsal horn neurons with a marked lamina specificity. PMID:23607965

  10. The Effect of Fibromyalgia and Widespread Pain on the Clinically Significant Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Pain Disorders - A Prospective 18-Month Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Velly, Ana Miriam; Look, John O.; Schiffman, Eric; Lenton, Patricia A.; Kang, Wenjun; Messner, Ronald P.; Holcroft, Christina A.; Fricton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Although most cases of Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) are mild and self-limiting, about 10% of TMJD patients develop severe disorders associated with chronic pain and disability. It has been suggested that fibromyalgia and widespread pain play a significant role in the Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) chronicity. This paper assessed the effects of fibromyalgia and widespread pain on clinically significant TMJD pain (GCPS II-IV). Four hundred eighty-five participants recruited from the Minneapolis/St. Paul area through media advertisements and local dentists received examinations and completed the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) at baseline and at 18th months. Baseline widespread pain (OR: 2.53, P=0.04) and depression (OR: 5.30, P=0.005) were associated with onset of clinically significant pain (GCPS II-IV) within 18 months after baseline. The risk associated with baseline fibromyalgia was moderate, but not significant (OR: 2.74, P=0.09). Persistence of clinically significant pain was related to fibromyalgia (OR: 2.48, P=0.02) and with depression (OR: 2.48, P=0.02). These results indicate that these centrally generated pain conditions play a role in the onset and persistence of clinically significant TMJD. PMID:20466595

  11. Towards Joint Disease Mapping Leonhard Held

    E-print Network

    Rue, Håvard

    Towards Joint Disease Mapping Leonhard Held #3; Department of Statistics, University of Munich the spatial variation of rates of several diseases with common risk factors. We start with a review of methods for separate analyses of diseases, then move to ecological regression approaches, where the rates from one

  12. Abnormal function of the temporomandibular joints and related musculature. Orthodontic implications. Part II.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J R

    1986-07-01

    Timing of mandibular growth and orthodontic treatment are coincidental, not cause-and-effect. Comparison of cephalometric radiographic tracings made before, during, and after treatment has shown no evidence that orthodontic forces can either arrest or stimulate growth of the condyle. Conversely, the growth behavior of the condyles can have a profound effect on the time required to achieve an orthodontic correction and on the anatomic and functional relationships at the end of treatment and later. Mandibular growth at the moment of orthodontic force application can have important effects on facial growth and function. If there is no growth, the mandible may rotate downward and backward, and condyle displacement and clicking can occur. Future growth rarely leads to recovery of such alterations. With adequate growth at the moment of orthodontic force application, the freeway space is maintained and horizontal tooth movement does not alter mandibular position. The position of the maxillary incisors in the face must be based on many considerations going far beyond arbitrary conformity to some "standard" values based on averages. Functional relationships and their effects on the joints are one of those considerations, along with esthetics. Dynamic thinking requires that maxillary incisors not be over-retracted, anticipating continued growth of the condyle that can reposition the body of the mandible and lower incisors downward and forward. This can occur before, during, or many years after treatment. If a tight incisor relationship is established, or develops naturally, in the early or midteens, and the condyles later outgrow the maxilla, clicking may well develop. Anterior translation of the mandible with the new growth is impeded by the incisors, so posterior displacement of the condyles occurs instead. This is most likely to occur in straight ("good") faces. Facial morphology, or pattern, has an impact on function. In the straight facial pattern, these problems usually involve incisor interference. In convex faces, the problems more often involve vertical molar interferences. Each of these presents its own unique problems and treatment requirements. PMID:3461729

  13. Temporomandibular disorders: associated features.

    PubMed

    Auvenshine, Ronald C

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) encompasses a number of clinical problems involving the masticatory muscles or the temporomandibular joints. These disorders are a major cause of nondental pain in the orofacial region, and are considered to be a subclassification of musculoskeletal disorders. Orofacial pain and TMD can be associated with pathologic conditions or disorders related to somatic and neurologic structures. When patients present to the dental office with a chief complaint of pain or headaches, it is vital for the practitioner to understand the cause of the complaint and to perform a thorough examination that will lead to the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. A complete understanding of the associated medical conditions with symptomology common to TMD and orofacial pain is necessary for a proper diagnosis. PMID:17185062

  14. Temporomandibular Joint, Open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Answers Grant Writing Tips Careers & Training Fellowships and Internships for... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education ...

  15. Analysis by Light, Scanning, and Transmission Microscopy of the Intima Synovial of the Temporomandibular Joint of Human Fetuses during the Development.

    PubMed

    Alvez, Carlos Sabu; Carvalho de Moraes, Luis Otavio; Marques, Sergio R; Tedesco, Roberto C; Harb, Leandro J C; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose F; Mérida-Velasco, Jose R; Alonso, Luis Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To characterize morphologically and ultrastructurally using light microscopy, the scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the intima synovial of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses between the 10th and the 38th week of development. Materials and Methods. The TMJ was dissected bilaterally in 37 human fetuses belonging to the Institute of Embryology of the University Complutense of Madrid and of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results. The outcome by light microscopy showed the morphology of the TMJ and that the formation of inferior joint cavity precedes the superior joint cavity and the presence of blood vessels in the synovial. Conclusion. By scanning and transmission electron microscopy we observed the presence of two well-defined cell types in the intima layer of synovial of the TMJ of human fetuses, macrophage-like type A cell and fibroblast-like type B cell, and the presence of the a third cell type, defined by the name of intermediate lining cell in the intima layer of the synovial. PMID:24527214

  16. Analysis by Light, Scanning, and Transmission Microscopy of the Intima Synovial of the Temporomandibular Joint of Human Fetuses during the Development

    PubMed Central

    Alvez, Carlos Sabu; Carvalho de Moraes, Luis Otavio; Marques, Sergio R.; Tedesco, Roberto C.; Harb, Leandro J. C.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose F.; Mérida-Velasco, Jose R.; Alonso, Luis Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To characterize morphologically and ultrastructurally using light microscopy, the scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy the intima synovial of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses between the 10th and the 38th week of development. Materials and Methods. The TMJ was dissected bilaterally in 37 human fetuses belonging to the Institute of Embryology of the University Complutense of Madrid and of the Federal University of São Paulo. Results. The outcome by light microscopy showed the morphology of the TMJ and that the formation of inferior joint cavity precedes the superior joint cavity and the presence of blood vessels in the synovial. Conclusion. By scanning and transmission electron microscopy we observed the presence of two well-defined cell types in the intima layer of synovial of the TMJ of human fetuses, macrophage-like type A cell and fibroblast-like type B cell, and the presence of the a third cell type, defined by the name of intermediate lining cell in the intima layer of the synovial. PMID:24527214

  17. Effects of condylar fibrocartilage on the biomechanical loading of the human temporomandibular joint in a three-dimensional, nonlinear finite element model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Qiguo, Rong; Fang, Jing; Mao, Jeremy J

    2003-03-01

    The present study was undertaken to test a hypothesis that the addition of articular fibrocartilage in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint reduces three-dimensional stress distribution in the condyle, the disc and articular eminence. A three-dimensional, nonlinear finite-element model was developed for analysis of joint loading before and after the addition of condylar fibrocartilage to the osseous mandibular condyle reconstructed from spiral computer topography data. In the model, each of the disc, condyle and articular eminence was arbitrarily divided into five regions: the anterior, posterior, medial, lateral and central. Von Mises stresses that in virtually all regions of the disc, condyle and articular eminence became lower after the addition of condylar fibrocartilage. Especially remarkable was the approximately four-fold reduction in von Mises stresses in the anterior, central and medial regions of the mandibular condyle. In comparison, only slight to moderate stress reductions occurred in the disc and articular eminence, suggesting that condylar fibrocartilage absorbs considerable stresses and likely dampens more loads than the disc and articular eminence. The mandibular condyle demonstrated the largest total displacement in all directions after the addition of articular fibrocartilage, followed by the disc and articular eminence. We conclude that the addition of articular fibrocartilage primarily reduces loading of the mandibular condyle, rather than the disc and articular eminence. These findings lead to a hypothesis that the mandibular condyle more likely functions as a shock absorber than the disc. PMID:12538065

  18. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via G?i-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  19. Dickkopf-related protein 1 induces angiogenesis by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor in the synovial fibroblasts of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, SHENG-JUN; LI, WEI; LI, YING-JIE; FANG, WEI; LONG, XING

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis has an important role in the progression of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The aim of the present study was to explore the association between dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1) and angiogenesis in TMD. The expression levels of DKK-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were quantified by an ELISA assay of the synovial fluid from patients with TMD. The correlation between DKK-1 and VEGF was analyzed by Pearson correlation test. Synovial fibroblasts were isolated from patients with TMD and were subsequently treated with recombinant human DKK-1, anti-DKK-1 antibody, hypoxia inducible factor-1? (HIF-1?), or small interfering RNA (siRNA). The expression levels of DKK-1, HIF-1?, and VEGF were subsequently quantified. The present study also investigated the effects of DKK-1 on the migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Increased expression levels of DKK-1 were concordant with increased expression levels of VEGF in the synovial fluid from patients with TMD. In the synovial fibroblasts, DKK-1 increased the expression levels of VEGF, and promoted HIF-1? nuclear localization. In addition, DKK-1 induced HUVEC migration, and HIF-1? siRNA inhibited DKK-1-induced cell migration. The results of the present study indicate that DKK-1 is associated with angiogenesis in the synovial fluid of patients with TMD. Furthermore, HIF-1? may be associated with DKK-1-induced HUVEC activation. PMID:26239269

  20. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via G?i-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  1. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint as a complication of acute otitis media in a child: A rare case and the importance of real-time PCR for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bast, F; Collier, S; Chadha, P; Collier, J

    2015-11-01

    We document the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with pain in his left ear and trismus after a diagnosis of acute otitis media one week previously. His blood inflammatory markers were raised and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed significant left temporomandibular joint effusion and partial attenuation of the left mastoid. A clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis of the TMJ was made and the patient was commenced on broad-spectrum antibiotics. Analysis using real time PCR enabled identification of the offending organism, confirmation of the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment to be specifically tailored for treatment. PMID:26340928

  2. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    LI, XIHAI; LIANG, WENNA; YE, HONGZHI; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; LIN, PINGDONG; LIU, XIANXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild-type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression-associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice. PMID:26096903

  3. Brain Signature of Chronic Orofacial Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Neuroimaging Research of Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-shu

    2014-01-01

    Brain neuroimaging has been widely used to investigate the bran signature of chronic orofacial pain, including trigeminal neuropathic pain (TNP) and pain related to temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). We here systematically reviewed the neuroimaging literature regarding the functional and structural changes in the brain of TNP and TMD pain patients, using a computerized search of journal articles via PubMed. Ten TNP studies and 14 TMD studies were reviewed. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed based on the criteria of patient selection, the history of medication, the use of standardized pain/psychological assessments, and the model and statistics of imaging analyses. Qualitative meta-analysis was performed by examining the brain regions which showed significant changes in either brain functions (including the blood-oxygen-level dependent signal, cerebral blood flow and the magnetic resonance spectroscopy signal) or brain structure (including gray matter and white matter anatomy). We hypothesized that the neuroimaging findings would display a common pattern as well as distinct patterns of brain signature in the disorders. This major hypothesis was supported by the following findings: (1) TNP and TMD patients showed consistent functional/structural changes in the thalamus and the primary somatosensory cortex, indicating the thalamocortical pathway as the major site of plasticity. (2) The TNP patients showed more alterations at the thalamocortical pathway, and the two disorders showed distinct patterns of thalamic and insular connectivity. Additionally, functional and structural changes were frequently reported in the prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia, suggesting the role of cognitive modulation and reward processing in chronic orofacial pain. The findings highlight the potential for brain neuroimaging as an investigating tool for understanding chronic orofacial pain. PMID:24759798

  4. Effects of glucosamine-chondroitin combination on synovial fluid IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-? and PGE2 levels in internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emin; Tatli, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of glucosamine-chondroitin sulphate combination on internal derangements of temporomandibular joint in clinical and biochemical manners. Material and Methods This randomized clinical study included 31 cases reporting joint tenderness, in which disc displacement was detected on MR imaging. In all patients, synovial fluid sampling was performed under local anesthesia. In the study group, the patients were prescribed a combination of 1500 mg glucosamine and 1200 mg chondroitin sulphate, while patients in the control group were only prescribed 50 mg tramadol HCl (twice daily) for pain control. After 8 weeks, synovial fluid sampling was repeated in the same manner. The levels of pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), synovial fluid IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-? and PGE2 measured before and after pharmacological intervention were compared. Results The reduction in pain levels was significant in both groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of pain reduction. The improvement in MMO was significant in the study group but it was not in the control group. The MMO improvement was significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group. In the study group, significant decrease was observed in PGE2 level, while the decreases in IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? levels were not significant. In the control group, no significant decrease was observed in any of the inflammatory cytokines after 8 weeks, moreover IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were increased. Alterations of IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were significant in study group while TNF-? and PGE2 levels were not, compared to control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results might suggest that glucosamine-chondroitin combination significantly increases the MMO and decreases the synovial fluid IL1? and IL6 levels in internal derangements of TMJ compared to tramadol. The modifications of synovial fluid TNF-? and PGE2 levels do not reach statistical significance. This combination also provides efficient pain relief in similar level with tramadol, a narcotic analgesic. Key words: Chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine, internal derangement, TMJ, tramadol. PMID:25662545

  5. Orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders: a curriculum proposal for postgraduate programs.

    PubMed

    Greene, Charles S; Stockstill, John; Rinchuse, Donald; Kandasamy, Sanjivan

    2012-07-01

    In a previous article, we reported the results of a survey of American and Canadian orthodontic postgraduate programs to determine how the topics of occlusion, temporomandibular joint, and temporomandibular disorders were currently being taught. Based on the finding of considerable diversity among those programs, we decided to write a curriculum proposal for temporomandibular disorders that would be compatible with and satisfy the current curriculum guidelines for postgraduate orthodontic programs. These guidelines arose from a combination of the requirements published by the American Dental Association's Commission on Dental Accreditation and the written guide (July 2010) of the American Board of Orthodontics for the its clinical examination. The proposed curriculum, based on the latest scientific evidence in the temporomandibular disorder field, gives program directors a template for covering these subjects thoroughly. At the same time, they can focus on related orthodontic issues, so that their future graduates will be prepared to deal with patients who either have or later develop temporomandibular disorder problems. PMID:22748986

  6. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without improvements to wear resistance behavior. Identified problems include high surface roughness due to an inadequate seeding procedure and a porous film surface. It is believed that these problems can be solved by future research, in which case NCD thin films should prove to-be well-suited as wear resistant coatings in biomedical applications.

  7. Sacroiliac joint pain: burden of disease

    PubMed Central

    Cher, Daniel; Polly, David; Berven, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is an important and significant cause of low back pain. We sought to quantify the burden of disease attributable to the SIJ. Methods The authors compared EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D) and Short Form (SF)-36-based health state utility values derived from the preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic SIJ pain participating in two prospective clinical trials of minimally invasive SIJ fusion versus patients participating in a nationally representative USA cross-sectional survey (National Health Measurement Study [NHMS]). Comparative analyses controlled for age, sex, and oversampling in NHMS. A utility percentile for each SIJ subject was calculated using NHMS as a reference cohort. Finally, SIJ health state utilities were compared with utilities for common medical conditions that were published in a national utility registry. Results SIJ patients (number [n]=198) had mean SF-6D and EQ-5D utility scores of 0.51 and 0.44, respectively. Values were significantly depressed (0.28 points for the SF-6D utility score and 0.43 points for EQ-5D; both P<0.0001) compared to NHMS controls. SIJ patients were in the lowest deciles for utility compared to the NHMS controls. The SIJ utility values were worse than those of many common, major medical conditions, and similar to those of other common preoperative orthopedic conditions. Conclusion Patients with SIJ pain presenting for minimally invasive surgical care have marked impairment in quality of life that is worse than in many chronic health conditions, and this is similar to other orthopedic conditions that are commonly treated surgically. SIJ utility values are in the lowest two deciles when compared to control populations. PMID:24748825

  8. Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Sena, Marina Fernandes; de Mesquita, Késsia Suênia F.; Santos, Fernanda Regina R.; Silva, Francisco Wanderley G. P.; Serrano, Kranya Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents, verifying the methodological variations. DATA SOURCES: Research conducted in Medline, PubMed, Lilacs and BBO databases, including manuscripts (except reviews and case reports) published from 1990 to 2012. The descriptors were "temporomandibular joint syndrome", "temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome", "temporomandibular joint disorders", "prevalence studies", and "cross-sectional studies"; the words "dysfunction", "disorder", "temporomandibular", "children", "adolescents", "prevalence", "frequency", and "transversal" were used. DATA SYNTHESIS: Seventeen articles were selected, and the TMD frequency varied from 16 to 68%. Regarding the methodological criteria, only three articles (18%) reported sample size determination, three (18%) clearly described the sample selection process by stratified selection technique, and nine studies (53%) carried out the calibration of the examiners. The diagnostic criteria used in the studies were: Helkimo index (n=2; 12%), Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (n=4; 24%), the jaw index (n=1; 6%), clinical protocols (n=10; 59%), and anamnestic questionnaires (n=6; 35%). CONCLUSIONS: The TMD prevalence in children and adolescents varies in the literature. Appropriate and standardized methods are needed to identify, with greater validity, the presence of TMD in this population, allowing a better understanding of the pathological aspects in order to address more effective preventive and therapeutic procedures. PMID:24473961

  9. Treatment of Nongout Joint Deposition Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  10. Pathways involved in the resolution of inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Oliver; Buckley, Christopher D

    2015-05-01

    A common feature of seasonal colds and other infections is painful joints. This is due to an acute reactive inflammatory arthritis which almost always resolves. Unfortunately, for some people the inflammation never completely resolves but rather precedes progression to chronic inflammatory arthritis. The existing dogma that accounts for why chronic inflammatory joint disease persists is that it is due to an excess of pro-inflammatory signals and that resolution occurs by pro-inflammatory mediator catabolism. Recent discoveries have supported a new paradigm which proposes that the resolution of inflammation is an active process with genetic, molecular and cellular programs that promote catabasis. By seeking to understand the mechanisms behind the spontaneous resolution of inflammation, we can gain insight into why inflammation sometimes fails to resolve. This review seeks to highlight the mechanisms behind the resolution of joint inflammation and how endogenous pro-resolving mediators could be used to treat chronic persistent inflammatory joint disease. PMID:25944272

  11. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  12. Transport distraction osteogenesis as a method of reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint following gap arthroplasty for post-traumatic ankylosis in children: a clinical and radiological prospective assessment of outcome.

    PubMed

    Bansal, V; Singh, S; Garg, N; Dubey, P

    2014-02-01

    This clinical and radiographic study investigated the use of transport distraction osteogenesis in unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis patients. Six patients aged between 4 and 8 years were selected for the study; the mean preoperative maximal inter-incisal opening (MIO) was 3.5mm without lateral and protrusive mandibular movements. The ankylotic mass along with the posterior border of the ascending ramus was exposed via 'lazy-S' incision. A gap arthroplasty was performed, followed by a 'reverse L' osteotomy on the posterior border of the ramus. In-house manufactured extraoral distraction devices were used for this prospective study. Follow-up clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out for 13-27 months after completion of the activation period. After a mean follow-up of 19 months, the mean MIO was 29.1mm and the lateral and protrusive movements changed from none to slight. Cone beam computed tomography images of all patients showed remodelled neocondyle created by transport distraction osteogenesis with no statistically significant differences observed for average cancellous bone density, trabecular number, and trabecular spacing between the neocondyle of the operated side (test) and the condyle of the non-operated side (control). Neocondyle formation by transport distraction osteogenesis using the in-house distraction device is a promising treatment option for TMJ reconstruction in ankylosis patients. PMID:24016549

  13. Joint position sense is impaired by Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zia, S; Cody, F; O'Boyle, D

    2000-02-01

    The abilities of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, taking routine medication, and of control subjects, to discriminate bilateral differences in the static angular positions of the two elbow joints were studied during passive (subject relaxed) and active (subject contracting to hold position) conditions. On each trial, one of the subject's elbows served as the reference joint (angle 60 degrees) and the other as the test joint (angular range, 54 degrees to 69 degrees, at 3 degree intervals). Subjects, with eyes closed, were required to discriminate the relative angles of the two elbows. In Experiments 1 (passive condition) and 2 (active condition), parkinsonians (n = 12) gave significantly fewer correct responses, pooled across sides, than did controls (n = 12), both in total scores across all angles and at individual test angles of 57 degrees and 63 degrees. In Experiment 3 (passive condition), derivation of conventional psychophysical variables indicated that both the difference limen (DL; threshold) and Weber ratio (WR; discriminatory sensitivity, independent of absolute stimulus values; same as DL/PSE) values of patients (n = 6) were significantly larger than those of controls (n = 6), in the absence of a significant difference between groups in the point of subjective equality (PSE). Our results provide clear evidence of a quantitative impairment of joint position sense in PD patients. PMID:10665493

  14. The radiology of joint disease. 3rd Ed

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, D.M.; Brown, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book is a systematic radiographic approach to the arthritides. Part one deals with hand abnormalities ''to facilitate the teaching of basic principles and to dramatize the differences between radiographic features of various arthritides,'' as stated in the forward of the first edition. Part two, ''Arthritis from Head to Foot,'' illustrates the same diseases as they affect other joints. The ABCs (alignment, bone mineralization, cartilage space, soft tissue) approach is followed throughout the book. For example, reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome is dealt with in six different locations, and metatarsal stress fractures are mentioned in a chapter on erosions in rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Temporomandibular disorders. Part 2: conservative management

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Stephen M; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Sizer, Phillip S; Courtney, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) requires an understanding of the underlying dysfunction associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding structures. A comprehensive examination process, as described in part 1 of this series, can reveal underlying clinical findings that assist in the delivery of comprehensive physical therapy services for patients with TMD. Part 2 of this series focuses on management strategies for TMD. Physical therapy is the preferred conservative management approach for TMD. Physical therapists are professionally well-positioned to step into the void and provide clinical services for patients with TMD. Clinicians should utilize examination findings to design rehabilitation programs that focus on addressing patient-specific impairments. Potentially appropriate plan of care components include joint and soft tissue mobilization, trigger point dry needling, friction massage, therapeutic exercise, patient education, modalities, and outside referral. Management options should address both symptom reduction and oral function. Satisfactory results can often be achieved when management focuses on patient-specific clinical variables. PMID:24976744

  16. Evaluating inflammatory joint disease: how and when can autoantibodies help?

    PubMed

    Meyer, Olivier

    2003-12-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory joint disease rests on a constellation of symptoms, signs, laboratory test results and, occasionally, histological findings. Classification criteria have been developed by national learned societies, international panels of experts or, more rarely, an expert working alone. These criteria are intended to provide a common language for therapeutic trials and international publications. Yet, they are often inappropriately used as diagnostic tools for the individual patient. Identification of an early seroimmunologic marker with high sensitivity and specificity for classifying patients with recent-onset joint disease is a daunting challenge. Test performance characteristics such as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the positive or negative likelihood ratio help to assess the diagnostic usefulness of a laboratory test in a specific situation. The difference between the pretest and posttest likelihoods of obtaining a positive or negative result measures the usefulness, or performance, of a laboratory test in a specific situation according to the prevalence of the disease. A higher positive likelihood ratio indicates a more useful test. In a patient with inflammatory joint disease, the diagnosis can be sought by assaying a limited number of autoantibodies according to a decision tree. Thus, IgM rheumatoid factors (latex test or ELISA) and antibodies to filaggrin or other citrullinated proteins (antikeratin antibodies by indirect immunofluorescent assay or anticyclic citrullinated peptides by ELISA) identify more than 70% of cases of early rheumatoid arthritis with greater than 98% specificity. If these markers are negative, testing for antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescent assay on HEp-2 cells identifies 99% of cases of lupus and progressive systemic sclerosis. Confirmation of the diagnosis can be obtained by characterizing the autoantibodies: thus, presence of antidouble-stranded DNA (dsDNA, by the Farr radioimmunoassay, indirect immunofluorescent assay on Crithidia luciliae, or ELISA (IgG)) or of antinucleosome antibodies (ELISA) indicates lupus, whereas anticentromere, antitopoisomerase I (Scl 70), and antinucleolar antibodies point to progressive systemic sclerosis. A positive test for antibodies to soluble nuclear antigens of the U1 RNP type suggests mixed connective tissue disease or lupus but may indicate scleroderma. Anti-Sm antibodies are found in fewer than 10% of lupus patients but are highly specific. Anti-SSA (Ro) and anti-SSB (La) suggest lupus or primary Sjögren's syndrome. When tests are negative for ANA, several antibodies to cytoplasmic organelles are valuable diagnostic tools, such as anti-J01 for polymyositis syndromes and antiribosome antibodies for lupus, although their sensitivity is modest (20-25%). Finally antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) ensure the diagnosis of small-vessel vasculitides, which often involve the lungs and kidneys. Thus, in diffuse Wegener's granulomatosis, ANCAs exhibiting the classic cytoplasmic pattern and corresponding by ELISA to anti-PR3 are found. In microscopic polyangiitis the ANCAs are peripheral and correspond by ELISA to antimyeloperoxidase antibodies. Tests for other antibodies are less often needed to evaluate inflammatory joint disease. PMID:14667551

  17. Joint Leveling for Advanced Kienbock’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Van Steyn, Marlo O.; Gyuricza, Cassie; Adams, Amelia; Weiland, Andrew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The use of joint leveling procedures to treat Kienbock’s disease has been limited by the degree of disease advancement. This study was designed to compare clinical and radiographic outcomes of wrists with more advanced Kienbock’s disease (stage IIIB) to wrists with less advanced disease (stage II/IIIA) following radius shortening osteotomy. METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 31 adult wrists (30 patients, mean age 39 years), treated by radius shortening osteotomy between two institutions for either stage IIIB (n=14) or stage II/IIIA (n=17) disease. Evaluation was carried out at a mean of 74 months (IIIB, 77 months; II/IIIA, 72 months). Radiographic assessment determined disease progression. Clinical outcomes were determined by validated patient-based and objective measures. RESULTS Patient-based outcome ratings of wrists treated for stage IIIB were similar to those with stage II/IIIA [QuickDASH (15 vs 12:p=.63), MMWS (84 vs 87:p=.59), VAS pain (1.2 vs 1.7:p=.45), VAS function (2.6 vs 2.1:p=.59)]. The average flexion/extension arc was 102° for wrists with stage IIIB and 106° for wrists with stage II/IIIA Kienbock’s (p=.70). Grip strength was 77% of the opposite side for stage IIIB wrists versus 85% for stage II/IIIA (p=.25). Postoperative carpal height ratio and radioscaphoid angle were worse (p<.05) for wrists treated for stage IIIB (0.46:65°) than stage II/IIIA (0.53:53°) disease. Radiographic disease progression occurred in 7 wrists (6 stage II/IIIA: 1 stage IIIB). The one stage IIIB wrist that progressed underwent wrist arthrodesis. CONCLUSIONS In this limited series, clinical outcomes of radius shortening using validated, patient-based assessment instruments and objective measures failed to demonstrate predicted “clinically relevant” differences between stage II/IIIA and IIIB Kienbock’s. Provided the high percentage successful clinical outcomes in this case series of 14 stage IIIB wrists, we believe that static carpal malalignment does not preclude radius shortening osteotomy. Level of Evidence IV; retrospective case series PMID:20971577

  18. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; ?2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; ?2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; ?2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk factors (except loss of posterior support) show a statistically significant OR for the diagnosis of MFP. Key words:Disorder, dysfunction, temporomandibular, myofascial, osteoarthrosis, TMJ, disc displacement. PMID:22549687

  19. Synovium Fragment-Derived Cells Exhibit Characteristics Similar to Those of Dissociated Multipotent Cells in Synovial Fluid of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang-peng; Zheng, You-hua; Liu, Wen-jing; Zheng, Yu-liang; Zhang, Zhi-guang

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) found in the synovial fluid (SFMSCs) of the tempromandibular joint (TMJ) remain poorly understood. During TMJ arthrocentesis, we discovered that synovial fluid collected from some patients with TMJ disorders contained not only SFMSCs but also synovium fragments (SFs). In this study, we attempted to characterize both the SFMSCs and SF-derived cells (SFCs) in order to further understand the role of MSCs in the synovial fluid of the TMJ. The SFs were membranous and translucent and consisted of several cell layers, indicating that their origin was only from the intima. SFCs were obtained by digestion of the SFs and subsequently expanded in vitro. SFMSCs were enriched by centrifugation of the synovial fluid and expanded in vitro. SFCs and SFMSCs displayed a similar fibroblast-like, spindle-shaped morphology, and we observed that some SFMSCs grew out of small tissue masses in culture. Flow cytometric analysis showed that both groups of cells expressed similar surface markers, including CD90, CD44, CD105, and CD73. However, both were negative for Stro-1, CD146, CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19, and HLA-DR. Immunofluorescent staining showed that both SFs and SFMSCs expressed vascular cell adhesion molecule 1. Both SFCs and SFMSCs could be induced to differentiate down osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Together, our results indicate that the intima is the most likely tissue origin of SFMSCs in the TMJ. Moreover, the SFs are composed of only intima and thus offer an improved source of synovium-derived MSCs compared to synovium specimens obtained by surgery, which contain both intima and subintima. PMID:25003199

  20. Patients' Priorities and Attitudes Towards Their Temporo-Mandibular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Martin; Ray-Chaudhuri, Arijit; Khawaja, Noman

    2015-08-01

    The diagnosis and appropriate management of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMDs) remains controversial. Current scientific evidence highlights the importance of psychosocial factors in sufferers and the reducing emphasis on occlusal or dental/prosthetic factors. This paper describes the findings of a survey of 211 patients reporting pain from their temporo-mandibular joint area and associated structures. This article offers busy primary dental care practitioners a cost effective questionnaire for obtaining relevant information from patients about the history of their condition and highlights what patients hope to achieve through the management of their disorder. It also emphasises the importance of communicating effectively with patients and offers practical tips for the management of TMDs in primary care. PMID:26556513

  1. Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities Pieter T. J, Berkeley, CA, and approved September 10, 2013 (received for review June 3, 2013) Host­parasite interactions parasites. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have explored the joint effects of host and parasite

  2. Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease Past ... knees, pain plagued her every step. Living in New York City, Saisselin relied on walking and public ...

