Sample records for temporomandibular joint disease

  1. [Correlation between inner ear disorders and temporomandibular joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Kempf, H G; Roller, R; Mühlbradt, L

    1993-01-01

    Acute and chronic inner ear diseases involve many etiological factors, some as yet unknown. ENT-specific, orthopedic, hemorrheological, immunological and neurological disorders can affect the cochleovestibular system and induce hearing loss, vertigo and/ortinnitus. We performed a prospective study to analyze factors of the dentognathological system and of the temporomandibular joint that can influence acute and chronic inner ear dysfunctions. A total of 138 patients (49.3% female, 50.9% male) receiving clinical treatment for inner ear dysfunctions (12.3% chronic sensorineural hearing loss, 15.2% Ménière's disease, 52.2% sudden hearing loss, 13.8% isolated tinnitus, 6.5% recurrent hearing loss) underwent a prospective dental and gnathological examination. In particular, the patient's dental status and a functional investigation of the masticatory muscles and the temporomandibular joint were analyzed. In 20.3% patients the examination showed no pathology of the dentognathological system. In contrast, there were pathological findings in 110 patients (79.7%): in 43.5% a temporomandibular joint syndrome was diagnosed, in 29% parafunction of the occlusion, and in 35% a myopathy of the masticatory muscles. Additionally 32.6% patients showed dental disorders that required treatment; 11.65% had problems with dentures and 20.3% malpositioned wisdom teeth. In 16 patients the recommended dental treatment was followed up and improvement of otological symptoms was found in 56.6%. The present investigation shows that many patients with inner ear dysfunction suffer from dentognathological disorders. For a subgroup of patients there exists the possibility of improving otological symptoms by dental treatment. Therefore we recommend a dentognathological examination in patients with inner ear dysfunctions of unknown etiology. PMID:8449789

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePLUS

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)\\/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint – FNA findings and microanalysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asghar H Naqvi; Jerrold L Abraham; Robert M Kellman; Kamal K Khurana

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) presenting as a mass in the parotid and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that simulated a parotid tumor. A 35 year-old man presented with pain in the left ear area. A CT Scan of the area showed a large, calcified mass surrounding the left condylar head, and extending into the

  4. Posttraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E.; Quinn, Peter D.; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  5. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program explains temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ). It reviews the anatomy of the jaw, plus symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment options for TMJ disorders. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is...

  7. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872...CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices...Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is...

  10. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  11. Temporomandibular joint involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Amarnath, Janardhan; Ravindra, Setru Veerabhadrappa; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has varied from 4% to 35%. It is more common in men and produces generalised stiffness in involved joints. Clinician should be suspicious of AS when a patient reports with painful restricted movements of joint, neck or back and with no trauma history. Conventional radiographic methods have allowed the demonstration of TMJ abnormalities in patients with AS, but CT is necessary to establish joint space relations and bony morphology. We describe a case of severe AS with TMJ involvement in a 40-year-old female patient and demonstrated TMJ changes on CT. A CT was able to demonstrate articular cartilage changes, disc- and joint abnormalities. Thus, if conventional radiographs in a symptomatic patient with rheumatic diseases are unable to demonstrate changes, CT can provide valuable additional information of the changes in the TMJ. PMID:23645650

  12. [The pathology of temporomandibular joint luxations--anatomical studies on temporomandibular joint preparations].

    PubMed

    Pinkert, R

    1976-01-01

    After a description of the published hypothesis of luxation and subluxation in the temporomandibular joint the preparations of five temporomandibular joints is described. The results refer to the movement of the discus and the capitulum mandibulae and to the effects of the musculus temporalis and of the facies articularis ossis temporalis. In addition a hypothesis is established according to which the temporomandibular-joint-luxation may be considered to occur in the menisco-condylar part of the joint. PMID:141833

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: A Dental Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, Clyde D.

    1985-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is common and often acutely painful. Because of the large and diverse symptom complex created by this disorder, patients frequently first seek relief from their physician rather than their dentist. In this article temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is defined and the presenting signs and symptoms are discussed. Their etiology is described in relation to the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination techniques can help in the differential diagnosis. Current treatment ranges from heat, local anesthesia and ultrasound to anxiolytics, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and nutritional supplementation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:21274225

  14. [Arthrography of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Coquel, P; Lepoutre, F; Dupas, P H; Rousie, D; Donazzan, M

    1990-01-01

    In 1989, opaque contrast arthrography of temporomandibular joint is still seldom used. A brief historical review of the procedure is presented here, and the technique of puncturing the menisco-condylar and menisco-temporal compartments is discussed. The value of injecting opaque contrast material into the lower compartment and carrying out kinetic and tomographic studies as well as bilateral examinations is stressed. Normal aspects are described with their variants, as well as pathological ones (reducible and non-reducible luxations, perforations, distension of the bilaminar zone, adhesions, etc.). Both the place of arthrography in relation to other investigations (TDM, IRM) and its indications for visualization of menisco-condylar problems are discussed. PMID:2309081

  15. Clinical comparative study of microcurrent electrical stimulation to mid-laser and placebo treatment in degenerative joint disease of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, L E; Grey, T

    1995-04-01

    Mid-laser and microcurrent stimulation (MENS) have been found to be effective in the reduction of painful temporomandibular joints (TMJ) with internal derangement. There was significant improvement in mobility with the reduction of pain. Mid-laser was superior to MENS in its application and effect, and both were significantly better than the placebo treatment. PMID:8697497

  16. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  17. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  18. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying-Bin; Liang, Su-Xia; Shen, Jun; Zhang, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  19. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Gnanashanmugham, K; Saravanan, B; Sukumar, M R; Tajir, T Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy. PMID:26015741

  20. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy PMID:26015741

  1. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  2. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Helen; Chou, Joli C; Quinn, Peter D

    2013-07-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a proliferative disorder that affects synovium-lined joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths. It appears in both diffuse and localized forms, depending on the extent of synovial involvement. PVNS rarely involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ); when it does, it manifests clinically as a slowly growing and painless preauricular mass that resembles a parotid tumor. TMJ dysfunction, paresthesia, and/or hearing loss can result. We present a case of a large extra-articular PVNS of the TMJ, and we review the literature. PMID:23904309

  3. Two Cases of Masticator Space Abscess Initially Diagnosed as Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TAKUMI HASEGAWA; YASUYUKI SHIBUYA; SHINSUKE KUROKI; JUNICHIRO TAKEUCHI; SATOSHI YOKOO; MASAHIRO UMEDA; TAKAHIDE KOMORI

    Diseases causing trismus or pain of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) include temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD), trauma, tumors and an inflammation. This report describes two cases of masticator space abscesses causing trismus and TMJ pain, which were initially diagnosed as TMJD. The first case was a 62-year-old female suffering from trismus and right-TMJ pain without swelling or redness, which was diagnosed

  4. Bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation with locked mandibular impaction.

    PubMed

    Hynes, Sally L; Jansen, Leigh A; Brown, D Ross; Courtemanche, Douglas J; Boyle, James C

    2012-02-01

    Bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation is very rare, with only 2 reported cases published. In the present report, we describe a healthy 25-year-old man from Haida Gwaii, in British Columbia, Canada, who was transferred to our tertiary trauma center with life-threatening complications of a bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation with locked mandibular impaction. PMID:22260912

  5. The acoustical characteristics of the normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gay, T; Bertolami, C N; Donoff, R B; Keith, D A; Kelly, J P

    1987-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a clinical study that recorded and analyzed sounds emitted from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) during simple function as a means for differentially diagnosing disorders of the joint. The technique is based on the principle that each different disorder of the TMJ produces a different effect on the mechanical relationship between the articulating surfaces of the joint, and that these mechanical effects can be determined by analyzing joint sounds in relation to joint movement. A total of 79 patients (101 joints) were studied; 32 (46 joints) were diagnosed as having extracapsular disorders, (primarily MPD), 27 (32 joints) were diagnosed as having a displaced disc with reduction, nine (10 joints) were diagnosed as having a displaced disc without reduction, and 11 (13 joints) were diagnosed as degenerative disease (osteoarthritis/arthrosis). In addition, 25 adults (50 joints) with normal TMJs were included as controls. The results of this study demonstrated that each specific disease of the TMJ is characterized by a unique relationship between the sounds propagated by the joint and the movement of the joint. Essentially, an extracapsular disease was characterized by acoustic quiescence during natural (as opposed to maximal) jaw movement, an internal derangement by a usually symmetrical short duration click/reciprocal click, or random click complex, depending on the subcategory of the disorder, and a degenerative disease by a long duration noise during either or both jaw opening and closing. The data further suggest that the technique serves to reflect the mechanical events (and abnormalities) that are involved in function of the diseased joint and has potential for use as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:3471925

  6. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a)...

  7. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ. PMID:26010823

  8. Temporomandibular joint disorder and inner ear pruritus: resolution by eminectomy.

    PubMed

    Pentyala, Sahana; Mysore, Pooja; Moller, Daryn; Pentyala, Srinivas; Kardovich, Richard; Martino, Andrew; Proothi, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk is caused by many factors. Dislocation can result in an acute or chronic closed lock condition. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often presented with otalgia symptoms. Other aural symptoms such as deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage, and vertigo are also commonly presented together with TMJ dysfunction (Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1980;5:23-36). However, pruritus associated with TMJ dysfunction in the inner ear has never been reported in the literature. We report a case history of TMJ dysfunction and associated inner ear pruritus, which are both resolved by eminectomy. PMID:25072971

  9. An epidemiological study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar; Mehrotra, Divya; Malhotra, Seema; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, Girdhar Gopal; Pal, Uma Shanker

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms the very cornerstone of craniofacial integrity and its ankylosis in a growing child may cause problems in daily food intake, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene is affected to a major extent. It is one of the common acquired pathologies afflicting the skeleton. It is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. Materials and Methods: A house to house survey was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in rural and urban areas of Lucknow. A total of 21,720 children aged between 3-15 years from 9090 houses comprising a representative sample were included. Results: Ten TMJ ankylosis cases were identified in 21,720 children. Of these, six were bilateral and four were unilateral. Male to female ratio was 1:9, with most patients (70.0%) being in the 10-15 years’ age group (mean age was 11.1 years ± 3.34). The most common cause of ankylosis was trauma for 90.0% of cases. The majority of patients (70%) were reporting the condition for the first time, with 30% patients having had previous treatment. Conclusion: TMJ ankylosis is an acquired condition in most of the cases. Birth/childhood trauma would be the major causative factor. Knowledge amongst parents, providers of health about this entity was poor. Initial management of the causative factor was poor. Mere knowledge among the general population and healthcare providers can result in primary prevention and also secondary prevention along with its successful definitive treatment. PMID:23251054

  10. [Contrast arthrography of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Coquel, P; Lepoutre, F; Cordier, R; Rousie, D; Donazzan, M

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-four temporomandibular arthrographic examinations, mostly involving paracentesis of the menisco-condylar compartment, provided the means for visualizing normal and pathologic aspects of both reducible and non-reducible meniscal dislocations, and of perforations. Findings included distension of the bilaminar zone and adhesions. Post modeling condyloplasty status was noted. At present, arthrography seems to be the most reliable test, as well as being the easiest to perform and the least expensive one for visualizing menisco-condylar abnormalities. PMID:3165544

  11. Intraoral endoscopically assisted treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Sembronio, Salvatore; Albiero, Alberto Maria; Polini, Francesco; Robiony, Massimo; Politi, Massimo

    2007-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by the formation of a bony or fibrous mass that replaces the normal articulation. To avoid a possible re-ankylosis it is mandatory to perform a radical, complete resection of the bony/fibrous mass. We treated a patient affected by right temporomandibular joint ankylosis performing the osteotomy of the ankylotic mass through a preauricular and intraoral approach under endoscopic control. Then a temporalis muscle and fascia flap were used as the interpositional material. Through the endoscope it was easy to check the medial aspect of the resection and suture the flap. At 1-year follow-up the patient had significantly increased maximal mouth opening. No evidence of relapse of the joint ankylosis was shown by radiological studies. Intraoral endoscopic assistance may be useful to make the removal of the ankylotic mass safer, and the anchorage of the temporalis muscle and fascia flap more accurate, reducing the risk of re-ankylosis. PMID:17499531

  12. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  13. [Diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint dysfunction by graphic reconstruction of mandibular movements].

    PubMed

    Arutiunov, S D; Khvatov, I L; Arutiunov, D S; Nabiev, N V; Tuturov, N S

    2003-01-01

    A total of 974 patients with suspected abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were examined; diseases were detected in 371 patients. The test group consisted of 40 patients, control group of 18 patients. Analysis of the results of graphic recording of mandibular movements and clinical x-ray data in patients of the main and control groups helped develop the strategy for the diagnosis of TMJ dysfunction, based on the functional methods of examination (oral functionography and non-oral axiography). PMID:12666547

  14. Arthroscopy with open surgery for treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sembronio, Salvatore; Albiero, Alberto Maria; Toro, Corrado; Robiony, Massimo; Politi, Massimo

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in which both joint compartments were affected. Because of the important involvement of the medial aspect of the joint, arthrotomy was done with arthroscopic assistance. PMID:18329766

  15. Bilateral Alloplastic Prostheses for Temporomandibular Joint Reconstruction in a Patient with Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira-Neto, Patrício Jose; Marchiori, Erica Cristina; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Candida; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or Bechterew disease is a chronic, usually progressive, systemic inflammatory joint disease, which predominantly affects the spine and sacroiliac joints. In these joints, early inflammatory changes are followed by lumbosacral pain and progressive restriction of spinal movement associated with radiologically visible intervertebral ossification. Peripheral joint involvement occurs in 10 to 30% of patients and shows a predilection for the shoulders, knees, ankles, feet, and wrists. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement has been described, and its reported frequency varies from 11 to 35%. However, ankylosis is uncommon with a single documented case utilizing an alloplastic prosthesis for total joint replacement. A case report of bilateral ankylosis of the jaw treated with alloplastic prostheses for total TMJ replacement using a Brazilian system in a patient with AS is presented. PMID:25050151

  16. Bilateral alloplastic prostheses for temporomandibular joint reconstruction in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira-Neto, Patrício Jose; Marchiori, Erica Cristina; de Almeida Lopes, Maria Candida; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) or Bechterew disease is a chronic, usually progressive, systemic inflammatory joint disease, which predominantly affects the spine and sacroiliac joints. In these joints, early inflammatory changes are followed by lumbosacral pain and progressive restriction of spinal movement associated with radiologically visible intervertebral ossification. Peripheral joint involvement occurs in 10 to 30% of patients and shows a predilection for the shoulders, knees, ankles, feet, and wrists. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement has been described, and its reported frequency varies from 11 to 35%. However, ankylosis is uncommon with a single documented case utilizing an alloplastic prosthesis for total joint replacement. A case report of bilateral ankylosis of the jaw treated with alloplastic prostheses for total TMJ replacement using a Brazilian system in a patient with AS is presented. PMID:25050151

  17. Temporomandibular joint replacement periprosthetic joint infections: a review of early diagnostic testing options.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, L G

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of a periprosthetic joint infection is uncommon after total joint replacement. Since the clinical, psychological, and economic consequences of this complication are substantial, the development of management algorithms based on early diagnostic testing has been the subject of continued exploration in the orthopaedic literature. While there has been discussion of this topic in the total temporomandibular joint replacement literature and preliminary management algorithms have been established, no diagnostic testing protocols have been proposed or studied for the management of early and/or late periprosthetic joint infections. This paper will review the classification of periprosthetic joint infections, the associated risk factors, the clinical sensitivity and specificity of laboratory and imaging diagnostic studies and their utility in the management of early and late onset orthopaedic periprosthetic joint infections. This review may provide an initial framework for the use of early diagnostic testing for the management of total temporomandibular joint replacement periprosthetic joint infections and stimulate further investigation into this topic. PMID:25048029

  18. Cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint alterations in cats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcello R. Roza; Luiz Antonio F. Silva; Alessandro L. Januario; Maria Clorinda S. Fioravanti; Mauricio Barriviera

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the use of cone beam computed tomography as an auxiliary method to diagnose changes to the temporomandibular joints in cats. We used five cats of various ages, breeds and genders that showed clinical signs consistent with changes in the temporomandibular joint. Cone beam computed tomography enables a complete and thorough examination of

  19. Tinnitus in patients with temporo-mandibular joint disorder: Proposal for a new treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Giuseppe; Leonardi, Alessandra; Arangio, Paolo; Minni, Antonio; Covelli, Edoardo; Pucci, Resi; Russo, Francesca Yoshie; De Seta, Elio; Di Paolo, Carlo; Cascone, Piero

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to verify the correlation between tinnitus and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.86 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study, all affected by subjective tinnitus without hearing impairment, from both genders, age between 18 and 60 years old. The final number of patients included in the study was 55. All patients received a temporo-mandibular joint examination. All the patients were asked to rate the severity of their symptoms before and after treatment using a VAS scale and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and they followed a standardized protocol for the investigation of tinnitus. All the subjects were monitored by the same researcher and they underwent the same splint treatment. The comparison between pre- and posttreatment phase scores showed in patients with predisposition of TMD and with TMD a statistically significant decrease of THI and VAS values. The characteristics of tinnitus and the degree of response to treatment confirmed the relationship between tinnitus and TMD. The authors believe that, when the most common causes of tinnitus, such as otologic disorders and neurological diseases are excluded, it is correct to evaluate the functionality of the temporo-mandibular joint and eventually treat its pathology to obtain tinnitus improvement or even resolution. PMID:25868942

  20. Temporomandibular joints: high-resolution computed tomographic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed in 43 patients. Exquisite detail of the face, skull base, and TMJs was obtained with CT using soft tissue and bone algorithms, narrow collimation, and multiplanar images. In 10 patients clinically suspected of joint derangement, CT results were in close agreement with surgical findings and arthrography in 13/15 joints. CT showed indirect signs of disc dislocation, and the dislocated disc itself in 81% of affected joints. In two patients, arthrography with CT proved to be more helpful than conventional arthrography alone. CT without intra-articular contrast material provided information not appreciated on conventional radiogaphs in 28 patients (65%) and was particularly helpful in evaluating patients with disc pathosis and trauma. Early experience with CT of the TMJ shows that it is an excellent method of evaluation at acceptable radiation exposure levels that adds essential information not seen on standard radiographs.

  1. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  2. A case of pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint with giant cell reparative granuloma of the temporal bone.

    PubMed

    Lv, Huaiqing; Fan, Zhaomin; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Wang, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Pseudogout, also known as calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) with giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the temporal bone is a rare disease, which is very easy to misdiagnose. When two diseases occur simultaneously, the pathological tissue of diseases is closely associated, which complicates clinical representation and causes enormous difficulty in diagnosis and treatment. We report a case of CPPD of the temporomandibular joint accompanied by surrounding GCRG of temporal bone in a 62-year-old male. PMID:23969082

  3. Temporomandibular joint synovial chondromatosis with a traumatic etiology.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, L M; Congregado-Córdoba, J; Salinas-Martín, M V

    2011-03-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a metaplastic disorder characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules inside the articular space. SC is uncommon in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A few reports suggest a correlation between a traumatic episode and the development of SC. The authors describe the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of a patient with unilateral SC of the left TMJ in conjunction with bony resorption on the mandibular condyle and a clear traumatic etiology. They review and comment on previous reports in the literature. PMID:20951553

  4. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-05-16

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  5. A study of temporomandibular joint sounds. Part 2. Acoustic characteristics of joint sounds.

    PubMed

    Motoyoshi, M; Matsumoto, Y; Ohnuma, M; Arimoto, M; Takahashi, K; Namura, S

    1995-03-01

    In an attempt to gain a better understanding of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds, we recorded joint sounds from 14 non-orthodontically treated dental students, analyzed the acoustic characteristics of the TMJ sounds, and correlated the sound characteristics with axiographic features, morphologic observations of X-ray images and clinical history. The group with a low peak frequency (< 500 Hz) of the opening click had a shorter history of subjective joint sound, a longer distance between the opening and closing curves, and a low rate of TMJ transformation. For the closing click, the history of subjective joint sounds tended to be longer when the duration of the wave was short. Acoustic analysis of TMJ sounds could be an aid to the differential diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders, although it is difficult to deduce the clinical history and internal deformities of the TMJ based solely on acoustic characteristics. PMID:7782822

  6. Enlarged follicles and temporomandibular joint abnormalities in mucolipidosis Type III

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, H; Grubisa, HS; Lee, L; Lam, EWN

    2013-01-01

    Mucolipidosis Type III, or pseudo-Hurler polydystrophy, is a rare genetic abnormality, the result of a mutation to one of two genes that encode the hexameric protein N-acetylglucosaminyl-1-phosphotransferase (Glc-NAc-PT). The abnormality results in the accumulation of unprocessed macromolecules in cell and tissue compartments throughout the body. In this case report, we describe the clinical and radiographic findings of a 15-year-old male with this disorder. He presented with bilateral ectopically developing mandibular molar teeth with enlarged follicles and multiple joint involvement, including the temporomandibular joints. The patient underwent surgical removal of the molar teeth and curettage of the associated follicles. The subsequent histopathological examination of the tissues revealed hyperplastic follicles suggestive of dentigerous cysts. This report presents the plain film and cone beam CT examinations of the patient. PMID:22241869

  7. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  8. UK temporomandibular joint replacement database: report on baseline data.

    PubMed

    Idle, Matthew R; Lowe, Derek; Rogers, Simon N; Sidebottom, Andrew J; Speculand, Bernard; Worrall, Stephen F

    2014-03-01

    Our goal is to establish the long-term collection of data on temporomandibular joint replacement from all centres in the UK where this is done. Currently, 16 surgeons have been identified, and 13 of them had entered data when this paper was being prepared. Data are entered online through the Snap Survey and then analysed annually. We report on 402 patients (332 (83%) female and 70 (17%) male) who had 577 joints inserted between 1994 and 2012. The main diagnoses that resulted in total joint replacement were osteoarthritis, failed operation, ankylosis, and seronegative arthritis. Preoperatively, the median (IQR) maximal incisal opening was 20 (15-26)mm (mean 20) and the median pain scores on the visual analogue scale (VAS 0-10) were 8 for both joints. The median (IQR) baseline dietary score (liquid 0 - solid 10) was 4 (3-6). A total of 173 (43%) patients had had one or more open procedure(s) before total replacement, 177 (44%) had not had open operation, and 52 (13%) had no data entered. The 3 primary systems used were the TMJ Concepts System (Ventura, USA), the Biomet System (Biomet/Lorenz Microfixation, Jacksonville, USA), and the Christensen System (TMJ Implants, Golden, USA). The median (IQR) duration of inpatient stay was 3 (2-4) days (mean 3). Follow-up data will be collected to assess patient recorded outcome measures (PROM) and objective measurements of total joint replacements in the UK from 1994 onwards. PMID:24388051

  9. Effect of turban use on temporomandibular joint problems.

    PubMed

    Uysal, S; Avcu, N

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of daily turban wear on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 249 female patients. Of these, 119 patients were using turban daily, while 130 patients did not use. Patients were asked questions to ascertain the signs of TMJ problems. Thereafter, the TMJ region was examined clinically. Cross-tabulations and Chi-square statistics were computed in accordance with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. To investigate the association between continuous turban wear and temporomandibular disorder symptoms, logistic regression analysis was performed. Limited mouth opening, deviation, pain on TMJ palpation and mouth opening were not affected with turban usage. However, turban users more frequently demonstrated pain during palpation of the masticatory muscles than non-users (P = 0.001). Duration of the turban usage did not affect clinical examination findings except pain on masticatory muscles during palpation (P = 0.001). Complaint of pain on masticatory muscles are more frequently seen among the turban users. PMID:18976273

  10. Sleep deprivation induces abnormal bone metabolism in temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wei; Wu, Gaoyi; Huang, Fei; Zhu, Yong; Nie, Jia; He, Yuhong; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of experimental sleep deprivation (SD) on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats and the possible mechanism related to abnormal bone metabolism. Material and methods: SD was induced by a modified multiple platform method and assessed by serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. TMJs were detached and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Expression of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Compared with controls, SD significantly increased serum ACTH, indicating that the SD model was successful. In the SD group, H&E staining revealed greater vessel hyperplasia in the synovial membrane and thicker hypertrophic layers in condylar cartilages. Compared with controls, RNA and protein expression of the inflammatory factors IL-1? and TNF-? and the bone metabolism-related factor RANKL increased in condylar cartilage in the SD group, whereas OPG and the OPG/RANKL ratio decreased. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that OPG/RANKL immunopositive cells were mainly located in hypertrophic layers. Conclusions: These results suggest that sleep deprivation might play an important role in the occurrence and development of temporomandibular disorders, which may occur through abnormal secretion of inflammatory and bone metabolism-related factors. PMID:25785010

  11. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Beltran, Jorge; de Laat, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Results Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Conclusion Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment. PMID:26125003

  12. Tensile Characterization of Porcine Temporomandibular Joint Disc Attachments

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M.K.; Arzi, B.; Hu, J.C.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and impact of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders necessitate research in characterizing the joint’s function. The 6 discal attachments have not yet been systematically characterized under tension. Understanding their role in joint function may guide our study of TMJ pathologies, including disc displacement. In the present study, a porcine model was used to characterize the attachments in tension anteroposteriorly and mediolaterally, based on previously identified similarities in the porcine and human masticatory behaviors and discal properties. Tensile stiffness, strength, toughness, and maximum strain were quantified. Collagen alignment was characterized via polarized light and scanning electron microscopy. Anisotropy was demonstrated in all attachments, with the exception of the anterior inferior attachment. Anteroposteriorly, the lateral attachment was stiffest (8.3 MPa) and the anterior superior was least stiff (1.4 MPa). Mediolaterally, the posterior superior attachment was stiffest (16.3 MPa) and the medial was least stiff (1.4 MPa). The greatest strain was observed in the lateral attachment in the mediolateral direction and the posterior superior attachment in the anteroposterior direction. With greatest strains in the most commonly observed directions of disc displacement, it is suggested that compromise in the posterior and lateral attachments contributes to partial lateral and anterior disc displacement. PMID:23783320

  13. Outcome of Otologic Symptoms after Temporomandibular Joint Arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Tozoglu, S; Bayramoglu, Z; Ozkan, O

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of otologic complaints in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) closed lock (CL), and to evaluate the efficacy of arthrocentesis in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients with otologic symptoms. Fifty-seven patients with TMJ CL were included in this study. The pre-treatment evaluations included assessment of the maximum mouth opening (MMO); pain level in palpation of the affected TMJ; pain level with function; and otologic complaints, including otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo, and hearing loss. Arthrocentesis treatment was performed for all the patients, and post-treatment data were recorded 1 month later. Before arthrocentesis and lavage, the mean MMO was 24.67?±?4.61?mm; the mean tenderness score was 7.02?±?1.09; and the mean score for pain in function was 6.86?±?1.31. Following TMJ arthrocentesis and lavage, the mean MMO was 39.81?mm?±?4.56?mm; the mean tenderness score was 2.37?±?0.65; and the mean score for pain in function was 2.45?±?0.69. Seventeen (29.82%) patients reported at least 1 otologic complaint, 17 (29.82%) patients reported otalgia, and 8 (14.04%) patients reported tinnitus. Vertigo was noted in 5 (8.77%) patients. Complaints of hearing loss were not noted in any of the patients. After treatment, 14 patients no longer complained of otalgia, 5 patients no longer complained of tinnitus, and 2 patients no longer complained of vertigo. This represented a significant improvement in the patients' condition, especially in patients with otalgia (P?

  14. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ. PMID:25457626

  15. Somatosensory function following painful repetitive electrical stimulation of the human temporomandibular joint and skin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. E. Ayesh; T. S. Jensen; P. Svensson

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are common pain problems in the population with uncertain pathophysiology and mechanisms.\\u000a The aim of this experimental study was to: (1) Establish an experimental pain model using electrical stimuli to describe characteristics\\u000a of nociception from the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and overlying skin. (2) Test the hypothesis that there would be\\u000a sex-related differences in TMJ sensitivity. Forty-three

  16. Effects of enzymatic degradation after loading in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y; Su, S; Kunimatsu, R; Hirose, N; Mitsuyoshi, T; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, E; Tanne, K; Tanimoto, K

    2015-02-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1? (IL-1?), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1?, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1? in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading. PMID:25503611

  17. Assessment of the relationship between stress and temporomandibular joint disorder in female students before university entrance exam (Konkour exam)

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Razavi, S. Mohammad; Pozveh, Elham Zamani; Jahangirmoghaddam, Milad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Temporomandibular joint is one of the most complicated joints of the body and plays an important role in the head and neck system. One of the factors affecting the temporomandibular joint and lead to temporomandibular disorder is anxiety with all the events causing it. The aim of this study was to determine a relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, subjects were randomly selected. One hundred and thirty pre-university students in Isfahan were evaluated with Ketel's test of anxiety, exam stress test and temporomandibular disorder questionnaires. The evaluation was done in two stages 10 months and 1 month prior to the university entrance exam (Konkour), clinical assessments consisted of masticatory muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscle palpation, temporomandibular joint palpation for pain and noise and its movement, and mouth opening limitations. The Wilcoxon rank test and paired t-test were used to analyze the data and the P value under 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The level of anxiety and occurrence of temporomandibular disorders were increased between two stages and had the highest level in the second stage. There was a significant increase between two stages (P<0.001). Conclusion: The parallel increase of temporomandibular disorders and anxiety between the two stages can suggest a possible relationship between anxiety and temporomandibular disorders. Therefore, the effect of anxiety in triggering temporomandibular disorder symptoms is probable. PMID:23372600

  18. [Treatment of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint by an occlusion splint].

    PubMed

    Zajko, J; Satko, I; Hirjak, D

    1990-06-01

    At present we include under the term arthropathy of the temporomandibular joint a large group of affections of this joint. In recent years the term myofacial painful dysfunction syndrome was defined in mode detail. It is a condition characterized by its polyaetiological nature and is linked to the area of the temporo-mandibular joint and its surroundings. It is associated with pain without apparent destructive changes on the X-ray picture. In the submitted paper attention is paid to conservative treatment of painful dysfunctional muscular syndrome by means of an occulsion splint. In a group of 32 patient the advantages of the method are demonstrated. PMID:2103616

  19. Synovial tissue in internal derangement of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Zhang, ShanYong; Yang, Chi; Liu, XiuMing; Wei, KuiJie; Wang, LiZhen; Wang, XiaoYue; Haddad, Majd S

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the changes of the synovial tissue in rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID) models using light and electron microscope. Thirteen rabbits were included in our study. The right TMJ of all animals were used as the experimental group while the left ones as the control group. ID model was established by using elastic rubber rope to stretch anteriorly. Synovial tissues were collected and examined by light and electron microscope to observe microstructure and ultrastructure changes after establishing the model. CD34 was used to count small blood vessels. A paired t test was performed with SPSS 16.0 software package to compare the data of the experimental and the control side. The average number of small blood vessels in the experimental side was significantly greater than the control side both in the first and second week. Numerous synovial cells of type A and type B were detected under electron microscope, and type A cells shrunk after a period of time. This study is helpful to understand the development of the TMJ intra-articular adhesion. PMID:23714872

  20. Long-term follow-up of the CAD\\/CAM patient fitted total temporomandibular joint reconstruction system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louis G. Mercuri; Larry M. Wolford; Bruce Sanders; R. Dean White; Anita Giobbie-Hurder

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was the assessment of the long-term safety and effectiveness of the Techmedica (Camarillo, CA) CAD\\/CAM Total Temporomandibular Joint Reconstruction System (now called the TMJ Concepts Patient Fitted Total Temporomandibular Joint Reconstruction System, Ventura, CA). Patients and Methods: A survey was mailed to the available addresses of 170 (79%) of the 215 patients who had

  1. Surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M

    1998-11-01

    TMJ osteoarthrosis and internal derangements are in close connection, representing a substantial portion of temporomandibular disorders. The authors wish to underline the role of surgery in the treatment of this degenerative disease to improve function and to alleviate pain. A 63 year-old woman suffering from closed-lock with reduced opening movements was accepted in our Department in March, 1995. Clinical and radiological evaluations showed bilateral closed lock and severe TMJ osteoarthrosis. Occlusal, pharmacological and physical therapy were performed for one year, without results. Bilateral condylectomy and diskectomy with arthroplasty were carried out. Immediate muscular rehabilitation after surgery was performed by the patient. Follow-up 3, 6, 12 months after surgery were carried out. Full opening movements and reduction of pain were obtained 20 days after surgery. The patient, followed-up one year after surgery, presented effective mandibular movements and adequate amelioration of clinical picture. TMJ surgery in association with physical therapy represents in selected cases an adequate procedure for the treatment of TMJ degenerative disease. PMID:9882996

  2. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Choi, Hang-Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence.

  3. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Young; Kim, Seong-Gon; Choi, Hang-Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-06-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence. PMID:26125005

  4. Use of indomethacin as an adjuvant to surgery for recurrent temporomandibular joint ankylosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krushna; Pandey, Sandeep; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2014-01-01

    Two cases with multiple recurrences of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and multiple failed interposition/gap arthroplasty procedures are presented here. Heterotopic bone formation was thought to be the reason. Indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of heterotopic new bone formation at the osteoarthrectomy site was used as an adjuvant to surgery, in dosages of 75 mg/day for six weeks. Indomethacin is used frequently in hip and elbow arthroplasties to prevent heterotopic ossification, but its use in temporomandibular joint is not routine. The presented cases did not develop further recurrence and attained stable mouth opening over two-year follow-up after osteoarthrectomy and oral indomethacin. PMID:25937735

  5. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  6. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Meghan K; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-02-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular cartilage. PMID:25519993

  7. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint - computed tomography and magnetic resonance findings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Cho, Hyun-Young; Cho, Hyun-Woo; Seo, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Dong-Hwan; Peng, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive disease originating in the synovial membranes. It is a proliferative disorder of unknown etiology. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare. Computed tomography clearly reveals areas of lytic bone erosion and sclerosis, and also clearly defines the extent of the tumor which is the focal areas of hyperdensity within the soft-tissue mass. Magnetic resonance images invariably show profound hypointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences due to hemosiderin pigmentation. Additionally, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images may indicate cystic loculation of the joint fluid. This case study describes a rare case of PVNS of the TMJ with bone destruction of the mandibular condyle. Complete surgical excision of the lesion was performed through a preauricular approach with temporal extension. During the 10-year follow-up, two more operations were performed due to local recurrence and the fracture of the reconstruction plate. Total joint reconstruction with Biomet was finally performed, and the absence of disease was confirmed with a biopsy report showing fibrosis with hyalinization and mild inflammation of the excised soft tissue from the old lesion. PMID:25045642

  8. A case of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint followed for 17 years.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yui; Kakudo, Kenji; Gotoh, Motohiro; Kubo, Hirohito; Akiyama, Hironori; Yotsui, Yoritaka; Shimizutani, Kimishige

    2011-07-01

    The patient was a 52-year-old woman who visited our hospital for the chief complaint of a strange sensation in the left temporomandibular joint region on February 22, 1992. On the first examination, crepitus was heard, but no disturbance of mouth opening was noted. On panoramic radiography, radiopaque bodies were present in the left temporomandibular joint region, diagnosed as synovial chondromatosis. Course observation without active treatment was selected. Calcified bodies were noted on the lateral side directly below the left temporomandibular articular tubercle on the first computed tomography image performed in December 1998. Reportedly, this lesion grows slowly, but the lesions started to enlarge at a specific time point during the 17-year follow-up in this patient, showing the necessity of long-term follow-up by imaging even though no quality-of-life reduction or subjective symptom is observed. PMID:21531596

  9. Management of Temporomandibular Joint Reankylosis in Syndromic Patients Corrected with Joint Prostheses: Surgical and Rehabilitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galiè, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe disorder described as an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface with bony fusion. The management of this disability is challenging and rarely based on surgical and rehabilitation protocols. We describe the treatment in two young adults affected by Goldenhar syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence with reankylosis after previous surgical treatments. There are three main surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJA: gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and joint reconstruction. Various authors have described reankylosis as a frequent event after treatment. Treatment failure could be associated with surgical errors and/or inadequate intensive postoperative physiotherapy. Surgical treatment should be individually tailored and adequate postoperative physiotherapy protocol is mandatory for success. PMID:24624260

  10. Bone SPECT imaging of patients with internal derangement of temporomandibular joint before and after splint therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nergis Ulutuncel; E CANAY; B CANER

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients with disc displacement without reduction have a misaligned disc-condyle structural relation. As the condition becomes chronic, painful osteoarthritic changes may occur. For these patients, splint therapy may help to position the condyle to a more structurally compatible and functional position and to decrease the loading force of articular surfaces. The aim of this study was

  11. Psoriatic arthritis of the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. Literature review and case reports.

    PubMed

    Koorbusch, G F; Zeitler, D L; Fotos, P G; Doss, J B

    1991-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is currently defined as psoriasis associated with chronic, erosive inflammatory arthritis, which is seronegative for rheumatoid factor. A review of the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment is accompanied by two unusual case reports of psoriatic arthritis affecting the temporomandibular joints with ankylosis. PMID:2011347

  12. Post-surgical neuromas in patients with total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction: a retrospective case series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Granquist; J. C. Chou; H. Giannakopoulos; V. A. Livolsi; P. D. Quinn

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated pain scores and maximal incisal opening (MIO) in patients with total alloplastic temporomandibular joints found to have post-surgical neuromas following revision arthroplasty, compared with patients who underwent revision arthroplasty without neuromas. 19 cases were reviewed of which 11 had neuromas excised. Data were available for 8 cases in the immediate postoperative period and 7 cases had follow-up

  13. Loading of a Unilateral Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis: A Three-dimensional Mathematical Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-P. van Loon; E. Otten; C. H. Falkenström; L. G. M. de Bont; G. J. Verkerke

    1998-01-01

    The load on the prosthetic side and the influence of the design on the remaining natural contralateral TMJ must be known before a unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis can be developed. The aim of the present study was to determine the maximum loading of the TMJ prosthetic side and the natural contralateral TMJ and to investigate the influence of the

  14. Acupuncture in the Treatment of Painful Dysfunction of the Temporomandibular Joint - a Review of the Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Fink; Palle Rosted; Michael Bernateck; Meike Stiesch-Scholz; Matthias Karst

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to analyze the results of randomized clinical trials on the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of painful dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods: A literature search of 3 electronic databases was performed, and only randomized studies comparing acupuncture-treated patients with either untreated or conservatively treated control groups were included.

  15. Temporomandibular joint loading generated during bilateral static bites at molars and premolars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Makoto Abe; Raul U. Medina-Martinez; Ken-ichi Itoh; Shoji Kohno

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the features of the loading vectors of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) generated during bilateral static bites at the molars and at the premolars, and to determine the major factors affecting the difference between the two loading vectors. We computed the subjects’ estimated and theoretical minimum TMJ loadings under the two different bite

  16. Physical therapy in the postoperative management of temporomandibular joint arthroscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Uriell, P; Bertolucci, L; Swaffer, C

    1989-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is now commonly employed for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Literature regarding the rehabilitation of patients who have undergone therapeutic anthroscopy is essentially nonexistent. This article presents basic rehabilitation principles based on the authors' experience in the postoperative care of 100 TMJs treated anthroscopically over a two-year period. PMID:2611896

  17. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint successfully treated with arthroscopic lysis and lavage: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sembronio, Salvatore; Albiero, Alberto Maria; Robiony, Massimo; Costa, Fabio; Toro, Corrado; Politi, Massimo

    2007-02-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is infrequently reported. We present a case of septic arthritis of the TMJ following the extraction of the left upper second molar that occurred 1 week before beginning of symptoms. No evident predisposing factors were detected. Arthroscopic diagnosis of septic arthritis, lysis and lavage, and capsular stretch were performed. Cultures taken from the TMJ space grew Streptococcus sp. After 1 month of antimicrobial therapy the patient was asymptomatic and mandibular function was normal. Literature related to septic arthritis of TMJ and its treatment was reviewed. Different surgical procedures are available to treat this condition. Arthroscopy should be preferred as initial treatment on account of the possibility of drainage and accurate lavage under direct visualization of joint space, at the same time allowing confirmation of diagnostic hypotheses. Improving joint mobility with lysis of adhesions and capsular stretch in an early stage of disease may be helpful in stopping the fibrosis process. PMID:17095265

  18. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. Materials and methods This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18–40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared thermography for the determination of skin temperatures over the TMJ, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. The Shapiro–Wilk test was used to determine the normality of the data. The Kruskal–Wallis test, followed by Dunn’s test, was used for comparisons among groups according to TMD severity. Spearman’s correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the strength of associations among variables. Results Weak, positive, significant associations were found between FAI score and skin temperatures over the left TMJ (rs = 0.195, p = 0.009) and right TMJ (rs = 0.238, p = 0.001). Temperatures over the right and left TMJ were significantly higher in groups with more severe TMD (p < 0.05). Conclusion FAI score was associated with skin temperature over the TMJ, as determined by infrared thermography, in this sample. Women with more severe TMD demonstrated a bilateral increase in skin temperature. PMID:25544814

  19. [The relationship between whiplash injury and temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo

    2013-10-01

    This article aims to discuss the possible relationship between rapid extension-flexion of the neck-whiplash injury and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Clinical experience and studies revealed that whiplash injury may cause TMD. The pathophysiology of TMD is described as well as clinical and imaging diagnostic criteria. The treatment modalities for TMD are: physiotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and occlusal splints. PMID:24450037

  20. Acoustic characteristics of sounds from temporomandibular joints with and without effusion: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Sano, T; Widmalm, S E; Westesson, P L; Yamaga, T; Yamamoto, M; Takahashi, K; Michi, K I; Okano, T

    2002-02-01

    Joint effusion has been associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain but can only be diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For screening of patients with suspected effusion a simple and less expensive method would be desirable. We recorded joint sounds during jaw opening and closing movement from 34 TMJs with internal derangement (ID). Seventeen joints had joint effusion seen on MRI. Spectrograms of the sounds were displayed as waterfall plots showing profiles of the consecutive Hamming windows. If the profiles were similar, as judged by initial evaluation, the displayed pattern was classified as stable. If some profiles were distinctly deviating in their pattern, this was classified as unstable. Joints with effusion showed unstable sound pattern more often than joints without effusion (P < 0.001). It was concluded that TMJ sound analyses have a potential to identify joints with effusion based on their unstable sound pattern. PMID:11856395

  1. Fracture of costochondral graft in temporomandibular joint reconstructive surgery: an unexpected complication.

    PubMed

    Merkx, M A; Freihofer, H P

    1995-04-01

    The case of a 35-year-old woman with a history of several temporomandibular joint (TMJ) operations, including condylectomy, is reported. She presented with myofacial pain and partial fibrous ankylosis of her right TMJ. The ankylosis was released and an autogenous costochondral graft was used to restore the vertical dimension of the ramus. About 3 months after surgery, a fracture of the graft occurred during physical therapy. The cause of this complication is discussed with reference to the literature. PMID:7608577

  2. Imaging diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint: critical review of indications and new perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernardino Robinson de Senna; Virgínia Kelma dos Santos Silva; Julieta Petruceli França; Leandro Silva Marques; Luciano José Pereira

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades, there have been important developments in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging. New techniques complement\\u000a preexisting methods, and each modality is indicated for specific conditions in accordance with the clinical diagnosis. The\\u000a aim of this review is to give an overview of conventional and new techniques in TMJ imaging. The literature review includes\\u000a studies published between 1976 and 2009

  3. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. PMID:25458883

  4. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of temporomandibular joint: pathological aspects and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Baj, A; Beltramini, G; Moneghini, L; Marelli, S; Segna, E; Giannì, A

    2015-08-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an uncommon, benign, tumour-like disorder of unknown etiology affecting synovium-lined joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It results in proliferative, locally invasive lesions, usually presenting in monoarticular form in adults. PVNS rarely presents in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The treatment of choice is complete surgical excision of the lesion, followed by immediate reconstruction. We report a case of PVNS with masticatory space involvement, and focus on the pathological aspects and surgical treatment of the lesion. PMID:25937582

  5. Association of GDF5, SMAD3 and RUNX2 polymorphisms with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in female Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J-L; Meng, J-H; Gan, Y-H; Zhou, C-Y; Ma, X-C

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) is a complex disease and has a strong genetic component in its pathogenesis. Experimental evidence suggests the involvement of biological pathway in the disease. This case-control study was designed to investigate whether five common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGF?1 and CHST11, respectively, are associated with TMJOA in female Han Chinese patients. A total of 240 participants were evaluated comprising 114 female patients diagnosed with TMJOA based on Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and 126 healthy female controls. The SNPs of the five genes in the genomic DNA were examined by sequencing, and their allelic, genotypic and carriage rate frequency distributions, as well as the triple combination of the risk genotypes, were analysed using the logistic regression model. The SNP in GDF5 or SMAD3 showed significant association with TMJOA, a relatively weak association was observed in RUNX2. In the triple combinational analysis, the risk of TMJOA grew 5·09 times in the patients with five or six risk alleles (P < 0·01). This is the first study to evaluate the association of GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGF?1 and CHST11 with TMJOA in female Han Chinese. Our study suggests that the SNPs of genes related to TGF? family might contribute to the risk of TMJOA. PMID:25757091

  6. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Frederick; Steinkeler, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial disease process caused by muscle hyperfunction or parafunction, traumatic injuries, hormonal influences, and articular changes. Symptoms of TMD include decreased mandibular range of motion, muscle and joint pain, joint crepitus, and functional limitation or deviation of jaw opening. Only after failure of noninvasive options should more invasive and nonreversible treatments be initiated. Treatment can be divided into noninvasive, minimally invasive, and invasive options. Temporomandibular joint replacement is reserved for severely damaged joints with end-stage disease that has failed all other more conservative treatment modalities. PMID:23809304

  7. 18F-DOPA PET/CT unravels malignant paraganglioma mimicking temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Terzic, A; Becker, M; Wissmeyer, M; Scolozzi, P

    2011-07-01

    This report presents a 29-year-old patient with severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Anamnesis and clinical examination led us to the diagnosis of TMJ disorder. He was also in control for a malignant paraganglioma originating from the right carotid body. After initial surgery 8.5 years ago and the removal of metastases 2 years ago he was deemed disease free. An (18)F-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan was obtained during follow-up 6 months before he was presented to our clinic. Suspicious of a connection between the actual pain and the tumour, we scrutinized these images. We found a tiny pathological tracer uptake in the right jugular foramen but no correlating finding in the matching CT. We repeated the DOPA PET/CT and found several metastases including the previously detected lesion. Further thin-slice CT and MRI showed a 5 mm paraganglioma located anteriorly to the jugular bulb within the jugular foramen. The lesion was in close relation to the Arnold's nerve, a branch of the vagus nerve which carries sensory information from the external tympanic membrane, external auditory canal and the external ear and explained the severe pain in our patient. He then underwent radiotherapy (45 Gy) during which the pain diminished considerably. In a variety of neuroendocrine tumours, including paraganglioma, DOPA PET/CT allows primary diagnosis, staging and restaging with a higher detection rate than conventional radiological imaging. Owing to low anatomical resolution however, high resolution contrast-enhanced CT and MRI are necessary to complete the investigations. PMID:21697158

  8. 18F-DOPA PET/CT unravels malignant paraganglioma mimicking temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Terzi?, A; Becker, M; Wissmeyer, M; Scolozzi, P

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a 29-year-old patient with severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Anamnesis and clinical examination led us to the diagnosis of TMJ disorder. He was also in control for a malignant paraganglioma originating from the right carotid body. After initial surgery 8.5 years ago and the removal of metastases 2 years ago he was deemed disease free. An 18F-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan was obtained during follow-up 6 months before he was presented to our clinic. Suspicious of a connection between the actual pain and the tumour, we scrutinized these images. We found a tiny pathological tracer uptake in the right jugular foramen but no correlating finding in the matching CT. We repeated the DOPA PET/CT and found several metastases including the previously detected lesion. Further thin-slice CT and MRI showed a 5 mm paraganglioma located anteriorly to the jugular bulb within the jugular foramen. The lesion was in close relation to the Arnold's nerve, a branch of the vagus nerve which carries sensory information from the external tympanic membrane, external auditory canal and the external ear and explained the severe pain in our patient. He then underwent radiotherapy (45 Gy) during which the pain diminished considerably. In a variety of neuroendocrine tumours, including paraganglioma, DOPA PET/CT allows primary diagnosis, staging and restaging with a higher detection rate than conventional radiological imaging. Owing to low anatomical resolution however, high resolution contrast-enhanced CT and MRI are necessary to complete the investigations. PMID:21697158

  9. Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporal Bone Invading into the Pterygoid Muscle through the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Ishikawa, Kazuo; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Sato, Teruyuki; Fukui, Naoko; Takahasi, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of giant cell tumor of the temporal bone invading into the pterygoid muscle through the temporomandibular joint. The patient was a 43-year-old woman who developed left ear fullness 2 years earlier with a mass in the external auditory canal. Radiologic evaluation revealed extension into the infratemporal fossa and confirmed that the tumor was invading into pterygoid muscle. A middle cranial fossa approach along with tympanoplasty was used for total resection of the tumor. Once a tumor invades into muscle tissue, meticulous care is required to remove it because identification of tumor tissue becomes extremely difficult. PMID:25083373

  10. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2002-10-01

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60+/-5 GPa averaged over three samples.

