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Sample records for tendon tears comparison

  1. Following rotator cuff tears, the remaining (intact) tendons are mechanically altered

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Stephanie M.; Getz, Charles L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Although presumed, damage in the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons in the presence of an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear or multiple tendon tear has not been well studied. This study utilized an animal model of multiple rotator cuff tendon tears to investigate alterations in the remaining (intact) tendon mechanical properties at 4 and 8 weeks post-injury. Twenty-four animals served as uninjured controls, while seventy-two were divided among the tendon detachment groups (supraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+infraspinatus tendon detachment, supraspinatus+subscapularis tendon detachment). We found the remaining (intact) rotator cuff tendons have decreased mechanical properties in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Remaining (intact) subscapularis and infraspinatus tendon cross-sectional area increased, while tendon modulus decreased after both one and two tendon tears. Additionally, the remaining (intact) tendon cross-sectional areas continued to increase with time post-injury. These alterations could potentially lead to further tendon damage and tear progression. PMID:19095175

  2. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Andrew DJ; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George AC

    2015-01-01

    Background Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Methods Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Results Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Conclusions Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs. PMID:27582997

  3. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture

    PubMed Central

    Gilmer, Brian B.; Crall, Timothy S.; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  4. Knotless Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tears Using Looped Suture.

    PubMed

    Gilmer, Brian B; Crall, Timothy S; Guttmann, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Subscapularis tendon tears present a technical challenge because both diagnosis and arthroscopic treatment can be difficult. One difficulty is the limited visualization and working space of the anterior shoulder. Although most tears of the subscapularis are partial- or full-thickness tears of the upper third of the tendon, occasionally, larger or more retracted tears are encountered. Various techniques have been developed to treat a wide variety of tear patterns. We present a simple technique using a looped suture that remains easy to use in the limited working space of the anterior shoulder; can be easily modified to accommodate a broad spectrum of subscapularis pathology, from partial to full and retracted tears; and uses familiar viewing and working portals. This technique creates a single-row, knotless repair. Traction on the superior suture improves visualization and ease of passing more inferior sutures. Risks include unintentional over-tensioning of the repair and medialization of the femoral footprint, which can be avoided with appropriate exposure and arm positioning during repair. Postoperative care includes restriction of external rotation for 3 to 6 weeks and strengthening at 3 months. PMID:26258042

  5. Interstitial Tear of the Subscapularis Tendon, Arthroscopic Findings and Technique of Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Tears of the subscapularis tendon have been significantly recognized as a source of shoulder pain and dysfunction in the past decade, thanks to arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder and biomechanical and anatomical studies of the tendon. Current classification of subscapularis tendon tear is based on insertion site of the tendon. Recently, a classification for non-insertional types of subscapularis tendon tear has been published. Interstitial tear of subscapularis tendon has not been described in classifications available in the literature. This report describes significant interstitial tear of the subscapularis tendon. This tear looks normal in superior, bursal and articular sides. Then its specific arthroscopic findings as “Air bag sign” and repair technique of the pathology is explained. PMID:27200399

  6. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  7. Medial Biceps Sling Takedown May Be Necessary to Expose an Occult Subscapularis Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Robert U.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    With a systematic approach to diagnosis, including a thorough history, physical examination, advanced imaging, and arthroscopic evaluation, most subscapularis tendon tears may be readily discovered. Occult tears, on the other hand, may escape arthroscopic detection if a high index of suspicion and certain intraoperative examination steps are lacking. We describe an occult tear pattern in which a subscapularis tendon tear was completely hidden by an intact medial biceps tendon sling. Takedown of the sling, which was expendable because a tenodesis was planned, was required to expose this occult tear. Awareness of occult subscapularis tear patterns makes diagnosis and repair possible. PMID:25685681

  8. Medial biceps sling takedown may be necessary to expose an occult subscapularis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Robert U; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2014-12-01

    With a systematic approach to diagnosis, including a thorough history, physical examination, advanced imaging, and arthroscopic evaluation, most subscapularis tendon tears may be readily discovered. Occult tears, on the other hand, may escape arthroscopic detection if a high index of suspicion and certain intraoperative examination steps are lacking. We describe an occult tear pattern in which a subscapularis tendon tear was completely hidden by an intact medial biceps tendon sling. Takedown of the sling, which was expendable because a tenodesis was planned, was required to expose this occult tear. Awareness of occult subscapularis tear patterns makes diagnosis and repair possible. PMID:25685681

  9. Peroneal tendon tears, surgical management and its complications.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Rebecca A; Myerson, Mark S

    2009-06-01

    Peroneal tendon injuries in the athlete are recognized with increasing frequency as a pathologic entity. Once considered uncommon, they have been attributed to many cases of persistent lateral ankle symptoms after a "typical" ankle sprain. Acute tears of the peroneus brevis, and less commonly the peroneus longus, have been implicated in sport activities and are often coexistent with peroneal instability. Subluxation typically occurs when the foot is in a dorsiflexed position and the peroneal muscles strongly contract, causing an eversion force simultaneously. Peroneal instability, as well as tearing, has been linked to ballet dancing, skiing, soccer, tennis, American football, running, basketball, and ice skating. This article discusses the mechanism of injury, methods of patient evaluation and management, complications, and outcomes. PMID:19501808

  10. Latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive, irreparable posterosuperior rotator cuff tears: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Rabah; Romine, Lucas; Yao, David C; Duncan, Scott F M

    2014-09-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears remain a complex and challenging problem for both the patient and the surgeon. Although significant advancements in surgical techniques as well as technology for arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repairs have been made, many massive tears result in failed repair with continued progressive tendon retraction and degeneration. In cases when primary tendon to bone healing is impractical, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer provides promising and reproducible clinical results. Herein, we present a latissimus tendon transfer surgical technique, a procedure we have used as a salvage operation for failed arthroscopic/mini-open primary rotator cuff repair. PMID:24854152

  11. Exogenous collagen cross-linking recovers tendon functional integrity in an experimental model of partial tear.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Wernli, Jeremy; Li, Yufei; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous collagen cross-linking can augment intact regions of tendon to mitigate mechanical propagation of partial tears. We first screened the low toxicity collagen cross-linkers genipin, methylglyoxal and ultra-violet (UV) light for their ability to augment tendon stiffness and failure load in rat tail tendon fascicles (RTTF). We then investigated cross-linking effects in load bearing equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFT). Data indicated that all three cross-linking agents augmented RTTF mechanical properties but reduced native viscoelasticity. In contrast to effects observed in fascicles, methylglyoxal treatment of SDFT detrimentally affected tendon mechanical integrity, and in the case of UV did not alter tendon mechanics. As in the RTTF experiments, genipin cross-linking of SDFT resulted in increased stiffness, higher failure loads and reduced viscoelasticity. Based on this result we assessed the efficacy of genipin in arresting tendon tear propagation in cyclic loading to failure. Genipin cross-linking secondary to a mid-substance biopsy-punch significantly reduced tissue strains, increased elastic modulus and increased resistance to fatigue failure. We conclude that genipin cross-linking of injured tendons holds potential for arresting tendon tear progression, and that implications of the treatment on matrix remodeling in living tendons should now be investigated. PMID:22102295

  12. Identification of suitable reference genes for gene expression studies in tendons from patients with rotator cuff tear.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Cohen, Carina; Loyola, Leonor Casilla; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Smith, Marília Cardoso; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tear is one of the most common causes of shoulder dysfunction. Gene expression analysis may be a useful tool for understanding tendon tears and the failure of cuff healing, and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) has become an effective method for such studies. However, this technique requires the use of suitable reference genes for data normalization. Here, we evaluate the suitability of six reference genes (18S, ACTB, B2M, GAPDH, HPRT1 and TBP) using samples from the rotator cuff tendons of 28 individuals with tendon tears (3 tendons regions) and 8 controls (2 tendon regions); for the tear patients, we evaluated ruptured and non-ruptured tendon samples. The stability of the candidate reference genes was determined using the NormFinder, geNorm, BestKeeper and DataAssist software packages. Overall, HPRT1 was the best single reference gene, and HPRT1+TBP composed the best pair and HPRT1+TBP+ACTB composed the best trio of reference genes from the analysis of different groups, including the simultaneous analysis of all tissue samples. To identify the optimal combination of reference genes, we evaluated the expression of COL1A1 and COL3A1, and no obvious differences were observed when using 2, 3 or 4 reference genes for most of the analyses. However, COL3A1 expression differed between ruptured and non-ruptured (posterior superior region) tendons of patients only when normalized by HPRT1+TBP+B2M and HPRT1+TBP. On the other hand, the comparison between these two groups using the best trio of reference genes (HPRT1+TBP+ACTB) and 4 reference genes did not revealed a significant difference in COL3A1 expression. Consequently, the use of suitable reference genes for a reliable gene expression evaluation by RT-qPCR should consider the type of tendon samples investigated. HPRT1+TBP+ACTB seems to be the best combination of reference genes for the analysis of involving different tendon samples of individuals with rotator cuff tears

  13. Detection of partial-thickness tears in ligaments and tendons by Stokes-polarimetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; John, Raheel; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2008-02-01

    A Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system utilizes an algorithm developed to construct degree of polarization (DoP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination. Partial-thickness tears of turkey tendons were imaged by the SPI system in order to examine the feasibility of the system to detect partial-thickness rotator cuff tear or general tendon pathology. The rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides a way to analyze different tissue types which may be sensitive to IPA variations. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) images revealed collagen fiber structure, related to partial-thickness tears, better than standard intensity images. DoLP images also revealed structural changes in tears that are related to the tendon load. DoLP images with red-wavelength-filtered incident light may show tears and related organization of collagen fiber structure at a greater depth from the tendon surface. Degree of circular polarization (DoCP) images exhibited well the horizontal fiber orientation that is not parallel to the vertically aligned collagen fibers of the tendon. The SPI system's DOLP images reveal alterations in tendons and ligaments, which have a tissue matrix consisting largely of collagen, better than intensity images. All polarized images showed modulated intensity as the IPA was varied. The optimal detection of the partial-thickness tendon tears at a certain IPA was observed. The SPI system with varying IPA and spectral information can improve the detection of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by higher visibility of fiber orientations and thereby improve diagnosis and treatment of tendon related injuries.

  14. Effect of partial-thickness tear on loading capacities of the supraspinatus tendon: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Christoph; Ingram, David; Müllhaupt, Philippe; Farron, Alain; Becce, Fabio; Pioletti, Dominique; Terrier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon frequently occur at its insertion on the greater tubercule of the humerus, causing pain and reduced strength and range of motion. The goal of this work was to quantify the loss of loading capacity due to tendon tears at the insertion area. A finite element model of the supraspinatus tendon was developed using in vivo magnetic resonance images data. The tendon was represented by an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive law identified with experimental measurements. A failure criterion was proposed and calibrated with experimental data. A partial-thickness tear was gradually increased, starting from the deep articular-sided fibres. For different values of tendon tear thickness, the tendon was mechanically loaded up to failure. The numerical model predicted a loss in loading capacity of the tendon as the tear thickness progressed. Tendon failure was more likely when the tendon tear exceeded 20%. The predictions of the model were consistent with experimental studies. Partial-thickness tears below 40% tear are sufficiently stable to persist physiotherapeutic exercises. Above 60% tear surgery should be considered to restore shoulder strength. PMID:26290956

  15. RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF ISOLATED TEARS OF THE SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Glaydson Gomes; de Oliveira França, Flávio; Freita, José Márcio Alves; Santos, Flávio Márcio Lago; dos Santos, Ricardo Barreto Monteiro; Taglietti, Thiago Martins; Guevara, Carlos Leonidas Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional and clinical outcomes and identify prognostic factors in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of isolated tears of the subscapularis tendon. Methods: Between January 2003 and May 2009, we identified 18 shoulders with isolated tears or deinsertions that were complete or affected at least one third of the subscapularis tendon and underwent arthroscopic repair. Results: Three shoulders (17%) showed lesions in the upper third of the subscapularis; nine shoulders (50%) showed lesions in the upper two thirds; and six shoulders (33%) presented complete tears. In comparing the range of lateral rotation of the injured shoulder between before surgery and the time of the reevaluation, there was no statistical difference (p = 0.091). The LHBT was damaged in 11 shoulders (61%). According to the Constant score validation, we had excellent and good results in 83% of the cases and 17% were reasonable. The reevaluations on three patients showed re-tearing on MRI. Acromioplasty was performed on ten patients and this procedure did not represent statistical differences in the final results (p = 0.57). Conclusions: There was no statistically significant difference in relation to preoperative lateral rotation between the injured shoulder and the contralateral side. There was no significant loss of lateral rotation after surgery. The LHBT may be normal in deinsertions of the subscapularis tendon. Acromioplasty did not influence the results. The re-tearing rate for arthroscopic repair of the subscapularis tendon was 16.6%. PMID:27042642

  16. The Subscapularis Interlocking Stitch for the Arthroscopic Treatment of Subscapularis Tendon Tears at the Shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Jörn; Schwalba, Knut; Hedtmann, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of subscapularis function is essential for long-term maintenance of good clinical results for both traumatic and nontraumatic rotator cuff tears. The anatomic repair of partially and completely torn tendons from the footprint at the lesser tuberosity is the goal of surgical repair. The described technique, with a combination of an interlocking stitch and additional mattress sutures using a double-loaded suture anchor, provides reduction of the retracted tendon, sufficient pullout strength, and compression of the tendon to the footprint to facilitate healing. PMID:26900550

  17. Partial tendon tear as unusual cause of trigger finger: a case report.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Cosma; Guzzini, Matteo; Pagnottelli, Marco; Fabbri, Mattia; Perugia, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger due to a partial longitudinal tear of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The suspect came from the clinical history and the young age of the patient. It was successfully treated with tendon flap suture and pulley A1 release. PMID:27583273

  18. Partial tendon tear as unusual cause of trigger finger: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Calderaro, Cosma; Guzzini, Matteo; Pagnottelli, Marco; Fabbri, Mattia; Perugia, Dario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a case of post-traumatic trigger finger due to a partial longitudinal tear of the flexor digitorum superficialis. The suspect came from the clinical history and the young age of the patient. It was successfully treated with tendon flap suture and pulley A1 release. PMID:27583273

  19. Influence of tendon tears on ultrasound echo intensity in response to loading

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Kayt E.; Marcu, David; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Thelen, Darryl G.; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Acoustoelastic (AE) ultrasound image analysis is a promising non-invasive approach that uses load-dependent echo intensity changes to characterize stiffness of tendinous tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AE can detect localized changes in tendon stiffness due to partial and full-thickness tendon tears. Ovine infraspinatus tendons with different levels of damage (Intact, 33%, 66% and full thickness cuts initiated on the articular and bursal sides) were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while cine ultrasound images were recorded. The load-induced changes in echo intensity on the bursal and articular side of the tendon were determined. Consistent with AE theory, the undamaged tendons exhibited an increase in echo intensity with tendon loading, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. In the intact condition, the articular region demonstrated a significantly greater increase in echo intensity during loading than the bursal region. Cuts initiated on the bursal side resulted in a progressive decrease in echo intensity of the adjacent tissue, likely reflecting the reduced load transmission through that region. However, image intensity information was less sensitive for identifying load transmission changes that result from partial thickness cuts initiated on the articular side. We conclude that AE approaches may be useful to quantitatively assess load-dependent changes in tendon stiffness, and that disruption of AE behavior may be indicative of substantial tendon damage. PMID:25468301

  20. [Irreparable rotator cuff tears. Debridement, partial reconstruction, tendon transfer or reversed shoulder arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Patzer, Th; Hufeland, M; Krauspe, R

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears are fluent, are dependent on the patients' claims and demands and on the grade of the ongoing cuff tear arthropathy.A partial rotator cuff reconstruction with sufficient tenolysis combined with interval slide techniques to restore the anterior and posterior force couple may be indicated if there is no fatty degeneration > grade 3 of the rotator cuff muscles in a well-centered joint. The margin convergence technique with side-by-side adaptation of the tendon limbs may reduce the load on the reconstructed tendons.The role of the suprascapular nerve, which can probably be constricted by the retracted rotator cuff, and its therapy has not been completely clarified. When distinct symptoms are present neurolysis may be reasonable.Tendon transfers can be indicated in a cooperative patient < 65 years with a higher grade of muscular atrophy but without degenerative changes > grade II according to Hamada with the loss of active external rotation but performable active flexion. For posterosuperior tears the latissimus dorsi or recently the teres major tendon transfer to the rotator cuff footprint may be appropriate. For nonreconstructable anterosuperior tears a partial transfer of the pectoralis major tendon is possible.Careful subacromial debridement combined with biceps tenotomy and a cautious or reversed decompression may reduce the pain temporarily without having an influence on active motion until with the loss of active elevation the indication for a reversed shoulder arthroplasty is reached.In the mean time, absorbable subacromial spacers may re-center the humeral head, but the effectiveness of this therapy on clinical outcome should be analyzed in further studies. PMID:26768144

  1. Isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius presenting as a painless lump in the calf

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2009-01-01

    We report on a case of isolated tear of the medial head of gastrocnemius tendon. The patient presented with a painless lump in the right calf and denied any prior history of trauma or strain to the leg. A longitudinal split of the tendon was demonstrated at ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no other abnormalities and the gastrocnemius muscle was normal. There are no reports in the literature of isolated gastrocnemius tendon tear. To date the calf muscle complex injury described in this area is tearing of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle, sometimes referred to as “tennis leg”. We conclude that an isolated tear of the tendon to the medial head of gastrocnemius should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a lump or swelling in the upper medial area of the calf and we recommend ultrasound or MRI as the investigations of choice. PMID:21687013

  2. Acute tear of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon: a new diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Webborn, Nick; Morrissey, Dylan; Sarvananthan, Kasthuri; Chan, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Background The fascia cruris encloses the posterior structures of the calf and connects to the paratenon and the Achilles tendon. We describe the clinical presentation, ultrasound imaging characteristics and the time to the recovery of tears of the fascia cruris at the attachment to the Achilles tendon. Methods Retrospective review of 11 tears of the fascia cruris in the different legs as separate events in 9 patients (6 male and 3 female, mean age 35.52 years, range 11–48) identified using diagnostic ultrasound, after presenting with Achillodynia. Results 11 participants presented at a mean of 4.5 weeks (range 0.5–12) after onset of symptoms. The left Achilles was more commonly injured than the right (7 : 4) and the lateral side more than the medial (6 : 4) with one case with medial and lateral presentation. Clinically, there was swelling and tenderness over the medial or lateral border in the mid to upper portion of the Achilles. 7 of the 11 (63.6%) had functional overpronation. Ultrasound appearances of a tear were identified as hypoechoic area extending from the medial or lateral border of the Achilles extending along the anatomical plane of the fascia cruris. Average return to activity was 5.2 weeks (range 1–22). Participants presenting later had longer recovery but all participants returned to full activity (r=0.4). Conclusions This is the first description of the clinical details and sonographic findings of a tear to the fascia cruris at its attachment to the Achilles tendon. This needs to be considered as a cause of Achillodynia in athletes as recognition will affect the management. PMID:25202137

  3. Clinical results of a surgical technique using endobuttons for complete tendon tear of pectoralis major muscle: report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We herein describe a surgical technique for the repair of complete tear of the pectoralis major (PM) tendon using endobuttons to strengthen initial fixation. Methods Five male patients (3 judo players, 1 martial arts player, and 1 body builder) were treated within 2 weeks of sustaining complete tear of the PM tendon. Average age at surgery and follow-up period were 28.4 years (range, 23-33) and 28.8 months (range, 24-36). A rectangular bone trough (about 1 × 4 cm) was created on the humerus at the insertion of the distal PM tendon. The tendon stump was introduced into this trough, and fixed to the reverse side of the humeral cortex using endobuttons and non-absorbable suture. Clinical assessment of re-tear was examined by MRI. Shoulder range of motion (ROM), outcome of treatment, and isometric power were measured at final follow-up. Results There were no clinical re-tears, and MRI findings also showed continuity of the PM tendon in all cases at final follow-up. Average ROM did not differ significantly between the affected and unaffected shoulders. The clinical outcomes at final follow-up were excellent (4/5 cases) or good (1/5). In addition, postoperative isometric power in horizontal flexion of the affected shoulder showed complete recovery when compared with the unaffected side. Conclusions Satisfactory outcomes could be obtained when surgery using the endobutton technique was performed within 2 weeks after complete tear of the PM tendon. Therefore, our new technique appears promising as a useful method to treat complete tear of the PM tendon. PMID:21955511

  4. Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture and unilateral ACL tear in a weightlifter, associated with anabolic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Fenelon, Christopher; Dalton, David M; Galbraith, John G; Masterson, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous quadriceps tendon rupture is rare. A 29-year-old man, an amateur weight lifter, taking androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS), developed sudden onset bilateral pain and swelling of his anterior thighs when attempting to squat 280 kg (620 lb). Examination revealed gross swelling superior to the patella and palpable gaps in both quadriceps tendons. He underwent successful operative repair. MRI revealed a partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the right knee. This was not reconstructed. Only a few case reports of the association between AAS and quadriceps rupture exist in the literature, with none to the best of our knowledge in the past 10 years. ACL rupture coexisting is very rare, with only two reported cases. PMID:27154985

  5. Peroneus Tertius Tendon Tear: A Rare Cause of Lateral Ankle Pain.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Edward; Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt; Bancroft, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is a variably present muscle, uncommonly found in humans. Injury to the PT tendon is rare with virtually no cases reported in the literature. As a consequence of the rarity of this injury, there is little clinical information regarding injury or rupture of the PT muscle and tendon. We present a case of injury involving this rare anatomical variant. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrates a short segment longitudinal split tear adjacent to the tendinous insertion of the peroneus tertius muscle. Knowledge of this rare anatomic variant and the potential for associated pathology is critical in the management of the patient. Directing the orthopedic surgeon, or podiatrist, to this finding is critical for directing intervention. PMID:27226938

  6. Peroneus Tertius Tendon Tear: A Rare Cause of Lateral Ankle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Miguel; Scherer, Kurt; Bancroft, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The peroneus tertius (PT) muscle is a variably present muscle, uncommonly found in humans. Injury to the PT tendon is rare with virtually no cases reported in the literature. As a consequence of the rarity of this injury, there is little clinical information regarding injury or rupture of the PT muscle and tendon. We present a case of injury involving this rare anatomical variant. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrates a short segment longitudinal split tear adjacent to the tendinous insertion of the peroneus tertius muscle. Knowledge of this rare anatomic variant and the potential for associated pathology is critical in the management of the patient. Directing the orthopedic surgeon, or podiatrist, to this finding is critical for directing intervention.  PMID:27226938

  7. Tendon transfer for irreparable rotator cuff tears: indications and surgical rationale

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Chillemi, Claudio; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Cerciello, Simone; Ippolito, Giorgio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: treatment of symptomatic irreparable rotator cuff tears is extremely challenging because, at present, there are no ideal solutions to this problem. Many patients respond favorably to nonsurgical treatment. However, when conservative measures fail to improve the patient’s pain and disability, surgery should be considered. Methods: different surgical techniques are available and the choice of the most appropriate procedure depends on the presenting symptoms, age of the patient, functional demand, medical comorbidities, joint stability and presence of arthritic changes. The transposition of the surrounding muscles to replace the rotator cuff function represents a viable option in the treatment of younger patients without glenohumeral osteoarthritis and with severe functional limitation. Purpose: aim of this study is to give an overview of the currently available evidence regarding tendon transfer procedures for irreparable rotator cuff tears. PMID:25767779

  8. Radiographic analysis of factors predisposing toward tendon tears in the knee extensor mechanism☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Pires e Albuquerque, Rodrigo; Campos, André Luiz Siqueira; dos Santos Neto, José Félix; Karam, Evaldo; Neves, José Guilherme; Di Tullio, Paulo; Giordano, Vincenzo; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to review radiographs of patients who suffered tendon tears of the knee extensor apparatus and observe alterations that might be factors predisposing toward this type of injury. Methods we retrospectively analyzed 60 cases of injury to the knee extensor mechanism that were treated surgically at the Miguel Couto Municipal Hospital between March 2004 and March 2011. Four patients were excluded due to poor quality of the examination. Results of the 56 patients evaluated, 23 were considered to be normal and 33 presented radiographic alterations. Among these, eight (24.3%) presented suprapatellar osteophytes alone; seven (21.2%), infrapatellar calcification; seven (21.2%), suprapatellar calcification; six (18.2%), supra- and infrapatellar osteophytes; and five (15.1%), infrapatellar osteophytes alone. Conclusion radiographic alterations were frequently observed in patients with extensor mechanism tears. PMID:26229830

  9. Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the glands to the surface of your eye. Problems with the tear system can include too many tears, too few tears, or problems with the tear ducts. Treatment of the problem depends on the cause.