  3. [Computer-assisted temporomandibular joint reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Mommers, X-A; Cheynet, F

    2013-08-01

    Prosthetic replacement of TMJ is gradually becoming a common procedure because of good functional and aesthetic results and low morbidity. Prosthetic models available can be standard or custom-made. Custom-made prosthesis are usually reserved for complex cases, but we think that computer assistance for custom-made prosthesis should be indicated for each case because it gives a greater implant stability and fewer complications. Computer assistance will further enlarge TMJ prosthesis replacement indications. PMID:23916312

  4. Evaluation of Pain Regression in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction Treated by Intra-Articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Ze?czak-Wi?ckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. Materials and Methods. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5?mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. Results. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Conclusion. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. PMID:25157351

  5. The Diagnostic Value of Pressure Algometry for Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wi?ckiewicz, W?odzimierz; Wo?niak, Krzysztof; Lipski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the diagnostic value of pressure algometry in temporomandibular disorders. Two hundred volunteers aged 19.3 to 27.8 (mean 21.50, SD 0.97) participated in this study. An analogue pressure algometer was used for the evaluation of muscle tenderness of the following masticatory muscles: superficial and deep parts of the masseter muscle; anterior and posterior parts of the temporal muscle; and the tissues adjacent to the lateral and dorsal part of the temporomandibular joint capsule. Each patient described the algometry result for the individual components of the masticatory motor system, by selecting each time the intensity of pain on a 100?mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) ruler. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, indicating the discriminatory efficiency for asymptomatic subjects and patients with temporomandibular dysfunction according to the dysfunction Di index, was the largest for the mean pain value (AUC?=?0.8572; SEM?=?0.0531). The 7.4 VAS cut-off point marked 95.3% specificity for this variable in identifying healthy subjects and 58.4% sensitivity in identifying patients with symptoms of dysfunctions (accuracy 68.1%). Assuming comparable sensitivity (74.9%) and specificity (74.2%) for a diagnostic test, there was test accuracy of 74.5% at the 4.2 VAS cut-off point. PMID:25883964

  6. Joint and fascia manifestations in chronic graft-versus-host disease and their assessment

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Pidala, Joseph; Chai, Xiaoyu; Kurland, Brenda F.; Weisdorf, Daniel; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Palmer, Jeanne; Arai, Sally; Jacobsohn, David; Cutler, Corey; Jagasia, Madan; Goldberg, Jenna D.; Martin, Paul J.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Vogelsang, Georgia B.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Carpenter, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Joint and fascia manifestations in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation need to be assessed reliably, simply and in a clinically meaningful way. Methods In a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal, observational cohort of patients with chronic GVHD (n=567), we evaluated 3 scales proposed for assessing joint status: National Institutes of Health (NIH) joint/fascia scale, Hopkins fascia scale and the Photographic Range of Motion (P-ROM) scale. Ten other scales were also tested for assessing symptoms, quality of life and physical functions. Results Joint and fascia manifestations were present at study enrollment in 164 (29%) patients. Limited range of motion was most frequent at wrists or fingers. Among the 3 joint scales, changes in the NIH scale correlated with both clinician and patient-perceived improvement of joint and fascia manifestations with higher sensitivity than the Hopkins fascia scale. Changes in all 3 scales correlated with clinician and patient-perceived worsening but the P-ROM scale was the most sensitive in this regard. Onset of joint and fascia manifestations was not associated with subsequent mortality. Conclusion Joint and fascia manifestations are common and should be assessed carefully in patients with chronic GVHD. Our results support the use of the NIH joint/fascia scale and P-ROM scale to assess joint and fascia manifestations. The NIH scale better captures improvement, while the P-ROM scale better captures worsening. The utility of these scales could also be tested in the rheumatic diseases. PMID:24757155

  7. Nutraceutical therapies for degenerative joint diseases: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Goggs, Robert; Vaughan-Thomas, Anne; Clegg, Peter D; Carter, Stuart D; Innes, John F; Mobasheri, Ali; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schwab, Wolfgang; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2005-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of nutritional factors in the maintenance of bone and joint health, and that nutritional imbalance combined with endocrine abnormalities may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Despite this, dietary programs have played a secondary role in the management of these connective tissue disorders. Articular cartilage is critically dependent upon the regular provision of nutrients (glucose and amino acids), vitamins (particularly vitamin C), and essential trace elements (zinc, magnesium, and copper). Therefore, dietary supplementation programs and nutraceuticals used in conjunction with non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may offer significant benefits to patients with joint disorders, such as OA and OCD. This article examines the available clinical evidence for the efficacy of nutraceuticals, antioxidant vitamin C, polyphenols, essential fatty acids, and mineral cofactors in the treatment of OA and related joint disorders in humans and veterinary species. This article also attempts to clarify the current state of knowledge. It also highlights the need for additional targeted research to elucidate the changes in nutritional status and potential alterations to the expression of plasma membrane transport systems in synovial structures in pathophysiological states, so that current therapy and future treatments may be better focused. PMID:16048146

  8. Efficacy of glucosamine, chondroitin, and methylsulfonylmethane for spinal degenerative joint disease and degenerative disc disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Kent; Sajko, Sandy; Kristmanson, Kevyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nutritional supplements are commonly used for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, including knee and hip degenerative joint disease. Although these supplements are occasionally recommended for patients with degenerative disc disease and spinal degenerative joint disease, the evidence supporting this use is unknown. Objective: To systematically search and assess the quality of the literature on the use of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and methylsulfonylmethane for the treatment of spinal osteoarthritis / degenerative joint disease, and degenerative disc disease. Data Sources: The Index of Chiropractic Literature, AMED, Medline, and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials in English from 1984 to July 2009. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data from studies meeting the inclusion criteria was extracted and reviewed by three reviewers. The Jadad scale was used to assess study quality. No attempts were made at meta-analysis due to variation in study design. Results: Two articles met the inclusion criteria. One study was found to have good quality but reported negative results for the supplemented group compared with placebo, the other study had low quality but reported significant positive results for the supplemented group when compared with a no intervention control group. Conclusion: There was little literature found to support the use of common nutritional supplements for spinal degeneration, making it difficult to determine whether clinicians should recommend them. PMID:21403782

  9. Radiological and Radionuclide Imaging of Degenerative Disease of the Facet Joints

    PubMed Central

    Shur, Natalie; Corrigan, Alexis; Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Desai, Amidevi; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    The facet joint has been increasingly implicated as a potential source of lower back pain. Diagnosis can be challenging as there is not a direct correlation between facet joint disease and clinical or radiological features. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnosis, treatment, and current imaging modality options in the context of degenerative facet joint disease. We describe each modality in turn with a pictorial review using current evidence. Newer hybrid imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) provide additional information relative to the historic gold standard magnetic resonance imaging. The diagnostic benefits of SPECT/CT include precise localization and characterization of spinal lesions and improved diagnosis for lower back pain. It may have a role in selecting patients for local therapeutic injections, as well as guiding their location with increased precision. PMID:26170560

  10. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:26155354

  11. [Orthodontic-surgical treatment puts an end to temporomandibular dysfunction complaints].

    PubMed

    van Beek, H

    2011-05-01

    Late in the last decade of the previous century, an orthodontic-surgical treatment was elected for a 31-years-old woman, who had severe malocclusion and temporomandibular complaints. The skeletal pattern (high angled mandibula) and degenerating joints were considered risk factors for relapse and condylar lysis. Nevertheless, the severity of the malocclusion justified the treatment. The goal was a stable occlusion and the creation ofa smooth articulation to eliminate dysfunction and facilitate later temporomandibular joint treatment with splints if necessary. In the 1990s this was considered state of the art treatment. Eliminating the scissors bite of 27 seemed instrumental in the elimination of the symptoms. Surgery brought the face and the occlusion further in harmony. The final occlusion features only one lower incisor. PMID:21661246

  12. Feedforward postural adjustments in a simple two-joint synergy in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Latash, M L; Aruin, A S; Neyman, I; Nicholas, J J; Shapiro, M B

    1995-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease, age-matched controls and young control subjects performed discrete elbow or wrist movements in a sagittal plane under the instruction to move one of the joints "as fast as possible." Relative stability of the other, postural joint was comparable in all 3 groups, while movement time was the highest in the patients and the lowest in young controls. Typically, EMG patterns in both muscle pairs acting at the joints demonstrated a commonly observed "tri-phasic" pattern. A cross-correlation analysis of the EMGs confirmed virtually simultaneous bursts in the wrist and elbow flexors and in the wrist and elbow extensors. In all 3 groups, there were no signs of anticipatory activation of postural muscles in about 90% of movements. We consider postural anticipation not a separate process, but a separate peripheral pattern of a single control process that may involve a number of joints and muscles. We conclude that the postural deficits in Parkinson's disease are not related to a basic deficit in the ability to generate feedforward postural adjustments but to other factors that may include the specificity of maintaining the vertical posture in the field of gravity. PMID:7537207

  13. Muscle disorders and dentition-related aspects in temporomandibular disorders: controversies in the most commonly used treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Abbas, Syedda; Kafas, Panagiotis; Vourvachis, Michael; Rob, Jubli; Mc Carthy, Eileen; Angouridakis, Nikolaos; Hopper, Colin

    2008-01-01

    This review explores the aetiology of temporomandibular disorders and discusses the controversies in variable treatment modalities. Pathologies of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and its' associated muscles of mastication are jointly termed temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). TMDs present with a variety of symptoms which include pain in the joint and its surrounding area, jaw clicking, limited jaw opening and headaches. It is mainly reported by middle aged females who tend to recognize the symptoms more readily than males and therefore more commonly seek professional help. Several aetiological factors have been acknowledged including local trauma, bruxism, malocclusion, stress and psychiatric illnesses. The Research Diagnostic Criteria of the Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) is advanced to other criteria as it takes into consideration the socio-psychological status of the patient. Several treatment modalities have been recommended including homecare practices, splint therapy, occlusal adjustment, analgesics and the use of psychotropic medication; as well as surgery, supplementary therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy. Although splint therapy and occlusal adjustment have been extensively used, there is no evidence to suggest that they can be curative; a number of evidence-based trials have concluded that these appliances should not be suggested as part of the routine care. Surgery, except in very rare cases, is discouraged since it is the most invasive alternative; recent studies have shown healthier outcome with cognitive behavioural therapy. PMID:18973654

  14. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation. PMID:21979468

  15. Treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain with deep dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Luis M.; Granados-Nuñez, Mercedes; Urresti-Lopez, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of deep dry needling in the treatment of temporomandibular myofascial pain. Study Design: We selected 36 patients with myofascial pain located in the external pterygoid muscle (30 women/6 men, mean age=27 years with SD±6,5). We studied differences in pain with a visual analog scale and range of mandibular movements before and after intervention. Results: We found a statistically significant relationship (p<0,01) between therapeutic intervention and the improvement of pain and jaw movements, which continued up to 6 months after treatment. Pain reduction was greater the higher was the intensity of pain at baseline. Conclusions: Although further studies are needed, our findings suggest that deep dry needling in the trigger point in the external pterygoid muscle can be effective in the management of patients with myofascial pain located in that muscle. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, myofascial pain, external pterygoid muscle, trigger point, deep dry needling. PMID:22549679

  16. Scedosporium apiospermum Otitis Complicated by a Temporomandibular Arthritis: A Case Report and Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Huguenin, A; Noel, V; Rogez, A; Chemla, C; Villena, I; Toubas, D

    2015-10-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is an ubiquitous fungus responsible for various infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Ear infections are infrequent. We report an exceptional case of S. apiospermum external otitis complicated by temporomandibular joint arthritis. After 6 months of antibiotherapy, diagnosis was established by mycological analysis of external auditory canal and infratemporal fossae needle sampling. A satisfactory outcome was obtained after 2 months of voriconazole alone. We have reviewed 15 cases of S. apiospermum otitis. Seven of these patients were immunocompromised. Most common clinical presentation included a chronic external otitis lasting months or years before complication stage. Most common clinical features included recurrent unilateral otalgia (11/15) and purulent otorrhea (13/15). Diagnosis was often made at later stage (12/15) with local extension to bones and/or soft tissues (9/15) or cerebral lethal dissemination (3/15).The extremely low incidence of S. apiospermum otomycosis and its non-specific presentation results in a frequent diagnosis delay. A mycological investigation should be performed in case of persistent external otitis and/or osteolysis despite prolonged antibiotic treatment to prevent further extension of the disease. PMID:26105580

  17. Regenerative injection therapy with whole bone marrow aspirate for degenerative joint disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Ross A; Orlofsky, Amos

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative therapeutic strategies for joint diseases usually employ either enriched concentrates of bone marrow-derived stem cells, chondrogenic preparations such as platelet-rich plasma, or irritant solutions such as hyperosmotic dextrose. In this case series, we describe our experience with a simple, cost-effective regenerative treatment using direct injection of unfractionated whole bone marrow (WBM) into osteoarthritic joints in combination with hyperosmotic dextrose. Seven patients with hip, knee or ankle osteoarthritis (OA) received two to seven treatments over a period of two to twelve months. Patient-reported assessments were collected in interviews and by questionnaire. All patients reported improvements with respect to pain, as well as gains in functionality and quality of life. Three patients, including two whose progress under other therapy had plateaued or reversed, achieved complete or near-complete symptomatic relief, and two additional patients achieved resumption of vigorous exercise. These preliminary findings suggest that OA treatment with WBM injection merits further investigation. PMID:24046512

  18. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 ?m and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  19. Treating temporomandibular disorders with permanent mandibular repositioning: is it medically necessary?

    PubMed

    Greene, Charles S; Obrez, Ales

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the authors review the rationale and history of mandibular repositioning procedures in relation to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) as these procedures have evolved over time. A large body of clinical research evidence shows that most TMDs can and should be managed with conservative treatment protocols that do not include any mandibular repositioning procedures. Although this provides a strong clinical argument for avoiding such procedures, very few reports have discussed the biologic reasons for either accepting or rejecting them. This scientific information could provide a basis for determining whether mandibular repositioning procedures can be defended as being medically necessary. This position paper introduces the biologic concept of homeostasis as it applies to this topic. The continuing adaptability of teeth, muscles, and temporomandibular joints throughout life is described in terms of homeostasis, which leads to the conclusion that each person's current temporomandibular joint position is biologically "correct." Therefore, that position does not need to be changed as part of a TMD treatment protocol. This means that irreversible TMD treatment procedures, such as equilibration, orthodontics, full-mouth reconstruction, and orthognathic surgery, cannot be defended as being medically necessary. PMID:25864818

  20. Chronic joint disease caused by persistent Chikungunya virus infection is controlled by the adaptive immune response.

    PubMed

    Hawman, David W; Stoermer, Kristina A; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Pal, Pankaj; Oko, Lauren; Diamond, Michael S; Morrison, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes incapacitating disease in humans characterized by intense joint pain that can persist for weeks, months, or even years. Although there is some evidence of persistent CHIKV infection in humans suffering from chronic rheumatologic disease symptoms, little is known about chronic disease pathogenesis, and no specific therapies exist for acute or chronic CHIKV disease. To investigate mechanisms of chronic CHIKV-induced disease, we utilized a mouse model and defined the duration of CHIKV infection in tissues and the associated histopathological changes. Although CHIKV RNA was readily detectable in a variety of tissues very early after infection, CHIKV RNA persisted specifically in joint-associated tissues for at least 16 weeks. Inoculation of Rag1(-/-) mice, which lack T and B cells, resulted in higher viral levels in a variety of tissues, suggesting that adaptive immunity controls the tissue specificity and persistence of CHIKV infection. The presence of CHIKV RNA in tissues of wild-type and Rag1(-/-) mice was associated with histopathological evidence of synovitis, arthritis, and tendonitis; thus, CHIKV-induced persistent arthritis is not mediated primarily by adaptive immune responses. Finally, we show that prophylactic administration of CHIKV-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented the establishment of CHIKV persistence, whereas therapeutic administration had tissue-specific efficacy. These findings suggest that chronic musculoskeletal tissue pathology is caused by persistent CHIKV infection and controlled by adaptive immune responses. Our results have significant implications for the development of strategies to mitigate the disease burden associated with CHIKV infection in humans. PMID:24131709

  1. Chronic Joint Disease Caused by Persistent Chikungunya Virus Infection Is Controlled by the Adaptive Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Hawman, David W.; Stoermer, Kristina A.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Pal, Pankaj; Oko, Lauren; Diamond, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne pathogen that causes incapacitating disease in humans characterized by intense joint pain that can persist for weeks, months, or even years. Although there is some evidence of persistent CHIKV infection in humans suffering from chronic rheumatologic disease symptoms, little is known about chronic disease pathogenesis, and no specific therapies exist for acute or chronic CHIKV disease. To investigate mechanisms of chronic CHIKV-induced disease, we utilized a mouse model and defined the duration of CHIKV infection in tissues and the associated histopathological changes. Although CHIKV RNA was readily detectable in a variety of tissues very early after infection, CHIKV RNA persisted specifically in joint-associated tissues for at least 16 weeks. Inoculation of Rag1?/? mice, which lack T and B cells, resulted in higher viral levels in a variety of tissues, suggesting that adaptive immunity controls the tissue specificity and persistence of CHIKV infection. The presence of CHIKV RNA in tissues of wild-type and Rag1?/? mice was associated with histopathological evidence of synovitis, arthritis, and tendonitis; thus, CHIKV-induced persistent arthritis is not mediated primarily by adaptive immune responses. Finally, we show that prophylactic administration of CHIKV-specific monoclonal antibodies prevented the establishment of CHIKV persistence, whereas therapeutic administration had tissue-specific efficacy. These findings suggest that chronic musculoskeletal tissue pathology is caused by persistent CHIKV infection and controlled by adaptive immune responses. Our results have significant implications for the development of strategies to mitigate the disease burden associated with CHIKV infection in humans. PMID:24131709

  2. Rheumatoid arthritis-celiac disease relationship: joints get that gut feeling.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Aaron; Matthias, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and celiac disease (CD) belong to the autoimmune disease family. Despite being separate entities they share multiple aspects. Epidemiologically they share comparable incidence environmental influences, associated antibodies and a recent incidental surge. They differ in their HLA pre-dispositions and specific predictive and diagnostic biomarkers. At the clinical level, celiac disease exhibits extra-intestinal rheumatic manifestations and RA gastrointestinal ones. Small bowel pathology exists in rheumatic patients. A trend towards responsiveness to a gluten free diet has been observed, ameliorating celiac rheumatic manifestations, whereas dietary interventions for rheumatoid arthritis remain controversial. Pathophysiologically, both diseases are mediated by endogenous enzymes in the target organs. The infectious, dysbiotic and increased intestinal permeability theories, as drivers of the autoimmune cascade, apply to both diseases. Contrary to their specific HLA pre-disposition, the diseases share multiple non-HLA loci. Those genes are crucial for activation and regulation of adaptive and innate immunity. Recently, light was shed on the interaction between host genetics and microbiota composition in relation to CD and RA susceptibility, connecting bugs and us and autoimmunity. A better understanding of the above mentioned similarities in the gut-joint inter-relationship, may elucidate additional facets in the mosaic of autoimmunity, relating CD to RA. PMID:26190704

  3. Therapeutic and physical fitness exercise prescription for older adults with joint disease: an evidence-based approach.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, M; Fletcher, J; Ortiz, S

    2000-08-01

    Aging with joint disease does necessarily result in chronic pain, adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, and functional dependency. Several randomized controlled trials clearly show that regular exercise does not exacerbate pain or accelerate disease progression. On the contrary, these studies suggest that exercise training may increase the physiologic reserve and reduce the risk for functional dependency in older adults with joint disease. The goals for an exercise program should be directed toward increasing flexibility, muscle strength, endurance, and cardiovascular fitness. An exercise training program that is tailored specifically to an older adult's physical limitations may achieve these goals, and by optimizing patient safety lead to improve long-term exercise compliance. PMID:10989515

  4. Independent and joint effects of the MAPT and SNCA genes in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Alexis; Ross, Owen A.; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Moisan, Frédéric; Aasly, Jan; Annesi, Grazia; Bozi, Maria; Brighina, Laura; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Destée, Alain; Ferrarese, Carlo; Ferraris, Alessandro; Gibson, J. Mark; Gispert, Suzana; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Jasinska-Myga, Barbara; Klein, Christine; Krüger, Rejko; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Lohmann, Katja; van de Loo, Simone; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Lynch, Timothy; Mellick, George D.; Mutez, Eugénie; Nilsson, Christer; Opala, Grzegorz; Puschmann, Andreas; Quattrone, Aldo; Sharma, Manu; Silburn, Peter A.; Stefanis, Leonidas; Uitti, Ryan J.; Valente, Enza Maria; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We studied the independent and joint effects of the genes encoding alpha-synuclein (SNCA) and microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT) in Parkinson's disease (PD) as part of a large meta-analysis of individual data from case-control studies participating in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease (GEO-PD) consortium. Methods Participants of Caucasian ancestry were genotyped for a total of four SNCA (rs2583988, rs181489, rs356219, rs11931074) and two MAPT (rs1052553, rs242557) SNPs. Individual and joint effects of SNCA and MAPT SNPs were investigated using fixed- and random-effects logistic regression models. Interactions were studied both on a multiplicative and an additive scale, and using a case-control and case-only approach. Results Fifteen GEO-PD sites contributed a total of 5302 cases and 4161 controls. All four SNCA SNPs and the MAPT H1-haplotype defining SNP (rs1052553) displayed a highly significant marginal association with PD at the significance level adjusted for multiple comparisons. For SNCA, the strongest associations were observed for SNPs located at the 3? end of the gene. There was no evidence of statistical interaction between any of the four SNCA SNPs and rs1052553 or rs242557, neither on the multiplicative nor on the additive scale. Interpretation This study confirms the association between PD and both SNCA SNPs and the H1 MAPT haplotype. It shows, based on a variety of approaches, that the joint action of variants in these two loci is consistent with independent effects of the genes without additional interacting effects. PMID:21391235

  5. CONTAGIOUS DISEASE MODULE FOR THE JOINT EFFECTS MODEL Mr. Jason Rodriguez, Ms. Karen E. Cheng, Dr. Gene E. McClellan, Dr. David J. Crary, and Dr.

    E-print Network

    Ray, Jaideep

    CONTAGIOUS DISEASE MODULE FOR THE JOINT EFFECTS MODEL Mr. Jason Rodriguez, Ms. Karen E. Cheng, Dr to modeling the spread of contagious diseases across a population-at-risk represented by the LandScan database used by the Joint Effects Model (JEM). We are implementing two models of disease transmission

  6. Joint Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    A joint is where two or more bones come together, like the knee, hip, elbow, or shoulder. Joints can be damaged by many types of injuries or diseases, including Arthritis - inflammation of a joint. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling. Over time, ...

  7. ["Plica disease" (synovial folds) of the knee-joint: arthroscopic and histological findings, with suggestions for treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klein, W; Schulitz, K P; Huth, F

    1979-09-01

    A mediopatellar plica (synovial fold) of the knee-joint may develop without recognisable cause in adolescents or young adults, predominantly females. It leads to pain on pressure over the medial knee compartment, sudden or "springing" intraarticular movements and pseudolocking of the joint. Similar plicae occur after traumatic joint contusion, with meniscus disease, or more rarely with arthrosis deformans. Histologically they are characterized by band-like fibrosed evaginations of the synovial membrane and of the synovial fat and connective tissue into the joint spaces. The following therapeutic suggestions, based on the personal experience of 15 cases, are made in the knowledge that significant inflammatory or proliferative arthritic changes can be excluded: the plica can be cut through under arthroscopy; chondromalacial defects, directly or indirectly caused by plical rubbing, of the medial femoral condyle and the medial patella can be removed, also under arthroscopic control, with an electric razor. Arthrotomy is no longer needed in most cases. PMID:477536

  8. Force distribution through the wrist joint in patients with different stages of Kienböck's disease: using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, N; Minami, A; Miyazawa, T; Kaneda, K

    2000-09-01

    The pattern of subchondral bone density has been considered to reflect the stress distribution that occurs under physiologic loading conditions. To determine the force distribution through the wrist joint with Kienböck's disease in living subjects, we applied a computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry and investigated the subchondral bone density pattern across the radio-carpal joint of 6 normal subjects and 10 patients suffering from Kienböck's disease (Lichtman's stage IIIA, 5 patients; stage IIIB, 5 patients). A single density maximum was found in each scaphoid and lunate fossa in all normal subjects. Among the subjects with Kienböck's disease, the current analysis demonstrated that the density maximum area significantly increased in the scaphoid fossa and decreased in the lunate fossa from stage IIIA to IIIB group. These findings indicate that the load is shifted away from the lunate to the scaphoid with the progression of Kienböck's disease in living subjects. PMID:11040302

  9. A Missed Case of Occult Bilateral Temporomandibular Dislocation Mistaken for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Evelyn; Shoenberger, Jan; Wagner, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A 24-year-old male with a history of psychiatric disorder and no prior significant temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology presented to the emergency department for “lockjaw.” Plain film X-rays of the mandible were read as unremarkable by an attending radiologist, leading to the initial diagnosis of medication-induced dystonic reaction. Following unsuccessful medical treatment a maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) was ordered. CT confirmed bilateral dislocation, illustrating the importance of clinical judgment, and limitations of certain radiographic images. The authors believe this case to be the first reported case in the medical literature of bilateral anterior TMJ dislocation with a false negative X-ray. PMID:26435859

  10. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American ...