  11. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report and the literature review.

    PubMed

    Cai, J; Cai, Z; Gao, Y

    2011-11-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an uncommon benign proliferative disorder of synovium that may involve joints, tendon sheaths, and bursae. It most often affects the knees, and less frequently involves other joints. It presents in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) extremely rarely. The authors report an elderly female patient with PVNS of the TMJ with skull base extension, who had traumatic history in the same site. It was diagnosed through core-needle biopsy, which was not documented in the literature. Radical excision and follow-up for 7-8 years was recommended because of the reported malignant transformation and high recurrence rate. This case and previously reported cases in the literature are reviewed and discussed. PMID:21474285

  12. Functional anatomy of the temporo-mandibular joint (II).

    PubMed

    Sava, Anca; Scutariu, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Jaw movement is analyzed as an action between two rigid components jointed together in a particular way, the movable mandible against the stabilized cranium. Opening and closing movements are symmetrical; that is, both sides of the cranio-mandibular articulation are making the same movements. Protrusive and retrusive movements may also be symmetrical. The mandibular muscles determine all the complicated postures and-movements of the jaw. Their behavior can be greatly clarified by restating certain fundamentals crucial to purposive muscular activity. The joint derives its arterial supply from the superficial temporal artery and the maxillary artery. Branches of the auriculo-temporal and masseteric nerves and postganglionic sympathetic nerves supply the tissues associated with the capsular ligament and the looser posterior bilaminar extension of the disc. PMID:23700914

  13. Effectiveness of a Home Exercise Program in Combination with Ultrasound Therapy for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, ?rfan; Ero?lu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyac?, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:25540479

  14. Increased Risk of Temporomandibular Joint Closed Lock: A Case-Control Study of ANKH Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyen; Takahashi, Katsu; Sakata, Tomoko; Kiso, Honoka; Sugai, Manabu; Fujimura, Kazuma; Shimizu, Akira; Kosugi, Shinji; Sato, Tosiya; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to carry out a histological examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in ank mutant mice and to identify polymorphisms of the human ANKH gene in order to establish the relationship between the type of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and ANKH polymorphisms. Materials and Methods Specimens from the TMJ of ank mutant and wild-type mice were inspected with a haematoxylin and eosin staining method. A sample of 55 TMD patients were selected. Each was examined with standard clinical procedures and genotyping techniques. Results The major histological finding in ank mutant mice was joint space narrowing. Within TMD patients, closed lock was more prevalent among ANKH-OR homozygotes (p?=?0.011, OR?=?7.7, 95% CI 1.6–36.5) and the elder (p?=?0.005, OR?=?2.4, 95% CI 1.3–4.3). Conclusions Fibrous ankylosis was identified in the TMJ of ank mutant mice. In the human sample, ANKH-OR polymorphism was found to be a genetic marker associated with TMJ closed lock. Future investigations correlating genetic polymorphism to TMD are indicated. PMID:22003394

  15. Differential Diagnostics of Pain in the Course of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Ze?czak-Wi?ckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  16. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: Case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Eryka A.; Young, Sean M.; McKenna, Samuel J.; McNaughton, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular (TM) joint is rare, but it is associated with high risk for significant morbidity. Objective We reviewed the available literature regarding the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and clinical course of TM joint septic arthritis, focusing on elements relevant to emergency medicine physicians. Case Reports In the first case, a healthy 6-year-old boy presented with fever and trismus; computed tomography with contrast revealed a TM joint effusion. After empiric intravenous antibiotics, intraoperative arthrocentesis of the TM joint returned one milliliter of flocculent fluid, which was cultured and grew pan-sensitive Streptococcus pyogenes. He was discharge home with amoxicillin/clavulanate and experienced complete resolution of his symptoms. In the second case, more than three weeks after extraction of her third molars, an 18-year-old woman presented with facial pain, swelling, and trismus and was found to have a loculated abscess involving the left masseteric and pterygomandibular spaces with extension to the left deep temporal region and the skull base. She experienced a complicated postoperative course and required multiple procedures and intravenous antibiotics for growth of multiple bacteria. More than a month later underwent TM joint arthrotomy for TM joint septic arthritis, and she was found to have acute osteomyelitis. She continued to require multiple treatment modalities; twenty months after her initial presentation, she underwent left total TM joint arthroplasty for fibrous ankylosis of the TM joint. Conclusion Septic arthritis of the TM joint may be caused by hematogenous spread of distant infection or local spread of deep masticator space infections. Patients may present with TM joint septic arthritis acutely or sub-acutely. Septic arthritis of the TM joint should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with trismus and pain or fever. PMID:23896057

  17. Unrecognized bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation after general anesthesia with a delay in diagnosis and management: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anterior bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation is not an uncommon occurrence and has been reported before. However, its diagnosis can easily be overlooked, especially by clinicians who are unfamiliar with this pathology. Continuous discussion of the pathology is required to prevent delays in diagnosis, which can lead to long-term sequelae for the patient. Case presentation We present the case of a 66-year-old Somali woman who experienced a bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation after a general anesthetic for an exploratory laparotomy for excision of a pelvic sarcoma. She first presented in the intensive care unit with preauricular pain and an inability to close her mouth, and was initially misdiagnosed and treated for a muscle spasm. The cause of her misdiagnosis was multifactorial - opioid-related sedation, language and cultural barrier, and unfamiliarity with the pathology. Her diagnosis was proven 18 hours after the completion of surgery with a plain X-ray. A manual closed reduction was performed with minimal sedation by oral surgery. Conclusion We provided an in-depth discussion of temporomandibular joint dislocation and suggest a simple test that would prevent delayed diagnosis of temporomandibular joint dislocation in any patient undergoing general anesthesia. A normal mandibular excursion should be tested in every patient after surgery in the postoperative care unit, by asking the patient to open and close their mouth during the immediate postoperative recovery period or passively performing the range of motion test. PMID:24139071

  18. Lateral cephalometric analysis of asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with and without bilateral temporomandibular joint disk displacement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José A. Bósio; James G. Burch; Ross H. Tallents; Dale B. Wade; Frank M. Beck

    1998-01-01

    Few studies of dentofacial and orthodontic structural relationships relative to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction have been reported. We undertook this investigation to determine any correlation of orthodontic and dentofacial characteristics with TMJ bilateral disc displacement. The population of patients was selected from a TMJ clinic where a control group of asymptomatic volunteers had been previously established and standardized. Differences in

  19. The effect of catastrophizing and depression on chronic pain – a prospective cohort study of temporomandibular muscle and joint pain disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana Miriam Velly; John O. Look; Charles Carlson; Patricia A. Lenton; Wenjun Kang; Christina A. Holcroft; James R. Fricton

    2011-01-01

    Although most cases of temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD) are mild and self-limiting, about 10% of TMJD patients develop severe disorders associated with chronic pain and disability. It has been suggested that depression and catastrophizing contributes to TMJD chronicity. This article assesses the effects of catastrophizing and depression on clinically significant TMJD pain (Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS] II–IV).

  20. A comparison of stress distributions for different surgical procedures, screw dimensions and orientations for a Temporomandibular joint implant

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Roy Chowdhury; Ajay Kashi; Subrata Saha

    2011-01-01

    Finite element analysis is a useful analytical tool for the design of biomedical implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of temporomandibular joint implants with multiple design variables of the screws used for fixation of the implant. A commercially available implant with full mandible was analyzed using a finite element software package. The effects of different

  1. Dynamic MRI of the temporomandibular joint at 3 Tesla using a gradient echo sequence , J. L. Go2

    E-print Network

    Southern California, University of

    -time gradient echo (GRE) imaging at 3 Tesla. Methods and Results Experiments were performed on a GE Signa ExciteDynamic MRI of the temporomandibular joint at 3 Tesla using a gradient echo sequence Y-C. Kim1 , J sequence at 1.5 Tesla [1]. In this work, we report our preliminary studies on the feasibility of a real

  2. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: a comparison between a fluoroscopic and a nonfluoroscopic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.W.; Langlais, R.P.; Abramovitch, K.

    1989-05-01

    A nonfluoroscopic temporomandibular joint arthrographic technique is contrasted with a more widely employed fluoroscopically guided technique. The nonfluoroscopic technique uses a posterior approach to joint injection, as contrasted with the lateral injection approach of the fluoroscopically guided technique. The advantages of the nonfluoroscopic technique are less radiation dose to the patient, less expensive and less sophisticated imaging equipment, and less potential for neurovascular trauma. The fluoroscopic technique offers greater control of the procedure, less patient and operator time, and the capability for a dynamic videofluoroscopic study. Both techniques appear to be safe and efficacious. Differences in anatomy, imaging modalities, patient radiation exposure, and potential complications are also discussed as part of this comparison.48 references.

  3. The development of strains, forces and nociceptor activity in retrodiscal tissues of the temporomandibular joint of male and female goats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Loughner; J. Miller; V. Broumand; B. Cooper

    1997-01-01

    Chronic pain in the temporomandibular (TM) joint is predominantly manifested in women. We examined biomechanical and neural\\u000a factors that could contribute to this differential representation. Relationships between jaw rotation, soft tissue strains\\u000a and soft tissue forces were examined in the goat TM joint. Strains were minimal until the jaw was rotated beyond the normal\\u000a range of motion (7.25 deg). There

  4. Incidence of Otolaryngological Symptoms in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Ferendiuk, E.; Zajdel, K.

    2014-01-01

    The functional disorders of the masticatory organ are the third stomatological disease to be considered a populational disease due to its chronicity and widespread prevalence. Otolaryngological symptoms are a less common group of dysfunction symptoms, including sudden hearing impairment or loss, ear plugging sensation and earache, sore and burning throat, difficulties in swallowing, tinnitus, and vertigo. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems encountered in patients with the functional disorders of the masticatory organ triggered our interest in conducting retrospective studies with the objective of assessing the incidence of otolaryngological symptoms in patients subjected to prosthetic treatment of the functional disorders of masticatory organ on the basis of the analysis of medical documentation containing data collected in medical interviews. Material and Methods. Retrospective study was conducted by analyzing the results of medical interviews of 1208 patients, who had reported for prosthetic treatment at the Functional Disorders Clinic of the Department of Dental Prosthetics of Jagiellonian University Medical College in Cracow between 2008 and March 14, 2014. Results. Otolaryngological symptoms were observed in 141 patients. The most common symptoms in the study group were earache and sudden hearing impairment; no cases of sudden hearing loss were experienced. PMID:25050373

  5. Temporomandibular joint development and functional disorders related to clinical otologic symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Savi?-Pavicin, Ivana; Zadravec, Dijana; Marotti, Miljenko; Krolo, Ivan; Grbesa, Durdica

    2011-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are a form of musculoskeletal pain of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and/or masticatory muscles of nonspecific etiology. In this study, the relationship between embryonic and anatomic-topographic similarities of the TMJ and the ear was analyzed, i.e. secondary otologic symptoms that can be closely connected to TMJ disorder. Nonspecific otologic symptoms are not primary diagnostic symptoms of TMD, but may cause diagnostic confusion due to patients' inability to correctly locate the origin of pain. The most common otologic symptoms that can be related to TMDs are otalgia, tinnitus and vertigo. Otorhinolaryngologists have to differentiate between primary otologic symptoms and those caused by TMJ disorders. In TMD diagnosis, manual techniques are used to determine the arthrogenic or myogenic form, whereas in the diagnosis of arthrogenic disorders magnetic resonance imaging is indicated as the highly specific imaging method ofjoint disk and osteoarthritic changes. Symptomatic treatments for TMD as well as the etiologic diagnosis of the pain require multidisciplinary cooperation between dentists and medical specialists. PMID:22034784

  6. Engineered microporosity: enhancing the early regenerative potential of decellularized temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Juran, Cassandra M; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120??m through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm(2) and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  7. Engineered Microporosity: Enhancing the Early Regenerative Potential of Decellularized Temporomandibular Joint Discs

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Cassandra M.; Dolwick, M. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120??m through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm2 and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  8. Use of autologous conditioned serum (Orthokine®) for the treatment of the dege-nerative osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Camino, Juan C.; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) using autologous conditioned serum (ACS) has become in recent years an alternative to consider in the approach of the degenerative joint disease of the knee. There is no support in the literature for the use of ACS for the treatment of OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), although the promising results obtained in human patients with knee joint disease as well as in animal studies are opening the way for its use at the TMJ. The aim of this paper is to conduct a review of the published literature regarding the use of the ACS for the treatment of OA in humans, considering the level of scientific evidence, and following the principles of the evidence-based medicine and dentistry. Material and Methods: A PubMed-MEDLINE search was carried out of articles published between 1980 and 2011. After an initial search, a total of 102 articles were obtained, followed by a selection of the most relevant articles according to the topic; a total of 8 articles were selected, which were stratified according to their level of scientific evidence using SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy). Results: At the time of this review, there is no available literature referring the use of ACS at the TMJ. However, the use of the ACS in other joints is well documented, both experimentally and clinically, in humans and animals. The reviewed articles, with a level of evidence 1 and 2 according to the SORT criteria, have generally promising results. Discussion and Conclusions: The use of ACS in the treatment of OA in joints other than the TMJ, is endorsed by the level of evidence found in the literature, which opens the door to future studies to determine the feasibility of the use of the ACS in the treatment of degenerative OA that affects TMJ. Key words:Osteoarthritis, temporomandibular joint, autologous conditioned serum. PMID:23524415

  9. Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    A 33-year-old man fell from a height and was referred to our hospital. Physical examination showed a swelling in the left preauricular region without laceration. No thrill or bruit was detected at this time. A face x-ray and a computed tomographic scan showed a left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, Le Fort I fractures, and a mandibular body fracture. Left TMJ dislocation was treated by manual reduction. Two days after admission, a swelling in the left preauricular region progressed, with thrill and bruit. Left external carotid artery angiograms showed an arteriovenous fistula with a dilated pouch near the left TMJ. The fistula was fed by the left superficial temporal artery and drained into the left superficial temporal vein. The fistula was successfully embolized using Tornado coils. This is the first case of an arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of TMJ dislocation. PMID:21959481

  10. Association Between Stress, Sleep Quality and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: Simulated Mars Mission

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the association between quality of sleep and stress in individuals with TMD (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) in simulated Mars mission. Methods The 24 healthy crew members were recruited. The physiological measures of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded. The Symptom Checklist-90-revised was used which was based on nine dimensions of psychological functioning. The Multidimensional Pain Inventory was pain severity, social and physical activities, affective distress, social support, and feelings of life control. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to measure the number of hours spent in bed and during asleep, frequency and reasons for awakening, and difficulty returning to sleep after awakening. The orofacial pain questionnaire was applied to measure pain experience using descriptors from the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Salivary cortisol and melatonin were measured. Results The 15 crew members reported temporomandibular joint pain after 6 days of mission. On dental examination, 5 crew members reported simple muscle pain (SM) and other 10 crew members with TMD. The TMD group endorsed more affective descriptors of their pain experience. Compared to the TMD group, the SM group also reported significantly poorer sleep duration. The TMD group reported nonsignificantly more daytime dysfunction than the control. Higher levels of salivary cortisol and salivary melatonin were reported in the TMD group as compared to other group. Conclusion This study concludes that both quality of sleep and stress levels due to extreme condition (simulated Mars mission) were associated with TMD in simulated Mars mission. PMID:23772292

  11. Sleep Disorders and their Association with Laboratory Pain Sensitivity in Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael T.; Wickwire, Emerson M.; Grace, Edward G.; Edwards, Robert R.; Buenaver, Luis F.; Peterson, Stephen; Klick, Brendan; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: We characterized sleep disorder rates in temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and evaluated possible associations between sleep disorders and laboratory measures of pain sensitivity. Design: Research diagnostic examinations were conducted, followed by two consecutive overnight polysomnographic studies with morning and evening assessments of pain threshold. Setting: Orofacial pain clinic and inpatient sleep research facility Participants: Fifty-three patients meeting research diagnostic criteria for myofascial TMD. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: We determined sleep disorder diagnostic rates and conducted algometric measures of pressure pain threshold on the masseter and forearm. Heat pain threshold was measured on the forearm; 75% met self-report criteria for sleep bruxism, but only 17% met PSG criteria for active sleep bruxism. Two or more sleep disorders were diagnosed in 43% of patients. Insomnia disorder (36%) and sleep apnea (28.4%) demonstrated the highest frequencies. Primary insomnia (PI) (26%) comprised the largest subcategory of insomnia. Even after controlling for multiple potential confounds, PI was associated with reduced mechanical and thermal pain thresholds at all sites (P < 0.05). Conversely, the respiratory disturbance index was associated with increased mechanical pain thresholds on the forearm (P < 0.05). Conclusions: High rates of PI and sleep apnea highlight the need to refer TMD patients complaining of sleep disturbance for polysomnographic evaluation. The association of PI and hyperalgesia at a non-orofacial site suggests that PI may be linked with central sensitivity and could play an etiologic role in idiopathic pain disorders. The association between sleep disordered breathing and hypoalgesia requires further study and may provide novel insight into the complex interactions between sleep and pain-regulatory processes. Citation: Smith MT; Wickwire EM; Grace EG; Edwards RR; Buenaver LF; Peterson S; Klick B; Haythornthwaite JA. Sleep disorders and their association with laboratory pain sensitivity in temporomandibular joint disorder. SLEEP 2009;32(6):779–790. PMID:19544755

  12. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding. PMID:25737135

  13. Long-Term Symptoms Onset and Heterotopic Bone Formation around a Total Temporomandibular Joint Prosthesis: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Manfredini, Daniele; Ferronato, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The literature on total alloplastic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstructions is encouraging, and studies on total alloplastic TMJ replacements outcomes showed acceptable improvements in terms of both pain levels and jaw function. Nevertheless, some adverse events, such as heterotopic bone formation around the implanted prosthesis, may occur. In consideration of that, the present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant. Methods The present manuscript describes a case of heterotopic bone formation around a total TMJ prosthesis, which occurred several years after the implant in patients, who previously underwent multiple failed TMJ surgeries. Results Ten years after the surgical TMJ replacement to solve an ankylotic bone block, the patient came to our attention again referring a progressive limitation in mouth opening. A computerized tomography showed evidence of marked heterotopic bone formation in the medial aspects of the joint, where a new-born ankylotic block occupied most part of the gap created by resecting the coronoid process at the time of the TMJ prosthesis insertion. Conclusions Despite this adverse event has been sometimes described in the literature, this is the first case in which its occurrence happened several years after the temporomandibular joint replacement. It can be suggested that an accurate assessment of pre-operative risk factors for re-ankylosis (e.g., patients with multiple failed temporomandibular joint surgeries) and within-intervention prevention (e.g., strategies to keep the bone interfaces around the implant separated) should be better standardized and define in future studies. PMID:24800055

  14. Investigating activity of masticatory muscles in patients with hypermobile temporomandibular joints by using EMG

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Amin; Rybalov, Oleg; Shadmehr, Elham; Hatami, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) can manifest higher range of motions in mandible. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the activity of masticatory muscle of TMJs in healthy individuals and patients with mild, moderate and severe TMJH. Material and Methods In this clinical study, 69 patients (between the ages of 22 to 42) with manifestation of TMJH were included. The patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO): (light) with MMO of 50-55 mm; (moderate) with MMO between 55 to 65 mm; and (severe) with MMO >65 mm. Also, 20 healthy people with profiled tomography in the last 6 months were invited as control group (healthy) with normal MMO (<50 mm). All the groups subjected to electromyogram (EMG) in 2 steps: maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) of the jaws; and during chewing of bread by using one side of the jaws voluntary. The collected data were analyzed by Student T-test and Chi-Square tests using SPSS software version 15 at significant level of 0.05. Results Both TMJs of light, moderate and severe groups showed significant differences in frequency, time of activity and rest in comparison with healthy group during chewing and MVC (all p values < 0.01). Conclusions Masticatory muscles activity reduced in relation with the severity of TMJH and higher excessive mouth opening. Key words:Electromyography, joint hypermobility, mouth opening, tempormandibular joint.

  15. Noninfectious joint disease in cattle.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Sylvain; Lardé, Hélène

    2014-03-01

    Osteochondrosis causes variable degrees of joint effusion and lameness. Arthroscopic debridement of the lesions provides the best long-term outcome. Articular fracture or joint instability following collateral ligament rupture causes severe joint effusion and lameness. Internal fixation combined with external coaptation is the treatment of choice. Degenerative joint disease in young animals has a guarded prognosis. Arthroscopy combined with medical therapy may slow down the disease process. Degenerative joint disease involving the distal interphalangeal joint has a good prognosis following joint resection. PMID:24534666

  16. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc position in patients with TMJ pain assessed by coronal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, L; Giannakopoulos, NN; Rohde, S; Schmitter, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the position of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc in patients with TMJ pain and compare it with equivalent published data of asymptomatic volunteers. Methods: The oblique coronal closed- and open-jaw MR images from 66 patients with TMJ pain were evaluated. Clinical examination followed the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. In all coronal images, the transverse condylar axis and the medial and lateral edges of the disc were determined using special software. Inter-rater agreement was calculated [two raters; inter-rater correlation coefficient (ICC)]. The presence of osteoarthrosis (OA) was determined by two independent raters. The influence of OA was estimated in patients (generalized estimation equation model). The results were compared with those of healthy volunteers (t-test). Differences between closed and open jaw in patients were analysed with the Wilcoxon matched-pair test. Results: The ICC was good for the transverse condylar axis (0.987) and the medial edge of the disc (0.799) and fair for the lateral edge (0.355). On average, the disc projected 5.5% to the medial side; laterally, the condyle was partially uncovered by the disc (?16.6%). In the open-jaw position, both the medial and the lateral edges shifted medially (to 17.6% vs ?23.6%, Wilcoxon matched-pair test, p?

  17. Effectiveness of Physiotherapy and GaAlAs Laser in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hlinakova, Petra; Kasparova, Magdalena; Rehacek, Adam; Vavrickova, Lenka; Navrátil, Leoš

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a treatment method commonly used in physiotherapy for musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to monitor the function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues and compare the objective measurements of the effect of LLLT. Background data: LLLT has been considered effective in reducing pain and muscular tension; thus improving the quality of patients' lives. Materials and Methods: TMJ function was evaluated by cephalometric tracing analysis, orthopantomogram, TMJ tomogram, and computer face-bow record. Interalveolar space between central incisors before and after therapy was measured. Patients evaluated pain on the Visual Analog Scale. LLLT was performed in five treatment sessions (energy density of 15.4?J/cm2) by semiconductive GaAlAs laser with an output of 280?mW, emitting radiation wavelength of 830?mm. The laser supplied a spot of?0.2?cm2. Results: Baseline comparisons between the healthy patients and patients with low-level laser application show that TMJ pain during function is based on anatomical and function changes in TMJ areas. Significant differences were seen in the posterior and anterior face height. The results comparing healthy and impaired TMJ sagittal condyle paths showed that patients with TMJ pain during function had significantly flatter nonanatomical movement during function. After therapy, the unpleasant feeling was reduced from 27.5 to 4.16 on the pain Visual Analog Scale. The pain had reduced the ability to open the mouth from 34 to 42?mm. Conclusions: The laser therapy was effective in the improvement of the range of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and promoted a significant reduction of pain symptoms. PMID:22551049

  18. Effect of Low-Level Laser on Healing of Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peimani, Ali; Sardary, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are clinical conditions characterized by pain and sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study was designed to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on healing of osteoarthritis in rats with TMD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar rats (250–200 g) were housed in standard plastic cages. After injection of Complete Freund’s adjuvant into the TMJ, rats were randomly divided into two groups of 16 (case and control) and anesthetized; then osteoarthritis was induced via intraarticular injection of 50 µl of Complete Freund’s adjuvant; into the bilateral TMJs. In the case group, LLLT was done transcutaneously for 10 minutes daily, starting the day after the confirmation of osteoarthritis. Exposure was performed for 10 minutes at the right side of the TMJ with 880 nm low-level laser with 100 mW power and a probe diameter of 0.8 mm. Control rats were not treated with laser. Results: After three days of treatment the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, angiogenesis, number of cell layers and arthritis in rats in the case group were not significantly different compared with controls (P>0.05). After seven days, the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, number of cell layers, and arthritis in the case group improved compared to controls (P<0.05); angiogenesis in both groups was similar. Conclusion: Treatment of TMD with LLLT after 7 days of irradiation with a wavelength of 880 nm was associated with a greater improvement compared to the control group. PMID:25628667

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint: diagnostic difficulty caused by extensive pneumatization of the mastoid air cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth Wong; Peter L. Munk

    1999-01-01

    Objective. During routine MR imaging of temporomandibular joints we have observed that an area of low signal is sometimes identified\\u000a within the temporal bone overlying the glenoid fossa on proton-density sequences. This finding at times simulates a mass.\\u000a CT in this situation has demonstrated marked pneumatization of the mastoid air cell extending to that portion of the temporal\\u000a bone overlying

  20. Treatment of painful temporomandibular joints with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor: a randomized placebo-controlled comparison of celecoxib to naproxen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lauren E. Ta; Raymond A. Dionne

    2004-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, with naproxen, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and placebo in the treatment of painful temporomandibular joints (TMJs). In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 68 subjects with painful TMJs secondary to disc-displacement with reduction, received celecoxib 100 mg twice a day; naproxen, 500 mg twice a day; or placebo

  1. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    Skulls from 145 northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria. The museum specimens were acquired from strandings along the west coast of the USA between 1896 and 2008. Seventy-one skulls (49.0%) were from male animals, 56 (38.6%) from female animals and 18 (12.4%) from animals of unknown sex. Their age varied from juvenile to adult, with 58 adult animals (40.0%) and 87 juvenile animals (60.0%). The majority of teeth were available for examination (95.1%); 3.4% of teeth were artefactually absent, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 0.6% were deemed congenitally absent. Males were no more likely than females to have either acquired tooth loss (P = 0.054) or congenitally absent teeth (P = 0.919). Adults had significantly more acquired tooth loss than juveniles (P = 0.0099). Malformations were seen in 11 teeth (0.2% of all 4,699 teeth available for examination). Two roots, instead of the typical one root, were found on 14 teeth (0.3%). Supernumerary teeth were associated with 14 normal teeth (0.3%) in eight specimens (5.5% of the total number of specimens). A total of 22 persistent deciduous teeth were found, 19 of which were associated with the maxillary canine teeth. Attrition/abrasion was seen on 194 teeth (3.9%); the canine teeth were most often affected, accounting for 39.7% of all abraded teeth. Adults were found to have a greater prevalence of abraded teeth than juveniles (P <0.0001). No significant difference was found in the appearance of attrition/abrasion between males and females (P = 0.072). Tooth fractures were found in 24 specimens (16.6%), affecting a total of 54 teeth (1.1%). Periapical lesions were found in two skulls (1.4%). None of the specimens showed signs of enamel hypoplasia. About a fifth (18.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, showed signs of alveolar bony changes consistent with periodontitis. A total of 108 specimens (74.5%) had at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality. PMID:25824117

  2. Stakeholder engagement analysis - a bioethics dilemma in patient-targeted intervention: patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Demerjian, Gary; Jan, Allison; Sama, Nateli; Nguyen, Mia; Du, Angela; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Modern health care in the field of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing is grounded in fundamental philosophy and epistemology of translational science. Recently in the U.S major national initiatives have been implemented in the hope of closing the gaps that sometimes exist between the two fundamental components of translational science, the translational research and translational effectiveness. Subsequent to these initiatives, many improvements have been made; however, important bioethical issues and limitations do still exist that need to be addressed. One such issue is the stakeholder engagement and its assessment and validation. Federal, state and local organizations such as PCORI and AHRQ concur that the key to a better understanding of the relationship between translational research and translational effectiveness is the assessment of the extent to which stakeholders are actively engaged in the translational process of healthcare. The stakeholder engagement analysis identifies who the stakeholders are, maps their contribution and involvement, evaluates their priorities and opinions, and accesses their current knowledge base. This analysis however requires conceptualization and validation from the bioethics standpoint. Here, we examine the bioethical dilemma of stakeholder engagement analysis in the context of the person-environment fit (PE-fit) theoretical model. This model is an approach to quantifying stakeholder engagement analysis for the design of patient-targeted interventions. In our previous studies of Alzheimer patients, we have developed, validated and used a simple instrument based on the PE-fit model that can be adapted and utilized in a much less studied pathology as a clinical model that has a wide range of symptoms and manifestations, the temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the jaw joint endowed with sensory and motor innervations that project from within the central nervous system and its dysfunction can be manifested systemically in forms of movement disorders, and related pathological symptomatologies.Currently, there is limited reliable evidence available to fully understand the complexity of the various domains of translational effectiveness, particularly in the context of stakeholder engagement and its assessment, validation as well as the bioethical implications as they pertain to evidence-based, effectivness-focused and patient-centered care. PMID:25600231

  3. Functional Analysis of the Rabbit Temporomandibular Joint Using Dynamic Biplane Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Desai, Riddhi; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic function of the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was analyzed through non-invasive three-dimensional skeletal kinematics, providing essential knowledge for understanding normal joint motion. The objective of this study was to evaluate and determine repeatable measurements of rabbit TMJ kinematics. Maximal distances, as well as paths were traced and analyzed for the incisors and for the condyle-fossa relationship. From one rabbit to another, the rotations and translations of both the incisors and the condyle relative to the fossa contained multiple clear, repeatable patterns. The slope of the superior/inferior incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the transverse axis was repeatable to 0.14 mm/degree and the right/left incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the vertical axis was repeatable to 0.03 mm/degree. The slope of the superior/inferior condylar translation with respect to the rotational movement about the transverse axis showed a consistent relationship to within 0.05 mm/degree. The maximal translations of the incisors and condyles were also consistent within and between rabbits. With an understanding of the normal mechanics of the TMJ, kinematics can be used to compare and understand TMJ injury and degeneration models. PMID:24594064

  4. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. Results: The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P < 0.0001). Clicking noise during mouth chewing was significantly different between groups (P = 0.01). And, there was significant difference in the frequencies of maximum opening of the mouth between groups (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that subjects’ war veterans with PTSD have significantly poorer TMJ functional status than the control subjects. PMID:25077153

  5. A technique to investigate the three-dimensional kinesiology of the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Siegler, S; Hayes, R; Nicolella, D; Fielding, A

    1991-06-01

    Previous kinesiological studies of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were based on the motion of only one or two selected points on the mandible (such as the lower central incisor, the mandibular condyle). In the present study, a technique was developed to measure, analyze, and describe the full three-dimensional kinematic characteristics of the TMJ during any mandibular activity. The technique was based on determination of the relative position between the mandible and the temporal bone from measurement of the location of points on light-weight frames rigidly attached through splints to the maxillary and mandibular teeth. An optoelectric kinematic data acquisition system has been used to record the location of these points. The results of the study indicate the following major advantages of this technique over previously reported kinesiological methods: (1) the technique provides a full description of the motion of the mandible with respect to the temporal bone, including all the six degrees of freedom associated with this motion; (2) the description of motion in terms of joint parameters enhances interpretation of the data by clinicians; (3) the motion of any point of interest on the mandible can be easily derived from the data and; (4) the system provides only negligible interference with the natural jaw motion of the subject. It does not require head fixation, does not alter or interfere with the natural occlusion, and its light weight causes only minimal (and negligible) loading of the mandible. PMID:2072331

  6. Correlation between clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with temporomandibular joint internal derangement

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young-Wook; Park, Sung-Hoon; On, Sung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to clarify which findings in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are good predicators of pain and mouth opening limitation in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement (ID). Materials and Methods Clinical examinations for pain and mouth opening limitation were conducted for suspected TMJ ID. MRI scans were taken within a week of clinical examinations. On the oblique-sagittal plane image, readings were obtained in terms of the functional aspect of disc position, degree of displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion, and osteoarthrosis. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the predictors of pain and mouth opening limitation. Results A total of 48 patients (96 TMJs) were studied, including 39 female patients and 9 male patients whose ages ranged from 10 to 65 years. The resultant data showed significant correlations between pain and the MR imaging of the degree of disc displacement (P<0.05). The probability of there being pain in moderate to significant cases was 9.69 times higher than in normal cases. No significant correlation was found between mouth opening limitation and MRI findings. Conclusion We identified a significant correlation between clinical symptoms and MRI findings of ID. The degree of anterior disc displacement may be useful for predicting pain in patients with TMJ ID. PMID:26131429

  7. Arthrocentesis and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    De Riu, Giacomo; Soma, Damiano; Pisano, Milena; Sembronio, Salvatore; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512. PMID:24319462

  8. Knockdown of Fc?RIII in an arthritic temporomandibular joint reduced the nociceptive response

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Puri, Jyoti; Bellinger, Larry L.

    2010-01-01

    Fc?RIII (CD16) is a receptor expressed on immune cells that selectively binds immmunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules, IgG binding results in cellular activation and cytokine release. IgG is an important factor in arthritis and can be found in arthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJ). We hypothesize that a reduction in Fc?RIII expression in the TMJ tissues will reduce the nociceptive and inflammatory response in an inflamed joint. To test this hypothesis siRNA, either naked or complexed with linear polyethylenimine (PEI) was injected into the superior joint space of the TMJ. After administration of siRNA the joint was injected with saline or with complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Nociceptive responses were quantitated in the rat by measuring the animal’s meal duration. Fc?RIII expression in the TMJ tissue was assayed by immunocytochemistry or western. Cleavage of Fc?RIII transcript was then assayed by 5? rapid amplification of cDNA ends method (5? RACE). Interleukin-1? (IL-1?) and IgG content was measured in the TMJ tissue by ELISA. The results indicate that injection of Fc?RIII siRNA reduced the amount of Fc?RIII in the TMJ tissues and that the transcript was cleaved in a manner consistent with a RNA interference mechanism. Moreover, injection of Fc?RIII siRNA reduced the nociceptive response of rats with an arthritic TMJ and reduced the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1?. We conclude that Fc?RIII contributes to the pain resulting from inflammatory arthritis of the TMJ and that siRNA has the potential to be an effective treatment for this disorder. PMID:20589683

  9. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  10. Characterization of Degenerative Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M. K.; Arzi, B.; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N.; Athanasiou, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  11. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30?years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  12. Changes in Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Symptoms Following Massage Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melissa Joan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this case report was to describe the effects that massage therapy had on a woman with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Participant The 26-year-old woman’s primary symptoms were pain, decreased range of motion, clicking, and crepitus. These symptoms were reportedly associated with emotional stress and bruxism. Intervention Ten 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The client’s progress was monitored by an initial, midway, and final assessment, using range of motion testing, personal interview, an orthopedic test, and postural analysis. Progress was also evaluated by the use of a daily journal. The client participated in a home care routine consisting of stretches, self-massage, postural training, a proprioception exercise, and hydrotherapy. Results Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress. Conclusion Although the client in this report experienced positive results, more extensive studies are needed to understand the effects of massage on TMD. PMID:22211156

  13. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction?An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective?To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods?A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results?Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p?=?0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio?=?2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion?These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  14. Incremental increase in percentage mouth opening after coronoidectomy in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Singh, V; Agrawal, A; Bhagol, A; Bali, R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental improvement in mouth opening following coronoidectomy. Twenty-three patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis (Sawhney types I-III) were assessed preoperatively; physical and radiological examinations were done (panoramic radiography and computed tomography). Data including demographic and clinical parameters were recorded. Patients with bilateral ankylosis, recurrent cases, and those with Sawhney type IV TMJ ankylosis were not included. The improvement in mouth opening was measured after ostectomy, after ipsilateral coronoidectomy, and after contralateral coronoidectomy. The improvements in mouth opening at each stage were analysed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a marked improvement in maximal incisal opening (MIO) from 5.7±4.2mm to 23.7±5.9mm after removal of the ankylotic bony mass. MIO was significantly increased after ipsilateral coronoidectomy (31.6±7.4mm), and after contralateral coronoidectomy, a mean MIO of 39.4±11.2mm was achieved. At more than 1 year of follow-up, all patients showed improved mouth opening. In conclusion, coronoidectomy plays an important role in improving mouth opening in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25801011

  15. [Temporomandibular joint reconstruction with free rib and iliac crest bone transplants].

    PubMed

    Ordung, R; Reuther, J; Michel, C; Pistner, H; Eckstein, T

    1994-01-01

    From 1981-1992 we reconstructed the temporomandibular joint in 42 patients. In 33 cases reconstruction followed tumour resection of the mandible, almost advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the retromolar region. Primary reconstruction was made by an alloplastic condylar prosthesis combined with a plate for mandibular reconstruction. 2 years after first treatment secondary reconstruction followed by transplantation of a free iliac bone graft. In some cases a new condylus was formed using autogenous rib graft or allogenous cartilage. Result was adequate and painless oral aperture. For reconstruction after ankylosis, arthrosis or arthritis we use a autogenous costochondral graft. 9 patients received such treatment. In 5 or 9 cases with severe ankylosis we prefer a two-time-approach: after resection of the ankylosis we first fix an alloplastic implant (Palacos) at the skull base for distraction of the scar. Two or three years later we do secondary reconstruction with a costochondral graft. The final result strongly depends on functional postoperative treatment and the compliance of the patient. PMID:8088648

  16. The region-dependent dynamic properties of porcine temporomandibular joint disc under unconfined compression.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pelayo; Jesús Lamela, María; Ramos, Alberto; Fernández-Canteli, Alfonso; Tanaka, Eiji

    2013-02-22

    In this study, the dynamic compressive properties in five different regions of the porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc are investigated over a wide range of loading frequencies. The aim was, thus far, to evaluate the regional difference and the frequency-related effect of the applied load on these properties. Eleven porcine TMJ discs were used; each disc was divided into 5 regions, anterior, central, posterior, lateral and medial. Sinusoidal compressive strain was applied with an amplitude of 1.0% and a frequency range between 0.01 and 10Hz. The dynamic storage and loss moduli increase with frequency, the highest values being attained at the posterior region, followed by the central and anterior regions. Loss tangent, tan?, ranged from 0.20 to 0.35, which means that the disc is primarily elastic in nature and has a small but not negligible viscosity. The present results suggest that the dynamic viscoelastic compressive modulus is region-specific and depends on the loading frequency, thus having important implications for the transmission of load to the TMJ. PMID:23261240

  17. Dynamic compressive properties of articular cartilages in the porcine temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Lamela, María Jesús; Fernández, Pelayo; Ramos, Alberto; Fernández-Canteli, Alfonso; Tanaka, Eiji

    2013-07-01

    The mandibular condylar and temporal cartilages in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) play an important role as a stress absorber during function. However, relatively little information is available on its viscoelastic properties in dynamic compression, particularly in a physiological range of frequencies. We hypothesized that these properties are region-specific and depend on loading frequency. To characterize the viscoelastic properties of both cartilages, we performed dynamic indentation tests over a wide range of loading frequencies. Nine porcine TMJs were used; the articular surface was divided into five regions: anterior; central; posterior; medial and lateral. Sinusoidal compressive strain was applied with an amplitude of 1.0% and a frequency range between 0.01 and 10 Hz. In both cartilages, the dynamic storage modulus increased with frequency, and the value was the highest in the lateral region. These values of E' in the temporal cartilage were smaller than those in the mandibular condylar cartilage in all five regions except the lateral region. The Loss tangent values were higher in the temporal cartilage (0.35-0.65) than in the mandibular condylar one (0.2-0.45), which means that the temporal cartilage presents higher viscosity. The present results suggest that the dynamic compressive moduli in both cartilages are region-specific and dependent on the loading frequency, which might have important implications for the transmission of load in the TMJ. PMID:23660305

  18. Long-term Outcomes of Shamanic Treatment for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vuckovic, Nancy H; Williams, Louise A; Schneider, Jennifer; Ramirez, Michelle; Gullion, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) are chronic, often refractory, pain conditions affecting the jaw and face. Patients least likely to respond to allopathic treatment have the most marked biologic responsiveness to external stressors and concomitant psychosocial and emotional difficulties. From a shamanic healing perspective, this describes individuals who are thought to be “dispirited” and may benefit from this ancient form of spiritual healing. Objective: To report on the long-term quantitative and qualitative outcomes relative to end-of-treatment status of a phase I study that evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of shamanic healing for people with TMDs. Methods/Design: Participants were contacted by telephone at one, three, six, and nine months after treatment and asked to report pain and disability outcomes and qualitative feedback. Setting: Portland, OR. Participants: Twenty-three women aged 25 to 55 years diagnosed with TMD. Primary Outcome Measures: Participants rated their TMD-related pain and disability (on the TMD Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis II Pain Related Disability and Psychological Status Scale) at each follow-up call and were asked to describe their condition qualitatively. Results: Improvements in usual pain, worst pain, and functional impairment reported at end of treatment did not change during the 9 months after treatment ended (p > 0.18). Conclusion: Shamanic healing had lasting effects on TMDs in this small cohort of women. PMID:22745613

  19. Botulinum toxin therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-W; Chiu, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Chuang, S-K

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to undertake a systematic review to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy (BTX) for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). A comprehensive search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was conducted to locate all relevant articles published from inception to October 2014. Eligible studies were selected based on inclusion criteria and included English language, peer-reviewed publications of randomized controlled trials comparing BTX versus any alternative intervention or placebo. Quality assessment and data extraction were done according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and recommendations. The entire systematic search and selection process was done independently by two reviewers. Five relevant study trials were identified, involving 117 participants. Two trials revealed a significant between-group difference in myofascial pain reduction, another trial that compared BTX with fascial manipulation showed equal efficacy of pain relief on TMDs, while the remaining two trials showed no significant difference between the BTX and placebo groups. Because of considerable variations in study methods and evaluation of results, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Based on this review, no consensus could be reached on the therapeutic benefits of BTX on TMDs. A more rigorous design of trials should be carried out in future studies. PMID:25920597

  20. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-10-01

    Introduction?An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective?To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods?A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results?Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p?=?0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio?=?2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion?These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  1. Single- or multiple-session viscosupplementation protocols for temporomandibular joint degenerative disorders: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Arboretti, R; Bonnini, S; Stellini, E; Manfredini, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two single-session protocols, either adopting high- (protocol A) or medium-molecular weight hyaluronic acid (protocol B), with the reference five-session protocol of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage plus viscosupplementation (protocol C) in the management of chronic TMJ degenerative disorders. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) with ten participants per treatment group was designed, with multiple observation points, ending at 6 months after treatment. Pain levels on a 10-point VAS scale were selected as the primary outcome variable to rate treatment effectiveness, along with a number of secondary outcome parameters. Findings showed that Group C patients had the highest decrease in pain levels. Nonparametric permutation analyses revealed that the global effect of treatment was significantly different between the three protocols (P = 0·024). Pairwise comparisons showed that the differences of treatment effect between the two single-session interventions were negligible (global P-value = 0·93). On the contrary, the five-session protocol was significantly superior to both single-session protocols (global P-values ranging from 0·003 to 0·012). In conclusion, in a population of age-, sex-, and psychosocial aspects-matched study groups, the standard of reference five-session protocol proved to be superior at 6 months as far as the decrease in pain levels was concerned, whilst there were no differences between the two single-session interventions. The absence of differences in treatment effect as for some other secondary clinical outcome variables may suggest that there is further space for future investigations attempting to reduce the number of multiple interventions for TMJ viscosupplementation. PMID:25704621

  2. Effectiveness of Dexamethasone Iontophoresis for Temporomandibular Joint Involvement in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Rina; Melson, Paula; Powell, Stephanie; Rao, Marepalli; Hinze, Claas; Passo, Murray; Graham, T. Brent; Brunner, Hermine I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement is common in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). Dexamethasone iontophoresis (DIP) uses low-grade electric currents for transdermal dexamethasone delivery into deeper anatomic structures. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of DIP for the treatment of TMJ involvement in JIA, and to delineate variables that are associated with improvement after DIP. Methods Medical records of all JIA patients who underwent DIP for TMJ involvement at a larger tertiary pediatric rheumatology center from 1997 to 2011 were reviewed. DIP was performed using a standard protocol. The effectiveness of DIP was assessed by comparing the maximal inter-incisor opening (MIOTMJ) and the maximal lateral excursion (MLETMJ) before and after treatment. Results Twenty-eight patients (ages 2– 21 years) who received an average of eight DIP treatment sessions per involved TMJ were included in the analysis. Statistically significant improvement in the median MIOTMJ (p< 0.0001) was observed in 68%. The median MLETMJ (p= 0.03) improved in 69%, and resolution of TMJ pain occurred in 73% of the patients who had TMJ pain at baseline. Side effects of DIP were transient site erythema (86%), skin blister (4%), and metallic taste (4%). Improvement in TMJ range of motion from DIP is associated with lower MIOTMJ, lower MLETMJ, and absence of TMJ crepitus at baseline. Conclusion In this pilot study DIP appeared to be an effective and safe initial treatment of TMJ involvement in JIA, especially among patients with decreased TMJ measurements. Prospective controlled studies are needed. PMID:22034112

  3. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the fibrocartilage disc of the temporomandibular joint – a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Pittschieler, Elisabeth; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Schmid-Schwap, Martina; Weber, Michael; Egerbacher, Monika; Traxler, Hannes; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Objective To 1) test the feasibility of delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) at 3 T in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and 2) to determine the optimal delay for measurements of the TMJ disc after i.v. contrast agent (CA) administration. Design MRI of the right and left TMJ of six asymptomatic volunteers was performed at 3 T using a dedicated coil. 2D inversion recovery (2D-IR) sequences were performed at 4 time points covering 120 minutes and 3D gradient-echo (3D GRE) dual flip-angle sequences were performed at 14 time points covering 130 minutes after the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid ion (Gd-DTPA)2-, i.e., 0.4 mL of Magnevist™ per kg body weight. Pair-wise tests were used to assess differences between pre-and post-contrast T1 values. Results 2D-IR sequences showed a statistically significant drop (p < 0.001) in T1 values after i.v. CA administration. The T1 drop of 50% was reached 60 minutes after bolus injection in the TMJ disc. The 3D GRE dual flip-angle sequences confirmed these results and show plateau of T1 after 60 minutes. Conclusions T1(Gd) maps calculated from dGEMRIC data allow in vivo assessment of the fibrocartilage disc of the TMJ. The recommended measurement time for dGEMRIC in the TMJ after i.v. CA administration is from 60 to 120 minutes. PMID:25131629

  4. Temporomandibular joint pain: A critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H.; McNulty, Amy L.; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Parekh, Puja K.; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert; Taylor, Andrea B.; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, and “therapy-refractoriness” of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background we sought to investigate pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation evoked pain behavior in mice, and that trigeminal ganglion pro-nociceptive changes are Trpv4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4?/? mice with TMJ-inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in WT mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ-inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after CFA injections, but remarkably independent of Trpv4 genotype. Intriguingly, as a result of TMJ-inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant up-regulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated ERK in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, absent in Trpv4?/? mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed a similar resistance to reduction of bite-force as Trpv4?/? mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ-inflammation, and likely functions up-stream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in-vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pro-nociceptive target in TMJ inflammation, and should be considered a target-of-interest in human TMJD. PMID:23726674

  5. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  6. Pseudogout in the temporomandibular joint with imaging, arthroscopic, operative, and pathologic findings. Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Amir; Sadow, Peter M; Keith, David A

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a destructive painful condition in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that proved to be calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposits at subsequent biopsy examination. The patient presented with the chief complaints of pain and limitation that had not resolved with splint therapy, medications, and habit control. Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed internal derangement without reduction. Right TMJ arthroscopy with manipulation of the jaw under anesthesia showed unique findings of fronds of synovial tissue in the posterior joint space and areas of white matter. Because there was no long-term improvement in her clinical symptoms, she subsequently underwent arthroplasty of the right joint, with the white material clearly seen at surgery, and the biopsy examination confirmed the clinical and arthroscopic impression of pseudogout. The presentation, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of pseudogout of the TMJ are discussed. PMID:25843817

  7. Retrospective study of facial nerve function following temporomandibular joint arthroplasty using the endaural approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Frederick; Giannakopoulos, Helen; Quinn, Peter D; Granquist, Eric J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective case-control study is to evaluate the incidence of facial nerve injury associated with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroplasty using the endaural approach for the treatment of TMJ pathology. The sample consisted of 36 consecutive patients who underwent TMJ arthroplasty. A total of 39 approaches were performed through an endaural incision. Patients undergoing total joint replacement and/or with preexisting facial nerve dysfunction were excluded from the study. Five patients were lost to follow-up and were excluded from the study. Facial nerve function of all patients was clinically evaluated by resident physicians preoperatively, postoperatively, and at follow-up appointments. Facial nerve injury was determined to have occurred if the patient was unable to raise the eyebrow or wrinkle the forehead (temporalis branch), completely close the eyelids (zygomatic branch), or frown (marginal mandibular branch). Twenty-one of the 36 patients or 22 of the 39 approaches showed signs of facial nerve dysfunction following TMJ arthroplasty. This included 12 of the 21 patients who had undergone previous TMJ surgery. The most common facial nerve branch injured was the temporal branch, which was dysfunctional in all patients either as the only branch injured or in combination with other branches. By the 18th postoperative month, normal function had returned in 19 of the 22 TMJ approaches. Three of the 22 TMJ approaches resulted in persistent signs of facial nerve weakness 6 months after the surgery. This epidemiological study revealed a low incidence of permanent facial nerve dysfunction. A high incidence of temporary facial nerve dysfunction was seen with TMJ arthroplasty using the endaural approach. Current literature reveals that the incidence of facial nerve injury associated with open TMJ surgery ranges from 12.5 to 32%. The temporal branch of the facial nerve was most commonly affected, followed by 4 of the 22 approaches with temporary zygomatic branch weakness. Having undergone previous TMJ surgery did not increase the incidence of facial nerve injury using the endaural approach. This information is important for patients and surgeons in the postoperative period, as a majority of patients will experience recovery of nerve function. PMID:26000077

  8. 15-deoxy-?12,14-prostaglandin J2 reduces albumin-induced arthritis in temporomandibular joint of rats.