  10. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  11. CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS OF SUBSCAPULARIS TENDON TEAR USING THE BEAR HUG SEMIOLOGICAL MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    Schiefer, Márcio; Júnior, Yonder Archanjo Ching-San; Silva, Sérgio Maurício; Fontenelle, César; Dias Carvalho, Marcos Genúncio; de Faria, Fabio Garcia; Franco, José Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the Bear Hug maneuver for clinically diagnosing subscapularis tendon tears, and compare this with other maneuvers described previously (Lift-off, Napoleon and Belly Press). Methods: Forty-nine patients with rotator cuff injuries who had undergone arthroscopy to repair the injury and had previously been assessed using the semiological maneuvers mentioned above were evaluated. Results: The diagnostic values obtained for the Bear Hug test were as follows: sensitivity 75%, specificity 56%, positive predictive value 62%, negative predictive value 70% and accuracy 65%. Conclusion: The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value values were obtained with the Bear Hug test. The highest specificity value was seen with the Lift-off test. The Belly press test gave the greatest specificity, positive predictive and accuracy values. PMID:27047870

  12. Effect of return to overuse activity following an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear on adjacent intact tendons and glenoid cartilage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Katherine E; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Tucker, Jennica J; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F; Glaser, David L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-05-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. PMID:23280495

  13. Effect of Return to Overuse Activity Following an Isolated Supraspinatus Tendon Tear on Adjacent Intact Tendons and Glenoid Cartilage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. PMID:23280495

  14. Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... as those salty drops that fall from your eyes when you cry. Actually, your tears clean your eyes every time you blink. Tears also keep your eyes moist, which is important for your vision. Tear ...

  15. Repair versus shaving of partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis tendon. A prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ALIPRANDI, ALBERTO; SDAO, SILVANA; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; CABITZA, PAOLO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treating partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis (SSC) tendon with a dedicated suture anchor would result in an internal rotation strength improvement compared with simple shaving of the SSC tendon and footprint. Methods twenty-six patients with a limited SSC tendon tear (equal or inferior to the most superior centimeter) in association with a posterosuperior cuff lesion were prospectively randomized to two treatments: repair with a dedicated suture anchor versus shaving of the tendon and footprint. The patients also underwent long head of the biceps (LHB) treatment and posterosuperior cuff tear repair. In each patient the following parameters were measured both preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 2.5 years: strength in internal rotation in the bear-hug testing position (using a digital tensiometer), DASH score and Constant scores. MRI assessment of tendon healing was performed at the final follow-up. Results twenty of the 26 patients (76%) were reviewed after a mean follow-up time of 42 months: 11 patients had undergone SSC tendon repair and nine simple shaving. At final follow-up no significant differences were found between the repaired and shaving group in strength in internal rotation (9.5 ± 3.8 kg versus 10.3±5.4 kg; p=0.7). The DASH score and Constant score also failed to show significant differences between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant difference in SSC tendon healing rate was observed on MRI evaluation. Conclusions partial-thickness articular-sided tear of the upper SSC tendon in association with a posterosuperior rotator cuff repair and LHB treatment, when limited to the superior centimeter of the SSC tendon, shows a comparable performance in terms of strength in internal rotation either after simple shaving or a tendon-to-bone repair. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26889466

  16. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  18. Intra-articular changes precede extra-articular changes in the biceps tendon following rotator cuff tears in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hsu, Jason E.; Zgonis, Miltiadis H.; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Biceps tendon pathology is common with rotator cuff tears. The mechanisms for biceps changes, and therefore its optimal treatment, are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effect of rotator cuff tears on regional biceps tendon pathology. We hypothesized that histological and compositional changes would appear before organizational changes, both would appear before mechanical changes, and changes would begin at the tendon’s insertion site. Methods Sixty-five Sprague-Dawley rats received either detachment of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons or sham surgery. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 4 or 8 weeks for regional measurements of histological, compositional, organizational (1, 4 and 8 weeks) or mechanical properties (4 and 8 weeks only). Results One week following tendon detachments, decreased organization and more rounded cell shape were found in the intra-articular space of the biceps tendon. Aggrecan expression was increased along the entire length of the tendon while all other compositional changes were at the tendon’s proximal insertion into bone only. With time, this disorganization and more rounded cell shape extended the length of the tendon. Organizational and cell shape changes also preceded detrimental mechanical changes, as decreased modulus in the intra-articular space was found after 8 weeks. Conclusions Results support a degenerative component to pathology in the biceps tendon. Additionally, changes resembling a tendon exposed to compressive loading occurring first in the intra-articular space indicate that the biceps tendon plays an increased role as a load bearing structure against the humeral head in the presence of rotator cuff tears. PMID:21816629

  19. Acute, simultaneous tear of patellar tendon and ACL: possible mechanism of injury and rationality of the two-stage surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Koumis, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Alexis; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 47-year-old professional driver with an acute, simultaneous tear of patellar tendon and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The patient was treated in two stages. Acute patellar tendon repair and delayed (6-month postinjury) ACL reconstruction was performed. The authors discuss the possible mechanism of injury and the rationality of the two-stage surgical treatment. PMID:22687668

  20. Acute, simultaneous tear of patellar tendon and ACL: possible mechanism of injury and rationality of the two-stage surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Koumis, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Alexis; Kyparlis, Dimitris; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 47-year-old professional driver with an acute, simultaneous tear of patellar tendon and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The patient was treated in two stages. Acute patellar tendon repair and delayed (6-month postinjury) ACL reconstruction was performed. The authors discuss the possible mechanism of injury and the rationality of the two-stage surgical treatment. PMID:22687668

  1. Allograft reconstruction of peroneus longus and brevis tendons tears arising from a single muscular belly. Case report and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Manuel J; Adams, Samuel B; Parekh, Selene G

    2015-03-01

    Anatomic variants of the peroneal tendons may cause tendon disorders. Moreover, there is a lack of evidence on how to address chronic tendon pathology when a variant of the peroneal tendons is causing the patient's symptoms. We present a patient with an uncommon peroneal muscle presentation: a single muscular belly dividing into both the peroneus longus and brevis tendons. After extensive debridement of tendinopathic tissue, primary repair or tenodesis was not possible; therefore a unique solution for this problem was performed, reconstructing both peroneal tendons using a semitendinosus allograft. PMID:25682415

  2. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R. PMID:24414293

  3. Reconstruction of Chronic Foveal TFCC Tears with an Autologous Tendon Graft

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I.; Eng, Kevin; Lee, Yu Chao; Mcguire, Duncan; Zumstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Background A triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury can produce distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. If the foveal attachment is avulsed, it translates distally. The footprint is separated from its origin and will become covered in synovitis, preventing healing. The authors describe a surgical technique for the treatment of instability of the DRUJ due to chronic foveal detachment of the TFCC. Technique The procedure utilizes a loop of autologous palmaris longus tendon graft passed through the ulnar aspect of the TFCC and through an osseous tunnel in the distal ulna to reconstruct the fovel attachment. Patients and Methods We report on nine patients with a mean age of 42. Median follow-up was 13 months. Results The median pain scores measured were reduced from 8 to 3 postoperatively, and all had a stable DRUJ. Conclusions This technique provides stability of the distal ulna to the radius and carpus, with potential for biologic healing through osseous integration. It is a robust, anatomically based reconstruction of the TFCC to the fovea that stabilizes the DRUJ and the ulnar-carpal sag. PMID:25709873

  4. Comparison of Clinical Outcome of Autograft and Allograft Reconstruction for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yu-Hua; Sun, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamstring (HS) autograft and bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft are the most common choice for reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). There was a little report about the clinical outcome and difference of arthroscopic ACL reconstruction using allograft and autograft. This study aimed to compare the clinical outcome of autograft and allograft reconstruction for ACL tears. Methods: A total of 106 patients who underwent surgery because of ACL tear were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups, including 53 patients in each group. The patients in group I underwent standard ACL reconstruction with HS tendon autografts, while others in group II underwent reconstruction with bone-patellar tendon-bone allograft. All the patients were followed up and analyzed; the mean follow-up was 81 months (range: 28–86 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, and patient satisfaction questionnaires. The complication rates of both groups were compared. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening were assessed using lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. Results: At the end of follow-up, no significant differences were found between the groups in terms of IKDC, Lysholm scores, physical instability tests, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and incidences of arthrofibrosis. Tibial and femoral tunnel widening was less in the HS tendon autografts. This difference was more significant on the tibial side. Conclusions: In the repair of ACL tears, allograft reconstruction is as effective as the autograft reconstruction, but the allograft can lead to more tunnel widening evidently in the tibial tunnel, particularly. PMID:26612290

  5. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007643.htm Achilles tendon repair To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Your Achilles tendon joins your calf muscle to your heel. You can tear your Achilles tendon if you land hard on your heel during sports, from a ...

  6. Comparison of the Insall-Salvati ratio of the patella in patients with and without an ACL tear.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Fu Jeff; Wu, Jiunn-Jer; Chen, Teng-Shung; Huang, Tung-Fu

    2005-01-01

    The object of this prospective study is to compare the Insall-Salvati ratio between the patients who have an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear and receive arthroscopic-assistant ACL reconstruction and the patients who have no ACL tear but do have an internal disorder of the knee and receive arthroscopic surgery. We prospectively and consecutively collected into two groups a total of 217 patients who had sport injuries and received arthroscopic surgery. The study group included 115 patients who had an ACL tear and received arthroscopic-assistant ACL reconstruction with middle-third bone-patella tendon-bone graft. The control group included 102 patients with internal disorders of the knee joint, including meniscus tear, plicae, or other chondral lesion, but without an ACL tear. We measured the patellar Insall-Salvati ratio [12] on the pre-operative X-ray films for all patients. The Insall-Salvati ratio in the ACL-tear study group is significantly smaller than the control group of internal disorders of the knee (0.99+/-0.11 vs 1.05+/-0.12, p=0.001). There is no significant difference in age, gender, the side of the involved knee, duration of symptoms, patella length and patella tendon length between the two groups. In conclusion, our study shows that patella infra has an association with ACL tears, and patella infra may be a risk factor for ACL tears. In patients with an ACL tear who had patella baja, the middle-third patellar tendon may not be an ideal graft for reconstruction. PMID:15654645

  7. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients’ ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29–71 years) and 30 years (range: 14–62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is

  8. Subscapularis Tendon Repair Using Suture Bridge Technique

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong Bok; Park, Young Eun; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Lim, Tae Kang; Shon, Min Soo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    The subscapularis tendon plays an essential role in shoulder function. Although subscapularis tendon tears are less common than other rotator cuff tears, tears of the subscapularis tendon have increasingly been recognized with the advent of magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy. A suture bridge technique for the treatment of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears has provided the opportunity to improve the pressurized contact area and mean footprint pressure. However, suture bridge fixation of subscapularis tendon tears appears to be technically challenging. We describe an arthroscopic surgical technique for suture bridge repair of subscapularis tendon tears that obtains ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. Surgery using such a suture bridge technique is indicated for large tears, such as tears involving the entire first facet or more, tears with a disrupted lateral sling, and combined medium to large supraspinatus/infraspinatus tears. PMID:26052489

  9. Comparison of CO2 laser welding with suture technique for repair of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Neven A.; Johnstone, Frederic L.; Kilkelly, Francis X.; McKinney, LuAnn; Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Smith, Allan C.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, histology, and strength of laser welding in repair of sharply transected rat Achilles tendons. In 26 adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats, the severed tendons were repaired with a 7-0 nylon, modified Kessler core suture followed by either a running 9-0 nylon epitendinous suture or a circumferential CO2 laser epidendinous weld using 25% human albumin as a solder. All repairs were timed and post- operative tensile strength was analyzed with material testing equipment. In addition, histologic testing was performed on both types of repairs. The mean time to complete the epitendinous repair in the laser group was 3.5 minutes and in the suture group, 8 minutes. The mean ultimate tensile strength in 6 normal tendons was 40.9 Newtons (N) with group standard deviation of 5.2 N. When compared with normal controls, post-operatively both types of tendon repairs resulted in tensile failure at lower forces. The ultimate tensile strength for the epitendinous suture repair and the laser welds were 13% and 6% of normal controls, respectively. Twenty tendons with epidendinous suture repair had mean ultimate tensile strength of 5.4 (+/- 1.2) N, while the 17 tendons with laser wends failed at 2.6 (+/- 0.9) N. Histologic evaluation of tendons repaired with CO2 laser revealed areas of coagulation and edema on the surface of tendon edges. Post-operatively, greater tissue changes were noted in laser treated tendons than those repaired with sutures. Laser welding of epitenon is possible and can be completed faster than the suture repair. The repaired tendon surface appears smoother and less bulky after laser treatment. However, significantly decreased immediate post-operative strength was demonstrated by the use of Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance and Turkey's pairwise comparison.

  10. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  11. MRI-Arthroscopic Correlation in Rotator Cuff Tendon Pathologies; A Comparison between Various Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Dehghani, Sakineh; Gerami, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been considered a perfect imaging study for evaluation of shoulder pathologies despite occasional discrepancies between MR reports and arthroscopic findings. In this study we aim to evaluate impact of imaging center as an indicator of image quality on accuracy of MRI reports in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon pathologies. Methods: We reviewed MR reports of 64 patients who underwent arthroscopy in university center hospital. MRIs were done in various centers including both university-affiliated and out-centers. All studies were reported by two radiologists in consensus unaware of the arthroscopic results or previous reports. An inter-observer agreement analysis using the kappa statistics was performed to determine consistency among imaging and surgical reports. Results: Kappa values for out-centers were as follows: 0.785 for biceps, 0.469 for suscapularis, 0.846 for supraspinatus and 0.785 for infraspinatus tendons. In university centers values were 0.799 for biceps, 0.802 for suscapularis, 0.789 for supraspinatus and 0.770 for infraspinatus tendons. Conclusion: Image reporting in university centers with proficient sequences increased accuracy of diagnosis in 3/4 of evaluated features and showed subtle decreased inter-observer agreement in 1/4 of features. Uniformity of the scanners and protocols as well as evaluation on a workstation rather than hard copies cumulatively resulted in a meaningful increase in the accuracy of the same radiologists in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon tear. PMID:27200392

  12. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  13. The Prevalence and Role of Low Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients with Peroneal Tendon Pathologies: A Potential Source for Tendon Subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A low lying peroneus brevis muscle belly is a rare anomaly. There are few published studies that support presence of this anomaly as an etiology for peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a low lying peroneus muscle belly (LLMB) and tendon subluxation is not well explored. In this retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing a primary peroneal tendon surgery, in a five year period, were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI, in comparison to intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease was investigated. Presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologies in patients with and without LLMB was compared. Sensitivity of MRI was high in identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, LLMB was seen in 62.00% of patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% cases of tenosynovitis, 29.03% cases of tendon subluxation, and 80.65% cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear. While presence of a LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, among the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant LLMB. More studies with a larger patient population are needed to better study the role of a low lying muscle belly as a mass occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  14. Tear System

    MedlinePlus

    ... with tear production or tear drainage. Increased Tear Production and Dry Eyes The eye has two sets ... as aging and menopause lead to decreased tear production. As tear production diminishes, the surface of the ...

  15. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  16. Effect of Supraspinatus Tendon Injury on Supraspinatus and Infraspinatus Muscle Passive Tension and Associated Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silldorff, Morgan D.; Choo, Alexander D.; Choi, Anthony J.; Lin, Evie; Carr, J. Austin; Lieber, Richard L.; Lane, John G.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Injury to the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons and the associated atrophic changes to the muscle remain a common clinical problem. Specifically, increased muscle stiffness has been implicated in failure of the repair and poor functional outcomes. We present a comparison of the passive mechanical properties and associated biochemical studies from patients with and without torn supraspinatus tendons. Methods: Muscle biopsy samples (n = 40) were obtained from twenty patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Passive mechanical tests of both individual fibers and fiber bundles as well as analysis of titin molecular weight and collagen content were performed. Results: At the fiber-bundle level, a significant increase in passive modulus was observed between intact supraspinatus samples (mean [and standard error], 237.41 ± 59.78 kPa) and torn supraspinatus samples (515.74 ± 65.48 kPa) (p < 0.05), a finding that was not observed at the single fiber level. Within the torn samples, elastic moduli in the supraspinatus were greater than in the infraspinatus at both the single fiber and the fiber-bundle level. There was a significant positive correlation between bundle elastic modulus and collagen content (r2 = 0.465) in the supraspinatus muscle as well as a significant positive correlation between tear size and bundle elastic modulus (r2 = 0.702) in the torn supraspinatus samples. Conclusions: Supraspinatus muscle passive tension increases in a tendon tear size-dependent manner after tendon injury. The increase in muscle stiffness appears to originate outside the muscle cell, in the extracellular matrix. Clinical Relevance: Muscle stiffness after rotator cuff tendon injury is more severe with large tears. This finding supports the concept of early intervention, when tendon tears are smaller, and interventions targeting the extracellular matrix. PMID:25320205

  17. Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction: biomechanical comparison of tendon graft repairs to a synthetic double bundle augmentation.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Kempka, Jan P; Schanz, Steffen; Zantop, Thore; Waizy, Hazibullah; Raschke, Michael J; Petersen, Wolf

    2009-05-01

    For currently presented anatomical coracoclavicular ligament repairs issues such as autologous tendon graft versus synthetic suture augmentation and the optimum fixation strategies for both types of reconstruction are not solved. The purpose of the study was to compare the biomechanical properties of different tendon graft repairs to the characteristics of a synthetic polyester augmentation. Four anatomical coracoclavicular ligament repairs were biomechanically tested: 5 mm coracoclavicular tendon loop with suture fixation, tendon loop with flip button fixation, tendon loop with interference screw fixation versus a double 1.0-mm polyester repair with flip button fixation. The biomechanical testing included cyclic superio-inferior loading and a subsequent load to failure protocol. The ultimate failure loads were significantly higher for the double polyester/flip button repair (927 N) compared to all tendon repair techniques (maximum 640 N). In contrast the stiffness level was higher for the tendon repairs compared to the polyester/flip button repair (68.7 N/mm) but strongly dependent on the fixation technique (interference screw 97.2 N/mm, flip button 84.9 N/mm, side to side suture 60.9 N/mm). A synthetic coracoclavicular augmentation using a polyester suture provides adequate structural properties compared to a tendon repair. Therefore the decision for a tendon graft should be made by the necessity of a biologic substrate rather than by the assumption of a biomechanical advantage. PMID:19225755

  18. [Comparison of local acetylcysteine and artificial tears in the management of dry eye syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pokupec, Rajko; Petricek, Igor; Sikić, Jakov; Bradić, Mirna; Popović-Suić, Smiljka; Petricek, Goranka

    2005-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome is a common clinical entity causing difficulties to many people, especially the elderly. Standard substitution therapy with artificial tears may frequently prove inadequate, thus any new treatment modality is highly welcome. The syndrome implies lacrimal hyperosmolality, which in turn results in mucus accumulation in the conjunctival sac causing additional irritation. Locally applied acetylcysteine, a mucolytic, regulates mucus secretion and reduces mucus accumulation. The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of artificial tear therapy and therapy with local acetylcysteine. The study included 32 patients with the symptoms and signs of dry eye attending our department between March 20 and May 9, 2003. All study patients were on long-term substitution therapy with artificial tears. Upon evaluation of subjective discomforts and objective signs, the patients were switched from artificial tear therapy (Isopto-Tears, Alcon, with polyvinyl alcohol as active ingredient) to therapy with locally applied acetylcysteine (Brunac, Bruschettini). All parameters were re-evaluated at 2-week control visit. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) completed the study with control visit. Of these, 18 (60%) patients reported reduction of subjective discomforts, ten (33%) patients observed no change, and two (7%) patients experienced more discomforts with acetylcysteine than with artificial tear therapy. On objective sign evaluation, 12 (40%) patients showed less discomforts, unchanged condition was recorded in 13 (43%) patients, and five (17%) patients had more discomforts as compared with artificial tear therapy. A statistically significant difference (p=0.05) between artificial tear therapy and acetylcysteine therapy was found for the subjective symptom score but not for the objective sign score. Therapy with acetylcysteine proved more efficient than artificial tears in reducing subjective symptoms but had no effect on the objective signs of dry eye syndrome. The

  19. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  20. Comparison of structural anisotropic soft tissue models for simulating Achilles tendon tensile behaviour.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Longo, Giacomo; Gustafsson, Anna; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of tendon injury (tendinopathy) has increased over the past decades due to greater participation in sports and recreational activities. But little is known about the aetiology of tendon injuries because of our limited knowledge in the complex structure-function relationship in tendons. Computer models can capture the biomechanical behaviour of tendons and its structural components, which is essential for understanding the underlying mechanisms of tendon injuries. This study compares three structural constitutive material models for the Achilles tendon and discusses their application on different biomechanical simulations. The models have been previously used to describe cardiovascular tissue and articular cartilage, and one model is novel to this study. All three constitutive models captured the tensile behaviour of rat Achilles tendon (root mean square errors between models and experimental data are 0.50-0.64). They further showed that collagen fibres are the main load-bearing component and that the non-collagenous matrix plays a minor role in tension. By introducing anisotropic behaviour also in the non-fibrillar matrix, the new biphasic structural model was also able to capture fluid exudation during tension and high values of Poisson׳s ratio that is reported in tendon experiments. PMID:27108350

  1. Endoscopic Repair of a Gluteus Medius Tear at the Musculotendinous Junction

    PubMed Central

    Yanke, Adam B.; Hart, Michael A.; McCormick, Frank; Nho, Shane J.