  11. The Effects on Knowledge of the Systematic Education of Patients with Joint Diseases Treated with NSAIDs and Diuretics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linne, Agneta Bjorck; Liedholm, Hans; Jacobsson, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information focusing on awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment. Results reveal that the intervention group achieved greater…

  12. A joint model for multistate disease processes and random informative observation times, with applications to electronic medical records data

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Jane M.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Inoue, Lurdes Y. T.; Minin, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multistate models are used to characterize individuals’ natural histories through diseases with discrete states. Observational data resources based on electronic medical records pose new opportunities for studying such diseases. However, these data consist of observations of the process at discrete sampling times, which may either be pre-scheduled and non-informative, or symptom-driven and informative about an individual’s underlying disease status. We have developed a novel joint observation and disease transition model for this setting. The disease process is modeled according to a latent continuous-time Markov chain; and the observation process, according to a Markov-modulated Poisson process with observation rates that depend on the individual’s underlying disease status. The disease process is observed at a combination of informative and non-informative sampling times, with possible misclassification error. We demonstrate that the model is computationally tractable and devise an expectation-maximization algorithm for parameter estimation. Using simulated data, we show how estimates from our joint observation and disease transition model lead to less biased and more precise estimates of the disease rate parameters. We apply the model to a study of secondary breast cancer events, utilizing mammography and biopsy records from a sample of women with a history of primary breast cancer. PMID:25319319

  13. Otalgia and aversive symptoms in temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Bush, F M; Harkins, S W; Harrington, W G

    1999-09-01

    The term Costen's syndrome has been used in the dentomedical literature to describe a constellation of craniofacial symptoms. Since some of the same complaints have been reported in patients with "generalized" psychological distress, symptoms associated with the syndrome may not be useful in differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. The present study investigated whether some somatic complaints, particularly tinnitus and dizziness, were pathognomonic in patients with chronic temporomandibular pain. Illness behavior and personality factors were studied for possible interrelationships with these symptoms. Factor analysis revealed that tinnitus and dizziness loaded on separate factors. Tinnitus loaded with nasal stuffiness, tearing, and itching of the eyelids and nose, while dizziness loaded with complaints of altered taste and smell and blurred vision. Neither was consistently related to measures of pain or to indices of illness behavior or somatic focus. PMID:10527281

  14. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system and previously implemented reconstruction scheme, I have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular and metabolic reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  15. Haemophilus influenzae infection of a prosthetic knee joint in a patient with CLL: a vaccine preventable disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sheema; Reddy, Srinivasulu

    2013-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was admitted with a 2-day history of the hot and swollen right knee in December 2012. He had undergone a primary cemented right total knee replacement (TKR) in 2002. He also had a history of chronic lymphatic leukaemia (CLL), haemolytic anaemia and splenomegaly, and was in partial remission following chemotherapy in 2008. He underwent arthroscopic washout of right TKR on admission. Blood cultures on admission and joint fluid specimen grew Haemophilus influenzae (Hi). The isolate was identified as a non-encapsulated Hi strain by the reference laboratory. Non-encapsulated Hi strains rarely cause invasive disease. CLL with splenomegaly may have predisposed our patient to severe invasive disease. A recently licensed 10-valent pneumococcal vaccine conjugated to the immunogenic outer membrane protein D of Hi could potentially prevent invasive Hi disease. Routine vaccination should be considered in all patients with prosthetic joints and predisposing comorbidities. PMID:24252835

  16. Interposition of lateral pterygoid in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Pappachan, Biju; Snehal, B

    2009-06-01

    Conventionally temporalis myofascial flap is popular for interposition in TMJ ankylosis. Medial pterygoid and masseter also has been used in the past for interposition. We introduce here lateral pterygoid for interposition in cases of mild ankylosis where condylar bony architecture is not distorted. PMID:23139490

  17. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Griffith, Emily H.; Thomson, Andrea E.; Simpson, Wendy; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI) and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM). Methods Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period. Results Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (p<0.0001) compared to baseline. The FMPI results and activity count data offer concurrent validation for the FMPI, though the relationship between baseline activity counts and FMPI scores at baseline was poor (R2=0.034). The CSOM did not show responsiveness for improvement in this study, and the relationship between baseline activity counts and CSOM scores at baseline was similarly poor (R2=0.042). Conclusions Refinements to the FMPI, including abbreviation of the instrument and scoring as percent of possible score are recommended. This study offered further validation of the FMPI as a clinical metrology instrument for use in detecting therapeutic efficacy in cats with degenerative joint disease. PMID:26162101

  18. Charge-based transport and drug delivery into cartilage for localized treatment of degenerative joint diseases

    E-print Network

    Bajpayee, Ambika Goel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic joint injuries significantly increase synovial fluid levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can initiate cartilage degeneration leading to osteoarthritis (OA). Articular cartilage is a highly negatively charged, ...

  19. Current panorama of temporomandibular disorders' field in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    MACHADO, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; LIMA, Fernanda Ferruzzi; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the recognition of the specialty of Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain completed ten years. Given this scenario, it is extremely important to track the current situation of this field of knowledge in Brazil, specifically in the area of research and training. We hope to discuss the importance of the recognition of this specialty and the inclusion of these subjects in undergraduate programs in Dentistry. Objective The objective of this study is to perform a bibliometric survey of researches regarding Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain conducted in the country, determine the number of specialization courses in Orofacial Pain and the number of specialists in the field. Methods The bibliometric survey was conducted based on the Dissertations Portal of Coordination for the Improvement of Higher education Personnel (CAPES) and on PubMed. The panorama of the field of Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular disorders in Brazil was determined by searching on the website of the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Results We found 731 theses and dissertations with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain as the main subjects; 81 accredited/recognized Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction completed; 8 accredited/recognized Specialization Courses on Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction still in progress, and 1,064 registered specialists in Orofacial Pain and Temporomandibular Dysfunction in the Brazilian Council of Dentistry. Search in the PUBMED database yielded 576 articles published with the participation of Brazilian researchers as first authors and/or co-authors in the period from 2000 to 2013. From this amount, only 5 were published in Portuguese, while all the others were published in english. We can also notice that the number of published articles increases over time. Conclusion The number of researches related to temporomandibular disorders has increased over the last ten years, as well as the number of specialization courses and the number of specialists, which represents a major breakthrough for this field of knowledge. PMID:25025553

  20. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT. In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists. The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively). A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy. PMID:26376393

  1. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sucena Pita, Murillo; Sato, Sandra; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; do Nascimento, Cássio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac), panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine), and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients' pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time. PMID:25874243

  2. Role of Auriculotherapy in the Treatment of Temporomandibular Disorders with Anxiety in University Students

    PubMed Central

    Iunes, Denise Hollanda; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Moura, Caroline de Castro; Côrrea, Bruna; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Silva, Andreia Maria; de Carvalho, Emília Campos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of auriculotherapy with mustard seeds in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), anxiety, and electromyographic (EMG) activity in university students. Methodology. The State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMDs (RDC/TMDs), and electromyography were used in this study of 44 college students with high levels of anxiety and TMDs. The subjects were divided into two groups: an auriculotherapy (AA) group (n = 31) and an AA sham group (n = 13). The mustard seeds were applied to the shenmen, rim, sympathetic, brain stem, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) points in the AA group and to sham points in the external ear and wrist in the AA sham group. The treatment protocol was 10 sessions (two treatments per week). Results. Anxiety (p < 0.01) was significantly reduced in the AA group. This group also showed a decrease in tender points in the mandibular posterior region (p = 0.04) and in the right side of the submandibular region (p = 0.02). Complaints of bilateral pain were reduced in the temporal tendon (p ? 0.01) and in the left side of the ATM (p < 0.01). In addition, electromyographic (EMG) activity was reduced during temporal muscle contraction (p = 0.03).??Conclusion. Auriculotherapy was effective in the treatment of students with anxiety and TMDs. PMID:26495012

  3. Somatosensory assessment and conditioned pain modulation in temporomandibular disorders pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Simple Futarmal; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Oono, Yuka; Svensson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiology and underlying pain mechanisms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are poorly understood. The aims were to assess somatosensory function at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) and to examine whether conditioned pain modulation (CPM) differs between TMD pain patients (n = 34) and healthy controls (n = 34). Quantitative sensory testing was used to assess the somatosensory function. Z-scores were calculated for patients based on reference data. Conditioned pain modulation was tested by comparing pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before, during, and after the application of painful and nonpainful cold stimuli. Pressure pain thresholds were measured at the most painful TMJ and thenar muscle (control). Data were analyzed with analyses of variance. Most (85.3%) of the patients exhibited at least 1 or more somatosensory abnormalities at the most painful TMJ with somatosensory gain with regard to PPT and punctate mechanical pain stimuli, and somatosensory loss with regard to mechanical detection and vibration detection stimuli as the most frequent abnormalities. There was a significant CPM effect (increased PPT) at both test sites during painful cold application in healthy controls and patients (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the relative CPM effect during painful cold application between groups (P = 0.227). In conclusion, somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in TMD pain patients and CPM effects were similar in TMD pain patients and healthy controls. PMID:26307861

  4. Functional anatomy of the distal radioulnar joint in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is critical to the function of the forearm as a mechanical unit. This paper is concerned with the concepts and observations that have changed understanding of the function of the DRUJ, notably with respect to the biomechanics of this joint. The DRUJ has been shown to be important in acting to distribute load and removal of the ulna head leads to the biomechanical equivalent of a one-bone forearm. The soft tissues with topographical relations to the distal forearm and DRUJ have also been investigated in our experimental series with findings including the description of a clinical disorder termed subluxation-related ulna neuropathy syndrome. PMID:23827285

  5. High Spatial Resolution MRI of Cystic Adventitial Disease of the Iliofemoral Vein Communicating with the Hip Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelides, Michael; Pantziara, Maria Ioannidis, Kleanthis

    2013-05-14

    Venous cystic adventitial disease (CAD) is an extremely rare entity, and so far less than 20 cases have been described in the literature. Herein, we describe the imaging findings of CAD of iliofemoral vein in a 51-year-old woman who presented with leg swelling with special emphasis on high spatial resolution MRI, which demonstrated communication of the cyst with the hip joint. To our knowledge, this is the first description of high spatial resolution MRI findings in venous CAD supporting a new theory about the pathogenesis of venous CAD.

  6. The infrapatellar fat pad from diseased joints inhibits chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, W; Rudjito, E; Fahy, N; Verhaar, J A; Clockaerts, S; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Y M; van Osch, G J

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage repair by bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be influenced by inflammation in the knee. Next to synovium, the infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) has been described as a source for inflammatory factors. Here, we investigated whether factors secreted by the IPFP affect chondrogenesis of MSCs and whether this is influenced by different joint pathologies or obesity. Furthermore, we examined the role of IPFP resident macrophages. First, we made conditioned medium from IPFP obtained from osteoarthritic joints, IPFP from traumatically injured joints during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Additionally, we made conditioned medium of macrophages isolated from osteoarthritic IPFP and of polarised monocytes from peripheral blood. We evaluated the effect of different types of conditioned medium on MSC chondrogenesis. Conditioned medium from IPFP decreased collagen 2 and aggrecan gene expression as well as thionin and collagen type 2 staining. This anti-chondrogenic effect was the same for conditioned medium from IPFP of osteoarthritic and traumatically injured joints. Furthermore, IPFP from obese (Body Mass Index >30) donors did not inhibit chondrogenesis more than that of lean (Body Mass Index <25) donors. Finally, conditioned medium from macrophages isolated from IPFP decreased the expression of hyaline cartilage genes, as did peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines. The IPFP and the resident pro-inflammatory macrophages could therefore be targets for therapies to improve MSC-based cartilage repair. PMID:26629970

  7. Joint analysis of structural and perfusion MRI for cognitive assessment and classification of Alzheimer’s disease and normal aging

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Duygu; Mojabi, Pouria; Weiner, Michael W.; Schuff, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain tissue loss and physiological imaging of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can provide complimentary information for the characterization of brain disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but studies into gains in classification power for AD using these image modalities jointly have been limited. Our aim in this study was to determine the joint contribution of structural and perfusion-weighted imaging for the classification of AD in a cross-sectional study using an integrated multimodality MRI processing framework and a cortical surface-based analysis approach. We used logistic regression analysis to determine sequentially the value of cortical thickness, rCBF, and cortical thickness and rCBF jointly for classification for diagnosis of AD compared to controls. We further tested the extent to which cortical thinning and reduced rCBF explain individually or together variability in dementia severity. Separate analysis of structural MRI and perfusion-weighted MRI data yielded the well-established pattern of cortical thinning and rCBF reduction in AD, affecting predominantly temporo-parietal brain regions. Using structural MRI and perfusion-weighted MRI jointly indicated that cortical thinning dominated the classification of AD and controls without significant contributions from rCBF. However there was also a positive interaction between reduced rCBF and cortical thinning in the right superior temporal sulcus, implying that structural and physiological brain alterations in AD can be complementary. Compared to reduced rCBF, regional cortical thinning better explained the variability in dementia severity. In conclusion, structural brain alterations compared to physiological variations are the dominant features of MRI in AD. PMID:20406691

  8. The relationship of whiplash injury and temporomandibular disorders: a narrative literature review?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Charles E.; Amiri, Abid; Jaime, Joseph; Delaney, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this article is to offer a narrative review and discuss the possible relationship between temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and whiplash injuries. Methods Databases from 1966 to present were searched including PubMed; Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System; and Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Search terms used included whiplash injury, temporomandibular disorders and craniomandibular disorders. Inclusion criteria consisted of studies on orofacial pain of a musculoskeletal origin addressing the following topics: posttraumatic temporomandibular disorder (pTMD) incidence and prevalence, mechanism of injury, clinical findings and characteristics, prognosis (including psychologic factors). Excluded were studies of orofacial pain from nontraumatic origin, as well as nonmusculoskeletal causes including neurologic, vascular, neoplastic, or infectious disease. Results Thirty-two studies describing the effects of whiplash on TMD were reviewed based on inclusion/exclusion criteria. The best evidence from prospective studies indicates a low to moderate incidence and prevalence. Only 3 studies addressed mechanism of injury theories. Most studies focusing on clinical findings and characteristics suggest significant differences when comparing pTMD to idiopathic/nontraumatic patients. Regarding prognosis, most studies suggest a significant difference when comparing pTMD to idiopathic/nontraumatic TMD patients, with pTMD having a poorer prognosis. Conclusions There is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of whiplash on the development of TMD. Furthermore, because of lack of homogeneity in the study populations and lack of standardization of data collection procedures and outcomes measured, this review cannot conclusively resolve the controversies that exist concerning this relationship. This review of the literature is provided to clarify the issues and to provide useful clinical information for health care providers managing TMD such as doctors of chiropractic, physical therapists, dentists, and medical doctors. PMID:19948308

  9. Factors involved in the etiology of temporomandibular disorders - a literature review

    PubMed Central

    CHISNOIU, ANDREA MARIA; PICOS, ALINA MONICA; POPA, SEVER; CHISNOIU, PETRE DANIEL; LASCU, LIANA; PICOS, ANDREI; CHISNOIU, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim This review aims at presenting a current view on the most frequent factors involved in the mechanisms causing temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Method We conducted a critical review of the literature for the period January 2000 to December 2014 to identify factors related to TMD development and persistence. Results The etiology of TMD is multidimensional: biomechanical, neuromuscular, bio-psychosocial and biological factors may contribute to the disorder. Occlusal overloading and parafunctions (bruxism) are frequently involved as biomechanical factors; increased levels of estrogen hormones are considered biological factors affecting the temporo-mandibular-joint. Among bio-psychosocial factors, stress, anxiety or depression, were frequently encountered. Conclusions The etiopathogenesis of this condition is poorly understood, therefore TMDs are difficult to diagnose and manage. Early and correct identification of the possible etiologic factors will enable the appropriate treatment scheme application in order to reduce or eliminate TMDs debilitating signs and symptoms.

  10. Dynamic activation of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in collagen-induced arthritis supports their role in joint homeostasis and disease

    PubMed Central

    Daans, Melina; Lories, Rik JU; Luyten, Frank P

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease affecting peripheral joints and leading to loss of joint function. The severity and outcome of disease are dependent on the balance between inflammatory/destructive and homeostatic or repair pathways. Increasing evidence suggests a role for bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in joint homeostasis and disease. Methods Activation of BMP signaling in collagen-induced arthritis as a model of rheumatoid arthritis was studied by immunohistochemistry and Western blot for phosphorylated SMAD1/5 at different time points. Expression of different BMP ligands and noggin, a BMP antagonist, was determined on synovium and cartilage extracts of arthritic knees, at different time points, with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. At the protein level, BMP2 and BMP7 were studied with immunohistochemistry. Finally, the effect of anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF?) treatment on the expression of BMP2, BMP7, and growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees was investigated. Results A time-dependent activation of the BMP signaling pathway in collagen-induced arthritis was demonstrated with a dynamic and characteristic expression pattern of different BMP subfamily members in synovium and cartilage of arthritic knees. As severity increases, the activation of BMP signaling becomes more prominent in the invasive pannus tissue. BMP2 is present in cartilage and the hyperplastic lining layer. BMP7 is found in the sublining zone and inflammatory infiltrate. Treatment with etanercept slowed down progression of disease, but no change in expression of GDF5, BMP2, and BMP7 in synovium was found; in the cartilage, however, blocking of TNF? increased the expression of BMP7. Conclusions BMP signaling is dynamically activated in collagen-induced arthritis and is partly TNF?-independent. TNF? blocking increased the expression of BMP7 in the articular cartilage, possibly enhancing anabolic mechanisms. Different types of source and target cells are recognized. These data further support a role for BMP signaling in arthritis. PMID:18816401

  11. In an interconnected world: joint research priorities for the environment, agriculture and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Brijnath, Bianca; Butler, Colin D; McMichael, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the UNICEF/UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) commissioned ten think-tanks to work on disease-specific and thematic reference groups to identify top research priorities that would advance the research agenda on infectious diseases of poverty, thus contributing to improvements in human health. The first of the thematic reference group reports - on environment, agriculture and infectious diseases of poverty - was recently released. In this article we review, from an insider perspective, the strengths and weaknesses of this thematic reference group report and highlight key messages for policy-makers, funders and researchers. PMID:24472225

  12. Are temporomandibular disorders and tinnitus associated?

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Aline Dantas Diógenes; Hilgenberg, Priscila Brenner; Pinto, Lívia Maria Sales; Conti, Paulo Cesar Rodrigues

    2012-07-01

    The current study aimed to research the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients with subjective tinnitus, as compared to controls, and the association between symptoms of TMD, tinnitus, and chronic pain. Two hundred patients were divided into two groups, according to the presence (experimental) or not (control) of subjective tinnitus. The subgroups were determined according to the RDC/TMD criteria. The Pain Pressure Threshold (PPT) values of the masseter and temporalis muscles were recorded bilaterally, and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was used to address subjective pain. The most prevalent TMD subgroups in the tinnitus patients (p < 0.05) were myofascial pain with limited opening (39.0%), disc displacement with reduction (44.33%), and arthralgia (53.54%). The severity of tinnitus was significantly associated with the severity of chronic pain (p = .000). The PPT values were lower (p > 0.05), while the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was statistically higher (p = .000) for the tinnitus patients. These results suggest that an association exists between TMD and subjective tinnitus. PMID:22916668

  13. Correlation Between Clinical Findings of Temporomandibular Disorders and MRI Characteristics of Disc Displacement

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Sheikh, Soheyl; Mittal, Amit; Gupta, Deepak; Gupta, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a common condition that is best evaluated with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The first step in MR imaging of the TMJ is to evaluate the articular disk, or meniscus, in terms of its morphologic features and its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Disk location is of prime importance because the presence of a displaced disk is a critical sign of TMJ dysfunction. However, disk displacement is also frequently seen in asymptomatic volunteers. It is important for the maxillofacial radiologist to detect early MR imaging signs of dysfunction, thereby avoiding the evolution of this condition to its advanced and irreversible phase which is characterized by osteoarthritic changes such as condylar flattening or osteophytes. Further the MR imaging techniques will allow a better understanding of the sources of TMJ pain and of any discrepancy between imaging findings and patient symptoms. Henceforth, the aim of the study was to evaluate whether MRI findings of various degrees of disk displacement could be correlated with the presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. Materials and Methods : In this clinical study, 44 patients (88 TMJs) were examined clinically and divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 22 patients with clinical signs and symptoms of TMDs either unilaterally or bilaterally and considered as study group. Group 2 consisted of 22 patients with no signs and symptoms of TMDs and considered as control group. MRI was done for both the TMJs of each patient. Displacement of the posterior band of articular disc in relation to the condyle was quantified as anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR), anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR), posterior disc displacement (PDD). Results : Disk displacement was found in 18 (81.8%) patients of 22 symptomatic subjects in Group 1 on MRI and 4 (18.1%) were diagnosed normal with no disc displacement. In Group 2, 2 (9.1%) of 22 asymptomatic patients were diagnosed with disc displacement while 20 (90.1%) were normal. Sensitivity and Specificity tests were applied in both the groups to correlate clinical findings of TMD and MRI characterstics of disc displacement and results showed Sensitivity of 90% and Specificity of 83.3%. Conclusion : Disk displacement on MRI correlated well with presence or absence of clinical signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders with high Sensitivity and Specificity of 90% and 83.3% respectively. PMID:26464595

  14. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Joint ICS/NCCP (I) recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Maturu, V. N.; Dhooria, Sahajal; Prasad, K. T.; Sehgal, Inderpaul S.; Yenge, Lakshmikant B.; Jindal, Aditya; Singh, Navneet; Ghoshal, A. G.; Khilnani, G. C.; Samaria, J. K.; Gaur, S. N.; Behera, D.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem in India. Although several International guidelines for diagnosis and management of COPD are available, yet there are lot of gaps in recognition and management of COPD in India due to vast differences in availability and affordability of healthcare facilities across the country. The Indian Chest Society (ICS) and the National College of Chest Physicians (NCCP) of India have joined hands to come out with these evidence-based guidelines to help the physicians at all levels of healthcare to diagnose and manage COPD in a scientific manner. Besides the International literature, the Indian studies were specifically analyzed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (a) definitions, epidemiology, and disease burden; (b) disease assessment and diagnosis; (c) pharmacologic management of stable COPD; (d) management of acute exacerbations; and (e) nonpharmacologic and preventive measures. The modified grade system was used for classifying the quality of evidence as 1, 2, 3, or usual practice point (UPP). The strength of recommendation was graded as A or B depending upon the level of evidence. PMID:24049265

  15. Expanding the Taxonomy of the Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD)

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Christopher C.; Goulet, Jean-Paul; Lobbezoo, Frank; Schiffman, Eric L.; Alstergren, Per; Anderson, Gary C.; de Leeuw, Reny; Jensen, Rigmor; Michelotti, Ambra; Ohrbach, Richard; Petersson, Arne; List, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a need to expand the current temporomandibular disorder (TMD) classification to include less common, but clinically important disorders. The immediate aim was to develop a consensus-based classification system and associated diagnostic criteria that have clinical and research utility for less common TMDs. The long-term aim was to establish a foundation, vis-à-vis this classification system, that will stimulate data collection, validity testing, and further criteria refinement. Methods A working group [members of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), members of the Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group (SIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), and members from other professional societies] reviewed disorders for inclusion based on clinical significance, the availability of plausible diagnostic criteria, and the ability to operationalize and study the criteria. The disorders were derived from the literature when possible and based on expert opinion as necessary. The expanded TMD taxonomy was presented for feedback at international meetings. Results Of 56 disorders considered, 37 were included in the expanded taxonomy and were placed into the following four categories: temporomandibular joint disorders, masticatory muscle disorders, headache disorders, and disorders affecting associated structures. Those excluded were extremely uncommon, lacking operationalized diagnostic criteria, not clearly related to TMDs, or not sufficiently distinct from disorders already included within the taxonomy. Conclusions The expanded TMD taxonomy offers an integrated approach to clinical diagnosis and provides a framework for further research to operationalize and test the proposed taxonomy and diagnostic criteria. PMID:24443898

  16. The True-Positive Rate of a Screening Questionnaire for Temporomandib-ular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Akira; Otomo, Natsuko; Tsukagoshi, Kaori; Tobe, Shoko; Kino, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Background: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) occur at an incidence of 5–12% in the general population. We aimed to investigate the rate of true-positives for a screening questionnaire for TMD (SQ-TMD) and differences in the characteristics between the true-positive and false-negative groups. Materials and Methods: Seventy-six individuals (16 men, 60 women; mean age, 41.1 ± 16.5 years) were selected from pa-tients with TMD who had visited the Temporomandibular Joint Clinic at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The patients were assessed using a questionnaire that contained items on TMD screening (SQ-TMD); pain intensity (at rest, maximum mouth-opening, and chewing), as assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS); and TMD-related limitations of daily func-tion (LDF-TMD). A logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the factors potentially influencing the true-positive rate. Results: Of the 76 subjects, 62 (81.6%) were true-positive for the questionnaire based on the SQ-TMD scores. The mean VAS score for maximum mouth-opening and chewing and the mean LDF-TMD score were significantly greater in the true-positive group than those in the false-negative group. The results of the logistic regression analysis showed that only the VAS score for chewing was a statistically significant factor (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The true-positive rate of TMD using SQ-TMD was very high. The results indicate that SQ-TMD can be used to screen TMD in patients with moderate or severe pain and difficulty in living a healthy daily life. PMID:25614769

  17. Speech evaluation in children with temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    PIZOLATO, Raquel Aparecida; FERNANDES, Frederico Silva de Freitas; GAVIÃO, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the influence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) on speech in children, and to verify the influence of occlusal characteristics. Material and methods Speech and dental occlusal characteristics were assessed in 152 Brazilian children (78 boys and 74 girls), aged 8 to 12 (mean age 10.05 ± 1.39 years) with or without TMD signs and symptoms. The clinical signs were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD) (axis I) and the symptoms were evaluated using a questionnaire. The following groups were formed: Group TMD (n=40), TMD signs and symptoms (Group S and S, n=68), TMD signs or symptoms (Group S or S, n=33), and without signs and symptoms (Group N, n=11). Articulatory speech disorders were diagnosed during spontaneous speech and repetition of the words using the "Phonological Assessment of Child Speech" for the Portuguese language. It was also applied a list of 40 phonological balanced words, read by the speech pathologist and repeated by the children. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, Fisher's exact or Chi-square tests (?=0.05). Results A slight prevalence of articulatory disturbances, such as substitutions, omissions and distortions of the sibilants /s/ and /z/, and no deviations in jaw lateral movements were observed. Reduction of vertical amplitude was found in 10 children, the prevalence being greater in TMD signs and symptoms children than in the normal children. The tongue protrusion in phonemes /t/, /d/, /n/, /l/ and frontal lips in phonemes /s/ and /z/ were the most prevalent visual alterations. There was a high percentage of dental occlusal alterations. Conclusions There was no association between TMD and speech disorders. Occlusal alterations may be factors of influence, allowing distortions and frontal lisp in phonemes /s/ and /z/ and inadequate tongue position in phonemes /t/; /d/; /n/; /l/. PMID:21986655

  18. Joint recognition-expression impairment of facial emotions in Huntington's disease despite intact understanding of feelings.