    PubMed

    Silva Quinteiro, Mariana; Henrique Napimoga, Marcelo; Gomes Macedo, Cristina; Furtado Freitas, Fabiana; Balassini Abdalla, Henrique; Bonfante, Ricardo; Trindade Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the peripheral effect of 15-deoxy-?12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) in albumin-induced arthritis in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) was generated in rats with methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) diluted in complete Freund?s adjuvant. Pretreatment with an intra-articular injection of 15d-PGJ2 (100 ng/TMJ) before mBSA intra-articular injection (10 µg/TMJ) (challenge) in immunized rats significantly reduced the albumin-induced arthritis inflammation. The results demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 was able to inhibit plasma extravasation, leukocyte migration and the release of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12, IL-18 and the chemokine CINC-1 in the TMJ tissues. In addition, 15d-PGJ2 was able to increase the expression of the anti-adhesive molecule CD55 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Taken together, it is possible to suggest that 15d-PGJ2 inhibit leukocyte infiltration and subsequently inflammatory process, through a shift in the balance of the pro- and anti-adhesive properties. Thus, 15d-PGJ2 might be used as a potential anti-inflammatory drug to treat arthritis-induced inflammation of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:25016088

  9. Acromioclavicular joint disease.

    PubMed

    Mcdonald, Scott; Hopper, Melanie A

    2015-07-01

    The acromioclavicular joint is an important component of the shoulder girdle experiencing significant loading during normal activities of daily living. The joint is frequently subjected to trauma and as a synovial articulation can become involved in rheumatoid arthritis and the seronegative arthropathies. PMID:26021590

  10. [Metabolic bone and joint diseases].

    PubMed

    Endo, Itsuro

    2014-10-01

    Metabolic bone and joint diseases in adults include osteomalacia, rheumatoid arthritis, gouty arthritis. Recently, the newest molecular biology procedures and the clinical observation studies can produce good results for understanding of these diseases. From this perspective, the author introduced updated information of the pathophysiology, the latest diagnostic criteria and the therapy of these diseases. PMID:25509803

  11. Otitis interna, media, and externa with destruction of the left tympanic bulla and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos)

    PubMed Central

    Galvan, Noe; Middleton, John R.; Cook, Cristi; Britt, Lisa G.; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old, 37.7 kg, female alpaca was evaluated for a 2-week history of weight loss, left ear droop, and deviation of the rostral mandible to the right. Antemortem radiography and postmortem examination revealed otitis interna, media, and externa, destruction of the left tympanic bulla, and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint. PMID:23997267

  12. Upregulation of cystathionine-?-synthetase expression contributes to inflammatory pain in rat temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), an endogenous gaseotransmitter/modulator, is becoming appreciated that it may be involved in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. However, the role for H2S in nociceptive processing in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron remains unknown. The aim of this study was designed to investigate whether endogenous H2S synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-?-synthetase (CBS) plays a role in inflammatory pain in temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods TMJ inflammatory pain was induced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into TMJ of adult male rats. Von Frey filaments were used to examine pain behavioral responses in rats following injection of CFA or normal saline (NS). Whole cell patch clamp recordings were employed on acutely isolated TG neurons from rats 2 days after CFA injection. Western blot analysis was carried out to measure protein expression in TGs. Results Injection of CFA into TMJ produced a time dependent hyperalgesia as evidenced by reduced escape threshold in rats responding to VFF stimulation. The reduced escape threshold was partially reversed by injection of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor for CBS, in a dose-dependent manner. CFA injection led to a marked upregulation of CBS expression when compared with age-matched controls. CFA injection enhanced neuronal excitability as evidenced by depolarization of resting membrane potentials, reduction in rheobase, and an increase in number of action potentials evoked by 2 and 3 times rheobase current stimulation and by a ramp current stimulation of TG neurons innervating the TMJ area. CFA injection also led to a reduction of IK but not IA current density of TG neurons. Application of AOAA in TMJ area reduced the production of H2S in TGs and reversed the enhanced neural hyperexcitability and increased the IK currents of TG neurons. Conclusion These data together with our previous report indicate that endogenous H2S generating enzyme CBS plays an important role in TMJ inflammation, which is likely mediated by inhibition of IK currents, thus identifying a specific molecular mechanism underlying pain and sensitization in TMJ inflammation. PMID:24490955

  13. Wnt5a/Ror2 mediates temporomandibular joint subchondral bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, T; Zhang, J; Cao, Y; Zhang, M; Jing, L; Jiao, K; Yu, S; Chang, W; Chen, D; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Increased subchondral trabecular bone turnover due to imbalanced bone-resorbing and bone-forming activities is a hallmark of osteoarthritis (OA). Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling, which can derive from bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), takes a role in modulating osteoblast and osteoclast formation. We showed previously that experimentally unilateral anterior crossbites (UACs) elicited OA-like lesions in mice temporomandibular joints (TMJs), displaying as subchondral trabecular bone loss. Herein, we tested the role of BMSC-derived Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling in regulating osteoclast precursor migration and differentiation in this process. The data confirmed the decreased bone mass, increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cell number, and enhanced osteoclast activity in TMJ subchondral trabecular bone of UAC-treated rats. Interestingly, the osteoblast activity in the tissue of TMJ subchondral trabecular bone of these UAC-treated rats was also enhanced, displaying as upregulated expressions of osteoblast markers and increased proliferation, migration, and differentiation capabilities of the locally isolated BMSCs. These BMSCs showed an increased CXCL12 protein expression level and upregulated messenger RNA expressions of Rankl, Wnt5a, and Ror2. Ex vivo data showed that their capacities of inducing migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors were enhanced, and these enhanced capabilities were restrained after blocking their Ror2 signaling using small interfering RNA (siRNA) assays. Reducing Ror2 expression in the BMSC cell line by siRNA or blocking the downstream signalings with specific inhibitors also demonstrated a suppression of the capacity of the BMSC cell line to promote Wnt5a-dependent migration (including SP600125 and cyclosporine A) and differentiation (cyclosporine A only) of osteoclast precursors. These findings support the idea that Wnt5a/Ror2 signaling in TMJ subchondral BMSCs enhanced by UAC promoted BMSCs to increase Cxcl12 and Rankl expression, in which JNK and/or Ca(2+)/NFAT pathways were involved and therefore were engaged in enhancing the migration and differentiation of osteoclast precursors, leading to increased osteoclast activity and an overall TMJ subchondral trabecular bone loss in the UAC-treated rats. PMID:25749876

  14. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  15. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement using stock prosthesis: a one-year follow-up report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Da-Jung; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Alloplastic total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was developed in recent decades. In some conditions, previous studies suggested the rationale behind alloplastic TMJ replacement rather than reconstruction with autogenous grafts. Currently, three prosthetic products are available and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Among these products, customized prostheses are manufactured, via computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for customized design; stock-type prostheses are provided in various sizes and shapes. In this report, two patients (a 50-year-old female who had undergone condylectomy for the treatment of osteochondroma extending to the cranial base on the left condyle, and a 21-year-old male diagnosed with left temporomandibular ankylosis) were treated using the alloplastic total replacement of TMJ using stock prosthesis. The follow-up results of a favorable one-year, short-term therapeutic outcome were obtained for the alloplastic total TMJ replacement using a stock-type prosthesis. PMID:24516821

  16. Management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome secondary to temporomandibular joint ankylosis by mandibular elongation using distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Hemavathy, O R

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with repetitive nocturnal upper airway obstruction leading to daytime sleepiness, cardiovascular derangements, and can be a debilitating, even life-threatening condition. The most favorable treatment for patients with OSAS is multidisciplinary care by a team that represents various dental and medical disciplines. Prescribed therapies might include weight loss, behavior modification, oral appliances, soft tissue surgery, skeletal surgery, or some combination of approaches. Osteogenesis by mandibular distraction has proved effective in children in the treatment of obstructive apnea syndrome associated with congenital malformations. In the adult, the possibility of using distraction osteogenesis in the management of OSAS remains to be defined. We report a case of an adult patient treated for OSAS secondary to temporomandibular joint ankylosis by mandibular distraction followed by interpositional arthroplasty. PMID:22557901

  17. Time-dependent analysis of nociception and anxiety-like behavior in rats submitted to persistent inflammation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Glauce Crivelaro; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade

    2014-02-10

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is prevalent in dental clinics and can involve problems with the masticatory muscles or the temporomandibular joints (TMJ). The pain of TMD is frequently associated with inflammation in the TMJs, but it's etiology is considered to be multifactorial and includes biologic, behavioral, environmental, social, emotional and cognitive factors. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the anxiety-like behavior in rats exposed to temporomandibular inflammation via injection of Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) with the elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark box (LDB) tests and to evaluate nociceptive behavior with the von Frey test at different periods. Moreover, this study measured TMJ inflammation using plasma extravasation (Evans blue test) and the intraarticular infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (myeloperoxidase quantification). The results showed that rats that were submitted to TMJ inflammation exhibited a decreased number of entries into the open arms of the EPM and a decrease in the time spent in the light compartment and in the number of transitions in the LDB. Additionally, the number of entries in closed arms in the EPM, used as indicator of locomotor activity, did not alter between treatments. Furthermore, increases in mechanical sensitivity and increases in plasma extravasation in the joint tissue occurred throughout the inflammation process, along with an increase in myeloperoxidase in the synovial fluid of TMJ. Our results suggest that the temporomandibular inflammation induced by CFA produced anxiety-like behaviors in rats and induced nociceptive behavior across different periods of inflammation. PMID:24291383

  18. Differential Diagnosis of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Disorders in Patients with Tinnitus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Bürgers; Martin Gosau; Sebastian Hahnel; Michael Behr

    \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a 1. \\u000a \\u000a This chapter aims at providing non-dental healthcare specialists engaged in tinnitus treatment with a description of a short\\u000a screening of individuals with tinnitus to clarify the involvement of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in such patients. A\\u000a screening test for TMD seems to be reasonable for all tinnitus patients. Patients with a positive TMD screening should be\\u000a referred to an experienced

  19. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Douglas Fries

    2002-01-01

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical

  20. Persistent monoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint region enhances nocifensive behavior and lumbar spinal Fos expression after noxious stimulation to the hindpaw in rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiichiro Okamoto; Akihisa Kimura; Tomohiro Donishi; Hiroki Imbe; Kyosuke Goda; Koki Kawanishi; Yasuhiko Tamai; Emiko Senba

    2006-01-01

    Effects of persistent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation on nociceptive responses of remote bodily areas of the rat\\u000a were investigated. Monoarthritis of the TMJ region was evoked by the injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the\\u000a left TMJ region. Rats without injection of CFA into the TMJ region served as controls (non-CFA group). Time spent on licking\\u000a behavior evoked by

  1. Bilateral synovial chondromatosis in the knee joint with both intra and extra-articular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bassir, Rida-Allah; Ismael, Farid; Elbardouni, Ahmed; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Elyaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare disease of unknown etiology. It usually occurs unilaterally in the large joints like the knee, but may occur in the shoulder, elbow, hip, ankle and temporomandibular joints. The disease is usually intracapsular, but can also be extracapsular on rare occasions. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis is given after an anamnesis, physical examination and radiographic examination. However, the diagnosis is obtained after histological examination of the synovial tissue. We report an unusual presentation of bilateral synovial chondromatosis in the knee joint, with both intra and extracapsular localization. never described in the literature. Although synovial chondromatosis is described as a benign disease, it can be very destructive and debilitating. These lesions can mimic a malignant tumor and present a diagnostic problem. PMID:25667719

  2. Degenerative joint disease in captive waterfowl

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Degernes; P. S. Lynch; H. L. Shivaprasad

    2011-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate degenerative joint disease (DJD) in captive waterfowl that died or were euthanized at Fresno's Chaffee Zoo in Fresno, California, USA from 2001 to 2005. Of these, 16 out of 33 birds (48%) had DJD in one or both stifle (femoral–tibiotarsal joint; n = 13), hock (tibiotarsal–tarsometatarsal joint; n = 4), or toe joints

  3. Combined palliative and anti-inflammatory medications as treatment of temporomandibular joint disc displacement without reduction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Januzzi, Eduardo; Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Grossmann, Eduardo; Leite, Frederico Mota Gonçalves; Heir, Gary M; Melnik, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of self-care combined with anti-inflammatory medications in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain associated with disc displacement without reduction (DDWOR). A systematic review of randomized clinical trials was done by the authors. The databases searched were Medline (1966 to July 2012); EMBASE (1980 to July 2012); and LILACS (from 1982 to July 2012). The review authors independently assessed trials for eligibility and methodological quality and also extracted all data. The data was double-checked for accuracy. There was no language restriction in the searches of EMBASE, PubMed, and LILACS databases, or in the manual search. The risk of bias and the heterogeneity of the studies taken into consideration were assessed. Two studies, randomizing 175 patients, were included in this review. The first study (n = 106) compared the following interventions: medical treatment, rehabilitation, arthroscopic surgery with postoperative rehabilitation, or arthroplastic surgery with post-operative rehabilitation. The second study (n = 69) compared the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and self-care instructions, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, occlusal splint, and mobilization therapy. The third group received no treatment; patients were only informed of their prognosis. There is no sufficient evidence regarding efficacy and safety of the palliative treatments associated with anti-inflammatory versus other treatments, or absence of treatment on pain reduction in patients with TMJ DDWOR. PMID:23971162

  4. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Arai, Chihiro; Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-05-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  5. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ.

  6. Temporomandibular joint articulations on working side during chewing in adult females with cross-bite and mandibular asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Yashiro, K; Iwata, A; Takada, K; Murakami, S; Uchiyama, Y; Furukawa, S

    2015-03-01

    Influence of mandibular asymmetry and cross-bite on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articulation remained unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether/how the working-side condylar movement irregularity and articular spaces during chewing differ between patients with mandibular asymmetry/cross-bite and control subjects. The cross-bite group and the control group consisted of 10 adult female patients and 10 adult female subjects, respectively. They performed unilateral gum-chewing. The mandibular movements were recorded using a video-based opto-electronic system. The 3D articular surface of the TMJ for each individual was reconstructed using CT/MRI data. For local condylar points, the normalised jerk cost (NJC) towards normal direction to the condylar surface, the angle between tangential velocity vector and condylar long axis and intra-articular space were measured. Three rotatory angles at centre of the condyle were also measured. During closing and intercuspation, (i) movements of posterior portion of the deviated side condyle showed significantly less smoothness as compared with those for the non-deviated side and control subjects, (ii) the rotations of the condyle on the deviated side induced greater intra-articular space at posterior and lateral portions. These findings suggest that chewing on the side of mandibular deviation/cross-bite may cause irregular movement and enlarged intra-articular space at posterior portion of the deviated side condyle. PMID:25545582

  7. Intra-Articular Controlled Release of Anti-Inflammatory siRNA with Biodegradable Polymer Microparticles Ameliorates Temporomandibular Joint Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mountziaris, Paschalia M.; Tzouanas, Stephanie N.; Sing, David C.; Kramer, Phillip R.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of an intra-articular controlled release system consisting of biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) encapsulating anti-inflammatory small interfering RNA (siRNA), together with branched poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) as a transfecting agent, in a rat model of painful temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. The in vivo effects of PLGA MP dose and siRNA-PEI polyplex delivery were examined via non-invasive meal pattern analysis and by quantifying the protein level of the siRNA target as well as of several downstream inflammatory cytokines. Controlled release of siRNA-PEI from PLGA MPs significantly reduced inflammation-induced changes in meal patterns compared to untreated rats with inflamed TMJs. These changes correlated to decreases in tissue-level protein expression of the siRNA target to 20–50% of the amount present in the corresponding control groups. Similar reductions were also observed in the expression of downstream inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interleukin-6 (IL-6), whose tissue levels in the siRNA-PEI PLGA MP groups were 50% of the values for the corresponding controls. This intra-articular sustained release system has significant implications for the treatment of severe TMJ pain, and also has the potential to be readily adapted and applied to mitigate painful, chronic inflammation in a variety of conditions. PMID:22750740

  8. Malignant pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint with lung metastasis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jung; Cho, Young-Ah; Lee, Jae-Il; Hong, Sam-Pyo; Hong, Seong-Doo

    2011-05-01

    Malignant pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is an extremely rare lesion. Approximately 30 cases of malignant PVNS have been reported to date and of these, only 1 case involved the temporomandibular joint. Owing to the rarity of well-documented cases and the heterogeneous histologic features of this group of tumors, there has been some confusion regarding its diagnosis. The heterogeneous features of the sarcomatous areas contain fibrosarcomatous, myxosarcomatous, malignant fibrous histiocytomalike or giant cell tumorlike patterns. However, despite the absence of frank sarcomatous change in the histopathogy of PVNS, there have been 3 reported cases of metastatic lesions in the lung or lymph nodes. Here we present an additional case of clinically malignant PVNS with pulmonary metastasis after recurrence. A 29-year-old man presented in our hospital with a recurrent swelling and pain in the right preauricular area, where benign tumor had been previously resected. MRI demonstrated a large mass with a low signal intensity that seemed to demonstrate a ferromagnetic effect. Surgical resection of the lesion was performed and the diagnosis of PVNS with focal atypical cells was made. Unfortunately, at 30 months post surgery, a thoracic CT found a metastatic nodule in the left lower lobe of the lung. PMID:21444225

  9. Temporomandibular Joint Surgery: What Does it Mean to India in the 21st Century?

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2012-09-01

    While India boasts the largest collective experience in the surgical management of TMJ ankylosis, times are changing and Indian Surgeons will need to begin thinking about other TMJ disorders that have previously gone under the radar. A growing Indian middle class with greater access to health facilities will demand treatment for TMJ disorders like myofacial pain and dysfunction, internal derangement and osteoarthrosis which Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons must be prepared to manage. The aim of this paper is to review the role of TMJ surgery and its place in the treatment armamentarium of temporomandibular disorders. Indications, rationale for surgery, risks vs benefits are discussed and complemented with examples of clinical cases treated by the author. As India moves up the economic ladder of success, TMJ disorders that have largely been confined to Western nations will begin to appear in the rising middle classes of India. Indian Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons must be prepared to recognize and manage disorders which present with more complex symptomatology where the role of TMJ surgery is less clear cut. PMID:23997473

  10. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  11. Prospective comparison study of one-year outcomes for all titanium total temporomandibular joint replacements in patients allergic to metal and cobalt-chromium replacement joints in patients not allergic to metal.

    PubMed

    Hussain, O T; Sah, S; Sidebottom, A J

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to ascertain whether there are any early differences in outcome between all titanium temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prostheses in patients allergic to metal and standard cobalt-chromium prostheses in patients not allergic to metal. All patients who had primary TMJ prostheses placed with one-year follow-up between March 2003 and February 2011 were included. We reviewed the basic characteristics of patients. The outcome variables measured included disease, pain, mouth opening, and diet. A total of 55 patients with 77 joint replacements fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Forty patients had standard cobalt-chromium alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) prostheses (20 unilateral and 20 bilateral), and 15 had all titanium prostheses (13 unilateral and 2 bilateral). Osteoarthritis was the most common disease in both groups. There was significant improvement in pain score at reviews at 6 weeks (p=0.001) and 12 months (p=0.03). Values between groups were not significant (p=0.48 at 6 weeks, and p=0.10 at 1 year). Mouth opening in each group improved significantly with continued gains between assessments at 6 weeks and 12 months (p=0.001) but there were no significant differences between groups. Diet scores were significantly improved one year postoperatively in both groups (p=0.001), but differences between groups were not significant (p=0.90). At one year, outcomes for all titanium prostheses in patients allergic to metal were similarly favourable to those in patients who had no hypersensitivity to metal and had standard prostheses. No patient developed a hypersensitivity reaction, and no all titanium prosthesis failed during the one-year follow-up period. PMID:23522619

  12. Peripheral N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of inflammatory temporomandibular joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Ivanusic, JJ; Beaini, D; Hatch, RJ; Staikopoulos, V; Sessle, BJ; Jennings, EA

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether peripheral N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are involved in inflammation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. We developed a rat model of mechanical sensitivity to Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA; 2?l containing 1?g Mycobacterium tuberculosis)-induced inflammation of the TMJ and examined changes in sensitivity following injection of NMDA receptor antagonists (DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) or Ifenprodil) with CFA. CFA injected into the TMJ resulted in an increase in mechanical sensitivity relative to pre-injection that peaked at day 1 and lasted for up to 3 days (n=8, P<0.05). There was no change in mechanical sensitivity in vehicle-injected rats at any time-point (n=9). At day 1, there was a significant increase in mechanical sensitivity in animals injected with CFA+vehicle (n=7) relative to those injected with vehicle alone (n=7; P<0.05), and co-injection of AP5 (n=6) or Ifenprodil (n=7) with CFA blocked this hypersensitivity. Subcutaneous injection of AP5 (n=7) and Ifenprodil (n=5) instead of into the TMJ had no significant effect on CFA-induced hypersensitivity of the TMJ region. Western blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of the NR1 and NR2B subunits in trigeminal ganglion lysates. Immunohistochemical studies showed that 99% and 28% of trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervated the TMJ contained the NR1 and NR2B subunits respectively. Our findings suggest a role for peripheral NMDA receptors in inflammation-induced pain of the TMJ region. Targeting peripheral NMDA receptors with peripheral application of NMDA receptor antagonists could provide therapeutic benefit and avoid side effects associated with blockade of NMDA receptors in the central nervous system. PMID:20675160

  13. Enhancement of chondrocyte autophagy is an early response in the degenerative cartilage of the temporomandibular joint to biomechanical dental stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mian; Zhang, Jing; Lu, Lei; Qiu, Zhong-Ying; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Shi-Bin; Wu, Yao-Ping; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is a cell protective mechanism for maintaining cellular homeostasis. The present study aimed to investigate whether autophagy is enhanced in the biomechanically induced degenerative cartilage of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the potential role of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 3 (MAP4K3) and mammalian Target of rapamycin (mTOR) in this observation. To induce degenerative changes in the TMJs, rats were subjected to biomechanical dental stimulation by moving 4 molars away from their original position as we previously reported. The ultrastructure of autophagosome was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The number of lysosomes was analyzed by flow cytometry. The expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3 and the involvement of MAP4K3 activity were detected by immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and western blot. The activity of the mTOR pathway indicated by p-mTOR and p-p70S6 K was assayed by western blot. TMJ degeneration, characterized by irregular cell arrangement and cell-free area, was induced in the experimental groups. Under transmission electron microscopy, we observed the presence of autophagosomes, small patches of condensed chromatin, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. The number of lysosomes and the expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3 increased, while the activity of mTOR and the expression level of MAP4K3 decreased in the experimental groups. Cartilage in TMJ which was induced to be degenerative biomechanically exhibited autophagy accompanied by reduced mTOR and MAP4K3 activity. PMID:23386193

  14. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Katagiri, A; Rahman, M; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2015-07-23

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1-2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1-2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1-2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high-threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1-2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception. PMID:25913635

  15. The Effects of Cycling Levels of 17?-Estradiol and Progesterone on the Magnitude of Temporomandibular Joint-Induced Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, P. R.; Bellinger, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    A greater incidence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain is reported in females, suggesting that gonadal hormones may play a role in this condition. However, the exact roles of 17?-estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) in TMJ pain are not completely known. Two experiments were performed to determine the separate roles of E2 and P4 in TMJ nociception at various stages of the estrous cycle. Ovariectomized (OVX) rats were cycled with physiological concentrations of E2 or P4. The E2-cycled rats then received bilateral TMJ injections of saline (SAL) or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) on the morning of diestrus-2 (low E2 condition) or proestrus (high E2 condition). As a control, OVX rats (no ovarian E2 and no replacement) were injected with SAL or CFA. The TMJ nociception was measured using a validated novel method in which an increase in meal duration directly correlated to the intensity of deep TMJ nociception. In the E2 experiment, CFA injection, but not SAL, increased TMJ nociception in the OVX group, but the effect was less pronounced in diestrus-2 and even less in proestrus. In the P4 experiment, the rats receiving TMJ CFA in diestrus-2 (end of minor P4 surge) did not show an increase in TMJ nociception, whereas the rats injected in proestrus (major P4 surge), estrus (low P4), and metestrus (low P4) had similar increases in TMJ nociception. The hormones’ concentration did not affect TMJ IL-1?, IL-6, C-C motif ligand 20, or C-X-C motif ligand 2 or the trigeminal ganglia calcitonin gene-related peptide. The high physiological concentrations of E2 observed at proestrus and the low P4 concentrations observed at diestrus-2 attenuated or eliminated CFA-induced TMJ nociception. The results suggest that the cyclic estrous cycle concentrations of E2 and P4 can influence CFA-induced TMJ nociception in the rat. PMID:19359384

  16. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-06-26

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls. PMID:26114704

  17. Conservative care of temporomandibular joint disorder in a 35-year-old patient with spinal muscular atrophy type III: a case study?

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Sébastien; Descarreaux, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective This article describes the chiropractic clinical management and therapeutic benefits accruing to a patient with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder and spinal muscular atrophy type III. Clinical Features A 35-year-old white man presented at the university chiropractic outpatient clinic with a complaint of masseter muscle pain and mouth-opening restriction. Temporomandibular joint range of motion evaluation revealed restricted opening (11 mm interincisival), and pain was rated by the patient at an intensity of 5 on a pain scale of 0 to 10. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic care was provided and included TMJ mobilization, myofascial therapy, trigger point therapy, and light spinal mobilizations of the upper cervical vertebrae. Final evaluation of TMJ range of motion showed active opening of 12 mm with absence of pain and muscle tenderness of the jaw. Conclusion This case suggests that a patient with musculoskeletal disorders related to underlying neurodegenerative pathologies may benefit from chiropractic management adapted to their condition. In the present case, chiropractic treatment of the TMJ represented a viable, low-cost approach with limited adverse effects compared with surgery. PMID:19948309

  18. Alterations in intermediate filaments expression in disc cells from the rat temporomandibular joint following exposure to continuous compressive force

    PubMed Central

    Magara, Jin; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Suzuki, Akiko; Kawano, Yoshiro; Ono, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2012-01-01

    The articular disc in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that serves in load relief and stabilizing in jaw movements is a dense collagenous tissue consisting of extracellular matrices and disc cells. The various morphological configurations of the disc cells have given us diverse names, such as fibroblasts, chondrocyte-like cells and fibrochondrocytes; however, the characteristics of these cells have remained to be elucidated in detail. The disc cells have been reported to exhibit heterogeneous immunoreaction patterns for intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and vimentin in the adult rat TMJ. Because these intermediate filaments accumulate in the disc cells as tooth eruption proceeds during postnatal development, it might be surmised that the expression of these intermediate filaments in the disc cells closely relates to mechanical stress. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the effect of a continuous compressive force on the immunoexpression of these intermediate filaments and an additional intermediate filament – muscle-specific desmin – in the disc cells of the TMJ disc using a rat experimental model. The rats wore an appliance that exerts a continuous compressive load on the TMJ. The experimental period with the appliance was 5 days as determined by previous studies, after which some experimental animals were allowed to survive another 5 days after removal of the appliance. Histological observations demonstrated that the compressive force provoked a remarkable acellular region and a decrease in the thickness of the condylar cartilage of the mandible, and a sparse collagen fiber distribution in the articular disc. The articular disc showed a significant increase in the number of desmin-positive cells as compared with the controls. In contrast, immunopositive cells for GFAP, nestin and vimentin remained unchanged in number as well as intensity. At 5 days after removal of the appliance, both the disc and cartilage exhibited immunohistological and histological features in a recovery process. These findings indicate that the mature articular cells are capable of producing desmin instead of the other intermediate filaments against mechanical stress. The desmin-positive disc cells lacked ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) in this study, even though desmin usually co-exists with ?-SMA in the vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes. Because the precursor of a pericyte has such an immunoexpression pattern during angiogenesis, there is a further possibility that the formation of new vessels commenced in response to the extraordinary compressive force. PMID:22458657

  19. Joint Involvement Associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. De Vos

    2009-01-01

    Joint involvement associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) belongs to the concept of spondyloarthritis (SpA) and includes two types of arthritis: a peripheral arthritis characterized by the presence of pauciarticular asymmetrical arthritis affecting preferentially joints of lower extremities and an axial arthropathy including inflammatory back pain, sacroiliitis and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Treatment of arthritis includes a short-term use of NSAIDs

  20. Comparison of cytokine level in synovial fluid between successful and unsuccessful cases in arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint 1 1 A grant for Specially Promoted Research from Kanazawa Medical University and a grant for Scientific Research (13672129) from the ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan supported this work

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaaki Nishimura; Natsuki Segami; Keiseki Kaneyama; Jun Sato; Kazumza Fujimura

    2004-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to compare proinflammatory cytokine levels between successful cases and unsuccessful cases of arthrocentesis in patients with internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ).

  1. [Rheumatic joint diseases in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuya; Yokosawa, Masahiro; Kaneko, Shunta; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-10-01

    The most frequent rheumatic joint disease in the elderly is rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent advances in the treatment of RA improve prognosis, and gradually increase the elderly patients with RA. There are some differences in clinical features between the patients with elderly onset RA and young onset RA, such as systemic symptoms and distribution of affected joints. In addition, it is occasionally difficult to differentiate elderly onset RA from the other rheumatic diseases like polymyalgia rheumatica and RS3PE syndrome, pseudogout, and osteoarthritis. Since elderly patients tend to have more co-morbidity and co-existing diseases requiring treatment with other drugs, a risk/benefit profile must always be taken into consideration when choosing the treatment in elderly patients with rheumatic joint diseases. PMID:25509802

  2. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  3. Temporomandibular Joint, Open

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High School and College Students Recent College Graduates Dental and Medical Students See All Careers & Training Opportunities Job Openings Loan Repayment Programs Careers in Dental Research See All Continuing Education Practical Oral Care ...

  4. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  5. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Panush; C. Schmidt; J. R. Caldwell; N. L. Edwards; S. Longley; R. Yonker; E. Webster; J. Nauman; J. Stork; H. Pettersson

    1986-01-01

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)\\/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal

  6. Estrogen in cycling rats alters gene expression in the temporomandibular joint, trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord junction

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Jyoti; Bellinger, Larry L.; Kramer, Phillip R.

    2011-01-01

    Females report temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain more than men and studies suggest estrogen modulates this pain response. Our goal in this study was to determine genes that are modulated by physiological levels of 17?-estradiol that could have a role in TMJ pain. To complete this goal, saline or complete Freund’s adjuvant was injected in the TMJ when plasma 17?-estradiol was low or when it was at a high proestrus level. TMJ, trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord junction (Vc/C1–2) tissues were isolated from the treated rats and expression of 184 genes was quantitated in each tissue using real time PCR. Significant changes in the amount of specific transcripts were observed in the TMJ tissues, trigeminal ganglia and Vc/C1–2 region when comparing rats with high and low estrogen. GABA A receptor subunit ?6 (Gabra6) and the glycine receptor ?2 (Glra2) were two genes of interest because of their direct function in neuronal activity and a greater than 29 fold increase in the trigeminal ganglia was observed in proestrus rats with TMJ inflammation. Immunohistochemical studies showed that Gabr?6 and Glr?2 neuronal and not glial expression increased when comparing rats with high and low estrogen. Estrogen receptors ? and ? are present in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia, whereby 17?-estradiol can alter expression of Gabr?6 and Glr?2. Also, estrogen receptor ? (ER?) but not ER? was observed in satellite glial cells of the trigeminal ganglia. These results demonstrate that genes associated with neurogenic inflammation or neuronal excitability were altered by changes in the concentration of 17?-estradiol. PMID:21321935

  7. Overexpression of Indian hedgehog partially rescues short stature homeobox 2-overexpression?associated congenital dysplasia of the temporomandibular joint in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xihai; Liang, Wenna; Ye, Hongzhi; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Lin, Pingdong; Liu, Xianxiang

    2015-09-01

    The role of short stature homeobox 2 (shox2) in the development and homeostasis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been well documented. Shox2 is known to be expressed in the progenitor cells and perichondrium of the developing condyle. A previous study by our group reported that overexpression of shox2 leads to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ via downregulation of the Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling pathway, which is essential for embryonic disc primordium formation and mandibular condylar growth. To determine whether overexpression of Ihh may rescue the overexpression of shox2 leading to congenital dysplasia of the TMJ, a mouse model in which Ihh and shox2 were overexpressed (Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice) was utilized to assess the consequences of this overexpression on TMJ development during post-natal life. The results showed that the developmental process and expression levels of runt-related transcription factor 2 and sex determining region Y-box 9 in the TMJ of the Wnt1-Cre; pMes-stop shox2; pMes-stop Ihh mice were similar to those in wild?type mice. Overexpression of Ihh rescued shox2 overexpression-associated reduction of extracellular matrix components. However, overexpression of Ihh did not inhibit the shox2 overexpression-associated increase of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP9, MMP13 and apoptosis in the TMJ. These combinatory cellular and molecular defects appeared to account for the observed congenital dysplasia of TMJ, suggesting that overexpression of Ihh partially rescued shox2 overexpression?associated congenital dysplasia of the TMJ in mice. PMID:26096903

  8. Congenital cheek teratoma with temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis managed with ultra-thin silicone sheet interpositional arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Ankur; Verma, Vinay Kumar; Purohit, Vishal

    2013-01-01

    Primary cheek teratomas are rare with < 5 reported cases. None had associated temporo mandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). The fundamental aim in the treatment of TMJA is the successful surgical resection of ankylotic bone, prevention of recurrence, and aesthetic improvement by ensuring functional occlusion. Early treatment is necessary to promote proper growth and function of mandible and to facilitate the positive psychological development of child. Inter-positional arthroplasty with ultra-thin silicone sheet was performed. Advantages include short operative time, less foreign material in the joint space leading to negligible foreign body reactions and least chances of implant extrusion. Instead of excising a large bony segment, a thin silicone sheet was interposed and then sutured ensuring preservation of mandibular height. Aggressive post-operative physiotherapy with custom made dynamic jaw exerciser was used to prevent recurrence. PMID:24163567

  9. Effects of glucosamine-chondroitin combination on synovial fluid IL-1?, IL-6, TNF-? and PGE2 levels in internal derangements of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Esen, Emin; Tatli, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of glucosamine-chondroitin sulphate combination on internal derangements of temporomandibular joint in clinical and biochemical manners. Material and Methods This randomized clinical study included 31 cases reporting joint tenderness, in which disc displacement was detected on MR imaging. In all patients, synovial fluid sampling was performed under local anesthesia. In the study group, the patients were prescribed a combination of 1500 mg glucosamine and 1200 mg chondroitin sulphate, while patients in the control group were only prescribed 50 mg tramadol HCl (twice daily) for pain control. After 8 weeks, synovial fluid sampling was repeated in the same manner. The levels of pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), synovial fluid IL-1ß, IL-6, TNF-? and PGE2 measured before and after pharmacological intervention were compared. Results The reduction in pain levels was significant in both groups. There was no significant difference between two groups in terms of pain reduction. The improvement in MMO was significant in the study group but it was not in the control group. The MMO improvement was significantly higher in the study group compared to the control group. In the study group, significant decrease was observed in PGE2 level, while the decreases in IL-1?, IL-6 and TNF-? levels were not significant. In the control group, no significant decrease was observed in any of the inflammatory cytokines after 8 weeks, moreover IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were increased. Alterations of IL-1ß and IL-6 levels were significant in study group while TNF-? and PGE2 levels were not, compared to control group. Conclusions In conclusion, these results might suggest that glucosamine-chondroitin combination significantly increases the MMO and decreases the synovial fluid IL1? and IL6 levels in internal derangements of TMJ compared to tramadol. The modifications of synovial fluid TNF-? and PGE2 levels do not reach statistical significance. This combination also provides efficient pain relief in similar level with tramadol, a narcotic analgesic. Key words: Chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine, internal derangement, TMJ, tramadol. PMID:25662545

  10. [Functional state of the masticatory system in healthy individuals (control group) and in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Tourné, L

    1997-01-01

    The functional status of the masticatory system was investigated in a sample of 68 self-defined controls without any treatment need and 82 craniomandibular disorder patients. Among the parameters investigated were measures of mandibular mobility, the presence of joint noises and palpation tenderness of 17 muscle and 3 TMJ sites. These data allowed for calculation of Fricton's Craniomandibular Index (CMI) and Helkimo's Clinical Dysfunction Index (Di). Several socalled signs of dysfunction were found in the normal control group: 38% of the joints had some kind of noise and several muscle sites were tender to palpation (splenius capitis muscle 50%, anterior masseter and temporal muscle 45%, insertion of the trapezius muscle 40%). In addition, according to Helkimo's Di. 90% of the controls would be classified as having mild to moderate dysfunction. The high prevalence of positive signs in the control sample calls for a less rigid definition of what is called a normal craniomandibular status and refutes the a priori establishment of a narrow set of criteria for normality. Some parameters showed a highly statistically significant difference among the control and patient group (p < .001): active range of motion, deviation upon opening, pain on mandibular movement, number of tender palpation points and the CMI and Di. PMID:9709798

  11. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without improvements to wear resistance behavior. Identified problems include high surface roughness due to an inadequate seeding procedure and a porous film surface. It is believed that these problems can be solved by future research, in which case NCD thin films should prove to-be well-suited as wear resistant coatings in biomedical applications.

  12. Use of Oral Mucoperiosteal and Pterygo-Masseteric Muscle Flaps as Interposition Material in Surgery of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyanechi, CE; Osunde, OD; Bassey, GO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of surgery for the release of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is relapse of the ankylosis. To prevent re-ankylosis, a variety of interpositional materials have been used. Aim: The aim was to compare the surgical outcome of oral mucoperiosteal flap, not hitherto used as interpositional material, with pterygo-masseteric muscles flap after surgical release of TMJ ankylosis. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study of all consecutive patients treated for the release of complete TMJ bony ankylosis, from January 2003 to December 2012, at the Oral and Maxillofacial unit of our institution. The patients were randomized into two groups: The pterygo-masseteric group comprises 22 patients while the oral mucoperiosteal group had 23 patients. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and postoperative complications over a 5 year follow-up period were obtained, and analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 13, Chicago, IL, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 28 mean 20.3 (3.35) years while the duration of ankylosis ranged from 2 to 16 mean 5.1 (3.4) years. The baseline demographic (gender; P = 0.92; side; P = 0.58) and clinical characteristics in terms of etiology (P = 0.60) and age (P = 0.52) were comparable in both treatment groups. All the patients presented with complete bony TMJ ankylosis with a preoperative inter-incisal distance of <0.5 cm. The intraoperative mouth opening achieved ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm, mean 4.6 (0.27) cm and this was not different for either group (P = 0.51). The patients were followed up postoperatively for a period ranging from 3 to 5 years, mean 3.4 (0.62) years. The mouth opening decreased, over the period of postoperative review, from the initial range of 4–5 cm to 2.9–3.6 cm, and this was not different in both groups (P = 0.18). Conclusion: This study suggests that oral mucoperiosteal flap could be an option in the choice of interpositional materials in surgery of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25745573

  13. Self-repair in degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Di Nicola, Valerio; Di Nicola, Renato

    2012-12-01

    This study presents a method for treating and structurally improving articulations affected by degenerative joint disease (DJD). The focus of this analysis is on two groups of patients: the first comprised patients over eighty years old, and the second comprised patients aged 45 to 55 years. The first group was a high surgical risk and both had been nonresponders to current conservative therapies. Scholars like Davis, Filatov, and Cerletti have been studying and using the regenerative properties of placenta, amnios and other nonvital tissues since the early 1900s. These pioneering studies have opened a new track for tissue renewal. More recently, the new biological knowledge about extracellular nucleic acids, growth factors (GF) (as by-products of trauma response), and heat shock proteins (Hsp) has helped research even further. Building on those experiences, we have developed a regenerative gel obtained with distressed, processed blood, polydeoxyribonucleotides (Pdrn), and a thickening substance. The objective was to stimulate the local innate stem cells with our gel in order induce tissue repair. From 2003 until 2009, we treated 948 patients. As mentioned, the first group comprided of 86 ultra-octogenarian patients with severe osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee, and the second group comprised of 90 younger patients (around 50 years old) affected by the same disease. Treated patients have been clinically and radiologically evaluated with a follow-up of 6 to 48 months. Results show a statistically significant improvement in terms of pain and joint mobility, sometimes coupled with clear improvement in radiological imaging. Follow-up shows encouraging data in terms of clinical stability over time. During the study, we encountered virtually no side effects, adverse reactions, or toxicity. Currently the pharmacological treatment of DJD is palliative, though toxicity and side effects of the drugs remain problematic. Patients who can be operated on conclude their trial with a prosthesis followed by a long rehabilitation period. This study presents a new methodological approach to the treatment of DJD based on tissue regeneration and restoration resulting in a positive clinical resolution. PMID:23330827

  14. The Pilot Study of Fibrin with Temporomandibular Joint Derived Synovial Stem Cells in Repairing TMJ Disc Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhongcheng; Li, Jian; Meng, Qinggong; Fang, Wei; Long, Xing

    2014-01-01

    TMJ disc related diseases are difficult to be cured due to the poor repair ability of the disc. TMJ-SDSCs were ideal cell sources for cartilage tissue engineering which have been widely used in hyaline cartilage regeneration. Fibrin gel has been demonstrated as a potential scaffold for neocartilage formation. The aim of this study was to repair the TMJ disc perforation using fibrin/chitosan hybrid scaffold combined with TMJ-SDSCs. Rat TMJ-SDSCs were cultured on hybrid scaffold or pure chitosan scaffolds. The cell seeding efficiency, distribution, proliferation, and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were investigated. To evaluate the in vivo repair ability of cell/scaffold construct, rat TMJ disc explants were punched with a defect to mimic TMJ disc perforation. Cell seeded scaffolds were inserted into the defect of TMJ disc explants and then were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice for 4 weeks. Results demonstrated that fibrin may improve cell seeding, proliferation, and chondrogenic induction in vitro. The in vivo experiments showed more cartilage ECM deposition in fibrin/chitosan scaffold, which suggested an enhanced reparative ability. This pilot study demonstrated that the regenerative ability of TMJ-SDSCs seeded in fibrin/chitosan scaffold could be applied for repairing TMJ disc perforation. PMID:24822210

  15. Psycho-education programme for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Waseem Jerjes; Geir Madland; Charlotte Feinmann; Mohammed El Maaytah; Mahesh Kumar; Colin Hopper; Tahwinder Upile; Stanton Newman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are by far the most predominant condition affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), however many patients have mild self-limiting symptoms and should not be referred for specialist care. The aim of this pilot study was to develop a simple, cost-effective management programme for TMDs using CD-ROM. 41 patients (age 18–70) participated in this study, patients were divided

  16. Treatment of Nongout Joint Deposition Diseases: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Richette, Pascal; Flipo, René-Marc

    2014-01-01

    This update develops the actual therapeutic options in the management of the joint involvement of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease (CPPD), basic calcium phosphate (BCP) deposition disease, hemochromatosis (HH), ochronosis, oxalosis, and Wilson's disease. Conventional pharmaceutical treatment provides benefits for most diseases. Anti-interleukine-1 (IL-1) treatment could provide similar results in CPPD than in gout flares. There is only limited evidence about the efficacy of preventive long-term colchicine intake, methotrexate, and hydroxychloroquine in chronic CPPD. Needle aspiration and lavage have satisfactory short and midterm results in BCP. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy has also proved its efficacy for high-doses regimes. Phlebotomy does not seem to have shown real efficacy on joint involvement in HH so far. Iron chelators' effects have not been assessed on joint involvement either, while IL-1 blockade may prove useful. NSAIDs have limited efficacy on joint involvement of oxalosis, while colchicine and steroids have not been assessed either. The use of nitisinone for ochronotic arthropathy is still much debated, but it could provide beneficial effects on joint involvement. The effects of copper chelators have not been assessed either in the joint involvement of Wilson's disease. NSAIDs should be avoided because of the liver affection they may worsen. PMID:24895535

  17. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: The study group included 112 patients (56 men, 56 women; median age 49.7±12 years) with psoriasis, 25 of them were affected by psoriatic arthritis. A group of 112 subjects without psoriasis (56 men, 56 women; median age 47.7±17 years) served as controls. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders were evaluated according to the standardized Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Psoriasis patients were subgrouped according to the presence/absence of psoriatic arthritis and by gender, to assess the prevalence of traditional symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders. RESULTS: Patients with psoriasis, and to an even greater extent those with psoriatic arthritis, were more frequently affected by symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders, including an internal temporomandibular joint opening derangement than healthy subjects. A statistically significant increase in symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, in opening derangement, bruxism and sounds of temporomandibular joint was found in patients with psoriatic arthritis as compared with psoriasis patients without arthritis and controls. CONCLUSIONS: psoriasis seems to play a role in temporomandibular joint disorders, causing an increase in orofacial pain and an altered chewing function. PMID:26019683

  18. Symptom relief after treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in patients with Meniere's disease: a three-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bjorne, Assar; Agerberg, Göran

    2003-01-01

    This study describes the coordinated treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and cervical spine disorders in patients diagnosed with Meniere's disease. The aim was to follow up treatment outcomes for three years with regular follow-up examinations every six months. Of the 31 patients with Meniere's disease who participated in a controlled comparative study on the signs and symptoms of TMD, 24 participated in a subsequent controlled comparative study on the signs and symptoms of cervical spine disorders (CSD). These 24 Meniere's disease patients (ten males and 14 females) agreed to participate in this longitudinal study. At each follow-up, their symptoms were evaluated using self-administered questionnaires and visual analog scales (VAS). The results of the coordinated treatment showed simultaneous decreases in the intensities of vertigo, nonwhirling dizziness, tinnitus, feeling of fullness in the ear, pain in the face and jaws, pain in the neck and shoulders, and headache that were both longitudinal and highly significant. Significant longitudinal reductions in the frequencies of vertigo, nonwhirling dizziness, and headache were also reported by the patients as well as a complete disappearance of pain located in the vertex area. A significant relief of TMD symptoms and a decrease in nervousness was also achieved. The results showed that a coordinated treatment of TMD and CSD in patients with Meniere's disease is an effective therapy for symptoms of this disease. The results also suggested that Meniere's disease has a clear association with TMD and CSD and that these three ailments appeared to be caused by the same stress, nervousness, and muscular tension. PMID:12555932

  19. Hydroxyapatite deposition disease of the joint.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Eamonn S; McCarthy, Geraldine M

    2003-06-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals include partially carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate. They may form deposits, which are frequently asymptomatic but may give rise to a number of clinical syndromes including calcific periarthritis, Milwaukee shoulder syndrome, and osteoarthritis, in and around joints. Recent data suggest that magnesium whitlockite, another form of BCP, may play a pathologic role in arthritis. Data from the past year have provided further understanding of the mechanisms by which BCP crystals induce inflammation and degeneration. There remains no specific treatment to modify the effects of BCP crystals. Although potential drugs are being identified as the complex pathophysiology of BCP crystals is unraveled, much work remains to be done in order to translate research advances to date into tangible clinical benefits. PMID:12744814

  20. Effect of iron chelation on inflammatory joint disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F J Andrews; C J Morris; G Kondratowicz; D R Blake

    1987-01-01

    Mild iron deficiency induced by treatment with the iron chelator desferrioxamine reduced the incidence and severity of joint inflammation associated with adjuvant disease in rats but did not alter the local primary inflammatory response or the systemic sequelae. Both rats treated with desferrioxamine and control rats showed increased levels of alpha 1 acid glycoprotein, characteristic pathological changes in the liver

  1. Sensitivity of patients with painful temporomandibular disorders to experimentally evoked pain: evidence for altered temporal summation of pain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William Maixner; Roger Fillingim; Asgeir Sigurdsson; Shelley Kincaid; Stefanie Silva

    1998-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) represent a group of chronic painful conditions involving the muscles of mastication and the temporomandibular joint. Several studies have reported that TMD is associated with enhanced sensitivity to experimental pain. Twenty-three TMD subjects and 24 pain-free matched control subjects participated in a set of studies which were designed to evaluate whether the temporal integrative aspects of thermal

  2. Feline degenerative joint disease: a genomic and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangming; Lee, Junyu; Malladi, Sukhaswami; Melendez, Lynda; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Al-Murrani, Samer

    2013-06-01

    The underlying disease mechanisms for feline degenerative joint disease (DJD) are mostly unidentified. Today, most of what is published on mammalian arthritis is based on human clinical findings or on mammalian models of human arthritis. However, DJD is a common occurrence in the millions of domestic felines worldwide. To get a better understanding of the changes in biological pathways that are associated with feline DJD, this study employed a custom-designed feline GeneChip, and the institution's unique access to large sample populations to investigate genes and proteins from whole blood and serum that may be up- or down-regulated in DJD cats. The GeneChip results centered around three main pathways that were affected in DJD cats: immune function, apoptosis and oxidative phosphorylation. By identifying these key disease-associated pathways it will then be possible to better understand disease pathogenesis and diagnose it more easily, and to better target it with pharmaceutical and nutritional intervention. PMID:23295270

  3. [Disability due to traumas and diseases of a knee joint].