    2013-01-01

    Abductor tendon tears are an increasingly recognized clinical entity in patients with lateral thigh pain and weakness. These “rotator cuff tears of the hip” typically result from chronic, nontraumatic rupture of the anterior fibers of the gluteus medius. Although the abductor tendon typically tears from the osseous insertion, the case discussed here ruptured at the musculotendinous junction. This is the first report of this abductor tear subtype and its endoscopic repair. PMID:23875152

  2. ACL reconstruction by patellar tendon. A comparison of length by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Högerle, S; Letsch, R; Sievers, K W

    1998-01-01

    In 50 knees the length of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), the patellar tendon, and the distance between the tibial tuberosity and the femoral origin of the ACL were evaluated by means of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which permits subsequent reconstruction of any sectional view. The measurements showed that the patellar tendon was always markedly longer than the ACL (mean 14.4 mm), but always shorter than the distance between the tibial tuberosity and the femoral insertion of the ACL (mean 19.2 mm). The mean lengths of the ACL and the patellar tendon were 38.2 mm and 52.6 mm, respectively. The mean distance between the femoral ACL origin and the tibial insertion of the patellar tendon was 71.8 mm. These results demonstrate that a distally based patellar tendon autograft alone (with the patellar bone block but without extension into the periosteum of the patella or the quadriceps tendon) cannot be placed anatomically correctly to the isometric femoral insertion of the ACL. When the patellar tendon is used for ACL reconstruction, it must be implanted as a free autograft. Nevertheless, considerable variations of length must be taken into account. PMID:9457339

  3. Biomechanical Comparison of Parallel and Crossed Suture Repair for Longitudinal Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Milchteim, Charles; Branch, Eric A.; Maughon, Ty; Hughey, Jay; Anz, Adam W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal meniscus tears are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Meniscus repair devices have been previously tested and presented; however, prior studies have not evaluated repair construct designs head to head. This study compared a new-generation meniscus repair device, SpeedCinch, with a similar established device, Fast-Fix 360, and a parallel repair construct to a crossed construct. Both devices utilize self-adjusting No. 2-0 ultra–high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and 2 polyether ether ketone (PEEK) anchors. Hypothesis: Crossed suture repair constructs have higher failure loads and stiffness compared with simple parallel constructs. The newer repair device would exhibit similar performance to an established device. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Sutures were placed in an open fashion into the body and posterior horn regions of the medial and lateral menisci in 16 cadaveric knees. Evaluation of 2 repair devices and 2 repair constructs created 4 groups: 2 parallel vertical sutures created with the Fast-Fix 360 (2PFF), 2 crossed vertical sutures created with the Fast-Fix 360 (2XFF), 2 parallel vertical sutures created with the SpeedCinch (2PSC), and 2 crossed vertical sutures created with the SpeedCinch (2XSC). After open placement of the repair construct, each meniscus was explanted and tested to failure on a uniaxial material testing machine. All data were checked for normality of distribution, and 1-way analysis of variance by ranks was chosen to evaluate for statistical significance of maximum failure load and stiffness between groups. Statistical significance was defined as P < .05. Results: The mean maximum failure loads ± 95% CI (range) were 89.6 ± 16.3 N (125.7-47.8 N) (2PFF), 72.1 ± 11.7 N (103.4-47.6 N) (2XFF), 71.9 ± 15.5 N (109.4-41.3 N) (2PSC), and 79.5 ± 25.4 N (119.1-30.9 N) (2XSC). Interconstruct comparison revealed no statistical difference between all 4 constructs regarding maximum

  4. Peroneus longus tear and its relation to the peroneal tubercle: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Laver, Lior; Brin, Yaron S.; Kotz, Evgeny; Hetsroni, Iftach; Mann, Gideon; Nyska, Meir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Tear of the peroneal tendon may occur in different anatomical sites. The most prevalent site is around the lateral malleolus. Tear of the peroneus longus at the level of the peroneal tubercle is unusual. Anatomically, the lateral surface of the calcaneous can be divided into thirds. The middle third includes the peroneal tubercle, which separates the peroneus longus tendon from the peroneus brevis. An anatomic variation of the peroneal tubercle may lead to chronic irritation of the peroneus longus tendon that could ultimately cause a longitudinal tear. We conducted this review aiming to clarify the anatomy, biomechanics of the tendon, and the clinical features of tear of the peroneus longus tendon on the lateral surface of the calcaneous due to an enlarged peroneal tubercle. In addition, we reviewed the diagnostic and treatment options of peroneal tendon tears at this site. PMID:23738264

  5. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Greenhalgh; Jonathan, Sinclair

    2014-01-01

    Recreational running is an activity with multiple reported health benefits for both sexes, however, chronic injuries caused by excessive and/or repetitive loading of the Achilles tendon are common. Males have been identified as being at an increased risk of suffering an injury to the Achilles tendon and as such, knowledge of differences in loading between the sexes may provide further information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74 ± 5.52 years, body height 1.80 ± 0.11 m and body mass 74.22 ± 7.27 kg) and fifteen female (age 25.13 ± 6.39 years, body height 1.68 ± 0.12 m and body mass 67.12 ± 9.11 kg) recreational runners volunteered to take part in the current investigation. Participants completed 10 trials running at 4.0 m·s−1 ±5% striking a force platform (1000 Hz) with their right foot. Ankle joint kinematics were synchronously recorded (250 Hz) using an optoelectric motion capture system. Ankle joint kinetics were computed using Newton-Euler inverse-dynamics. Net external ankle joint moments were then calculated. To estimate Achilles tendon kinetics the plantarflexion moment calculated was divided by an estimated Achilles tendon moment arm of 0.05 m. Differences in Achilles tendon kinetics were examined using independent sample t-tests (p<0.05). The results indicate that males were associated with significantly (p<0.05) greater Achilles tendon loads than females. The findings from this study support the notion that male recreational runners may be at greater risk of Achilles tendon pathology. PMID:25713676

  6. Two cases of chronic knee pain caused by unusual injuries to the popliteus tendon

    PubMed Central

    DAVALOS, ERIC A.; BARANK, DAVID; VARMA, RAJEEV K.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the popliteus tendon are less frequent than injuries to the menisci or ligamentous structures of the knee. When they do occur, injuries to the popliteus tendon tend to be the result of trauma and associated with injuries to other components of the knee. The most commonly seen injuries include tears at the musculotendinous junction and avulsion tears at the lateral femoral condyle insertion site. This report presents two unusual injuries of the popliteus tendon in patients with chronic knee pain: an isolated split tear of the tendon and a subluxed tendon residing within the lateral joint space. PMID:27386449

  7. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  8. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p < 0.0001) and a specificity of 67% (p < 0.0001). The strongest predictors of rotator cuff repairability were tear size (p < 0.001) and age (p = 0.004). Sonographic assessments of tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  9. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  10. Analysis of tear inflammatory mediators: A comparison between the microarray and Luminex methods

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, Karen; Nichols, Jason J.; Nichols, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inflammatory mediators have been shown to modulate dry eye (DE) disease and may correlate with disease severity, yet the methods used and the associated findings vary significantly in the literature. The goal of this research was to compare two methods, the quantitative microarray and the magnetic bead assay, for detecting cytokine levels in extracted tear samples across three subject groups. Methods Tears were collected from Schirmer strips of the right and left eyes of 20 soft contact lens wearers (CL), 20 normal non-contact lens wearers (NOR), and 20 DE subjects and stored at −80 °C. Tear proteins were eluted and precipitated using ammonium bicarbonate and acetone. The right and left eye samples were combined for each subject. Following the Bradford protein quantitation method, 10 µg of total protein was used for each of the two analyses, Quantibody® Human Inflammation Array 3 (RayBiotech) and High Sensitivity Human Cytokine Magnetic Bead Kit (Millipore). The assays were run using the GenePix® 4000B Scanner (Molecular Devices) or the Luminex MagPix® plate reader (Luminex), respectively. The data were then compared between the two instruments and the three subject groups Results Of the 40 proteins on the Quantibody® microarray, seven had average expression levels above the lower limit of detection: ICAM-1, MCP-1, MIG, MCSF, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TNF-RI. Significant differences in expression levels (p<0.05) were detected between the CL and DE groups for MCSF, TIMP-1, and TNF R1, between the NOR and DE groups for ICAM-1, and between the CL and NOR groups for ICAM-1, MCP-1, MCSF, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TNF-R1 when using the Student t test. Of the 13 proteins tested with Luminex, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, and IL-8 had expression levels above the minimum detectable level, and these were most often detected using the Luminex assay compared to the Quantibody® microarray. Contrarily, IL-2, IL-12, IL-13, INF-g, and GM-CSF were detected more frequently using

  11. Comparison between three methods to value lower tear meniscus measured by image software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Resúa, Carlos; Pena-Verdeal, Hugo; Lira, Madalena; Oliveira, M. Elisabete Real; Giráldez, María. Jesús; Yebra-Pimentel, Eva

    2013-11-01

    To measure different parameters of lower tear meniscus height (TMH) by using photography with open software of measurement. TMH was addressed from lower eyelid to the top of the meniscus (absolute TMH) and to the brightest meniscus reflex (reflex TMH). 121 young healthy subjects were included in the study. The lower tear meniscus was videotaped by a digital camera attached to a slit lamp. Three videos were recorded in central meniscus portion on three different methods: slit lamp without fluorescein instillation, slit lamp with fluorescein instillation and TearscopeTM without fluorescein instillation. Then, a masked observed obtained an image from each video and measured TMH by using open source software of measurement based on Java (NIH ImageJ). Absolute central (TMH-CA), absolute with fluorescein (TMH-F) and absolute using the Tearscope (TMH-Tc) were compared each other as well as reflex central (TMH-CR) and reflex Tearscope (TMH-TcR). Mean +/- S.D. values of TMH-CA, TMH-CR, TMH-F, TMH-Tc and TMH-TcR of 0.209 +/- 0.049, 0.139 +/- 0.031, 0.222 +/- 0.058, 0.175 +/- 0.045 and 0.109 +/- 0.029 mm, respectively were found. Paired t-test was performed for the relationship between TMH-CA - TMH-CR, TMH-CA - TMH-F, TMH-CA - TMH-Tc, TMH-F - TMH-Tc, TMH-Tc - TMH-TcR and TMH-CR - TMH-TcR. In all cases, it was found a significant difference between both variables (all p < 0.008). This study showed a useful tool to objectively measure TMH by photography. Eye care professionals should maintain the same TMH parameter in the follow-up visits, due to the difference between them.

  12. Mechanisms of tendon injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Parks, William C.; Rifkin, Daniel B.; Derwin, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon disorders are common and lead to significant disability, pain, healthcare cost, and lost productivity. A wide range of injury mechanisms exist leading to tendinopathy or tendon rupture. Tears can occur in healthy tendons that are acutely overloaded (e.g., during a high speed or high impact event) or lacerated (e.g., a knife injury). Tendinitis or tendinosis can occur in tendons exposed to overuse conditions (e.g., an elite swimmer’s training regimen) or intrinsic tissue degeneration (e.g., age-related degeneration). The healing potential of a torn or pathologic tendon varies depending on anatomic location (e.g., Achilles vs. rotator cuff) and local environment (e.g., intrasynovial vs. extrasynovial). Although healing occurs to varying degrees, in general healing of repaired tendons follows the typical wound healing course, including an early inflammatory phase, followed by proliferative and remodeling phases. Numerous treatment approaches have been attempted to improve tendon healing, including growth factor- and cell-based therapies and rehabilitation protocols. This review will describe the current state of knowledge of injury and repair of the three most common tendinopathies-- flexor tendon lacerations, Achilles tendon rupture, and rotator cuff disorders-- with a particular focus on the use of animal models for understanding tendon healing. PMID:25641114

  13. Rotator Cuff Tear Shape Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, David Steven; Kaplan, Daniel James; Fralinger, David; Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Meislin, Robert J.; Jazrawi, Laith M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proper surgical planning requires accurate and reliable pre-operative patient information. The more comprehensive the data, the more the surgeon can tailor a general surgical technique to an individual patient’s unique anatomy. A previous retrospective study demonstrated that three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging more accurately characterized rotator cuff tears compared to two-dimensional images when checked against intra-operative pictures. The purpose of this study was to determine if three-dimensional MRI imaging would continue to be more accurate than two-dimensional imaging in a prospective study. Methods: Patients were prospectively included if they had a full-thickness primary rotator cuff tear on pre-operative MRI. Intra-op videos were taken from the posterior and lateral portals, with a grasper fully mobilizing the torn tendon in each view. 7 surgeons then reviewed the videos and independently characterized the shape of the tears into crescent, U-shaped tears, L-shaped tears, or massive tears. This was considered the gold-standard. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the corresponding MRI studies independently and blind to the arthroscopic findings and characterized the shape on the basis of the tear’s retraction and size 2D MRI. The 3D reconstructions of each cuff tear were reviewed by each radiologist to characterize the shape. Statistical analysis included 95% confidence intervals and fleiss’s kappa. Results: 37 patients were enrolled in the study. Among the 7 surgeons, agreement on cuff tear was 93% ( =.87). The accuracy for differentiating between crescent-shaped, longitudinal, and massive tears using measurements on 2D MRI was 73.4% for reader 1 and 71.2% for reader 2. The accuracy for tear shape characterization into crescent and longitudinal U- or L-shaped using 3D MRI was 92% for reader 1 and 94% for reader 2. When further characterizing the longitudinal tears as massive or not using 3D MRI, both readers had an

  14. SLAP Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by acute trauma or by repetitive shoulder motion. An acute SLAP injury may result from: • A ... labrum tears as a result of repeated shoulder motion. This cross-section view of the shoulder socket ...

  15. Statistical Comparison of Classifiers Applied to the Interferential Tear Film Lipid Layer Automatic Classification

    PubMed Central

    Remeseiro, B.; Penas, M.; Mosquera, A.; Novo, J.; Penedo, M. G.; Yebra-Pimentel, E.

    2012-01-01

    The tear film lipid layer is heterogeneous among the population. Its classification depends on its thickness and can be done using the interference pattern categories proposed by Guillon. The interference phenomena can be characterised as a colour texture pattern, which can be automatically classified into one of these categories. From a photography of the eye, a region of interest is detected and its low-level features are extracted, generating a feature vector that describes it, to be finally classified in one of the target categories. This paper presents an exhaustive study about the problem at hand using different texture analysis methods in three colour spaces and different machine learning algorithms. All these methods and classifiers have been tested on a dataset composed of 105 images from healthy subjects and the results have been statistically analysed. As a result, the manual process done by experts can be automated with the benefits of being faster and unaffected by subjective factors, with maximum accuracy over 95%. PMID:22567040

  16. Comparison of conventional MRI and MR arthrography in the evaluation of wrist ligament tears: A preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Srivastava, Deep N; Sharma, Raju; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Kotwal, Prakash P; Sharma, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To compare conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in the evaluation of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and intrinsic wrist ligament tears. Materials and Methods: T1-weighted, fat suppressed (FS) proton density plus T2-weighted (FS PD/T2), 3D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) sequences and direct MR arthrography were performed in 53 patients with wrist pain. Images were evaluated for the presence and location of TFCC, scapholunate ligament (SLL) and lunatotriquetral ligament (LTL) tears, and imaging findings were compared with operative findings in 16 patients who underwent arthroscopy or open surgery (gold standard). Results: Sixteen patients underwent arthroscopy/open surgery: 12 TFCC tears were detected arthroscopically out of which 9 were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, 10 on MEDIC sequence, and all 12 were detected on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in the detection of TFCC tears were 75%, 83.3%, and 100%, respectively. Out of the eight arthroscopically confirmed SLL tears, three tears were detected on FS PD/T2 sequence, five on MEDIC sequence, and all eight were visualized on MR arthrography. The sensitivities of FS PD/T2, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting SLL tears were 37.5%, 62.5%, and 100%, respectively. One arthroscopically confirmed LTL tear was diagnosed on FS PD/T2 sequence, three on MEDIC sequence, and all five arthroscopically confirmed LTL tears were detected with MR arthrography. The sensitivities of PD, MEDIC sequences, and MR arthrography in detecting LTL tears were 20%, 40%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: MR arthrography is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament tears. PMID:25114389

  17. The Hug-up Test: A New, Sensitive Diagnostic Test for Supraspinatus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Lei; Ao, Ying-Fang; Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The supraspinatus tendon is the most commonly affected tendon in rotator cuff tears. Early detection of a supraspinatus tear using an accurate physical examination is, therefore, important. However, the currently used physical tests for detecting supraspinatus tears are poor diagnostic indicators and involve a wide range of sensitivity and specificity values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a new physical test for the diagnosis of supraspinatus tears and evaluate its accuracy in comparison with conventional tests. Methods: Between November 2012 and January 2014, 200 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy were prospectively evaluated preoperatively. The hug-up test, empty can (EC) test, full can (FC) test, Neer impingement sign, and Hawkins-Kennedy impingement sign were used and compared statistically for their accuracy in terms of supraspinatus tears, with arthroscopic findings as the gold standard. Muscle strength was precisely quantified using an electronic digital tensiometer. Results: The prevalence of supraspinatus tears was 76.5%. The hug-up test demonstrated the highest sensitivity (94.1%), with a low negative likelihood ratio (NLR, 0.08) and comparable specificity (76.6%) compared with the other four tests. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the hug-up test was 0.854, with no statistical difference compared with the EC test (z = 1.438, P = 0.075) or the FC test (z = 1.498, P = 0.067). The hug-up test showed no statistical difference in terms of detecting different tear patterns according to the position (χ2 = 0.578, P = 0.898) and size (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.999) compared with the arthroscopic examination. The interobserver reproducibility of the hug-up test was high, with a kappa coefficient of 0.823. Conclusions: The hug-up test can accurately detect supraspinatus tears with a high sensitivity, comparable specificity, and low NLR compared with the conventional clinical tests and

  18. Comparison of Semi-Invasive "Internal Splinting" and Open Suturing Techniques in Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Memisoglu, Kaya; Aydin, Adem; Atmaca, Halil; Baran, Tuncay; Odabas Ozgur, Bahar; Ozgur, Turgay; Kantar, Cengizhan

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the semi-invasive "internal splinting" (SIIS) method for repair of Achilles tendon rupture relative to open repair with Krakow sutures. Efficacy was evaluated based on the clinical and functional outcomes, postoperative magnetic resonance imaging measurements, isokinetic results, and surgical complication rates. Functional measurements included the Thermann and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle scores, bilateral ankle dorsiflexion, and plantar flexion measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare the bilateral length and thickness of each Achilles tendon. The isokinetic outcomes were evaluated using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Of the 45 patients meeting the inclusion criteria, 24 were treated by SIIS and 21 by the open Krackow suture technique. The mean follow-up time for all patients was 43.7 (range 6 to 116) months. In the SIIS group, patients returned to normal daily activities after 7.2 (range 6 to 8) weeks compared with 14.3 (range 12 to 15) weeks in the open surgery group. The AOFAS ankle scores were 93.5 (range 82 to 100) points in the open repair group and 96.2 (range 86 to 100) points in the SIIS group. The Thermann scores were 80.4 (range 53 to 91) points for the open repair group and 87.9 (range 81 to 100) points for the SIIS method. The mean Achilles length on the operated side measured using magnetic resonance imaging was 175.06 (range 110 to 224) mm and 177.76 (range 149 to 214) mm for the open surgery and SIIS groups, respectively. Sensory impairment in the territory of the sural nerve was identified in 1 patient immediately after SIIS surgery, although this defect had completely resolved within 12 months. SIIS yielded better outcomes relative to the open surgery group according to the isokinetic measurements. Taken together, these data indicate the SIIS method for Achilles tendon ruptures performed better in terms of both functional and objective outcomes

  19. Fifteen Year Prospective Comparison of Patellar & Hamstring Tendon Grafts for ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Justin; Salmon, Lucy; Kok, Alison; Linklater, James; Pinczewski, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This prospective longitudinal study compares isolated endoscopic ACL reconstruction utilizing 4-strand hamstring tendon (HT) or patellar tendon (PT) autograft over a 15-year period with respect to clinical outcomes and the development of osteoarthritis. Method: 90 consecutive patients with isolated ACL rupture were reconstructed with a PT autograft and 90 patients received HT autograft, with an identical surgical technique. Patients were assessed at 2, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years. Assessment included the IKDC Knee Ligament Evaluation including radiographic evaluation, KT1000, kneeling pain, and clinical outcomes. Results: Subjects who received the PT graft had significantly worse outcomes at 15 years for the variables of radiologically detectable osteoarthritis (p=0.001), motion loss (p=0.02), single leg hop test (p=0.002), participation in strenuous activity (p=0.03), knee related decrease in activity level (p=0.002) and kneeling pain (p=0.03). There was no significant difference between the HT and PT groups in overall IKDC grade (p=0.28). ACL graft rupture occurred in 16% of HT group and 8% of the PT group (p=0.10). Contralateral ACL rupture occurred in significantly more PT patients (24%) than HT patients (12%) (p=0.03). Conclusion: Significant differences have developed at 15 years after surgery which were not seen at earlier reviews. Compared to the HT Group, the PT group had significantly worse outcomes with respect to radiological osteoarthritis, range of motion and functional tests but no significant difference in laxity was identified. There was a high incidence of ACL injury after reconstruction, to both the reconstructed and the contralateral knee.