    PubMed

    Trinkler, Iris; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder that causes major motor impairments, also show cognitive and emotional deficits. While their deficit in recognising emotions has been explored in depth, little is known about their ability to express emotions and understand their feelings. If these faculties were impaired, patients might not only mis-read emotion expressions in others but their own emotions might be mis-interpreted by others as well, or thirdly, they might have difficulties understanding and describing their feelings. We compared the performance of recognition and expression of facial emotions in 13 HD patients with mild motor impairments but without significant bucco-facial abnormalities, and 13 controls matched for age and education. Emotion recognition was investigated in a forced-choice recognition test (FCR), and emotion expression by filming participants while they mimed the six basic emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, surprise, sadness and joy) to the experimenter. The films were then segmented into 60 stimuli per participant and four external raters performed a FCR on this material. Further, we tested understanding of feelings in self (alexithymia) and others (empathy) using questionnaires. Both recognition and expression were impaired across different emotions in HD compared to controls and recognition and expression scores were correlated. By contrast, alexithymia and empathy scores were very similar in HD and controls. This might suggest that emotion deficits in HD might be tied to the expression itself. Because similar emotion recognition-expression deficits are also found in Parkinson's Disease and vascular lesions of the striatum, our results further confirm the importance of the striatum for emotion recognition and expression, while access to the meaning of feelings relies on a different brain network, and is spared in HD. PMID:22244587

  19. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Januzzi, Eduardo; Gonçalves, Rafael Tardin Rosa Ferraz; Mares, Fernando Antonio Guedes; de Paula, Marcos Vinicius Queiroz; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-01-01

    Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study) and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control). We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p < 0.05). However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p < 0.05) already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term. PMID:26351510

  20. Detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema using a joint morphological-fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has high accuracy and specificity on volumetrically capturing serial images of the lung. It increases the capability of computerized classification for lung tissue in medical research. This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3D) automated approach based on mathematical morphology and fuzzy logic for quantifying and classifying interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) and emphysema. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages: (1) an image multi-resolution decomposition scheme based on a 3D morphological filter is used to detect and analyze the different density patterns of the lung texture. Then, (2) for each pattern in the multi-resolution decomposition, six features are computed, for which fuzzy membership functions define a probability of association with a pathology class. Finally, (3) for each pathology class, the probabilities are combined up according to the weight assigned to each membership function and two threshold values are used to decide the final class of the pattern. The proposed approach was tested on 10 MDCT cases and the classification accuracy was: emphysema: 95%, fibrosis/honeycombing: 84% and ground glass: 97%.

  1. Efficacy and tolerability of etodolac in aged patients affected by degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) in its active phase.

    PubMed

    Todesco, S; Del Ross, T; Marigliano, V; Ariani, A

    1994-01-01

    Three-hundred-and-fifteen patients, aged 60 or more years, affected by degenerative joint disease (DJD) in the active stage, the majority with concomitant pathological conditions of various organs and systems and undergoing various combined drug treatments, were treated with 300 mg b.i.d. etodolac in order to assay its efficacy and safety profile in an aged population more exposed to the occurrence of adverse events. In a subset of these patients, the impact of etodolac treatment on cognitive function and mood was studied. All clinical assessments revealed highly significant improvement after etodolac treatment. Significant improvement was found also for what concerns mood, whereas only the less aged patients showed improvement in cognitive abilities after treatment with etodolac. Only 30 patients (9.5%) showed side-effects, resulting in suspension of treatment in 10 cases (3.17%). In all cases, adverse reactions subsided with no consequences. Laboratory tests performed at the end of the study yielded mean values comprised within the normal range and were not statistically different from the same examinations performed before starting treatment. Occult blood in stool turned positive after treatment with etodolac only in six patients (2%). In conclusion, etodolac proved to be effective and well-tolerated in the treatment of risk-aged patients with active DJD. PMID:7927957

  2. Joint swelling

    MedlinePLUS

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  3. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christropher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT) in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD. PMID:26213970

  4. Contrast-enhanced microCT (EPIC-µCT) ex vivo applied to the mouse and human jaw joint

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, L; Lin, A S; Langenbach, G E J; Koolstra, J H; Guldberg, R E; Everts, V

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is susceptive to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). More detailed knowledge of its development is essential to improve our insight into TMJ-OA. It is imperative to have a standardized reliable three-dimensional (3D) imaging method that allows for detailed assessment of both bone and cartilage in healthy and diseased joints. We aimed to determine the applicability of a contrast-enhanced microCT (µCT) technique for ex vivo research of mouse and human TMJs. Methods: Equilibrium partitioning of an ionic contrast agent via µCT (EPIC-µCT) was previously applied for cartilage assessment in the knee joint. The method was ex vivo, applied to the mouse TMJ and adapted for the human TMJ. Results: EPIC-µCT (30-min immersion time) was applied to mouse mandibular condyles, and 3D imaging revealed an average cartilage thickness of 110?±?16?µm. These measurements via EPIC-µCT were similar to the histomorphometric measures (113?±?19?µm). For human healthy OA-affected TMJ samples, the protocol was adjusted to an immersion time of 1?h. 3D imaging revealed a significant thicker cartilage layer in joints with early signs of OA compared with healthy joints (414.2?±?122.6 and 239.7?±?50.5?µm, respectively). A subsequent significant thinner layer was found in human joints with late signs of OA (197.4?±?159.7?µm). Conclusions: The EPIC-µCT technique is effective for the ex vivo assessment of 3D cartilage morphology in the mouse as well as human TMJ and allows bone–cartilage interaction research in TMJ-OA. PMID:24353248

  5. Rolling contact orthopaedic joint design

    E-print Network

    Slocum, Alexander Henry, Jr

    2013-01-01

    Arthroplasty, the practice of rebuilding diseased biological joints using engineering materials, is often used to treat severe arthritis of the knee and hip. Prosthetic joints have been created in a "biomimetic" manner to ...

  6. [Contribution of air computerized tomography of the joint in the assessment of algo-dysfunctional syndromes of the mastication system].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J L; Rives, J M; Cantaloube, D; Proust, J

    1990-01-01

    The prospective study of evaluation temporomandibular dysfunction by air computerized tomography of the joint are reported. The authors propose a new injection technique of both articular compartments by CT Scan location. With thin sagittal computed tomography sections, closed mouth and open mouth position, this study is made. Preliminary data from air computerized tomography of the joint imaging show directly the disk with anterior and posterior attachments. The authors present the normal results and major pathology found in the evaluationof temporomandibular dysfunction. CT Scan puncture is more precise. The air computerized tomography imaging of the joint was undoubtedly superior to that of conventional opaque joint tomography, but dynamic notion is much less than in the absence of videoscopy. PMID:2309085

  7. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hypermobile joints have an increased risk for joint dislocation and other problems. Extra care may be needed ... the joint? Is there any history of joint dislocation, difficulty walking, or difficulty using the arms? Further ...

  8. Eagle’s syndrome—A non-perceived differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Thoenissen, P.; Bittermann, G.; Schmelzeisen, R.; Oshima, T.; Fretwurst, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This article unveils a case of the classic styloid syndrome and states that panoramic imaging and ultrasound can be an alternative to computed tomography. In addition, the endoscope-assisted extraoral approach using CT-based navigation is useful. Eagle’s Syndrome is an aggregate of symptoms described by Eagle in 1937. He described different forms: the classic styloid syndrome consisting of elongation of the styloid process which causes pain. Second, the stylo-carotid-artery syndrome which is responsible for transient ischemic attack or stroke. Presentation of case Using the example of a 66 years old male patient suffering from long term pain, we explain our diagnostic and surgical approach. After dissecting the styloid process of the right side using an extraoral approach, the pain ceased and the patient could be discharged without any recurrence of the pain up to this point. Discussion Eagle’s syndrome, with its similar symptoms, is rather difficult to differentiate from temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), but can be easily excluded from possible differential diagnoses of TMD using panoramic radiographs and ultrasound. Conclusion Making use of low cost and easily accessible diagnostic workup techniques can reveal this particular cause for chronic pain restricting quality of life. Thereby differentiation from the TMD symptomatic complex is possible. PMID:26342352

  9. Increased risk of tinnitus in patients with temporomandibular disorder: a retrospective population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Feng; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Hui-Tzu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Wang, Tang-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    This study determined whether there is an increased risk of tinnitus in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We used information from health insurance claims obtained from Taiwan National Health Insurance (TNHI). Patients aged 20 years and older who were newly diagnosed with TMJ disorder served as the study cohort. The demographic factors and comorbidities that may be associated with tinnitus were also identified, including age, sex, and comorbidities of hearing loss, noise effects on the inner ear, and degenerative and vascular ear disorders. A higher proportion of TMJ disorder patients suffered from hearing loss (5.30 vs. 2.11 %), and degenerative and vascular ear disorders (0.20 vs. 0.08 %) compared with the control patients. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of tinnitus in the TMJ disorder cohort was 2.73-fold higher than that in the control patients, with an adjusted HR of 2.62 (95 % CI = 2.29-3.00). The comorbidity-specific TMJ disorder cohort to the control patients' adjusted HR of tinnitus was higher for patients without comorbidity (adjusted HR = 2.75, 95 % CI = 2.39-3.17). We also observed a 3.22-fold significantly higher relative risk of developing tinnitus within the 3-year follow-up period (95 % CI = 2.67-3.89). Patients with TMJ disorder might be at increased risk of tinnitus. PMID:25573837

  10. Soft versus hard occlusal splint therapy in the management of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs)

    PubMed Central

    Seifeldin, Sameh A; Elhayes, Khaled A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare between soft and hard occlusal splint therapy for the management of myofacial pain dysfunction (MPD) or internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with reciprocal clicking. Patients and methods This study included 50 patients (age range: 24–47 years) who had been diagnosed with MPD or ID of the TMJ in the form of reciprocal clicking. Patients were divided into two groups. They were treated for 4 months with either a vacuum-formed soft occlusal splint constructed from 2-mm-thick elastic rubber sheets (soft splint group) or a hard flat occlusal splint fabricated from transparent acrylic resin (hard splint group). Monthly follow-up visits were performed during the treatment period. Before treatment and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months after treatment, the dentist measured all parameters of TMJ function (pain visual analog scores, tenderness of masticatory muscles, clicking and tenderness of the TMJ, and range of mouth opening). Results All parameters of TMJ function showed significant improvement in both groups during the follow-up period, with a statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 4-month follow-up visit. Conclusions Both forms of occlusal splints (soft and hard) improved TMJ symptoms in patients with MPD or ID of the TMJ. However, the soft occlusal splints exhibited superior results after 4 months of use.

  11. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-09-01

    The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT.In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists.The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively).A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy. PMID:26376393

  12. Neuromuscular dentistry: Occlusal diseases and posture

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohd Toseef; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Zahid, Syed Naved; Chaudhary, Prabhat K.

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular dentistry has been a controversial topic in the field of dentistry and still remains debatable. The issue of good occlusion and sound health has been repeatedly discussed. Sometimes we get complains of sensitive teeth and sometimes of tired facial muscles on getting up in the morning. Owing to the intimate relation of masticatory apparatus with the cranium and cervico-scapular muscular system, the disorders in any system, draw attention from concerned clinicians involved in management, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for the suffering patients. There may be patients reporting to the dental clinics after an occlusal restoration or extraction, having pain in or around the temporomandibular joint, headache or neck pain. Although their esthetic demands must not be undermined during the course of treatment plan, whenever dental treatment of any sort is planned, occlusion/bite should be given prime importance. Very few dentist are able to diagnose the occlusal disease and of those who diagnose many people resort to aggressive treatment modalities. This paper aims to report the signs of occlusal disease, and discuss their association with TMDs and posture. PMID:25737904

  13. Serum and synovial fluid C-reactive protein level variations in dogs with degenerative joint disease and their relationships with physiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Boal, S; Miguel Carreira, L

    2015-09-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD) is a progressive, chronic joint disease with an inflammatory component promoting an acute phase protein (APP) response. C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important APPs, used as an inflammation marker in human, but not veterinary medicine. The study was developed in a sample of 48 dogs (n = 48) with DJD and aimed to: 1) identify and quantify the synovial fluid CRP (SFCRP) in these specimens using a validated ELISA test for serum CRP (SCRP) detection and quantification; and 2) to study the possible relationship between SCRP and SFCRP levels variations in DJD patients evaluating the influence of some physical parameters such as gender, body weight, pain level, DJD grade, and the physical activity (PA) of the patients. Statistical analysis considered the results significant for p values <0.05. Our study showed that it is possible to detect and quantify SFCRP levels in DJD patients using a previously validated canine SCRP ELISA test, allowing us to point out a preliminary reference value for SFCRP in patients with DJD. Although, individuals with DJD presents SCRP values within the normal reference range and the SFCRP levels were always lower. Obesity, pain, and the DJD grade presented by the patients are conditions which seem to influence the SCRP levels but not the SFCRP. PMID:26178643

  14. Anti-Lubricin Monoclonal Antibodies Created Using Lubricin-Knockout Mice Immunodetect Lubricin in Several Species and in Patients with Healthy and Diseased Joints

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Minrong; Cui, Yajun; Sy, Man-Sun; Lee, David M.; Zhang, Ling Xiu; Larson, Katherine M.; Kurek, Kyle C.; Jay, Gregory D.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Lubricin, encoded by the gene PRG4, is the principal lubricant in articulating joints. We immunized mice genetically deficient for lubricin (Prg4-/-) with purified human lubricin, and generated several mAbs. We determined each mAb’s binding epitope, sensitivity, and specificity using biologic samples and recombinant lubricin sub-domains, and we also developed a competition ELISA assay to measure lubricin in synovial fluid and blood. We found the mAbs all recognized epitopes containing O-linked oligosaccharides conjugated to the peptide motif KEPAPTTT. By western blot, the mAbs detected lubricin in 1 ?l of synovial fluid from several animal species, including human. The mAbs were specific for lubricin since they did not cross-react with other synovial fluid constituents from patients with camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP), who genetically lack this protein. The competition ELISA detected lubricin in blood samples from healthy individuals but not from patients with CACP, indicating blood can be used in a diagnostic test for patients suspected of having CACP. Lubricin epitopes in blood do not represent degradation fragments from synovial fluid. Therefore, although blood lubricin levels did not differentiate patients with inflammatory joint disease from healthy controls, epitope-specific anti-lubricin mAbs could be useful for monitoring disease activity in synovial fluid. PMID:25642942

  15. Anti-lubricin monoclonal antibodies created using lubricin-knockout mice immunodetect lubricin in several species and in patients with healthy and diseased joints.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Cui, Yajun; Sy, Man-Sun; Lee, David M; Zhang, Ling Xiu; Larson, Katherine M; Kurek, Kyle C; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2015-01-01

    Lubricin, encoded by the gene PRG4, is the principal lubricant in articulating joints. We immunized mice genetically deficient for lubricin (Prg4-/-) with purified human lubricin, and generated several mAbs. We determined each mAb's binding epitope, sensitivity, and specificity using biologic samples and recombinant lubricin sub-domains, and we also developed a competition ELISA assay to measure lubricin in synovial fluid and blood. We found the mAbs all recognized epitopes containing O-linked oligosaccharides conjugated to the peptide motif KEPAPTTT. By western blot, the mAbs detected lubricin in 1 ?l of synovial fluid from several animal species, including human. The mAbs were specific for lubricin since they did not cross-react with other synovial fluid constituents from patients with camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP), who genetically lack this protein. The competition ELISA detected lubricin in blood samples from healthy individuals but not from patients with CACP, indicating blood can be used in a diagnostic test for patients suspected of having CACP. Lubricin epitopes in blood do not represent degradation fragments from synovial fluid. Therefore, although blood lubricin levels did not differentiate patients with inflammatory joint disease from healthy controls, epitope-specific anti-lubricin mAbs could be useful for monitoring disease activity in synovial fluid. PMID:25642942

  16. DISEASE IN WILDLIFE OR EXOTIC SPECIES Characterization of Degenerative Changes in the

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) M; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were

  17. Oral Health, Temporomandibular Disorder, and Masticatory Performance in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Rejane L. S.; Bonjardim, Leonardo R.; Neves, Eduardo L. A.; Santos, Lidiane C. L.; Nunes, Paula S.; Garcez, Catarina A.; Souza, Cynthia C.; Araújo, Adriano A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral health status of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism, as well as to measure masticatory performance of subjects with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2). Methods and Results. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) for both groups, control (CG) and CMT2, was considered low (CG = 2.46; CMT2 = 1.85, P = 0.227). The OHIP-14 score was considered low (CG = 2.86, CMT2 = 5.83, P = 0.899). The prevalence of self-reported TMD was 33.3% and 38.9% (P = 0.718) in CG and CMT2 respectively and for self-reported bruxism was 4.8% (CG) and 22.2% (CMT2), without significant difference between groups (P = 0.162). The most common clinical sign of TMD was masseter (CG = 38.1%; CMT2 = 66.7%) and temporalis (CG = 19.0%; GCMT2 = 33.3%) muscle pain. The geometric mean diameter (GMD) was not significantly different between groups (CG = 4369; CMT2 = 4627, P = 0.157). Conclusion. We conclude that the CMT2 disease did not negatively have influence either on oral health status in the presence and severity of TMD and bruxism or on masticatory performance. PMID:24391462

  18. Adaptive plasticity in mammalian masticatory joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravosa, Matthew J.; Kunwar, Ravinder; Nicholson, Elisabeth K.; Klopp, Emily B.; Pinchoff, Jessie; Stock, Stuart R.; Stack, M. Sharon; Hamrick, Mark W.

    2006-08-01

    Genetically similar white rabbits raised on diets of different mechanical properties, as well as wild-type and myostatin-deficient mice raised on similar diets, were compared to assess the postweaning effects of elevated masticatory loads due to increased jaw-adductor muscle and bite forces on the proportions and properties of the mandibular symphysis and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Microcomputed tomography (microCT) was used to quantify bone structure at a series of equidistant external and internal sites in coronal sections for a series of joint locations. Discriminant function analyses and non-parametric ANOVAs were used to characterize variation in biomineralization within and between loading cohorts. In both species, long-term excessive loading results in larger joint proportions, thicker articular and cortical bone, and increased biomineralization of hard tissues. Such adaptive plasticity appears designed to maintain the postnatal integrity of masticatory joint systems for a primary loading environment(s). This behavioral signal may be increasingly mitigated in older organisms by the interplay between adaptive and degradative joint tissue responses.

  19. Prevalence of temporomandibular dysfunction in a group of scuba divers

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, R; Fenlon, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) has been reported to be a common problem in divers, with a prevalence of up to 68%. No evidence for this is available. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of TMD in divers. Method: Sixty three subjects were asked to retrospectively complete a questionnaire on symptoms of TMD after diving in warm and cold water areas and in daily life. Results: The prevalence of TMD was greater in female divers. The prevalence of TMD while diving was about 26%, comparable to that experienced in daily life. Conclusion: Improvements in mouthpiece design and lighter demand valves mean that TMD is now probably exacerbated by diving rather than caused by it. PMID:14751950

  20. Association of neck pain with symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in the general adult population.

    PubMed

    Ciancaglini, R; Testa, M; Radaelli, G

    1999-03-01

    The association of neck pain with symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction in the general adult population was evaluated in a sample of 483 subjects selected from the population living in the municipality of Segrate, northern Italy. Subjects were interviewed by a standard questionnaire about oral conditions, temporomandibular symptomatology and neck pain. Symptoms related to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index were the indicators of temporomandibular dysfunction, and the evaluation also included history of trauma of the masticatory system. Troublesome neck pain was experienced within the last year in 38.9% of the total series, and the prevalence of complaints was higher in women than in men (41.7 vs 34.4%). Prevalence increased with age (p < 0.005) and was significantly higher in subjects with than without temporomandibular symptomatology (47.4 vs 28.6%, p < 0.0001). At univariate analysis, facial and jaw pain (p < 0.001) and feeling of stiffness or fatigue of the jaws (p < 0.01) were significantly related to neck pain. Age- and sex-adjusted multiple logistic analysis showed that neck pain is associated with the temporomandibular symptomatology as a whole (p < 0.001), and in particular with facial and jaw pain (p < 0.01). These findings confirm that there is a significant association between neck pain and the temporomandibular symptomatology. Moreover, they suggest that the most relevant relationship is with facial and jaw pain, according to recent neurophysiologic studies on pain mechanism. Further clinical and longitudinal studies are desirable in order to give a better clarification of mutual specific roles of craniocervical and temporomandibular disorders in the aetiology of these pathologies. PMID:10229999

  1. Probable Immunoglobulin Subtype—G4-Related Disease in the Head and Neck from Foreign Body Injection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Highstein, Mallory Jayne; Mallen, Jonathan; Tham, Tristan; Brennan, Tara; Boubour, Alexandra; Opher, Elena; Wolf, Vira; Singh, Prabhjyot; Costantino, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?Immunoglobulin subtype G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disease of unknown etiology, with manifestations involving nearly every organ system. Its association with foreign bodies is not established. Here, we present a novel case of IgG4-RD in response to foreign body injection. Case Description?A 58-year-old woman presented with history of persistent left facial pain, xerophthalmia, blurred vision, and trismus. The patient's medical history was significant for left-sided temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction with silicone injection into the joint. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion in the left skull base. Biopsies demonstrated the cardinal histopathological features of IgG4-RD. The patient was treated with a tapering dose of prednisolone followed by rituximab, resulting in tumor shrinkage and resolution of her symptoms. Discussion?This is the first reported case of IgG4-RD potentially precipitated by a foreign body, in this case injected silicone into the TMJ. The pathogenesis and etiology of IgG4-RD is still not fully elucidated, but allergic and reactive inflammatory reactions have been implicated in the disease process. This case report should raise the idea of reactive foreign bodies as a causative agent for IgG4-RD. PMID:26623239

  2. Is the burden of oral diseases higher in urban disadvantaged community compared to the national prevalence?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The urban low income has often been assumed to have the greatest dental treatment needs compared to the general population. However, no studies have been carried out to verify these assumptions. This study was conducted to assess whether there was any difference between the treatment needs of an urban poor population as compared to the general population in order to design an intervention programme for this community. Methods A random sampling of living quarters (households) in the selected areas was done. 586 adults over 19 years old living in these households were clinically examined using World Health Organization (WHO) Oral Health Survey criteria 4th edition (1997). Results The overall prevalence of dental caries, periodontal disease, denture wearers and temporomandibular joint problems were 70.5%, 97.1%, 16.7% and 26%, respectively. The majority (80.5%) needed some form of dental treatment. The highest treatment needs were found in the oldest age group while the lowest were in the youngest group (19-29 years) (p = 0.000). The most prevalent periodontal problem was calculus; regardless of gender, ethnicity and age. Significantly more females (20.5%) wore prosthesis than males (11.1%) (p = 0.003). Prosthetic status and need significantly increased with age (p = 0.000). About one in four adults had Temporo-Mandibular Joint (TMJ) problems. Overall, it was surprising to note that the oral disease burden related to caries, prosthetic status and treatment need were lower in this population as compared to the national average (NOHSA, 2010). However, their periodontal disease status and treatment needs were higher compared to the national average indicating a poor oral hygiene standard. Conclusions The evidence does not show that the overall oral disease burden and treatment needs in this urban disadvantaged adult population as higher than the national average, except for periodontal disease. The older age groups and elderly were identified as the most in need for oral health intervention and promotion. An integrated health intervention programme through a multisectoral common risk factor approach in collaboration with the Faculties of Medicine, Dentistry and other agencies is needed for the identified target group. PMID:25438162

  3. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom ... Muscle and joint aches A stiff neck Fatigue Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because you may ...

  4. Joint Commission

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Updates America’s Hospitals: Improving Quality and Safety: The Joint Commission’s Annual Report 2015 Tuesday November 17, 2015 ... Center of Sarasota Read Full Testimonial | Read All Joint Commission Vision All people always experience the safest, ...

  5. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Demonstrating Destructive Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition Disease of the Distal Radioulnar Joint Mimicking Tophaceous Gout.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ian M; Scott, Joshua N; Mansfield, Liem T; Battafarano, Daniel F

    2015-09-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition (CPPD) disease is a common etiology of crystalline arthropathy; however, it can manifest in multiple patterns such as acute calcium pyrophosphate (CPP) crystal arthritis, osteoarthritis with CPPD, and chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis. Tumoral or tophaceous-like CPPD is a rare manifestation that is occasionally mistaken for gouty tophus or a soft tissue malignancy. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is a new imaging modality currently utilized in assessing monosodium urate crystal deposition; however, its value in CPPD is uncertain. We describe a case using DECT to diagnose tumoral CPPD mimicking tophaceous gout versus recurrence of a previous synovial sarcoma. The imaging findings on DECT prevented unnecessary surgery to assess for possible malignancy, allowing for the prompt diagnosis of tumoral CPPD. Further studies should be performed to determine the role of DECT in assessing for crystalline deposition disease other than gout. PMID:26267716

  6. Estimating genetic effect sizes under joint disease-endophenotype models in presence of gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Alexandre; Croteau, Jordie; Couture, Christian; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Effects of genetic variants on the risk of complex diseases estimated from association studies are typically small. Nonetheless, variants may have important effects in presence of specific levels of environmental exposures, and when a trait related to the disease (endophenotype) is either normal or impaired. We propose polytomous and transition models to represent the relationship between disease, endophenotype, genotype and environmental exposure in family studies. Model coefficients were estimated using generalized estimating equations and were used to derive gene-environment interaction effects and genotype effects at specific levels of exposure. In a simulation study, estimates of the effect of a genetic variant were substantially higher when both an endophenotype and an environmental exposure modifying the variant effect were taken into account, particularly under transition models, compared to the alternative of ignoring the endophenotype. Illustration of the proposed modeling with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, physical activity and polymorphisms in the NOX3 gene in the Quebec Family Study revealed that the positive association of the A allele of rs1375713 with the metabolic syndrome at high levels of physical activity was only detectable in subjects without abdominal obesity, illustrating the importance of taking into account the abdominal obesity endophenotype in this analysis. PMID:26284107

  7. The temporomandibular joint in a rheumatoid arthritis patient after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sasaguri, Kenichi; Ishizaki-Takeuchi, Rika; Kuramae, Sakurako; Tanaka, Eliana Midori; Sakurai, Takashi; Sato, Sadao

    2009-07-01

    A 32-year-old Japanese female patient consulted the authors' dental clinic with a 4.5-year history of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). She complained of pain during mouth opening and difficulty in eating due to masticatory dysfunction caused by an anterior open bite. Imaging showed severe erosion and flattening of both condyles. RA stabilized after pharmacological therapy and became inactive during the orthodontic therapy aimed at reconstructing an optimal occlusion capable of promoting functional repositioning of the mandible. At present, 4 years and 2 months postretention, the reconstructed occlusion remains stable, and both condyles continue to be remodeled. The distance from reference position to intercuspal position has gradually decreased throughout the 4-year posttreatment and postretention periods. Orthodontic therapy that comprehensively reconstructs occlusion and enhances the functioning of the mandible can induce remodeling of eroded condyles, even those with a history of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19537854

  8. Temporomandibular joint: conservative care of TMJ dysfunction in a competitive swimmer

    PubMed Central

    Yuill, Erik; Howitt, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To detail the progress of a patient with TMJ dysfunction and headaches due to swimming, who underwent a conservative treatment plan featuring soft tissue therapy, spinal manipulative therapy, and rehabilitation. Clinical Features The most important features were initial bilateral temporal headaches and persistent left sided TMJ pain brought about by bilateral breathing while swimming. Conventional treatment aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing hyoid mobility, improving TMJ mobility, resolving cervical restrictions, and improving digastric facilitation. Intervention and Outcome The conservative treatment approach utilized in this case involved soft tissue therapy, hyoid mobility treatment, TMJ mobilization, spinal manipulative therapy, and digastric facilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, range of motion, and motion palpation of the cervical spine. Conclusion A patient with bilateral temporal headaches and TMJ pain due to bilateral breathing while swimming appeared to be relieved of his pain after three treatments of soft tissue therapy, hyoid mobility treatment, spinal manipulative therapy, and digastric facilitation. PMID:19714231

  9. [The role of muscle rehabilitation in the treatment of temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Psaume-Vandenbeek, D; Dichamp, J; Goudot, P; Guilbert, F

    1990-01-01

    Physiotherapy in association with mechanotherapy provides a functional treatment for T.M. algo-dysfunctional syndromes. The authors review the indications for this treatment and distinguish two varieties requiring different treatments: syndromes with a defect in propulsion and a limitation of mouth opening and syndromes with hyperpropulsion and subluxation. PMID:2130439

  10. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging of the porcine temporomandibular joint disc

    E-print Network

    Benavides, E.; Bilgen, M.; Al-Hafez, B.; Alrefae, T.; Wang, Y; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-28

    Objectives: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MRI modality for characterizing the property, microstructural organization and function in tissues such as the brain and spinal cord. Prior to this investigation, DTI had not been adapted for studies...