    PubMed

    Strafun, S S; Kostogryz, O A; Rygan, M M; Ilyin, Yu V; Kostogryz, Yu O; Nechyporenko, R V

    2015-02-01

    The invalidism structure was analyzed for patients, suffering consequences of traumas and diseases of a knee joint (KJ). The primary invalidism level because of traumas and diseases of a KJ have constituted in 2013 yr 12.4%. The cause of invalidism in men is predominantly a one-side gonarthrosis, and in women--a bilateral one--due to concurrent aggravating causes (dishormonal changes, excessive body mass). The invalidism indices enhancement is caused by absence of a dispensary follow-up, insufficient treatment on various stages of the disease course, severity and irreversibility of pathological process in a KJ, socio-economic factors, low rehabilitational potential, prognosticated impossibility to conduct a professional-labour rehabilitation in a prepensionable and pensionable age. PMID:25985702

  4. Reduction in sick leave and costs to society of patients with Meniere's disease after treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders: a controlled six-year cost-benefit study.

    PubMed

    Bjorne, Assar; Agerberg, Göran

    2003-04-01

    This study compares the frequency of sick leave between the three-year period after and the three-year period before coordinated treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders in 24 patients (ten males and 14 females) diagnosed with Meniere's disease. The frequency of sick leave for the patients was also compared with the frequency of sick leave in a control group from the population. A cost-benefit analysis was made regarding the costs to society of sick leave related to the treatment costs of the patients. In a previous study the same patients were treated for their severe signs and symptoms of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders, and they reported a substantial reduction in their vertigo, non-whirling dizziness, tinnitus, feeling of fullness in the ear, pain in the face and jaws, pain in the neck and shoulders, and headache. The number of days of sick leave and the year the patient began to receive disability pension due to the symptoms of Meniere's disease were obtained from the National Health Insurance Service in Sweden. Two of the patients received disability pension benefits due to Meniere's disease 17 years prior to their normal retirement pension. A third patient received disability pension for another reason and two were receiving a retirement pension. Data on the remaining 19 patients showed a considerable reduction in number of days of sick leave during the three-year period after coordinated treatment (270 days) compared with the three-year period before the treatment (1,536 days). The control subjects used a total of 14 days sick leave for the same symptoms during the same six-year period. Vertigo (nine days) was the dominant cause followed by pain in the neck and shoulders, and headache. The reduction in sick leave for the 19 nonretired patients and the treatment costs for the 24 patients can be used for a simple cost-benefit calculation for the subgroup of nonretired patients. During the first three years after treatment the reduction in sick leave was on average 66.6 days for each of the 19 nonretired patients. Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the costs to society for sick leave and disability pension due to Meniere's disease are substantial. A coordinated treatment of temporomandibular and cervical spine disorders appears to substantially reduce these costs. PMID:12723860

  5. Charcot-like joints in calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.; Chapman, G.S.; Wild, J.H.

    1981-10-01

    Two cases of Charcot-like joints in patients with pseudogout who were otherwise neurologically intact are presented. The arthropathy of pseudogout should include Charcot-like joints and it is emphasized that an apparent Charcot joint should raise the question of pseudogout.

  6. Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities Pieter T. J, Berkeley, CA, and approved September 10, 2013 (received for review June 3, 2013) Host­parasite interactions parasites. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have explored the joint effects of host and parasite

  7. Feedforward postural adjustments in a simple two-joint synergy in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark L. Latash; Alexander S. Aruin; Ida Neyman; John J. Nicholas; Mark B. Shapiro

    1995-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease, age-matched controls and young control subjects performed discrete elbow or wrist movements in a sagittal plane under the instruction to move one of the joints “as fast as possible.” Relative stability of the other, postural joint was comparable in all 3 groups, while movement time was the highest in the patients and the lowest in young

  8. Acute mastoiditis with temporomandibular joint effusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TESSA A. HADLOCK; NALTON F. FERRARO; REZA RAHBAR

    2001-01-01

    Acute otitis media has a markedly lower incidence of intra- and extratemporal sequelae today than in the pre- antibiotic era. Among the complications of acute otitis media, mastoiditis continues to be the most common intratemporal complication. The classic description of acute mastoiditis involves a child with antecedent acute otitis media who develops high fever, severe otalgia, postauricular erythema, and tenderness.

  9. Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Easing Arthritis: Research offers new hope for people with common joint disease Past ... knees, pain plagued her every step. Living in New York City, Saisselin relied on walking and public ...

  10. A Systems Biology Approach to Synovial Joint Lubrication in Health, Injury, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Alexander Y.; McCarty, William J.; Masuda, Koichi; Firestein, Gary S.; Sah, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The synovial joint contains synovial fluid (SF) within a cavity bounded by articular cartilage and synovium. SF is a viscous fluid that has lubrication, metabolic, and regulatory functions within synovial joints. SF contains lubricant molecules, including proteoglycan-4 and hyaluronan. SF is an ultrafiltrate of plasma with secreted contributions from cell populations lining and within the synovial joint space, including chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Maintenance of normal SF lubricant composition and function are important for joint homeostasis. In osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and joint injury, changes in lubricant composition and function accompany alterations in the cytokine and growth factor environment and increased fluid and molecular transport through joint tissues. Thus, understanding the synovial joint lubrication system requires a multi-faceted study of the various parts of the synovial joint and their interactions. Systems biology approaches at multiple scales are being used to describe the molecular, cellular, and tissue components and their interactions that comprise the functioning synovial joint. Analyses of the transcriptome and proteome of SF, cartilage, and synovium suggest that particular molecules and pathways play important roles in joint homeostasis and disease. Such information may be integrated with physicochemical tissue descriptions to construct integrative models of the synovial joint that ultimately may explain maintenance of health, recovery from injury, or development and progression of arthritis. PMID:21826801

  11. Use of cervical collar in temporomandibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Jaisani, Mehul R; Pradhan, Leeza; Sagtani, Alok

    2015-06-01

    Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint represents 3 % of all reported dislocated joints. In the last 3 decades many cases of TMJ dislocation have been reported with a wide variety of treatment options ranging from non-surgical conservative approaches to open joint procedures. The question remains whether one method is superior to the others. Conservative treatments are still the option in this part of the continent due to financial constraints and as well as due to availability of skilled manpower. A variety of conservative techniques have been described for reducing dislocations, all of which require 10-14 days of immobilization of the jaw post reduction so as to prevent further episodes of dislocation. Immobilization of the jaw can be done in the form of barrel bandage, barton bandage, head chin cap or maxillomandibular fixation using arch bars. We suggest the use of a cervical collar as a form of post reduction immobilization technique to overcome the inherent disadvantages of conventional forms of immobilization techniques. PMID:26028876

  12. [Restorative treatment of degenerative-dystrophic diseases of large joints].

    PubMed

    Neverov, V A; Kurbanov, S Kh

    2004-01-01

    The authors performed courses of treatment with Midocalm in 110 patients according to their original method. It reduced the pain syndrome, increased the volume of movements in the joint and shortened the time of treatment. PMID:15199782

  13. Assessment of glycosaminoglycan concentration in equine synovial fluid as a marker of joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J L; Bertone, A L; McClain, H

    1995-01-01

    A modification of a colorimetric assay was used to determine synovial fluid total and individual sulphated-glycosaminoglycan concentration in various clinical presentations of joint disease in horses. Concentrations of synovial fluid and serum sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) were measured by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) dye assay in normal horses (n = 49), horses with acute (n = 26) or chronic (n = 27) joint disease (defined by clinical, radiographic, and clinicopathological parameters), and horses with cartilaginous lesions at diagnostic arthroscopy, but with normal radiographs and synovial fluid (n = 9). Horses with acute joint disease were subdivided into moderate acute (n = 21) and severe acute (n = 5) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis and clinical examination. Horses with chronic joint disease were subdivided into mild chronic (n = 9), moderate chronic (n = 10), and severe chronic (n = 8) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis, clinical examination, and radiographic findings. The concentrations of chondroitin sulphate (CS) and keratan sulphate (KS) were analyzed in each sample following sequential enzymatic digestion of the sample with chondroitinase or keratanase. In addition, the concentration of hyaluronate (HA) in each sample was determined by a colorimetric assay following digestion of the sample with microbial hyaluronidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8521354

  14. Vitamin D level: is it related to disease activity in inflammatory joint disease?

    PubMed

    Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Toledano, K; Markovits, D; Rozin, A; Nahir, A M; Balbir-Gurman, A

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the vitamin D status in patients (pts) with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), and its correlation with disease activity. 121 consecutive pts (85 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 22 psoriatic arthritis (PSA), 14 ankylosing spondylitis (AS)) underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation which included kidney and liver function tests, serum calcium and phosphor levels, 25(OH)D and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Disease activity was assessed by DAS 28 in RA and PSA pts and by BASDAI in AS pts, sedimentation rate (ESR) and CRP. According to activity indexes, pts were divided into subgroups with low (DAS28 < 3.2 and BASDAI < 4), and moderate-to-high disease activity (DAS28 > 3.2 and BASDAI > 4). Associations between serum levels of 25(OH)D and age, gender, ethnicity, type and disease duration, treatment, (anti-tumor necrosis factor? (TNF?) agents or DMARDs), seasonal variations, and disease activity were assessed. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 51 pts (42.1%). The incidence was higher among Arab pts (76.7%) compared to Jews (23%). The difference of 25(OH)D levels between Arabs (mean 9.4 ± 4.2 ng/ml) and Jews (mean 17.8 ± 8.4 ng/ml) was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). We did not find correlation between vitamin D levels and the other evaluated factors. A surprisingly high incidence of vitamin D deficiency was found in IJD patients in a sunny Mediterranean country. This finding justifies the inclusion of vitamin D in the routine lab work-up of pts with IJD. The only statistical significant correlation was found between vitamin D level and ethnic origin. Further studies are needed to look for genetic polymorphism of vitamin D receptors. PMID:20033415

  15. Evaluation of Pain Regression in Patients with Temporomandibular Dysfunction Treated by Intra-Articular Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Ze?czak-Wi?ckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the regression of temporomandibular pain as a result of intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction previously subjected to prosthetic treatment. Materials and Methods. The baseline study material consisted of 10 patients, both males and females, aged 28 to 53 years, previously treated due to painful temporomandibular joint dysfunction using occlusal splints. All patients were carried out to a specialist functional assessment of the dysfunction using the Polish version of the RDC/TMD questionnaire axis I and II. Intra-articular injections were preceded by a preparation of PRP. The injection sites were determined by the method used during arthroscopic surgical procedures. Following aspiration, 0.5?mL of plasma was injected into each temporomandibular joint. Results. The comparison of the intensity of pain during all examinations suggests a beneficial effect of the procedure being performed as the mean VAS score was 6.5 at examination I, 2.8 at examination II, and 0.6 at examination III. Conclusion. Application of the intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma into the temporomandibular joints has a positive impact on the reduction of the intensity of pain experienced by patients treated for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. PMID:25157351

  16. Management of temporomandibular ankylosis – compromise or individualization – a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Sporniak-Tutak, Katarzyna; Janiszewska-Olszowska, Joanna; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is defined as bony or fibrous adhesion of the anatomic joint components accompanied by a limitation in opening the mouth, causing difficulties with mastication, speaking and oral hygiene as well as inadvertently influencing mandibular growth. Surgical treatment procedures include arthroplasty of the joint cavity with or without a reconstruction and a coronoidectomy, an autogenous costochondral rib graft, distraction osteogenesis and intensive mouth-opening exercise, corrective orthognathic surgery or alloplastic joint prostheses. The authors of this study would like to provide the reader with an evidence-based review of the literature in order to determine the most efficient way to manage TMJ ankylosis and re-ankylosis. The authors have concluded that in order to achieve a satisfactory and durable effective treatment, an individualized approach is necessary in each case. PMID:21525821

  17. Nutraceutical Therapies for Degenerative Joint Diseases: A Critical Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Goggs; Anne Vaughan-Thomas; Peter D. Clegg; Stuart D. Carter; John F. Innes; Ali Mobasheri; Mehdi Shakibaei; Wolfgang Schwab; Carolyn A. Bondy

    2005-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of nutritional factors in the maintenance of bone and joint health, and that nutritional imbalance combined with endocrine abnormalities may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD). Despite this, dietary programs have played a secondary role in the management of these connective tissue disorders. Articular cartilage is critically

  18. How antibodies to a ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme may provoke joint-specific autoimmune disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isao Matsumoto; Mariana Maccioni; David M. Lee; Madelon Maurice; Barry Simmons; Michael Brenner; Diane Mathis; Christophe Benoist

    2002-01-01

    Arthritis in the K\\/BxN mouse model results from pathogenic immunoglobulins (Igs) that recognize the ubiquitous cytoplasmic enzyme glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI). But how is a joint-specific disease of autoimmune and inflammatory nature induced by systemic self-reactivity? No unusual amounts or sequence, splice or modification variants of GPI expression were found in joints. Instead, immunohistological examination revealed the accumulation of extracellular GPI

  19. Tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease of the knee mimicking an aggressive soft tissue tumour.

    PubMed

    Watura, Christopher; Saifuddin, Asif

    2014-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPPD), previously pseudogout, is the second most common crystal arthropathy after gout. There is increased radiographic prevalence associated with age, trauma and several metabolic disorders. Tophaceous CPPD (T-CPPD) is a rare form of CPPD which, though non-neoplastic, mimics a bone or soft tissue malignancy. T-CPPD usually presents as a mass in the temporomandibular joint and occasionally in the paraspinal tissues, but rarely in the joints of the extremities. We present an exceptionally rare case of T-CPPD that was subtle on plain radiography, presenting as a soft tissue mass in the knee joint. PMID:24916978

  20. Efficacy of glucosamine, chondroitin, and methylsulfonylmethane for spinal degenerative joint disease and degenerative disc disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Kent; Sajko, Sandy; Kristmanson, Kevyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nutritional supplements are commonly used for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, including knee and hip degenerative joint disease. Although these supplements are occasionally recommended for patients with degenerative disc disease and spinal degenerative joint disease, the evidence supporting this use is unknown. Objective: To systematically search and assess the quality of the literature on the use of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and methylsulfonylmethane for the treatment of spinal osteoarthritis / degenerative joint disease, and degenerative disc disease. Data Sources: The Index of Chiropractic Literature, AMED, Medline, and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials in English from 1984 to July 2009. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data from studies meeting the inclusion criteria was extracted and reviewed by three reviewers. The Jadad scale was used to assess study quality. No attempts were made at meta-analysis due to variation in study design. Results: Two articles met the inclusion criteria. One study was found to have good quality but reported negative results for the supplemented group compared with placebo, the other study had low quality but reported significant positive results for the supplemented group when compared with a no intervention control group. Conclusion: There was little literature found to support the use of common nutritional supplements for spinal degeneration, making it difficult to determine whether clinicians should recommend them. PMID:21403782

  1. Scientific methodology in temporomandibular disorders. Part III: Diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Moses, A J

    1994-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD), as a cluster of individual diseases and disorders, pose new intellectual challenges to the diagnostic skills of dentists. New technologies enable dentists to avail themselves of paraclinical data such that diagnosis can and should be disease specific or etiology specific. The importance of logic in diagnostic reasoning is discussed. Studies of the reasoning process of doctors with reputations for having good clinical judgement have resulted in protocols of diagnostic reasoning. Three specific strategies are presented and discussed-probabilistic, causal and deterministic. The difference between intellectual and managerial decisions are explained relative to utility of the strategies. PMID:7828209

  2. [Detecting adiponectin in industrial workers having inflammatory diseases of joints].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, A B; Akhverdian, Iu R; Simakova, E S; Zavodovski?, B V; Sivordova, L E

    2013-01-01

    Examination of 55 patients with rheumatoid arthritis revealed low serum level of adiponektin in 25.4 % of the patients. Patients with low serum level of adiponektin demonstrate such symptoms set as: increased activity degree on DAS28 (II-III activity grade), high level of antibodies to citrullinated vimentin, advanced and late stages of the disease, severe X-ray changes. PMID:23785809

  3. The tissue architecture of synovial membranes in inflammatory and non-inflammatory joint diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. R. Burmester; P. Locher; B. Koch; R. J. Winchester; A. Dimitriu-Bona; J. R. Kalden; W. Mohr

    1983-01-01

    Utilizing monoclonal reagents directed towards antigens of the monocyte-macrophage lineage and Ia antigens, the tissue architecture of synovial membranes obtained from patients with non-inflammatory joint diseases and patients with rheumatoid arthritis was studied. Emphasis was placed on the localization of the type I, type II and type III synoviocytes that previously had been defined by their cell surface phenotype with

  4. Hyperplasia of the coronoid process in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (Bechterew disease).

    PubMed

    Wenghoefer, Matthias; Martini, Markus; Allam, Jean-Piere; Novak, Natalja; Reich, Rudolf; Bergé, Stefaan J

    2008-07-01

    Although involvement of the temporomandibular joint in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS, Bechterew disease) has been described previously, hyperplasia of the mandibular coronoid process in those patients has not been reported yet. Case notes were studied, and records were made of age, sex, clinical symptoms, radiography, and treatment in all patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronoid hyperplasia presenting at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Bonn, between 1995 and 2007. Sixteen cases of coronoid hyperplasia were recruited, of which 12 were bilateral and 4 were unilateral. Four patients had AS, 3 of them were HLA-B27-positive. Temporomandibular joint symptoms are frequently seen in patients with AS. Nevertheless, it must be considered that a limitation of jaw mobility in those patients might also be caused by an elongation of the mandibular coronoid process. PMID:18650743

  5. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction.

  6. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor Ameliorates Joint Disease in Murine Collagen- Induced Arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard O.; Feldmann, Marc; Maini, Ravinder N.

    1992-10-01

    There is considerable evidence implicating tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This evidence is based not only on the universal presence of TNF-? in arthritic joints accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-? receptors but also on the effects of neutralizing TNF-? in joint cell cultures. Thus, neutralization of TNF-? in vitro results in inhibition of the production of interleukin 1, which like TNF-?, is believed to contribute to joint inflammation and erosion. To determine the validity of this concept in vivo, the effect of administering TNF-neutralizing antibodies to mice with collagen-induced arthritis has been studied. This disease model was chosen because of its many immunological and pathological similarities to human rheumatoid arthritis. TN3-19.12, a hamster IgG1 monoclonal antibody to murine TNF-?/?, was injected i.p. into mice either before the onset of arthritis or after the establishment of clinical disease. Anti-TNF administered prior to disease onset significantly reduced paw swelling and histological severity of arthritis without reducing the incidence of arthritis or the level of circulating anti-type II collagen IgG. More relevant to human disease was the capacity of the antibody to reduce the clinical score, paw swelling, and the histological severity of disease even when injected after the onset of clinical arthritis. These results have implications for possible modes of therapy of human arthritis.

  7. Bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a juvenile male yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    PubMed

    Buckle, Kelly N; Alley, Maurice R

    2011-08-01

    A juvenile, male, yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) with abnormal stance and decreased mobility was captured, held in captivity for approximately 6 weeks, and euthanized due to continued clinical signs. Radiographically, there was bilateral degenerative joint disease with coxofemoral periarticular osteophyte formation. Grossly, the bird had bilaterally distended, thickened coxofemoral joints with increased laxity, and small, roughened and angular femoral heads. Histologically, the left femoral articular cartilage and subchondral bone were absent, and the remaining femoral head consisted of trabecular bone overlain by fibrin and granulation tissue. There was no gross or histological evidence of infection. The historic, gross, radiographic, and histopathologic findings were most consistent with bilateral aseptic femoral head degeneration resulting in degenerative joint disease. Although the chronicity of the lesions masked the initiating cause, the probable underlying causes of aseptic bilateral femoral head degeneration in a young animal are osteonecrosis and osteochondrosis of the femoral head. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a penguin. PMID:21812716

  8. Relação da classe econômica e qualidade do sono na ocoRRência da disfunção tempoRomandibulaR The RelaTiOnShiP beTween eCOnOmiC ClaSS and qUaliTy Of SleeP On The OCCURRenCe Of TemPOROmandibUlaR jOinT dy SfUnCTiOn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald Jefferson Martins

    Resumo Introdução: Objetivou-se, neste estudo, verificar a relação da classe econômica e qualidade do sono na ocorrência da disfunção temporomandibular (DTM). A população constituiu-se a de uma amostra es- tatisticamente significativa de indivíduos pertencentes às diferentes classes econômicas do município de Piacatu, São Paulo, Brasil. Método: Utilizou-se o Critério de Classificação Econômica Brasil (CCEB) para a estratificação econômica da população.

  9. Scientific methodology in temporomandibular disorders. Part I: Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Moses, A J

    1994-04-01

    Epidemiological methodology is examined relative to the following: a) use of proper controls; b) the large magnitude of variation in published epidemiological studies on occurrence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD); c) its suitability for the study of TMD as stress disorders; d) the fact that TMD are a group of diseases each with different etiologies and symptomologies (epidemiological studies directed at the whole group may be misleading and inappropriate); and e) subjectivity of the criteria used in epidemiologic studies of TMD. This article involves the logic of the methodology and does not deal with statistical analysis. PMID:8055585

  10. Disruptions in joint control during drawing arm movements in Parkinson’s disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natalia Dounskaia; Caroline J. Ketcham; Berta C. Leis; George E. Stelmach

    2005-01-01

    Impairments in control of multi-joint arm movements in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) were investigated. The PD patients and age-matched elderly participants performed cyclical arm movements, tracking templates of a large circle and four differentially oriented ovals on a horizontal table. The wrist was immobilized and the movements were performed with shoulder and elbow rotations. The task was performed with and without

  11. Pedicle marrow signal intensity changes in the lumbar spine: a manifestation of facet degenerative joint disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer L. Morrison; Phoebe A. Kaplan; Robert G. Dussault; Mark W. Anderson

    2000-01-01

    Objective. Signal intensity changes in lumbar pedicles, similar to those described in vertebral body endplates adjacent to degenerated\\u000a discs, have been described as an ancillary sign of spondylolysis on MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine whether\\u000a pedicle marrow signal intensity changes also occur in association with facet degenerative joint disease.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Design. Eighty-nine lumbar spine MRI examinations without

  12. Age-related differences in temporomandibular disorder diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Piccotti, Fabio; Mogno, Giorgia; Favero, Lorenzo; Manfredini, Daniele

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the pattern of age distribution of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and to identify prevalence peaks for the different diagnoses. The study sample (N = 383; F:M ratio = 3.9; mean age range 41.7 +/- 17 years) consisted of patients seeking treatment for TMD and who were assessed in accordance with the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) version 1.0 guidelines. The sample was divided into four age groups on the basis of percentile-derived intervals to compare prevalence of different diagnoses in relation to age. The pattern of clinical diagnoses changed with increasing age. The peculiar distribution of RDC/TMD axis I diagnoses, with relation to age, mainly affected the disorders trend of groups II and III, with the former decreasing with age from about 62% to 40% and the latter increasing from 75% to almost 95%. Two distinct age peaks were identified for the prevalence of the main clinical marker of group III diagnosis of arthrosis/arthritis, viz., joint crepitus sounds (N = 104, mean age range 51.9 +/- 14.5), and for the prevalence of all other diagnoses in patients without joint crepitus (N = 279, mean age range 37.9 +/- 16.4). The hypothesis that TMD patient populations may be composed of at least two diagnostic subgroups in relation to age, and that the presence of clinically diagnosed degenerative joint disorders may be a key discriminating factor, was supported. The external validity of the results from this investigation needs to be confirmed by multicenter and cross-cultural studies. PMID:22606853

  13. Thermo and ozone\\/ No \\/Co2 — ultrasound method of non - invasive lymphotropic therapy of destructive - degenerate diseases of joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valeriy V. Pedder; Helena V. Egorova; Guennadiy Z. Rot; Alexander V. Pedder; Yury V. Shkuro; Irina V. Surgutskova; Anna V. Shudina; Vadim N. Mironenko; Maxim V. Naboka

    2008-01-01

    A new thermal and O3\\/NO\\/CO2 ultrasonic method and the equipment related to it have been designed and implemented for the first time in clinical practice for non-invasive lymphotropic therapy of the diseases of joints. The therapy increases the efficiency of joint disease treatment due to implementing of a non-invasive method of thermal contrast absorption of medications by tissues using low-frequency

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of the human finger: towards the assessment of inflammatory joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Es, P.; Biswas, S. K.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Steenbergen, W.; Manohar, S.

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory arthritis is often manifested in finger joints. The growth of new or withdrawal of old blood vessels can be a sensitive marker for these diseases. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has great potential in this respect since it allows the sensitive and highly resolved visualization of blood. We systematically investigated PA imaging of finger vasculature in healthy volunteers using a newly developed PA tomographic system. We present the PA results which show excellent detail of the vasculature. Vessels with diameters ranging between 100 ?m and 1.5 mm are visible along with details of the skin, including the epidermis and the subpapillary plexus. The focus of all the studies is at the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and in the context of ultimately visualizing the inflamed synovial membrane in patients. This work is important in laying the foundation for detailed research into PA imaging of the phalangeal vasculature in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. JOINT ANALYSIS OF SNP AND GENE EXPRESSION DATA IN GENETIC ASSOCIATION STUDIES OF COMPLEX DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Vanderweele, Tyler J; Lin, Xihong

    2014-03-01

    Genetic association studies have been a popular approach for assessing the association between common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and complex diseases. However, other genomic data involved in the mechanism from SNPs to disease, e.g., gene expressions, are usually neglected in these association studies. In this paper, we propose to exploit gene expression information to more powerfully test the association between SNPs and diseases by jointly modeling the relations among SNPs, gene expressions and diseases. We propose a variance component test for the total effect of SNPs and a gene expression on disease risk. We cast the test within the causal mediation analysis framework with the gene expression as a potential mediator. For eQTL SNPs, the use of gene expression information can enhance power to test for the total effect of a SNP-set, which are the combined direct and indirect effects of the SNPs mediated through the gene expression, on disease risk. We show that the test statistic under the null hypothesis follows a mixture of ? (2) distributions, which can be evaluated analytically or empirically using the resampling-based perturbation method. We construct tests for each of three disease models that is determined by SNPs only, SNPs and gene expression, or includes also their interactions. As the true disease model is unknown in practice, we further propose an omnibus test to accommodate different underlying disease models. We evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed methods using simulation studies, and show that our proposed test performs well and the omnibus test can almost reach the optimal power where the disease model is known and correctly specified. We apply our method to re-analyze the overall effect of the SNP-set and expression of the ORMDL3 gene on the risk of asthma. PMID:24729824

  16. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in Edentulous Patients: A Review and Proposed Classification (Dr. Bader’s Classification).

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a collective term given to a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joints and associated structures, or both. Although the aetiology of TMD has not been fully understood, in general it is considered to be multifactorial. The signs and symptoms of TMD which present in patients with natural teeth may also occur in edentulous patients. These symptoms may appear in various combinations and degrees. TMD has attained a prominent role within the context of dental care due to its high prevalence. The present paper is a review of the current literature on TMD in edentulous patients; with an attempt to propose a classification for the same. PMID:26023660

  17. Replacement of missing anterior teeth in a patient with temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Saeed Al-Shahrani, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The loss of anterior teeth leads to extreme psychological trauma, along with functional and esthetic debilitations. Healthy anterior teeth play an important role of protecting the posterior teeth during excursive mandibular movement. Loss of anterior teeth induces posterior interference with extended disocclusion time. Posterior disocclusion is critical to remove the harmful force on the teeth temporomandibular joint and eliminate muscle hypertonicity. Occlusal interference is considered as contributing factor to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms. Prosthesis design should eliminate deleterious tooth contacts. Establishing optimum anterior guidance is a key to establishing harmonious functional occlusion in addition to the correction of the esthetic and phonetic disabilities. This case report explains the steps involved in the rehabilitation of the TMD patient with loss of maxillary anterior teeth. PMID:24715993

  18. Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) in Edentulous Patients: A Review and Proposed Classification (Dr. Bader's Classification).

    PubMed

    Alzarea, Bader K

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a collective term given to a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joints and associated structures, or both. Although the aetiology of TMD has not been fully understood, in general it is considered to be multifactorial. The signs and symptoms of TMD which present in patients with natural teeth may also occur in edentulous patients. These symptoms may appear in various combinations and degrees. TMD has attained a prominent role within the context of dental care due to its high prevalence. The present paper is a review of the current literature on TMD in edentulous patients; with an attempt to propose a classification for the same. PMID:26023660

  19. KERNEL-BASED MULTI-TASK JOINT SPARSE CLASSIFICATION FOR ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaping; Liu, Manhua; Guo, Lei; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-12-31

    Multi-modality imaging provides complementary information for diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its prodrome, mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In this paper, we propose a kernel-based multi-task sparse representation model to combine the strengths of MRI and PET imaging features for improved classification of AD. Sparse representation based classification seeks to represent the testing data with a sparse linear combination of training data. Here, our approach allows information from different imaging modalities to be used for enforcing class level joint sparsity via multi-task learning. Thus the common most representative classes in the training samples for all modalities are jointly selected to reconstruct the testing sample. We further improve the discriminatory power by extending the framework to the reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS) so that nonlinearity in the features can be captured for better classification. Experiments on Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database shows that our proposed method can achieve 93.3% and 78.9% accuracy for classification of AD and MCI from healthy controls, respectively, demonstrating promising performance in AD study. PMID:24443696

  20. Preliminary results of automated removal of degenerative joint disease in bone scan lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Gregory H.; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J.; Auerbach, Martin; Goldin, Jonathan; Henkel, Keith; Banola, Ashley; Morris, Darren; Coy, Heidi; Brown, Matthew S.

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body bone scintigraphy (or bone scan) is a highly sensitive method for visualizing bone metastases and is the accepted standard imaging modality for detection of metastases and assessment of treatment outcomes. The development of a quantitative biomarker using computer-aided detection on bone scans for treatment response assessment may have a significant impact on the evaluation of novel oncologic drugs directed at bone metastases. One of the challenges to lesion segmentation on bone scans is the non-specificity of the radiotracer, manifesting as high activity related to non-malignant processes like degenerative joint disease, sinuses, kidneys, thyroid and bladder. In this paper, we developed an automated bone scan lesion segmentation method that implements intensity normalization, a two-threshold model, and automated detection and removal of areas consistent with non-malignant processes from the segmentation. The two-threshold model serves to account for outlier bone scans with elevated and diffuse intensity distributions. Parameters to remove degenerative joint disease were trained using a multi-start Nelder-Mead simplex optimization scheme. The segmentation reference standard was constructed manually by a panel of physicians. We compared the performance of the proposed method against a previously published method. The results of a two-fold cross validation show that the overlap ratio improved in 67.0% of scans, with an average improvement of 5.1% points.

  1. Influence of gender on assessments of disease activity and function in early rheumatoid arthritis in relation to radiographic joint damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Ahlmén; B Svensson; K Albertsson; K Forslind; I Hafström

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate gender differences in score on 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and Signals Of Functional Impairment (SOFI) and to relate these scores to radiographic joint destruction.Methods:In all, 549 patients with early RA (62% women) from the BARFOT (for “Better Anti-Rheumatic FarmacOTherapy”) study were included. At baseline, 1, 2 and 5 years DAS28, HAQ and SOFI

  2. [Temporomandibular fibro-chondromalacia. Physiological basis. Classification on the basis of clinical characteristics and course. Spongialisation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Couly, G; Dautrey, J

    1982-01-01

    The temporomandibular joints are neural structures which develop from the cephalic ectomesenchyme of the neural crests. They are analogous to the effector organs. Their lesional abnormalities have two characteristics:--pain sensation,--"foreign body". A classification is suggested on the basis of clinical characteristics and course of articular signs due to temporo-menisco-condylar stress resulting from occlusion problems, and concomitant lesions of the articular fibrocartilage: closed and open fibro-chondromalacia. Emphasis is placed upon the constant dissociation between articular clinical features and nosography. Spongialisation, or the property of regeneration of fibrocartilage from spongy bone tissue fully justifies the technique of condyloplasty to remodel the temporomandibular joints in the presence of fibro-chondromalacia. The future lies in the distinction between fibro-chondromalacia secondary to occlusive stress and that due to primary ischaemia of bone. PMID:6954631

  3. Joint action of disease control measures: a case study of alternaria leaf blight of carrot.

    PubMed

    Ben-Noon, E; Shtienberg, D; Shlevin, E; Dinoor, A

    2003-10-01

    ABSTRACT The efficacy of chemical (i.e., foliar fungicide sprays), genetic (i.e., moderately resistant cultivars), and cultural (i.e., drip-irrigation system) control measures was quantified individually and in combination in the management of Alternaria dauci, the causal agent of Alternaria leaf blight of carrot. Whereas host resistance and drip irrigation affected both the time of disease onset and the rate of disease progression, chemical control affected only the latter. In all cases, a single control measure did not provide an acceptable level of disease suppression. Control efficacy values (based on the relative area under the disease progress curve) for chemical, genetic, and cultural control were 58 +/- 11, 39 +/- 20, and 60 +/- 22%, respectively (values are means +/- standard error). By contrast, implementing two control measures concurrently always improved disease suppression significantly compared with the individual measures. Control efficacy values were 91 +/- 8% for the integration of chemical and genetic measures and 82 +/- 23% for the integration of chemical and cultural measures. Moreover, yields in plots protected by two control measures simultaneously were higher by 10.1 to 28.6 t/ha than those in the respective plots protected by single measures. The joint effect of chemical control and host resistance was additive, whereas that of chemical control and drip irrigation was synergistic in most cases. A literature review was performed to determine if these findings represent a general relationship between chemical and genetic, and chemical and cultural measures. Based on 19 reviewed cases, it was concluded that additive effects are the rule and synergistic or antagonistic effects are the exception. Synergistic effects of two control measures were observed when one control measure improved the efficacy of the other directly or when one control measure induced host resistance or predisposed the pathogen to increased susceptibility. These results may enable a more effective selection of candidate control measures for integration in the future. PMID:18944332

  4. Anti-CarP antibodies as promising marker to measure joint damage and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yee, Alvin; Webb, Tyler; Seaman, Andrea; Infantino, Maria; Meacci, Francesca; Manfredi, Mariangela; Benucci, Maurizio; Lakos, Gabriella; Favalli, Ennio; Shioppo, Tommaso; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Mahler, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) are important serological markers in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are part of the recent disease classification criteria. However, there is a strong need for reliable markers for measuring and predicting joint damage and disease activity. Recently, antibodies directed against carbamylated antigens (anti-CarP antibodies) were identified. A total of 120 RA patients were tested for anti-CCP antibodies using different methods and for anti-CarP antibodies using carbamylated fetal calf serum according to the method described by Shi et al. Additionally, ACPA fine specificities (to three citrullinated peptides) were measured. Disease activity was assessed at baseline using the disease activity score 28 (DAS28) in 80 patients. For 40 RA patients, joint erosion score (JES) was established. The median JES was 14.1 with a standard deviation of 11.5. Anti-CarP antibodies were correlated with joint erosion score (? = 0.34, 95% CI 0.03-0.59; p = 0.0332). No correlation between ACPA and joint erosion score was observed. No individual marker correlated with DAS28. When one ACPA peptide was combined with anti-CarP antibodies in a score (ACPA peptide 1 divided by anti-CarP), a statistically relevant correlation was found (p = 0.0264). In this small cohort, the presence of anti-CarP antibodies, but not ACPA correlate with joint erosion score. Anti-CarP antibodies combined with ACPA fine specificities correlated with DAS28. Therefore, anti-CarP antibodies might represent a promising marker to predict joint damage and disease activity in RA patients. PMID:25391608

  5. Joint symptoms and diseases associated with moisture damage in a health center.

    PubMed

    Luosujärvi, R A; Husman, T M; Seuri, M; Pietikäinen, M A; Pollari, P; Pelkonen, J; Hujakka, H T; Kaipiainen-Seppänen, O A; Aho, K

    2003-12-01

    Rheumatic diseases do not usually cluster in time and space. It has been proposed that environmental exposures may initiate autoimmune responses. We describe a cluster of rheumatic diseases among a group of health center employees who began to complain of symptoms typically related to moldy houses, including mucocutaneous symptoms, nausea and fatigue, within a year of moving into a new building. Dampness was found in the insulation space of the concrete floor below ground level. Microbes indicating mold damage and actinobacteria were found in the flooring material and in the outer wall insulation. The case histories of the personnel involved were examined. All 34 subjects working at the health center had at least some rheumatic complaints. Two fell ill with a typical rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 10 had arthritis that did not conform to any definite arthritic syndrome (three met the classification criteria for RA). Prior to moving into the problem building one subject had suffered reactive arthritis, which had then recurred. Another employee had undiagnosed ankylosing spondylitis and later developed psoriatic arthritis, and another developed undifferentiated vasculitis. A total of 16 subjects developed joint pains, 11 of these after beginning work at the health center. Three subjects developed Raynaud's symptom. Fourteen cases had elevated levels of circulating immune complexes in 1998, 17 in 1999, but there were only three cases in 2001, when the health center had been closed for 18 months. The high incidence of joint problems among these employees suggests a common triggering factor for most of the cases. As some of the symptoms had tended to subside while the health center was closed, the underlying causes are probably related to the building itself and possibly to the abnormal microbial growth in its structures. PMID:14677010

  6. Joint disease mapping of cervical and male oropharyngeal cancer incidence in blacks and whites in South Carolina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgiana Onicescu; Elizabeth G. Hill; Andrew B. Lawson; Jeffrey E. Korte; M. Boyd Gillespie

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is an established causal agent for cervical cancer and a subset of oropharyngeal cancers. It is hypothesized that orogenital transmission results in oral cavity infection. In this paper we explore the geographical association between cervical and male oropharyngeal cancer incidence in blacks and whites in South Carolina using Bayesian joint disease mapping models fit to publicly

  7. Joint Statement on Bed Bug Control in the United States from the U.S. Centers for Disease

    E-print Network

    Joint Statement on Bed Bug Control in the United States from the U.S. Centers for Disease) developed this document to highlight emerging public health issues associated with bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) in communities throughout the United States. Bed bugs (Photo 1) have been common in U.S. history

  8. Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease associ-ated with the degradation of articular cartilage, is a leading

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a degenerative joint disease associ- ated with the degradation of articular- chanical engineering department at the University of Delaware. He is a member of the Materials Tribology of degradation. Edward plans to continue his stud- ies in tribology while pursuing a doctorate. You can reach him

  9. The Effects on Knowledge of the Systematic Education of Patients with Joint Diseases Treated with NSAIDs and Diuretics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linne, Agneta Bjorck; Liedholm, Hans; Jacobsson, Lennart

    2001-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial, patients with joint diseases and concomitant treatment with NSAIDs and diuretics received systematic education. The intervention group was given information focusing on awareness of drug interactions and encouragement of self-adjustment of treatment. Results reveal that the intervention group achieved greater…

  10. A joint model for multistate disease processes and random informative observation times, with applications to electronic medical records data.

    PubMed

    Lange, Jane M; Hubbard, Rebecca A; Inoue, Lurdes Y T; Minin, Vladimir N

    2015-03-01

    Multistate models are used to characterize individuals' natural histories through diseases with discrete states. Observational data resources based on electronic medical records pose new opportunities for studying such diseases. However, these data consist of observations of the process at discrete sampling times, which may either be pre-scheduled and non-informative, or symptom-driven and informative about an individual's underlying disease status. We have developed a novel joint observation and disease transition model for this setting. The disease process is modeled according to a latent continuous-time Markov chain; and the observation process, according to a Markov-modulated Poisson process with observation rates that depend on the individual's underlying disease status. The disease process is observed at a combination of informative and non-informative sampling times, with possible misclassification error. We demonstrate that the model is computationally tractable and devise an expectation-maximization algorithm for parameter estimation. Using simulated data, we show how estimates from our joint observation and disease transition model lead to less biased and more precise estimates of the disease rate parameters. We apply the model to a study of secondary breast cancer events, utilizing mammography and biopsy records from a sample of women with a history of primary breast cancer. PMID:25319319

  11. Defining the research agenda to reduce the joint burden of disease from Diabetes Mellitus and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D; Murray, Megan B; Jeon, Christie Y; Ottmani, Salah-Eddine; Lonnroth, Knut; Barreto, Mauricio L; Billo, Nils; Brostrom, Richard; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Fisher-Hoch, Susan; Mori, Toru; Ramaiya, Kaushik; Roglic, Gojka; Strandgaard, Hanne; Unwin, Nigel; Viswanathan, Vijay; Whiting, David; Kapur, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The steadily growing epidemic of diabetes mellitus (DM) poses a threat for global tuberculosis (TB) control. Previous studies have identified an important association between DM and TB. However, these studies have limitations: very few were carried out in low-income countries, with none in Africa, raising uncertainty about the strength of the DM-TB association in these settings, and many critical questions remain unanswered. An expert meeting was held in November 2009 to discuss where there was sufficient evidence to make firm recommendations about joint management of both diseases, to address research gaps and to develop a research agenda. Ten key research questions were identified, of which 4 were selected as high priority: i) whether, when and how to screen for TB in patients with DM and vice versa; ii) the impact of DM and non-DM hyperglycaemia on TB treatment outcomes and deaths, and the development of strategies to improve outcomes; iii) implementation and evaluation of the tuberculosis “DOTS” model for DM management; and iv) the development and evaluation of better point-of-care diagnostic and monitoring tests, including measurements of blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for patients with DM. Implementation of this research agenda will benefit the control of both diseases. PMID:20406430

  12. A digital-signal-processor-based optical tomographic system for dynamic imaging of joint diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasker, Joseph M.