  20. Characterization and comparison of post-natal rat Achilles tendon-derived stem cells at different development stages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jialin; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Zeyu; Zhu, Ting; Shen, Weiliang; Ran, Jisheng; Tang, Qiaomei; Gong, Xiaonan; Backman, Ludvig J.; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Xiaowen; Wen, Feiqiu; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) are a potential cell source for tendon tissue engineering. The striking morphological and structural changes of tendon tissue during development indicate the complexity of TSPCs at different stages. This study aims to characterize and compare post-natal rat Achilles tendon tissue and TSPCs at different stages of development. The tendon tissue showed distinct differences during development: the tissue structure became denser and more regular, the nuclei became spindle-shaped and the cell number decreased with time. TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue showed the highest self-renewal ability, cell proliferation, and differentiation potential towards mesenchymal lineage, compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue. Microarray data showed up-regulation of several groups of genes in TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue, which may account for the unique cell characteristics during this specific stage of development. Our results indicate that TSPCs derived from 7 day Achilles tendon tissue is a superior cell source as compared to TSPCs derived from 1 day and 56 day tissue, demonstrating the importance of choosing a suitable stem cell source for effective tendon tissue engineering and regeneration. PMID:26972579

  1. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cannon DL. Flexor and extensor tendon injuries. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . ... Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  2. Comparison of the Thickness of Pulley and Flexor Tendon Between in Neutral and in Flexed Positions of Trigger Finger

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Junko; Ishii, Yoshinori; Noguchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to compare the morphology of the A1 pulley and flexor tendons in idiopathic trigger finger of digits other than the thumb between in neutral position and in the position with the interphalangeal joints full flexed and with the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint 0° extended (hook grip position). Method: A total of 48 affected digits and 48 contralateral normal digits from 48 patients who initially diagnosed with idiopathic trigger finger were studied sonographically. Sonographic analysis was focused on the A1 pulley and flexor tendons at the level of the MP joint in the transverse plane. We measured the anterior-posterior thickness of A1 pulley and the sum of the flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus tendons, and also measured the maximum radialulnar width of the flexor tendon in neutral and hook grip positions, respectively. Each measurement was compared between in neutral and in hook grip positions, and also between the affected and contralateral normal digits in each position. Results: In all the digits, the anterior-posterior thickness of flexor tendons significantly increased in hook grip position as compared with in neutral position, whereas radial-ulnar width significantly decreased. Both the A1 pulley and flexor tendons were thicker in the affected digits as compared with contralateral normal digits. Conclusion: The thickness of flexor tendons was significantly increased anteroposteriorly in hook grip position as compared with in neutral position. In trigger finger, A1 pulley and flexor tendon were thickened, and mismatch between the volume of the flexor tendon sheath and the tendons, especially in anterior-posterior direction, might be a cause of repetitive triggering. PMID:27099639

  3. Comparison of the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Karakoc, Yunus; Ozkok, Ahmet; Arici, Ceyhun; Ozcan, Omer; Ipcioglu, Osman

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of first and second generation silicone hydrogel (SiH) contact lens wear on tear film osmolarity. METHODS The healthy subjects who have never used contact lenses before were enrolled in the study. Tear film osmolarity values of 16 eyes (group 1) who wore first generation SiH contact lenses were compared with those of 18 eyes (group 2) who wore second generation SiH contact lenses after three months follow-up. RESULTS Before contact lens wear, tear film osmolarity of groups 1 and 2 were 305.02±49.08 milliosmole (mOsm) and 284.66±30.18mOsm, respectively. After three months of contact lens wear, osmolarity values were found 317.74±60.23mOsm in group 1 and 298.40±37.77mOsm in group 2. Although osmolarity values for both groups of SiH contact lens wear after three months periods were slightly higher than before the contact lens wear, the difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION Contact lens wear may cause evaporation from the tear film and can increase tear film osmolarity leading to symptoms of dry eye disease. In the current study, there is a tendency to increase tear film osmolarity for both groups of SiH contact lens wear, but the difference is not statistically significant. PMID:24195046

  4. Do Cells Contribute to Tendon and Ligament Biomechanics?

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Huster, Daniel; Fritsch, Sebastian; Hädrich, Carsten; Koch, Holger; Schmidt, Peter; Sichting, Freddy; Wagner, Martin Franz-Xaver; Boldt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen. Material and Methods Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay. Results The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain. Discussion The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in

  5. Unusual location of a posttraumatic ganglion and rupture of the peroneus brevis tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Waldecker, Ute

    2005-01-01

    The typical location of a peroneus brevis tendon tear has been described at the posterior margin of the fibula due to an entrapment mechanism or repetitive anterior subluxation of the tendon. A case of a posttraumatic intratendinous ganglion of the peroneus brevis tendon in the distal third of the peroneus brevis is reported. The ganglion developed from a longitudinal tear in the tendon substance after an inversion ankle sprain. This case is reported because of the unusual location. The clinical course and surgical treatment is also discussed. PMID:15768368

  6. Rotator Cuff Tear Consequent to Glenohumeral Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Christian, Matthew W; Lovering, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old collegiate running back who was tackled during a football game and sustained a posterior glenohumeral dislocation. He was referred to an orthopaedist and presented 3 weeks after the injury, and, following examination, further imaging was ordered by the orthopaedist due to rotator cuff weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete tear of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus, as well as a posterior Bankart lesion, a subscapularis tear, and a dislocation of the biceps long head tendon into the reverse Hill-Sachs lesion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):708. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0413. PMID:27477475

  7. Overuse tendon conditions: time to change a confusing terminology.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Khan, K M; Puddu, G

    1998-01-01

    In overuse clinical conditions in and around tendons, frank inflammation is infrequent, and is associated mostly with tendon ruptures. Tendinosis implies tendon degeneration without clinical or histological signs of intratendinous inflammation, and is not necessarily symptomatic. Patients undergoing an operation for Achilles tendinopathy show similar areas of degeneration. When the term tendinitis is used in a clinical context, it does not refer to a specific histopathological entity. However, tendinitis is commonly used for conditions that are truly tendinoses, and this leads athletes and coaches to underestimate the proven chronicity of the condition. Paratenonitis is characterized by acute edema and hypermia of the paratenon, with infiltration of inflammatory cells, possibly with production of a fibrinous exudate that fills the tendon sheath, causing the typical crepitus that can be felt on clinical examination. The term partial tear of a tendon should describe a macroscopically evident subcutaneous partial tear of a tendon, an uncommon acute lesion. Most articles describing the surgical treatment of 'partial tears' of a given tendon in reality deal with degenerative tendinopathies. The combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance should be labeled tendinopathy. According to the tissues affected, the terms tendinopathy, paratendinopathy, or pantendinopathy should be used. PMID:9848596

  8. Comma Sign–Directed Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Dilisio, Matthew F.; Neyton, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The comma sign was described as an arthroscopic landmark to identify the torn subscapularis stump to mobilize and repair the tendon in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears. It was hypothesized that it is composed of the humeral attachments of the superior glenohumeral and coracohumeral ligaments. This arthroscopic finding has since become accepted orthopaedic nomenclature pathognomonic for subscapularis tears and a key component of subscapularis tear classification. We propose an alternative theory of the pathoanatomy of the comma sign in anterosuperior rotator cuff tears and present the technique of comma sign–directed repairs of combined subscapularis and supraspinatus lesions. After appropriate releases, tendon-to-tendon repair of the distal-superior aspect of the comma sign to the upper border of the remnant subscapularis results in anatomic re-creation of the intra-articular portion of the torn subscapularis with concomitant reduction of the anterior leading edge of the supraspinatus and reconstitution of the rotator cable complex. A tension-free, single-anchor subscapularis repair is then performed to secure the tendon to the lesser tuberosity. After subscapularis repair, the supraspinatus that was previously retracted to the glenoid rim takes the appearance of a crescent-type tear that is easily approximated to its anatomic insertion. PMID:25685676

  9. No prosthetic management of massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Cesari, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    A massive rotator cuff tear is not necessarily irreparable. Number of tendons involved, muscle-tendon unit quality, and decreased acromionhumeral distance (AHD) are as important as tear size in determining reparability of lesion. Massive and irreparable rotator cuff tears cannot be anatomically repaired to the bone and are a common source of pain and disability even in middle-aged patients. In these patients when conservative management has failed, it is possible to perform different surgical techniques. A functional repair can help to restore the horizontal force couple of the cuff on the humeral head and to increase the AHD. Debridement of irreparable tears and biceps tenotomy or tenodesis can have a role in low functional demand patients but results deteriorate over time. Recently, several commercially available tissue-engineered biological and synthetic scaffolds have been developed to augment rotator cuff repairs. The aim is to provide a mechanical improvement in case of poor quality tissue at time zero and give a support to have a better cuff healing. In selected cases, the scaffold can be used also to bridge tendon defect. Patients who not have pseudoparalysis, cuff tear arthropathy and with intact deltoid function can benefit from tendon transfers with satisfactory outcomes. These different procedures should be chosen for each patient with selected criteria and after a satisfactory explanation about the really possible expectation after surgery.

  10. Rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Evaluation of injury of the spring ligament and clinical assessment of tendon transfer and ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Gazdag, A R; Cracchiolo, A

    1997-05-01

    Eighteen of twenty-two patients who were having a tendon transfer to treat rupture of the posterior tibial tendon had evidence of injury to the spring ligament. The injury consisted of a longitudinal tear in the ligament in seven patients, a lax ligament without a gross tear in seven, and a complete rupture of the ligament in four. The ruptured posterior tibial tendon was treated with transfer of the flexor digitorum longus in twenty of the twenty-two patients. A variety of methods were used to repair the ligament. It is essential to determine the status of the spring ligament when patients are managed for rupture of the posterior tibial tendon. Patients who have a torn or lax spring ligament in addition to the ruptured posterior tibial tendon may have more severe abnormalities of the hindfoot than those who have only a ruptured tendon. PMID:9160939

  11. Endoscopic Treatment of Gluteus Medius Tears: A Review.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, Frantz R; Cohn, Randy; Youm, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a term used to describe disorders of the peritrochanteric region. This constellation of conditions includes greater trochanteric bursitis, gluteus medius (GM) tears, and external coxa saltans or snapping hip syndrome. Tears of the abductor mechanism, more specifically gluteus medius tears, have recently gained a considerable amount of interest in the orthopaedic literature. Abductor tears were first described by Bunker and Kagan in the late 1990s. They used the rotator cuff as an analogous structure to describe the pathological process associated with gluteus medius tears. Tears of the gluteus medius tendon can often be difficult to recognize. The clinical presentation is often attributed to trochanteric bursal inflammation, without any further workup. Provocative hip physical examination findings are an important key to proper diagnosis of abductor injuries. Depending on the size of the tear, patients with abductor tendon pathology may present with a Trendelenburg gait and reduced resisted abduction strength accompanied by pain. Initial noninvasive management of greater trochanteric pain syndrome includes oral or topical anti-inflammatory medication and activity modification. Physical therapy or other treatment modalities can be considered, with a focus on core strengthening, truncal alignment, and iliotibial band stretching. Gluteus medius tears have historically been repaired in an open fashion; however, the advent of new endoscopic surgery techniques has allowed for a less invasive approach. Access to the peritrochanteric space affords the surgeon with access to pathology associated with the greater trochanter, iliotibial band, trochanteric bursa, sciatic nerve, short external-rota tors, iliopsoas tendon, and the gluteus medius and minimus tendon attachments. Over the last decade, we have seen rapid technological advances in hip arthroscopy, improved diagnostic imaging and interpretation, and an improved

  12. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  13. Tear Film Mucins: Front Line Defenders of the Ocular Surface; Comparison with Airway and Gastrointestinal Tract Mucins

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.; Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    The ocular surface including the cornea and conjunctiva and its overlying tear film are the first tissues of the eye to interact with the external environment. The tear film is complex containing multiple layers secreted by different glands and tissues. Each layer contains specific molecules and proteins that not only maintain the health of the cells on the ocular surface by providing nourishment and removal of waste products but also protect these cells from environment. A major protective mechanism that the corneal and conjunctival cells have developed is secretion of the innermost layer of the tear film, the mucous layer. Both the cornea and conjunctiva express membrane spanning mucins, whereas the conjunctiva also produces soluble mucins. The mucins present in the tear film serve to maintain the hydration of the ocular surface and to provide lubrication and anti-adhesive properties between the cells of the ocular surface and conjunctiva during the blink. A third function is to contribute to the epithelial barrier to prevent pathogens from binding to the ocular surface. This review will focus on the different types of mucins produced by the corneal and conjunctival epithelia. Also included in this review will be a presentation of the structure of mucins, regulation of mucin production, role of mucins in ocular surface diseases, and the differences in mucin production by the ocular surface, airways and gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23954166

  14. Aspect ratio effects on neoclassical tearing modes from comparison between DIII-D and National Spherical Torus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Brennan, D. P.

    2012-06-01

    Neoclassical tearing mode islands are sustained by helically perturbed bootstrap currents arising at finite beta from toroidal effects that trap a fraction of the particles in non-circulating orbits. DIII-D and NSTX are here operated with similar shape and cross-sectional area but almost a factor of two difference in inverse aspect ratio a /R. In these experiments, destabilized n =1 tearing modes were self-stabilized (reached the "marginal point") by reducing neutral-beam power and thus beta. The measure of the marginal island gives information on the small-island stabilizing physics that in part (with seeding) governs onset. The marginal island width on NSTX is found to be about three times the ion banana width and agrees with that measured in DIII-D, except for DIII-D modes closer to the magnetic axis, which are about two times the ion banana width. There is a balance of the helically perturbed bootstrap term with small island effects with the sum of the classical and curvature terms in the modified Rutherford equation for tearing-mode stability at the experimental marginal point. Empirical evaluation of this sum indicates that while the stabilizing effect of the curvature term is negligible in DIII-D, it is important in NSTX. The mode temporal behavior from the start of neutral-beam injection reduction also suggests that NSTX operates closer to marginal classical tearing stability; this explains why there is little hysteresis in beta between mode onset, saturation, and self-stabilization (while DIII-D has large hysteresis in beta). NIMROD code module component calculations based on DIII-D and NSTX reconstructed experimental equilibria are used to diagnose and confirm the relative importance of the stabilizing curvature effect, an advantage for low aspect ratio; the relatively greater curvature effect makes for less susceptibility to NTM onset even if the classical tearing stability index is near marginal.

  15. Aspect ratio effects on neoclassical tearing modes from comparison between DIII-D and National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.; Buttery, R. J.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Brennan, D. P.

    2012-06-15

    Neoclassical tearing mode islands are sustained by helically perturbed bootstrap currents arising at finite beta from toroidal effects that trap a fraction of the particles in non-circulating orbits. DIII-D and NSTX are here operated with similar shape and cross-sectional area but almost a factor of two difference in inverse aspect ratio a/R. In these experiments, destabilized n=1 tearing modes were self-stabilized (reached the 'marginal point') by reducing neutral-beam power and thus beta. The measure of the marginal island gives information on the small-island stabilizing physics that in part (with seeding) governs onset. The marginal island width on NSTX is found to be about three times the ion banana width and agrees with that measured in DIII-D, except for DIII-D modes closer to the magnetic axis, which are about two times the ion banana width. There is a balance of the helically perturbed bootstrap term with small island effects with the sum of the classical and curvature terms in the modified Rutherford equation for tearing-mode stability at the experimental marginal point. Empirical evaluation of this sum indicates that while the stabilizing effect of the curvature term is negligible in DIII-D, it is important in NSTX. The mode temporal behavior from the start of neutral-beam injection reduction also suggests that NSTX operates closer to marginal classical tearing stability; this explains why there is little hysteresis in beta between mode onset, saturation, and self-stabilization (while DIII-D has large hysteresis in beta). NIMROD code module component calculations based on DIII-D and NSTX reconstructed experimental equilibria are used to diagnose and confirm the relative importance of the stabilizing curvature effect, an advantage for low aspect ratio; the relatively greater curvature effect makes for less susceptibility to NTM onset even if the classical tearing stability index is near marginal.

  16. Comparison of Roll Stitch Technique and Core Suture Technique for Extensor Tendon Repair at the Metacarpophalangeal Joint level

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamid; Mozaffarian, Kamran; Golmakani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proper suturing technique is needed to ensure good outcome in extensor tendon surgery. Different techniques have been reported for the repair of extensor tendon injuries at the level of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ). These reports were in vitro studies on cadaver models. Repair techniques must be clinically tested, to determine results. Objectives: The purpose of this in vivo study was to compare results of extensor tendon repair, using roll stitch and core suture techniques. Patients and Methods: Forty two fingers, in 38 patients (aged 15- 45 years), with simple complete extensor tendon injuries in the MCPJ area, were identified and operated by a single surgeon. The patients were divided into two groups, according to the technique used for tendon repair. The first group consisted of 21 digits, in 19 patients, who were repaired with roll stitch technique, while the second group consisted of 21 digits, in 19 patients, who were repaired with core suture technique. The same splint and rehabilitation regimen (early passive range of motion) were given to all patients. The splints were removed at 6 weeks after surgery and range of motion of the operated fingers was measured and compared to uninjured hands, after 12 weeks. Results: Five patients were lost to follow up or excluded from the study. There was no rupture of the repaired tendons in the groups. There was no statistically significant difference in mean MCPJ flexion, proximal interphalangeal joint (PIPJ) flexion, distal interphalangeal joint (DIPJ) flexion and total range of motion of the fingers, between the two groups. However, extension lag was significantly more common in the second group (11 of 19 digits) compared the first group (four of 17 digits). Conclusions: Roll stitch technique had superior outcome compared to the modified Kessler technique, when performed in the MCPJ area. Level of evidence: Therapeutic (Level III)

  17. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  18. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  19. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient's clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  20. Artificial tears potpourri: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Moshirfar, Majid; Pierson, Kasey; Hanamaikai, Kamalani; Santiago-Caban, Luis; Muthappan, Valliammai; Passi, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous brands and types of artificial tears are available on the market for the treatment of dysfunctional tear syndrome. Past literature has focused on comparing the components of these products on patient’s clinical improvement. The wide array of products on the market presents challenges to both clinicians and patients when trying to choose between available tear replacement therapies. Different formulations affect patients based on etiology and severity of disease. In order to provide an unbiased comparison between available tear replacement therapies, we conducted a literature review of existing studies and National Institutes of Health clinical trials on commercially available, brand name artificial tears. Outcomes evaluated in each study, as well as the percent of patients showing clinical and symptomatic improvement, were analyzed. Fifty-one studies evaluating different brands of artificial tears, and their efficacy were identified. Out of the 51 studies, 18 were comparison studies testing brand name artificial tears directly against each other. Nearly all formulations of artificial tears provided significant benefit to patients with dysfunctional tear syndrome, but some proved superior to others. From the study data, a recommended treatment flowchart was derived. PMID:25114502