  11. Passaged Goat Costal Chondrocytes Provide a Feasible Cell Source for Temporomandibular Joint Tissue Engineering

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    alone, there are over 10 million patients with TMJ disorders.29 There are various treatment options depending on the level of degeneration as reviewed elsewhere.12,51 In severe cases, treatment options have: articular,3,15,24,34,42 tra- cheal,43,48 elastic,20,43,44,52 and, most recently, fibro- cartilage.23

  12. Scientific findings with respect to the etiology of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint

    E-print Network

    Cemgil, A. Taylan

    ORAL SURGERY ORAL MEDICINE ORAL displacement without reduction. (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2001;92:98-107) a-2104/2001/$35.00 + 0 7/16/114621 doi:10.1067/moe.2001.114621 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY Editor: Sharon L. Brooks

  13. Time to face the challenge of multimorbidity. A European perspective from the joint action on chronic diseases and promoting healthy ageing across the life cycle (JA-CHRODIS).

    PubMed

    Onder, Graziano; Palmer, Katie; Navickas, Rokas; Jurevi?ien?, Elena; Mammarella, Federica; Strandzheva, Mirela; Mannucci, Piermannuccio; Pecorelli, Sergio; Marengoni, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    Research on multimorbidity has rapidly increased in the last decade, but evidence on the effectiveness of interventions to improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity is limited. The European Commission is co-funding a large collaborative project named Joint Action on Chronic Diseases and Promoting Healthy Ageing across the Life Cycle (JA-CHRODIS) in the context of the 2nd EU Health Programme 2008-2013. The present manuscript summarizes first results of the JA-CHRODIS, focuses on the identification of a population with multimorbidity who has a high or very high care demand. Identification of characteristics of multimorbid patients associated with a high rate of resource consumption and negative health outcomes is necessary to define a target population who can benefit from interventions. Indeed, multimorbidity alone cannot explain the complexity of care needs and further, stratification of the general population based on care needs is necessary for allocating resources and developing personalized, cost-efficient, and patient-centered care plans. Based on analyses of large databases from European countries a profile of the most care-demanding patients with multimorbidity is defined. Several factors associated with adverse health outcomes and resource consumption among patients with multimorbidity were identified in these analyses, including disease patterns, physical function, mental health, and socioeconomic status. These results underline that a global assessment is needed to identify patients with multimorbidity who are at risk of negative health outcomes and that a comprehensive approach, targeting not only diseases, but also social, cognitive, and functional problems should be adopted for these patients. PMID:25797840

  14. Analysis of laser therapy and assessment methods in the rehabilitation of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Amaral, Ana Paula; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Tosato, Juliana de Paiva; Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Arruda, Éric Edmur Camargo; Glória, Igor Phillip dos Santos; Garcia, Marilia Barbosa Santos; Barbosa, Bruno Roberto Borges; Rodrigues, Monique Sampaio; Silva, Katiane Lima; El Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the effects of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of TMD, and to analyze the use of different assessment tools. [Subjects and Methods] Searches were carried out of the BIREME, MEDLINE, PubMed and SciELO electronic databases by two independent researchers for papers published in English and Portuguese using the terms: “temporomandibular joint laser therapy” and “TMJ laser treatment”. [Results] Following the application of the eligibility criteria, 11 papers were selected for in-depth analysis. The papers analyzed exhibited considerable methodological differences, especially with regard to the number of sessions, anatomic site and duration of low-level laser therapy irradiation, as well as irradiation parameters, diagnostic criteria and assessment tools. [Conclusion] Further studies are needed, especially randomized clinical trials, to establish the exact dose and ideal parameters for low-level laser therapy and define the best assessment tools in this promising field of research that may benefit individuals with signs and symptoms of TMD. PMID:25642095

  15. Nonpharmacologic approaches to the management of myofascial temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J J; Turk, D C

    2001-10-01

    The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a heterogeneous group of painful musculoskeletal conditions that include masticatory muscle pain. TMD is a common condition but its etiology is, as yet, poorly understood. Although TMD can be quite disabling, most patients presenting with symptoms improve regardless of treatment type. This article focuses on nonpharmacologic treatments for TMD; recent articles on etiology, assessment, and treatment for this muscle pain condition are reviewed. Psychological approaches include biofeedback, minimal therapist contact interventions, relaxation, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. We suggest that treatments based on the biopsychosocial model of illness should be used concurrently with treatments focusing only on the biomedical aspects of TMD. Psychological treatments need not be viewed as a treatment of last resort, but rather should be delivered concurrent with biomedical treatments. We present data from recent clinical trials showing that treatment-matching approaches tailoring psychological and educational treatments to psychosocial profiles, delivered concurrent with usual dental care, results in greater and more sustained improvement than usual dental care alone. As such, treatment for TMD should be viewed in much the same way as treatment for most other chronic pain conditions, that is, from a multidisciplinary perspective. PMID:11560807

  16. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; van Wijk, A J; Klingler, M C; Ruiz Vicente, E; van Dijk, C J; Eijkman, M A J

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40.4 ± 11.9 years; 34.1% women) completed a specifically developed questionnaire, either online or on paper. Stepwise forward logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the presence of TMD pain, with several potential risk factors as predictors. Four hundred and eighty-five of the 536 respondents were free of any TMD pain before they started diving actively. In this sample, TMD pain was present in 214 persons (44.1%). Four predictors contributed significantly to the presence of TMD pain, viz., clenching (OR = 2.466), warm water (OR = 1.685), biting on the mouthpiece (OR = 1.598), and the quality rating of the mouthpiece (OR = 0.887, that is, a higher rating means a smaller odds of having TMD pain). TMD pain is a common complaint among scuba divers who were free of such complaints before they started diving actively. Clenching, biting on the mouthpiece, and a low rating of the mouthpiece are predictors for the presence of TMD pain in scuba divers, while diving in cold water serves as a protective factor for TMD pain. PMID:24766672

  17. Effects of joint capsule tissue on cartilage degradation in an in vitro joint injury model

    E-print Network

    Lin, Stephanie Norris, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease of the whole joint that affects an estimated 20.7 million Americans. Traumatic joint injury causes an increase in risk for the development of osteoarthritis. A previously developed ...

  18. Female Gender and Acne Disease Are Jointly and Independently Associated with the Risk of Major Depression and Suicide: A National Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Chien; Tu, Hung-Pin; Chang, Wei-Chao; Fu, Hung-Chun; Ho, Ji-Chen; Chang, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a common disease in adolescence with female preponderance. It could cause poor self-esteem and social phobia. Previous studies based on questionnaires from several thousands of adolescents showed that acne is associated with major depression and suicide. However, the gender- and age-specific risk of depression and suicide in patients with acne remain largely unknown. Using a database from the National Health Insurance, which included 98% of the population of Taiwan in 2006, we identified patients of acne, major depression, and suicide based on ICD-9-CM codes. Totally 47111 patients with acne were identified (16568 males and 30543 females) from 1 million subjects. The youths of 7–12 years had the highest prevalence of acne (14.39%). Major depression was more common in those with acne (0.77%) than controls (0.56% , P < 0.0001) regardless of gender. Multiple logistic regression showed an increased risk of major depression in women without acne (OR = 1.85, 95% CI 1.75–1.96). The risk is additive in women with acne (OR = 2.78, 95% CI 2.43–3.17). Similar additive risk of suicide was noticed in women with acne. In conclusion, acne and gender, independently and jointly, are associated with major depression and suicide. Special medical support should be warranted in females with acne for the risk of major depression and suicide. PMID:24678508

  19. Chronic HPA Axis Response to Stress in Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cynthia Ann; Sanders, Anne; Wilder, Rebecca S.; Slade, Gary D.; Van Uum, Stan; Russell, Evan; Koren, Gideon; Maixner, William

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Perceived stress is associated with temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but whether cortisol levels are elevated in individuals with TMD is unknown. We hypothesized that cortisol concentration, a biomarker of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function, was elevated in TMD cases relative to controls, and that perceived stress was positively correlated with cortisol concentration. Methods In this case control study, TMD case status was determined by examiners using TMD Research Diagnostic Criteria. Participants (n=116) aged 18 to 59 years were recruited from within a 50 mile radius of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Following examination, cases (n=45) and controls (n=71) completed the 14-item Perceived Stress Scale using a reference interval of the past 3 months. Approximately 100 strands of hair were cut from the posterior vertex segment of their scalp. The 3 centimeters of hair most proximal to the scalp was analyzed with a commercially available salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay adapted for hair cortisol. This length corresponds to the last 3 months of systemic HPA axis activity. Results TMD cases perceived higher stress than controls (p=0.001). However, hair cortisol concentration was lower in TMD cases than controls (p<0.001). The correlation coefficient revealed a weak negative relationship (r=?0.188) between perceived stress and hair cortisol concentration (p=0.044). In analysis stratified by case status, the relationship of perceived stress and hair cortisol concentration was non-significant for cases (p=0.169) and controls (p=0.498). Conclusion Despite greater perceived stress, TMD cases had lower hair cortisol concentrations than controls and the 2 measures of stress were weakly and negatively correlated. PMID:23986140

  20. Ceramic joints

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Bradley J. (Worcester, MA); Patten, Jr., Donald O. (Sterling, MA)

    1991-01-01

    Butt joints between materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion are prepared having a reduced probability of failure of stress facture. This is accomplished by narrowing/tapering the material having the lower coefficient of thermal expansion in a direction away from the joint interface and not joining the narrow-tapered surface to the material having the higher coefficient of thermal expansion.

  1. Mouse models of osteoarthritis and joint injury

    E-print Network

    Avedillo, Jose Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 21 million Americans are affected by osteoarthritis, a complex disease characterized by degenerative lesions to the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. The complexity of the disease makes the use ...

  2. Joint segmentation of lumen and outer wall from femoral artery MR images: Towards 3D imaging measurements of peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) plaque burden extracted from fast black-blood magnetic resonance (MR) images have shown to be more predictive of clinical outcomes than PAD stenosis measurements. To this end, accurate segmentation of the femoral artery lumen and outer wall is required for generating volumetric measurements of PAD plaque burden. Here, we propose a semi-automated algorithm to jointly segment the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, which are reoriented and reconstructed along the medial axis of the femoral artery to obtain improved spatial coherence between slices of the long, thin femoral artery and to reduce computation time. The developed segmentation algorithm enforces two priors in a global optimization manner: the spatial consistency between the adjacent 2D slices and the anatomical region order between the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces. The formulated combinatorial optimization problem for segmentation is solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation using a coupled continuous max-flow (CCMF) model, which is a dual formulation to the convex relaxed optimization problem. In addition, the CCMF model directly derives an efficient duality-based algorithm based on the modern multiplier augmented optimization scheme, which has been implemented on a GPU for fast computation. The computed segmentations from the developed algorithm were compared to manual delineations from experts using 20 black-blood MR images. The developed algorithm yielded both high accuracy (Dice similarity coefficients ?87% for both the lumen and outer wall surfaces) and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95 for generating vessel wall area), while outperforming the state-of-the-art method in terms of computational time by a factor of ?20. PMID:26387053

  3. Joint pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both rest and exercise are important. Warm baths, massage, and stretching exercises should be used as often ... Does keeping the joint elevated help? Do medicines, massage, or applying heat reduce the pain? What other ...

  4. Compliant joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eklund, Wayne D. (inventor); Kerley, James J. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A compliant joint is provided for prosthetic and robotic devices which permits rotation in three different planes. The joint provides for the controlled use of cable under motion. Perpendicular outer mounting frames are joined by swaged cables that interlock at a center block. Ball bearings allow for the free rotation of the second mounting frame relative to the first mounting frame within a predetermined angular rotation that is controlled by two stop devices. The cables allow for compliance at the stops and the cables allow for compliance in six degrees of freedom enabling the duplication or simulation of the rotational movement and flexibility of a natural hip or knee joint, as well as the simulation of a joint designed for a specific robotic component for predetermined design parameters.

  5. Joint Problems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ankles and toes. Other types of arthritis include gout or pseudogout. Sometimes, there is a mechanical problem ... for more information on osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. How Common are Joint Problems? Osteoarthritis, which affects ...

  6. Lyme disease (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Lyme disease is an acute inflammatory disease characterized by skin changes, joint inflammation and symptoms similar to ... that is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi . Lyme disease is transmitted by the bite of a ...

  7. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  8. TU-C-12A-12: Differentiating Bone Lesions and Degenerative Joint Disease in NaF PET/CT Scans Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Muzahir, S; Jeraj, R; Meyer, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: [F-18]NaF PET can be used to image bone metastases; however, tracer uptake in degenerative joint disease (DJD) often appears similar to metastases. This study aims to develop and compare different machine learning algorithms to automatically identify regions of [F-18]NaF scans that correspond to DJD. Methods: 10 metastatic prostate cancer patients received whole body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans prior to treatment. Image segmentation resulted in 852 ROIs, 69 of which were identified by a nuclear medicine physician as DJD. For all ROIs, various PET and CT textural features were computed. ROIs were divided into training and testing sets used to train eight different machine learning classifiers. Classifiers were evaluated based on receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). We also assessed the added value of including CT features in addition to PET features for training classifiers. Results: The training set consisted of 37 DJD ROIs with 475 non-DJD ROIs, and the testing set consisted of 32 DJD ROIs with 308 non-DJD ROIs. Of all classifiers, generalized linear models (GLM), decision forests (DF), and support vector machines (SVM) had the best performance. AUCs of GLM (0.929), DF (0.921), and SVM (0.889) were significantly higher than the other models (p<0.001). GLM and DF, overall, had the best sensitivity, specificity, and PPV, and gave a significantly better performance (p<0.01) than all other models. PET/CT GLM classifiers had higher AUC than just PET or just CT. GLMs built using PET/CT information had superior or comparable sensitivities, specificities and PPVs to just PET or just CT. Conclusion: Machine learning algorithms trained with PET/CT features were able to identify some cases of DJD. GLM outperformed the other classification algorithms. Using PET and CT information together was shown to be superior to using PET or CT features alone. Research supported by the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  9. Managing bruxism and temporomandibular disorders using a centric relation occlusal device.

    PubMed

    Nassif, N J; al-Ghamdi, K S

    1999-11-01

    This article discusses the rationale, indications, and fabrication of the centric relation occlusal (CRO) device in the management of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. Five methods of fabricating occlusal devices are briefly discussed. Two methods, preferred by the authors, are discussed in detail, including the laboratory phase. One method uses heat-cured acrylic resin, and the other method uses a heat-vacuum machine, thermoplastic splint resin material, and autopolymerizing clear acrylic resin. The use of the CRO device in the successful management of bruxism and temporomandibular disorders has been previously documented in the literature. Some patients may not successfully adjust to the wearing of occlusal devices (splints), which are not well-defined in terms of occlusal morphology, anterior guidance, and their relativity to centric relation. This problem usually is overcome when the dentist uses precise skill in the fabrication and delivery of a CRO device with mutually protected articulation. PMID:10650392

  10. Compliant Prosthetic Or Robotic Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J.; Eklund, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Rotation partly free and partly restrained by resilience and damping. Joint includes U-shaped x- and y-axis frames joined by cables that cross in at center piece. The y-axis frame rotates about y-axis on roller bearing within predetermined angular range. The y-axis frame rotates slightly farther when arm strikes stop, because cables can twist. This mimics compliant resistance of knee joint reaching limit of its forward or backward motion. Used in prosthetic device to replace diseased or damage human joint, or in robot linkage to limit movement and cushion overloads.

  11. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly encountered anaerobic organisms associated with PJI. Since anaerobic PJI has also been linked to dental procedures, we also reviewed information on the use of dental procedures and prophylaxis, when available. PMID:26341272

  12. Shoulder joint (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is the most freely moving joint of the body. The shoulder joint can move in multiple directions therefore it is less stable than other joints and is more susceptible to injury. Dislocation of the shoulder joint is common and occurs ...

  13. Arthritis: Metacarpophalangeal (MP) Joint

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is completely destroyed, then joint replacement or joint fusion are effective surgical options. The joints can be ... useful, especially for older or less active individuals. Fusion—or making the joint solid—is an effective ...

  14. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  15. Signs of temporomandibular disorders in tinnitus patients and in a population-based group of volunteers: results of the Study of Health in Pomerania.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, O; Gesch, D; Schwahn, C; Bitter, K; Mundt, T; Mack, F; Kocher, T; Meyer, G; Hensel, E; John, U

    2004-04-01

    The literature has documented a controversial discussion on the possible relationship of otogenous symptoms and craniomandibular dysfunction since the 1920s. Therefore, an investigation was conducted which consisted of two parts: a case study with population-based controls and a cross-sectional study. The aim of the first study was to screen a group of patients suffering from acute or chronic tinnitus for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in comparison with a population-based group of volunteers without tinnitus. To this end, 30 patients (13 females and 17 males, age 18-71 years) suffering from acute hearing loss associated with tinnitus, isolated acute tinnitus, and chronically transient tinnitus were examined for symptoms of craniomandibular dysfunction. The results were compared with those of clinical functional analysis from 1907 subjects selected representatively and according to age distribution from the epidemiological 'Study of Health in Pomerania' (SHIP); the occurrence of tinnitus was ruled out in these control subjects. Statistical analysis was performed with Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Sixty per cent of the tinnitus patients and 36.5% of the control subjects exhibited more than two symptoms of TMD (P = 0.004). Tinnitus patients had significantly more muscle palpation pain (P < 0.001), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) palpation pain (P < 0.001), and pain upon mouth opening (P < 0.001) than the general population group. No statistical differences were found in TMJ sounds, limitation of mandibular movement, or hypermobility of the TMJ. Furthermore, 4228 subjects of the population group examined in the epidemiological study were screened for co-factors of tinnitus with the help of a multivariate logistic regression model which was adjusted for gender, age, and a variety of anamnestic and examined data. Increased odds ratios (OR) were found for tenderness of the masticatory muscles (OR = 1.6 for one to three painful muscles and OR = 2.53 for four or more painful muscles), TMJ tenderness to dorsal cranial compression (OR = 2.99), listlessness (OR = 2.0) and frequent headache (OR = 1.84) A relationship between tinnitus and TMD was established in both examinations. Tinnitus patients seem to suffer especially from myofascial and TMJ pain. A screening for TMD should be included in the diagnostic survey for tinnitus patients. PMID:15089935

  16. Knee joint replacement prosthesis (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A prosthesis is a device designed to replace a missing part of the body, or to make a part of the body work better. The metal prosthetic device in knee joint replacement surgery replaces cartilage and bone which is damaged from disease or aging.

  17. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    DeVocht, James W.; Goertz, Christine M.; Hondras, Maria A.; Long, Cynthia R.; Schaeffer, Wally; Thomann, Lauren; Spector, Michael; Stanford, Clark M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Methods The authors assigned 80 participants randomly into one of the following four groups, all of which included a comprehensive self-care program: reversible interocclusal splint therapy (RIST), Activator Method Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) (Activator Methods International, Phoenix), sham AMCT and self-care only. They made assessments at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Results The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six months, as assessed on the 11-point numerical rating scale, was 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1-3.0) for RIST, 1.7 (0.9-2.5) for self-care only, 1.5 (0.7-2.4) for AMCT and 1.6 (0.7-2.5) for sham AMCT. The authors also assessed bothersomeness and functionality. Conclusions The authors found the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. Practical Implications. This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study that will provide clinicians with information that should be helpful when discussing treatment options for patients with TMD. PMID:24080932

  18. Knee joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    Knee joint replacement is surgery to replace a knee joint with a man-made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... cartilage and bone are removed from the knee joint. Man-made pieces are then placed in the ...

  19. Joint Durability Where Next?

    E-print Network

    Joint Durability Where Next? Peter Taylor #12;The problem? · Some joints are deteriorating faster joints · Batch variability · Drainage · Salt treatment · Hand placed #12;Ames, IA · Non-distressed joint Spacing factor: 0.007in w/cm: 0.40 to 0.45 · Distressed joint Spacing factor: 0.005in w/cm: 0.42 - 0

  20. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  1. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  2. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    .org Shoulder Joint Replacement Page ( 1 ) Although shoulder joint replacement is less common than knee or hip replacement, it is just as successful in relieving joint pain. Shoulder replacement surgery was ?rst performed in ...

  3. Joint Replacement Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Arthritis July 2014 Joint Replacement Surgery: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family What Is Joint Replacement Surgery? Joint replacement surgery is removing a ...

  4. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Joint Replacement Email to a friend * required fields From * ... name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION In a joint replacement, the abnormal bone and lining structures of ...

  5. Spacesuit mobility joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Joints for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit which have low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are described. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics. Linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli are featured. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  6. Spacesuit mobility knee joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C. (inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure suit mobility joints are for use in interconnecting adjacent segments of an hermetically sealed spacesuit in which low torques, low leakage and a high degree of reliability are required. Each of the joints is a special purpose joint characterized by substantially constant volume and low torque characteristics and includes linkages which restrain the joint from longitudinal distension and includes a flexible, substantially impermeable diaphragm of tubular configuration spanning the distance between pivotally supported annuli. The diaphragms of selected joints include rolling convolutions for balancing the joints, while various joints include wedge-shaped sections which enhance the range of motion for the joints.

  7. Joint position sense in the normal and pathologic knee joint.

    PubMed

    Skinner, H B; Barrack, R L

    1991-09-01

    Joint position sense has been suggested to be an important factor in the etiology of degenerative joint disease. It is also believed to be important in the rehabilitative process after reconstructive surgery of the knee. Despite this awareness, in many areas of orthopaedic surgery little effort has been devoted to study of this crucial topic. Therefore, we conducted several studies of knee joint position sense by measuring the ability of healthy subjects to reproduce an angle and detect the threshold of motion. Our goal was to evaluate the effects of the following factors: aging; degenerative joint disease; total knee replacement, i.e., both absence of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and sensory loss due to the absence of capsular structures; fatigue; athletic training; disruption and reconstruction of the ACL; and the role of ligament mechanoreceptors. Our results show that normal individuals can actively reproduce an angle with their knee to an average error of 2.5°. Furthermore, normal subjects require passive movement of ?2.5°-4° to detect a change in position at the speeds used in this study (?0.5°/s). Muscular training improves the ability to detect motion. On the other hand, muscular training and fatigue appear to decrease the ability to reproduce an angle. Changes in the knee and its associated structures caused by damage (ACL disruption, arthritis, total knee replacement) as well as aging uniformly cause deterioration of joint position sense. Total knee replacement and arthritic change cause the greatest deterioration. Reconstruction of ligamentous structures and/or rehabilitation appears to restore joint position sense to a near normal level. PMID:20870508

  8. 76 FR 61149 - Agency Information Collection (Disability Benefits Questionnaires-Group 4) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Temporomandibular Joint Conditions) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960D1. Endocrine Diseases (other... System) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21- 0960-J-4. Respiratory Conditions (other...

  9. Frey's Syndrome Consequent to an Unusual Pattern of Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Case Report with Review of Its Incidence and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Rajay A. D.; Bharani, Shiva; Prabhakar, Suhas

    2013-01-01

    Frey's syndrome was first described in the 18th century. Recognizing it as a nonspecific condition, the symptom of gustatory sweating in patients with parotid gland inflammation was described by Duphenix and Baillarger. However, as a specific diagnostic entity, gustatory sweating, following trauma to parotid glands, was first described by Polish neurologist Lucie Frey, in 1923, and hence he proposed the term auriculotemporal syndrome. The condition is characterized by sweating, flushing, a sense of warmth, and occasional pain in the preauricular and temporal areas, following the production of a strong salivary stimulus. Several etiologies of Frey's syndrome have been mentioned in the literature; however, none attribute dislocation of the “intact” mandibular condyle as a cause of the syndrome. Reviewing its pathophysiology, etiology, and incidence in detail, we describe a case of Frey's syndrome subsequent to superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle following fracture of the anterior mandible. Its management and prevention are also discussed in brief. PMID:24436729

  10. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePLUS

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  11. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  12. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  13. Butt Joint Tool Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-12-06

    ITER Central Solenoid uses butt joints for connecting the pancakes in the CS module. The principles of the butt joining of the CICC were developed by the JAPT during CSMC project. The difference between the CSMC butt joint and the CS butt joint is that the CS butt joint is an in-line joint, while the CSMC is a double joint through a hairpin jumper. The CS butt joint has to carry the hoop load. The straight length of the joint is only 320 mm, and the vacuum chamber around the joint has to have a split in the clamp shell. These requirements are challenging. Fig.1 presents a CSMC joint, and Fig.2 shows a CS butt joint. The butt joint procedure was verified and demonstrated. The tool is capable of achieving all specified parameters. The vacuum in the end was a little higher than the target, which is not critical and readily correctable. We consider, tentatively that the procedure is established. Unexpectedly, we discover significant temperature nonuniformity in the joint cross section, which is not formally a violation of the specs, but is a point of concern. All testing parameters are recorded for QA purposes. We plan to modify the butt joining tool to improve its convenience of operation and provide all features necessary for production of butt joints by qualified personnel.

  14. Joint estimation of multiple disease-specific sensitivities and specificities via crossed random effects models for correlated reader-based diagnostic data: application of data cloning.