    Over the last decade, optical tomography (OT) has emerged as viable biomedical imaging modality. Various imaging systems have been developed that are employed in preclinical as well as clinical studies, mostly targeting breast imaging, brain imaging, and cancer related studies. Of particular interest are so-called dynamic imaging studies where one attempts to image changes in optical properties and/or physiological parameters as they occur during a system perturbation. To successfully perform dynamic imaging studies, great effort is put towards system development that offers increasingly enhanced signal-to-noise performance at ever shorter data acquisition times, thus capturing high fidelity tomographic data within narrower time periods. Towards this goal, I have developed in this thesis a dynamic optical tomography system that is, unlike currently available analog instrumentation, based on digital data acquisition and filtering techniques. At the core of this instrument is a digital signal processor (DSP) that collects, collates, and processes the digitized data set. Complementary protocols between the DSP and a complex programmable logic device synchronizes the sampling process and organizes data flow. Instrument control is implemented through a comprehensive graphical user interface which integrates automated calibration, data acquisition, and signal post-processing. Real-time data is generated at frame rates as high as 140 Hz. An extensive dynamic range (˜190 dB) accommodates a wide scope of measurement geometries and tissue types. Performance analysis demonstrates very low system noise (˜1 pW rms noise equivalent power), excellent signal precision (˜0.04%--0.2%) and long term system stability (˜1% over 40 min). Experiments on tissue phantoms validate spatial and temporal accuracy of the system. As a potential new application of dynamic optical imaging I present the first application of this method to use vascular hemodynamics as a means of characterizing joint diseases, especially effects of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the proximal interphalangeal finger joints. Using a dual-wavelength tomographic imaging system and previously implemented reconstruction scheme, I have performed initial dynamic imaging case studies on healthy volunteers and patients diagnosed with RA. These studies support our hypothesis that differences in the vascular and metabolic reactivity exist between affected and unaffected joints and can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  13. A Collaborative Approach Between Chiropractic and Dentistry to Address Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rubis, Lisa M.; Rubis, David; Winchester, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the chiropractic and dental comanagement of a patient with temporomandibular dysfunction, headaches, and myalgia. Clinical features A 38-year-old black female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief concern of jaw pain, tinnitus, headaches, and neck and shoulder soreness of 8 months’ duration. The patient rated the pain a 6/10. The patient had a maximum mouth opening of 42 mm, graphed evidence of disk displacement, loss of translation on opening of the right temporomandibular joint viewed on the lateral radiograph, and numerous areas of point tenderness on the Kinnie-Funt Chief Complaint Visual Index. She had decreased lateral cervical flexion. Intervention and outcome Dental treatment consisted of an anterior repositioning splint. Chiropractic care consisted of Activator treatment to the pelvis and the thoracic and cervical spine. Manual manipulation of the temporomandibular joint was performed along with a soft tissue technique intraorally on the lateral pterygoid. Postisometric relaxation in the head and neck region was also done. The patient was treated 6 times over 3 weeks. At the end of treatment, the patient had a pain rating of 0/10, maximum mouth opening of 49 mm, no tender points on the follow-up Kinnie-Funt, and increased cervical range of motion. Conclusion The patient demonstrated increased mouth opening, decreased pain rating, improved Kinnie-Funt visual index, and an increased cervical lateral flexion range of motion after 3 weeks of a combination of chiropractic and dental care. PMID:24711786

  14. Improved Flow Cytometric Assessment Reveals Distinct Microvesicle (Cell-Derived Microparticle) Signatures in Joint Diseases

    PubMed Central

    György, Bence; Szabó, Tamás G.; Turiák, Lilla; Wright, Matthew; Herczeg, Petra; Lédeczi, Zsigmond; Kittel, Ágnes; Polgár, Anna; Tóth, Kálmán; Dérfalvi, Beáta; Zelenák, Gerg?; Böröcz, István; Carr, Bob; Nagy, György; Vékey, Károly; Gay, Steffen; Falus, András; Buzás, Edit I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Microvesicles (MVs), earlier referred to as microparticles, represent a major type of extracellular vesicles currently considered as novel biomarkers in various clinical settings such as autoimmune disorders. However, the analysis of MVs in body fluids has not been fully standardized yet, and there are numerous pitfalls that hinder the correct assessment of these structures. Methods In this study, we analyzed synovial fluid (SF) samples of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To assess factors that may confound MV detection in joint diseases, we used electron microscopy (EM), Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and mass spectrometry (MS). For flow cytometry, a method commonly used for phenotyping and enumeration of MVs, we combined recent advances in the field, and used a novel approach of differential detergent lysis for the exclusion of MV-mimicking non-vesicular signals. Results EM and NTA showed that substantial amounts of particles other than MVs were present in SF samples. Beyond known MV-associated proteins, MS analysis also revealed abundant plasma- and immune complex-related proteins in MV preparations. Applying improved flow cytometric analysis, we demonstrate for the first time that CD3+ and CD8+ T-cell derived SF MVs are highly elevated in patients with RA compared to OA patients (p?=?0.027 and p?=?0.009, respectively, after Bonferroni corrections). In JIA, we identified reduced numbers of B cell-derived MVs (p?=?0.009, after Bonferroni correction). Conclusions Our results suggest that improved flow cytometric assessment of MVs facilitates the detection of previously unrecognized disease-associated vesicular signatures. PMID:23185418

  15. Toward a joint health and disease management program. Toronto hospitals partner to provide system leadership.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Anne Marie; Gollish, Jeffrey; Kennedy, Deborah; McGlasson, Rhona; Waddell, James

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Health and Disease Management Program in the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) is envisioned as a comprehensive model of care for patients with hip and knee arthritis. It includes access to assessment services, education, self-management programs and other treatment programs, including specialist care as needed. As the first phase of this program, the hospitals in TC LHIN implemented a Hip and Knee Replacement Program to focus on improving access and quality of care, coordinating services and measuring wait times for patients waiting for hip or knee replacement surgery. The program involves healthcare providers, consumers and constituent hospitals within TC LHIN. The approach used for this program involved a definition of governance structure, broad stakeholder engagement to design program elements and plans for implementation and communication to ensure sustainability. The program and approach were designed to provide a model that is transferrable in its elements or its entirety to other patient populations and programs. Success has been achieved in creating a single wait list, developing technology to support referral management and wait time reporting, contributing to significant reductions in waits for timely assessment and treatment, building human resource capacity and improving patient and referring physician satisfaction with coordination of care. PMID:19369812

  16. Local Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation Decreases Temporomandibular Joint Inflammation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tânia C. Chicre-Alcântara; Karla E. Torres-Chávez; Luana Fischer; Juliana T. Clemente-Napimoga; Vilma Melo; Carlos Amílcar Parada; Claudia Herrera Tambeli

    In an attempt to decrease central side effects associated with the use of opioids, some strategies have been developed by\\u000a targeting peripheral opioid receptors. In this context, kappa receptors are of major interest, since, in contrast to other\\u000a opioid receptors, their activation is not associated with potent peripheral side effects. We have recently demonstrated that\\u000a local activation of kappa opioid

  17. Partial Antiviral Activities Detection of Chicken Mx Jointing with Neuraminidase Gene (NA) against Newcastle Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yani; Fu, Dezhi; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Zhentao; Shi, Qingqing; Elsayed, Ahmed Kamel; Li, Bichun

    2013-01-01

    As an attempt to increase the resistance to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and so further reduction of its risk on the poultry industry. This work aimed to build the eukaryotic gene co-expression plasmid of neuraminidase (NA) gene and myxo-virus resistance (Mx) and detect the gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells, it is most important to investigate the influence of the recombinant plasmid on the chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF) cells. cDNA fragment of NA and mutant Mx gene were derived from pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0-Mx plasmid via PCR, respectively, then NA and Mx cDNA fragment were inserted into the multiple cloning sites of pVITRO2 to generate the eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pVITRO2-Mx-NA. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease treatment and sequencing, and it was transfected into the mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3) cells. The expression of genes in pVITRO2-Mx-NA were measured by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CEF cells then RT-PCR and the micro-cell inhibition tests were used to test the antiviral activity for NDV. Our results showed that co-expression vector pVITRO2-Mx-NA was constructed successfully; the expression of Mx and NA could be detected in both NIH-3T3 and CEF cells. The recombinant proteins of Mx and NA protect CEF cells from NDV infection until after 72 h of incubation but the individually mutagenic Mx protein or NA protein protects CEF cells from NDV infection till 48 h post-infection, and co-transfection group decreased significantly NDV infection compared with single-gene transfection group (P<0. 05), indicating that Mx-NA jointing contributed to delaying the infection of NDV in single-cell level and the co-transfection of the jointed genes was more powerful than single one due to their synergistic effects. PMID:23977111

  18. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Griffith, Emily H.; Thomson, Andrea E.; Simpson, Wendy; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI) and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM). Methods Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period. Results Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (p<0.0001) compared to baseline. The FMPI results and activity count data offer concurrent validation for the FMPI, though the relationship between baseline activity counts and FMPI scores at baseline was poor (R2=0.034). The CSOM did not show responsiveness for improvement in this study, and the relationship between baseline activity counts and CSOM scores at baseline was similarly poor (R2=0.042). Conclusions Refinements to the FMPI, including abbreviation of the instrument and scoring as percent of possible score are recommended. This study offered further validation of the FMPI as a clinical metrology instrument for use in detecting therapeutic efficacy in cats with degenerative joint disease. PMID:26162101

  19. Prognostic factors affecting survival of 507 horses with joint disease: (1983 to 1990).

    PubMed Central

    Fubini, S L; Erb, H N; Freeman, K P; Todhunter, R J

    1999-01-01

    Between July 1, 1983 and December 31, 1990, risk factors were determined for all horses with joint disease presented to a referral center, of being discharged, of ever becoming sound, or of being alive at 3 mo follow-up. Logistic multiple-regression models were done separately for foals (< or = 4 mo), yearlings (> 4-24 mo) and racing or nonracing adult horses (> 24 mo). The breakdown in this study was 53 foals, 87 yearlings, 141 nonracing adults, and 226 racing adults. Thirty-one foals (58%), 68 yearlings (78%), 119 non-racing adults (84%), and 213 racing adults (94%) were discharged. Foals with a less severe lameness, duration of illness of > 1 d, and infectious arthritis had increased odds of discharge. At follow-up, 12 of 18 (67%) were alive, 10 (56%) of which were sound. Yearlings with osteochondrosis had higher odds of discharge; at follow-up, 38 of 49 (78%) were alive, 32 (65%) of which were sound. For non-racing adults, horses with less severe lameness, without a miscellaneous diagnosis, or intended for pleasure use had increased odds of discharge. At follow-up, 55 of 78 (70%) were alive and 33 of 58 (57%) with soundness data became sound. Risk factors for higher odds of being alive at follow-up were carpal lameness, arthroscopic surgery, a prognosis other than poor, became sound, above-median hospitalization costs, and duration of follow-up. The 161 racing adults (76% of discharges), with follow-up, were more likely to have had osteoarthritis, higher hospital costs, hospitalization > 1 d, and arthroscopy. Sixty-four (60%) of these became sound; the odds increased if the horse was not severely lame at admission or was hospitalized for > 1 d. Risk factors and prognosis differed by age-use group among horses seen at our hospital. PMID:10534004

  20. Charge-based transport and drug delivery into cartilage for localized treatment of degenerative joint diseases

    E-print Network

    Bajpayee, Ambika Goel

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic joint injuries significantly increase synovial fluid levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines that can initiate cartilage degeneration leading to osteoarthritis (OA). Articular cartilage is a highly negatively charged, ...

  1. Current knowledge and importance of dGEMRIC techniques in diagnosis of hip joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Zilkens, Christoph; Tiderius, Carl Johann; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Bittersohl, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Accurate assessment of early hip joint cartilage alterations may help optimize patient selection and follow-up of hip joint preservation surgery. Delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) is sensitive to the glycosaminoglycan content in cartilage that is lost early in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Hence, the dGEMRIC technique holds promise for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. However, because of the location of the hip joint deep within the body and due to the fairly thin cartilage layers that require high spatial resolution, the diagnosis of early hip joint cartilage alterations may be problematic. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of dGEMRIC in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. A literature search was performed with PubMed, using the terms "cartilage, osteoarthritis, hip joint, MRI, and dGEMRIC", considering all levels of studies. This review revealed that dGEMRIC can be reliably used in the evaluation of early stage cartilage pathology in various hip joint disorders. Modifications in the technique, such as the operation of three-dimensional imaging and dGEMRIC after intra-articular contrast medium administration, have expanded the range of application. Notably, the studies differ considerably in patient selection and technical prerequisites. Furthermore, there is a need for multicenter prospective studies with the required technical conditions in place to establish outcome based dGEMRIC data to obtain, in conjunction with clinical data, reliable threshold values for normal and abnormal cartilage, and for hips that may benefit from conservative or surgical treatment. PMID:25913097

  2. Temporomandibular region metastasis from cystosarcoma phyllodes: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Deeming, Guy; Divakaran, Ranjit; Butterworth, David; Foster, Murray

    2003-10-01

    A rare breast tumour (Cystosarcoma phyllodes) in a 58-year-old female metastasizing to the temporomandibular region and infra-temporal fossa, presenting as temporomandibular pain dysfunction syndrome is reported, along with a literature review. PMID:14563335

  3. Symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, Rickard; Tullberg, Marie; Ernberg, Malin; Hedenberg-Magnusson, Britt

    2009-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearingloss (SSH) usually affects one ear and leads to life long deafness in some cases. There are many theories about the origin of the condition but the etiology and pathophysiology are still unknown. However, tinnitus and vertigo frequently occur in patients with SSH, but are also frequent symptoms reported by patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). We hypothesized that TMD symptoms and signs are frequent in SSH patients. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate the presence of TMD symptoms and signs in SSH patients compared with healthy individuals. The groups, matched by gender and age, consisted each of 9 females and 6 males. Both groups answered a questionnaire about TMD symptoms and a clinical examination which included maximum voluntary mouth opening, temporomandibular joint sounds, tenderness to digital palpation of the TMJs and selected masticatory muscles, intermaxillary relations and dental occlusion was performed. The SSH patients reported significantly higher rates of pain in the head and face region and pain during mandibular movements as well as of aural symptoms compared with the control group. There was also a statistically significant difference between the groups in the number of masticatory muscles tender to digital palpation, as well as in some occlusal variables. In conclusion, this study shows that self-reported symptoms and clinical signs of TMD are more frequent in patients with SSH than in healthy controls. PMID:19994561

  4. Analgesia Evaluation of 2 NSAID Drugs as Adjuvant in Management of Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kurita Varoli, Fernando; Sucena Pita, Murillo; Sato, Sandra; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; do Nascimento, Cássio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this triple-blind full-randomized clinical trial was to quantify analgesia in masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joints after occlusal splint therapy associated with the adjuvant administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) isolated or associated with other therapeutic agents. Pain relief was also recorded. Eighteen volunteers who had been suffering from chronic pain in masticatory muscles due to temporomandibular disorders were selected after anamnesis and assessment using RDC/TMD translated to Portuguese. The 3 proposed treatments were NSAID (sodium diclofenac), panacea (sodium diclofenac + carisoprodol + acetaminophen + caffeine), and a placebo. The total treatment duration was 10 days, preceded and succeeded by patients' pain assessment. A washout interval of 11 days was established between each therapy. All participants received all treatments in different moments, in a full randomized crossover methodology. The assessment of drug therapies was performed using visual analogue scale for pain on palpation followed by 11-point numerical scale to quantify pain during treatment. Statistical analysis has shown that, after 10 days of treatment, all therapies were effective for pain relief. NSAID therapy promoted analgesia on the third day, while placebo only promoted analgesia in the eighth day. It has been concluded that sodium diclofenac used as splint adjuvant therapy, promotes significant analgesia in a shorter time. PMID:25874243

  5. Recognizing otolaryngologic symptoms in patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Cooper, B C; Cooper, D L

    1993-10-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) afflict millions of men, women and children. Although the management of these disorders has traditionally been the pervue of dentistry, the most common symptoms are otolaryngologic. The involvement of an otolaryngologist was important and necessary in the role of primary diagnostician and as a secondary diagnostician to rule out primary otolaryngologic disease in many of the 2,760 patients evaluated over the past 13 years. In 996 patients referred to the Center for Myofacial Pain/TMJ Therapy from the Otolaryngology Clinic of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, 85% complained of ear symptoms, including otalgia (64%), dizziness (42%), and muffling (30%). Sixty percent complained of throat symptoms, while headaches were reported by 81%. In 1,764 private patients evaluated for TMD, 53% were seen and/or referred by an otolaryngologist. The dentist and otolaryngologist must act as a team in recognizing and diagnosing TMD. As many of the symptoms of TMD fall within the pervue of the otolaryngologist, he or she must be cognizant of the clinical presentation of TMD. Likewise, dental practitioners must utilize the services of their medical colleagues to rule out primary otolaryngologic disorders in all patients with suspected TMD. PMID:8118896

  6. Factors to consider in joint prosthesis systems

    PubMed Central

    Wolford, Larry M.

    2006-01-01

    In joint reconstruction, the techniques and materials that provide the best outcomes for patients have been debated. The main points of controversy relate to the use of hemiarthroplasties versus total joint prostheses with metal-on-metal versus metal-on-polyethylene articulations. This article investigates these areas as well as the applicability of the techniques and materials and the complications that can occur. Hypersensitivity to materials used in joint prostheses is relatively common but often unrecognized. Although the discussion applies to all joints, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is emphasized. For TMJ reconstruction, metal-on-polyethylene articulation in total joint prostheses provides better treatment outcomes than metal-on-metal articulation. PMID:17252041

  7. CD4 T cells in the rheumatoid joint are oligoclonally activated and change during the course of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, H A; Lunardi, C; So, A K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the nature of T cell receptor (TCR) utilisation by CD4 T cells in the rheumatoid joint. METHODS--Sequencing of the joining (NDJ) region of TCR beta chain mRNA isolated from synovial fluid CD4 T cells was performed in three patients in order to determine if oligoclonal expansion of particular sequences was present. Two patients were studied longitudinally to determine if these sequences changed over time. RESULTS--A number of dominant clonotypes were found within the TCR transcripts sequenced in each patient. In the two patients who were studied longitudinally, different dominant clonotypes were detected over time. No single clonotype was persistently dominant during the period of study. CONCLUSIONS--The pattern of TCR usage showed multiple oligoclonally expanded CD4 T cells within the rheumatoid joint. The change in clonotypes within the joint over time suggests that different antigens may be able to elicit synovial inflammation during the course of rheumatoid disease. PMID:7763112

  8. The prevalence of chondrocalcinosis (CC) of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint on chest radiographs and correlation with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Carrera, Guillermo; Baynes, Keith; Mautz, Alan; Dubois, Melissa; Cerniglia, Ross; Ryan, Lawrence M

    2013-09-01

    Digital imaging combined with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) access allows detailed image retrieval and magnification. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals preferentially deposit in fibrocartilages, the cartilage of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint being one such structure. We sought to determine if examination of the AC joints on magnified PACS imaging of chest films would be useful in identifying chondrocalcinosis (CC). Retrospective radiographic readings and chart reviews involving 1,920 patients aged 50 or more who had routine outpatient chest radiographs over a 4-month period were performed. Knee radiographs were available for comparison in 489 patients. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographics, chest film reports, and diagnoses. AC joint CC was identified in 1.1 % (21/1,920) of consecutive chest films. Patients with AC joint CC were 75 years of age versus 65.4 in those without CC (p?joint CC, and of these, five also had knee CC (83 %). Of the 483 without AC joint CC, 62 (12 %) had knee CC (p?=?0.002). Patients with AC joint CC were more likely to have a recorded history of CPPD crystal deposition disease than those without AC joint CC (14 versus 1 %, p?=?0.0017). The prevalence of AC joint CC increases with age and is associated with knee CC. A finding of AC joint CC should heighten suspicion of pseudogout or secondary osteoarthritis in appropriate clinical settings and, in a young patient, should alert the clinician to the possibility of an associated metabolic condition. PMID:23609408

  9. Sleep bruxism and myofascial temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Karen G.; Sirois, David A.; Janal, Malvin N.; Wigren, Pia E.; Dubrovsky, Boris; Nemelivsky, Lena V.; Klausner, Jack J.; Krieger, Ana C.; Lavigne, Gilles J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many dentists believe that sleep bruxism (SB) is a pathogenic factor in myofascial temporomandibular disorder (TMD), but almost all supportive data rely on patients’ self-reports rather than on direct observation. Methods The authors administered a structured self-report interview to determine whether a large and well-characterized sample of patients with myofascial TMD (124 women) experienced SB more often than did matched control participants (46 women). The authors then used data from a two-night laboratory-based polysomnographic (PSG) study to determine whether the case participants exhibited more SB than the control participants. Results The results of independent sample t tests and ?2 analyses showed that, although self-reported rates of SB were significantly higher in case participants (55.3 percent) than in control participants (15.2 percent), PSG-based measures showed much lower and statistically similar rates of SB in the two groups (9.7 percent and 10.9 percent, respectively). Grinding noises were common in both case participants (59.7 percent) and control participants (78.3 percent). Conclusions Most case participants did not exhibit SB, and the common belief that SB is a sufficient explanation for myofascial TMD should be abandoned. Clinical Implications Although other reasons to consider treating SB may exist, misplaced concern about SB’s sustaining or exacerbating a chronic myofascial TMD condition should not be used to justify SB treatment. PMID:23115152

  10. Large cell lymphoma associated with prosthetic joint debris.

    PubMed

    Ong, Menchu G; Ghali, G E; Veillon, Diana; Cotelingam, James

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue reactions to materials in joint prostheses include discoloration, fibrosis, florid histiocytic reaction, and granulomatous inflammation with foreign body giant cell reaction. Clinical manifestations include pain and swelling. We report a case of temporomandibular joint Proplast-Teflon prosthesis, followed by the development of large cell lymphoma in the left parotid gland 10 years after joint replacement. While it is unclear whether the implant directly contributed to the development of lymphoma, this association has not been previously documented, prompting this report. PMID:22533111

  11. Scientific Methodology in temporomandibular disorders. Part II: ethology.

    PubMed

    Moses, A J

    1994-07-01

    The historical background of ethology and the paradigm of clinical treatment as scientific experiment, rather than practice of the art of dentistry are discussed. Ethology is defined and explained relative to the study of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) using instrumentation, measurement and retrospective clinical studies of successfully treated cases as meaningful research for improvement of future treatment. PMID:7813032

  12. Oral Splints: the Crutches for Temporomandibular Disorders and Bruxism?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. T. Dao; GJ Lavigne

    1998-01-01

    Despite the extensive use of oral splints in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism, their mechanisms of action remain controversial. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain their apparent efficacy (i.e., true therapeutic value), including the repositioning of the condyle and\\/or the articular disc, reduction in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles, modification of the patient's \\

  13. Birth cohorts in asthma and allergic diseases: Report of a NIAID, NHLBI, MeDALL joint workshop

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, J; Gern, JE; Martinez, FD; Anto, JM; Johnson, CC; Holt, PG; Lemanske, RF; Le Souef, PN; Tepper, R; von Mutius, ERM; Arshad, SH; Bacharier, LB; Becker, A; Belanger, K; Bergstrom, A; Bernstein, D; Cabana, MD; Carroll, KN; Castro, M; Cooper, PJ; Gillman, MW; Gold, DR; Henderson, J; Heinrich, J; S-J, Hong; Jackson, DJ; Keil, T; Kozyrskyj, AL; Lodrup-Carlsen, K; Miller, RL; Momas, I; Morgan, WJ; Noel, P; Ownby, DR; Pinart, M; Ryan, P; Schwaninger, JM; Sears, MR; Simpson, A; Smit, HA; Stern, D; Subbarao, P; Valenta, R; Wang, X; Weiss, ST; Wood, R; Wright, AL; Wright, RJ; Togias, A; Gergen, PJ

    2014-01-01

    Population-based birth cohorts on asthma and allergies increasingly provide new insights into the development and natural history of the diseases. Over 130 birth cohorts focusing on asthma and allergy have been initiated in the last 30 years. A NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases), NHLBI (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute), MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy, Framework Programme 7 of the European Commission) joint workshop was held in Bethesda, MD, USA September 11–12, 2012 with 3 objectives (1) documenting the knowledge that asthma/allergy birth cohorts have provided, (2) identifying the knowledge gaps and inconsistencies and (3) developing strategies for moving forward, including potential new study designs and the harmonization of existing asthma birth cohort data. The meeting was organized around the presentations of 5 distinct workgroups: (1) clinical phenotypes, (2) risk factors, (3) immune development of asthma and allergy, (4) pulmonary development and (5) harmonization of existing birth cohorts. This manuscript presents the workgroup reports and provides web links (AsthmaBirthCohorts.niaid.nih.gov or www.medall-fp7.eu) where the reader will find tables describing the characteristics of the birth cohorts included in this report, type of data collected at differing ages, and a selected bibliography provided by the participating birth cohorts. PMID:24636091

  14. Neural Network Modeling of Voluntary Single-Joint Movement Organization II. Parkinson’s Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vassilis Cutsuridis

    \\u000a The organization of voluntary movement is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. The neural network models of voluntary movement\\u000a preparation and execution presented in the previous chapter are extended here by studying the effects of dopamine depletion\\u000a in the output of the basal ganglia and in key neuronal types in the cortex and spinal cord. The resulting extended DA–VITE–FLETE\\u000a model offers an

  15. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Joint ICS/NCCP (I) recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dheeraj; Agarwal, Ritesh; Aggarwal, Ashutosh Nath; Maturu, V. N.; Dhooria, Sahajal; Prasad, K. T.; Sehgal, Inderpaul S.; Yenge, Lakshmikant B.; Jindal, Aditya; Singh, Navneet; Ghoshal, A. G.; Khilnani, G. C.; Samaria, J. K.; Gaur, S. N.; Behera, D.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem in India. Although several International guidelines for diagnosis and management of COPD are available, yet there are lot of gaps in recognition and management of COPD in India due to vast differences in availability and affordability of healthcare facilities across the country. The Indian Chest Society (ICS) and the National College of Chest Physicians (NCCP) of India have joined hands to come out with these evidence-based guidelines to help the physicians at all levels of healthcare to diagnose and manage COPD in a scientific manner. Besides the International literature, the Indian studies were specifically analyzed to arrive at simple and practical recommendations. The evidence is presented under these five headings: (a) definitions, epidemiology, and disease burden; (b) disease assessment and diagnosis; (c) pharmacologic management of stable COPD; (d) management of acute exacerbations; and (e) nonpharmacologic and preventive measures. The modified grade system was used for classifying the quality of evidence as 1, 2, 3, or usual practice point (UPP). The strength of recommendation was graded as A or B depending upon the level of evidence. PMID:24049265

  16. Clinical signs indicative of temporomandibular disorders in adults: time trends and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Alkisti Anastassaki; Hugoson, Anders; Magnusson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to examine possible time trends in the prevalence of clinical signs indicative of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in an adult population, to analyse possible associations between TMD signs and associated factors and to estimate the need for TMD treatment. Three independent, stratified and randomly selected samples of around 100 individuals in the age groups of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 years participated in the Jönköping studies in 1983,1993 and 2003. The study material consisted of 1,693 subjects who, after answering a questionnaire and being interviewed about the presence of TMD symptoms, were clinically examined in terms of the presence of TMD signs according to the Clinical Dysfunction Index (Di) by Helkimo. Associations between clinical signs and the Di as dependent variables and each of the independent variables of age group, gender, reported bruxism, trauma, self-perceived healthiness and the year of investigation were analysed in binary logistic regression models. Estimates of the need for TMD treatment were based on the presence of a combination of severe symptoms and clinical signs. The prevalence of severely impaired jaw movement capacity, relating to horizontal movements, had increased in 2003. The prevalence of muscle pain and temporomandibular joint pain upon posterior palpation was found to vary statistically significantly between 1993 and 2003. Gender differences were noted in these changes overtime. Female gender, advancing age, awareness of bruxism, self-perceived health impairment and the wearing of complete dentures were associated with TMD signs and a higher degree of clinical dysfunction. The estimated need for TMD treatment increased from 5% in 1983 to 8% in 2003 and was higher in women than in men. In conclusion, the results indicate that the prevalence of some TMD signs and of estimated treatment need increased during the period 1983-2003. PMID:23721032

  17. Laser Acupuncture Therapy in Patients with Treatment-Resistant Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hung, I-Ling; Hsu, Sheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical effects of laser acupuncture therapy for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) after ineffective previous treatments. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted in 29 treatment-resistant TMD patients (25 women, 4 men; age range, 17–67 years). Subjects were treated 3 times per week for 4 weeks with the Handylaser Trion (GaAlAs laser diode, 810 nm, 150 mW, pulsed waves), which delivered 0.375 J of energy (5 s) to ST7, ST6, and LI4 and 3 J (40 s) to each Ashi point, 7.5–26.25 J/cm2 in total. The visual analog scale (VAS) and maximal mouth opening (MMO) were evaluated before and after treatment. Results VAS analysis showed that the patients were free of pain at rest (endpoint) after 5.90±6.08 sessions of laser acupuncture for acute TMD and after 16.21±17.98 sessions for chronic TMD. The VAS score on palpation of the temporomandibular joint reduced to 0.30±0.67 for patients with acute TMD (p?=?0.005) and to 0.47±0.84 for those with chronic TMD (p<0.001). The MMO significantly increased in patients with acute TMD (7.80±5.43 mm, p?=?0.008) and in patients with chronic TMD (15.58±7.87 mm, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study shows that laser acupuncture therapy improves the symptoms of treatment-resistant TMD. Further studies with a more appropriate design, involving long-term follow-up examinations in a larger patient sample, are needed to evaluate its efficacy. PMID:25329855

  18. Effect of temporomandibular disorder pain duration on facial expressions and verbal report of pain.

    PubMed

    LeResche, L; Dworkin, S F; Wilson, L; Ehrlich, K J

    1992-12-01

    This study investigated how specific expressive behaviors (verbal report of pain level and the frequency of emitting specific non-verbal facial expressions of pain) may change over the course of a chronic pain condition. Based on the concept of chronic pain behaviors, we hypothesized that both verbal and non-verbal behavior would increase with duration of pain. Thirty-six women with chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain (duration over 6 months) were compared with 35 recent onset cases (first episode, duration < or = 2 months). Subjects completed questionnaires assessing depression, anxiety, somatization, daily hassles and pain coping strategies. They were videotaped during a resting baseline and 2 painful conditions: experimental cold pressor pain and the clinically relevant pain of palpation of the masticatory muscles and temporomandibular joint; tapes were coded for facial expression using the Facial Action Coding System. Visual analog scale (VAS) ratings of the aversiveness and intensity of ongoing TMD pain were collected at baseline, and similar ratings of cold pressor and clinical examination pain were gathered after the painful stimulus. Recent onset and chronic cases did not differ on self-report measures of anxiety, depression, somatization or daily stress. Coping strategies were also similar, although chronic cases showed a greater tendency to catastrophize. Self-report measures of ambient facial pain, as well as the pain of clinical examination and cold pressor stimulation, revealed no significant differences between the 2 groups. In contrast, rates of pain facial expression were significantly higher for chronic cases under all conditions of the experiment, including baseline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1491856

  19. A joint frailty model to estimate the recurrence process and the disease-specific mortality process without needing the cause of death.

    PubMed

    Belot, Aurélien; Rondeau, Virginie; Remontet, Laurent; Giorgi, Roch

    2014-08-15

    In chronic diseases, such as cancer, recurrent events (such as relapses) are commonly observed; these could be interrupted by death. With such data, a joint analysis of recurrence and mortality processes is usually conducted with a frailty parameter shared by both processes. We examined a joint modeling of these processes considering death under two aspects: 'death due to the disease under study' and 'death due to other causes', which enables estimating the disease-specific mortality hazard. The excess hazard model was used to overcome the difficulties in determining the causes of deaths (unavailability or unreliability); this model allows estimating the disease-specific mortality hazard without needing the cause of death but using the mortality hazards observed in the general population. We propose an approach to model jointly recurrence and disease-specific mortality processes within a parametric framework. A correlation between the two processes is taken into account through a shared frailty parameter. This approach allows estimating unbiased covariate effects on the hazards of recurrence and disease-specific mortality. The performance of the approach was evaluated by simulations with different scenarios. The method is illustrated by an analysis of a population-based dataset on colon cancer with observations of colon cancer recurrences and deaths. The benefits of the new approach are highlighted by comparison with the 'classical' joint model of recurrence and overall mortality. Moreover, we assessed the goodness of fit of the proposed model. Comparisons between the conditional hazard and the marginal hazard of the disease-specific mortality are shown, and differences in interpretation are discussed. PMID:24639014

  20. Simultaneous changes in gray matter volume and white matter fractional anisotropy in Alzheimer's disease revealed by multimodal CCA and joint ICA.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, X; Chen, K; Yao, L; Hu, B; Wu, X; Ye, Q; Guo, X

    2015-08-20

    The prominent morphometric alterations of Alzheimer's disease (AD) occur both in gray matter and in white matter. Multimodal fusion can examine joint information by combining multiple neuroimaging datasets to identify the covariant morphometric alterations in AD in greater detail. In the current study, we conducted a multimodal canonical correlation analysis and joint independent component analysis to identify the covariance patterns of the gray and white matter by fusing structural magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging data of 39 AD patients (23 males and 16 females, mean age: 74.91±8.13years) and 41 normal controls (NCs) (20 males and 21 females, mean age: 73.97±6.34years) derived from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The results revealed 25 joint independent components (ICs), of which three joint ICs exhibited strong links between the gray matter volume and the white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and significant differences between the AD and NC group. The joint IC maps revealed that the simultaneous changes in the gray matter and FA values primarily involved the following areas: (1) the temporal lobe/hippocampus-cingulum, (2) the frontal/cingulate gyrus-corpus callosum, and (3) the temporal/occipital/parietal lobe-corpus callosum/corona radiata. Our findings suggest that gray matter atrophy is associated with reduced white matter fiber integrity in AD and possibly expand the understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms in AD. PMID:26116521

  1. [Behcet's disease with ocular involvement in Taiwan: a joint survey of six major ophthalmological departments].

    PubMed

    Chung, Y M; Yeh, T S; Sheu, M M; Chen, M S; Wen, M S; Tsai, H Y; Liao, H R

    1990-05-01

    A total of 103 cases with ocular involvement of Behcet's disease, seen over a period of 19 years (1970 to 1988), were collected from the ophthalmological departments of 6 major medical centers in Taiwan. The yearly number of patients who first visited these hospitals from 1979 through 1983 was about 5 cases and about 14 cases from 1984 to 1988. The domiciles of the patients were most commonly (51.5%) in Northern Taiwan. All 103 patients were Chinese, of which 78 (75.7%) were men and 25 (24.3%) were women; the male to female ratio was 3.1. Extraocular symptoms of Behçet's disease, major or minor, and their frequencies among these patients included; oral ulcers, 97.1%, skin lesions, 74.8%; genital ulcers, 61.2%; arthritis, 47.6%; gastrointestinal lesions, 14.6%; epididymitis, 5.8%; central nervous system lesions, 2.9%; vascular lesions, 1.9%; pulmonary lesions, 2.9% and urinary lesions, 4.9%. Fifty-one (49.5%) patients were of the complete type and 52 (50.5%) of the incomplete type. The peak distribution of ages at the onset of the ocular lesions, was from 20 to 40 years. As for visual prognosis, 37.9% of the 198 diseases eyes had a visual acuity of 0.5 or better, 9.1% between 0.5 and 0.1, 25.3% between 0.1 and 0.01 and 27.8% were 0.01 or worse. In 24 (12.1%) eyes, the vision was completely lost. In HLA studies, a significantly increased incidence of HLA-A26 (p less than 0.01) and HLA-B51 (p less than 0.001) was found.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1977855

  2. Correlation of stress and muscle activity of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Tosato, Juliana de Paiva; Caria, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Berzin, Fausto; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Temporomandibular disorder is one of the many different adverse health conditions that can be triggered by stress. Therefore, a biopsychosocial model has been proposed to characterize the multifactorial nature of temporomandibular disorder. The aim of the present study was investigate the correlation of salivary cortisol levels with the activities of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles of patients with different degrees of temporomandibular disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine women between 18 and 40?years of age with a diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for temporomandibular disorders were evaluated using the Fonseca Index to determine the degree of the disorder. Salivary cortisol levels were determined and surface electromyography was used to evaluate electrical activity in the masticatory muscles. [Results] Positive correlations were found among the degree of temporomandibular disorder, electromyographic activity and salivary cortisol: as women with more severe temporomandibular disorder had greater electrical activity in the muscles analyzed, especially the anterior temporal muscle, and higher levels of cortisol. [Conclusion] Muscle activity was greater among individuals with severe temporomandibular disorder and positive correlations were found among electromyographic activity, salivary cortisol and the degree of temporomandibular disorder severity. PMID:25995595

  3. The relationship between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and bilateral occlusal contact patterns during lateral excursions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, E K; Yatani, H; Kuboki, T; Matsuka, Y; Terada, S; Orsini, M G; Yamashita, A

    1998-06-01

    The relationship between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bilateral occlusal contact patterns was investigated in 143 TMD patients (mean age: 34.0 +/- 15.9 years; 38 male and 105 female). In addition to an interview regarding chief complaints and accompanying symptoms, various muscles and the temporomandibular joints were palpated bilaterally and occlusal analyses were made. Only 5 out of 108 paired variables were found to be significantly associated by using the chi-squared test. Medial pterygoid muscle pain on palpation showed significant associations with the occlusal contact pattern (P < 0.005), especially working side contacts (interocclusal tooth contacts on the working side) (P < 0.005), during contralateral excursions; sternocleidomastoid muscle pain on palpation showed a significant association with balancing side contacts (interocclusal tooth contacts on the balancing side) during ipsilateral excursions P < 0.05); shoulder stiffness and pain in the eye showed significant associations with balancing side contacts during contralateral excursions (P < 0.05). The results show only a weak relationship between some TMD symptomatology and bilateral occlusal contact patterns during lateral excursions. The findings suggesting the specific laterality of a few TMD signs and symptoms associated with particular occlusal contacts may deserve closer case-control study. PMID:9687112

  4. Joint swelling

    MedlinePLUS

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  5. Detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema using a joint morphological-fuzzy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Fetita, Catalin; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise; Chang, Ruey-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) has high accuracy and specificity on volumetrically capturing serial images of the lung. It increases the capability of computerized classification for lung tissue in medical research. This paper proposes a three-dimensional (3D) automated approach based on mathematical morphology and fuzzy logic for quantifying and classifying interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) and emphysema. The proposed methodology is composed of several stages: (1) an image multi-resolution decomposition scheme based on a 3D morphological filter is used to detect and analyze the different density patterns of the lung texture. Then, (2) for each pattern in the multi-resolution decomposition, six features are computed, for which fuzzy membership functions define a probability of association with a pathology class. Finally, (3) for each pathology class, the probabilities are combined up according to the weight assigned to each membership function and two threshold values are used to decide the final class of the pattern. The proposed approach was tested on 10 MDCT cases and the classification accuracy was: emphysema: 95%, fibrosis/honeycombing: 84% and ground glass: 97%.

  6. Risk factors associated with hindlimb lameness and degenerative joint disease in the distal tarsus of Icelandic horses.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, M; Björnsdottir, S; Eksell, P; Häggström, J; Sigurdsson, H; Carlsten, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate potential risk factors associated with hindlimb lameness and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease (DJD) in the distal tarsus in Icelandic horses. The material consisted of riding horses (n = 420) age 6-12 years sired by 17 selected sires representing all major breeding lines, and of riding horses (n = 194) in the same age range sired by other sires. The examination protocol included the following: interview with owners/trainers, assessment of conformation, motion evaluation and radiographic examination. At the interview, data related to factors outside the horse (environmental variables) and data associated directly with the horse (intrinsic variables) were obtained. Data analysis was performed in 2 steps: screening using bivariate analysis, followed by testing with a multivariate logistic regression model. In the multivariate analysis, the factors of sire, age when broken to saddle and stud show participation were strongly associated with the prevalence of lameness. Height at the croup and ability to perform different gaits were also associated with the prevalence of lameness, but to a lesser degree. The risk factors of age, tarsal angle and birthplace were significantly associated with radiographic signs of DJD in the distal tarsus. Neither the variation in applied training intensity, the use of a professional or amateur trainer nor the temperament or front limb action of the individual horse was significantly associated with the prevalence of hindlimb lameness and/or radiographic signs of DJD in the distal tarsus in the Icelandic horse. PMID:11191616

  7. Imaging techniques for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease: joint ECCO and ESGAR evidence-based consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Panes, J; Bouhnik, Y; Reinisch, W; Stoker, J; Taylor, S A; Baumgart, D C; Danese, S; Halligan, S; Marincek, B; Matos, C; Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Rimola, J; Rogler, G; van Assche, G; Ardizzone, S; Ba-Ssalamah, A; Bali, M A; Bellini, D; Biancone, L; Castiglione, F; Ehehalt, R; Grassi, R; Kucharzik, T; Maccioni, F; Maconi, G; Magro, F; Martín-Comín, J; Morana, G; Pendsé, D; Sebastian, S; Signore, A; Tolan, D; Tielbeek, J A; Weishaupt, D; Wiarda, B; Laghi, A

    2013-08-01

    The management of patients with IBD requires evaluation with objective tools, both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease, to determine the location, extension, activity and severity of inflammatory lesions, as well as, the potential existence of complications. Whereas endoscopy is a well-established and uniformly performed diagnostic examination, the implementation of radiologic techniques for assessment of IBD is still heterogeneous; variations in technical aspects and the degrees of experience and preferences exist across countries in Europe. ECCO and ESGAR scientific societies jointly elaborated a consensus to establish standards for imaging in IBD using magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, ultrasonography, and including also other radiologic procedures such as conventional radiology or nuclear medicine examinations for different clinical situations that include general principles, upper GI tract, colon and rectum, perineum, liver and biliary tract, emergency situation, and the postoperative setting. The statements and general recommendations of this consensus are based on the highest level of evidence available, but significant gaps remain in certain areas such as the comparison of diagnostic accuracy between different techniques, the value for therapeutic monitoring, and the prognostic implications of particular findings. PMID:23583097

  8. Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) mimicking temporomandibular disorders: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Maurício A; Selaimen, Caio M P; Chaves, Karen D; Bisi, Melissa C; Grossi, Márcio L

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  9. VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA (ACOUSTIC NEUROMA) MIMICKING TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bisi, Maurício A.; Selaimen, Caio M. P.; Chaves, Karen D.; Bisi, Melissa C.; Grossi, Márcio L.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 6 to 16% of patients with trigeminal neuralgia symptoms present intracranial tumors, the most common being the vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma). Some symptoms reported by patients include hearing loss, tinnitus, headaches, vertigo and trigeminal disturbances. An increased muscle response in the surrounding head and neck musculature may also be observed, which mimics signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. In these cases, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a useful tool in tumor diagnosis. The differential diagnosis between myofascial and neuralgic pain is important, as both may present similar characteristics, while being of different origin, and demanding special treatment approaches. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship among trigeminal neuralgia symptoms, intracranial tumors and temporomandibular dysfunction by presenting a clinical case. PMID:19089251

  10. [Contribution of air computerized tomography of the joint in the assessment of algo-dysfunctional syndromes of the mastication system].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, J L; Rives, J M; Cantaloube, D; Proust, J

    1990-01-01

    The prospective study of evaluation temporomandibular dysfunction by air computerized tomography of the joint are reported. The authors propose a new injection technique of both articular compartments by CT Scan location. With thin sagittal computed tomography sections, closed mouth and open mouth position, this study is made. Preliminary data from air computerized tomography of the joint imaging show directly the disk with anterior and posterior attachments. The authors present the normal results and major pathology found in the evaluationof temporomandibular dysfunction. CT Scan puncture is more precise. The air computerized tomography imaging of the joint was undoubtedly superior to that of conventional opaque joint tomography, but dynamic notion is much less than in the absence of videoscopy. PMID:2309085

  11. Hypermobile joints

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hypermobile joints have an increased risk for joint dislocation and other problems. Extra care may be needed ... the joint? Is there any history of joint dislocation, difficulty walking, or difficulty using the arms? Further ...

  12. Psychological factors related to temporomandibular disorders: an evaluation of students preparing for college entrance examinations.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Maisa Reis; Sabadin, Patricia A; Leite, Fabiola P P; Kamizaki, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to research how stress and anxiety affected the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in 55 high school graduates at two different times: six months before and one the week before their college entrance examinations. The American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) Questionnaire, Lipp's Stress for Adults Inventory (ISSL) and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to evaluate TMD, stress and anxiety, respectively. The data were submitted to Pearson's and Spearman's correlation tests. At first the results showed higher positive correlation between anxiety and TMD than between stress and TMD. Out of the total participants, 36% had TMD, and of these, only 12.7% had no psychological disorder. One week before the tests there were high positive correlations between TMD and the psychological factors studied, and 50.9% of the students had TMD, of which only 9% had no psychological disorder The most prevalent signs of TMD symptomatology were joint sounds and headache, followed by neck pain. It was concluded that students preparing to take college entrance examinations are a potential risk group for developing TMD due to psychological factors generating anxiety and stress. Anxiety becomes more significant as the semester progresses, and both anxiety and stress increase as the examination dates approach. PMID:22928385

  13. Direct Toll-like receptor 2 mediated co-stimulation of T cells in the mouse system as a basis for chronic inflammatory joint disease.

    PubMed

    Sobek, Vera; Birkner, Nico; Falk, Ingrid; Würch, Andreas; Kirschning, Carsten J; Wagner, Hermann; Wallich, Reinhard; Lamers, Marinus C; Simon, Markus M

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory joint diseases such as adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and Lyme arthritis is still poorly understood. Central to the various hypotheses in this respect is the notable involvement of T and B cells. Here we develop the premise that the nominal antigen-independent, polyclonal activation of preactivated T cells via Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 has a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of pathogen-induced chronic inflammatory joint disease. We support this with the following evidence. Both naive and effector T cells express TLR-2. A prototypic lipoprotein, Lip-OspA, from the etiological agent of Lyme disease, namely Borrelia burgdorferi, but not its delipidated form or lipopolysaccharide, was able to provide direct antigen-nonspecific co-stimulatory signals to both antigen-sensitized naive T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines via TLR-2. Lip-OspA induced the proliferation and interferon (IFN)-gamma secretion of purified, anti-CD3-sensitized, naive T cells from C57BL/6 mice but not from TLR-2-deficient mice. Induction of proliferation and IFN-gamma secretion of CTL lines by Lip-OspA was independent of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement but was considerably enhanced after suboptimal TCR activation and was inhibitable by monoclonal antibodies against TLR-2. PMID:15380043

  14. Pain and temporomandibular disorders: a pharmaco-gender dilemma.

    PubMed

    Shaefer, Jeffry R; Holland, Nicole; Whelan, Julia S; Velly, Ana Miriam

    2013-04-01

    Gender is the biggest risk factor in the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain. Gender differences in pain thresholds, temporal summation, pain expectations, and somatic awareness exist in patients with chronic TMD or orofacial pain. There are gender differences in pharmacokenetics and pharmacodynamics of medications used to treat pain. A better understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to the increased incidence and persistence of chronic pain in females is needed. Future research will elucidate the sex effects on factors that protect against developing pain or prevent debilitating pain. Gender-based treatments for TMD and orofacial pain treatment will evolve from the translational research stimulated by this knowledge. PMID:23570804

  15. Association between painful temporomandibular disorders, sleep bruxism and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Giovana; Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli de; Godoi Gonçalves, Daniela Aparecida de; Camparis, Cinara Maria

    2014-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between sleep bruxism (SB), tinnitus and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The sample consisted of 261 women (mean age of 37.0 years). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were used to classify TMD and self-reported tinnitus. SB was diagnosed by clinical criteria proposed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The results showed an association between painful TMD and tinnitus (OR=7.3; 95%CI=3.50-15.39; p<0.001). With regard to SB, the association was of lower magnitude (OR=1.9; 95%CI=1.16-3.26; p<0.0163). When the sample was stratified by the presence of SB and painful TMD, only SB showed no association with tinnitus. The presence of painful TMD without SB was significantly associated with tinnitus (OR=6.7; 95%CI=2.64-17.22; p<0.0001). The concomitant presence of painful TMD and SB was associated with a higher degree of tinnitus severity (OR=7.0; 95%CI=3.00-15.89; p<0.0001). It may be concluded that there is an association between SB, painful TMD and self-reported tinnitus; however, no relationship of a causal nature could be established. PMID:24820426

  16. Effects of controlled condylar rotation exercise on symmetrical mouth opening in patients with temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jae-Seop; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 4-week program of active condylar rotation exercise on the extent of the lateral mandibular shift during mouth opening in patients with temporomandibular disorder. [Subjects and Methods] Patients with temporomandibular disorder (n = 12; 7 men and 5 women) were recruited. The active range of temporomandibular motion was recorded using 3-dimensional ultrasound-based motion analysis. The paired t-test was used to assess changes in lateral mandibular shift before and after active condylar rotation exercise. [Results] The degree of the lateral mandibular shift during mouth opening and the mouth opening-lateral mandibular shift ratio were significantly lower after active condylar rotation exercise than before the exercise. [Conclusion] Active condylar rotation exercise may effectively reduce the degree of the lateral mandibular shift during mouth opening to produce symmetrical mouth opening in patients with mild temporomandibular disorder.