  1. In Vitro Evaluation of a Novel Non-Mulberry Silk Scaffold for Use in Tendon Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Naot, Dorit; Chhana, Ashika; Matthews, Brya G.; McIntosh, Julie D.; Lin, Sandy T.C.; Choi, Ally J.; Callon, Karen E.; Dunbar, P. Rod; Lesage, Stephanie; Coleman, Brendan; Cornish, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Tearing of the rotator cuff tendon in the shoulder is a significant clinical problem, with large/full-thickness tears present in ∼22% of the general population and recurrent tear rates postarthroscopic repair being quoted as high as 94%. Tissue-engineered biomaterials are increasingly being investigated as a means to augment rotator cuff repairs, with the aim of inducing host cell responses to increase tendon tissue regeneration. Silk-derived materials are of particular interest due to the high availability, mechanical strength, and biocompatibility of silks. In this study, Spidrex®, a novel knitted, non-mulberry silk fibroin scaffold was evaluated in vitro for its potential to improve tendon regeneration. Spidrex was compared with a knitted Bombyx mori silk scaffold, a 3D collagen gel and Fiberwire® suture material. Primary human and rat tenocytes successfully adhered to Spidrex and significantly increased in number over a 14 day period (p<0.05), as demonstrated by fluorescent calcein-AM staining and alamarBlue® assays. A similar growth pattern was observed with human tenocytes cultured on the B. mori scaffold. Morphologically, human tenocytes elongated along the silk fibers of Spidrex, assuming a tenocytic cell shape, and were less circular with a higher aspect ratio compared with human tenocytes cultured on the B. mori silk scaffold and within the collagen gel (p<0.05). Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR showed that rat tenocytes cultured on Spidrex had increased expression of tenocyte-related genes such as fibromodullin, scleraxis, and tenomodulin (p<0.05). Expression of genes that indicate transdifferentiation toward a chondrocytic or osteoblastic lineage were significantly lower in tenocytes cultured on Spidrex in comparison to the collagen gel (p<0.05). Immunogenicity assessment by the maturation of and cytokine release from primary human dendritic cells demonstrated that Spidrex enhanced dendritic cell maturation in a similar manner to the

  2. Infraspinatus delamination does not affect supraspinatus tear repair.

    PubMed

    Zilber, Sébastien; Carillon, Yannick; Lapner, Peter C; Walch, Gilles; Nové-Josserand, Laurent

    2007-05-01

    Supraspinatus full-thickness tears with associated infraspinatus delamination are a frequent lesion, although the results of repair have not been reported. We retrospectively identified 35 patients treated for this cuff lesion among 378 open repaired full-thickness cuff tears. The aim of the study was to assess the subjective, objective, and anatomic outcomes of a subset of patients with supraspinatus tears involving delamination of the whole infraspinatus tendon. Thirty of the 35 patients were reviewed with magnetic resonance imaging at a minimum followup of 2 years (mean, 3.5 years; range, 2-6.5 years). The mean nonweighted Constant-Murley score at followup was 80/100 points, with an average gain of 17 points. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed all supraspinatus tendons but two were continuous. We observed no tear of the infraspinatus tendon, although a persistent delamination was present in 11 cases. One half of the patients had minor weakness in external rotation. One third of the infraspinatus muscles had minor fatty infiltration. Conservation of the infraspinatus tendon after closing the delamination did not seem to compromise the outcome of the supraspinatus repair. Avoiding resection of the infraspinatus delamination and treatment with simple curettage and closure yields satisfactory midterm functional and anatomic results. PMID:17308479

  3. Bilateral Congenital Agenesis of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon: The Beginning

    PubMed Central

    Rego Costa, Francisco; Esteves, Cátia; Melão, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The biceps brachii muscle is prone to variants but absence of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is an exceptionally rare anomaly. This report concerns the fourth case of bilateral congenital absence of the LHB tendon and presents the ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings. Our case has the peculiarity of being the first in which bilateral LHB tendon agenesis is not associated with rotator cuff or labral tears. PMID:26904345

  4. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and

  5. Tendon, tendon healing, hyperlipidemia and statins

    PubMed Central

    Esenkaya, Irfan; Unay, Koray

    2011-01-01

    Summary Both hyperlipidemia and metabolic syndrome have adverse effect on tendon structure. Atorvastatin is most widely used antihyperlipidemic drug. Statins have adverse effects on the tendon. Many studies have analyzed the relationship between atorvastatin and skeletal muscles. Atorvastatin administered after the surgical repair of a ruptured tendon appears to affect revascularization, collagenization, inflammatory cell infiltration, and collagen construction. Therefore, further investigations on the effects of atorvastatin on tendon healing are needed. PMID:23738266

  6. Results of the repair of acute rotator cuff tears is not influenced by tear retraction

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Bryan R.; Byrne, Abigail N.; Higgins, Laurence D.; Shah, Anup; Fowler, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated retraction in the setting of acute rotator cuff tears and determined its effects on patient outcomes and tendon repair integrity. Materials and Methods: A total of 22 patients had surgery within 6 weeks or less from the time of injury. Fifteen of these patients were prospectively followed at a minimum of 2 years; average 40.5 months (range 24-69). Pre-operative objective and subjective outcomes were compared. Tendon repair integrity was assessed with ultrasound at a minimum of 1 year from surgery. The population was stratified into Group 1 (8 patients) with minimal intra-operative medial tendon retraction to the mid-line level of the humeral head and Group 2 (7 patients) with a large medial tendon retraction to the glenohumeral joint or greater. Results: The average time to surgery from the onset of symptoms was 27 days (range, 6-42). Post-operative motion increased significantly for external rotation and forward elevation, 77% of patients were pain free, 80% were completely satisfied, and 100% would have the surgery again. Group 1 (small retraction) versus Group 2 (large retraction) showed that post-operative pain levels, satisfaction, range of motion, strength, subjective shoulder value (95.4% vs. 92.3%), Constant Score (80.8 vs. 78.1), and American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (96.2 vs. 93.5) scores were not statistically different. Ultrasound showed a tendon repair integrity rate of 87%. 2 patients who did have a re-tear were in Group 2, yet had comparative outcomes. Conclusion: In acute rotator cuff tears, equal patient satisfaction, pain scores, range of motion, strength, and outcome measures should be expected with surgical repair despite the level of retraction. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic level IV PMID:24167400

  7. Comparison of corneal sensitivity, tear function and corneal staining following laser in situ keratomileusis with two femtosecond laser platforms

    PubMed Central

    Petznick, Andrea; Chew, Annabel; Hall, Reece C; Chan, Cordelia ML; Rosman, Mohamad; Tan, Donald; Tong, Louis; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate longitudinal changes in corneal sensitivity, tear function, and corneal staining in patients who underwent laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using two different femtosecond lasers. Methods In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, contralateral eyes of 45 patients underwent flap creation by either VisuMax or IntraLase™ femtosecond laser. Corneal sensitivity, tear break up time (TBUT), Schirmer’s test, and corneal fluorescein staining were assessed preoperatively and at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Results There were no statistical differences in any clinical outcome measure between the two femtosecond lasers (P > 0.05), although there was a trend towards slightly lower reductions for corneal sensitivity and TBUT in VisuMax-operated eyes. Overall, corneal sensitivity was significantly reduced at 1 week (P < 0.05), 1 month (P < 0 .001), and 3 months (P < 0.001) postoperatively. A significantly greater reduction of corneal sensitivity was noted in eyes with a myopic spherical equivalent of −6.00 diopters (D) to −11.25 D as compared with eyes that had a relatively lower level of myopia of less than −6.00 D (P < 0.001). TBUT and Schirmer’s test values were significantly diminished at 1 week postoperatively (P < 0.04). Overall, corneal staining was significantly increased at 1 week postoperatively (P < 0.001). The level of myopia did not significantly affect postoperative changes in TBUT, Schirmer’s test values, or corneal staining (P > 0.05). Conclusion This study showed that changes in corneal sensitivity, tear function, and corneal staining were statistically similar in LASIK using VisuMax and IntraLase femtosecond lasers for flap creation. However, the trend towards faster recovery of corneal sensitivity and TBUT observed in VisuMax-operated eyes may be attributable to improved technical specifications. PMID:23576858

  8. Rotator Cuff Tears

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors because of a rotator cuff problem. A torn rotator cuff will weaken your shoulder. This means ... or more of the rotator cuff tendons is torn, the tendon no longer fully attaches to the ...

  9. A comparison of techniques for fixation of the quadriceps muscle-tendon complex for in vitro biomechanical testing of the knee joint in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schöttle, Philip; Goudakos, Ioannis; Rosenstiel, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Taylor, William R; Duda, Georg N; Heller, Markus O

    2009-01-01

    Whilst in vitro testing can contribute to a better understanding of the biomechanical interactions at the knee joint, the application of physiological-like muscle forces in vitro remains challenging. One main difficulty seems to be the adequate fixation of the muscle-tendon complex to the mechanical apparatus that provides the forces in vitro. The goal of this study was to compare the ability of different muscle-tendon fixation mechanisms, including a new technique developed to optimise the interface grip of the soft tissues, to reliably transmit physiological in vivo loads through the muscle-tendon complex to the attached bone. The fixations of three quadriceps components in 16 right knees of skeletally mature female merino sheep were loaded to failure using four different fixation techniques (aluminium clamp, freeze clamp, suture technique and a new extension hull technique). Each technique was tested 12 times: 4 times on each individual quadriceps component. A factorial analysis for repeated measurements was undertaken to examine differences between the different fixation techniques. The extension hull technique and the aluminium clamp performed similarly, exceeding the computationally determined physiological forces in all but one trial and achieved higher failure loads than the suture technique. Although the freeze clamp reached the highest mean load to failure, it also failed more often than the extension hull technique. This comparison of the fixation techniques suggests that the new extension hull technique is a suitable fixation method for applying physiological-like muscle loading in an in vitro set-up. It cannot only be handled in a very simple manner, but also possesses a compact, lightweight construction, providing the possibility for the application of more complex loading conditions that include, e.g. the action of multiple muscles of the knee flexor and extensor group concurrently. PMID:18539516

  10. How does a cadaver model work for testing ultrasound diagnostic capability for rheumatic-like tendon damage?

    PubMed

    Janta, Iustina; Morán, Julio; Naredo, Esperanza; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Uson, Jacqueline; Möller, Ingrid; Bong, David; Bruyn, George A W; D Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Filippucci, Emilio; Hammer, Hilde Berner; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Terslev, Lene; González, Jorge Murillo; Mérida, José Ramón; Carreño, Luis

    2016-06-01

    To establish whether a cadaver model can serve as an effective surrogate for the detection of tendon damage characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, we evaluated intraobserver and interobserver agreement in the grading of RA-like tendon tears shown by US, as well as the concordance between the US findings and the surgically induced lesions in the cadaver model. RA-like tendon damage was surgically induced in the tibialis anterior tendon (TAT) and tibialis posterior tendon (TPT) of ten ankle/foot fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens. Of the 20 tendons examined, six were randomly assigned a surgically induced partial tear; six a complete tear; and eight left undamaged. Three rheumatologists, experts in musculoskeletal US, assessed from 1 to 5 the quality of US imaging of the cadaveric models on a Likert scale. Tendons were then categorized as having either no damage, (0); partial tear, (1); or complete tear (2). All 20 tendons were blindly and independently evaluated twice, over two rounds, by each of the three observers. Overall, technical performance was satisfactory for all items in the two rounds (all values over 2.9 in a Likert scale 1-5). Intraobserver and interobserver agreement for US grading of tendon damage was good (mean κ values 0.62 and 0.71, respectively), with greater reliability found in the TAT than the TPT. Concordance between US findings and experimental tendon lesions was acceptable (70-100 %), again greater for the TAT than for the TPT. A cadaver model with surgically created tendon damage can be useful in evaluating US metric properties of RA tendon lesions. PMID:26995000

  11. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion. PMID:24045762

  12. Meniscus tears - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Knee cartilage tear - aftercare ... forms a buffer between the bones in your knee to protect the joint. The meniscus: Acts like a shock-absorber Helps lubricate your knee joint Can tear and limit your ability to ...

  13. Prevalence and Role of a Low-Lying Peroneus Brevis Muscle Belly in Patients With Peroneal Tendon Pathologic Features: A Potential Source of Tendon Subluxation.

    PubMed

    Mirmiran, Roya; Squire, Chad; Wassell, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A peroneus brevis low-lying muscle belly (LLMB) is a rare anomaly. A few published studies have supported the presence of this anomaly as an etiology for a peroneal tendon tear. However, the association between a peroneus brevis LLMB and tendon subluxation has not been well explored. In the present retrospective study, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative findings of 50 consecutive patients undergoing primary peroneal tendon surgery during a 5-year period were assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI compared with the intraoperative findings for identifying peroneal tendon disease were investigated. The presence of associated peroneal tendon pathologic features in patients with and without a peroneus brevis LLMB was also compared. The sensitivity of MRI was high for identifying peroneal tenosynovitis (81.58%) and tear (85.71%). Although the sensitivity of MRI for detecting a peroneus brevis LLMB (3.23%) and tendon subluxation (10.00%) was low, MRI had high specificity at 94.74% and 100%, respectively. Intraoperatively, a peroneus brevis LLMB was seen in 62.00% of the patients with chronic lateral ankle pain and was associated with 64.52% of the patients with tenosynovitis, 29.03% of those with tendon subluxation, and 80.65% of those with a peroneus brevis tendon tear. Although the presence of a peroneus brevis LLMB did not show any statistically significant association with peroneus brevis tendon subluxation, of the 10 patients with intraoperatively observed tendon subluxation, 9 had a concomitant peroneus brevis LLMB. More studies with larger patient populations are needed to better investigate the role of a peroneus brevis LLMB as a mass-occupying lesion resulting in peroneal tendon subluxation. PMID:25998478

  14. BILATERAL PATELLAR TENDON RUPTURE AT DIFFERENT SITES WITHOUT PREDISPOSING SYSTEMIC DISEASE OR STEROID USE

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin C.; Tancev, Alex; Fowler, Ty

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are extremely rare, and even more rare in patients without systemic disease. We describe bilateral simultaneous patellar tendon disruptions in the absence of systemic disease or steroid usage, with one tendon disruption at the inferior pole and the other an intrasubstance tear. The different locations of the ruptures are also exceedingly rare, as only two cases of non-identical ruptures have ever been reported. We also review all bilateral patellar tendon rupture case reports from English and German literature. PMID:19742095

  15. Pressurized liquid filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, G.E.

    1987-05-12

    This patent describes an apparatus for detecting a leak in a tension leg platform tendon, comprising: a fluid-tight tensioned tubular tendon, the tendon connected on its upper end to a buoyant offshore structure and on its lower end to an anchor means. The anchor means is connected to the sea floor; means for supplying liquid to the tendon; means for pressurizing the liquid in excess of the maximum hydrostatic pressure exerted by the sea water on the tendon; and means for monitoring pressure, the means monitoring variations in liquid pressure to the tendon.

  16. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  17. Distal biceps tendon injuries--current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Quach, Tony; Jazayeri, Reza; Sherman, Orrin H; Rosen, Jeffrey E

    2010-01-01

    Three percent of all biceps tendon ruptures occur at the distal aspect, where the tendon inserts into the radial tuberosity. Distal bicep tendon ruptures typically occur in middle-aged males after an eccentric extension load is applied to the elbow. Patients usually complain of a sudden, sharp, and painful tearing sensation in the antecubital region, with a palpable defect. The biceps squeeze and hook tests are specific maneuvers by which to diagnose distal biceps ruptures on physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ultrasound maybe be helpful to distinguish between partial and complete tears. Anatomic studies suggest there are two distinct insertions for the short and long heads of the distal biceps. The short head may be a more powerful flexor, and the long head may be a more powerful supinator. Nonoperative treatment typically results in loss of flexion and supination strength and endurance. Early anatomic re-attachment is the goal. Surgical approaches include one- or two-incision techniques, and tendon fixation methods include the use of suture anchors, bone tunnels, an endobutton, or biotenodesis screws. Biomechanical studies have shown that endobuttons have higher load-to-failure strengths, compared to the other fixation methods. However, clinical studies have demonstrated that patients do well regardless of surgical approach or fixation method. Possible complications include nerve injuries, heterotopic ossification, postoperative fracture, tendon rerupture, complex regional pain syndrome, and wound infection. Partial ruptures are significantly less common and initially can be treated conservatively. Chronic tears are more difficult to treat because of possible tendon retraction and poor tissue quality. Tendon grafts using semitendinosus, fascia lata, hamstring, Achilles (calcaneal), or flexor carpi radialis have been successfully used for length restoration in these cases. PMID:20632985

  18. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Samuel Salisbury, S T; Paul Buckley, C; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  19. Tears of the fascia cruris demonstrate characteristic sonographic features: a case series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Sarah; Chan, Otto; Webborn, Nick; Pritchard, Melanie; Morrissey, Dylan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background fascia cruris (FC) tears have recently been recognised in the literature, although little is known about their characteristic ultrasound findings. The aim was to describe the echo-graphic features of FC tears in order to improve recognition and diagnosis. Methods the ultrasound reports and images of >600 patients attending a specialist musculoskeletal clinic for Achilles tendon ultrasound scans between October 2010–May 2014 were reviewed. Any patient diagnosed with a FC tear had a structured data set extracted. All ultrasound images were performed by one consultant radiologist. Bilateral Achilles images were available for analysis. Results sixteen patients from >600 subjects were diagnosed with a FC tear. Fourteen subjects were male and two female (mean age 37.8; range 23–61), with seven elite level sports men. Nine tears were right sided and seven left, with eight situated laterally and seven medially. Seven of the tears were situated in the musculotendinous junction. Symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy co-existed in ten of sixteen subjects (average transverse diameter of Achilles tendon = 7.1±2.0 mm). Conclusion FC tears should be considered in the differential diagnoses for Achillodynia, diagnosed using their characteristic ultrasound findings, with a hypoechoic area at the medial or lateral attachment to the Achilles tendon in the transverse plane. PMID:26958540

  20. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  1. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  2. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  3. Biomechanical and tissue handling property comparison of decellularized and cryopreserved tibialis anterior tendons following extreme incubation and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J; Larsen, N; Burden, R; Chang, H; Caborn, D N M

    2009-01-01

    Little is known regarding the biomechanical profiles and tissue handling properties of decellularized and cryopreserved human tibialis anterior tendons prepared as allografts for ACL reconstruction. This study compared allografts prepared using two extremes of the same cryoprotectant incubation and rehydration technique with a standardly prepared control group. Porcine tibiae with similar apparent BMD were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens. Paired tendons were randomly divided into two experimental groups: Group 1 = 8 h incubation/15 min rehydration; Group 2 = 2 h incubation/1 h rehydration. Group 3 (control) consisted of ten standardly prepared tendons with 20 min rehydration. Tissue handling properties were graded during allograft preparation using a modified visual analog scale. Similar diameter allografts were fixed in matched diameter extraction drilled tibial tunnels with 35 mm long, 1 mm > tunnel diameter bioabsorbable interference screws. Potted constructs were mounted in a servo hydraulic device, pretensioned between 10-50 N at 0.1 Hz (10 cycles), and isometric pretensioned at 50 N for 1 min, prior to 500 submaximal loading cycles (50-250 N) at 0.5 Hz, and load to failure testing (20 mm/min). Constructs prepared under extreme conditions generally displayed comparable biomechanical properties to the control condition. Group 1 (8 h incubation/15 min rehydration)(-34 +/- 35 ms) and Group 2 (2 h incubation/1 h rehydration) (-22 +/- 38 ms) displayed smaller mean displacement-load peak phase timing differences over the initial ten cycles compared to Group 3 (control)(-42 +/- 49 ms), P = 0.004, suggesting greater relative construct stiffness. Group 1 (8 h incubation/15 min rehydration) (234.9 +/- 34 N/mm) and Group 2 (2 h incubation/1 h rehydration)(231.3 +/- 43 N/mm) displayed lower construct stiffness during load to failure testing than Group 3 (control)(284.5 +/- 25.2 N/mm), P = 0.003. Group 1 (8 h incubation/15 min rehydration) differed from

  4. Comparison of the Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Artificial Tears in a Rat Model of Corneal Scraping

    PubMed Central

    Daull, Philippe; Feraille, Laurence; Elena, Pierre-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Artificial tears (ATs) are used routinely to alleviate the symptoms of mild to moderate dry eye. Preservative-free cationic emulsions (eg, Cationorm®) are an innovative approach for the management of signs and symptoms of dry eye. The aim of the present exploratory experiment was to evaluate the efficacy of this cetalkonium chloride (CKC)-containing cationic emulsion on debrided cornea and to characterize its effects on scraping-induced inflammation. Methods: Four ATs were assessed in a rat model of corneal scraping. The upper part of the corneal epithelium was scraped before a 5-day treatment, followed by clinical evaluations and fluorescein staining to evaluate cornea recovery. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of the ATs was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Results: In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) revealed a trend toward better corneal clinical signs (lower IVCM scores) for the animals treated with the unpreserved ATs. Benzalkonium chloride treatment decreased goblet cell count by 37.5%. While the soft-preserved Systane Balance® and Optive® and the preservative-free Vismed® had no effect on the goblet cell count, Cationorm increased this count by almost 40%. Interestingly, inflammatory cell infiltration in the stroma was at its lowest following treatment with the preservative-free Cationorm. Cationorm is also the only AT decreasing IL6- and IL8-stimulated secretion by 59% and 74%, respectively. Conclusion: By restoring an adequately hydrated ocular surface environment, the different ATs promote corneal epithelium healing. These data position Cationorm as a promising AT for the management of signs and symptoms of dry eye in patients with mild to moderate dry eye disease presenting chronic subclinical levels of ocular inflammation. PMID:26751507

  5. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  6. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  7. A new tear pattern of the rotator cuff and its treatment: Fosbury flop tears