    PubMed

    Withanage, Niroshan; de Leon, Alexander R; Rudnisky, Christopher J

    2015-12-20

    We present a model for describing correlated binocular data from reader-based diagnostic studies, where the same group of readers evaluates the presence or absence of certain diseases on binocular organs (e.g., fellow eyes) of patients. Multiple random effects are incorporated to meaningfully delineate various associations in the data including crossed random effects to account for reader-specific variability and to incorporate cross correlations. To overcome the computational complexity involved in the evaluation and maximization of the marginal likelihood, we adopt the data cloning approach, which calculates maximum likelihood estimates under the Bayesian paradigm. The bias and efficiency of the estimates are assessed in two simulation studies. We apply our model to data from a diabetic retinopathy study. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26179660

  15. Joint Health Status of Hemophilia Patients in Jodhpur Region.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vikas; Sharma, Pramod; Chhangani, N P; Janu, Yojana; Singh, Yudhavir; Sharma, Akash

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia refers to a group of bleeding disorders in which there is a deficiency of one of the factors necessary for coagulation of the blood. Susceptibility to joint hemorrhage in persons with Hemophilia suggests that the routine assessment of joint health is an important aspect of clinical management and outcome studies assessing the efficacy of treatment. This prospective study was conducted to study joint health status in Hemophilia patients and draw their joint disability score by using Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS). Out of total 56 cases 51 (91.07 %) cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 cases (8.92 %) were diagnosed as hemophilia B. According to their factor level 44 % cases had severe 36 % had moderate and 20 % had mild disease. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 67.85 % cases followed by ankle joint (51.7 %) elbow joint (35.7 %), hip joint (12.5 %), shoulder joint (5.3 %) and proximal metacarpophalangeal joint (1.78 %).Out of total 37.5 % patients of hemophilia had developed target joint. Knee joint was the predominant target joint in 28.57 % cases and ankle joint was the target joint in 8.92 % cases. Maximum number of patients (40.47 %) had HJHS score of zero. The mean HJHS score was 6.78 ± 9.04. HJHS score showing significant positive correlation with age of patient (p < 0.0001). Most risky period and most aggravating development of hemophilic joint damage starts from 7 years of age. Therefore, treatment decisions, such as starting prophylaxis, should be tailored according to bleeding pattern and age of patients rather than based on the clotting factor activity levels. PMID:26085722

  16. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. Pressure suit joint analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Webbon, B. W. (inventors)

    1982-01-01

    A measurement system for simultaneously measuring torque and angular flexure in a pressure suit joint is described. One end of a joint under test is held rigid. A torque transducer is pivotably supported on the other movable end of a joint. A potentiometer is attached to the transducer by an arm. The wiper shaft of the potentiometer is gripped by a reference arm that rotates the wiper shaft the same angle as the flexure of joint. A signal is generated by the potentiometer which is representative of the joint flexure. A compensation circuit converts the output of the transducer to a signal representative of joint torque.

  18. The Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Gene and Essential Hypertension: The Joint Effect of Polymorphism E158K and Cigarette Smoking on Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bushueva, Olga; Solodilova, Maria; Churnosov, Mikhail; Ivanov, Vladimir; Polonikov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Gene encoding flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), a microsomal antioxidant defense enzyme, has been suggested to contribute to essential hypertension (EH). The present study was designed to investigate whether common functional polymorphism E158K (rs2266782) of the FMO3 gene is associated with EH susceptibility in a Russian population. A total of 2?995 unrelated subjects from Kursk (1?362 EH patients and 843 healthy controls) and Belgorod (357 EH patients and 422 population controls) regions of Central Russia were recruited for this study. DNA samples from all study participants were genotyped for the FMO3 gene polymorphism through PCR followed by RFLP analysis. We found that the polymorphism E158K is associated with increased risk of essential hypertension in both discovery population from Kursk region (OR 1.36?95% CI 1.09–1.69, P = 0.01) and replication population from Belgorod region (OR 1.54 95% CI 1.07–1.89, P = 0.02) after adjustment for gender and age using logistic regression analysis. Further analysis showed that the increased hypertension risk in carriers of genotype 158KK gene occurred in cigarette smokers, whereas nonsmoker carriers of this genotype did not show the disease risk. This is the first study reporting the association of the FMO3 gene polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:25243081

  19. The Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Gene and Essential Hypertension: The Joint Effect of Polymorphism E158K and Cigarette Smoking on Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bushueva, Olga; Solodilova, Maria; Churnosov, Mikhail; Ivanov, Vladimir; Polonikov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Gene encoding flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), a microsomal antioxidant defense enzyme, has been suggested to contribute to essential hypertension (EH). The present study was designed to investigate whether common functional polymorphism E158K (rs2266782) of the FMO3 gene is associated with EH susceptibility in a Russian population. A total of 2?995 unrelated subjects from Kursk (1?362 EH patients and 843 healthy controls) and Belgorod (357 EH patients and 422 population controls) regions of Central Russia were recruited for this study. DNA samples from all study participants were genotyped for the FMO3 gene polymorphism through PCR followed by RFLP analysis. We found that the polymorphism E158K is associated with increased risk of essential hypertension in both discovery population from Kursk region (OR 1.36?95% CI 1.09-1.69, P = 0.01) and replication population from Belgorod region (OR 1.54 95% CI 1.07-1.89, P = 0.02) after adjustment for gender and age using logistic regression analysis. Further analysis showed that the increased hypertension risk in carriers of genotype 158KK gene occurred in cigarette smokers, whereas nonsmoker carriers of this genotype did not show the disease risk. This is the first study reporting the association of the FMO3 gene polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:25243081

  20. Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Nat, Laura Bogdana; Simiti, Adriana Liana; Poanta, Laura Irina

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease (Borreliosis), also called the "disease of 1000 faces", is produced by a bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi, transmitted by the Ixodes tick. The clinical picture is non-specific and polymorph, with multisystemic involvement. Diagnosis is most often one of exclusion, and certain diagnosis is based on the presence of Borellia antibodies. The treatment is done differently depending on the stage of the disease and the severity of injuries, being used antibiotics like Doxycycline, Amoxicillin, Erythromycin or Penicillin. Under treatment the disease quickly heals without sequel, in the early stages, but advanced stages are usually resistant to treatment and chronic injuries can occur. Symptoms get worse without treatment and become chronic. We present the case of a woman of 66-year-old with a complex history of disease, which began one year prior to admission, through multiple and nonspecific symptoms; she presented herself in numerous medical services (gastroenterology, rheumatology--where an immunosuppressive treatment was initiated, hematology) without determining a final diagnosis. She was admitted in our service with altered general state and worsening symptoms, predominantly fever, muscle pain, joint pain, the patient being immobilized in bed. After multiple investigations and the problem of differential diagnosis with multiple pathologies, we finally established the diagnosis of Lyme disease. The peculiarities of the case are represented by the severity of the clinical manifestations and fulminant disease evolution under the unjustified administration of immunosuppressive treatment, and atypical joint involvement regarding localization and evolution that raised the issue of differential diagnosis with osteosarcoma or bone tuberculosis. PMID:25726630

  1. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  2. Behavior of jointed pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, A.C.

    1984-06-01

    Experimental data on the axial, bending and torsional behavior of ductile cast iron pipes with rubber gasket joints is presented. Analytical expressions are provided which predict the resistance mechanisms and behavior of the joints. The bending mechanism is found to be quite different from the axial and torsional mechanism. By repeating the tests in a specially designed soil box, the effects of burial depths are determined. A joint stiffness matrix including axial, bending and torsional effects is provided. The slip behavior of the joint changes the stiffness values, however this occurence may be dealt with by using an appropriate flag system placed within a computer program. To minimize axial compressional stresses and interlocking bending stresses at the joint, a minor geometrical change in the joint needs to be made. Joints with larger lip lengths provide more flexibility when subjected to axial compression or joint bending rotations.

  3. Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis) Print A A A Text Size ...

  4. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  5. Culture - joint fluid

    MedlinePLUS

    Joint fluid culture ... fungi, or viruses grow. This is called a culture. If these germs are detected, other tests may ... is no special preparation needed for the lab culture. How to prepare for the removal of joint ...

  6. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ... often caused by: Bursitis Arthritis Injury to the hip joint or surrounding area Overuse or strain from running ...

  7. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Multiple Congenital Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Caglar, Cagkan

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndrome characterized by nonprogressive multiple congenital joint contractures. The etiology of disease is multifactorial; it is most commonly suspected from absent fetal movements and genetic defects. AMC affects mainly limbs; also it might present with other organs involvement. It is crucial that the diagnosis of AMC should be kept in mind by musculoskeletal physicians in newborns with multiple joint contractures and patients must begin rehabilitation in early stage after accurate diagnosis in terms of functional independence. We present the diagnosis, types, clinical features, and treatment approaches of this disease in our case with literature reviews.

  8. Joint Enrollment Report, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Iowa Department of Education collects information on joint enrollment in Iowa's 15 community colleges. Jointly enrolled students are high school students enrolled in community college credit coursework. Most jointly enrolled students enroll through Senior Year Plus (SYP) programs such as Postsecondary Enrollment Options (PSEO) and concurrent…

  9. Prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorders among university students in Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Syed Rashid; Al Rifaiy, Mohammad Qasim; Awan, Kamran Habib; Alsaif, Abdulaziz; Alshalan, Abdulaziz; Altokais, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) among male university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The role of relevant medical and dental histories in the assessment of TMD in this Arab population was also addressed. Methods Required information was collected via a questionnaire. The first part of the questionnaire was used to obtain the medical and dental histories of participants. The second part included 10 questions regarding common TMD symptoms. Fonseca’s anamnestic index (FAI) was used to classify TMD severity as “no dysfunction”, “light dysfunction”, “moderate dysfunction”, or “severe dysfunction”. Results Of the 600 distributed questionnaires, 400 questionnaires were completed (response rate: 66.6%). Mean age of eligible participants was 21.90 ± 1.79 years. Psychological stress (30.5%) and direct restorations (77%) were the most commonly reported items on the medical and dental histories respectively for the total number of participants. According to the FAI, 53.2% of participants were classified as having no dysfunction, followed by light (36.1%), moderate (9.6%), and severe dysfunction (1.1%). Conclusions Based on the FAI, mild to moderate prevalence of TMD appears to exist among male university students in Riyadh. Histories of psychological stress and dental treatment were evident among these students. Information obtained from the FAI may be helpful in assessing the prevalence of TMD and has important implications for the early diagnosis of TMD and the prevention of future TMD-related complications. PMID:26236125

  10. Differential brain activity in subjects with painful trigeminal neuropathy and painful temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Andrew M; Gustin, Sylvia M; Nash, Paul G; Reeves, Jenna M; Petersen, Esben T; Peck, Chris C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2014-03-01

    Human brain imaging investigations have revealed that acute pain is associated with coactivation of numerous brain regions, including the thalamus, somatosensory, insular, and cingulate cortices. Surprisingly, a similar set of brain structures is not activated in all chronic pain conditions, particularly chronic neuropathic pain, which is associated with almost exclusively decreased thalamic activity. These inconsistencies may reflect technical issues or fundamental differences in the processing of acute compared with chronic pain. The appreciation of any differences is important because better treatment development will depend on understanding the underlying mechanisms of different forms of pain. In this investigation, we used quantitative arterial spin labeling to compare and contrast regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) patterns in individuals with chronic neuropathic orofacial pain (painful trigeminal neuropathy) and chronic nonneuropathic orofacial pain (painful temporomandibular disorder). Neuropathic pain was associated with CBF decreases in a number of regions, including the thalamus and primary somatosensory and cerebellar cortices. In contrast, chronic nonneuropathic pain was associated with significant CBF increases in regions commonly associated with higher-order cognitive and emotional functions, such as the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and the precuneus. Furthermore, in subjects with nonneuropathic pain, blood flow increased in motor-related regions as well as within the spinal trigeminal nucleus. PMID:24269492

  11. Are temporomandibular disorders associated with habitual sleeping body posture or nasal septal deviation?

    PubMed

    Yalç?nkaya, Esin; Cingi, Cemal; Bayar Muluk, Nuray; Ulusoy, Seçkin; Hanci, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Numerous factors can be considered for the etiology of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the presence of both nasal septal deviation (NSD) and habitual prone sleeping posture (HPSP) predisposes TMD. We evaluated 200 subjects in 4 groups. Group I (NSD-, HPSP-/control group), Group II (NSD+, HPSP-), Group III (NSD-, HPSP+), Group IV (NSD+, HPSP+). All patients were examined according to the research diagnostic criteria to determine the presence of TMD. Group IV had the highest value for TMD incidence (44 %). Thus, we found that the presence of both NSD and HPSP parameters increased TMD incidence in Group IV compared to the control group (p = 0.000). Additionally, Group IV showed significantly higher values than Group II (p = 0.012) and Group III (p = 0.039). For Group III (NSD-, HPSP+), TMD was determined higher compared to the control group (p = 0.009). A statistically higher value of presence of TMD was determined in Group II (NSD+, HPSP-) than control group (p = 0.029). The incidence of TMD was significantly higher in women than men (p = 0.020). We concluded that one having an unilateral obstructive nasal septal deviation in addition to a habit of sleeping in prone position must be alert for potential TMD. PMID:25555606

  12. Prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorder in Children and Adolescents from Public Schools in Southern Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Cardoso, Iara; Porfírio, Melani; Gonçalves, Roberta; Cascalheiro, Sabina; Barreto, Vera; Soeiro, Andreia; Almeida, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in children and adolescents is in the range of 6-68% and can be triggered or aggravated by emotional stress. Aim: The study was to investigate the prevalence of TMD in Portuguese children and adolescents and its association with emotional stress. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 3,260 students aged 5-19 years. The questionnaire was used to assess the presence of TMD, and was applied in a single moment. Results: TMD was observed in 821 (25.2%) students. The most common symptoms of TMD were: if considered tense or nervous (52%), have headaches (36.8%), and habit of clenching or grinding teeth (27.3%). The girls had a 1.36 higher probability of developing TMD than boys (95% CI: 1.14-1.63; p < 0.001); moreover, students from the older age group had a 2.31 higher probability of developing the disorder (95% CI: 1.85-2.89; p < 0.001). Students who considered themselves tense or nervous presented 8.74 higher probability (95% CI: 7.03-10.86; p < 0.001) of developing TMD. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of TMD in children and adolescents in southern Portugal, and revealed a significant association between this dysfunction and the levels of emotional stress. Female students, older students, and those considered tense or nervous have a higher probability of developing TMD. PMID:24741551

  13. Association of temporomandibular disorder symptoms with anxiety and depression in Portuguese college students.

    PubMed

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Morgado, Marcos; Caro, Tatiana

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its association with anxiety and depression among 1,493 Portuguese college students (age 17-69 years) at Piaget Institute. The assessment instruments were the Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TMD was present in 633 (42.4%) students, and anxiety or depression was present in 456 (30.5%) students. Regarding the association of TMD with anxiety and depression, 280 of the 633 students (61.4%) with TMD symptoms also had signs of anxiety or depression (P < 0.001). As compared with men, women had an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.53-2.46; P < 0.001) for TMD. As compared with students without signs of anxiety or depression, students with such signs had an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.42-3.84; P < 0.001) for TMD. College students from various fields of study and regions of Portugal had a high prevalence of TMD, which was significantly associated with anxiety and depression. PMID:24930749

  14. General health status and incidence of first-onset temporomandibular disorder: OPPERA prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Anne E.; Slade, Gary D.; Bair, Eric; Fillingim, Roger B.; Knott, Charles; Dubner, Ronald; Greenspan, Joel D.; Maixner, William; Ohrbach, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) overlap with other health conditions but no study has examined which of these conditions increase the risk of developing first-onset TMD. The authors prospectively evaluated the relationship between health status at enrollment and subsequent incidence of TMD in 2,722 men and women. Participants aged 18–44 years had no history of TMD and were clinically free of TMD when enrolled in 2006–08 at four U.S. study sites in the OPPERA prospective cohort study. First-onset examiner-classified TMD developed in 260 people over a median 2.8 years of follow-up. Cox regression estimated the association between health conditions and TMD incidence while accounting for potential confounders. Incidence of first-onset TMD was 50% higher for people with lower back pain (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.50, 95% confidence limits [95% CL]: 1.08, 2.10) and 75% higher for people with genital pain symptoms (AHR = 1.75 [95% CL: 1.04, 2.93]) than people without a history of these pain disorders. Digit ratio, a marker of intra-uterine exposure to sex hormones, was significantly associated with TMD incidence. Other independent predictors of first-onset TMD were sleep disturbance and cigarette smoking. These findings reveal multiple-influences of health status on incidence of first-onset TMD. PMID:24275223

  15. Joint Notice of Privacy Practices of

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    diseases · Drug and alcohol abuse treatment · Mental health · HIV/AIDS · Reproductive health for minorsJoint Notice of Privacy Practices of UW Medicine and Certain Other Providers EFFECTIVE MAY 15, 2013 Medicine and Certain Other Providers Effective May 15, 2013 THIS NOTICE DESCRIBES HOW MEDICAL INFORMATION

  16. Mechanics of Suture Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaning; Song, Juha; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz Group/DMSE/MIT Team; Boyce Group/ME/MIT Team

    2011-03-01

    Biological sutures are joints which connect two stiff skeletal or skeletal-like components. These joints possess a wavy geometry with a thin organic layer providing adhesion. Examples of biological sutures include mammalian skulls, the pelvic assembly of the armored fish Gasterosteus aculeatus (the three-spined stickleback), and the suture joints in the shell of the red-eared slider turtle. Biological sutures allow for movement and compliance, control stress concentrations, transmit loads, reduce fatigue stress and absorb energy. In this investigation, the mechanics of the role of suture geometry in providing a naturally optimized joint is explored. In particular, analytical and numerical micromechanical models of the suture joint are constructed. The anisotropic mechanical stiffness and strength are studied as a function of suture wavelength, amplitude and the material properties of the skeletal and organic components, revealing key insights into the optimized nature of these ubiquitous natural joints.

  17. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  18. Joint cavity injection combined with manual reduction and stabilization splint treatment of anterior disc displacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjie; Mu, Hong; Wang, Zhifeng; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Shizhou; Long, Xing; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of upper and lower joint cavity treatment (UJCT vs. LJCT) in patients with anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDw/oR) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Material and methods: A total of 56 patients with unilateral ADDw/oR were randomly divided into two groups: UJCT group and LJCT group. Manual reduction was done in all the patients after joint cavity rejection of sodium hyaluronate. Then, they were treated with stabilization splint for one or two months. At last, Friction index was calculated to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy at 6 to 12 months follow-up. Results: The maximal mouth-opening degrees in the both groups increased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01), and the Friction index decreased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01); In LJCT group, the degrees of maximal mouth-opening increased significantly as compared to UJCT group (P < 0.05), and Friction index were also markedly lower than that in UJCT group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In the patients with ADDw/oR of TMJ, the clinical efficacy of LJCT is superior to that of UJCT, especially in the TMJ pain relief, mouth-opening degree and mandibular movement improvement. PMID:26131189

  19. [Diagnosis and treatment of prosthetic joint infections].

    PubMed

    Laffer, R; Ruef, C

    2006-02-01

    Prosthetic replacement surgery for hip, knee, shoulder, and elbow joints has become commonplace due to the great success of these procedures in restoring function to persons disabled by arthritis. One of the most feared complications is prosthetic joint infection, which is associated with significant morbidity and health care costs. The pathogenesis of prosthetic joint infections is influenced by microorganisms growing in biofilms, making these infections difficult to diagnose and eradicate. Low-grade infections are often manifest as early loosening with or without pain. They are therefore difficult to distinguish from aseptic failure. For an accurate diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections, a combination of preoperative and intraoperative tests is usually needed. Underlying rheumatologic disease can lead to periprosthetic inflammatory changes in tissue. Therefore, only the culture of the microorganism is definitive proof of infection. Successful treatment requires long-term antimicrobial therapy, ideally with an agent acting on adhering stationary-phase microorganisms, combined with an adequate surgical procedure. In this article, the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of prosthetic joint infections are reviewed. We focus on difficult diagnostic aspects in the context of underlying rheumatologic disease. PMID:16421643

  20. Calculation and Visualization of Range of Motion of Hip Joint from MRI

    E-print Network

    Lee, WonSook

    Calculation and Visualization of Range of Motion of Hip Joint from MRI Sahar Aghayan School-Acetabular Impingement (FAI) is a hip joint disease which affects and impairs the range of hip motion during performing segmenting the bones. These tasks are accomplished first by calculating Hip Joint Center (HJC) which

  1. Diagnosing joint pain in the older people.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Shweta; Ostör, Andrew J K

    2010-01-01

    There are many potential causes of joint pain in older patients. The most likely aetiology is OA. However, the differential diagnosis includes conditions which should not be missed such as septic arthritis and inflammatory disease. The pattern of joint involvement points to the diagnosis. Bilateral symmetrical small joint pain, swelling and stiffness should arouse the suspicion of RA. The wrist and knee are commonly affected by pseudogout and the first metatarsophalangeal joint or knee joint involvement may represent gout. Stiffness in the shoulder and hip girdles, worse in the morning, suggests polymyalgia rheumatica. In straightforward cases of OA no specific investigations are required. If doubt exists, however, tests may be necessary including FBC, ESR and CRP, uric acid for suspected gout and X-rays of the affected joints especially following trauma, or pseudogout. Patients with OA should be offered education and advice as well as strengthening exercises and aerobic fitness training (if physically possible). If the patient is overweight, weight loss is critical, especially in OA of the knee. Paracetamol and topical NSAIDs are the first-line drug treatments. Elderly onset RA differs from younger onset RA in the following ways: a more balanced gender distribution; a higher frequency of acute onset; an association with systemic features; more frequent involvement of the shoulder girdle and higher disease activity. DMARD therapy should be used according to disease severity, as in younger onset RA. The current approach is for early, intensive intervention with combination therapy. Corticosteroids may be very effective in the elderly, however, prolonged use and/or high dosage may lead to marked toxicity especially osteoporosis and diabetes. PMID:20198931

  2. Compound solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.; Simonson, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Joining technique prevents contamination, may be used to join dissimilar metal tubes, minimizes fluid and gas entrapment, expedites repairs, and can yield joints having leakage rates less than 0.000001 standard cubic cm He/min. Components of joint are solder sleeve, two solder rings, Teflon sleeve, and tubing to be joined.

  3. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  4. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the place where the sacrum and the iliac bones join. The ... The main purpose of the joint is to connect the spine and the pelvis. As a result, there is very little movement at the SIJ. Major reasons ...

  5. Injecting Joints and Tendons With Steroids

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, Sydney L.

    1983-01-01

    The local intra-articular injection of cortisone compounds is a dependable method for giving patients relief from the pain and swelling of arthritic joints. Injecting the diseased synovium surrounding a joint or tendon sheath or lining a bursa is usually an easy procedure, and the first injection has few contraindications if it is done cautiously. Many clinicians therefore readily embark upon treating patients with steroid injections. However, problems, including post-injection flares, infections and hematomata may begin about 12 hours after an injection. Indications and contraindications for administering injections are therefore discussed, and limitations and precautionary measures are explained. PMID:21283480

  6. Validity of self-reported sleep bruxism among myofascial temporomandibular disorder patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Raphael, K G; Janal, M N; Sirois, D A; Dubrovsky, B; Klausner, J J; Krieger, A C; Lavigne, G J

    2015-10-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB), primarily involving rhythmic grinding of the teeth during sleep, has been advanced as a causal or maintenance factor for a variety of oro-facial problems, including temporomandibular disorders (TMD). As laboratory polysomnographic (PSG) assessment is extremely expensive and time-consuming, most research testing this belief has relied on patient self-report of SB. The current case-control study examined the accuracy of those self-reports relative to laboratory-based PSG assessment of SB in a large sample of women suffering from chronic myofascial TMD (n = 124) and a demographically matched control group without TMD (n = 46). A clinical research coordinator administered a structured questionnaire to assess self-reported SB. Participants then spent two consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Audiovisual and electromyographic data from the second night were scored to assess whether participants met criteria for the presence of 2 or more (2+) rhythmic masticatory muscle activity episodes accompanied by grinding sounds, moderate SB, or severe SB, using previously validated research scoring standards. Contingency tables were constructed to assess positive and negative predictive values, sensitivity and specificity, and 95% confidence intervals surrounding the point estimates. Results showed that self-report significantly predicted 2+ grinding sounds during sleep for TMD cases. However, self-reported SB failed to significantly predict the presence or absence of either moderate or severe SB as assessed by PSG, for both cases and controls. These data show that self-report of tooth grinding awareness is highly unlikely to be a valid indicator of true SB. Studies relying on self-report to assess SB must be viewed with extreme caution. PMID:26010126

  7. Psychosocial aspects of temporomandibular disorders and oral health-related quality-of-life

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Ossi; Lahti, Satu

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between psychosocial aspects of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and oral health-related quality-of-life (OHRQoL) and, secondly, to investigate the gender differences in these associations using patient and non-patient groups. Materials and methods. The sample of the study consisted of 79 patients with TMD and 70 non-patients. The data was collected by Finnish versions of the RDC/TMD Axis II profile and Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaires. The associations between Axis II profile sub-scales and OHIP prevalence were evaluated using chi-square tests, as stratified by group status (TMD patients and non-patient controls) and by gender. The association between OHIP prevalence and Axis II profile sub-scales were evaluated using logistic regression analysis, adjusted by age, gender and group. Results. OHIP prevalence (those reporting at least one problem) was 90.9% in the patient group and 33.3% in the non-patient group (p < 0.001, chi-squared test). OHIP prevalence was higher among those scoring higher on all RDC/TMD Axis II profile sub-scales, i.e. graded chronic pain status, depression and non-specific physical symptoms with pain items included and with pain items excluded. The associations were significant in the non-patient group. Women showed statistically significant associations of OHIP prevalence with all Axis II sub-scales. Among men, OHIP prevalence associated with GCPS and somatization. The logistic regression analysis showed that OHIP prevalence associated significantly with somatization and depression. Conclusions. TMD associate with OHRQoL through multiple ways, linked with depression and somatization. These findings emphasize the importance of early and effective treatment of TMD. PMID:22300221

  8. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-21

    Joint Aerosol Product (JOINT_AS) The MISR Level 3 Products are global or regional ... field campaigns at daily and monthly time scales. The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR ...

  9. Masticatory muscle activity during maximum voluntary clench in different research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) groups.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Moreira Rodrigues da Silva, Marco Antonio; Bottini, Stefano; Sforza, Chiarella; Ferrario, Virgilio F

    2008-10-01

    The research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) are used for the classification of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Surface electromyography of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching in 103 TMD patients subdivided according to the RDC/TMD into 3 non-overlapping groups: (a) 25 myogenous; (b) 61 arthrogenous; and (c) 17 psycogenous patients. Thirty-two control subjects matched for sex and age were also measured. During clenching, standardized total muscle activities (electromyographic potentials over time) significantly differed: 131.7 microV/muVs % in the normal subjects, 117.6 microV/microVs % in the myogenous patients, 105.3 microV/microVs % in the arthrogenous patients, 88.7 microV/microVs % in the psycogenous patients (p<0.001, analysis of covariance). Symmetry in the temporalis muscles was larger in normal subjects (86.3%) and in myogenous patients (84.9%) than in arthrogenous (82.7%), and psycogenous patients (80.5%) (p=0.041). No differences were found for masseter muscle symmetry and torque coefficient (p>0.05). Surface electromyography of the masticatory muscles allowed an objective discrimination among different RDC/TMD subgroups. This evaluation could assist conventional clinical assessments. PMID:17643338

  10. Topical review-connective tissue diseases: orofacial manifestations including pain.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Epstein, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This topical review presents an overview of orofacial manifestations associated with the more common connective tissue diseases affecting multiple organs. The orofacial manifestations associated with these autoimmune disorders include oral mucosa alterations, salivary gland pathosis, sensory neuropathies, headaches, and temporomandibular disorders. Since many of these orofacial manifestations may be painful, the practitioner managing pain patients should be familiar with them. An understanding of the orofacial manifestations associated with these systemic diseases will enable the pain practitioner to establish an appropriate diagnosis within the context of the underlying systemic disease. This will allow the practitioner the opportunity to contribute and collaborate as a member of a multidisciplinary health-care team in the management of these systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:17717956

  11. Pressure vessel flex joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An airtight, flexible joint is disclosed for the interfacing of two pressure vessels such as between the Space Station docking tunnel and the Space Shuttle Orbiter bulkhead adapter. The joint provides for flexibility while still retaining a structural link between the two vessels required due to the loading created by the internal/external pressure differential. The joint design provides for limiting the axial load carried across the joint to a specific value, a function returned in the Orbiter/Station tunnel interface. The flex joint comprises a floating structural segment which is permanently attached to one of the pressure vessels through the use of an inflatable seal. The geometric configuration of the joint causes the tension between the vessels created by the internal gas pressure to compress the inflatable seal. The inflation pressure of the seal is kept at a value above the internal/external pressure differential of the vessels in order to maintain a controlled distance between the floating segment and pressure vessel. The inflatable seal consists of either a hollow torus-shaped flexible bladder or two rolling convoluted diaphragm seals which may be reinforced by a system of straps or fabric anchored to the hard structures. The joint acts as a flexible link to allow both angular motion and lateral displacement while it still contains the internal pressure and holds the axial tension between the vessels.