  17. Comparing the effect of Glucosamine and Glucosamine With Alendronate in Symptomatic Relieve of Degenerative Knee Joint Disease: A Double- blind Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Arti, Hamid Reza; Azemi, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2012-01-01

    Background: Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) is the most common joint disease in human beings. Previous studies have explained that glucosamine is preferred as placebo and in efficacy compared with NSAID’s in treatment of patients’ knee osteoarthritis. Alendronate was used to treat osteoporotic patients and its efficacy was established. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of administration of glucosamine alone and its combination with alendronate in osteoarthritis of the knee. Patients and Methods: The study included 130 patients with osteoarthritis who randomly received glucosamine alone (group II) (500mg TDS), or combination of glucosamine (500mg TDS) and alendronate (70mg weekly) (group I) for 12 weeks. Patients were evaluated on 1, 3, 6 and 12 weeks after beginning the treatment to evaluate efficacy of each treatment. Results: Statistically, there was no significant difference in pain index (P > 0.05) but in the two groups the mean of pain index decreased in a similar fashion. The stiffness index in combination treatment group (group I) decreased more than glucosamine group (group II) (P < 0.05). The function of joints in combination treatment group (group I) improved after 12weeks. The bone mineral density (BMD) at 12weeks in combination therapy group improved. Conclusions: Combination therapy of glucosamine and alendronate indicated significant improvement of stiffness, function, BMD of osteoarthritis compared with glucosamine alone but there was no statistically significant decrease in pain index. It can be concluded that the combination of glucosamine and alendronate provide better and more rapid improvement in patients with osteoarthritis. PMID:24624161

  18. Anti-Lubricin Monoclonal Antibodies Created Using Lubricin-Knockout Mice Immunodetect Lubricin in Several Species and in Patients with Healthy and Diseased Joints

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Minrong; Cui, Yajun; Sy, Man-Sun; Lee, David M.; Zhang, Ling Xiu; Larson, Katherine M.; Kurek, Kyle C.; Jay, Gregory D.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Lubricin, encoded by the gene PRG4, is the principal lubricant in articulating joints. We immunized mice genetically deficient for lubricin (Prg4-/-) with purified human lubricin, and generated several mAbs. We determined each mAb’s binding epitope, sensitivity, and specificity using biologic samples and recombinant lubricin sub-domains, and we also developed a competition ELISA assay to measure lubricin in synovial fluid and blood. We found the mAbs all recognized epitopes containing O-linked oligosaccharides conjugated to the peptide motif KEPAPTTT. By western blot, the mAbs detected lubricin in 1 ?l of synovial fluid from several animal species, including human. The mAbs were specific for lubricin since they did not cross-react with other synovial fluid constituents from patients with camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP), who genetically lack this protein. The competition ELISA detected lubricin in blood samples from healthy individuals but not from patients with CACP, indicating blood can be used in a diagnostic test for patients suspected of having CACP. Lubricin epitopes in blood do not represent degradation fragments from synovial fluid. Therefore, although blood lubricin levels did not differentiate patients with inflammatory joint disease from healthy controls, epitope-specific anti-lubricin mAbs could be useful for monitoring disease activity in synovial fluid. PMID:25642942

  19. Validation of a recording protocol for assessing temporomandibular sounds and a method for assessing jaw position.

    PubMed

    Prinz, J F

    1998-05-01

    Sounds are often produced by the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) during movement in both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects. However, subjective methods of describing these sounds have been shown to have poor inter- and intra-observer reliability. In this study, a low cost system in which TMJ sounds were detected using the loudspeakers of lightweight in-ear headphones as microphones is evaluated. The sounds were recorded on tape and then analysed using a computer. Sounds were elicited by asking subjects to bring their teeth together with sufficient force to produce a tooth contact sound, then open their mouths as far as possible and then close again. Placing the microphones in the ears attenuated ambient sounds by 58%, thus providing a degree of immunity from ambient noise. Sampling was performed on the left microphone only at 3.4 kHz and from the left and right microphones together at 1.7 kHz for 60 TMJ sounds and 60 tooth contact sounds. Spectral analysis of sounds recorded at the two sample rates revealed no significant differences. Therefore, a sample rate of 1.7 kHz is adequate to resolve the frequency components present in the TMJ sounds. Although simply recording TMJ sounds does not give a direct measurement of the position of the mandible, using this protocol allows the length of the open close cycle to be determined. If the envelope of movement is assumed to approximate a sinusoid, then the direction of mandibular movement can be assumed to reverse at the half way point in the cycle. The accuracy of this assumption was calculated by comparing the mid-point of the cycle to the point of maximum gape in 129 cycles from nine subjects. The mean difference expressed as percentage of cycle length was 1.3 +/- 0.9%. PMID:9639154

  20. Tinnitus and vertigo in patients with temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Chole, R A; Parker, W S

    1992-08-01

    The association of tinnitus and vertigo with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) has been debated for many years. The observation that patients with TMD have otologic symptoms is confounded because tinnitus and vertigo are common symptoms in the normal population. The present study was conducted to determine if tinnitus and vertigo are actually more prevalent in patients with TMD than in appropriate age-matched controls. One control group was recruited from patients seeking care for health maintenance and the other from patients seeking routine dental care. We surveyed 1032 patients: 338 had TMD and 694 served as two age-matched control groups. Tinnitus and vertigo symptoms were significantly more prevalent in the TMD group than in either of the control groups. The mechanism of the association of TMD and otologic symptoms is unknown. PMID:1642833

  1. Probable Correlation between Temporomandibular Dysfunction and Vertigo in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Marchiori, Luciana Lozza de Moraes; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Meneses-Barrivieira, Caroline Luiz; Melo, Juliana Jandre; Macedo, Julya; Bruniera, Juliana Ribeiro Zuculin; Gorres, Vanessa Cristina; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Introduction?Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) covers a variety of clinical problems, and some epidemiologic studies have tried to indicate mechanisms of interaction and association between vertigo and TMD, but this topic still is controversial. Objective?To assess the presence of vertigo in elderly patients associated with TMD. Methods?A cross-sectional study was conducted with the inclusion of elderly individuals who lived independently. TMD was assessed by dental evaluation and vertigo was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square and relative risk. Results?There was a significant association (p?=?0.0256) between the TMD and vertigo (odds ratio?=?2.3793). Conclusion?These results highlighted the importance of identifying risk factors for vertigo that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential to prevent future episodes, as well as managing the process of rehabilitation of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992063

  2. Tinnitus, dizziness, and nonotologic otalgia improvement through temporomandibular disorder therapy.

    PubMed

    Wright, E F; Syms, C A; Bifano, S L

    2000-10-01

    U.S. Air Force otologic patients seeking care at Wilford Hall Medical Center for tinnitus, dizziness, and/or nonotologic otalgia without an identifiable cause and presenting with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms in the temple, jaw, or preauricular area or with otalgia at least once a month were referred to a TMD specialty clinic. The patients were provided a dental orthotic and TMD self-care instructions. After 3 months of orthotic wear, the percentages of patients reporting at least moderate symptom improvement of their tinnitus, dizziness, otalgia, and/or TMD were 64, 91, 87, and 92%, respectively. Follow-up telephone calls 6 months after completion of TMD therapy revealed that all patients maintained their symptom improvements. These findings imply that TMD was affecting the patients' otologic symptoms. Patients seeking care for tinnitus, dizziness, and/or nonotologic otalgia without an identifiable cause may have TMD, and their otologic symptoms may benefit from conservative reversible TMD therapy. PMID:11050868

  3. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient Resources > Diseases & Conditions Back to Diseases & Conditions HIV and Rheumatic Disease PRINT Download PDF HIV infection ... treatment and HIV infection all overlap. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  4. Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance of the Stomach: A Stable Endoscopic Landmark for Crohn’s Disease Regardless of Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Takeshima, Fuminao; Akazawa, Yuko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Minami, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Shiozawa, Ken; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Bamboo joint-like appearance is a common yet easy-to-miss endoscopic finding in the stomach of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). Bamboo joint-like appearance (BJA) is characterized by swollen longitudinal folds transversed by erosive fissures or linear furrows. However, whether BJA is observed during the remission stage of CD and during the active stage is unclear. In particular, the relationship between the course of BJA and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ? therapy has not been studied. We aimed to evaluate the course of BJA in CD patients treated with anti-TNF ? therapy. Material/Methods We examined 22 CD patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy before undergoing anti-TNF ? treatment. We evaluated the changes in BJA, clinical activity using the CD activity index (CDAI), and endoscopic activity using the simple endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD) from 6 months to 1 year after anti-TNF ? therapy. Results Fifteen of 22 patients (68.1%) presented with BJA in the stomach, 13 of whom received follow-up esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy after anti-TNF ? therapy. The mean CDAI and SES-CD scores significantly improved after anti-TNF ? therapy (P<0.01). Despite the marked improvements in clinical and endoscopic findings, the BJA of the stomach remained unchanged in all the patients. Conclusions The findings indicate that BJA is frequently observed in the stomach of CD patients, regardless of whether the patient has active disease or is in remission, even after anti-TNF ? therapy. Thus, BJA may be a stable endoscopic landmark in CD. PMID:25308423

  5. Morphologic and Functional Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint and Stomatognathic System after

    E-print Network

    Alberta, University of

    articles finally fulfilled the study inclusion criteria and were analyzed for their methodology. All the muscles of mastication and is important in speech, chewing, and swallowing functions. In addition to have implications for mastication, swallowing, and cosmetic appearance.2 Access to oral cavity

  6. Long-term results of different condylotomy designs for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    You-Sung Choi; Kyoung-In Yun; Seong-Gon Kim

    2002-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the long-term results of the condylotomy techniques. Study Design. Twenty-two patients (mean age, 20.8 years; occlusion: Class I in Angle's classification of malocclusion) were studied. All showed Wilkes stage II or early stage III. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), maximum mouth opening (MMO), and the positional change of the condylar segment

  7. Disc-repositioning surgery of the temporomandibular joint using bioresorbable screws.

    PubMed

    Sembronio, S; Robiony, M; Politi, M

    2006-12-01

    For successful disc-repositioning surgery, following arthrotomy and disc recovery by the release of attachments, the disc must be fixed and stabilized in the correct relationship with the condyle and fossa. This report describes a new surgical technique for fixing the disc to the condyle using two resorbable screws. PMID:16962741

  8. Scientific findings with respect to the etiology of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint

    E-print Network

    Cemgil, A. Taylan

    ORAL SURGERY ORAL MEDICINE ORAL displacement without reduction. (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2001;92:98-107) a-2104/2001/$35.00 + 0 7/16/114621 doi:10.1067/moe.2001.114621 ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL RADIOLOGY Editor: Sharon L. Brooks

  9. [The role of muscle rehabilitation in the treatment of temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Psaume-Vandenbeek, D; Dichamp, J; Goudot, P; Guilbert, F

    1990-01-01

    Physiotherapy in association with mechanotherapy provides a functional treatment for T.M. algo-dysfunctional syndromes. The authors review the indications for this treatment and distinguish two varieties requiring different treatments: syndromes with a defect in propulsion and a limitation of mouth opening and syndromes with hyperpropulsion and subluxation. PMID:2130439

  10. What is the TMJ? The temporomandibular joint is located in front of the ear

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    clenching the teeth Arthritis Displacement or dislocation of a disc that is located between the jawbone minutes. A heating pad may help. Avoid chewy or hard foods. Avoid chewing gum or cracking ice. Eat soft foods. Avoid clenching your teeth. Many people clench their teeth when they drive. Become aware

  11. Outcome of therapy in the conservative management of temporomandibular pain dysfunction disorder.

    PubMed

    Suvinen, T I; Hanes, K R; Reade, P C

    1997-10-01

    The present study considered predictors of the outcome of treatment for temporomandibular pain dysfunction disorder (TMPD). Thirty-seven patients were assessed with objective and self-report measures of physiological and psychosocial aspects of this disorder at initial assessment and at 6-month follow-up subsequent to conservative physical therapy. Patients were subdivided into slow and rapid responders to conservative physical therapy based on self-reported level of improvement. Measures employed included the Temporomandibular Pain Dysfunction Disorder Questionnaire and the Temporomandibular Pain Dysfunction Disorder Clinical Form. Eighty-one per cent of patients showed a 50% or greater improvement in pain severity at follow-up, with minimal differential changes across the two groups found in the physiological symptoms, while the rapid responding group showed greater improvement in terms of psychosocial factors. These findings indicated that psychosocial factors, particularly coping strategies and illness behaviour, cannot be ignored in the management of TMPD. PMID:9372461

  12. Analysis of laser therapy and assessment methods in the rehabilitation of temporomandibular disorder: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Amaral, Ana Paula; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Tosato, Juliana de Paiva; Gomes, Cid Andre Fidelis de Paula; Arruda, Éric Edmur Camargo; Glória, Igor Phillip dos Santos; Garcia, Marilia Barbosa Santos; Barbosa, Bruno Roberto Borges; Rodrigues, Monique Sampaio; Silva, Katiane Lima; El Hage, Yasmin; Politti, Fabiano; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature on the effects of low-level laser therapy in the treatment of TMD, and to analyze the use of different assessment tools. [Subjects and Methods] Searches were carried out of the BIREME, MEDLINE, PubMed and SciELO electronic databases by two independent researchers for papers published in English and Portuguese using the terms: “temporomandibular joint laser therapy” and “TMJ laser treatment”. [Results] Following the application of the eligibility criteria, 11 papers were selected for in-depth analysis. The papers analyzed exhibited considerable methodological differences, especially with regard to the number of sessions, anatomic site and duration of low-level laser therapy irradiation, as well as irradiation parameters, diagnostic criteria and assessment tools. [Conclusion] Further studies are needed, especially randomized clinical trials, to establish the exact dose and ideal parameters for low-level laser therapy and define the best assessment tools in this promising field of research that may benefit individuals with signs and symptoms of TMD. PMID:25642095

  13. Temporomandibular disorder modifies cortical response to tactile stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Mary Beth; Folger, Stephen; Tommerdahl, Mark; Hollins, Mark; McGlone, Francis; Essick, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) suffer from persistent facial pain and exhibit abnormal sensitivity to tactile stimulation. To better understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying TMD, we investigated cortical correlates of this abnormal sensitivity to touch. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we recorded cortical responses evoked by low frequency vibration of the index finger in subjects with TMD and in healthy controls (HC). Distinct subregions of contralateral SI, SII, and insular cortex responded maximally for each group. Although the stimulus was inaudible, primary auditory cortex was activated in TMDs. TMDs also showed greater activation bilaterally in anterior cingulate cortex and contralaterally in the amygdala. Differences between TMDs and HCs in responses evoked by innocuous vibrotactile stimulation within SI, SII, and the insula paralleled previously reported differences in responses evoked by noxious and innocuous stimulation, respectively, in healthy individuals. This unexpected result may reflect a disruption of the normal balance between central resources dedicated to processing innocuous and noxious input, manifesting itself as increased readiness of the pain matrix for activation by even innocuous input. Activation of the amygdala in our TMD group could reflect the establishment of aversive associations with tactile stimulation due to the persistence of pain. Perspective This article presents evidence that central processing of innocuous tactile stimulation is abnormal in TMD. Understanding the complexity of sensory disruption in chronic pain could lead to improved methods for assessing cerebral cortical function in these patients. PMID:20462805

  14. JOINT IDENTIFICATION OF IMAGING AND PROTEOMICS BIOMARKERS OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE USING NETWORK-GUIDED SPARSE LEARNING

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jingwen; Huang, Heng; Kim, Sungeun; Moore, Jason; Saykin, Andrew; Shen, Li

    2014-01-01

    Identification of biomarkers for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an important research topic. Prior work has shown that multimodal imaging and biomarker data could provide complementary information for prediction of cognitive or AD status. However, the relationship among multiple data modalities are often ignored or oversimplified in prior studies. To address this issue, we propose a network-guided sparse learning model to embrace the complementary information and inter-relationships between modalities. We apply this model to predict cognitive outcome from imaging and proteomic data, and show that the proposed model not only outperforms traditional ones, but also yields stable multimodal biomarkers across cross-validation trials. PMID:25408822

  15. Effects of joint capsule tissue on cartilage degradation in an in vitro joint injury model

    E-print Network

    Lin, Stephanie Norris, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease of the whole joint that affects an estimated 20.7 million Americans. Traumatic joint injury causes an increase in risk for the development of osteoarthritis. A previously developed ...

  16. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Blankstein; J. L. Amsallem; E. Rubinstein; H. Horoszowski; I. Farin

    1985-01-01

    A patient with isolated pyogenous arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint (A-C joint) caused by Streptococcus viridans is described. The patient had no underlying disease. Minor trauma preceded shortly the development of the septic process. The patient was treated successfully with surgical drainage and antibiotics. To our knowledge this is the first case report of septic arthritis of the A-C joint

  17. The active form of MMP-3 is a marker of synovial inflammation and cartilage turnover in inflammatory joint diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays an important role in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Measurement of active MMP-3 in clinical samples could provide information about progression of rheumatoid diseases, and potentially response to treatment. Hence, we aimed to develop a sensitive assay specifically measuring the active form of MMP-3 (act-MMP-3) both in ex vivo models and in human sera. Methods A monoclonal antibody against the first 6 amino acids of act-MMP-3 was developed, and the specificity was carefully tested by comparing total and active MMP-3. A technically robust act-MMP-3 ELISA was produced. For biological validation, human synovial membrane and human cartilage explant (HEX) culture models were measured and compared by ELISA and immunoblots. For clinical relevance, the serum levels of act-MMP-3 in AS and RA patients before and after anti-TNF-? treatment were evaluated. Results A highly specific and technically robust ELISA detecting act-MMP-3 in serum was developed. The lower limit of detection was 33.7 pg/mL. The dilution and spiking recovery of human serum was within 100?±?20%. The average intra- and inter-assay variations were 3.1% and 13.5% respectively. High levels of act-MMP-3 expression were observed in human synovial membrane culture and oncostatin M and TNF-? stimulated human cartilage. In a cross-sectional study of both AS and RA patients, serum act-MMP-3 level was correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). In addition, in patients receiving anti-TNF-? treatment, the serum level of act-MMP-3 was significantly reduced compared to baseline level reflecting the anti-inflammatory effects of the treatment. Conclusion We have successfully developed an assay measuring act-MMP-3 in human serum showing correlation to inflammatory markers. Further studies are required to clarify, whether act-MMP-3 can serve as a predictive marker for outcome in chronic rheumatoid disorders. PMID:24641725

  18. Overlapping Conditions Among Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Temporomandibular Disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie A. Aaron; Mary M. Burke; Dedra Buchwald

    2000-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia (FM), and temporomandibular dis- order (TMD) share many clinical illness features such as myalgia, fatigue, sleep disturbances, and impairment in abil- ity to perform activities of daily living as a consequence of these symptoms. A growing literature suggests that a variety of comorbid illnesses also may commonly coexist in these patients, including

  19. The roles of beliefs, catastrophizing, and coping in the functioning of patients with temporomandibular disorders

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith A Turner; Samuel F Dworkin; Lloyd Mancl; Kimberly H Huggins; Edmond L Truelove

    2001-01-01

    Pain-related beliefs, catastrophizing, and coping have been shown to be associated with measures of physical and psychosocial functioning among patients with chronic musculoskeletal and rheumatologic pain. However, little is known about the relative importance of these process variables in the functioning of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). To address this gap in the literature, self-report measures of pain, beliefs, catastrophizing,

  20. Evaluation of effect of low-level laser therapy on adolescents with temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of problems involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated structures can lead to temporomandibular disorder (TMD). The aim of the proposed study is to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy on occlusal contacts, mandibular movements, electromyography activity in the muscles of mastication and pain in adolescents with TMD. Methods/Design A randomized, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial will be carried out involving 85 male and female adolescents between 15 and 18 years of age. The research diagnostic criteria for TMD will be used to assess all individuals who agree to participate. All participants will be submitted to a clinical examination and electromyographic analysis of the masseter muscles and anterior bundle of the temporal muscles bilaterally, to determine TMD. Based on the clinical findings, the participants will be classified as having or not having TMD. Those with TMD will be divided into four groups, three of which will receive low-level laser therapy and one of which will receive a placebo treatment. The treatments will involve the TMJ region alone, the masseter and temporal muscles alone, or both these regions together. The data will be submitted to descriptive statistical analysis. The chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test will be used to determine associations among the categorical variables. The Student’s t test and analysis of variance will be used for the comparison of mean electromyographic signals. Pearson’s correlation coefficients will be calculated for the analysis of correlations among the continuous variables. Trial registration The protocol for this study has been submitted to Clinical Trials – registration number (NCT01846000). PMID:23876095

  1. Self-regulatory deficits in fibromyalgia and temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Solberg Nes, Lise; Carlson, Charles R; Crofford, Leslie J; de Leeuw, Reny; Segerstrom, Suzanne C

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pain conditions such as fibromyalgia (FM) and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are accompanied by complex interactions of cognitive, emotional, and physiological disturbances. Such conditions are complicated and draining to live with, and successful adaptation may depend on ability to self-regulate. Self-regulation involves capacity to exercise control and guide or alter reactions and behavior, abilities essential for human adjustment. Research indicates that self-regulatory strength is a limited source that can be depleted or fatigued, however, and the current study aimed to show that patients with FM and TMD are vulnerable to self-regulatory fatigue as a consequence of their condition. Patients (N=50) and pain-free matched controls (N=50) were exposed to an experimental self-regulation task followed by a persistence task. Patients displayed significantly less capacity to persist on the subsequent task compared with controls. In fact, patients exposed to low self-regulatory effort displayed similar low persistence to patients and controls exposed to high self-regulatory effort, indicating that patients with chronic pain conditions may be suffering from chronic self-regulatory fatigue. Baseline heart rate variability, blood glucose, and cortisol predicted persistence, more so for controls than for patients, and more so in the low vs. high self-regulation condition. Impact of chronic pain conditions on self-regulatory effort was mediated by pain, but not by any other factors. The current study suggests that patients with chronic pain conditions likely suffer from chronic self-regulatory fatigue, and underlines the importance of taking self-regulatory capacity into account when aiming to understand and treat these complex conditions. PMID:20561749

  2. Mouse models of osteoarthritis and joint injury

    E-print Network

    Avedillo, Jose Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 21 million Americans are affected by osteoarthritis, a complex disease characterized by degenerative lesions to the articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the joints. The complexity of the disease makes the use ...

  3. Joint Association of Dietary Pattern and Physical Activity Level with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanping; Luan, Dechun; Zhai, Fengying; Yang, Xiaoguang; Ma, Guansheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the joint associations of physical activity level (PAL) and dietary patterns in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Chinese men. The study population consisted of 13 511 Chinese males aged 18–59 years from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. Based on dietary data collected by a food frequency questionnaire, four dietary patterns were identified and labeled as “Green Water” (high consumption of rice, vegetables, seafood, pork, and poultry), “Yellow Earth” (high consumption of wheat flour products and starchy tubers), “New Affluent” (high consumption of animal sourced foods and soybean products), and “Western Adopter” (high consumption of animal sourced foods, cakes, and soft drinks). From the information collected by a 1-year physical activity questionnaire, PAL was calculated and classified into 4 categories: sedentary, low active, active, and very active. As compared with their counterparts from the New Affluent pattern, participants who followed the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of abdominal obesity (AO; 50.2%), hypertension (HT; 37.9%), hyperglycemia (HG; 41.5%), elevated triglyceride (ETG; 14.5%), low HDL (LHDL; 39.8%), and metabolic syndrome (MS; 51.9%). When compared to sedentary participants, the odds ratio of participants with very active PAL was 0.62 for AO, 0.85 for HT, 0.71 for HG, 0.76 for ETG, 0.74 for LHDL, and 0.58 for MS. Individuals who followed both very active PAL and the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of CVD risk factors (AO: 65.8%, HT: 39.1%, HG: 57.4%, ETG: 35.4%, LHDL: 56.1%, and MS: 75.0%), compared to their counterparts who followed both sedentary PAL and the New Affluent pattern. In addition, adherence to both healthy dietary pattern and very active PAL presented a remarkable potential for CVD risk factor prevention. PMID:23840426

  4. ISB recommendation on definitions of joint coordinate system of various joints for the reporting of human joint motion--part I: ankle, hip, and spine. International Society of Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ge; Siegler, Sorin; Allard, Paul; Kirtley, Chris; Leardini, Alberto; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Whittle, Mike; D'Lima, Darryl D; Cristofolini, Luca; Witte, Hartmut; Schmid, Oskar; Stokes, Ian

    2002-04-01

    The Standardization and Terminology Committee (STC) of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB) proposes a general reporting standard for joint kinematics based on the Joint Coordinate System (JCS), first proposed by Grood and Suntay for the knee joint in 1983 (J. Biomech. Eng. 105 (1983) 136). There is currently a lack of standard for reporting joint motion in the field of biomechanics for human movement, and the JCS as proposed by Grood and Suntay has the advantage of reporting joint motions in clinically relevant terms. In this communication, the STC proposes definitions of JCS for the ankle, hip, and spine. Definitions for other joints (such as shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and whole body) will be reported in later parts of the series. The STC is publishing these recommendations so as to encourage their use, to stimulate feedback and discussion, and to facilitate further revisions. For each joint, a standard for the local axis system in each articulating bone is generated. These axes then standardize the JCS. Adopting these standards will lead to better communication among researchers and clinicians. PMID:11934426

  5. Arthritis at the shoulder joint.

    PubMed

    Sankaye, Prashant; Ostlere, Simon

    2015-07-01

    The shoulder is a complex joint with numerous structures contributing to mobility and stability. Shoulder pain is a common clinical complaint that may be due to a wide spectrum of disorders including rotator cuff disease, instability, and arthropathy. Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint is uncommon because it is a non-weight-bearing joint. Significant osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint is unusual in the absence of trauma, and the detection of advanced degenerative changes in patients without a known history of trauma should alert the clinician to search for other disorders. This article reviews the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and key imaging findings of the common categories of the arthritis affecting the glenohumeral joint. PMID:26021591

  6. Cortical processing of facial tactile stimuli in temporomandibular disorder as revealed by magnetoencephalography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aurelio A. Alonso; Ioannis G. Koutlas; Arthur C. Leuthold; Scott M. Lewis; Apostolos P. Georgopoulos

    2010-01-01

    We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the cortical processing of an innocuous facial tactile stimulus in healthy\\u000a subjects and in a group of subjects suffering from chronic temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Equivalent current dipoles (ECDs)\\u000a were extracted for a time period of 1 s following stimulus application, and their location, duration and onset time determined.\\u000a The counts of ECDs extracted did not

  7. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angel Aneiros-Guerrero; Ana M Lendinez; Arturo R Palomares; Beatriz Perez-Nevot; Lidia Aguado; Alvaro Mayor-Olea; Maximiliano Ruiz-Galdon; Armando Reyes-Engel

    2011-01-01

    Background  Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated\\u000a with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development.\\u000a In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative\\u000a and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes

  8. Joint Projects / Joint Seminars October 2013

    E-print Network

    Fuchs, Clemens

    Joint Projects / Joint Seminars October 2013 Information Sheet Bilateral Programs (MoU) ­ Joint Projects (JP) / Joint Seminars (JS) FWF has signed bilateral agreements ­ so called "Memorandums of Understanding" (MoU) ­ with several international partner organisations. These agreements usually aim at jointly

  9. The Incidence and Prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorders and Posterior Open Bite in Patients Receiving Mandibular Advancement Device Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina V. Perez; Reny deLeeuw; Jeffrey P. Okeson; Charles R. Carlson; Hsin-Fang Li; Heather M. Bush; Donald Falace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients receiving a mandibular advancement device (MAD) to treat obstructive sleep apnea using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC\\/TMD). In addition, it also aims to assess the development of posterior open bite (POB). Materials and methods Data from 167 patients were evaluated at

  10. Challenges and opportunities in drug and biomarker development for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis: findings and recommendations from an American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases-U.S. Food and Drug Administration Joint Workshop.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Arun J; Friedman, Scott L; McCullough, Arthur J; Dimick-Santos, Lara

    2015-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease (CLD) in North America. It is a growing contributor to the burden of CDL requiring liver transplantation. Cirrhosis is also associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular cancer, which may occur even in the absence of cirrhosis in subjects with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the histological form of NAFLD associated with increased liver-related mortality. The diagnosis of NASH currently requires a liver biopsy. There are also no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapies for NASH. Therefore, there is a need to develop better diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for patients with NASH, targeting both those with early-stage disease as well as those with advanced liver fibrosis. There are unique challenges in the design of studies for these target populations. The long relatively asymptomatic time interval in the progression of NAFLD and NASH to cirrhosis and ultimately liver failure, along with gaps in knowledge regarding disease modifiers, combine to present significant challenges in trial design. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop methods to identify the populations at particular risk of disease progression and validate endpoints that reflect meaningful changes in health status in this population. This article summarizes the discussion at a joint workshop held September 5 and 6, 2013 in Silver Spring, Maryland, sponsored by the FDA and the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases to develop guidance on diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for NASH. PMID:25557690

  11. Joint assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A joint assembly is provided which includes a drive assembly and a swivel mechanism. The drive assembly features a motor operatively associated with a plurality of drive shafts for driving auxiliary elements, and a plurality of swivel shafts for pivoting the drive assembly. The swivel mechanism engages the swivel shafts and has a fixable element that may be attached to a foundation. The swivel mechanism is adapted to cooperate with the swivel shafts to pivot the drive assembly with at least two degrees of freedom relative to the foundation. The joint assembly allows for all components to remain encased in a tight, compact, and sealed package, making it ideal for space, exploratory, and commercial applications.

  12. Load transfer in Christensen(®) TMJ in alloplastic total joint replacement for two different mouth apertures.

    PubMed

    Ramos, António; Mesnard, Michel

    2014-10-01

    This study analyses load transfer in the fossa component based on two numerical models of total temporomandibular joint (TMJ) implants for two mouth openings. The TMJ articulation is a very complex system with muscles, ligaments and cartilage. Until now, studies of TMJ implants have analysed only condylar behaviour. The finite element models were constructed based on CT scans of a cadaveric mandible and cranium, considering the bone geometry and position. The influence of five principal muscle actions was simulated for two mouth positions, 5 mm and 15 mm openings at the incisive tooth support. Strain distributions into the surrounding bone tissue were analysed in both models in the condyle and fossa components. The results demonstrate that in Christensen(®) TJR of the temporomandibular joint the fossa component is the more critical part, presenting more stress near the screw holes and contact regions with the cranium. The most critical region is around the first two screws and the least critical is in the condyle component. For the mandible condyle reconstructed with a Christensen(®) prosthesis, the 15 mm mouth opening was more critical, as compression was increased, but for the fossa component the most critical situation occurred with the 5 mm opening. The micromovements observed suggest that the number of screws could be reduced to increase osteointegration of screws in the mandible condyle. PMID:24954763

  13. A pilot study of a chiropractic intervention for management of chronic myofascial temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    DeVocht, James W.; Goertz, Christine M.; Hondras, Maria A.; Long, Cynthia R.; Schaeffer, Wally; Thomann, Lauren; Spector, Michael; Stanford, Clark M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular pain has multiple etiologies and a range of therapeutic options. In this pilot study, the authors assessed the feasibility of conducting a larger trial to evaluate chiropractic treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Methods The authors assigned 80 participants randomly into one of the following four groups, all of which included a comprehensive self-care program: reversible interocclusal splint therapy (RIST), Activator Method Chiropractic Technique (AMCT) (Activator Methods International, Phoenix), sham AMCT and self-care only. They made assessments at baseline and at month 2 and month 6, including use of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. Results The authors screened 721 potential participants and enrolled 80 people; 52 participants completed the six-month assessment. The adjusted mean change in current pain over six months, as assessed on the 11-point numerical rating scale, was 2.0 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1-3.0) for RIST, 1.7 (0.9-2.5) for self-care only, 1.5 (0.7-2.4) for AMCT and 1.6 (0.7-2.5) for sham AMCT. The authors also assessed bothersomeness and functionality. Conclusions The authors found the study design and methodology to be manageable. They gained substantial knowledge to aid in conducting a larger study. AMCT, RIST and self-care should be evaluated in a future comparative effectiveness study. Practical Implications. This pilot study was a necessary step to prepare for a larger study that will provide clinicians with information that should be helpful when discussing treatment options for patients with TMD. PMID:24080932

  14. No Increased Risk of Temporomandibular Disorders and Bruxism in Children and Adolescents during Orthodontic Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Hirsch

    2009-01-01

    \\u000a Abstract\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background and Objective:\\u000a   Whether orthodontic therapy is a risk factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) or parafunctional habits such as bruxism\\u000a is a question that has long been discussed. The issue is highly relevant to public health due to the frequency of these functional\\u000a disorders in the general population and the sheer number of orthodontic treatments. The aim of this

  15. Synovial fibroblasts spread rheumatoid arthritis to unaffected joints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephanie Lefèvre; Anette Knedla; Christoph Tennie; Andreas Kampmann; Christina Wunrau; Robert Dinser; Adelheid Korb; Eva-Maria Schnäker; Ingo H Tarner; Paul D Robbins; Christopher H Evans; Henning Stürz; Jürgen Steinmeyer; Steffen Gay; Jürgen Schölmerich; Thomas Pap; Ulf Müller-Ladner; Elena Neumann

    2009-01-01

    Active rheumatoid arthritis originates from few joints but subsequently affects the majority of joints. Thus far, the pathways of the progression of the disease are largely unknown. As rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) which can be found in RA synovium are key players in joint destruction and are able to migrate in vitro, we evaluated the potential of RASFs to

  16. Osteoarthritis joint pain: the cytokine connection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rachel E; Miller, Richard J; Malfait, Anne-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic and painful disease of synovial joints. Chondrocytes, synovial cells and other cells in the joint can express and respond to cytokines and chemokines, and all of these molecules can also be detected in synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis. The presence of inflammatory cytokines in the osteoarthritic joint raises the question whether they may directly participate in pain generation by acting on innervating joint nociceptors. Here, we first provide a systematic discussion of the known proalgesic effects of cytokines and chemokines that have been detected in osteoarthritic joints, including TNF-?, IL-1, IL-6, IL-15, IL-10, and the chemokines, MCP-1 and fractalkine. Subsequently, we discuss what is known about their contribution to joint pain based on studies in animal models. Finally, we briefly discuss limited data available from clinical studies in human osteoarthritis. PMID:25066335

  17. [Tissue engineering: new treatment of cartilage alterations in degenerative joint diseases in horses--preliminary results of a long term study].

    PubMed

    Barnewitz, D; Evers, A; Zimmermann, J; Wilke, I; Kaps, C; Sittinger, M

    2003-01-01

    Degenerative alterations in fetlock joints of the forelimb are common diagnoses for horses. The hyaline cartilage has a low capacity to regenerate and the treatment by veterinarians is often insufficient. As a final result, horses with articular cartilage defects are often not able to take part in competitions anymore. To establish an autologous cartilage repair method, we set artificial lesions (8 mm in diameter) into the fetlock joints of the forelimb of three horses. These defects were closed with autologous chondrocyte implants, which were fixed with titan-suture-anchors. After 3, 12 and 24 months, biopsies were taken by arthroscopy. One horse was euthanized after 9, another one after 24 months. The repair tissue was examined histologically and by biochemical analysis of hydroxyproline and glycosaminoglycan, which are typical cartilage related substances. After 9 months, the integration of the implant into native cartilage was demonstrated by electron microscopy. After 24 months, histological staining showed a similar morphology of the cartilage repair tissue compared with the surrounding native cartilage. Biochemical analysis of typical cartilage matrix molecules revealed formation of hyaline-like cartilage within tissue engineered autologous chondrocyte transplants. PMID:12680284

  18. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  19. Joint Aspiration (Arthrocentesis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the joint. It is usually due to a bacterial infection in the joint. Joint aspiration helps to diagnose ... at the time of the test. If a bacterial infection such as septic arthritis is suspected, a culture ...

  20. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA. PMID:25741184

  1. Are radiological joint space widths of normal hips asymmetrical?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo Reis; Roula Nahal-Said; Philippe Ravaud; Maxime Dougados; Bernard Amor

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUNDTo be certain that the joint space width is abnormal in the case of hip joint pain when compared with the contralateral hip requires knowledge of physiological dissymmetry.AIM OF THE STUDYTo assess interindividual variability and dissymmetry in pelvic radiological joint space width.METHODSPelvic radiographs of subjects without hip joint disease. Measurement with a 0.1 mm graduated magnifying glass and 0.5 mm

  2. Accuracy of the surface electromyography RMS processing for the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Berni, Kelly Cristina Dos Santos; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Pires, Paulo Fernandes; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-08-01

    Due to the multifactor etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD), the precise diagnosis remains a matter of debate and validated diagnostic tools are needed. The aim was to determine the accuracy of surface electromyography (sEMG) activity, assessed in the amplitude domain by the root mean square (RMS), in the diagnosis of TMD. One hundred twenty-three volunteers were evaluated using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and distributed into two groups: women with myogenous TMD (n=80) and women without TMD (n=43). The volunteers were then submitted to sEMG evaluation of the anterior temporalis, masseter and suprahyoid muscles at rest and during maximum voluntary teeth clenching (MVC) on parafilm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the muscle activity were analyzed. Differences between groups were found in all muscles analyzed at rest as well as in the masseter and suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moderate accuracy (AUC: 0.74-0.84) of the RMS sEMG was found in all muscles regarding the diagnosis of TMD at rest and in the suprahyoid muscles during MVC on parafilm. Moreover, sensitivity ranging from 71.3% to 80% and specificity from 60.5% to 76.6%. In contrast, RMS sEMG did not exhibit acceptable degrees of accuracy in the other masticatory muscles during MVC on parafilm. It was concluded that the RMS sEMG is a complementary tool for clinical diagnosis of the myogenous TMD. PMID:26054969

  3. Visualization of the articular disk of the temporomandibular joint in near-real-time MRI: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Abolmaali, Nasreddin D; Schmitt, Jan; Schwarz, Wolfram; Toll, Douglas E; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Vogl, Thomas J

    2004-10-01

    While static MRI of the TMJ is the method of choice to evaluate the articular disk (AD), dynamic MRI so far has failed to display the AD. The capability of a modified True-FISP sequence to visualize the AD in dynamic near-real-time imaging (NRTI) was evaluated. Twelve healthy subjects and 17 patients were investigated. Besides static routine imaging, sagittal NRTI of both TMJs was performed with a True-FISP sequence at 1.5 T with TE/TR=1.84/3.68 ms. Two temporal resolutions (250/500 ms) were tested. The quality of the visualization of the AD was rated on a four-point scale (1= very good to 4= poor visualization) by two observers in consensus. ADs of the volunteers were visualized with high quality in all stages of movement (score: 1.69). In patients with internal derangement, disk-motion was clearly depicted, including fast reposition movements. Due to degenerative changes of the AD, the quality of the depiction in patients was slightly lower (score: 2.4). According to the preliminary results of this feasibility study, the suggested NRTI True-FISP sequence is capable of visualizing the entire motion of the AD of the TMJ in normal and pathologic stages with high quality. Further studies are needed to prove the clinical usefulness of this new technique. PMID:15378254

  4. Visualization of the articular disk of the temporomandibular joint in near-real-time MRI: feasibility study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nasreddin D. Abolmaali; Jan Schmitt; Wolfram Schwarz; Douglas E. Toll; Stefan Hinterwimmer; Thomas J. Vogl

    2004-01-01

    While static MRI of the TMJ is the method of choice to evaluate the articular disk (AD), dynamic MRI so far has failed to display the AD. The capability of a modified True-FISP sequence to visualize the AD in dynamic near-real-time imaging (NRTI) was evaluated. Twelve healthy subjects and 17 patients were investigated. Besides static routine imaging, sagittal NRTI of

  5. Force distribution of the temporomandibular joint and temporal bone surface subjected to the head-chincup force

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toshio Deguchi

    1998-01-01

    The present study is an in vitro study of chincup therapy. The purpose of the study was to investigate the localization and distribution of stress induced by the head-chincup appliance. Thin single and three-dimensional strain gauges were affixed on a young dry human skull capped by the head-chincup appliance. Three kilograms of force was then applied in the direction of

  6. Frey's Syndrome Consequent to an Unusual Pattern of Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Case Report with Review of Its Incidence and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Rajay A. D.; Bharani, Shiva; Prabhakar, Suhas

    2013-01-01

    Frey's syndrome was first described in the 18th century. Recognizing it as a nonspecific condition, the symptom of gustatory sweating in patients with parotid gland inflammation was described by Duphenix and Baillarger. However, as a specific diagnostic entity, gustatory sweating, following trauma to parotid glands, was first described by Polish neurologist Lucie Frey, in 1923, and hence he proposed the term auriculotemporal syndrome. The condition is characterized by sweating, flushing, a sense of warmth, and occasional pain in the preauricular and temporal areas, following the production of a strong salivary stimulus. Several etiologies of Frey's syndrome have been mentioned in the literature; however, none attribute dislocation of the “intact” mandibular condyle as a cause of the syndrome. Reviewing its pathophysiology, etiology, and incidence in detail, we describe a case of Frey's syndrome subsequent to superolateral dislocation of the intact mandibular condyle following fracture of the anterior mandible. Its management and prevention are also discussed in brief. PMID:24436729

  7. A Comparative Analysis of the Articular Cartilage in the Temporomandibular Joint of Gouging and Nongouging New World Monkeys

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy L. Mork; Walter E. Horton; Christopher J. Vinyard

    \\u000a Both laboratory and field data demonstrate that marmosets gouge trees with wide jaw gapes to elicit exudate flow. Tree gouging\\u000a distinguishes marmosets from other platyrrhines and presents a natural experiment for studying the morphological consequences\\u000a of this derived feeding behavior. We utilize comparative histomorphometrics to determine whether loading of the TMJ at wide\\u000a jaw gapes impacts articular cartilage form in

  8. The joint intersection probability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. H. Hatzor; A. Feintuch

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a practical method to apply block theory is presented. Block theory provides the removable joint pyramids from a given free surface regardless of the number of joints in any joint intersection. While robust, the application of the theory in real practice is hampered by the large outcome space of possibly removable joint pyramids consisting of k mutually

  9. Arthritis: joints inflamed.

    PubMed

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-06-01

    ARTHRITIS IS a generic term for inflammatory joint disease. There are various forms of arthritis, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. Arthritis can be a chronic debilitating condition or a transient effect of bacterial or viral infections. As a chronic condition, arthritis can cause loss of quality of life, disability and, with rheumatoid disease, early death. The economic burden of arthritis, in terms of management and loss of productivity due to disability, is high and set to increase with the ageing population. Recent advances in our understanding of the causes and progression of a number of forms of arthritis have raised hopes of better management and possible remission. Pharmacotherapy has moved from symptom management to addressing underlying disease processes. However, therapies that prevent or cure arthritis remain elusive. Current care for people with arthritis relies on a multidisciplinary approach and substantial pharmacological intervention. Nurses have a key role to play in guiding patients through treatment, ensuring they receive optimal therapy to reduce the impact of arthritis and its management on their lives. PMID:26168559

  10. Evaluation of microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation (MENS) effectiveness on muscle pain in temporomandibular disorders patients.

    PubMed

    Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Garcia, Alicio Rosalino; Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Hamata, Marcelo Matida

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Microcurrent Electrical Nerve Stimulation (MENS) was evaluated and compared with occlusal splint therapy in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with muscle pain. Twenty TMD patients were divided into four groups. One received occlusal splint therapy and MENS (I); other received splints and placebo MENS (II); the third, only MENS (III) and the last group, placebo MENS (IV). Sensitivity derived from muscle palpation was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Results were submitted to analysis of variance (p<0.05). There was reduction of pain level in all groups: group I (occlusal splint and MENS) had a 47.7% reduction rate; group II (occlusal splint and placebo MENS), 66.7%; group III (MENS), 49.7% and group IV (placebo MENS), 16.5%. In spite of that, there was no statistical difference (analysis of variance / p<0.05) between MENS and occlusal splint therapy regarding muscle pain reduction in TMD patients after four weeks. PMID:19089032

  11. Interventional radiology in bone and joint

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, M.; Laredo, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent radiologic procedures in bone and joints, some of which eliminate the need for surgery are exposed, including: trephine biopsies of the thoracic and lumbar spine, sacro-iliac joints, peripheral bones synovial membrane and soft tissues, using either fluoroscopic echographic or CT guidance - chemonucleolysis - vascular embolization of skeletal tumors and management of vertebral hemangiomas - selective steroid injection in a broad spectrum of diseases including vertebral facet syndrome, cervicobrachial nerve root pain, rotator cuff calcium deposit, bone cysts.

  12. Joint Health Status of Hemophilia Patients in Jodhpur Region.

    PubMed

    Payal, Vikas; Sharma, Pramod; Chhangani, N P; Janu, Yojana; Singh, Yudhavir; Sharma, Akash

    2015-09-01

    Hemophilia refers to a group of bleeding disorders in which there is a deficiency of one of the factors necessary for coagulation of the blood. Susceptibility to joint hemorrhage in persons with Hemophilia suggests that the routine assessment of joint health is an important aspect of clinical management and outcome studies assessing the efficacy of treatment. This prospective study was conducted to study joint health status in Hemophilia patients and draw their joint disability score by using Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS). Out of total 56 cases 51 (91.07 %) cases were diagnosed as hemophilia A while 5 cases (8.92 %) were diagnosed as hemophilia B. According to their factor level 44 % cases had severe 36 % had moderate and 20 % had mild disease. Knee joint was the predominant joint affected by hemarthrosis in 67.85 % cases followed by ankle joint (51.7 %) elbow joint (35.7 %), hip joint (12.5 %), shoulder joint (5.3 %) and proximal metacarpophalangeal joint (1.78 %).Out of total 37.5 % patients of hemophilia had developed target joint. Knee joint was the predominant target joint in 28.57 % cases and ankle joint was the target joint in 8.92 % cases. Maximum number of patients (40.47 %) had HJHS score of zero. The mean HJHS score was 6.78 ± 9.04. HJHS score showing significant positive correlation with age of patient (p < 0.0001). Most risky period and most aggravating development of hemophilic joint damage starts from 7 years of age. Therefore, treatment decisions, such as starting prophylaxis, should be tailored according to bleeding pattern and age of patients rather than based on the clotting factor activity levels. PMID:26085722

  13. Elevated sacroilac joint uptake ratios in systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    De Smet, A.A.; Mahmood, T.; Robinson, R.G.; Lindsley, H.B.

    1984-08-01

    Sacroiliac joint radiographs and radionuclide sacroiliac joint uptake ratios were obtained on 14 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus. Elevated joint ratios were found unilaterally in two patients and bilaterally in seven patients when their lupus was active. In patients whose disease became quiescent, the uptake ratios returned to normal. Two patients had persistently elevated ratios with continued clinical and laboratory evidence of active lupus. Mild sacroiliac joint sclerosis and erosions were detected on pelvic radiographs in these same two patients. Elevated quantitative sacroiliac joint uptake ratios may occur as a manifestation of active systemic lupus erythematosus.

  14. Tissue engineering in the rheumatic diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jochen Ringe; Michael Sittinger

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Diseases such as degenerative or rheumatoid arthritis are accompanied by joint destruction. Clinically applied tissue engineering technologies like autologous chondrocyte implantation, matrix-assisted chondrocyte implantation, or in situ recruitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells target the treatment of traumatic defects or of early osteoarthritis. Inflammatory conditions in the joint hamper the application of tissue engineering during chronic joint diseases.

  15. [Fetal bone and joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Jakobovits, Akos

    2008-12-21

    The article discusses the physiology and pathology of fetal bone and joint development and functions. The bones provide static support for the body. The skull and the bones of spinal column encase the central and part of the peripheral nervous system. The ribs and the sternum shield the heart and the lungs, while the bones of the pelvis protect the intraabdominal organs. Pathological changes of these bony structures may impair the functions of the respective systems or internal organs. Movements of the bones are brought about by muscles. The deriving motions are facilitated by joints. Bony anomalies of the extremities limit their effective functions. Apart from skeletal and joint abnormalities, akinesia may also be caused by neurological, muscular and skin diseases that secondarily affect the functions of bones and joints. Such pathological changes may lead to various degrees of physical disability and even to death. Some of the mentioned anomalies are recognizable in utero by ultrasound. The diagnosis may serve as medical indication for abortion in those instances when the identified abnormality is incompatible with independent life. PMID:19073454

  16. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  17. Bone and joint tuberculosis: a continuing problem.

    PubMed Central

    Enarson, D. A.; Fujii, M.; Nakielna, E. M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1979-01-01

    Although tuberculous disease of bones and joints is becoming uncommon, it still occurs and may cause devastating sequelae. It is frequently not diagnosed prior to the onset of permanent damage to the joints or spine; the most important reason for this delay may be the fact that it is not considered in the differential diagnosis of monoarthritis or back pain. Most persons with the disease have other evidence of tuberculosis. Not infrequently an aggressive approach (including synovial biopsy or surgical exploration of the back) is needed to confirm the diagnosis when there are no other clues. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:761142

  18. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the place where the sacrum and the iliac bones join. The ... The main purpose of the joint is to connect the spine and the pelvis. As a result, there is very little movement at the sacroiliac joint. Listed ...