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Denard, Patrick J.; Kolo, Frank C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this report is to describe a new full-thickness tear pattern of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. We describe the specific radiologic signs associated with this tear pattern and the arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique. Materials and Methods: A prospective radiologic and clinical study collected all patients with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram that underwent an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair over a 1 year period. Results: Among 97 patients, five demonstrated a tear of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing. Characteristic radiographic findings included a thicker tendon than normal, the presence of a stump and accumulation of liquid in the superior-medial part of the subacromial bursa, and adhesions between the supraspinatus tendon and the wall of the subacromial bursa. Conclusion: Avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff with reversal healing on its bursal-side is a less common condition. This type of lesion and distinct radiographic signs that can be recognized to facilitate anatomic repair of the rotator cuff. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:25709239

  8. Arthroscopic Changes of the Biceps Pulley in Rotator Cuff Tear and Its Clinical Significance in Relation to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Se Sik; Lee, Ju Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background In the case of rotator cuff tears, the biceps pulley can be stressed by the unstable biceps tendon, and this can subsequently affect the stability of the subscapularis tendon. Therefore, it is important to distinguish between normal variations and lesions of the biceps pulley that affect anterosuperior lesions in cases of rotator cuff tears. Methods From January 2002 through November 2010, we observed biceps pulley and associated anterosuperior lesions in 589 of 634 cases (93%) of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, including 72 cases (12.2%) of small tears, 219 cases (37.2%) of medium tears, 134 cases (22.8%) of large tears, and 164 cases (27.8%) of massive tears. We classified normal stretched biceps pulleys as type I, stretched biceps pulleys with mild changes as type II, those with a partial tear as type III, and torn pulleys as type IV. Results We were able to classify 589 cases of biceps pulleys as type I, II, III, or IV associated lesions in rotator cuff tears. Type I was seen in 91 cases (15.4%), type II in 216 cases (36.7%), type III in 157 cases (26.7%), and type IV in 101 cases (17.1%); unidentified cases numbered 24 (4.1%). Nearly three-quarters, 73.3%, of the cases (432/589) had associated anterosuperior lesions, and combined treatment for the associated lesions was administered in 29.2% (172/589) of cases. Conclusions Biceps pulley lesions with more than partial tears were identified in 48% of rotator cuff tear cases. The incidence and severity of pulley lesions were related to the rotator cuff tear size, the status of the long head of the biceps tendon and subscapularis tendon lesion, and the treatment methods. PMID:26330960

  9. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  10. All-Endoscopic Single-Row Repair of Full-Thickness Gluteus Medius Tears

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2016-01-01

    Abductor tendon tears typically develop insidiously in middle-aged women and can lead to debilitating lateral hip pain and a Trendelenburg limp. The gluteus medius tendon is most commonly torn and may show fatty degeneration over time, similar to the rotator cuff muscles of the shoulder. Endoscopic repair offers a therapeutic alternative to traditional open techniques. This article describes the workup, examination, and endoscopic repair of a full-thickness gluteus medius tear presenting as lateral hip pain and weakness. The surgical repair for this case used a single-row suture anchor technique. In addition, the indications and technique for a double-row repair will be discussed. PMID:27073767

  11. Tendon graft substitutes-rotator cuff patches.

    PubMed

    Coons, David A; Alan Barber, F

    2006-09-01

    Over the past few years, many biologic patches have been developed to augment repairs of large or complex tendon tears. These patches include both allograft and xenografts. Regardless of their origins, these products are primarily composed of purified type I collagen. Many factors should be considered when choosing an augmentation patch including tissue origin, graft processing, cross-linking, clinical experience, and physical properties. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the sports medicine community with several tendon augmentation grafts: GraftJacket (Wright Medical Technology, Arlington, TN), CuffPatch (Organogenesis, Canton, MA, licensed to Arthrotek, Warsaw, IN), Restore (Depuy, Warsaw, IN), Zimmer Collagen Repair (Permacol) patch (Tissue Science Laboratories Covington, GA, licensed to Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), TissueMend (TEI Biosciences, Boston, MA, licensed to Stryker Howmedica Osteonics, Kalamazoo, MI), OrthoADAPT (Pegasus Biologics, Irvine, CA), and BioBlanket (Kensey Nash, Exton, PA). PMID:17135966

  12. Miniopen Repair of Ruptured Achilles Tendon in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acute degenerative Achilles tendons ruptures may be managed either operatively or nonoperatively with the superiority of the operative treatment in reducing the risk of rerupture. Acute rupture of Achilles tendon is commonly seen in diabetic patients. Open techniques for Achilles tendon repair have been associated with significant complications as deep infection and wound-related problems. Patients and Methods. Thirteen type II diabetic patients with acute degenerative rupture of the Achilles tendon were managed by miniopen repair augmented by peroneus brevis tendon. Results. All repairs healed successfully. The patients were able to return to preinjury level of activity after a mean of 5 months. The mean ATRS score improved from 15.1 preoperatively to 74.8 postoperatively. The mean Leppilahti ankle score was 59.6. Three patients suffered from superficial wound infection which was successfully managed. However, no patients suffered any major complications such as DVT, deep infection, or reruptures during the period of the study. Conclusion. Repair of acute degenerative tear of the Achilles tendon with peroneus brevis tendon augmentation could be successfully performed through a miniopen technique with minimization of wound complications in diabetic patients. PMID:27437478

  13. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  14. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. PMID:25919320

  15. Arthroscopic Knotless, Double-Row, Extended Linked Repair for Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Greenspoon, Joshua A; Petri, Maximilian; Millett, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    The management of massive rotator cuff tears remains a challenge for physicians, with failure rates being higher when compared with smaller tears. Many surgical treatment options exist including debridement with biceps tenodesis, complete repair, partial repair, repair with augmentation devices, superior capsule reconstruction, tendon transfer, and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for a complete arthroscopic repair using an extended linked, knotless, double-row construct. PMID:27330944

  16. SIMULTANEOUS BILATERAL TEAR OF THE KNEE EXTENSOR MECHANISM IN A PRE-ADOLESCENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; Giordano, Vincenzo; Albuquerque, Maria Isabel Pires; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro; Barretto, João Maurício

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral tearing of a patellar tendon and a contralateral sleeve fracture in a pre-adolescent are rare lesions. We report a case in which a pre-adolescent sustained a fall while jumping during a soccer match. No predisposing risk factors were identified. The injuries were treated with surgical repairs and transosseous suturing. The aim of this study was to present a case of spontaneous concurrent tearing of the extensor mechanism of the knee in a pre-adolescent. PMID:27047882

  17. Surgical management of acute quadriceps tendon rupture (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is uncommon and often overlooked in emergency. Tearing affects weakening tendon by systemic diseases or some medications. The mechanism is generally indirect. Inability to actively extend the knee associated to a supra-patellar defect evoke easily the diagnosis without other investigations. Surgical repair is realized in emergency to completely restore the extension. We report a case of a patient who has sustained of complete quadriceps tendon tear after a long period of tendon weakening by statin therapy, hypertension and diabetes. The repair has consisted on end-to-end Krackow sutures associated with bone suture to the proximal pole of the patella. Surgeons and emergency physicians must think to this form of extensor apparatus rupture, because early diagnosis leads to early treatment and to best outcomes. PMID:26958106

  18. Tear biomarkers for keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Nishtala, Krishnatej; Pahuja, Natasha; Shetty, Rohit; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconus is a progressive corneal thinning, ectatic condition, which affects vision. Recent advances in corneal topography measurements has helped advance proper diagnosis of this condition and increased research and clinical interests in the disease etiopathogenesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in understanding the progression of the disease and tear fluid has played a major role in the progress. This review discusses the importance of tear fluid as a source of biomarker for keratoconus and how advances in technology have helped map the complexity of tears and thereby molecular readouts of the disease. Expanding knowledge of the tear proteome, lipidome and metabolome opened up new avenues to study keratoconus and to identify probable prognostic or diagnostic biomarkers for the disease. A multidimensional approach of analyzing tear fluid of patients layering on proteomics, lipidomics and metabolomics is necessary in effectively decoding keratoconus and thereby identifying targets for its treatment. PMID:27493978

  19. Tear of the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament causing flatfoot. A case report.

    PubMed

    Borton, D C; Saxby, T S

    1997-07-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity after injury is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the tendon of tibialis posterior, with secondary failure of the other structures which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. We describe a patient in whom the rupture of the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament resulted in a clinical picture similar to that of rupture of the tendon of tibialis posterior. Operative repair of the ligament and transfer of the tendon of flexor digitorum gave an excellent result at four years with the patient returning to full sporting activities. PMID:9250756

  20. Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. PMID:23880529

  1. Tendon Functional Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Screen, H.R.C.; Birk, D.E.; Kadler, K.E.; Ramirez, F; Young, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This article is one of a series, summarising views expressed at the Orthopaedic Research Society New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference. This particular article reviews the three workshops held under the “Functional Extracellular Matrix” stream. The workshops focused on the roles of the tendon extracellular matrix, such as performing the mechanical functions of tendon, creating the local cell environment and providing cellular cues. Tendon is a complex network of matrix and cells, and its biological functions are influenced by widely-varying extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as age, nutrition, exercise levels and biomechanics. Consequently, tendon adapts dynamically during development, ageing and injury. The workshop discussions identified research directions associated with understanding cell-matrix interactions to be of prime importance for developing novel strategies to target tendon healing or repair. PMID:25640030

  2. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  3. Arthroscopic Superior Capsule Reconstruction for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Lee, Thay Q.; Itami, Yasuo; HASEGAWA, Akihiko; Ohue, Mutsumi; Neo, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    follow-up (mean, 36.6 months after surgery; range, 12 to 96 months; ASES, 93.3 points; JOA, 92.2 points) (P < .00001). Ninety-two patients (92%) had neither graft tear nor re-tear of the repaired rotator cuff tendon during the follow-up period (5 to 8 years of follow-up, 17 patients; 3 to 4 years of follow-up, 19 patients; 1 to 2 years of follow-up, 56 patients). Postoperative clinical outcome scores and active elevation at final follow-up were significantly better in healed patients (ASES, 95.5 points; JOA, 93.7 points, 154.8° ± 24.2°) than in unhealed patients suffering from graft tear or re-tear of the repaired rotator cuff tendon (ASES, 76.3 points, P < 0.0001; JOA, 79.5, P < 0.001; 115.0° ± 41.8°, P < 0.001). Thirty-two patients returned fully to their previous jobs, whereas two patients returned with reduced hours and workloads. All 26 patients who had played sport before their injuries returned fully to their previous sports, although most of the patients had been playing at recreational level before their injuries. Conclusion: Arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction restored shoulder function and resulted in high rates of return to recreational sport and work. Graft tear or re-tear of the repaired rotator cuff tendon exacerbated the clinical outcome after superior capsule reconstruction. These results suggest that arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction is a viable surgical option for irreparable rotator cuff tears, especially in patients who work and enjoy sport.

  4. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  5. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  6. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  7. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears. Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative. PMID:26694070

  8. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  9. Biomimetic Scaffold Design for Functional and Integrative Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M.; Lu, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscore the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The two critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and future directions section. PMID:22244070

  10. COMPARISON BETWEEN THE RESULTS ACHIEVED IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH TWO KINDS OF AUTOLOGOUS GRAFTS: PATELLAR TENDON VERSUS SEMITENDINOUS AND GRACILIS

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Monteiro, Diego Antico; Dias, Leonardo; Correia, Dárcio Maurício; Cohen, Moisés; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective: this study aims to compare the arthrometric and isokinetic examination results from two types of autologous grafts: the central third of the patellar ligament and a graft formed by the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles, within the same rehabilitation protocol, six months after the surgery. Methods: the results from examinations carried out on 63 patients were analyzed. These patients were divided in two groups: one group of 30 patients who received a patellar tendon graft and another group of 33 patients who received a graft from the tendons of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscles. Both the grafts were attached in the same way, with Endobutton™ for suspensory fixation to the femur and a bioabsorbable interference screw for fixation in the tibial tunnel. Results: arthrometry 30 did not present any statistical difference between the two study groups. On the other hand, the isokinetic evaluation showed that the patellar tendon group had a larger mean peak torque of flexion and greater extension deficit, while the semitendinosus/gracilis group had a better mean flexion/extension ratio and greater percentage of flexion deficit. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups when measuring peak torque extension. Conclusion: therefore, when the patellar tendon was used, there was greater extensor deficit and, when the semitendinosus/gracilis tendons were used, there was greater flexor deficit. PMID:27004173

  11. Bilateral medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin: repair using polypropylene mesh and staples.

    PubMed

    Barnes, D M

    2013-09-01

    A three-year-old male greyhound was presented with acute onset right forelimb lameness because of medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin. Ultrasonographic examination confirmed the diagnosis, and a concomitant partial tear of the medial glenohumeral ligament was detected during arthroscopy. To stabilise the biceps tendon, polypropylene mesh was fixed across the intertubercular groove to replace the torn transverse humeral retinaculum. Recovery was uneventful and lameness resolved. Fifteen months later, the dog was presented with medial displacement of the biceps tendon of origin of the left shoulder, and was treated successfully using the same technique. PMID:23614688

  12. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  13. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  14. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Peroneal Tendon Injuries Text Size Print Bookmark ... foot run side-by-side behind the outer ankle bone. One peroneal tendon attaches to the outer ...

  15. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rotator Cuff Tears in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. Results The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Conclusions Rotator cuff injury is a very common

  17. The atypical homeodomain transcription factor Mohawk controls tendon morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjin; Watson, Spencer S; Lan, Yu; Keene, Douglas R; Ovitt, Catherine E; Liu, Han; Schweitzer, Ronen; Jiang, Rulang

    2010-10-01

    The Mohawk homeobox (Mkx) gene encodes a new atypical homeodomain-containing protein with transcriptional repressor activity. Mkx mRNA exhibited dynamic expression patterns during development of the palate, somite, kidney, and testis, suggesting that it may be an important regulator of multiple developmental processes. To investigate the roles of Mkx in organogenesis, we generated mice carrying a null mutation in this gene. Mkx(-/-) mice survive postnatally and exhibit a unique wavy-tail phenotype. Close examination revealed that the mutant mice had smaller tendons than wild-type littermates and that the rapid postnatal growth of collagen fibrils in tendons was disrupted in Mkx(-/-) mice. Defects in tendon development were detected in the mutant mouse embryos as early as embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5). Although collagen fibril assembly initially appeared normal, the tendons of Mkx(-/-) embryos expressed significantly reduced amounts of collagen I, fibromodulin, and tenomodulin in comparison with control littermates. We found that Mkx mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiating tendon cells during embryogenesis and in the tendon sheath cells in postnatal stages. In addition to defects in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis, Mkx(-/-) mutant mice exhibited abnormal tendon sheaths. These results identify Mkx as an important regulator of tendon development. PMID:20696843

  18. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  19. Comparison of a multifilament stainless steel suture with FiberWire for flexor tendon repairs--an in vitro biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    McDonald, E; Gordon, J A; Buckley, J M; Gordon, L

    2013-05-01

    Our goal was to investigate and compare the mechanical properties of multifilament stainless steel suture (MFSS) and polyethylene multi-filament core FiberWire in flexor tendon repairs. Flexor digitorum profundus tendons were repaired in human cadaver hands with either a 4-strand cruciate cross-lock repair or 6-strand modified Savage repair using 4-0 and 3-0 multifilament stainless steel or FiberWire. The multifilament stainless steel repairs were as strong as those performed with FiberWire in terms of ultimate load and load at 2 mm gap. This study suggests that MFSS provides as strong a repair as FiberWire. The mode of failure of the MFSS occurred by the suture pulling through the tendon, which suggests an advantage in terms of suture strength. PMID:22745156

  20. The nonlinear tearing mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Hoven, G.; Steinolfson, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    A series of nonlinear computations of tearing-mode development have been performed which achieve higher values of the magnetic Reynolds number and larger wavelengths than previously considered. A prime candidate for the realization of dynamic reconnection is the resistive magnetic tearing mode, a spontaneous instability of a stressed magnetic field. Typical simulations are described for a magnetic Lundquist number S of 10 to the 4th and wavelength parameters alpha from 0.05 to 0.5. In all cases, the nonlinear mode initially evolves at the linear growth rate, followed by a period of reduced growth. Another common feature is the formation of secondary flow vortices, near the tearing surface, which are opposite in direction to the initial linear vortices.

  1. [Tear lactoferrin in keratoconjunctivitis sicca].

    PubMed

    Hu, F R; Wang, T H; Lin, L L; Ko, L S

    1989-04-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is a commonly encountered disease with decreased lacrimal gland activity. There are several tests to determine the lacrimal gland function, but all have limitations in accuracy, sensitivity or technical difficulty. At present, there is no reliable objective test to render a firm diagnosis of dry eye. Lactoferrin is one of the major proteins secreted by the lacrimal gland. Its concentration was found to correlate well to lacrimal gland activity. In this study we tried to evaluate the diagnostic value of lactoferrin measurement in comparison with other tests for keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Tests including the measurement of tear lactoferrin, Schirmer's-1 test, Schirmer's basal test, tear film break-up time, and rose bengal stain of the cornea were done on 60 healthy eyes and 56 eyes with keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The lactoferrin level was measured by a commercially available "Lactoplate" (Eagle Vision, U.S.A.). It is a plate containing gel loaded with rabbit anti-human-lactoferrin antiserum. Tear-moistened filter paper discs containing lactoferrin were placed on the gel. The lactoferrin concentration could be determined by measuring the concentric ring of precipitate after 72 hours incubation at room temperature. The average concentration of lactoferrin was 1.9 +/- 0.51 mg/ml in the normal group and 1.4 +/- 0.93 mg/ml in the keratoconjunctivitis sicca group. They were significantly different from each other (t-test: p less than 0.05). The results of the other 4 tests also showed a significant difference between the normal and keratoconjunctivitis sicca group, but the lactoferrin measurement had the highest specificity among these 5 tests. Because of the technical simplicity of measurement and its high specificity, lactoferrin measurement could be a valuable tool for the early and accurate diagnosis of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. PMID:2794946

  2. Shear loads induce cellular damage in tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-09-18

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  3. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-02-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. PMID:21323277

  4. Achilles Tendon Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... after periods of rest, then improves somewhat with motion but later worsens with increased activity. Tenderness, or ... foot and ankle and evaluate the range of motion and condition of the tendon. The extent of ...

  5. Nibbling Tears of Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristoff, Jeff; Bush, John

    2006-11-01

    The meniscus of an alcohol-rich solution is known to climb upwards due to an evaporation-induced Marangoni stress, thus initiating the tears of wine phenomenon. Rather than merging directly, the tears may bob up and down when they make contact with the underlying reservoir, appearing to nibble at its edge. We present a qualitative description of this flow and propose a simple theoretical model for this behavior. We thus rationalize the observed dependence of the nibbling frequency on the system parameters.

  6. Subrupture Tendon Fatigue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Laudier, Damien M.; Shine, Jean H.; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Jepsen, Karl J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Flatow, Evan L.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical and microstructural bases of tendon fatigue, by which damage accumulates and contributes to degradation, are poorly understood. To investigate the tendon fatigue process, rat flexor digitorum longus tendons were cyclically loaded (1–16 N) until reaching one of three levels of fatigue damage, defined as peak clamp-to-clamp strain magnitudes representing key intervals in the fatigue life: i) Low (6.0%–7.0%); ii) Moderate (8.5%–9.5%); and iii) High (11.0%–12.0%). Stiffness, hysteresis, and clamp-to-clamp strain were assessed diagnostically (by cyclic loading at 1–8 N) before and after fatigue loading and following an unloaded recovery period to identify mechanical parameters as measures of damage. Results showed that tendon clamp-to-clamp strain increased from pre- to post-fatigue loading significantly and progressively with the fatigue damage level (p≤0.010). In contrast, changes in both stiffness and hysteresis were significant only at the High fatigue level (p≤0.043). Correlative microstructural analyses showed that Low level of fatigue was characterized by isolated, transverse patterns of kinked fiber deformations. At higher fatigue levels, tendons exhibited fiber dissociation and localized ruptures of the fibers. Histomorphometric analysis showed that damage area fraction increased significantly with fatigue level (p≤0.048). The current findings characterized the sequential, microstructural events that underlie the tendon fatigue process and indicate that tendon deformation can be used to accurately assess the progression of damage accumulation in tendons. PMID:18683881

  7. Tear dynamics and dry eye.

    PubMed

    Tsubota, K

    1998-10-01

    Tears undergo four processes: production by the lacrimal gland, distribution by blinking, evaporation from the ocular surface and drainage through the nasolacrimal duct. Abnormalities in any of these steps can cause dry eye. There are two kinds of tear production, basic and reflex, which can be distinguished from each other by the Schirmer test with nasal stimulation. Reflex tearing is important because it supplies such essential components as EGF and vitamin A, whose deficiency may cause squamous metaplasia. There is no reflex tearing in Sjogren's syndrome because of destruction of the lacrimal gland. In cases of diminished or absent reflex tearing, topical autologous serum is the treatment of choice. Even when there is adequate tear production, insufficient distribution, such as occurs with the decreased blinking associated with the use of video display terminals (VDT), may cause dry eye. Any process or activity that suppresses blinking interferes with tear distribution. Tear evaporation increases under certain conditions and in some diseases. When the exposed ocular surface area is increased, such as in VDT work, tear evaporation increases. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) also causes increased tear evaporation by altering the quality of the oily layer in tears. Tear evaporation can be suppressed by using a warm compresser or a humidifier, narrowing the palpebral fissure, or wearing protective eyeglasses. The tear clearance rate is measured by fluorescein dye dilution in the conjunctiva. When the tear clearance is low, inflammatory cytokines or preservatives accumulate in the conjunctival sac, resulting in ocular surface diseases. Frequent use of artificial tears without preservative is the key treatment. A differential diagnosis of the abnormalities of tear dynamics can give us a proper understanding of the pathogenesis of dry eye. With this knowledge, we can formulate an efficient therapeutic approach. PMID:9777650

  8. Measurement of stress strain and vibrational properties of tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian Marco; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2003-08-01

    The authors present a new non-intrusive experimental procedure based on laser techniques for the measurement of mechanical properties of tendons. The procedure is based on the measurement of the first resonance frequency of the tendon by laser Doppler vibrometry during in vitro tensile experiments, with the final aim of establishing a measurement procedure to perform the mechanical characterization of tendons by extracting parameters such as the resonance frequency, also achievable during in vivo investigation. The experimental procedure is reported, taking into account the need to simulate the physiological conditions of the Achilles tendon, and the measurement technique used for the non-invasive determination of tendon cross-sectional area during tensile vibration tests at different load levels is described. The test procedure is based on a tensile machine, which measures longitudinal tendons undergoing controlled load conditions. Cross-sectional area is measured using a new non-contact procedure for the measurement of tendon perimeter (repeatability of 99% and accuracy of 2%). For each loading condition, vibration resonance frequency and damping, cross-sectional area and tensile force are measured, allowing thus a mechanical characterization of the tendon. Tendon stress-strain curves are reported. Stress-strain curves have been correlated to the first vibration resonance frequency and damping of the tendon measured using a single-point laser Doppler vibrometer. Moreover, experimental results have been compared with a theoretical model of a vibrating cord showing discrepancies. In vitro tests are reported, demonstrating the validity of the method for the comparison of different aged rabbit tendons.