  12. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  13. Role of viscosupplementation in osteo-arthritis of knee joint.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rajesh; Mahajan, Sumit

    2013-05-01

    Osteo-arthritis is the chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It is caused by 'wear and tear' on a joint. Knee is the most commonly Involved joint. Disease is so crippling that patient is unable to walk independently from bed to bathroom. The major causes of osteo-arthritis are age, gender, obesity, medical condition and hereditary. The signs and symptoms of osteo-arthritis are pain, joint stiffness, joint swelling, and loss of function. No blood tests are helpful in diagnosing osteo-arthritis. Management of osteo-arthritis includes non-pharmacological, pharmacological and surgical. A relatively new procedure is viscosupplementation, in which a preparation of hyaluronic acid is injected into the knee joint. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring substance found in the synovial fluid. It acts as a lubricant to enable bones to move smoothly over each other and a shock absorber for joint loads. The decrease in the elastic and viscous properties of synovial fluid in osteo-arthritis results from both a reduced molecular size and a reduced concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid. Viscosupplementation may be a therapeutic option for individuals with osteo-arthritis of the knee. Viscosupplementation has been shown to relieve pain in many patients who cannot get relief from non-medicinal measures or analgesic drugs. This article is to know the mechanism of action, patients' selection criteria, rationale and efficacy of viscosupplimentation in the management of osteo-arthritis of knee. PMID:24765695

  14. Identification of inflammation sites in arthritic joints using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Milanic, Matija; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Grandaunet, Berit; Dhainaut, Alvilde; Hoff, Mari; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritic diseases have prevalence between 2 and 3% and may lead to joint destruction and deformation resulting in a loss of function. Patient's quality of life is often severely affected as the disease attacks hands and finger joints. Pathology involved in arthritis includes angiogenesis, hyper-vascularization, hyper-metabolism and relative hypoxia. We have employed hyperspectral imaging to study the hemodynamics of affected- and non-affected joints and tissue. Two hyperspectral, push-broom cameras were used (VNIR-1600, SWIR-320i, Norsk Elektro Optikk AS, Norway). Optical spectra (400nm - 1700nm) of high spectral resolution were collected from 15 patients with visible symptoms of arthritic rheumatic diseases in at least one joint. The control group consisted of 10 healthy individuals. Concentrations of dominant chromophores were calculated based on analytical calculations of light transport in tissue. Image processing was used to analyze hyperspectral data and retrieve information, e.g. blood concentration and tissue oxygenation maps. The obtained results indicate that hyperspectral imaging can be used to quantify changes within affected joints and surrounding tissue. Further improvement of this method will have positive impact on diagnosis of arthritic joints at an early stage. Moreover it will enable development of fast, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic tool of arthritic joints

  15. Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Malinda Carpenter

    E-print Network

    Carpenter, M.alinda

    Just How Joint Is Joint Action in Infancy? Malinda Carpenter Department of Developmental 2008; received in revised form 19 December 2008; accepted 20 January 2009 Abstract Joint action is central to countless aspects of human life. Here I examine the roots of joint action in infancy. First, I

  16. Joint Purchasing Consortium forms New Joint Procurement Committee

    E-print Network

    Victoria, University of

    Joint Purchasing Consortium forms New Joint Procurement Committee A new committee comprised of VPs the Consortium for a two year term. The Joint Procurement Committee members include: VP, Finance will be working on roles, responsibilities, and governance and implementation of the Wave 1 joint procurement

  17. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  18. Knee joint replacement - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ok to start again. People who have a prosthesis, such as an artificial joint, need to carefully ... in your wallet that says you have a prosthesis. You will need to take antibiotics before any ...

  19. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  20. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  1. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  2. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  3. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351 Transportation...at Track Classes 6 and Higher § 213.351 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint...

  4. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

    1993-11-30

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

  5. High pressure ceramic joint

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  6. COMT Diplotype Amplifies Effect of Stress on Risk of Temporomandibular Pain.

    PubMed

    Slade, G D; Sanders, A E; Ohrbach, R; Bair, E; Maixner, W; Greenspan, J D; Fillingim, R B; Smith, S; Diatchenko, L

    2015-09-01

    When measured once, psychological stress predicts development of painful temporomandibular disorder (TMD). However, a single measurement fails to characterize the dynamic nature of stress over time. Moreover, effects of stress on pain likely vary according to biological susceptibility. We hypothesized that temporal escalation in stress exacerbates risk for TMD, and the effect is amplified by allelic variants in a gene, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), regulating catechol neurotransmitter catabolism. We used data from the Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment prospective cohort study of 2,707 community-dwelling adults with no lifetime history of TMD on enrollment. At baseline and quarterly periods thereafter, the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) measured psychological stress. Genotyped DNA from blood samples determined COMT diplotypes. During follow-up of 0.25 to 5.2 y, 248 adults developed examiner-verified incident TMD. PSS scores at baseline were 20% greater (P < 0.001) in adults who developed incident TMD compared with TMD-free controls. Baseline PSS scores increased by 9% (P = 0.003) during follow-up in cases but remained stable in controls. This stress escalation was limited to incident cases with COMT diplotypes coding for low-activity COMT, signifying impaired catabolism of catecholamines. Cox regression models confirmed significant effects on TMD hazard of both baseline PSS (P < 0.001), modeled as a time-constant covariate, and change in PSS (P < 0.001), modeled as a time-varying covariate. Furthermore, a significant (P = 0.04) interaction of COMT diplotype and time-varying stress showed that a postbaseline increase of 1.0 standard deviation in PSS more than doubled risk of TMD incidence in subjects with low-activity COMT diplotypes (hazard ratio = 2.35; 95% confidence limits: 1.66, 3.32), an effect not found in subjects with high-activity COMT diplotypes (hazard ratio = 1.42; 95% confidence limits: 0.96, 2.09). Findings provide novel insights into dynamic effects of psychological stress on TMD pain, highlighting that effects are most pronounced in individuals whose genetic susceptibility increases responsiveness to catecholamine neurotransmitters. PMID:26198390

  7. Dissimilar metals joint evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Dissimilar metals tubular joints between 2219-T851 aluminum alloy and 304L stainless steel were fabricated and tested to evaluate bonding processes. Joints were fabricated by four processes: (1) inertia (friction) weldings, where the metals are spun and forced together to create the weld; (2) explosive welding, where the metals are impacted together at high velocity; (3) co-extrusion, where the metals are extruded in contact at high temperature to promote diffusion; and (4) swaging, where residual stresses in the metals after a stretching operation maintain forced contact in mutual shear areas. Fifteen joints of each type were prepared and evaluated in a 6.35 cm (2.50 in.) O.D. size, with 0.32 cm (0.13 in.) wall thickness, and 7.6 cm (3.0 in) total length. The joints were tested to evaluate their ability to withstand pressure cycle, thermal cycle, galvanic corrosion and burst tests. Leakage tests and other non-destructive test techniques were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints, and the microstructure of the bond areas was analyzed.

  8. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pascal; Szadek, Karolina; Cohen, Steven P; De Witte, Jan; Lataster, Arno; Patijn, Jacob; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower limb(s). Because sacroiliac joint pain is difficult to distinguish from other forms of low back pain based on history, different provocative maneuvers have been advocated. Individually, they have weak predictive value, but combined batteries of tests can help ascertain a diagnosis. Radiological imaging is important to exclude "red flags" but contributes little in the diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks are the diagnostic gold standard but must be interpreted with caution, because false-positive as well as false-negative results occur frequently. Treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is best performed in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Conservative treatments address the underlying causes (posture and gait disturbances) and consist of exercise therapy and manipulation. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint infiltrations with local anesthetic and corticosteroids hold the highest evidence rating (1 B+). If the latter fail or produce only short-term effects, cooled radiofrequency treatment of the lateral branches of S1 to S3 (S4) is recommended (2 B+) if available. When this procedure cannot be used, (pulsed) radiofrequency procedures targeted at L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of S1 to S3 may be considered (2 C+). PMID:20667026

  9. [Perspectives of selective laboratory screening in children with joint pathology].

    PubMed

    Pychkova, T A; Taloverova, L I

    2014-01-01

    The article highlights the problematic issues of the laboratory diagnostic possibilities in children with joint pathology with moden tests (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and antibodies to mutated citrullinated vimentin). The expediency and effectiveness of the proposed laboratory tests is justified for improvement of the early differential diagnosis, joint pathology treatment optimization, and discuss the prospect of selective laboratory screening in families burdened by rheumatic diseases genealogy. PMID:25796875

  10. Influence of anxiety on temporomandibular disorders--an epidemiological survey with elders and adults in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Boscato, N; Almeida, R C; Koller, C D; Presta, A A; Goettems, M L

    2013-09-01

    The socio-economic and psychological factors and the use of and need for dental prostheses have been associated with prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of socio-economic and psychological factors, use of and need for dental prostheses with the prevalence and severity of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A cross-sectional study was conducted in Luzerna/Brazil. All individuals aged 35-44 (adults) and 65-74 (elders) were invited to participate in this study. The measuring instrument included a questionnaire application and the clinical evaluation regarding signs and symptoms of TMD. Descriptive analyses, chi-squared test, unadjusted and adjusted Poisson regression were used for the statistic analysis. The level of statistical significance was given when P ? 0·05. In total, 568 individuals (338 adults and 230 elders) were included; among them, 43·5% had absent, 42·6% mild, 11·3% moderate and 2·6% severe TMD. The presence of higher TMD rates was found in females (P = 0·001), and the TMD occurrence increased with anxiety level (P = 0·001). Other socio-economic factors, such as colour (P = 0·115), family structure (P = 0·478), age (P = 0·143), social class (P = 0·935) and education (P = 0·678) showed no influence. In conclusion, the female gender and individuals with higher levels of anxiety had increased prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD. Additionally, was not founded association between TMD and use of and need for dental prostheses. PMID:23782389

  11. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  12. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  13. Application of an oral health-related quality of life questionnaire in primary care patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; González-López, Laura; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether patients who report orofacial pain (OP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have a poorer perception of their oral health-related quality of life and, if so, to what extent, and to analyze the association between oral health perception, sociodemographic variables and reported pain duration. Study Design: 407 patients treated at the OP and TMD units in the Healthcare District of Cordoba, Spain, diagnosed following the standard criteria accepted by the scientific community – the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) – were administered the Spanish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the degree of association between the patients’ OHIP-14 score and pain duration, pain intensity, and various sociodemographic variables. Results: The observed distribution was 89.4% women and 10.6% men. The mean OHIP-14 score was 20.57 ± 10.73 (mean ± standard deviation). A significant association (p<0.05) was found for gender, age, marital status, chronic pain grade, self-perceived oral health status and pain duration. Conclusions: The analysis of self-perceived oral health status in patients with OP and TMD, as measured by the OHIP-14, showed that oral health is perceived more negatively by women. Moreover, a one-point increase in the Chronic Pain Grade indicator increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 4.6 points, while chronic pain, defined as pain suffered by patients for one year or more, increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 3.2 points. Key words:Orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, Oral Health Impact Profile, sociodemographic variables, primary care, Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). PMID:24121906

  14. Effect of mandibular mobilization on electromyographic signals in muscles of mastication and static balance in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stomatognathic system and dysfunction in this system may be related to postural control. The proposal of the present study is to assess the effect of mandibular mobilization in individuals with temporomandibular disorder using surface electromyography of the muscles of mastication and stabilometric variables. Methods/Design A randomized, controlled, blind, clinical trial will be carried out, with the participants divided into three groups: 1) facial massage therapy (control group), 2) nonspecific mandibular mobilization and 3) specific mandibular mobilization. All groups will be assessed before and after treatment using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, surface electromyography of the masseter and temporal muscles and stabilometry. This study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (RBR9x8ssz). Discussion A large number of studies have employed surface electromyography to investigate the function/dysfunction of the muscles of mastication and associations with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. However, it has not yet been determined whether stabilometric variables offer adequate reliability in patients with this disorder. The results of the proposed study will help determine whether specific and/or nonspecific mandibular mobilization exerts an effect on the muscles of mastication and postural control. Moreover, if an effect is detected, the methodology defined in the proposed study will allow identifying whether the effect is local (found only in the muscles of mastication), global (found only in postural control) or generalized. PMID:24083628

  15. Johnson & Goodman Jointly Poisson Processes Jointly Poisson processes

    E-print Network

    Johnson & Goodman Jointly Poisson Processes Jointly Poisson processes Don H. Johnson and Ilan N. Goodman Electrical & Computer Engineering Department, MS380 Rice University Houston, Texas 77005­1892 {dhj for Gaussian 1 November 12, 2009 #12;Johnson & Goodman Jointly Poisson Processes random variables. A set

  16. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  17. Realignment Subtalar Joint Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Hentges, Matthew J; Gesheff, Martin G; Lamm, Bradley M

    2016-01-01

    Subtalar joint arthrodesis is a commonly performed procedure for the correction of hindfoot deformity and/or the relief of pain related to osteoarthritis. The purpose of the present study was to provide preoperative and intraoperative objective radiographic parameters to improve the accuracy and long-term success of realignment arthrodesis of the subtalar joint. We retrospectively reviewed the data from 16 patients, 11 male (57.9%) and 8 female (42.1%) feet, who had undergone realignment subtalar joint arthrodesis. A total of 19 fusions were performed in 9 (47.4%) right and 10 (52.6%) left feet, with a mean follow-up period of 2 (range 1 to 4.8) years. The mean age at surgery was 54.5 (range 14 to 77) years. Statistically significant improvement in radiographic alignment was found in the anteroposterior talo-first metatarsal angle (p = .002), lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (p < .001), tibial-calcaneal angle (p < .001), and tibial-calcaneal distance (p < .001). A positive correlation was observed between the tibial-calcaneal angle and tibial-calcaneal distance (r = 0.825, p < .001). The statistically significant improvement in tibial-calcaneal alignment, in both angulation and distance, support our conclusions that proper realignment of the calcaneus to vertical and central under the tibia will lead to short-term success and, likely, long-term success of subtalar joint arthrodesis. PMID:26028600

  18. Shoulder Joint For Protective Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Smallcombe, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Shoulder joint allows full range of natural motion: wearer senses little or no resisting force or torque. Developed for space suit, joint offers advantages in protective garments for underwater work, firefighting, or cleanup of hazardous materials.

  19. Joint Institute Marine and Atmospheric

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research NATIONALOCEA NIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Contribution 00-328 #12;ii This research is funded by Cooperative Agreement Number NA67RJ0154 between the Joint

  20. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  1. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  2. Independent and joint effect of type 2 diabetes and gastric and hepatobiliary diseases on risk of pancreatic cancer risk: 10-year follow-up of population-based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C-C; Chiang, J-H; Li, C-I; Hsieh, T-F; Liu, C-S; Lin, W-Y; Lee, Y-D; Li, T-C

    2014-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus, gastric and hepatobiliary comorbidities, and cancer share common risk factors: for example, tobacco, obesity, physical inactivity, high calorie intake, and metabolic disorders. Prior studies find type 2 diabetes and gastric and hepatobiliary comorbidities heightening risk of pancreatic cancer. Yet joint association of type 2 diabetes mellitus and gastric and hepatobiliary comorbidities on pancreatic cancer risk has not been assessed. Methods: This study rates independent/joint effects of type 2 diabetes as well as gastric and hepatobiliary comorbidity on pancreatic cancer risk for a retrospective population-based cohort of 166?850 type 2 diabetics identified in 1997–1998 and followed for 10–11 years, comparing their cancer incidence with that of 166?850 non-diabetics matched for age, gender, and locale. Time-dependent Cox's proportional hazards model evaluted joint association of type 2 diabetes and chronic conditions on pancreatic cancer risk. Results: A total of 1178 subjects were newly diagnosed with pancreatic cancer during follow-up, with incidence rates of 0.49 per 1000 person-years in type 2 diabetes and 0.26 per 1000 person-years in the non-diabetics. We observed greater magnitude of hazard ratios (HRs) of pancreatic cancer for patients with type 2 diabetes along with acute alcoholic hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and gastric ulcer compared with patients without type 2 diabetes or counterpart comorbidity (HR: 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19–1.56; 1.74, 1.23–2.45; 9.18, 7.44–11.33; and 2.31, 1.98–2.70, respectively). Main effects of type 2 diabetes were all statistically with narrow 95% CI and remained similar across risk stratification with various comorbidities: range 1.59–1.80. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that pre-existing type 2 diabetes, acute alcoholic hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and gastric ulcer independently or jointly predict subsequent pancreatic cancer risk. Clinicians must recognise burden of these gastric and hepatobiliary comorbidities and keep clinically vigilant for their diagnosis. PMID:25275365

  3. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F. (Albuquerque, NM); Benavides, Gilbert L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  4. JOINT PERFORMANCE Guide for Optimum

    E-print Network

    July 2012 JOINT PERFORMANCE Guide for Optimum of Concrete Pavements #12; #12;Guide for Optimum Joint Performance of Concrete Pavements i Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2. Report Date Guide for Optimum Joint Performance of Concrete Pavements July 2012 6. Performing

  5. Phase 1 Program Joint Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

  6. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

  7. STUDY OF WATERBORNE DISEASE OCCURRENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SDWA Amendments of 1996 added a requirement for EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to jointly carry out "pilot waterborne disease occurrence studies for at least five major U.S. communities or public water systems" and "prepare a report on the findin...

  8. Mechanical analysis on individualized finite element of temporal-mandibular joint under overlarge jaw opening status

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Yang, Jianjun; Zhou, Ruizhi; Li, Ningyi; Xia, Junnan; Gu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Analyze the stress status of temporal-mandibular joint (TMJ) of a healthy volunteer under the overlarge jaw opening status through the finite element method, with the purpose of clarifying the loading features of each structure in the joint area, and achieving further understanding of the pathogenesis of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Methods: Collect the CBCT and MRI data of a volunteer respectively under the maximum jaw opening, establish the finite element model (FEM) of TMJ under the maximum jaw opening status through a series of software, image segmentation, rectification, meshing, material evaluation and other related processing, simulate the mechanical environment of this joint area under this status, and analyze the stress status of the articular disc, condyle cartilage, and condyle process. Results: Based on CT and MRI image data, build 3D model and FEM of TMJ, fully simulate the mechanical environment under the large jaw opening status, and calculate the stress value of the articular disc, condyle process and condylar cartilage. Conclusions: This research result reminds us that the normal people’s articular disc are easy to generate stress concentration under large jaw opening, but its stress is far less than the one under the tight biting status. Perhaps the TMJ symptom induced under the large jaw opening status is mainly caused by the displacement of the articular disc. Under the large jaw opening status, the condylar cartilage plays a vital role in dispersing the stress. This method can be applied for carrying out individualized mechanical analysis on the patients with TMD. PMID:26309558

  9. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-coated fibers had a 0/90{degree} architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  10. Surgical treatment of trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    TACCARDO, GIUSEPPE; DE VITIS, ROCCO; PARRONE, GIUSEPPE; MILANO, GIUSEPPE; FANFANI, FRANCESCO

    2013-01-01

    Trapeziometacarpal joint osteoarthritis is a common cause of radial-sided wrist pain that prevalently affects women. It is diagnosed on the basis of a thorough history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation. While radiographs are used to determine the stage of disease, treatment is dependent on the severity of the symptoms. Non-surgical treatment frequently consists of activity modification, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, splinting and corticosteroid injections. After failure of conservative treatment, various surgical options exist depending on the stage of the disease. These options range from ligament reconstruction or osteotomy, for early painful laxity, to trapeziectomy, arthrodesis and arthroplasty for more severe osteoarthritis. This article reviews the literature supporting the various surgical treatment options and analyzes the surgical techniques most frequently used in the different disease stages. PMID:25606524

  11. RBPj?-dependent Notch signaling is required for articular cartilage and joint maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mirando, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhaoyang; Moore, Tyler; Lang, Alexandra; Kohn, Anat; Osinski, Alana M.; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Mooney, Robert A.; Zuscik, Michael J.; Hilton, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease resulting in severe joint cartilage destruction and disability. While the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of OA are poorly understood, gene mutations have been identified within cartilage-related signaling molecules implicating impaired cell signaling in OA and joint disease. The Notch pathway has recently been identified as a crucial regulator of growth plate cartilage development and components are expressed in joint tissues. Therefore, we set out to investigate a novel role for Notch signaling in joint cartilage development, maintenance, and the pathogenesis of joint disease. Methods We performed the first mouse genetic studies in which the core Notch signaling component, RBPj?, was tissue-specifically deleted within joints. The Prx1Cre transgene removed Rbpj? floxed alleles in mesenchymal joint precursor cells, while the Col2CreERT2 transgene specifically deleted Rbpj? in postnatal chondrocytes. Articular chondrocyte cultures were also utilized to examine Notch regulation of gene expression. Results Loss of Notch signaling in mesenchymal joint precursor cells does not affect embryonic joint development, but rather results in an early, progressive OA-like pathology. Additionally, partial loss of Notch signaling in postnatal cartilage results in progressive joint cartilage degeneration and an age-related OA-like pathology. Inhibition of Notch signaling alters expression of the ECM-related factors: COL2A1, PRG4, COL10A1, MMP13, and ADAMTSs. Conclusions These data have identified the RBPj?-dependent Notch pathway as: 1) a novel pathway involved in joint maintenance and articular cartilage homeostasis, 2) a critical regulator of articular cartilage ECM-related molecules, and 3) a potentially important therapeutic target for OA-like joint disease. PMID:23839930

  12. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  13. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  14. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  15. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  16. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  17. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  18. 17 CFR 300.105 - Joint accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint accounts. 300.105... Customers of Sipc Members § 300.105 Joint accounts. (a) A joint account shall be deemed to be a “qualifying joint account” if it is owned jointly, whether by the owners thereof as joint tenants with the right...

  19. 49 CFR 213.351 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.351 Section 213.351... Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions for the rail on which it is applied. (b) If a joint bar is cracked,...

  20. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  1. Finger joint injuries.

    PubMed

    Prucz, Roni B; Friedrich, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Finger joint dislocations and collateral ligament tears are common athletic hand injuries. Treatment of the athlete requires a focus on safe return to play and maximizing function. Certain dislocations, such as proximal interphalangeal and distal interphalangeal volar dislocations, may be associated with tendon injuries and must be treated accordingly. Treatment of other dislocations is ultimately determined by postreduction stability, with many dislocations amenable to nonoperative treatment (ie, immobilization followed by rehabilitation). Protective splinting does not necessarily preclude athletic participation. Minor bone involvement typically does not affect the treatment plan, but significant articular surface involvement may necessitate surgical repair or stabilization. Percutaneous and internal fixation are the mainstays of surgical treatment. Treatment options that do not minimize recovery or allow the patient to return to protected play, such as external fixation, are generally avoided during the season of play. Undertreated joint injuries and unrecognized ligament injuries can result in long term disability. PMID:25455398

  2. Achieving joint benefits from joint implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Moomaw, W.R.

    1995-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) appears to have been born with Applied Energy Services Guatemala project in 1988. That project, to plant 52 million trees, protect existing forests from cutting and fire, and enhance rural development, is being implemented by CARE Guatemala to offset 120 per cent of the emissions of a small coal burning power plant that has been built in Connecticut. Since that time, several utilities and governments have initiated additional projects. Not all of these necessarily consist of tree planting in other countries, but may consist of energy efficiency or energy conservation programs designed to reduce carbon emissions by at least as much as the additional releases from a new facility. All JI projects share the characteristic of linking the release of greenhouse gases in an industrial country with an offset that reduces or absorbs a comparable amount in another country. The emitter in the industrial country is willing to pay for the reduction elsewhere because costs are less than they would be at home.

  3. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  4. Formation of tough composite joints

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, M.K.

    1998-12-01

    Joints that exhibited tough fracture behavior were formed in a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure were proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) had to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength, by changing the fiber coating, significantly increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the joints. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints should permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses.

  5. Prosthetic elbow joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weddendorf, Bruce C. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An artificial, manually positionable elbow joint for use in an upper extremity, above-elbow, prosthetic is described. The prosthesis provides a locking feature that is easily controlled by the wearer. The instant elbow joint is very strong and durable enough to withstand the repeated heavy loadings encountered by a wearer who works in an industrial, construction, farming, or similar environment. The elbow joint of the present invention comprises a turntable, a frame, a forearm, and a locking assembly. The frame generally includes a housing for the locking assembly and two protruding ears. The forearm includes an elongated beam having a cup-shaped cylindrical member at one end and a locking wheel having a plurality of holes along a circular arc on its other end with a central bore for pivotal attachment to the protruding ears of the frame. The locking assembly includes a collar having a central opening with a plurality of internal grooves, a plurality of internal cam members each having a chamfered surface at one end and a V-shaped slot at its other end; an elongated locking pin having a crown wheel with cam surfaces and locking lugs secured thereto; two coiled compression springs; and a flexible filament attached to one end of the elongated locking pin and extending from the locking assembly for extending and retracting the locking pin into the holes in the locking wheel to permit selective adjustment of the forearm relative to the frame. In use, the turntable is affixed to the upper arm part of the prosthetic in the conventional manner, and the cup-shaped cylindrical member on one end of the forearm is affixed to the forearm piece of the prosthetic in the conventional manner. The elbow joint is easily adjusted and locked between maximum flex and extended positions.