  19. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: Recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L.; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T.; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M.; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ? 0.70 and specificity of ? 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Methods Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project—the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. Results The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ? 0.86, specificity ? 0.98) and for one intra-articular disorder (sensitivity of 0.80 and specificity of 0.97). Diagnostic criteria for other common intra-articular disorders lack adequate validity for clinical diagnoses but can be used for screening purposes. Inter-examiner reliability for the clinical assessment associated with the validated DC/TMD criteria for pain-related TMD is excellent (kappa ? 0.85). Finally, a comprehensive classification system that includes both the common and less common TMD is also presented. The Axis II protocol retains selected original RDC/TMD screening instruments augmented with new instruments to assess jaw function as well as behavioral and additional psychosocial factors. The Axis II protocol is divided into screening and comprehensive self-report instrument sets. The screening instruments’ 41 questions assess pain intensity, pain-related disability, psychological distress, jaw functional limitations, and parafunctional behaviors, and a pain drawing is used to assess locations of pain. The comprehensive instruments, composed of 81 questions, assess in further detail jaw functional limitations and psychological distress as well as additional constructs of anxiety and presence of comorbid pain conditions. Conclusion The recommended evidence-based new DC/TMD protocol is appropriate for use in both clinical and research settings. More comprehensive instruments augment short and simple screening instruments for Axis I and Axis II. These validated instruments allow for identification of patients with a range of simple to complex TMD presentations. PMID:24482784

  20. Genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway enzymes, DRD4 and GSTM1 are related to temporomandibular disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a multifactorial syndrome related to a critical period of human life. TMD has been associated with psychological dysfunctions, oxidative state and sexual dimorphism with coincidental occurrence along the pubertal development. In this work we study the association between TMD and genetic polymorphisms of folate metabolism, neurotransmission, oxidative and hormonal metabolism. Folate metabolism, which depends on genes variations and diet, is directly involved in genetic and epigenetic variations that can influence the changes of last growing period of development in human and the appearance of the TMD. Methods A case-control study was designed to evaluate the impact of genetic polymorphisms above described on TMD. A total of 229 individuals (69% women) were included at the study; 86 were patients with TMD and 143 were healthy control subjects. Subjects underwent to a clinical examination following the guidelines by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Genotyping of 20 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), divided in two groups, was performed by multiplex minisequencing preceded by multiplex PCR. Other seven genetic polymorphisms different from SNPs (deletions, insertions, tandem repeat, null genotype) were achieved by a multiplex-PCR. A chi-square test was performed to determine the differences in genotype and allelic frequencies between TMD patients and healthy subjects. To estimate TMD risk, in those polymorphisms that shown significant differences, odds ratio (OR) with a 95% of confidence interval were calculated. Results Six of the polymorphisms showed statistical associations with TMD. Four of them are related to enzymes of folates metabolism: Allele G of Serine Hydoxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) rs1979277 (OR = 3.99; 95%CI 1.72, 9.25; p = 0.002), allele G of SHMT1 rs638416 (OR = 2.80; 95%CI 1.51, 5.21; p = 0.013), allele T of Methylentetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (MTHFD) rs2236225 (OR = 3.09; 95%CI 1.27, 7.50; p = 0.016) and allele A of Methionine Synthase Reductase (MTRR) rs1801394 (OR = 2.35; 95CI 1.10, 5.00; p = 0.037). An inflammatory oxidative stress enzyme, Gluthatione S-Tranferase Mu-1(GSTM1), null allele (OR = 2.21; 95%CI 1.24, 4.36; p = 0.030) and a neurotransmission receptor, Dopamine Receptor D4 (DRD4), long allele of 48 bp-repeat (OR = 3.62; 95%CI 0.76, 17.26; p = 0.161). Conclusions Some genetic polymorphisms related to folates metabolism, inflammatory oxidative stress, and neurotransmission responses to pain, has been significantly associated to TMD syndrome PMID:21615938

  1. Chicken and egg in autoimmunity and joint inflammation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Burkhardt; Joachim R Kalden; Hendrik Schulze-Koops

    2001-01-01

    The 2nd International Symposium of the German Network for Competence in Rheumatology: New Frontiers in Arthritis Research in the Decade of Joint and Bone Disease was held at Bamberg, Germany from 8–10 March 2001.

  2. CERVICAL SPINE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS: PERPETUATING RATHER THAN PREDISPOSING FACTORS FOR TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess in a sample of female community cases the relationship between the increase of percentage of cervical signs and symptoms and the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and vice-versa. Material and Methods: One hundred women (aged 18-26 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD signs and symptoms and cervical spine disorders were randomly selected from a sample of college students. Results: 43% of the volunteers demonstrated the same severity for TMD and cervical spine disorders (CSD). The increase in TMD signs and symptoms was accompanied by increase in CSD severity, except for pain during palpation of posterior temporal muscle, more frequently observed in the severe CSD group. However, increase in pain during cervical extension, sounds during cervical lateral flexion, and tenderness to palpation of upper fibers of trapezius and suboccipital muscles were observed in association with the progression of TMD severity. Conclusion: The increase in cervical symptomatology seems to accompany TMD severity; nonetheless, the inverse was not verified. Such results suggest that cervical spine signs and symptoms could be better recognized as perpetuating rather than predisposing factors for TMD. PMID:19089141

  3. Electromyographic indices, orofacial myofunctional status and temporomandibular disorders severity: A correlation study.

    PubMed

    De Felício, Cláudia Maria; Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Medeiros, Ana Paula Magalhães; Rodrigues Da Silva, Marco Antonio M; Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Sforza, Chiarella

    2012-04-01

    This study examined whether there is an association between surface electromyography (EMG) of masticatory muscles, orofacial myofunction status and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity scores. Forty-two women with TMD (mean 30 years, SD 8) and 18 healthy women (mean 26 years, SD 6) were examined. According to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD), all patients had myogenous disorders plus disk displacements with reduction. Surface EMG of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Standardized EMG indices were obtained. Validated protocols were used to determine the perception severity of TMD and to assess orofacial myofunctional status. TMD patients showed more asymmetry between right and left muscle pairs, and more unbalanced contractile activities of contralateral masseter and temporal muscles (p<0.05, t-test), worse orofacial myofunction status and higher TMD severity scores (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney test) than healthy subjects. Spearman coefficient revealed significant correlations between EMG indices, orofacial myofunctional status and TMD severity (p<0.05). In conclusion, these methods will provide useful information for TMD diagnosis and future therapeutic planning. PMID:22206640

  4. Histamine and substance P in synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Long, X; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Fang, W

    2015-05-01

    Although psychosocial factors and malocclusion are regarded as potential causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that substance P (SP), which has been associated with both psychosocial factors and malocclusion, and histamine, whose release can be induced by SP, may be implicated in the pathogenetic process. This study was designed to measure the concentration of histamine and SP in synovial fluid (SF) of both 38 patients with TMD and 11 healthy controls, and analyse the correlation between histamine and SP. Patients with TMD were divided into three subgroups: displaced disc with reduction (DDR), displaced disc without reduction (DDNR) and osteoarthritis (OA), with 10, 13, 15 subjects in every subgroup, respectively. After collecting SF samples, histamine and SP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA) and calibrated by bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-quantified protein level in the samples. The results suggest that OA group presented a significantly higher level of both histamine and SP than DDNR, DDR and healthy control groups. Histamine or SP in DDR and DDNR groups tend to be higher than control group, but no significance was found. Painful TMJs show higher histamine and SP than painless TMJs. Correlation analysis reveals a significant correlation between histamine and SP concentrations. Collectively, this study showed the changes of histamine and SP in the SF from different stages of TMD and found a significant correlation between the two substances, suggesting their potential implication in the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID:25545415

  5. Severity of temporomandibular disorders in women: validity and reliability of the Fonseca Anamnestic Index.

    PubMed

    Campos, Juliana Alvares Duarte Bonini; Carrascosa, Andréa Corrêa; Bonafé, Fernanda Salloume Sampaio; Maroco, João

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Fonseca Anamnestic Index (IAF), used to assess the severity of temporomandibular disorders, applied to Brazilian women. We used a probabilistic sampling design. The participants were 700 women over 18 years of age, living in the city of Araraquara (SP). The IAF questionnaire was applied by telephone interviews. We conducted Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) using Chi-Square Over Degrees of Freedom (?2/df), Comparative Fit Index (CFI), Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI), and Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) as goodness of fit indices. We calculated the convergent validity, the average variance extracted (AVE) and the composite reliability (CR). Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (a).The factorial weights of questions 8 and 10 were below the adequate values. Thus, we refined the original model and these questions were excluded. The resulting factorial model showed appropriate goodness of fit to the sample (c2/df = 3.319, CFI = 0.978, TLI = 0.967, RMSEA = 0.058). The convergent validity (AVE = 0.513, CR = 0.878) and internal consistency (a = 0.745) were adequate. The reduced IAF version showed adequate validity and reliability in a sample of Brazilian women. PMID:25000601

  6. Prevalence of Temporomandibular Disorder in Children and Adolescents from Public Schools in Southern Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Cardoso, Iara; Porfírio, Melani; Gonçalves, Roberta; Cascalheiro, Sabina; Barreto, Vera; Soeiro, Andreia; Almeida, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in children and adolescents is in the range of 6-68% and can be triggered or aggravated by emotional stress. Aim: The study was to investigate the prevalence of TMD in Portuguese children and adolescents and its association with emotional stress. Materials and Methods: The sample comprised 3,260 students aged 5-19 years. The questionnaire was used to assess the presence of TMD, and was applied in a single moment. Results: TMD was observed in 821 (25.2%) students. The most common symptoms of TMD were: if considered tense or nervous (52%), have headaches (36.8%), and habit of clenching or grinding teeth (27.3%). The girls had a 1.36 higher probability of developing TMD than boys (95% CI: 1.14-1.63; p < 0.001); moreover, students from the older age group had a 2.31 higher probability of developing the disorder (95% CI: 1.85-2.89; p < 0.001). Students who considered themselves tense or nervous presented 8.74 higher probability (95% CI: 7.03-10.86; p < 0.001) of developing TMD. Conclusion: This study showed a high prevalence of TMD in children and adolescents in southern Portugal, and revealed a significant association between this dysfunction and the levels of emotional stress. Female students, older students, and those considered tense or nervous have a higher probability of developing TMD. PMID:24741551

  7. Association of temporomandibular disorder symptoms with anxiety and depression in Portuguese college students.

    PubMed

    Minghelli, Beatriz; Morgado, Marcos; Caro, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and its association with anxiety and depression among 1,493 Portuguese college students (age 17-69 years) at Piaget Institute. The assessment instruments were the Fonseca Anamnestic Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. TMD was present in 633 (42.4%) students, and anxiety or depression was present in 456 (30.5%) students. Regarding the association of TMD with anxiety and depression, 280 of the 633 students (61.4%) with TMD symptoms also had signs of anxiety or depression (P < 0.001). As compared with men, women had an odds ratio of 1.9 (95% confidence interval: 1.53-2.46; P < 0.001) for TMD. As compared with students without signs of anxiety or depression, students with such signs had an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval: 2.42-3.84; P < 0.001) for TMD. College students from various fields of study and regions of Portugal had a high prevalence of TMD, which was significantly associated with anxiety and depression. PMID:24930749

  8. Bilateral Dupuytren's contractures of the thumb interphalangeal joints.

    PubMed

    Miranda, B H; Elliott, C; Fahmy, F S

    2012-12-01

    Dupuytren's disease was first described by Baron Guillaume Dupuytren in 1831. He outlined the pathology of palmar fascia thickening and contracture resulting in flexion of one or more digits. Dupuytren's disease usually affects the little or ring fingers, with the thumb rarely affected. Furthermore, the thumb in isolation is only affected in 0.5% of cases, with contracture at the metacarpophalangeal joint. We present a unique and interesting case of Dupuytren's disease predominantly of the thumbs, with isolated contractures bilaterally at the interphalangeal joints, in a 59 year old lady with epilepsy who was otherwise fit and well. To our knowledge this disease pattern has never been reported in the literature. Furthermore a relevant literature review of Dupuytren's disease affecting the thumb, in particular the interphalangeal joint, is presented. Our interesting and unique case reinforces the notion that the disease pathogenesis is diverse and multifactorial, and provides a further interesting example for the literature. PMID:22652288

  9. Mechanics of Suture Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yaning; Song, Juha; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz group/DMSE/MIT Team; Boyce group/ME/MIT Team

    2011-03-01

    Biological sutures are joints which connect two stiff skeletal or skeletal-like components. These joints possess a wavy geometry with a thin organic layer providing adhesion. Examples of biological sutures include mammalian skulls, the pelvic assembly of the armored fish Gasterosteus aculeatus (the three-spined stickleback), and the suture joints in the shell of the red-eared slider turtle. Biological sutures allow for movement and compliance, control stress concentrations, transmit loads, reduce fatigue stress and absorb energy. In this investigation, the mechanics of the role of suture geometry in providing a naturally optimized joint is explored. In particular, analytical and numerical micromechanical models of the suture joint are constructed. The anisotropic mechanical stiffness and strength are studied as a function of suture wavelength, amplitude and the material properties of the skeletal and organic components, revealing key insights into the optimized nature of these ubiquitous natural joints.

  10. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  11. Joint cavity injection combined with manual reduction and stabilization splint treatment of anterior disc displacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junjie; Mu, Hong; Wang, Zhifeng; Lan, Jing; Zhang, Shizhou; Long, Xing; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of upper and lower joint cavity treatment (UJCT vs. LJCT) in patients with anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDw/oR) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Material and methods: A total of 56 patients with unilateral ADDw/oR were randomly divided into two groups: UJCT group and LJCT group. Manual reduction was done in all the patients after joint cavity rejection of sodium hyaluronate. Then, they were treated with stabilization splint for one or two months. At last, Friction index was calculated to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy at 6 to 12 months follow-up. Results: The maximal mouth-opening degrees in the both groups increased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01), and the Friction index decreased significantly when compared with pre-treatment group (P < 0.01); In LJCT group, the degrees of maximal mouth-opening increased significantly as compared to UJCT group (P < 0.05), and Friction index were also markedly lower than that in UJCT group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: In the patients with ADDw/oR of TMJ, the clinical efficacy of LJCT is superior to that of UJCT, especially in the TMJ pain relief, mouth-opening degree and mandibular movement improvement.

  12. Campylobacter Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasoo, Shawn; Schwab, Jeramy J.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Robinson, Trisha J.; Cass, Joseph R.; Berbari, Elie F.; Walker, Randall C.; Osmon, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    A 75-year-old man was diagnosed with probable Campylobacter jejuni prosthetic knee infection after a diarrheal illness. Joint aspirate and operative cultures were negative, but PCR of prosthesis sonicate fluid was positive, as was stool culture. Nineteen additional cases of Campylobacter prosthetic joint infection reported in the literature are reviewed. PMID:24523462

  13. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  14. Compound solder joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.; Simonson, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Joining technique prevents contamination, may be used to join dissimilar metal tubes, minimizes fluid and gas entrapment, expedites repairs, and can yield joints having leakage rates less than 0.000001 standard cubic cm He/min. Components of joint are solder sleeve, two solder rings, Teflon sleeve, and tubing to be joined.

  15. Dysregulation of the Autonomous Nervous System in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorder: A Pupillometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Mesin, Luca; Ciarrocchi, Irma; Sgolastra, Fabrizio; Pietropaoli, Davide

    2012-01-01

    The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) was recently investigated in Temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Several authors argue that in subjects with TMD there is a dysregulation of ANS. Recent literature support that Pupillometry is a simple non-invasive tool to study ANS. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between TMD and ANS activity using pupillometry recording in Infrared light at rest Mandible Position (RP); Infrared light at Forced Habitual Occlusion (FHO); Yellow-green light at RP; Yellow-green light at FHO. Forty female subjects were enrolled: 20 case patients showed TMD based on the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD, and 20 control patients, aged matched, had no signs or symptoms of TMD. Statistical analysis was performed on average pupil size. Ratio between pupil size in FHO and RP (FHO/RP ratio) and yellow-green and infrared (light/darkness ratio) lighting were carried out. Within group differences of pupil size and of “ratio” were analyzed using a paired t test, while differences of pupil size between groups were tested using an unpaired t test. Statistical comparisons between groups showed no significant differences of absolute values of pupil dimension in RP and FHO, both in yellow-green and in infrared lighting. In addition, there were no significant differences within groups comparing RP and FHO in yellow-green light. In within group comparison of pupil size, differences between RP and FHO were significant in infrared conditions. Control subjects increased, whereas TMD patients decreased pupil size at FHO in infrared lightening. FHO/RP ratio in darkness and light/darkness ratio in RP were significantly different between groups. Taken together, these data suggest that TMD subjects have an impairment of the sympathetic-adrenergic component of the ANS to be activated under stress. The present study provides preliminary pupillometric data confirming that adrenergic function is dysregulated in patients with TMD. PMID:23028999

  16. Orientation of craniofacial planes and temporomandibular disorder in young adults with normal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ciancaglini, R; Colombo-Bolla, G; Gherlone, E F; Radaelli, G

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between orientation of craniofacial planes relative to the true horizontal and temporomandibular disorder (TMD), in normal occlusion. Fourteen university dental students, with full natural dentition and bilateral Angle Class I occlusion, who exhibited signs and symptoms of TMD, were compared with 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Frontal and lateral photographs were taken in natural head position with the subject standing up, clenching a Fox plane and having a facial arch positioned. Photographs were examined by a standardized image analysis. Inter-pupillary axis, Frankfurt, occlusal and Camper planes were evaluated. In frontal view, the Frankfurt plane was right rotated relative to the true horizontal both in TMD subjects (P < 0.01) and controls (P < 0.05), but rotation was larger in TMD subjects (mean difference between groups, 1.1 degrees, 95% confidence interval, 95% CI, 0.2-2.0 degrees ). No significant deviation from the horizontal or difference between groups was observed for the interpupillary axis and occlusal plane. In lateral view, the Frankfurt plane was upward-orientated relative to the true horizontal in TMD group (mean angular deviation 2.8 degrees, 95% CI, 1.0-4.6 degrees ). The occlusal and Camper planes were downward-orientated in both groups (P < 0.0001), but inclination of occlusal plane tended to be smaller in TMD subjects (mean difference between groups, -3.8 degrees, 95% CI, -7.6-0.1 degrees ). Angles between any craniofacial planes did not significantly differ between groups. The findings show that in young adults with normal occlusion, a weak association exists between the orientation of craniofacial planes in natural head position and signs and symptoms of TMD. Furthermore, they suggest that, within this population, TMD might be mainly associated with head posture rather than with craniofacial morphology. PMID:12950968

  17. Anatomical changes within the medullary dorsal horn in chronic temporomandibular disorder pain.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, S L; Gustin, S M; Macey, P M; Peck, C C; Murray, G M; Henderson, L A

    2015-08-15

    Accumulated evidence from experimental animal models suggests that neuroplastic changes at the dorsal horn are critical for the maintenance of various chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. However, to date, no study has specifically investigated whether neuroplastic changes also occur at this level in humans. Using brain imaging techniques, we sought to determine whether anatomical changes were present in the medullary dorsal horn (spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis) in subjects with the chronic musculoskeletal pain. In twenty-two subjects with painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and forty pain-free controls voxel based morphometry of T1-weighted anatomical images and diffusion tensor images were used to assess regional grey matter volume and microstructural changes within the brainstem and, in addition, the integrity of ascending pain pathways. Voxel based morphometry revealed significant regional grey matter volume decreases in the medullary dorsal horn, in conjunction with alterations in diffusivity properties, namely an increase in mean diffusivity, in TMD subjects. Volumetric and mean diffusivity changes also occurred in TMD subjects in regions of the descending pain modulation system, including the midbrain periaqueductal grey matter and nucleus raphe magnus. Finally, tractography revealed altered diffusivity properties, namely decreased fractional anisotropy, in the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve, the spinal trigeminal tract and the ventral trigeminothalamic tracts of TMD subjects. These data reveal that chronic musculoskeletal pain in humans is associated with discrete alterations in the anatomy of the medullary dorsal horn, as well as its afferent and efferent projections. These neural changes may be critical for the maintenance of pathological pain. PMID:25979666

  18. Temporomandibular disorders and cutaneous allodynia are associated in individuals with migraine.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, D; Lipton, R B; Napchan, U; Grosberg, B; Ashina, S; Bigal, M E

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate and contrast the occurrence of ictal and interictal cutaneous allodynia (CA) in individuals with migraine with and without temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Both TMD and CA are common in migraine and may be associated with migraine transformation from episodic into a chronic form. Herein we hypothesize that TMD contributes to the development of CA and to more severe headaches. In a clinic-based sample of individuals with episodic migraine, the presence of TMD was assessed using the research diagnostic criteria for myofascial or mixed (myofascial and arthralgic) TMD. Ictal CA was quantified using the validated Allodynia Symptom Checklist (ASC-12). The ASC-12 measures CA over the preceding month by asking 12 questions about the frequency of allodynia symptoms during headaches. Interictal CA was assessed in the domains of heat, cold and mechanical static allodynia using quantitative sensory testing. Our sample consists of 55 individuals; 40 (73%) had TMD (23 with myofascial TMD and 17 with the mixed type). CA of any severity (as assessed by ASC-12) occurred in 40% of those without TMD (reference group), 86.9% of those with myofascial TMD (P = 0.041, RR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.5-7.0) and in 82.3% of those with mixed TMD (P = 0.02, RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2-5.3). Individuals with TMD were more likely to have moderate or severe CA associated with their headaches. Interictally (quantitative sensory testing), thresholds for heat and mechanical nociception were significantly lower in individuals with TMD. Cold nociceptive thresholds were not significantly different in migraine patients with and without TMD. TMDs were also associated with change in extra-cephalic pain thresholds. In logistical regression, TMD remained associated with CA after adjusting for aura, gender and age. TMD and CA are associated in individuals with migraine. PMID:19614688

  19. Somatosensory profiles in subgroups of patients with myogenic temporomandibular disorders and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Doreen B; Rolke, Roman; Nickel, Ralf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Daublaender, Monika

    2009-12-15

    Some patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) report pain in extra-trigeminal body regions. Our aim was to distinguish TMD as regional musculoskeletal pain syndrome (n=23) from a widespread pain syndrome (FMS; n=18) based on patients' tender point scores, pain drawings and quantitative sensory testing (QST) profiles. Referenced to 18 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects significant group differences for cold, pressure and pinprick pain thresholds, suprathreshold pinprick sensitivity and mechanical detection thresholds were found. Pain sensitivity in TMD patients ranged between those of FMS patients and healthy controls. The group of TMD patients was inhomogeneous with respect to their tender point count with an insensitive group (n=12) resembling healthy controls and a sensitive TMD group (n=9) resembling FMS patients. Nevertheless sensitive TMD patients did not fulfil diagnostic criteria for FMS in regard to widespread pain as shown by their pain drawings. TMD subgroups did not differ with respect to psychological parameters. The sensitive subgroup was more sensitive compared to healthy controls and to insensitive TMD patients in regard to their QST profile over all test areas as well as to their tenderness over orofacial muscles and trigeminal foramina. However, sensitive TMD patients had a short pain duration arguing against a transition from TMD to FMS over time. Data rather suggest an overlap in pathophysiology with FMS, e.g. a disturbance of central pain processing, in this subgroup of TMD patients. Those patients could be identified on the basis of their tender point count as an easy practicable screening tool. PMID:19767146

  20. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunovi?, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs. PMID:26040083

  1. Accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder in female community cases.

    PubMed

    Berni, Kelly Cristina Dos Santos; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) in the identification of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Two hundred and three female volunteers participated in this study, 117 with myogenous TMD and 86 without TMD. The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were first applied as the gold standard for the diagnosis. The volunteers then answered the 10 items on the FAI, which furnished a score ranging from 0 to 100 points. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) was used to determine the accuracy of the diagnosis (area under the curve) and the best cutoff point of the tool. Thus, FAI demonstrated a high degree of accuracy for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD (area under the ROC curve of 0.940). The best cutoff point was a score of 47.50. Thus, a score ranging from 0 to 45 points corresponds to the absence of myogenous TMD and scores ranging from 50 to 100 points identifies individuals with the disorder. In conclusion, the high degree of diagnostic accuracy demonstrates that the FAI can be employed for the identification of myogenous TMD in female community cases. PMID:26118509

  2. Accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis of the masticatory muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Packer, Amanda Carine; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; de Castro, Ester Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of two forms of infrared image analysis (area and extension) of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles in the diagnosis of myogenous temporomandibular disorder (TMD). A cross-sectional study was carried out involving 104 female volunteers from the university community. Following the application of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, the volunteers were divided into a TMD group (n = 52) and control group (n = 52), and evaluated using infrared thermography. The area and extension of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were measured on the images. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine diagnostic accuracy (area under the curve), best cutoff point, sensitivity and specificity. A significant difference in skin temperature between groups was only found in the measurement of the area of the left anterior temporalis muscle (p = 0.011). The area under the ROC curve was less than the reference values for all muscles evaluated in the analyses of area and extension. Thus, neither method of infrared thermography tested for the quantification of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles (analysis of area and extension) is consistent with the RDC/TMD for the diagnosis of myogenous TMD in women. PMID:24411149

  3. JOINT ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND

    E-print Network

    JOINT ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING AND PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM "Speckle Statistics, Coherence confirmation of the increase in the well- defined polarization state of the output radiation. In the joint

  4. Degenerative Diseases of the Spine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Stäbler

    \\u000a Degenerative diseases of the spine consist of various processes that depend on the anatomically involved portion. Thus, there\\u000a may be degeneration of the intervertebral disc and endplates or of the intervertebral joints. Activated intervertebral or\\u000a facet-joint osteoarthrosis may become symptomatic due to an increased stimulation of sensitive nerve endings by synovitis\\u000a and fibrovascular tissue. Facet joint osteoarthrosis can also be

  5. Compliant Joints For Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerley, James J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Compliant joints devised to accommodate misalignments of tools and/or workpieces with respect to robotic manipulators. Has characteristics and appearance of both universal-joint and cable-spring-type flexible shaft coupling. Compliance derived from elastic properties of short pieces of cable. Compliance of joint determined by lengths, distances between, relative orientations, thickness of strands, number of strands, material, amount of pretwist, and number of short pieces of cable. Worm-drive mechanism used to adjust lengths to vary compliance as needed during operation.

  6. Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panel Post & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie Bar, & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Tie Bar, & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Medora Bridge, Spanning East Fork of White River at State Route 235, Medora, Jackson County, IN

  7. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePLUS

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... result means no bacteria are present on the Gram stain. Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ... Abnormal results mean bacteria were seen on the Gram stain. This may be a sign of a ...

  8. Pushing the limit: masticatory stress and adaptive plasticity in mammalian craniomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Ravosa, Matthew J; Kunwar, Ravinder; Stock, Stuart R; Stack, M Sharon

    2007-02-01

    Excessive, repetitive and altered loading have been implicated in the initiation of a series of soft- and hard-tissue responses or ;functional adaptations' of masticatory and locomotor elements. Such adaptive plasticity in tissue types appears designed to maintain a sufficient safety factor, and thus the integrity of given element or system, for a predominant loading environment(s). Employing a mammalian species for which considerable in vivo data on masticatory behaviors are available, genetically similar domestic white rabbits were raised on diets of different mechanical properties so as to develop an experimental model of joint function in a normal range of physiological loads. These integrative experiments are used to unravel the dynamic inter-relationships among mechanical loading, tissue adaptive plasticity, norms of reaction and performance in two cranial joint systems: the mandibular symphysis and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Here, we argue that a critical component of current and future research on adaptive plasticity in the skull, and especially cranial joints, should employ a multifaceted characterization of a functional system, one that incorporates data on myriad tissues so as to evaluate the role of altered load versus differential tissue response on the anatomical, cellular and molecular processes that contribute to the strength of such composite structures. Our study also suggests that the short-term duration of earlier analyses of cranial joint tissues may offer a limited notion of the complex process of developmental plasticity, especially as it relates to the effects of long-term variation in mechanical loads, when a joint is increasingly characterized by adaptive and degradative changes in tissue structure and composition. Indeed, it is likely that a component of the adaptive increases in rabbit TMJ and symphyseal proportions and biomineralization represent a compensatory mechanism to cartilage degradation that serves to maintain the overall functional integrity of each joint system. Therefore, while variation in cranial joint anatomy and performance among sister taxa is, in part, an epiphenomenon of interspecific differences in diet-induced masticatory stresses characterizing the individual ontogenies of the members of a species, this behavioral signal may be increasingly mitigated in over-loaded and perhaps older organisms by the interplay between adaptive and degradative tissue responses. PMID:17267649

  9. Quantification of the Radiographic Joint Space Width of the Ankle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berna Goker; Emel Gonen; Mehmet D. Demirag; Joel A. Block

    2009-01-01

    Quantification of joint space width of the ankle could provide information essential to evaluate the effects of potential\\u000a disease-modifying agents and adverse effects of devices intended to ameliorate osteoarthritis elsewhere in the lower extremity.\\u000a Current methods require proprietary software or have not been well validated; our purpose was to develop and assess the reliability\\u000a of a digital joint space width

  10. [Perspectives of selective laboratory screening in children with joint pathology].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    The article highlights the problematic issues of the laboratory diagnostic possibilities in children with joint pathology with moden tests (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and antibodies to mutated citrullinated vimentin). The expediency and effectiveness of the proposed laboratory tests is justified for improvement of the early differential diagnosis, joint pathology treatment optimization, and discuss the prospect of selective laboratory screening in families burdened by rheumatic diseases genealogy. PMID:25796875

  11. Assessment of finger joint inflammation by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielscher, Andreas H.; Klose, Alexander D.; Scheel, Alexander K.; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe J.; Beuthan, Juergen

    2003-10-01

    Inflammatory processes as they occur during rheumatoid arthritis (RA) lead to changes in the optical properties of joint tissues and fluids. These changes occur early on in the disease process and can potentially be used as diagnostic parameter. In this work we report on in vivo studies involving 12 human subjects, which show the potential of diffuse optical tomographic techniques for the diagnosis of inflammatory processes in proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joints.

  12. THE PREVALENCE OF COMORBID SYMPTOMS OF CENTRAL SENSITIZATION SYNDROME AMONG THREE DIFFERENT GROUPS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Lorduy, Kara M.; Liegey-Dougall, Angela; Haggard, Robbie; Sanders, Celeste; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Symptoms of central sensitization syndrome (CSS) were evaluated among three different groups of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Additionally, TMD group differences in pain and pain-related disability were assessed, as well as emotional distress. Methods Participants were 250 patients with symptoms of acute TMD, recruited from dental clinics within a major metropolitan area. Sequential regressions and multivariate analyses of covariance were conducted in order to make group comparisons. Results Those with a TMD Muscle Disorder [i.e., myofacial TMD (m-TMD)] and those with more than one TMD diagnosis, had the most symptoms of CSS and higher reports of pain and pain-related disability. Moreover, emotional distress accounted for a substantial amount of the variance for physical symptoms and mediated all TMD comparisons. Conclusions Myofacial TMD is characterized by a high degree of comorbidity of symptoms of CSS and associated emotional distress. PMID:23336585

  13. A 17 year old with isolated proximal tibiofibular joint arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proximal tibiofibular joint (TFJ) is rarely affected in rheumatic diseases, and we frequently interpret pain of the lateral knee as the result of overuse or trauma. Nonetheless, the TFJ is a synovial joint that communicates with the tibiofemoral joint in a proportion of patients. While proximal TFJ arthritis has been rarely associated with existing spondyloarthritis, isolated TFJ arthritis as the presenting manifestation of spondyloarthritis has not yet been described. Here, we report the clinical and radiographic presentation of an adolescent with chronic proximal TFJ arthritis heralding spondyloarthritis highly suggestive of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:23302539

  14. A retrospective analysis of temporomandibular findings among Israeli-born patients based on the RDC/TMD.

    PubMed

    Winocur, E; Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Reiter, S; Eli, I

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate temporomandibular disorders (TMD) Axis I and II among Israeli-Jewish patients using the Hebrew version of the Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) for TMD and to compare the results with Swedish, United States, Asian and Israeli-Arab populations. The study consisted of 298 Israeli-born, Jewish patients (male/female ratio 3.5:1), arriving at an Orofacial Pain Clinic during the year 2001-2004. A complete clinical examination was carried out according to the RDC/TMD protocol. Axis I diagnoses: 65% of the Israeli-Jewish patients exhibited myofacial pain (Group I disorder), 38% disc displacement (Group II disorder) and 18% arthralgia, osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis (Group III disorder). Axis II diagnoses: 20% of the patients scored severe depression and 35% scored somatization. Pain was reported in 82% of the patients (mean pain duration 35.7-33.8 months for women, 44.1 for men). Patients had an average disability score of 30.0 +/- 30.2. Chronic pain grade IV was present in 4% of the patients. Israeli-Jewish temporomandibular disorder patients showed results similar to those reported for other countries, further supporting the use of the RDC/TMD internationally as a reliable epidemiological tool. Globally, Axis I scores were similar, while Axis II scores were more susceptible to geographic/ethnic differences. Gender can influence Axis I and Axis II as well as possible gender specific association with socio-economic status. In future comparisons, men and women should be considered separately. PMID:18976270

  15. New Joint Sealants. Criteria, Design and Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Contents include--(1) sealing concrete joints, (2) sealing glass and metal joints, (3) metal and glass joint sealants from a fabricator's viewpoint, (4) a theory of adhesion for joint sealants, (5) geometry of simple joint seals under strain, (6) joint sealant specifications from a manufacturer's viewpoint, (7) joint sealant requirements from an…

  16. Clinical Guidelines for the Antimicrobial Treatment of Bone and Joint Infections in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There are many various diseases in the bone and joint infections, and we tried to make antimicrobial treatment guidelines for common infectious diseases based on available data for microbiology and clinical trials. This guidelines focused on the treatment of osteomyelitis and septic arthritis, which can be experienced by physicians at diverse clinical settings. This guidelines is not applicable to diabetic foot infections, postoperative infections or post-traumatic infections which need special considerations. The guidelines for those conditions will be separately developed later. Surgical treatment of bone and joint infections, pediatric bone and joint infection, tuberculous bone and joint infection, and prophylactic antibiotic use were not included in this guideline. PMID:25024877

  17. Joint for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craighead, N. D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A joint is described for connecting a pair of beams to pivot them between positions in alignment or beside one another, which is of light weight and which operates in a controlled manner. The joint includes a pair of fittings and at least one center link having opposite ends pivotally connected to opposite fittings and having axes that pass through centerplates of the fittings. A control link having opposite ends pivotally connected to the different fittings controls their relative orientations, and a toggle assemly holds the fittings in the deployed configuration wherein they are aligned. The fittings have stops that lie on one side of the centerplane opposite the toggle assembly.

  18. [Morton's disease].

    PubMed

    Isomoto, Shinji; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-12-01

    Morton's disease refers to neuralgia at the web space of the toes with a pseudo-neuroma. It commonly occurs in the third web space of the foot in middle-aged and older women. The pseudo-neuroma is thought to be a secondary change after entrapment or repeated microtrauma. Patients complain of forefoot pain while walking. Typically, symptoms are caused by tight high-heeled shoes. The physical examination includes palpation of the web spaces and Mulder's test. Weight bearing foot radiographs are used to evaluate the deformity of the foot, especially at metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MRI is useful for differential diagnosis of pseudo-neuroma, MTP joint arthritis, and interdigital bursitis. Conservative treatments are shoe modification, use of orthotic insoles, and injection of corticosteroids and local anesthesia. The injections are useful not only for the treatment but also for diagnosis of Morton's disease. If the local injection is not temporally effective, surgical treatment is not indicated. If the conservative treatment fails, surgical treatment is indicated. The most common surgery is excision of the pseudo-neuroma. The surgery is usually performed using a dorsal approach. PMID:25475032

  19. Vibration disease.

    PubMed

    Kákosy, T

    1989-04-01

    Today, in this age of technology, vibration caused by machinery is an almost universal hazard. Vibration transferred from a machine to the human body may cause discomfort, a reduction of performance, and even injury. Vibratory manual tools may cause damage to the circulatory system of the upper extremities (Raynaud's syndrome), to the peripheral nerves (peripheral neuropathy), and to the bones and joints (aseptic necrosis, fatigue fractures, degenerative joint disease). Vehicles and machines causing floor vibration cause degenerative disc disease of the lumbar spine. The pathogenesis of vibration injuries is still not completely clear and there is no effective treatment. Some of the abnormalities are irreversible and may cause permanent decrease of working ability, and even unemployment. This is why prevention is so important. Prevention is complex, including technical and organizational measures, use of individual protective clothing and footwear, and medical supervision both before and during employment. Workers who are exposed to vibration should be protected against other aggravating factors such as cold and noise, etc. Vibration-induced injuries are recognized in law in many countries as grounds for financial compensation. Their cost to industry is rising and, unless a means of prevention or cure is found, will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. PMID:2661029

  20. Joints in a Cornstarch Analog

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Juliet Crider

    Joints are very important to problems in applied geology (fluid flow, slope stability), but three-dimensional exposures of simple joint sets are not readily accessible from my campus. I developed this exercise based on the experiments of Miller (2001) to give students hands-on practice describing and interpreting joints. For the exercise, I prepare a cornstarch-water mixture a few days in advance and pour it into plastic petri dishes. I add a "flaw" to each dish (typically a small pebble). As the cornstarch dries, vertical joints develop. In class, each group of 3-4 students is provided a petri dish of desiccated cornstarch. Students are asked to draw a map of the joints, paying particular attention to intersection angles. (The joints curve to intersect at 90 degrees.) They determine relative ages of the joints using abutting relationships. (Typically 3-6 generations of joints.) Students next dissect the sample and describe the surface textures of the larger joints and the location of the flaw. The cornstarch produces beautiful plumose structure (hackles). Students then interpret the joint propagation direction from the surface textures, and note the origin of the joint. (Typically, a first- or second-generation joint initiates at the flaw.) Students discuss the role of flaws in the initiation of joints in their groups.

  1. Biochemical markers of ongoing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis - current and future applications, limitations and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease associated with potentially debilitating joint inflammation, as well as altered skeletal bone metabolism and co-morbid conditions. Early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to control disease activity offers the highest likelihood of preserving function and preventing disability. Joint inflammation is characterized by synovitis, osteitis, and/or peri-articular osteopenia, often accompanied by development of subchondral bone erosions, as well as progressive joint space narrowing. Biochemical markers of joint cartilage and bone degradation may enable timely detection and assessment of ongoing joint damage, and their use in facilitating treatment strategies is under investigation. Early detection of joint damage may be assisted by the characterization of biochemical markers that identify patients whose joint damage is progressing rapidly and who are thus most in need of aggressive treatment, and that, alone or in combination, identify those individuals who are likely to respond best to a potential treatment, both in terms of limiting joint damage and relieving symptoms. The aims of this review are to describe currently available biochemical markers of joint metabolism in relation to the pathobiology of joint damage and systemic bone loss in RA; to assess the limitations of, and need for additional, novel biochemical markers in RA and other rheumatic diseases, and the strategies used for assay development; and to examine the feasibility of advancement of personalized health care using biochemical markers to select therapeutic agents to which a patient is most likely to respond. PMID:21539724

  2. Effect of mandibular mobilization on electromyographic signals in muscles of mastication and static balance in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The stomatognathic system and dysfunction in this system may be related to postural control. The proposal of the present study is to assess the effect of mandibular mobilization in individuals with temporomandibular disorder using surface electromyography of the muscles of mastication and stabilometric variables. Methods/Design A randomized, controlled, blind, clinical trial will be carried out, with the participants divided into three groups: 1) facial massage therapy (control group), 2) nonspecific mandibular mobilization and 3) specific mandibular mobilization. All groups will be assessed before and after treatment using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, surface electromyography of the masseter and temporal muscles and stabilometry. This study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials (RBR9x8ssz). Discussion A large number of studies have employed surface electromyography to investigate the function/dysfunction of the muscles of mastication and associations with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. However, it has not yet been determined whether stabilometric variables offer adequate reliability in patients with this disorder. The results of the proposed study will help determine whether specific and/or nonspecific mandibular mobilization exerts an effect on the muscles of mastication and postural control. Moreover, if an effect is detected, the methodology defined in the proposed study will allow identifying whether the effect is local (found only in the muscles of mastication), global (found only in postural control) or generalized. PMID:24083628

  3. Clad metal joint closure

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, O.W.

    1985-04-09

    A plasma arc spray overlay of cladding metals is used over joints between clad metal pieces to provide a continuous cladding metal surface. The technique permits applying an overlay of a high melting point cladding metal to a cladding metal surface without excessive heating of the backing metal.

  4. CARTILAGE, BONES, AND JOINTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cartilage is a special type of connective tissue that is of extreme importance in embryonic development, serving as the model upon which true bone is later formed. Cartilage also persists in adult animals, primarily as articular cartilage which cushions the interface between adjacent bones or joint...

  5. Joint publication: Department of

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    century. The first law to protect consumers was passed in 1906, and Charles Dadant is credited with getJoint publication: Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services University of Florida Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services 1911 SW 34 Street PO Box 147100 Gainesville, FL

  6. Dolphin Skeleton (Gliding Joint)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; )

    2007-07-14

    The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward.

  7. Joint Honours AFRICAN STUDIES

    E-print Network

    Miall, Chris

    : The Joint Honours African Studies degree programme at Birmingham is broad, combining arts and social Office - Retail management - Aid work with Save the Children - Probation work - Welfare rights worker - Computer programmer - NGO work in Kurdistan - Work with adults who have learning disabilities - Research

  8. Joint Institute Marine and Atmospheric

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research NATIONALOCEA NIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Contribution 00-328 #12;ii This research is funded by Cooperative Agreement Number NA67RJ0154 between the Joint

  9. Cellular Pressure-Actuated Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, John R.

    2003-01-01

    A modification of a pressure-actuated joint has been proposed to improve its pressure actuation in such a manner as to reduce the potential for leakage of the pressurizing fluid. The specific joint for which the modification is proposed is a field joint in a reusable solid-fuel rocket motor (RSRM), in which the pressurizing fluid is a mixture of hot combustion gases. The proposed modification could also be applicable to other pressure-actuated joints of similar configuration.

  10. Phase 1 Program Joint Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nield, George C. (Editor); Vorobiev, Pavel Mikhailovich (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This report consists of inputs from each of the Phase I Program Joint Working Groups. The Working Groups were tasked to describe the organizational structure and work processes that they used during the program, joint accomplishments, lessons learned, and applications to the International Space Station Program. This report is a top-level joint reference document that contains information of interest to both countries.

  11. Joint Communiqu Progress against the

    E-print Network

    1 Joint Communiqué Progress against the Joint Statement of Cooperation between Kalimantan Timur the Joint Statement of Cooperation of 16 September 2010 designed to develop closer ties between Kalimantan the following areas: Livestock Following the 2010 Livestock Workshop held in Balikpapan, a Kalimantan Timur

  12. Joint Seminar UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

    E-print Network

    Wang, Lily

    Joint Seminar UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS DEPARTMENT OF EPIDEMIOLOGY longitudinal covariates are involved in the modeling of the survival data. A joint likelihood approach has been data. However, in the presence of left truncation, there are additional challenges for the joint

  13. JOINT PERFORMANCE Guide for Optimum

    E-print Network

    July 2012 JOINT PERFORMANCE Guide for Optimum of Concrete Pavements #12; #12;Guide for Optimum Joint Performance of Concrete Pavements i Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2. Report Date Guide for Optimum Joint Performance of Concrete Pavements July 2012 6. Performing

  14. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint...data collection, and ratemaking. Franchising authorities jointly certified to regulate...independent rate decisions. (b) Franchising authorities may apply for joint...

  15. 47 CFR 76.912 - Joint certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...912 Joint certification. (a) Franchising authorities may apply for joint...data collection, and ratemaking. Franchising authorities jointly certified to regulate...independent rate decisions. (b) Franchising authorities may apply for joint...

  16. Joint Degrees & Promotion towards European Students

    E-print Network

    Di Pillo, Gianni

    Joint Degrees & Promotion towards European Students 26 June 2014 MATTEA CAPELLI & ALESSANDRA GALLERANO INTERNATIONAL OFFICE #12;Joint Degrees and Promotion towards European students Joint degrees guidelines and template for agreements Support to student participation Promotion of Joint Degrees towards

  17. Mild to Moderate Hip OA: Joint Preservation or Total Hip Arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher L

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of structural hip disease such as FAI and acetabular dysplasia has increased dramatically over the past decade with the goal of preservation of the native hip joint. A number of patient and disease specific parameters including the amount of underlying hip osteoarthrosis can help predict success with joint preservation surgery. Total hip arthroplasty remains a very good option in young patients who are not ideal candidates for joint preservation surgery. Future developments will help to better identify ideal surgical candidates and improve understanding of the disease processes. PMID:25842248

  18. A comparison of radiographic, arthroscopic and histological measures of articular pathology in the canine elbow joint.

    PubMed

    Goldhammer, Marc A; Smith, Sionagh H; Fitzpatrick, Noel; Clements, Dylan N

    2010-10-01

    Validation of radiographic and arthroscopic scoring of joint pathology requires their comparison with histological measures of disease from the same joint. Fragmentation of the medial coronoid process (FMCP) is a naturally occurring disease of the canine elbow joint that results in osteoarthritis, and the objectives of this study were to compare the severity of histopathological changes in the medial coronoid process (MCP) and medial articular synovial membrane with gross radiographic scoring of elbow joint osteophytosis and the arthroscopic assessment of the MCP articular cartilage surface. Radiographic scoring of osteophytosis and the arthroscopic scoring of visual cartilage pathology of the MCP correlated moderately well with the histopathological evaluation of cartilage damage on the MCP and synovial inflammation in the medial part of the joint, but not with bone pathology in the MCP. Marked cartilage pathology on the MCP was identified in joints with either no radiographic evidence of osteophytosis or with mild cartilage damage that was evident arthroscopically. PMID:19716324

  19. Joint scintigraphy using technetium-99m pyrophosphate in experimental hemarthrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Salimi, Z.; Vas, W.; Restrepo, G.

    1986-02-01

    To determine the validity of a method for induction of experimental hemarthrosis in dogs and for the nuclear imaging of hemarthrosis, serial technetium-99m pyrophosphate ((/sup 99m/Tc)PYP) flow and blood-pool scans were performed monthly in eight dogs who received bi-weekly injections of autologous blood into their femoro-tibial joints (also called stifle joint). In four control dogs, one joint was injected with saline while the other joint received only a sham injection. In addition, two dogs received intra-articular injections of autologous blood into their right stifle joint and saline into their left stifle joint. These dogs were studied with /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4/ joint scintigraphy at monthly intervals. The dogs were periodically taken out of the study and explored surgically. Pathologic examination of synovial tissue was performed. Serial radiographs were also obtained and correlated with the scan and surgical findings. There was a striking abnormal increase in blood-pool activity of (/sup 99m/Tc)PYP in the treated stifle joints, commencing at the first examination after 1 mo of blood injections and continuing for the length of the study. All radiographs showed only minimal joint space widening and some soft-tissue swelling. On pathologic examination, both grossly and microscopically, there was profuse pannus formation, with intense inflammatory infiltrate replacing much of the subsynovial fat. The scintigraphic findings correlated well with these pathologic findings. This study not only validates this method for simulating hemophilic hemarthrosis but also suggests that (/sup 99m/Tc)PYP joint scintigraphy is a simple, and noninvasive method for monitoring the early changes in hemophilic arthropathy and is superior to pertechnetate imaging for this disease process.