  9. Comparison of effect of nepafenac and diclofenac ophthalmic solutions on cornea, tear film, and ocular surface after cataract surgery: the results of a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Atsushi; Utsunomiya, Tsugiaki; Kato, Yuji; Takayanagi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the effects of nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% (Nevanac) and diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.1% (Diclod) on the cornea, tear film, and ocular surface after cataract surgery. Methods A total of 60 eyes (60 patients) were selected for this study, with no ocular diseases other than cataract (scheduled for cataract surgery by one surgeon). Patients were randomly enrolled to receive nepafenac or diclofenac in the perioperative period, and cataract surgery was performed using torsional microcoaxial phacoemulsification and aspiration with intraocular lens implantation via a transconjunctival single-plane sclerocorneal incision at the 12 o’clock position. We compared intra- and intergroup differences preoperatively and postoperatively in conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores, tear film breakup times, Schirmer’s tests, the Dry Eye Related Quality of Life Scores, and tear meniscus areas using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Results The diclofenac group had significantly higher conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores at 4 weeks postoperatively compared with the nepafenac group (P<0.001). Within the diclofenac group, significantly higher conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores were noted at 4 weeks postoperatively than those seen preoperatively (P<0.001) and at 1 week postoperatively (P<0.001). No statistically significant differences were found in any other items. Conclusions Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% is considered safe for the corneal epithelium after cataract surgery. PMID:27019091

  10. Rat rotator cuff tendon-to-bone healing properties are adversely affected by hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Beason, David P.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Lee, Chang Soo; Edelstein, Lena; Abboud, Joseph A.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendon tears represent a major component of reported orthopaedic injuries. In addition, more than one quarter of U.S. adults either currently have high cholesterol levels or have reduced their previously high cholesterol levels through the use of pharmaceuticals. Our clinical data have already linked hypercholesterolemia to full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and experimental data from our laboratory have shown effects on native tendon properties in multiple species. The objective of this study was to evaluate healing of supraspinatus tendons in our rat rotator cuff injury model. We hypothesized that tendon healing would be inferior in rats receiving a high-cholesterol diet for 6 months compared with those receiving standard chow. Methods All animals were subjected to a unilateral supraspinatus detachment and repair surgery, with contralateral limbs serving as within-animal comparative data. Animals continued their respective diet courses, and their supraspinatus tendons were biomechanically or histologically evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks postoperatively. Results Biomechanical testing revealed a significant reduction in normalized stiffness in hypercholesterolemic rats compared with controls at 4 weeks after injury, whereas histologic analyses showed no significant differences in collagen organization, cellularity, or cell shape between groups. Conclusion On the basis of our findings, hypercholesterolemia may have a detrimental biomechanical effect on tendon healing in our rat rotator cuff injury and repair model. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Animal Model. PMID:24295837

  11. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  12. Contribution of biomechanics to management of ligament and tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Woo, Savio L Y; Fisher, Matthew B; Feola, Andrew J

    2008-03-01

    The contribution of biomechanics to the advancement of management of ligament and tendon injuries has been significant. Thanks to Professor Y.C. Fung's writing and guidance, our field of research has done fundamental work on anatomy and biology of ligaments and tendons, developed methods to accurately determine mechanical properties, identified various experimental factors which could change the outcome measurements as well as examined biological factors that change tissue properties in-vivo. Professor Fung also gave us his quasi-linear viscoelastic theory for soft tissues so that the time and history dependent properties of ligaments and tendons could be properly described. We have further adopted Professor Fung's eight steps on methods of approach for biomechanical investigation to understand as well as enhance the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries during work or sports related activities. Examples on how to better treat the tears of the medial collateral ligament of the knee, as well as how to improve reconstruction procedures for the anterior cruciate ligament are presented in detail. Currently the use of functional tissue engineering for ligament and tendon healing is a topic of great interest. Here the use of biological scaffolds, such as porcine small intestinal submucosa, has shown promise. For the last 35 to 40 years, the field of biomechanics has made great strides in the treatment of ligament and tendon injuries, and many patients have benefited. The future is even brighter because of what has been done properly in the past. Exciting advances can be made in the field of tissue engineering through novel in-vitro culture and bioscaffold fabrication techniques. Recent technology can also allow the collection of in-vivo data so that ligament and tendon injuries can be better understood. Yet, solving new and more complex problems must still follow the stepwise methods of approach as taught by Professor Fung. PMID:18524246

  13. Effects of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid on torn rotator cuff tendons in vitro and in rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Keiichirou; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto; Matsueda, Satoko

    2015-10-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) or hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in subacromial injection for the conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears (RCT); this study addresses the question of how CS and HA affect the tendon tissue and fibroblasts in vitro and in rats. Cell proliferation assays were performed in human tendon fibroblasts from RCT. Rats underwent surgery to create RCT, and the surgical sites were injected with CS or HA. The rotator cuff tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing, microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and ultrastructural analysis. Cell proliferation was significantly decreased with CS in vitro (p < 0.05). Maximal load of CS-treated tendons was significantly decreased compared with that of HA-treated tendons (p < 0.05), as well as PCNA(+) cells at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Ultrastructural observations of the CS-treated rats detected apoptosis of tendon fibroblasts 24 h after surgery. Histological and biomechanical data 4 weeks after surgery were not significant among the three groups. Unlike HA, CS caused cell death, and inhibition of the proliferation of tendon fibroblasts, leading to a delay of tendon healing involved and a subsequent decrease of biomechanical strength at the surgical site. PMID:26174562

  14. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic £elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi£cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  15. Tears of Wine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugliotti, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    The unique occurrence of the upward motion of a thin film of wine, and its formation into drops inside the wall of a wine glass is explained. Evaporation of alcohol generates a surface tension gradient, moving the film of wine upwards on the internal sides of a wine glass, where it collects and forms into drops or tears.

  16. Rehabilitating psoas tendonitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Jaime

    2009-02-01

    This case report describes the examination and physical therapy intervention for a woman with anterior hip pain whose medical diagnosis following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was bilateral labral tears and psoas tendinitis. Her physical therapy evaluation revealed findings consistent with psoas tendonitis. Utilizing theories of neuromuscular patterning and knowledge of normal muscle function, the patient was successfully treated in physical therapy following six physical therapy sessions, once a week for 6 weeks. The patient was found to have an overactive psoas muscle, as indicated by hip flexion being the primary mover in her movement patterns, and dysfunctional abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. Functionally based therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation were used to reeducate the muscles of the abdomen, pelvic floor, and hips in order to create muscular balance and correct muscle dysfunction. PMID:19048347

  17. Rehabilitating Psoas Tendonitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the examination and physical therapy intervention for a woman with anterior hip pain whose medical diagnosis following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was bilateral labral tears and psoas tendinitis. Her physical therapy evaluation revealed findings consistent with psoas tendonitis. Utilizing theories of neuromuscular patterning and knowledge of normal muscle function, the patient was successfully treated in physical therapy following six physical therapy sessions, once a week for 6 weeks. The patient was found to have an overactive psoas muscle, as indicated by hip flexion being the primary mover in her movement patterns, and dysfunctional abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. Functionally based therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation were used to reeducate the muscles of the abdomen, pelvic floor, and hips in order to create muscular balance and correct muscle dysfunction. PMID:19048347

  18. The influence of radiofrequency ablation patterns on length, histological and mechanical properties of tendons

    PubMed Central

    Oron, Amir; Reshef, Noam; Beer, Yiftah; Brosh, Tamar; Agar, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Summary The use of radiofrequency ablation for thermomodulation of connective tissues has gained acceptance with some surgeons. It is now mainly used for shoulder instability, and two techniques are commonly applied – ablation in a uniform pattern (paintbrush) and ablation in a linearly dispersed fashion (grid). The use of these techniques for shrinkage of tendons or cruciate ligaments is not widely accepted but may be utilized in selected cases. We assessed the effects of thermo-modulation via monopolar radiofrequency ablation using these two techniques on the histological and biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. 16 paired rabbit achilles tendons were divided into two treatment groups. Using a Monopolar RF device, eight tendons were treated using the paintbrush technique, and eight using the grid technique. The tendons were shrunk to about 90% of their original length, and the paired tendons were used as control. Following thermomodulation, tendons were pulled to tear using the Instron 4502 (Instron, Mass.) device. We found treated tendons were significantly less resistant to tear when compared to control; the average load to failure of the treatment group was 19.4% lower (p=0.05) than the control group values and the average tissue stiffness in the treatment group was 11.3% lower (p=0.051) than the control group. We found a tendency towards a lower resistance to pull in the tendon group treated using the grid technique. Histological analysis demonstrated areas of collagen denaturation correlated to areas of thermomodulation. A random point of failure was found along the tendons in the paintbrush group whereas the typical point of failure in the grid group was located at the treatment point or at its margins. Our findings demonstrate that use of the grid technique in ablation of tendons creates typical failure points (locus minoris resistenci) which bring about failure and alter the biomechanical properties of the thermomodulated tendons

  19. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  20. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  1. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  2. Integrated Approach for Prediction of Hot Tearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyitno; Kool, W. H.; Katgerman, L.

    2009-10-01

    Shrinkage, imposed strain rate, and (lack of) feeding are considered the main factors that determine cavity formation or the formation of hot tears. A hot-tearing model is proposed that will combine a macroscopic description of the casting process and a microscopic model. The micromodel predicts whether porosity will form or a hot tear will develop. Results for an Al-4.5 pct Cu alloy are presented as a function of the constant strain rate and cooling rate. Also, incorporation of the model in a finite element method (FEM) simulation of the direct-chill (DC) casting process is reported. The model shows features well known from literature such as increasing hot-tearing sensitivity with increasing deformation rate, cooling rate, and grain size. Similar trends are found for the porosity formation as well. The model also predicts a beneficial effect of applying a ramping procedure during the start-up phase, which is an improvement in comparison with earlier findings obtained with alternative models. In principle, the model does not contain adjustable parameters, but several parameters are not well known. A full quantitative validation not only requires detailed casting trials but also independent determination of some thermophysical parameters of the semisolid mush.

  3. All-Arthroscopic Patch Augmentation of a Massive Rotator Cuff Tear: Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Gupta, Anil K.; Yanke, Adam B.; Trenhaile, Scott W.; Romeo, Anthony A.; Bach, Bernard R.; Verma, Nikhil N.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical management of massive rotator cuff tears remains challenging, with failure rates ranging from 20% to 90%. Multiple different arthroscopic and open techniques have been described, but there is no current gold standard. Failure after rotator cuff repair is typically multifactorial; however, failure of tendon-footprint healing is often implicated. Patch augmentation has been described as a possible technique to augment the biology of rotator cuff repair in situations of compromised tendon quality and has shown promising short-term results. The purpose of this article is to describe our preferred surgical technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with patch augmentation. PMID:24400198

  4. Peroneus Brevis Attrition & Longitudinal Split Tear without Subluxation and Associated Hypertrophy of Peronal Tubercle” – Treatment of an Uncommon Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Singh, Varun; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peroneus brevis tendinitis with its attritional longitudinal split rupture without any subluxation from peroneal groove and associated enlarged peroneal tubercle is un common presentation. Case Report: A 40 year old female presented with moderate swelling and tenderness over the lateral and dorso-lateral aspect of left ankle with history of old trauma to ankle with swelling, persistant pain and difficulty in walking. On physical examination during passive eversion and inversion the excursion of the peroneal tendons was painful. Most tender point was just posterior to the tip of the fibula. During surgery we found the intact superior peroneal ligament with both peroneal tendons placed at normal site without subluxation, tendon sheath was inflamed and swollen, on further dissection we could see the attrition of inner surface of the peroneus brevis and a 2 cm longitudinal split tear of the same. Conclusion: Although rare but peroneus brevis tendon attrition and tear can occur without subluxation from peronal groove. Refractory ankle pain on lateral aspect presenting with on and off swelling should arise suspicion of peroneal tendon tear. Correct diagnosis and proper surgical repair can produce excellent results.

  5. Meniscus tears in children.

    PubMed

    Bellisari, Greg; Samora, Walter; Klingele, Kevin

    2011-03-01

    Increased athletic participation by the skeletally immature athlete and a heightened suspicion by physicians have contributed to an increase in the incidence of meniscal injuries in children and adolescents. In young patient, meniscal injury could have long-term consequences, so an understanding of recognition and treatment is essential. We review the anatomy and development of the menisci, review classification and diagnosis of meniscal tears, discuss management options and outcomes of treatment, and focus on discoid lateral meniscus and meniscal cysts. PMID:21293238

  6. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  7. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection. PMID:26590723

  8. FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION OF PATIENTS WHO HAVE UNDERGONE ARTHROSCOPIC DEBRIDEMENT TO TREAT MASSIVE AND IRREPARABLE TEARS OF THE ROTATOR CUFF

    PubMed Central

    Veado, Marco Antônio de Castro; Rodrigues, Alessandro Ulhôa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from patients who underwent arthroscopic debridement of extensive irreparable rotator cuff injuries. Methods: 27 patients were operated between 2003 and 2007, and 22 of them were evaluated. The surgical procedure consisted of arthroscopic debridement of the stumps of the tendons involved, bursectomy, removal of acromial osteophytes and, possibly, biceps tenotomy and tuberoplasty. Results: All the patients showed involvement of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons at the preoperative stage. In the postoperative evaluation, 14 patients had a complete teres minor muscle, and three had partial tears of the subscapularis tendon. There was an improvement in the UCLA criteria, from 15 preoperatively to 31 postoperatively. There was no improvement in muscle strength, but there was a reduction in the pain. Conclusion: Arthroscopic debridement is a recommended procedure for elderly patients with irreparable rotator cuff tears, good range of motion and low functional demand, when the main objective is to diminish pain. PMID:27022590

  9. Outlet biceps tenodesis: a new technique for treatment of biceps long head tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lemos, David; Esquivel, Amanda; Duncan, Douglas; Marsh, Stephanie; Lemos, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    Degeneration and tearing of the long head of the biceps brachii tendon (LHBT) are common intra-articular findings, and surgical intervention including tenodesis or tenotomy is beneficial. A new arthroscopic shoulder technique may be performed through an anterior portal while one is viewing from a posterior portal: (1) Visualize the intra-articular biceps tendon. (2) Identify the segment of the LHBT to be enlarged. (3) Use a tissue modulation wand to enlarge the tendon. (4) Evaluate the diameter of the enlarged segment. It should be twice the original diameter. (5) Cut the biceps tendon at the proximal end of the enlarged segment. (6) View the tendon within the tunnel. (7) Identify and cut the remaining stump of the biceps tendon. Seventeen cadaveric shoulders were used to compare the pullout force, stiffness, and displacement of outlet tenodesis versus tenotomy. There was a significant increase in pullout force for the outlet tenodesis group when compared with tenotomy. This technique is used to operatively treat LHBT intra-articular pathology in patients who would benefit from tenotomy and traditional biceps tenodesis and may minimize the retraction of the biceps tendon distally. PMID:23875155

  10. Free biceps tendon autograft to augment arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    PubMed

    Obma, Padraic R

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while one is performing rotator cuff surgery. A subpectoral biceps tenodesis provides a source of autograft to augment rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. Two techniques are presented to augment rotator cuff repairs with a free biceps tendon autograft. This is a novel idea in an attempt to improve healing rates and long-term results of rotator cuff repairs of all sizes. PMID:24400197

  11. Treatment options for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Galasso, Olimpio; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) occur more commonly with advanced age, with most rotator cuff abnormalities in patients less than 30 years old being painful tendinoses or partial-thickness RCTs. Irreparable postero-superior cuff tears has been reported as frequent as 7% to 10% in the general population, and the incidence of irreparable RCTs in young patients is still unknown. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for young patients with irreparable postero-superior RCTs, such as rotator cuff debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, rotator cuff grafting, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer, and reverse shoulder arthroplasty. After being thoroughly investigated in open surgery, arthroscopic techniques for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer have been recently described. They have been shown to be an adequate option to open surgery for managing irreparable postero-superior RCTs refractory to conservative management. PMID:26601058

  12. Treatment options for irreparable postero-superior cuff tears in young patients.

    PubMed

    Galasso, Olimpio; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio

    2015-11-18

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) occur more commonly with advanced age, with most rotator cuff abnormalities in patients less than 30 years old being painful tendinoses or partial-thickness RCTs. Irreparable postero-superior cuff tears has been reported as frequent as 7% to 10% in the general population, and the incidence of irreparable RCTs in young patients is still unknown. Several surgical procedures have been proposed for young patients with irreparable postero-superior RCTs, such as rotator cuff debridement, partial rotator cuff repair, biceps tenotomy/tenodesis, rotator cuff grafting, latissimus dorsi tendon transfer, and reverse shoulder arthroplasty. After being thoroughly investigated in open surgery, arthroscopic techniques for latissimus dorsi tendon transfer have been recently described. They have been shown to be an adequate option to open surgery for managing irreparable postero-superior RCTs refractory to conservative management. PMID:26601058

  13. Long Head of the Biceps Pathology Combined with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Ditsios, Konstantinos; Agathangelidis, Filon; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2012-01-01

    The long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) is an anatomic structure commonly involved in painful shoulder conditions as a result of trauma, degeneration, or overuse. Recent studies have pointed out the close correlation between LHBT lesions and rotator cuff (RCT) tears. Clinicians need to take into account the importance of the LHBT in the presence of other shoulder pathologies. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of recent publications on anatomy, pathophysiology, diagnosis, classification, and current treatment strategies. PMID:23209915

  14. Histological Study of Fresh Versus Frozen Semitendinous Muscle Tendon Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Alexandre Carneiro; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Pereira, João Alberto Ramos Maradei; França Bisneto, Edgard N.; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini Miranda; Oliveira, Claudia Regina G. C. M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to histologically analyze allografts from cadaveric semitendinous muscle after cryopreservation at −80°C in comparison to a control group kept at only −4°C to test the hypothesis that the histological characteristics of the tissue are maintained when the tendons are kept at lower temperatures. METHODS: In a tissue bank, 10 semitendinous tendons from 10 cadavers were frozen at −80ºC as a storage method for tissue preservation. They were kept frozen for 40 days, and then a histological study was carried out. Another 10 tendon samples were analyzed while still “fresh”. RESULTS: There was no histological difference between the fresh and frozen samples in relation to seven variables. CONCLUSIONS: Semitendinous muscle tendon allografts can be submitted to cryopreservation at −80ºC without suffering histological modifications. PMID:20360921

  15. FATTY MUSCLE INFILTRATION IN CUFF TEAR: PRE AND POST OPERATIVE EVALUATION BY MRI

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; Sella, Guilherme do Val; Miranda, Eduardo Régis de Alencar Bona; Zampieri, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus in the pre- and postoperative of a rotator cuff lesion (RCL), by MRI. Methods: Ten patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears who had undergone surgical arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between September and December 2011 were included. This is a prospective study, with analysis and comparison of fatty infiltration and atrophy of the supraespinatus. The occupation ratio was measured using the magic selection tool in Adobe Photoshop CS3(r) on T1 oblique sagittal Y-view MRI. Through Photoshop, the proportion occupied by the muscle belly regarding its fossae was calculated. Results: There was a statistically significant increase in the muscle ratio (p=0.013) comparing images pre and postoperative, analyzed by the Wilcoxon T test. Conclusion: The proportion of the supraspinal muscle above the pit increases in the immediate postoperative period, probably due to the traction exerted on the tendon at the time of repair. Level of Evidence II, Cohort Study. PMID:26981032

  16. Tear Film Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.

    2013-01-01

    Human meibomian gland secretions (MGS, or meibum) are formed from a complex mixture of lipids of different classes such as wax esters, cholesteryl esters, (O-acyl)-ω-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA) and their esters, acylglycerols, diacylated diols, free fatty acids, cholesterol, and a smaller amount of other polar and nonpolar lipids, whose chemical nature and the very presence in MGS have been a matter of intense debates. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent results that were obtained using different experimental techniques, estimate limitations of their usability, and discuss their biochemical, biophysical, and physiological implications. To create a lipid map of MGS and tears, the results obtained in the author’s laboratory were integrated with available information on chemical composition of MGS and tears. The most informative approaches that are available today to researchers, such as HPLC-MS, GC-MS, and proton NMR, are discussed in details. A map of the meibomian lipidome (as it is seen in reverse phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments) is presented. Directions of future efforts in the area are outlined. PMID:23769846

  17. Giant retinal tears.

    PubMed

    Shunmugam, Manoharan; Ang, Ghee Soon; Lois, Noemi

    2014-01-01

    A giant retinal tear (GRT) is a full-thickness neurosensory retinal break that extends circumferentially around the retina for three or more clock hours in the presence of a posteriorly detached vitreous. Its incidence in large population-based studies has been estimated as 1.5% of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments, with a significant male preponderance, and bilaterality in 12.8%. Most GRTs are idiopathic, with trauma, hereditary vitreoretinopathies and high myopia each being causative in decreasing frequency. The vast majority of GRTs are currently managed with a pars plana vitrectomy; the use of adjunctive circumferential scleral buckling is debated, but no studies have shown a clear anatomical or visual advantage with its use. Similarly, silicone oil tamponade does not influence long-term outcomes when compared with gas. Primary and final retinal reattachment rates are achieved in 88% and 95% of patients, respectively. Even when the retina remains attached, however, visual recovery may be limited. Furthermore, fellow eyes of patients with a GRT are at higher risk of developing retinal tears and retinal detachment. Prophylactic treatment under these circumstances may be considered but there is no firm evidence of its efficacy at the present time. PMID:24138895

  18. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon. PMID:26485923

  19. In vitro effects of glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism on human tendon derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Javaid, Muhammad Kassim; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    It is known that extracellular glutamate concentrations are increased in tendinopathy but the effects of glutamate upon human tendon derived cells are unknown. The primary purpose was to investigate the effect of glutamate exposure on human tendon-derived cells in terms of viability, protein, and gene expression. The second purpose was to assess whether NMDAR antagonism would affect the response of tendon-derived cells to glutamate exposure. Human tendon-derived cells were obtained from supraspinatus tendon tissue obtained during rotator cuff repair (tendon tear derived cells) and from healthy hamstring tendon tissue (control cells). The in vitro impact of glutamate exposure and NMDAR antagonism (MK-801) was measured using the Alamar blue cell viability assay, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Glutamate reduced cell viability at 24 h in tendon tear derived cells but not in control cells at concentrations of 7.5 mM and above. Cell viability was significantly reduced after 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate in both cell groups; this deleterious effect was attenuated by NMDAR antagonism with 10 µM MK-801. Both 24 and 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate exposure reduced Type 1 alpha 1 collagen (COL1A1) and Type 3 alpha 1 collagen (COL3A1) gene expression, but increased Aggrecan gene expression. We propose that these effects of glutamate on tendon derived cells including reduced cell viability and altered matrix gene expression contribute to the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. PMID:26041147

  20. Tear-ducts in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    1999-11-01

    We examine the radial spoke pattern evident in the meniscus region in glasses of strong alcoholic beverages exhibiting the `tears-in-wine' phenomenon. We demonstrate that the pattern results from ridge-like elevations of the free surface which are supported by evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection in the meniscus region. Vortices associated with the convective motions are aligned in the radial direction by the surface tension gradient responsible for the generation of tears. The radial flow is focussed into the ridges, which thus serve as the principal conduits of fluid for the tears; consequently, we refer to the ridges as `tear-ducts'. The phenomenon is examined experimentally, and a numerical model of evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection is developed which reproduces the salient features of the tear-duct phenomenon.