  6. [The value of mandibular kinesiography and of T-scanning in the diagnosis and treatment of algo-dysfunctional syndrome of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Combadazou, J C; Combelles, R; Cadenat, H

    1990-01-01

    The application of T-Scan and kinesiographic techniques in combination with electromyography is of great value to the clinician for substantiating certain clinically hard-to-evidence factors, such as chronology and strength of contact points, muscular activity, or certain mandibular movements. The utilisation of these methods is of benefit for diagnosis, treatment and objective patient follow-up. PMID:2309097

  7. Orthopaedic manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Beredjiklian, P K; Drummond, D S; Dormans, J P; Davidson, R S; Brock, G T; August, C

    1998-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-recognized complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Musculoskeletal manifestations include joint contractures, polymyositis, polyserositis, and fasciitis. We present 14 patients with orthopaedic complications of chronic GVHD. Long-term conservative management of joint contractures with physical therapy and orthotics was generally successful in restoring patients' premorbid functional status. Surgical release of joint contractures yielded poor results and rendered the affected joints unresponsive to further conservative treatment. Surgical intervention in the treatment of joint contractures resulting from chronic GVHD does not appear qualitatively to improve functional status in patients affected with this disease process. PMID:9746402

  8. Influence of Meniscectomy and Meniscus Replacement on the Stress Distribution in Human Knee Joint

    E-print Network

    Vaziri, Ashkan

    Influence of Meniscectomy and Meniscus Replacement on the Stress Distribution in Human Knee Joint long been associated with mechanical insult.26­28,59 Analysis of the stress distribution in human knee of the knee joint has direct implications in understanding the state of human health and disease and can aid

  9. Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetics Nematollah K. Batmanghelich1

    E-print Network

    Golland, Polina

    Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetics Nematollah K. Batmanghelich1 , Adrian V. Dalca1 , Mert R,adalca,msabuncu,polina}@csail.mit.edu Abstract. We propose a unified Bayesian framework for detecting genetic variants associated with a disease while exploiting image-based features as an intermediate phenotype. Traditionally, imaging genetics

  10. Modeling Disease Progression With Longitudinal Markers

    E-print Network

    Morrell, Christopher H.

    Modeling Disease Progression With Longitudinal Markers Lurdes Y. T. INOUE, Ruth ETZIONI, Christopher MORRELL, and Peter MÜLLER In this article we propose a Bayesian natural history model for disease progression based on the joint modeling of longitudinal biomarker levels, age at clinical detection of disease

  11. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  12. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, J.V.; Novak, R.F.; McBride, J.R.

    1991-08-27

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system. 11 figures.

  13. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  14. Osteoarthritis: The Peripheral Joints

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Harold S.

    1981-01-01

    Understanding of osteoarthritis has increased: the simplistic “wear and tear” concept no longer holds and this has positive clinical implications. A parallel development has taken place in treatment techniques: there is increasing expertise in the use of physical measures and in new orthopedic reconstructive surgical approaches to multiple joints. This gives the physician alternative approaches to the patient with painful and disabling osteoarthritis. The timing of these treatment options and some considerations which lead to orthopedic referral are considered in this general discussion. Imagesp285-aFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:20469342

  15. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  16. Pests and Diseases 1 Exotic longhorn beetle

    E-print Network

    in Malaysia. The symposium title, Biological Invasions of Forest Insect Pests - Agents of Global Change-ordinator of a session on the biology of quarantine pests and diseases and a joint paper by Joan Webber and Clive Brasier

  17. Radiologic atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an ''atlas of rheumatic joint disease'' selected from 20 years of personal experience by the author. The author sets a goal of demonstrating the value of soft-tissue imaging in the diagnosis of early joint disease. This goal is achieved with high quality reproductions, many of which are presented in duplicate to illustrate bone and soft-tissue changes. The contents include an introductory overview of the ''Mosaic of Arthritis'' followed by sections on adult rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative spondyloarthropathies, classic collagen disease, enthesiopathies, and lastly a section on gout and psuedogout. The subject index is specific and indexes figures with boldface type. Each section is introduced by a brief outline or overview of the radiographic spectrum of the joint disorder to be illustrated.

  18. [Lesions of the radio-carpal joint in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and its surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Herasymenko, S I; Babko, A M

    2014-08-01

    Affection of radio-carpal joint is most frequently revealed in patients, suffering rheumatoid arthritis. While the disease progressing in almost 75% of patients the inflammatory changes in radio-carpal joint occur. An acute and chronic synovitis, damage of a cartilage constitute a cause of a typical erosion of bones inside a joint, weakening of a tendo-ligamentous apparatus and its further deformity. Operative treatment was aimed for the inflammatory focus elimination, reduction of the pain syndrome severity, the function loss, and the joint deformity correction. The mostly used operative interventions are tenoectomy, synovectomy, arthrodesis, total endoprosthesis. PMID:25417294

  19. Joint custody: solution or illusion?

    PubMed

    Benedek, E P; Benedek, R S

    1979-12-01

    Although the phrase "joint custody" is in popular use, the concept lacks standard definitin; parents who express interest in this form of disposition have widely differing objectives and expectations. The authors discuss the need for determining the primary objectives of the parties involved and for exploring the potential for achieving these through joint custody as well as through other alternatives. They examine the benefits of joint custody as well as the risks engendered by this type of arrangement and make a number of specific recommendations. They conclude that joint custody should be considered and explored, together with other available alternatives, and awarded only in appropriate cases. PMID:507203

  20. Disorders of the sacroiliac joint.

    PubMed

    Sizer, Phillip S; Phelps, Valerie; Thompsen, Kirk

    2002-03-01

    Controversies have surrounded the sacroiliac joint. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a considerably complex and strong joint with limited mobility, mechanically serving as a force transducer and a shock absorber. Anatomical changes are seen in the SIJ throughout an individual's lifetime. The ligamentous system associated with the SIJ serves to enhance stability and offer proprioceptive feedback in context with the rich plexus of articular receptors. Stability in the SIJ is related to form and force closure. Movement in the SIJ is 3-D about an axis outside of the joint. The functional examination of the SIJ is related to a clinical triad. PMID:17134467

  1. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  2. Three groups in the 28 joints for rheumatoid arthritis synovitis--analysis using more than 17,000 assessments in the KURAMA database.

    PubMed

    Terao, Chikashi; Hashimoto, Motomu; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Murakami, Kosaku; Ohmura, Koichiro; Nakashima, Ran; Yamakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Kawabata, Daisuke; Usui, Takashi; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Furu, Moritoshi; Yamada, Ryo; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Ito, Hiromu; Fujii, Takao; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a joint-destructive autoimmune disease. Three composite indices evaluating the same 28 joints are commonly used for the evaluation of RA activity. However, the relationship between, and the frequency of, the joint involvements are still not fully understood. Here, we obtained and analyzed 17,311 assessments for 28 joints in 1,314 patients with RA from 2005 to 2011 from electronic clinical chart templates stored in the KURAMA (Kyoto University Rheumatoid Arthritis Management Alliance) database. Affected rates for swelling and tenderness were assessed for each of the 28 joints and compared between two different sets of RA patients. Correlations of joint symptoms were analyzed for swellings and tenderness using kappa coefficient and eigen vectors by principal component analysis. As a result, we found that joint affected rates greatly varied from joint to joint both for tenderness and swelling for the two sets. Right wrist joint is the most affected joint of the 28 joints. Tenderness and swellings are well correlated in the same joints except for the shoulder joints. Patients with RA tended to demonstrate right-dominant joint involvement and joint destruction. We also found that RA synovitis could be classified into three categories of joints in the correlation analyses: large joints with wrist joints, PIP joints, and MCP joints. Clustering analysis based on distribution of synovitis revealed that patients with RA could be classified into six subgroups. We confirmed the symmetric joint involvement in RA. Our results suggested that RA synovitis can be classified into subgroups and that several different mechanisms may underlie the pathophysiology in RA synovitis. PMID:23555018

  3. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  4. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  5. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  6. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  7. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  8. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  9. 37 CFR 1.45 - Joint inventors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint inventors. 1.45 Section... Patent § 1.45 Joint inventors. (a) Joint inventors must apply for a patent jointly and each must make the... joint application under 35 U.S.C. 116. If multiple inventors are named in a provisional...

  10. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  11. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  12. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  13. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  14. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  15. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  16. 20 CFR 410.645 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint hearings. 410.645 Section 410.645..., Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.645 Joint hearings. When two or more hearings... joint hearing, a joint hearing may not be held. Where joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  17. 49 CFR 213.121 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rail joints. 213.121 Section 213.121..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRACK SAFETY STANDARDS Track Structure § 213.121 Rail joints. (a) Each rail joint, insulated joint, and compromise joint shall be of a structurally sound design and dimensions...

  18. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  19. 14 CFR 27.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shafting joints. 27.935 Section 27.935... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 27.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation must...

  20. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  1. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by signing as joint applicants. (b) If an application for certificate is made by...

  2. 14 CFR 29.935 - Shafting joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shafting joints. 29.935 Section 29.935... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Rotor Drive System § 29.935 Shafting joints. Each universal joint, slip joint, and other shafting joints whose lubrication is necessary for operation...

  3. Association between friction and wear in diarthrodial joints lacking lubricin

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Gregory D; Torres, Jahn R; Rhee, David K; Helminen, Heikki J; Hytinnen, Mika M; Cha, Chung-Ja; Elsaid, Khaled; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Cui, Yajun; Warman, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The glycoprotein lubricin (encoded by the gene Prg4) is secreted by surface chondrocytes and synovial cells, and has been shown to reduce friction in vitro. In contrast to man-made bearings, mammalian diarthrodial joints must endogenously produce friction-reducing agents. This study was undertaken to investigate whether friction is associated with wear. Methods The lubricating ability of synovial fluid (SF) samples from humans with genetic lubricin deficiency was tested in vitro. The coefficient of friction in the knee joints of normal and lubricin-null mice was measured ex vivo; these joints were also studied by light and electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to image and measure how lubricin reduces friction in vitro. Results SF lacking lubricin failed to reduce friction in the boundary mode. Joints of lubricin-null mice showed early wear and higher friction than joints from their wild-type counterparts. Lubricin self-organized and reduced the work of adhesion between apposing asperities. Conclusion These data show that friction is coupled with wear at the cartilage surface in vivo. They imply that acquired lubricin degradation occurring in inflammatory joint diseases predisposes the cartilage to damage. Lastly, they suggest that lubricin, or similar biomolecules, will have applications in man-made devices in which reducing friction is essential. PMID:17968947

  4. Less Is Often Best in Treating TMJ Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... care. NIDCR > OralHealth > Topics > TMJ (Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorders) > Less Is Often Best In Treating TMJ Disorders ... Main Content What is TMJ? Temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders, commonly called "TMJ," are a group of painful ...

  5. Joint strength in RCS frames 

    E-print Network

    Kirby, Cynthia Dawn

    1998-01-01

    for the addition of a RC slab, cover plates, and band plates. Results indicated that the addition of a reinforced concrete slab compositely connected to the steel beams framing into a typical RCS joints as defined by the ASCE guidelines (1994), improved the joint...

  6. Exercise and the Knee Joint.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    This report by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports examines the effects of various forms of physical exercise on the knee joint which, because of its vulnerability, is especially subject to injury. Discussion centers around the physical characteristics of the joint, commonly used measurements for determining knee stability,…

  7. Tube joint leak repair coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, W. B.

    1968-01-01

    Tube joint leak repair coupling consists of 2 split seals, 1 male split nut, 1 female split nut, and two aligning pins. Each split nut consists of 2 half-shell sections which, when engaged, are held together by a dovetail joint and an aligning pin.

  8. Management of limited joint mobility in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Several rheumatologic manifestations are more pronounced in subjects with diabetes, ie, frozen shoulder, rotator cuff tears, Dupuytren’s contracture, trigger finger, cheiroarthropathy in the upper limb, and Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis in the lower limb. These conditions can limit the range of motion of the affected joint, thereby impairing function and ability to perform activities of daily living. This review provides a short description of diabetes-related joint diseases, the specific pathogenetic mechanisms involved, and the role of inflammation, overuse, and genetics, each of which activates a complex sequence of biochemical alterations. Diabetes is a causative factor in tendon diseases and amplifies the damage induced by other agents as well. According to an accepted hypothesis, damaged joint tissue in diabetes is caused by an excess of advanced glycation end products, which forms covalent cross-links within collagen fibers and alters their structure and function. Moreover, they interact with a variety of cell surface receptors, activating a number of effects, including pro-oxidant and proinflammatory events. Adiposity and advanced age, commonly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus, are further pathogenetic factors. Prevention and strict control of this metabolic disorder is essential, because it has been demonstrated that limited joint motion is related to duration of the disease and hyperglycemia. Several treatments are used in clinical practice, but their mechanisms of action are not completely understood, and their efficacy is also debated. PMID:23690694

  9. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  10. Shock transmissibility of threaded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.R.; Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with threaded joints that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil and rock penetration; drilling pipe strings that must survive rock-cutting, shock environments; and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact shock. This paper summarizes an analytical study and an experimental evaluation of compressive, one-dimensional, shock transmission through a threaded joint in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Thread geometries were scaled to simulate large diameter threaded joints with loadings parallel to the axis of the threads. Both strain and acceleration were evaluated with experimental measurements and analysis. Analytical results confirm the experimental conclusions that in this split Hopkinson bar configuration, the change in the one-dimensional shock wave by the threaded joint is localized to a length equal to a few diameters` length beyond the threaded joint.

  11. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  12. Method of forming a joint

    DOEpatents

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-08-22

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, including providing a first multicomponent metallic oxide having a perovskitic or fluorite crystal structure; providing a second sintered body including a second multicomponent metallic oxide having a crystal structure of the same type as the first; and providing at an interface a joint material containing at least one metal oxide containing at least one metal identically contained in at least one of the first and second multicomponent metallic oxides. The joint material is free of cations of Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P and Te and has a melting point below the sintering temperatures of both sintered bodies. The joint material is heated to a temperature above the melting point of the metal oxide(s) and below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies to form the joint. Structures containing such joints are also disclosed.

  13. Psoriatic Disease: Clinical Staging.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Raffaele; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Peluso, Rosario; Spanò, Angelo; Lubrano, Ennio; Del Puente, Antonio; Moll, John M H

    2015-11-01

    In 2006, the introduction of the concept "psoriatic disease" (PsD) extended the traditional idea of a condition confined to skin and joints. Now we consider PsD a systemic condition, in which the increased activity of tumor necrosis factor acts as the most potent engine for a series of molecular interactions. These lead not only to the genesis of skin and joint symptoms, but also to other clinical aspects such as inflammatory bowel disease, eye involvement, and metabolic syndrome. The blocking of a precise molecular target has dramatically modified therapeutic strategies, making possible adequate control of all the clinical aspects of the condition. Therefore, an expanded clinical staging of patients could now be considered in order to ensure the best therapeutic approach and prognosis. PMID:26523050

  14. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  15. 11 CFR 9034.8 - Joint fundraising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint fundraising. 9034.8 Section 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.8 Joint fundraising. (a) General...funds under this subchapter may engage in joint fundraising with other candidates,...

  16. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  17. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  18. 11 CFR 9034.8 - Joint fundraising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint fundraising. 9034.8 Section 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.8 Joint fundraising. (a) General...funds under this subchapter may engage in joint fundraising with other candidates,...

  19. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570.308 Housing...BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements....

  20. 11 CFR 9034.8 - Joint fundraising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint fundraising. 9034.8 Section 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.8 Joint fundraising. (a) General...funds under this subchapter may engage in joint fundraising with other candidates,...

  1. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  2. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570.308 Housing...BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements....

  3. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  4. 11 CFR 9034.8 - Joint fundraising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint fundraising. 9034.8 Section 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.8 Joint fundraising. (a) General...funds under this subchapter may engage in joint fundraising with other candidates,...

  5. 11 CFR 9034.8 - Joint fundraising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Joint fundraising. 9034.8 Section 9034...MATCHING FUND ENTITLEMENTS § 9034.8 Joint fundraising. (a) General...funds under this subchapter may engage in joint fundraising with other candidates,...

  6. 24 CFR 570.308 - Joint requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Joint requests. 570.308 Section 570.308 Housing...BLOCK GRANTS Entitlement Grants § 570.308 Joint requests. (a) Joint requests and cooperation agreements....

  7. [Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease and adult-onset Still's disease : A rare co-occurence].

    PubMed

    Sondermann, W; Hillen, U; Reis, A C; Schimming, T; Schilling, B

    2015-12-01

    Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease and adult-onset Still's disease are rare inflammatory conditions with overlapping clinical features. Adult-onset Still's disease causes high fevers, a typical salmon-colored rash, and joint pain. The principal symptom of Kikuchi's disease is cervical lymphadenopathy with typical histopathological features including extensive necrosis of the involved lymph nodes. Here, we report on a rare case of concurrent adult-onset Still's disease and Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome in a young Caucasian patient. PMID:26115972

  8. Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imtiaz, Kauser

    2011-01-01

    Common Bolted Joint Analysis Tool (comBAT) is an Excel/VB-based bolted joint analysis/optimization program that lays out a systematic foundation for an inexperienced or seasoned analyst to determine fastener size, material, and assembly torque for a given design. Analysts are able to perform numerous what-if scenarios within minutes to arrive at an optimal solution. The program evaluates input design parameters, performs joint assembly checks, and steps through numerous calculations to arrive at several key margins of safety for each member in a joint. It also checks for joint gapping, provides fatigue calculations, and generates joint diagrams for a visual reference. Optimum fastener size and material, as well as correct torque, can then be provided. Analysis methodology, equations, and guidelines are provided throughout the solution sequence so that this program does not become a "black box:" for the analyst. There are built-in databases that reduce the legwork required by the analyst. Each step is clearly identified and results are provided in number format, as well as color-coded spelled-out words to draw user attention. The three key features of the software are robust technical content, innovative and user friendly I/O, and a large database. The program addresses every aspect of bolted joint analysis and proves to be an instructional tool at the same time. It saves analysis time, has intelligent messaging features, and catches operator errors in real time.

  9. Qualification of improved joint heaters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    Qualification testing of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters was conducted on the fired TEM-04 static test motor and was completed on 7 Sep. 1989. The purpose of the test was to certify the installation and performance of the improved joint heaters for use on flight motors. The changes incorporated in the improved heaters improve durability and should reduce handling damage. The igniter-to-case joint and field joint primary heater circuits were subjected to five 20-hr ON cycles. The heater redundant circuits were then subjected to one 20-hr ON cycle. Voltage, current, and temperature set point values were maintained within the specified limits for both heaters during each ON cycle. When testing was complete, both heaters were removed and inspected. No discolorations or any other anomalies were found on either of the heaters. Based on the successful completion of this test, it is recommended that the improved igniter-to-case joint and field joint heaters be used on future flight motors.

  10. Synovial Hemangioma of the Knee Joint: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Ibrahim; Nayman, Alaaddin; Koplay, Mustafa; Paksoy, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Synovial hemangioma is benign tumor of the joints and is seen relatively rare. The most affected joint is knee but should also be seen in other joints. The disease is usually symptomatic. They are classified as juxta-articular haemangioma, intra-articular haemangioma or an intermediate type of hemangioma with intra- and extraarticular components. Case Report A 19-years-old male patient presented with swollen and painful knee. The laboratory findings and physical examination were normal. MRI demonstrated a large lesion that was filling the suprapatellar bursa. Conclusions All radiologic examinations should be used in diagnosis but magnetic resonance imaging is the non-invasive method and excellent modality in the evaluation of soft tissues. In this paper, a 19-year-old male patient with the diagnosis of synovial hemangioma is reported and its radiologic findings are mentioned. PMID:26491492

  11. Intraarticular osteoblastoma with subluxation of the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kyoji; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Chida, Schuichi; Nanjo, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 5 Final Diagnosis: Osteoblastoma Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Osteoblastomas are relatively uncommon bone tumors that account for <1% of all bone tumors. They usually occur in the medullary region of the bone. As such, intraarticular osteoblastomas are quite rare. Case Report: In this report, we present the case of a 5-year-old boy who presented with vague pain and subluxation of the hip joint due to an intraarticular osteoblastoma. Radiological examinations showed an irregular calcified mass lesion in the hip joint. The final diagnosis of osteoblastoma was made by histological examination. The patient’s symptoms completely subsided following surgical removal of the tumor. Conclusions: Osteoblastomas can occur in the intraarticular region. Although quite rare, osteoblastoma should be considered among the differential diagnoses for patients with pain and subluxation of the hip joint. PMID:23901353

  12. Joint numerical ranges, quantum maps, and joint numerical shadows

    E-print Network

    Eugene Gutkin; Karol Zyczkowski

    2012-10-12

    We associate with k hermitian N\\times N matrices a probability measure on R^k. It is supported on the joint numerical range of the k-tuple of matrices. We call this measure the joint numerical shadow of these matrices. Let k=2. A pair of hermitian N\\times N matrices defines a complex N\\times N matrix. The joint numerical range and the joint numerical shadow of the pair of hermitian matrices coincide with the numerical range and the numerical shadow, respectively, of this complex matrix. We study relationships between the dynamics of quantum maps on the set of quantum states, on one hand, and the numerical ranges, on the other hand. In particular, we show that under the identity resolution assumption on Kraus operators defining the quantum map, the dynamics shrinks numerical ranges.

  13. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  14. Foreign Fishery Developments Japanese Joint

    E-print Network

    .) The four other joint ventures, which are rela- tively small, are located in New Gui- nea, Indonesia, New listed in millions of dollars. Total 25 19 10 26 31 20 60 193 20 Marine Fisheries Review #12;Latin

  15. Osteochondral Lesions of Major Joints

    PubMed Central

    Durur-Subasi, Irmak; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Yildirim, Omer Selim

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides information about osteochondral lesions (OCL) and example cases of OCL occurring in major joints, some of which are rarely seen. This simple tutorial is presented in question and answer format. PMID:26180500

  16. A JOINT PROGRAM OF Interactive

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    animation, game design and development, visual effects, graphic design, human-computer interaction (HCIA JOINT PROGRAM OF Interactive Multimedia and Design www.bitdegree.ca BACHELOR OF INFORMATION, imagination, fun and technology. The Interactive Multimedia and Design (IMD) program provides

  17. Is Clinic Visit Frequency Associated with Weight Gain During the Interstage Period? A Report from the Joint Council on Congenital Heart Disease National Pediatric Cardiology Quality Improvement Collaborative (JCCHD-NPCQIC).

    PubMed

    Hurst, David M; Oster, Matthew E; Smith, Sherry; Clabby, Martha L

    2015-10-01

    Growth problems are prevalent among infants with congenital heart disease. We sought to determine whether frequency of outpatient clinic visits correlated with weight gain in patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome or variant during the interstage period between discharge from stage I palliation and presentation for stage II palliation (SIIP). Using prospectively collected data from the JCCHD NPC-QIC database from June 2008 to July 2013, we performed a retrospective cohort study assessing the association of days between clinic visits (DBV) with the change in weight-for-age z-score (WAZ) during the interstage period. Eligible subjects were those who survived to a SIIP performed at <270 days of age and had at least two outpatient clinic visits. There were 561 patients from 49 centers who fulfilled inclusion criteria. The average interstage change in WAZ was +0.22. The mean number of DBV was 16.1 days, and the average number of clinic visits was six. There was no correlation of change in WAZ with either DBV (r = 0.02, P = 0.62) or the number of visits (r = 0.03, P = 0.44). Subjects within this cohort are seen about every 2 weeks averaged over the interstage period. There is no correlation between interstage visit frequency and change in WAZ in this patient population. Further research is needed to describe differences in visit frequency as the patient progresses through the interstage period and to elucidate whether patient factors such as growth velocity are influencing visit frequency. The optimal visit frequency remains unknown. PMID:25916314

  18. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    E-print Network

    J. Acacio de Barros

    2012-07-03

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantum-like response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  19. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, J. Acacio

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  20. Pyrothermal treatment of welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Serikov, S.V.; Idiyatullin, R.S.; Myakushkin, S.N.; Yaufman, V.V.

    1992-03-01

    The results of investigation of the structure and distribution of residual stresses in welded joints in pipes after heat treatment, which includes heating of the surface being treated due to combustion of plates formed from a thermite-type material of pyrotechnic composition, placed around the perimeter of the welded joint, and also an assessment of the level of residual stresses prior to and after pyrotechnic treatment demonstrated the promising nature of the proposed method. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  1. IRS memorandum limits joint ventures.

    PubMed

    Herman, A W

    1992-08-01

    Based on a new memorandum, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will be looking at joint hospital/physician activities with greater attention to the nuances of public versus private benefit. As a result, hospitals face greater risk of losing their tax-exempt status in the maze of joint ventures, physician recruitment, and practice acquisition. To be successful, ventures will have to be backed by sound reasoning and thorough documentation. PMID:10145664

  2. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    You are here: Home / Types of Vasculitis / Behcet’s Disease Behcet’s Disease First Description Who gets Behcet’s Disease (the “typical” patients)? Classic symptoms of Behcet’s Disease What causes Behcet’s Disease? ...

  3. Lyme Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Lyme Disease Lyme disease, or borreliosis, is caused by ... designed to increase our understanding of this disease. Lyme Disease A History of Lyme Disease, Symptoms, Diagnosis, ...

  4. Simplified procedures for designing composite bolted joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1988-01-01

    Simplified procedures are described to design and analyze single and multi-bolt composite joints. Numerical examples illustrate the use of these methods. Factors affecting composite bolted joints are summarized. References are cited where more detailed discussion is presented on specific aspects of composite bolted joints. Design variables associated with these joints are summarized in the appendix.

  5. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  6. 42 CFR 422.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint hearings. 422.1040 Section 422.1040 Public...) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Appeal procedures for Civil Money Penalties § 422.1040 Joint... conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are held, a single record of...

  7. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or...

  8. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint tortfeasors... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  9. 42 CFR 423.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint hearings. 423.1040 Section 423.1040 Public... § 423.1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  10. Joint Press Release TWELFTH ITER NEGOTIATION MEETING

    E-print Network

    Joint Press Release TWELFTH ITER NEGOTIATION MEETING Jeju, Korea, 6 December th 2005 Delegations on an Agreement on the joint implementation of the ITER international fusion energy project. This was the first/6/05 1:21 PMDraft Joint News Release Page 1 of 2http://www.iter.org/N_12_Joint_Press_Release.htm #12

  11. 42 CFR 423.1040 - Joint hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint hearings. 423.1040 Section 423.1040 Public... § 423.1040 Joint hearings. When two or more affected parties have requested hearings and the same or... the prehearing conference or hearing and conduct all proceedings jointly. If joint hearings are...

  12. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.233 Rail joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located... than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in such condition to ensure electrical conductivity....

  13. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  14. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint certification. 76.912 Section 76.912... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Rate Regulation § 76.912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint certification and may engage in joint regulation, including, but not limited...

  15. 21 CFR 26.73 - Joint Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint Committee. 26.73 Section 26.73 Food and...Frameworkâ Provisions § 26.73 Joint Committee. (a) A Joint Committee consisting of representatives of the United States and the European Community (EC) will be established. The Joint Committee shall...

  16. 32 CFR 536.54 - Joint tortfeasors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint tortfeasors. 536.54 Section 536.54... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.54 Joint tortfeasors. When joint... United States rather than pay the claim in full and then bring suit against the joint tortfeasor...

  17. 14 CFR 23.693 - Joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joints. 23.693 Section 23.693 Aeronautics... Systems § 23.693 Joints. Control system joints (in push-pull systems) that are subject to angular motion... factor may be reduced to 2.0 for joints in cable control systems. For ball or roller bearings,...

  18. 14 CFR 23.693 - Joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joints. 23.693 Section 23.693 Aeronautics... Systems § 23.693 Joints. Control system joints (in push-pull systems) that are subject to angular motion... factor may be reduced to 2.0 for joints in cable control systems. For ball or roller bearings,...

  19. 49 CFR 234.233 - Rail joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rail joints. 234.233 Section 234.233..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.233 Rail joints. Each non-insulated rail joint located... than joint bars and the bonds shall be maintained in such condition to ensure electrical conductivity....

  20. 38 CFR 4.45 - The joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The joints. 4.45 Section... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.45 The joints. As regards the joints the factors... (from flail joint, resections, nonunion of fracture, relaxation of ligaments, etc.). (c)...