  20. Relapsing Polychondritis: Inflamed Joints and Ears

    PubMed Central

    Meliko?lu, Meltem Alkan; ?enel, Kaz?m

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapsing polychondritis (RP) is an episodic and progressive inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous structures, including elastic cartilage of the ear and nose, hyaline cartilage of the peripheral joints, fibrocartilage at axial sites, and cartilage of the tracheo-bronchial tree. The spectrum of its presentations may vary from intermittent mild episodes of chondritis to occasional organ involvement or even life-threatening manifestations. Case Report: We presented a 64 year-old male patient with bilaterally knee arthritis and discoloration of pinna. Conclusion: There is lack of awareness about this disease due to its rarity. With this case presentation, our goal was to draw attention to this disease, which could be delayed for the diagnosis. PMID:25759785

  1. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure.

  2. Achieving joint benefits from joint implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Moomaw, W.R. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Joint Implementation (JI) appears to have been born with Applied Energy Services Guatemala project in 1988. That project, to plant 52 million trees, protect existing forests from cutting and fire, and enhance rural development, is being implemented by CARE Guatemala to offset 120 per cent of the emissions of a small coal burning power plant that has been built in Connecticut. Since that time, several utilities and governments have initiated additional projects. Not all of these necessarily consist of tree planting in other countries, but may consist of energy efficiency or energy conservation programs designed to reduce carbon emissions by at least as much as the additional releases from a new facility. All JI projects share the characteristic of linking the release of greenhouse gases in an industrial country with an offset that reduces or absorbs a comparable amount in another country. The emitter in the industrial country is willing to pay for the reduction elsewhere because costs are less than they would be at home.

  3. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  4. Collective and joint intention

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raimo Tuomela; Joint Intentions

    2000-01-01

    The paper discussed and analyzes collective and joint intentions of various strength. Thus there are subjectively shared collective\\u000a intentions and intersubjectively shared collective intentions as well as collective intentions which are objectively and intersubjectively\\u000a shared. The distinction between collective and private intentions is considered from several points of view. Especially, it\\u000a is emphasized that collective intentions in the full sense

  5. [Congenital vascular malformations (Hauert disease)].

    PubMed

    Hauert, J; Loose, D A; Dreyer, T; Obermayer, B; Deibele, A

    2012-06-01

    Patients with congenital vascular malformations often suffer from arthralgia, especially of the lower limbs. This orthopaedic disease pattern is defined as destructive, angiodysplatic arthritis or Hauert disease and leads to very early destruction of the joints. By presenting diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms, Hauert disease is emphasized as a possible differential diagnosis in order to minimize the risk of an incorrect diagnosis which might lead to under-, over-, or even incorrect treatment. A minimally invasive transathroscopic therapy in the early stages can lead to significant improvement of symptoms and prevention of progressive joint destruction. PMID:22699760

  6. Joint measurements and Bell inequalities

    E-print Network

    Wonmin Son; Erika Andersson; Stephem M. Barnett; M. S. Kim

    2005-09-20

    Joint quantum measurements of non-commuting observables are possible, if one accepts an increase in the measured variances. A necessary condition for a joint measurement to be possible is that a joint probability distribution exists for the measurement. This fact suggests that there may be a link with Bell inequalities, as these will be satisfied if and only if a joint probability distribution for all involved observables exists. We investigate the connections between Bell inequalities and conditions for joint quantum measurements to be possible. Mermin's inequality for the three-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state turns out to be equivalent to the condition for a joint measurement on two out of the three quantum systems to exist. Gisin's Bell inequality for three co-planar measurement directions, meanwhile, is shown to be less strict than the condition for the corresponding joint measurement.

  7. Registration of knee joint surfaces for the in vivo study of joint injuries based on magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Rita W. T.; Habib, Ayman F.; Frayne, Richard; Ronsky, Janet L.

    2006-03-01

    In-vivo quantitative assessments of joint conditions and health status can help to increase understanding of the pathology of osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects a large population each year. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a non-invasive and accurate means to assess and monitor joint properties, and has become widely used for diagnosis and biomechanics studies. Quantitative analyses and comparisons of MR datasets require accurate alignment of anatomical structures, thus image registration becomes a necessary procedure for these applications. This research focuses on developing a registration technique for MR knee joint surfaces to allow quantitative study of joint injuries and health status. It introduces a novel idea of translating techniques originally developed for geographic data in the field of photogrammetry and remote sensing to register 3D MR data. The proposed algorithm works with surfaces that are represented by randomly distributed points with no requirement of known correspondences. The algorithm performs matching locally by identifying corresponding surface elements, and solves for the transformation parameters relating the surfaces by minimizing normal distances between them. This technique was used in three applications to: 1) register temporal MR data to verify the feasibility of the algorithm to help monitor diseases, 2) quantify patellar movement with respect to the femur based on the transformation parameters, and 3) quantify changes in contact area locations between the patellar and femoral cartilage at different knee flexion angles. The results indicate accurate registration and the proposed algorithm can be applied for in-vivo study of joint injuries with MRI.

  8. [The value of mandibular kinesiography and of T-scanning in the diagnosis and treatment of algo-dysfunctional syndrome of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Combadazou, J C; Combelles, R; Cadenat, H

    1990-01-01

    The application of T-Scan and kinesiographic techniques in combination with electromyography is of great value to the clinician for substantiating certain clinically hard-to-evidence factors, such as chronology and strength of contact points, muscular activity, or certain mandibular movements. The utilisation of these methods is of benefit for diagnosis, treatment and objective patient follow-up. PMID:2309097

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Group Organisms in Human and Mouse Joint Tissue by Reverse Transcriptase PCR: Prevalence in Diseased Synovial Tissue Suggests Lack of Specific Association with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; McColm, Andrew A.; Bagshaw, Julie A.; Reece, Richard; Veale, Douglas J.; Emery, Paul; Isaacs, John D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2001-01-01

    Infection with mycobacterial species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has long been implicated in the etiopathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on the basis of clinical and pathological similarities between tuberculosis and RA. Despite evidence of immune responses to mycobacterial antigens in RA patient synovial fluid, cross-reactivity between these and host joint antigens, and the presence of M. tuberculosis protein antigen in RA synovial fluid, a definite causal association with RA has not been shown. Previous studies from our laboratory using reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) of bacterial rRNAs have shown RA synovium to be colonized by a diverse range of bacteria, most of commensal origin. However, M. tuberculosis group organism (MTG) RNA sequences were found in one RA patient tissue. Since this was considered of sufficient interest to warrant further investigation, we devised a M. tuberculosis-specific nested RT-PCR test which could be used for detection of MTG in a mixed pool of bacterial crDNAs. This test was used to investigate the distribution of MTG in RA synovial tissue and also non-RA arthritis and healthy control tissues and was also used to examine the tissue distribution of MTG in an acute and chronic model of M. tuberculosis infection in the BALB/c mouse. MTG sequences were found in a high proportion of RA patient synovial tissues but also in non-RA arthritis control tissues at lower frequency. This likely reflects trafficking of persistent M. bovis BCG to inflamed joint tissue, irrespective of cause. MTG were not found in healthy synovial tissue or the tissue of patients with undifferentiated arthritis. In both the acute and chronic models of infection in BALB/c mice, M. tuberculosis was also found to have trafficked to joint tissues, however, no signs of inflammation, arthritis, or pathology associated with M. tuberculosis infection was seen. These combined results would argue against a specific causal role of MTG in RA-like arthritis; however, their role as adjuvant in immune dysfunction in an innately susceptible host cannot be excluded. PMID:11179360

  10. The ratio of circulating osteoprotegerin to RANKL in early rheumatoid arthritis predicts later joint destruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. P. Geusens; R. B. M. Landewé; P. Garnero; D. Chen; C. R. Dunstan; W. F. Lems; P. Stinissen; D. M. F. M. van der Heijde; S. van der Linden; M. Boers

    2006-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that may result in debilitating joint deformities with destruction of bone and cartilage. Inflammation is still considered the pivotal inducer of both components of joint damage. Results of recent animal studies suggested a prominent contribution of osteoclastic bone resorption that could be dissociated from inflammation. RANKL and its natural decoy re-

  11. Contact stresses in the knee joint in deep flexion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashvin Thambyah; James C. H. Goh; Shamal Das De

    2005-01-01

    The contact stresses in the knee that arise from activities involving deep flexion have not been given due consideration in view of social and cultural practice amongst many Asians that frequently cause the engagement of these activities. Excessively large stresses (>25MPa) can cause cartilage damage and may be the precursor to the development of degenerative disease of the joint. In

  12. [A woman with recurrent urticaria, joint pain and fever].

    PubMed

    Gran, Jan Tore; Midtvedt, Øyvind; Haug, Sidsel

    2011-01-21

    A middle-aged woman suffered from chronic recurrent urticarial rash and fever. After 13 years of skin disease, she developed monoclonal IgM gammopathy, myalgia and joint pain. She was diagnosed with Schnitzler's syndrome and successfully treated with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. PMID:21267032

  13. Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetics Nematollah K. Batmanghelich1

    E-print Network

    Golland, Polina

    Joint Modeling of Imaging and Genetics Nematollah K. Batmanghelich1 , Adrian V. Dalca1 , Mert R,adalca,msabuncu,polina}@csail.mit.edu Abstract. We propose a unified Bayesian framework for detecting genetic variants associated with a disease while exploiting image-based features as an intermediate phenotype. Traditionally, imaging genetics

  14. Orthopedic Health: Healthy Joints for a Lifetime / Keep Your Moving Parts Moving

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Healthy Joints for a Lifetime Past Issues / ... being made every day in the world of orthopedic health and disease treatment —our bones, muscles, tendons, ...

  15. On representations for joint moments using a joint coordinate system.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Oliver M; Sena, Mark P; Feeley, Brian T; Lotz, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-01

    In studies of the biomechanics of joints, the representation of moments using the joint coordinate system has been discussed by several authors. The primary purpose of this technical brief is to emphasize that there are two distinct, albeit related, representations for moment vectors using the joint coordinate system. These distinct representations are illuminated by exploring connections between the Euler and dual Euler bases, the "nonorthogonal projections" presented in a recent paper by Desroches et al. (2010, "Expression of Joint Moment in the Joint Coordinate System," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132(11), p. 11450) and seminal works by Grood and Suntay (Grood and Suntay, 1983, "A Joint Coordinate System for the Clinical Description of Three-Dimensional Motions: Application to the Knee," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 105(2), pp. 136-144) and Fujie et al. (1996, "Forces and Moment in Six-DOF at the Human Knee Joint: Mathematical Description for Control," Journal of Biomechanics, 29(12), pp. 1577-1585) on the knee joint. It is also shown how the representation using the dual Euler basis leads to straightforward definition of joint stiffnesses. PMID:24008987

  16. Capsaicin-induced joint inflammation is not blocked by local anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Michelle L. Y.; Haas, Daniel A.; Hu, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of local anesthetic blockade of afferent innervation on the development of capsaicin-induced edema in the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region and on reflex jaw muscle activity. Under halothane anesthesia, 64 male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared for monitoring of edema development by lateral movement of a needle overlying the left TMJ region and for acute recording of electromyographic activity in ipsilateral digastric and masseter muscles. A double-barrel catheter was inserted into the TMJ region for delivery of saline or 0.5% bupivacaine from 1 needle, followed with the injection of 1% capsaicin, 0.1% capsaicin, or vehicle control from the other needle 5 minutes later. Application of capsaicin into the saline pretreated TMJ region led to dose-dependent edema development and reflex jaw muscle activity; however, only 1% capsaicin solution resulted in significant tissue expansion and muscle activity when compared with the vehicle control. Pretreatment of the rat TMJ region with bupivacaine failed to inhibit capsaicin-induced edema development, although successful blockade of nerve conduction was confirmed with the absence of reflex jaw muscle activity. Capsaicin-induced edema of the rat TMJ region developed independent of axonal conduction, suggesting neurogenic inflammation may arise regardless of functional nerve conduction. PMID:15106683

  17. Joint bone radiobiology workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, P.A. (ed.)

    1991-01-01

    The Joint Bone Radiobiology Workshop was held on July 12--13, 1991 in Toronto, Canada. This document contains the papers presented at the meeting. The five sections were: Dose-effects, Endogenous Cofactors, Tumorigenesis, New Methods and Medical Implications. The papers covered risk assessment, tissue distribution of radionuclides, lifetime studies, biological half-lifes, the influence of age at time of exposure, tumor induction by different radionuclides, microscopic localization of radionuclides, and nuclear medicine issues including tissue distribution in the skeleton and bone marrow transplantation. (MHB)

  18. Patellofemoral Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stalker, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Knee pain is a common presenting complaint by athletes and the general population. Disorders of the patellofemoral joint are responsible for most of these disorders. Abnormal patellar tracking is thought to be the principal cause. Patellar tracking is influenced by a number of dynamic and static factors. These can be assessed with a careful history and physical examination. A treatment program can be designed to alter the precipitating factors. Lower-extremity malalignment, principally hyperpronation of the foot, is believed to be a major cause of abnormal patellar tracking. Conservative treatment programs have had successful results, and less emphasis is now being placed on surgical procedures. PMID:21263850

  19. Bladder operated robotic joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Glen A. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a robotic joint which is operated by inflatable bladders and which can be used in applications where it is desired to move or hold an object. A support block supports an elongated plate to which is pivotally attached a finger. A tension strip passes over a lever attached to the finger and is attached at its ends to the support block on opposite sides of the plate. Bladders positioned between the plate and the tension strip on opposite sides of the plate can be inflated by pumps to pivot the finger, with one of the bladders being inflated while the other is being deflated.

  20. Metal to ceramic sealed joint

    DOEpatents

    Lasecki, John V. (Livonia, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI); McBride, James R. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1991-01-01

    A metal to ceramic sealed joint which can withstand wide variations in temperature and maintain a good seal is provided for use in a device adapted to withstand thermal cycling from about 20 to about 1000 degrees C. The sealed joint includes a metal member, a ceramic member having an end portion, and an active metal braze forming a joint to seal the metal member to the ceramic member. The joint is positioned remote from the end portion of the ceramic member to avoid stresses at the ends or edges of the ceramic member. The sealed joint is particularly suited for use to form sealed metal to ceramic joints in a thermoelectric generator such as a sodium heat engine where a solid ceramic electrolyte is joined to metal parts in the system.

  1. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  2. Use of the Occivator for the correction of forward head posture, and the implications for temporomandibular disorders: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Catherine; Makofsky, Howard W; Britt, Christina; Adomsky, Barbara; Deshler, Jennifer Matire; Ramirez, Paula; Douris, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Numerous studies suggest that temporomandibular disorders may be associated with forward head posture. The current study presents a need for an intervention that will effectively facilitate an ideal postural alignment of the head. The Occivator (Posteocentric Systems, Mastic Beach, NY) is an intervention speculated to improve forward head posture (FHP). However there has not been a randomized study to correlate use of the Occivator with improvement of FHP. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Occivator as a therapeutic intervention for the correction of FHP. Using a plumb line, twenty-nine (29) subjects were selected on the basis of having FHP. The CROM (cervical range of motion) device was used to determine measurement of forward head position for each group, pre and post an eight week period. The experimental group followed a specific protocol of 20 minutes of stretches and exercises on the Occivator, two times a week for eight weeks. The control group did not receive any intervention. The experimental group as compared to the control group, demonstrated significant improvement for forward head posture (p = .02). Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Occivator. PMID:18468273

  3. Clinical study on the comparison of masticatory efficiency and jaw movement before and after temporomandibular disorder treatment.

    PubMed

    Kümbülo?lu, Ovül; Saracoglu, Ahmet; Bingöl, Pinar; Hatipo?lu, Anil; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-07-01

    In this clinical study, pre- and post-rehabilitation changes in intraborder mandible movements, chewing cycles, masticatory efficiencies, and borders of the chewing area of patients with unilateral muscular disorders (MD) (n = 20) or unilateral disc derangement disorders (DDD) (n = 20) of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were observed and compared with healthy individuals with full dentition (n = 20) (48 female, 12 male; mean age: 28). The MD patients received stabilization splints and the DDD patients, anterior positioning splints for six weeks. Symptoms, such as muscle pain, TMJ pain, headache, chewing difficulty, and maximum mouth opening, showed significant improvements after splint therapy for both MD (p = 0.000) and DDD (p = 0.000) patients, but lateral excursion and protrusion were not significantly changed (p > 0.05). Chewing efficacy and chewing cycles improved significantly (p < 0.05) in both the MD (p < 0.05) and DDD (p < 0.05) groups, but only the MD group was comparable to the control group after treatment. Pre- and post-rehabilitation chewing cycles along the frontal plane on both sides in the MD group were similar to the control group. Considering the majority of the improvements in the diagnostic measures, patients with MD and DDD may benefit from occlusal splint therapy. PMID:23971160

  4. Jaw Dysfunction Is Associated with Neck Disability and Muscle Tenderness in Subjects with and without Chronic Temporomandibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, A.; Gadotti, I. C.; Armijo-Olivo, S.; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D. A.; Magee, D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Tender points in the neck are common in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with TMD still needs further investigation. This study investigated the correlation among neck disability, jaw dysfunction, and muscle tenderness in subjects with and without chronic TMD. Participants. Forty females between 19 and 49 years old were included in this study. There were 20 healthy controls and 20 subjects who had chronic TMD and neck disability. Methods. Subjects completed the neck disability index and the limitations of daily functions in TMD questionnaires. Tenderness of the masticatory and cervical muscles was measured using an algometer. Results. The correlation between jaw disability and neck disability was significantly high (r = 0.915, P < 0.05). The correlation between level of muscle tenderness in the masticatory and cervical muscles with jaw dysfunction and neck disability showed fair to moderate correlations (r = 0.32–0.65). Conclusion. High levels of muscle tenderness in upper trapezius and temporalis muscles correlated with high levels of jaw and neck dysfunction. Moreover, high levels of neck disability correlated with high levels of jaw disability. These findings emphasize the importance of considering the neck and its structures when evaluating and treating patients with TMD. PMID:25883963

  5. Pharmacogenetics: implications for therapy in rheumatic diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lesley Davila; Prabha Ranganathan

    2011-01-01

    DMARDs not only improve the joint pain and swelling associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but also slow down the joint damage associated with the disease. The efficacy of biologic therapies, introduced in the past decade for the treatment of RA, has been unequivocally established. Similarly, in addition to traditional drugs such as hydroxychloroquine, new biologic agents such as rituximab have

  6. OIG targets contractual joint ventures.

    PubMed

    O'Hare, Patrick K

    2003-09-01

    A recent OIG Special Advisory Bulletin raises questions for providers involved in joint ventures. The Bulletin describes several characteristics that the OIG views as potentially suspect, including a referral stream controlled by the provider initiating the joint venture and the use of a wholly owned subsidiary of the provider to bill and collect for services. According to the OIG, profits paid by the subsidiary to the provider owner in such "suspect contractual joint ventures" could constitute illegal remuneration for referrals. PMID:14503145

  7. Joint custody: solution or illusion?

    PubMed

    Benedek, E P; Benedek, R S

    1979-12-01

    Although the phrase "joint custody" is in popular use, the concept lacks standard definitin; parents who express interest in this form of disposition have widely differing objectives and expectations. The authors discuss the need for determining the primary objectives of the parties involved and for exploring the potential for achieving these through joint custody as well as through other alternatives. They examine the benefits of joint custody as well as the risks engendered by this type of arrangement and make a number of specific recommendations. They conclude that joint custody should be considered and explored, together with other available alternatives, and awarded only in appropriate cases. PMID:507203

  8. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints 

    E-print Network

    Pendelton, Alice Mae

    2009-05-15

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. ...

  9. Metacarpophalangeal joint arthroscopy: indications revisited.

    PubMed

    Choi, Alexander K Y; Chow, Esther C S; Ho, P C; Chow, Y Y

    2011-08-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has become the gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of major joint disorders. With advancement in arthroscopic technique, arthroscopy has become feasible in most human joints, even those as small as the finger joints. The metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ) can become spacious with simple traction, the intra-articular anatomy is simple, and its major structures can be easily visualized and identified. However, MCPJ arthroscopy has never been popular. This article describes our experience with MCPJ arthroscopy and seeks to establish its role in clinical practice. PMID:21871361

  10. Rotary Joint for Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shauback, R.

    1986-01-01

    Rotary joint exchanges heat between two heat pipes - one rotating and one stationary. Joint accommodates varying heat loads with little temperature drop across interface. According to concept, heat pipe enters center of disklike stationary section of joint. There, wicks in central artery of heat pipe separate into multiple strands that lead to concentric channels on rotaryinterface side of stationary disk. Thin layer of liquid sodium/potassium alloy carries heat from one member of rotary joint to other. Liquid conducts heat efficiently while permitting relative motion between members. Polypropylene rings contain liquid without interfering with rotation.

  11. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  12. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  13. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  14. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    Preventing venous thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2011. Harkess JW, Crockarell JR. Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ...

  15. Plasminogen Is a Joint-Specific Positive or Negative Determinant of Arthritis Pathogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Harini; Jone, Alice; Cruz, Carolina; Rewerts, Cheryl L.; Frederick, Malinda D.; Thornton, Sherry; Degen, Jay L.; Flick, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective A fundamental metric in the diagnosis of arthropathies is the pattern of joint involvement, including differences in proximal versus distal joints and patterns of symmetric or asymmetric disease. The basis for joint selectivity among arthritides and/or within a defined disease such as rheumatoid arthritis remains enigmatic. Coagulation and fibrinolytic activity are observed in both experimental animals with inflammatory joint disease and patients with inflammatory arthritis. However, the contribution of specific hemostatic factors to joint disease is not fully defined. We sought to determine the contribution of the fibrinolytic protease, plasminogen, to tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?)–driven arthritis in distinct joints in mice. Methods The impact of plasminogen and/or fibrinogen genetic deficiencies on arthritis progression was evaluated in Tg197 mice genetically predisposed to spontaneous, nonabating, and erosive polyarthritis due to exuberant human TNF? expression. Results Elimination of plasminogen in Tg197 mice significantly exacerbated the incidence and severity of arthritis within the paw joints, but simultaneously and dramatically diminished the entire spectrum of pathologies within the knee joints of the same animals. These opposing outcomes were both mechanistically linked to fibrin(ogen), in that superimposing fibrinogen deficiency reversed both the proarthritic phenotype in the paws and arthritis resistance in the knees of plasminogen-deficient mice. Intriguingly, the change in disease severity in the knees, but not the paws, was associated with a plasminogen-dependent reduction in matrix metalloproteinase 9 activity. Conclusion Plasminogen is a key molecular determinant of inflammatory joint disease capable of simultaneously driving or ameliorating arthritis pathogenesis in distinct anatomic locations in the same subject. PMID:24574269

  16. Rheumatological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Paraskevi V.

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and include peripheral arthritis, axial involvement and peripheral enthesitis. Secondary osteoporosis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy may also occur. Complications of IBD (e.g. septic arthritis) must be distinguished from sterile inflammation. Adverse effects of corticosteroid treatment, such as osteonecrosis, may also affect joints. Axial involvement ranges from low back pain to true ankylosing spondylitis. Human leukocyte antigen B27 is associated with axial involvement of IBD. Peripheral arthritis has been classified into two types. Type I is a pauciarticular, asymmetric usually non destructive arthritis affecting large joints and is usually associated with active bowel disease. Type II is a polyarthritis affecting small joints and tends to run a course independent of the bowel disease. Treatment of joint symptoms in IBD include sulphasalazine, azathioprine, methotrexate and glucocorticoids. Anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies are effective in treating resistant or complicated Crohn’s disease as well as peripheral arthritis and axial involvement. PMID:24713717

  17. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drinks. My children had fifth disease about 3 weeks ago and now my joints are sore. I ... watch for possible pregnancy complications. I am 14 weeks pregnant and testing showed that I recently had ...

  18. Diagnostic and operative arthroscopy of the coxofemoral joint in horses.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A J

    1994-01-01

    Arthroscopic examination of the hip joint was performed in mature and juvenile horses, using a lateral approach and standard or long instruments depending on body weight. Nine hip joints were examined in three cadavers and four anesthetized horses. The lateral, cranial, and caudal regions of the femoral head and acetabulum were accessible, and, after distraction of the limb, the ligament of the head of the femur and the acetabular notch were also visible. In small horses, the medial regions of the hip joint were visible but were inaccessible in larger horses. Iatrogenic injury to the sciatic nerve or periarticular vasculature was not evident at necropsy examination. Six horses with lameness localized to the hip joint were examined arthroscopically. At surgery, two horses had tearing of the ligament of the head of the femur, two horses had osteochondrosis of the femoral head or acetabulum, and two horses had degenerative joint disease, one associated with a rim fracture of the caudal aspect of the acetabulum and the other of indeterminant origin. Improvement after debridement occurred in one of the horses with partial disruption of the ligament of the head of the femur and in both horses with osteochondrosis. Diagnostic and surgical arthroscopy of the hip can be accomplished in foals and weanlings using standard equipment, but, in adults weighing more than 300 kg, longer instruments are required and the ease of access and the visible extent of the hip joint is considerably reduced. PMID:7839596

  19. Association between friction and wear in diarthrodial joints lacking lubricin

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Gregory D; Torres, Jahn R; Rhee, David K; Helminen, Heikki J; Hytinnen, Mika M; Cha, Chung-Ja; Elsaid, Khaled; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Cui, Yajun; Warman, Matthew L

    2007-01-01

    Objective The glycoprotein lubricin (encoded by the gene Prg4) is secreted by surface chondrocytes and synovial cells, and has been shown to reduce friction in vitro. In contrast to man-made bearings, mammalian diarthrodial joints must endogenously produce friction-reducing agents. This study was undertaken to investigate whether friction is associated with wear. Methods The lubricating ability of synovial fluid (SF) samples from humans with genetic lubricin deficiency was tested in vitro. The coefficient of friction in the knee joints of normal and lubricin-null mice was measured ex vivo; these joints were also studied by light and electron microscopy. Atomic force microscopy was used to image and measure how lubricin reduces friction in vitro. Results SF lacking lubricin failed to reduce friction in the boundary mode. Joints of lubricin-null mice showed early wear and higher friction than joints from their wild-type counterparts. Lubricin self-organized and reduced the work of adhesion between apposing asperities. Conclusion These data show that friction is coupled with wear at the cartilage surface in vivo. They imply that acquired lubricin degradation occurring in inflammatory joint diseases predisposes the cartilage to damage. Lastly, they suggest that lubricin, or similar biomolecules, will have applications in man-made devices in which reducing friction is essential. PMID:17968947

  20. Active joints for microrobot limbs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Elwenspoek; L. Smith; B. Hok

    1992-01-01

    In this contribution we propose an electrostatic actuator for active joints. The active joint consists of two plates, one of which is a bilayer and bent by the bimorph effect. The plates are clamped to each other at one edge. A voltage between the plates leads to a very large field at the clamp where the plates are in intimate

  1. Joint strength in RCS frames 

    E-print Network

    Kirby, Cynthia Dawn

    1998-01-01

    for the addition of a RC slab, cover plates, and band plates. Results indicated that the addition of a reinforced concrete slab compositely connected to the steel beams framing into a typical RCS joints as defined by the ASCE guidelines (1994), improved the joint...

  2. Robotic joint experiments under ultravacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borrien, A.; Petitjean, L.

    1988-01-01

    First, various aspects of a robotic joint development program, including gearbox technology, electromechanical components, lubrication, and test results, are discussed. Secondly, a test prototype of the joint allowing simulation of robotic arm dynamic effects is presented. This prototype is tested under vacuum with different types of motors and sensors to characterize the functional parameters: angular position error, mechanical backlash, gearbox efficiency, and lifetime.

  3. International Joint Commission

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The International Joint Commission was created by Canada and the United States "because they recognized that each country is affected by the other's actions in lake and river systems along the border. The two countries cooperate to manage these waters wisely and to protect them for the benefit of today's citizens and future generations." Visitors to the site can read about great lakes water quality issues, great lakes exports, water levels, news releases, publications, view maps, and much more. One of the latest publications available on the site includes the proceeding from a workshop entitled Addressing Atmospheric Mercury: Science and Policy. This extensive site is well organized and written, giving anyone living near or interested in the great lakes a good source for timely and important information.

  4. Smart material joint band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucchio, Michael A.; Stoodt, Robert A.; Livsey, Robert A.

    1993-12-01

    The present invention relates to an improved connector for joining two tubular members together. The connector is formed by a plurality of longitudinally extending fingers extending from an end of one of the tubular members and at least one locking groove in the other of the tubular members for receiving the fingers. The connector further includes a circumferentially extending wire member which is received in a notch in a head portion of each of the plurality of fingers. The wire member is preferably formed from a shape memory alloy and has an original circumference less than the circumference of a circle formed by the notches in the head portions of the fingers. The connector includes apertures through which electric wires may be connected to the shape memory alloy ring member so as to cause the shape memory alloy ring member to return to its original shape and allow release of the joint connection.

  5. Smart material joint band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucchio, Michael A.; Stoodt, Robert A.; Livsey, Robert A.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention relates to an improved connector for joining two tubular members together. The connector is formed by a plurality of longitudinally extending fingers extending from an end of one of tubular members and at least one locking groove in the other of the tubular members for receiving the fingers. The connector further includes a circumferentially extending wire member which is received in a notch in a head portion of each of the plurality of fingers. The wire member is preferably formed from a shape memory alloy and has an original circumference less than the circumference of a circle formed by the notches in a head portions of the fingers. The connector includes apertures through which electric wires may be connected to the shape memory alloy ring member so as to cause the shape memory alloy ring member to return to its original shape and allow release of the joint connection.

  6. Localized pigmented villonodular synovitis of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jae Ho; Han, Jae Hwi; Almeida, Vivian Rd'; Kim, Seong Hyun; Park, Hai Jin; Nha, Kyung-Wook

    2014-12-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare disease. It is a benign neoplastic process typically affecting young to middle-aged adults and most commonly involving the knee, hip, and shoulder joints. The symptoms include diffuse pain and swelling with discomfort. We report a rare case of localized PVNS originating at the proximal tibiofibular joint in a 39-year-old female patient with radiologic changes for short duration of time. The clinical history, plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and pathologic findings of the reported patient were reviewed. Complete surgical excision was performed and there was no evidence of recurrence after one-year follow-up. PMID:25505708

  7. [Periprosthetic joint infections: a practical overview for family physicians].

    PubMed

    Eyer, M; Sendi, P

    2014-10-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a rare but serious complication. Its management requires the collaboration between general practitioner, orthopaedic surgeon and infectious disease specialist. A delay in the diagnosis can result in complications, requiring complex surgical procedures. Identification of the causative pathogen and its susceptibility pattern is crucial, because it guides both the choice of antimicrobial treatment and the surgical strategy. Antimicrobial treatment without proper micro- biological sampling must be avoided. Swabs from open wounds are not helpful, because microorganisms belonging to the skin flora will grow. The target audience of this review article on periprosthetic joint infections is the general practitioner. PMID:25417357

  8. Method of forming a joint

    DOEpatents

    Butt, Darryl Paul; Cutler, Raymond Ashton; Rynders, Steven Walton; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2006-08-22

    A method of joining at least two sintered bodies to form a composite structure, including providing a first multicomponent metallic oxide having a perovskitic or fluorite crystal structure; providing a second sintered body including a second multicomponent metallic oxide having a crystal structure of the same type as the first; and providing at an interface a joint material containing at least one metal oxide containing at least one metal identically contained in at least one of the first and second multicomponent metallic oxides. The joint material is free of cations of Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P and Te and has a melting point below the sintering temperatures of both sintered bodies. The joint material is heated to a temperature above the melting point of the metal oxide(s) and below the sintering temperatures of the sintered bodies to form the joint. Structures containing such joints are also disclosed.

  9. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107...REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or...

  10. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  11. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  12. 29 CFR 791.2 - Joint employment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint employment. 791.2 Section 791...INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS JOINT EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP UNDER FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 § 791.2 Joint employment. (a) A single...

  13. [Diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis in the shoulder joint and the biceps tendon: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sipahio?lu, Serkan; Zehir, Sinan; A?kar, Hüseyin; Ozkanli, U?ur

    2011-12-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign proliferative disease of synovium frequently most frequently seen in the knee joint and hand tendon synovial tissues; shoulder involvement is extremely rare. It can be seen in joints in two forms as nodular or diffuse involvement. The clinical and radiological symptoms are not specific to the disease and usually mimic other joint diseases. The general complaint of the patients is long-lasting painful swelling that could not be diagnosed. In magnetic resonance imaging it is observed as soft tissue mass. Pigment deposition and histiocytic cell infiltration in the villous synovial projections are the major histological findings. Synovectomy is performed for treatment and the incidence of recurrence is high. In this article, we report a 23-years-old male patient with diffuse PVNS in the shoulder joint and biceps tendon which are rarely involved in PVNS. PMID:22085354

  14. Development of cryogenic rotatable heat transfer joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadunas, J. A.; Backovsky, Z. F.; Wilson, D. E.

    1992-07-01

    A summary of cryogenic rotatable heat transfer joint technology development, at Rockwell International Space Division, is presented. Starting with the flight qualified radiative joint on the RM-20B IR sensor of the early 70's, leading to rotatable heat pipe joint, gas conductive joints, rolling-contact-conductance joints, and the more recent work on development and evaluation of cryogenic rotatable seals and mechanical interfaces. Potential applications, joint design optimization, heat transfer, seal leakage and torque test data are presented.

  15. Momentary Pain and Coping in Temporomandibular Disorder Pain: Exploring Mechanisms of Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Shafer, David M.; Ibanez, Carlos R.; Kreutzer, Donald L.; Tawfik-Yonkers, Zeena

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) operates by effecting changes in cognitions, affects, and coping behaviors in the context of painful episodes. Patients were 54 men and women with temporomandibular dysfunction-related orofacial pain (TMD) enrolled in a study of brief (6 weeks) standard conservative treatment (STD) or standard treatment plus CBT (STD+CBT). Momentary affects, pain, and coping processes were recorded on a cellphone keypad four times per day for seven days prior to treatment, and for 14 days after treatment had finished, in an experience sampling paradigm. Analyses indicated no treatment effects on general retrospective measures of pain, depression, or pain-related interference with lifestyle at posttreatment. However, mixed model analyses on momentary pain and coping recorded pre- and posttreatment indicated that STD+CBT patients reported greater decreases in pain than did STD patients, significantly greater increases in the use of active cognitive and behavioral coping, and significantly decreased catastrophization. Analyses of experience sampling data indicated that posttreatment momentary pain was negatively predicted by concurrent active coping, self-efficacy, perceived control over pain, and positive-high arousal affect. Concurrent catastrophization was strongly predictive of pain. Active behavioral coping and self-efficacy reported at the prior time point (about 3 hours previously) were also protective, while prior catastrophization and negative-high arousal mood were predictive of momentary pain. The results suggest that CB treatment for TMD pain can help patients alter their coping behaviors, and that these changes translate into improved outcomes. PMID:19553018

  16. Influence of Psychosocial Factors and Habitual Behavior in Temporomandibular Disorder–Related Symptoms in a Working Population in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Akira; Kino, Koji; Sugisaki, Masashi; Tsukagoshi, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    Background: The symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are directly influenced by numerous factors, and it is thought that additional factors exert indirect influences. However, the relationships between TMD-related symptoms (TRS) and these contributing factors are largely unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate influences on TRS in a working population by determining the prevalence of TRS, analyzing contributing factors, and determining their relative influences on TRS. Materials and Methods: The study subjects were 2203 adults who worked for a single company. Subjects completed a questionnaire assessing TRS, psychosocial factors (stress, anxiety, depressed mood, and chronic fatigue), tooth-contacting habit, and sleep bruxism-related morning symptoms, using a 5-point numeric rating scale. Our analysis proceeded in 2 phases. First, all variables of the descriptor were divided into parts by using an exploratory factor analysis. Second, this factorial structure was verified by using a confirmatory factor analysis with structural equation modeling. Results: Of 2203 employees, 362 reported experiencing TRS (16.4%). Structural equation modeling generated a final model with a goodness of fit index of 0.991, an adjusted goodness of fit index of 0.984, and a root mean square error of approximately 0.021. These indices indicate a strong structural model. The standardized path coefficients for “habitual behavioral factors and TRS,” “psychosocial factors and habitual behavioral factors,” “psychosocial factors and TRS,” and “gender and habitual behavior factors” were 0.48, 0.38, 0.14, and 0.18, respectively. Conclusions: Habitual behavioral factors exert a stronger effect on TRS than do psychosocial factors. PMID:23346261

  17. Joint numerical ranges, quantum maps, and joint numerical shadows

    E-print Network

    Eugene Gutkin; Karol Zyczkowski

    2012-10-12

    We associate with k hermitian N\\times N matrices a probability measure on R^k. It is supported on the joint numerical range of the k-tuple of matrices. We call this measure the joint numerical shadow of these matrices. Let k=2. A pair of hermitian N\\times N matrices defines a complex N\\times N matrix. The joint numerical range and the joint numerical shadow of the pair of hermitian matrices coincide with the numerical range and the numerical shadow, respectively, of this complex matrix. We study relationships between the dynamics of quantum maps on the set of quantum states, on one hand, and the numerical ranges, on the other hand. In particular, we show that under the identity resolution assumption on Kraus operators defining the quantum map, the dynamics shrinks numerical ranges.

  18. Models for jointed rock structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuze, F. E.; Barbour, T. G.

    1981-03-01

    Models for axisymmetric interfaces found in shaft and footing designs, and for the dilatant effects of rock joints, as encountered in underground caverns and reinforced rock slopes are presented. The models were incorporated into a finite element program, and test case analyses were performed. Use of the models can lead to safer estimates of footing settlements and shaft lining stresses, as well as to more economical design of rock reinforcement. Because the dilatant joint provides a refined estimate of joint opening and closing, it can be applied to the analysis of hard rock hydraulics, in which the flow is very sensitive to fracture aperture.

  19. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  20. Joint services electronics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Leon, Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The report represents the fifteenth annual summary of The Ohio State University Joint Services Electronics Program (JSEP). The transfer of the compact range identification technology initiated under JSEP support for time domain studies continues to make large advances. We are also assisting Rockwell (Tulsa) to update their RCS facilities. This work is on a subcontract to the ESL from the Air Force. This has lead to involvement in the study of Ultra Wide Band radar systems. The research activities devoted to the Generalized Ray and Gaussian Beams continues. Our JSEP research continues to be expanded by external funding. This program is being expanded by use of such funds which are more focussed on the requirements of the sponsors which includes both the Air Force and the Navy. Our JSEP research continues to focus on electromagnetic related topics. There are four major electromagnetics areas that were pursued in the past year. The Diffraction Studies Work Unit has initiated research on a time domain version of the Uniform Theory of Diffraction. A second topic under the Diffraction Studies Work Unit involves further extensions of the generalized resistive boundary condition and the generalized impedance boundary condition. These have been applied to scattering from a chiral slab. A third topic of interest is the diffraction from a corner. A fourth task involves the reflection/diffraction of a Gaussian beam. This represents an approach to replace the usual ray optics solution for very complex geometries where the versatile ray optics solution becomes cumbersome.

  1. Proprioceptive impairments associated with knee osteoarthritis are not generalized to the ankle and elbow joints.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Camille J; Wrigley, Tim V; Farrell, Michael J; Bennell, Kim L; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    The mechanisms for proprioceptive changes associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain elusive. Observations of proprioceptive changes in both affected knees and other joints imply more generalized mechanisms for proprioceptive impairment. However, evidence for a generalized effect remains controversial. This study examined whether joint repositioning proprioceptive deficits are localized to the diseased joint (knee) or generalized across other joints (elbow and ankle) in people with knee OA. Thirty individuals with right knee OA (17 female, 66±7 [mean±SD] years) of moderate/severe radiographic disease severity and 30 healthy asymptomatic controls of comparable age (17 female, 65±8years) performed active joint repositioning tests of the knee, ankle and elbow in randomised order in supine. Participants with knee OA had a larger relative error for joint repositioning of the knee than the controls (OA: 2.7±2.1°, control: 1.6±1.7°, p=.03). Relative error did not differ between groups for the ankle (OA: 2.2±2.5°, control: 1.9±1.3°, p=.50) or elbow (OA: 2.5±3.3°, control: 2.9±2.8°, p=.58). These results are consistent with a mechanism for proprioceptive change that is localized to the knee joint. This could be mediated by problems with mechanoreceptors, processing/relay of somatosensory input to higher centers, or joint-specific interference with cognitive processes by pain. PMID:25796008

  2. Osteochondral Lesions of Major Joints

    PubMed Central

    Durur-Subasi, Irmak; Durur-Karakaya, Afak; Yildirim, Omer Selim

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides information about osteochondral lesions (OCL) and example cases of OCL occurring in major joints, some of which are rarely seen. This simple tutorial is presented in question and answer format. PMID:26180500

  3. MISR JOINT_AS Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-21

    ... reported on various geographic grids depending on the data product. Parameters from multiple orbits are combined to make complete ... The Joint Aerosol product provides a monthly global statistical summary of MISR Level 2 aerosol optical depth retrievals on a 5 ...

  4. The complexity of joint computation

    E-print Network

    Drucker, Andrew Donald

    2012-01-01

    Joint computation is the ubiquitous scenario in which a computer is presented with not one, but many computational tasks to perform. A fundamental question arises: when can we cleverly combine computations, to perform them ...

  5. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, J. Acacio

    2012-12-01

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  6. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Acacio de Barros, J. [Liberal Studies, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2012-12-18

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  7. Blood-Induced Joint Damage

    PubMed Central

    Roosendaal, Goris; Jansen, Nathalie W.D.; Lafeber, Floris P.J.G.; Mastbergen, Simon C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Four days of blood exposure leads to irreversible cartilage damage in vitro. In contrast, intermittent intra-articular blood injections twice a week during 4 weeks (mimicking micro-bleeds) in a canine model resulted in transient damage only. In this study, it was evaluated whether acute joint bleeds are more harmful than micro-bleeds in a canine model of knee arthropathy. Design: Seven dogs received 4 sequential daily intra-articular blood injections twice in 2 weeks (mimicking 2 acute 4-day joint bleeds). Seven other dogs received the same blood load but in a total of 8 injections intermittently over the 4-week period with at least 1 day in between (mimicking micro-bleeds over the same timespan). Contralateral knees served as controls. Ten weeks after the last injection cartilage matrix turnover and synovial inflammation were evaluated. Results: Only after the acute joint bleeds the release of newly formed and total (resident) cartilage matrix glycosaminoglycans were increased (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, in animals with the acute joint bleeds cartilage glycosaminoglycan content was decreased (P = 0.01) and not in animals with micro-bleeds. Mild synovial inflammation was observed in both groups (both P < 0.0001) but was not different between groups. Conclusions: In contrast to micro-bleeds, 2 acute joint bleeds lead to prolonged cartilage damage independent of the level of synovial inflammation. This model suggests that micro-bleeds are less devastating than acute joint bleeds with respect to joint damage, which might be of relevance to treatment of joint bleeds in clinical practice.

  8. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    E-print Network

    de Barros, J Acacio

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantum-like response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  9. Arthrosonography of hip and knee joints in the follow up of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Frosch, M; Foell, D; Ganser, G; Roth, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Twenty eight patients with JRA with active disease at entry in 15 hips and 38 knee joints were followed up three times in intervals of 4–6 weeks. Sonographic, clinical, and laboratory findings were documented at the same time in clinically active and inactive disease. As controls of the sonographic variables 10 children without a history of arthritis were examined by ultrasound. Results: In active arthritis of the hip joint 19/31 (61%) examinations showed a pathological widening of the synovial joint space. There was no significant correlation between sonographic and clinical measures of disease activity in coxitis. Marked effusion within the suprapatellar pouch was seen in 87% and thickening of the synovial membrane in 92% of cases of active gonarthritis in patients with JRA. There was a significant difference in the number of patients with joint effusion and in the mean joint effusion between patients with clinically active gonarthritis at entry and inactive arthritis at follow up (p<0.001). In contrast, synovial thickening persisted in about 80% after induction of clinical remission. Conclusion: The data confirm the high sensitivity of arthrosonography in imaging changes in hip and knee joints of patients with JRA. Sonographic effusion of the knee provided the highest correlation with measures of clinical disease activity. Further prospective studies should evaluate whether persistent thickening of the synovial membrane detected by ultrasound in clinically inactive arthritis indicates residual inflammatory activity and an increased risk of relapse. PMID:12594110

  10. Future trends in the use of X-ray fluoroscopy for the measurement and modelling of joint motion.

    PubMed

    Ackland, D C; Keynejad, F; Pandy, M G

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of three-dimensional skeletal kinematics during functional activities such as walking, is required for accurate modelling of joint motion and loading, and is important in identifying the effects of injury and disease. For example, accurate measurement of joint kinematics is essential in understanding the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis and its symptoms and for developing strategies to alleviate joint pain. Bi-plane X-ray fluoroscopy has the capacity to accurately and non-invasively measure human joint motion in vivo. Joint kinematics obtained using bi-plane X-ray fluoroscopy will aid in the development of more complex musculoskeletal models, which may be used to assess joint function and disease and plan surgical interventions and post-operative rehabilitation strategies. At present, however, commercial C-arm systems constrain the motion of the subject within the imaging field of view, thus precluding recording of motions such as overground gait. These fluoroscopy systems also operate at low frame rates and therefore cannot accurately capture high-speed joint motion during tasks such as running and throwing. In the future, bi-plane fluoroscopy systems may include computer-controlled tracking for the measurement of joint kinematics over entire cycles of overground gait without constraining motion of the subject. High-speed cameras will facilitate measurement of high-impulse joint motions, and computationally efficient pose-estimation software may provide a fast and fully automated process for quantification of natural joint motion. PMID:22320053

  11. 5, 163185, 2008 Joint effect of the

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigated. Joint effect of the WPWP and EPWP on ENSO was examined based on a joint effect index, which by the WPWP and EPWP on ENSO, and the joint effect of both warm pools must be considered. A joint index of 1 global climate abnormity and serious drought or flood, and cold calamity in many regions of the world

  12. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction: complications and innovations.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C; Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Minimally invasive anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular joint is a technically challenging procedure. The repair must be sufficiently strong and reconstitute the joint as closely as possible. This includes restoration of both superior-inferior stability, and the often overlooked anterior-posterior stability, of the acromioclavicular joint. There is no gold standard treatment for acromioclavicular joint separation. PMID:25953219

  13. Young Children's Understanding of Joint Commitments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grafenhain, Maria; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    When adults make a joint commitment to act together, they feel an obligation to their partner. In 2 studies, the authors investigated whether young children also understand joint commitments to act together. In the first study, when an adult orchestrated with the child a joint commitment to play a game together and then broke off from their joint

  14. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture...VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by...

  15. Joint Press Release TWELFTH ITER NEGOTIATION MEETING

    E-print Network

    Joint Press Release TWELFTH ITER NEGOTIATION MEETING Jeju, Korea, 6 December th 2005 Delegations on an Agreement on the joint implementation of the ITER international fusion energy project. This was the first/6/05 1:21 PMDraft Joint News Release Page 1 of 2http://www.iter.org/N_12_Joint_Press_Release.htm #12

  16. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture...VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by...

  17. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture...VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by...

  18. 7 CFR 97.14 - Joint applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint applicants. 97.14 Section 97.14 Agriculture...VARIETY AND PROTECTION The Application § 97.14 Joint applicants. (a) Joint owners shall file a joint application by...

  19. Tissue-engineered Neogenesis of Human-shaped Mandibular Condyle from Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Alhadlaq; J. J. Mao

    2003-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint is susceptible to diseases and trauma that may ultimately lead to structural degeneration. Current approaches for replacing degenerated mandibular condyles suffer from deficiencies such as donor site morbidity, immunorejection, implant wear and tear, and pathogen transmission. The hypothesis of this study was that a human-shaped mandibular condyle can be tissue-engineered from rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) encapsulated

  20. Combined use of chondroitinase-ABC, TGF-b1, and collagen crosslinking agent lysyl oxidase to engineer functional neotissues for

    E-print Network

    Athanasiou, Kyriacos

    tissues, such as the knee menisci, intervertebral discs, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs, tendons, and ligaments, lack an intrinsic ability to self-repair following disease- or injury-induced degradation solution for acute fibrocartilage injuries and chronic degenerative pathologies [5]. Toward engineering