  1. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  2. [Diseases of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Schönbauer, H R

    1986-01-01

    In this report diseases of the Achilles tendon are discussed. First an anatomical survey of this region is presented including anatomical variations together with the results of the author's own investigations on corpses. Certain positions and insertions of the plantaris tendon with respect to the Achilles tendon may have pathological influence. Pathological aspects are discussed after a review of the physiology of the Achilles tendon, including functional and tensile tests. The clinical picture changes according to the location of the pathological disorder--tendon, paratenon, insertion and bursae--and whether the disease is acute or chronic. There are various reasons for degenerative changes in the tendon, which can even lead to rupture. Surgical and non-surgical treatment and their indications are presented. In conclusion treatment methods and their results for 36 cases are given. PMID:3087066

  3. Traumatic flexor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lapegue, F; Andre, A; Brun, C; Bakouche, S; Chiavassa, H; Sans, N; Faruch, M

    2015-12-01

    The flexor system of the fingers consisting of flexor tendons and finger pulleys is a key anatomic structure for the grasping function. Athletes and manual workers are particularly at risk for closed injuries of the flexor system: ruptured pulleys, ruptures of the flexor digitorum profundus from its distal attachment ("jersey finger"), and less frequently, ruptures of the flexor digitorum superficialis and of the lumbrical muscles. Open injuries vary more and their imaging features are more complex since tendons may be torn in several locations, the locations may be unusual, the injuries may be associated with nerve and vascular injuries, fibrosis… Sonography is the best imaging modality to associate with the clinical exam for it allows an experienced physician to make an accurate and early diagnosis, crucial to appropriate early treatment planning. PMID:26564614

  4. Parameters influencing prevalence and outcome of tendonitis in Thoroughbred and Arabian racehorses.

    PubMed

    Kalisiak, O

    2012-01-01

    Flexor tendonitis and suspensory desmitis are among most prevalent musculoskeletal injuries observed in racehorses. The aim of this study was to determine which horse and race-related parameters can help to diminish the possibility of injury or--when injury has occurred--to evaluate the potential for the horse to continue a successful career after convalescence. Special attention was given to the comparison of Arabian and Thoroughbred racehorses. 187 horses with ultrasonographically visible lesions were included in the study. Following parameters were analyzed: structure (Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon [SDFT], Deep Digital Flexor Tendon [DDFT], Suspensory Ligament [SL]); percentage of cross sectional area increase; hypoechogenic lesion character; in horses with SDF tendonitis - tendonitis grade according to Genovese. This study showed that Thoroughbreds are more at risk of musculoskeletal problems than Arabian racehorses. In both breeds, the most frequent injuries concern SDFT, then SL. Over 95% of tendonitis concern forelimbs. In Thoroughbreds, the prevalence of tendonitis is higher in bigger horses, in males when compared to females and in fence/steeple racehorses when compared to flat track racehorses. The inside limb is more at risk of SDF tendonitis, when the external limb - of SL desmitis. Tendonitis severity increases with age and is greater in steeplechasers when compared to flat track racehorses. The outcome of tendonitis without hypoechogenic lesion is much better than that with hypoechogenic lesion. Evaluation of hypoechogenic lesion length is an easy and accurate prognosis tool, as the chances of returning to racing drop dramatically with lesions longer than 12 cm. PMID:22708365

  5. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc-/- tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc-/- tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  6. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  7. Clinical presentation and imaging results of patients with symptomatic gluteus medius tears

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Dror; Shohat, Noam; Botser, Itamar; Agar, Gabriel; Domb, Benjamin G.

    2015-01-01

    Greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS) is a common complaint. Recently, it has become well recognized that tendinopathy and tears of the gluteus medius (GM) are a cause of recalcitrant GTPS. Nevertheless, the clinical syndrome associated with GM tears is not fully characterized. We characterize the clinical history, findings on physical examination, imaging and intraoperative findings associated with symptomatic GM tears. Forty-five patients (47 hips) who underwent GM repair for the diagnosis of tear were evaluated. Pain was estimated on the visual analog scale (VAS) and hip-specific scores were administered to assess functional status. The imaging modalities were reviewed and intra operative findings were recorded. The average patient age was 54 years (17–76), 93% were females. Symptom onset was commonly insidious (75%) and the average time to diagnosis was 28 months (2–240). The most common pain location was the lateral hip (75%). The average pre-surgery VAS and modified Harris Hip Score were 6.65 (0–10) and 55.5 (12–90), respectively. All patients had pathological findings on magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) ranging from tendinosis to complete tears of the GM tendon. There was a discrepancy between MRA interpretation by a radiologist and findings during surgery. Hip abductor tears are an under-recognized cause of hip pain and hip symptomatology. In this study, we further characterize the clinical presentation of this entity. The data we present here may facilitate early diagnosis, early orthopedic care and avoid unnecessary prolonged patient sufferings. PMID:27011854

  8. Anatomic Reconstruction Technique for a Plantar Calcaneonavicular (Spring) Ligament Tear.

    PubMed

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Shabat, Shay; Brin, Yaron S; Feldman, Viktor; Kish, Benny; Nyska, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acquired flatfoot deformity in adults is usually due to partial or complete tearing of the posterior tibial tendon, with secondary failure of other structures such as the plantar calcaneonavicular (spring) ligament (SL), which maintain the medial longitudinal arch. In flexible cases, the tibialis posterior can be replaced with the flexor digitorum longus. It is common practice to suture the SL directly in the case of a tear; however, if the tear is complete, suturing directly to the ligament alone will not be possible. Reconstruction of the ligament is needed; however, no validated methods are available to reconstruct this ligament. The operative technique of SL reconstruction described in this report as a part of acquired flatfoot deformity reconstruction consists of augmenting remnants of the spring from the navicularis to the sustentaculum tali and suspending it to the medial malleolus using 2-mm-wide, long-chain polyethylene suture tape. This technique results in the firm anatomic reconstruction of the SL, in addition to "classic" medial arch reconstruction. We recommend SL reconstruction for medial arch reconstruction when the SL is torn. PMID:26253476

  9. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture. PMID:22704825

  10. Role of Serum Fibrinogen Levels in Patients with Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Berton, Alessandra; Spiezia, Filippo; Loppini, Mattia; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy is a frequent pathology of the shoulder, the real understanding of its aetiopathogenesis is still unclear. Several studies showed that RC tendinopathy is more frequent in patients with hyperglycemia, diabetes, obesity, or metabolic syndrome. This paper aims to evaluate the serum concentration of fibrinogen in patients with RC tears. Metabolic disorders have been related to high concentration of serum fibrinogen and the activity of fibrinogen has been proven to be crucial in the development of microvascular damage. Thus, it may produce progression of RC degeneration by reducing the vascular supply of tendons. We report the results of a cross-sectional frequency-matched case-control study comparing the serum concentration of fibrinogen of patients with RC tears with that of a control group of patients without history of RC tears who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy. We choose to enrol in the control group patients with pathology of the lower limb with a likely mechanic, not metabolic, cause, different from tendon pathology. We found no statistically significant differences in serum concentration of fibrinogen when comparing patients with RC tears and patients who underwent arthroscopic meniscectomy (P = 0.5). Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of fibrinogen in RC disease. PMID:24817887

  11. Comparison of femoral and tibial pullout forces in bone-patellar tendon-bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions with a new interference fixation device.

    PubMed

    Seitz, H; Vécsei, V; Menth-Chiari, W A; Pichl, W; Wielke, B; Marlovits, S

    1999-03-01

    Interference screws have become the standard method for fixing bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts. To avoid the inherent pitfalls and complications of interference screws, a 28-mm long and from 5 to 7 mm spreadable metal bolt with nontapping threads was developed for this study. The technical applicability and biomechanical characteristics of this new BPTB interference fixation device were investigated by dissection or tensile testing of 48 cadaveric knee specimens from young donors. No problems occurred with respect to bone plug anchoring during insertion of the spreading bolts. The clinically important linear load was 920+/-283 N for the femoral and 635+/-247 N for the tibial fixation site. Bone plug pullout was the mode of failure in all specimens. The results of this study indicate that the spreading bolt is a reasonable alternative to interference screws. PMID:10210075

  12. Tear Lipocalin: Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dartt, Darlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalins are a family of diverse low molecular weight proteins that act extracellularly. They use multiple recognition properties that include: 1) ligand binding to small hydrophobic molecules, 2) macromolecular complexation with other soluble macromolecules, and 3) binding to specific cell surface receptors to deliver cargo. Tear lipocalin (TLC) is a major protein in tears and has a large ligand binding cavity that allows the lipocalin to bind an extensive and diverse set of lipophilic molecules. TLC can also bind to macromolecules including the tear proteins lactoferin and lysozyme. The receptor to which TLC binds is termed tear lipocalin interacting membrane receptor (LIMR). LIMR appears to work by endocytosis. TLC has a variety of suggested functions in tears including regulation of tear viscosity, binding and release of lipids, endonuclease inactivation of viral DNA, binding of microbial siderophores (iron chelators used to deliver essential iron to bacteria), use as a biomarker for dry eye, and possession of anti-inflammatory activity. Additional research is warranted to determine the actual functions of TLC in tears and the presence of its receptor on the ocular surface. PMID:21791187

  13. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  14. Mechanisms of collagen fibril alignment in tendon injury: from tendon regeneration to artificial tendon.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Kojun; Tanaka, Hirohito F; Yonenaga, Kazumichi; Ohkochi, Hiroki; Miyasaka, Muneo; Sato, Ryota; Kuzumaki, Toru; Yoshida, Kazuharu; Yoshida, Toshiko

    2011-12-01

    The process by which collagen fibrils are aligned following tendon injury remains unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the process of tendon regeneration by transmission electron microscopy, using a film model method. In mice, the Achilles tendon of medial head was transected. On day 3, after only the proximal end of the transected tendon was placed on film and kept in vivo, a translucent substance containing granules, called tendon gel, was secreted. On day 5, the granules assembled in a loose (L) layer, and coalesced tightly in a dense (D) layer, forming an L-D-L layered pattern. On day 10, granules showed high electron density in H layers, which developed into D-H-D layers on day 13. The distal end was placed on film to face the proximal end. On day 10, the tendon gel showed a D-H-D layer pattern. On day 11, mechanical stress from muscular constriction changed the tendon gel to aligned collagen fibrils (6 ± 2 nm in diameter). Thereafter, the diameter of the fibrils increased. Tendon gel harvested on day 5 or day 10 was pulled manually or by hanging weights (about 0.6 MPa). Aligned collagen fibrils (32 ± 7 nm in diameter) were created by traction using tendon gel harvested on day 10. PMID:21618275

  15. 49 CFR 178.1070 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tear test. 178.1070 Section 178.1070... Containers § 178.1070 Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all of Flexible Bulk Containers design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. Flexible Bulk...

  16. 49 CFR 178.818 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tear test. 178.818 Section 178.818 Transportation... Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all flexible IBC design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. The flexible IBC must be filled to not less...

  17. Suture-bridge subscapularis tendon repair technique using low anterior portals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Young; Park, Jun-Suk; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Kumar, Praveen; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2011-02-01

    A suture-bridge technique has been introduced to facilitate fixation procedures and to achieve increased holding strength in posterosuperior rotator cuff. Based on biomechanical studies, this technique has been suggested as an effective method that could optimize rotator cuff tendon-footprint contact area and mean pressure, as well as holding strength. In this technique, the suture-bridge creation is adapted for arthroscopic subscapularis repair to attain the ideal cuff integrity and footprint restoration. To obtain enough working portals and space, two accessory portals were made on the anterior aspect of the shoulder and use an elevator to retract the conjoined tendons and deltoid muscle. This technique could be useful for the repair of subscapularis tears, which are not easily approached using other arthroscopic techniques. From a biomechanical point of view, the subscapularis tendon could be restored more ideally using the suture-bridge technique. PMID:20890701

  18. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  19. Observation of tendon repair in animal model using second-harmonic-generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Eiji; Minamikawa, Takeo; Sato, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Yasui, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Tendon rupture is a trauma difficult to recover the condition before injury. In previous researches, tensile test and staining method have been widely used to elucidate the mechanism of the repair process from the viewpoints of the mechanical property and the histological findings. However, since both methods are destructive and invasive, it is difficult to obtain both of them for the same sample. If both the mechanical property and the histological findings can be obtained from the same sample, one may obtain new findings regarding mechanisms of tendon repairing process. In this paper, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, deep penetration, and without additional staining. Since SHG light intensity sensitively reflects the structural maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates, it will be a good indicator for the repairing degree of the ruptured tendon. From comparison of SHG images between the 4-weeks-repaired tendon and the sound tendon in the animal model, we confirmed that SHG light intensity of the repaired tendon was significantly lower than that of the sound tendon, indicating that the collagen structure in the repaired tendon is still immature. Furthermore, we performed both SHG imaging and the tensile test for the same sample, and confirmed a correlation between them. This result shows a potential of SHG light for an indicator of the histological and mechanical recovery of the ruptured tendon.

  20. Tensile properties of craniofacial tendons in the mature and aged zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rishita R.; Nerurkar, Nandan L.; Wang, Calvin; Galloway, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio is a powerful model for the study of development, regenerative biology, and human disease. However, the analysis of load-bearing tissues such as tendons and ligaments has been limited in this system. This is largely due to technical limitations that preclude accurate measurement of their mechanical properties. Here, we present a custom tensile testing system that applies nano-Newton scale forces to zebrafish tendons as small as 1 mm in length. Tendon properties were remarkably similar to mammalian tendons, including stress-strain nonlinearity and a linear modulus (515±152 MPa) that aligned closely with mammalian data. Additionally, a simple exponential constitutive law used to describe tendon mechanics was successfully fit to zebrafish tendons; the associated material constants agreed with literature values for mammalian tendons. Finally, mature and aged zebrafish comparisons revealed a significant decline in mechanical function with age. Based on the exponential constitutive model, age related changes were primarily caused by a reduction in nonlinearity (e.g. changes in collagen crimp or fiber recruitment). These findings demonstrate the utility of zebrafish as a model to study tendon biomechanics in health and disease. Moreover, these findings suggest that tendon mechanical behavior is highly conserved across vertebrates. PMID:25665155

  1. Tensile properties of craniofacial tendons in the mature and aged zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rishita R; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Wang, Calvin C; Galloway, Jenna L

    2015-06-01

    The zebrafish Danio rerio is a powerful model for the study of development, regenerative biology, and human disease. However, the analysis of load-bearing tissues such as tendons and ligaments has been limited in this system. This is largely due to technical limitations that preclude accurate measurement of their mechanical properties. Here, we present a custom tensile testing system that applies nano-Newton scale forces to zebrafish tendons as small as 1 mm in length. Tendon properties were remarkably similar to mammalian tendons, including stress-strain nonlinearity and a linear modulus (515 ± 152 MPa) that aligned closely with mammalian data. Additionally, a simple exponential constitutive law used to describe tendon mechanics was successfully fit to zebrafish tendons; the associated material constants agreed with literature values for mammalian tendons. Finally, mature and aged zebrafish comparisons revealed a significant decline in mechanical function with age. Based on the exponential constitutive model, age-related changes were primarily caused by a reduction in nonlinearity (e.g., changes in collagen crimp or fiber recruitment). These findings demonstrate the utility of zebrafish as a model to study tendon biomechanics in health and disease. Moreover, these findings suggest that tendon mechanical behavior is highly conserved across vertebrates. PMID:25665155

  2. TLP tendon bottom connector

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, H.S.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a bottom connector for connecting a tendon segment of a tension leg platform to a subsea template which includes a receptacle for the connector comprising: a first body member adapted to be received within an anchor receptacle, a second body member connected to the first body member through a flexible joint for universally pivotal movement and adapted to be connected to the tendon segment, a latch carrier movable with respect to the first body member and having latch segments pivotally connected to the latch carrier, the latch segments being such that in one position of the latch carrier, the latch segments engage both a recess in the receptacle and the first body member when the connector is inserted into the receptacle a sufficient distance so that the latch segments and carrier will react to the recess and such that when the latch carrier is in another position, the latch segments are clear of the recess to enable the connector to move further into the receptacle or to allow the bottom connector to be removed from the receptacle, and release means operative to maintain the carrier in the other position if a decision is made to remove the connector from the receptacle.

  3. Tear lipocalin is the major endonuclease in tears

    PubMed Central

    Yusifov, Taleh N.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Narsinh, Kiran; Gasymov, Oktay K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Human endonucleases are integral to apoptosis in which unwanted or potentially harmful cells are eliminated. The rapid turnover of ocular surface epithelium and microbial colonization of the eyelids are continual sources of DNA in tears. Here, we determine the principal sources of endonuclease activity in tears. Methods Endonucleases in human tears were identified after Sephadex G100 gel filtration. DNA hydrolyzing activity was measured by the conversion pUC19 plasmid DNA to its circular form in agarose gels. Fractions with endonuclease activity were further isolated using a combination ConA-Sepharose DNA, oligo (dT) cellulose, and anion exchange chromatographies. The molecular weights of the DNA hydrolyzing proteins were estimated in zymograms and by calibration of size exclusion chromatography. DNase activities were characterized for activity at a variety of pH and ion concentrations as well as in the presence of inhibitors including NiCl2, ZnCl2, G-actin, and aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA). To determine the mode of hydrolysis, the cleaved ends of the DNA digested by tear DNases were analyzed by 3′ and 5′ end labeling using either terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase or polynucleotide kinase with or without pretreatment with alkaline phosphatase. Results Tear lipocalin (TL) accounts for over 75% of the DNA catalytic activity in tears while a second endonuclease, ~34 kDa, is responsible for less than 24% of the activity. Both are Mg2+ dependent enzyme endonucleases that are enhanced by Ca2+, active at physiologic pH, inhibited by aurintricarboxylic acid, and catalyze hydrolysis of DNA to produce 3′-OH/5′P ends. However, the two enzymes can be distinguished by the inhibitory effect of NiCl2 and the sizes of the cleaved DNA fragments. Conclusions Two magnesium dependent extracellular endonucleases were identified in tears that are different from other major human extracellular nucleases. TL is the principal endonuclease in human tear fluid. Tear

  4. The Trapped Medial Meniscus Tear

    PubMed Central

    Herschmiller, Thomas A.; Anderson, John A.; Garrett, William E.; Taylor, Dean C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous clinical examination maneuvers have been developed to identify meniscus tears of the knee. While meniscus injuries vary significantly in type and severity, no maneuvers have been developed that help to distinguish particular tear characteristics. Purpose: This nonconsecutive case series highlights a distinctive clinical finding that correlates with inferiorly displaced flap tears of the medial meniscus that become trapped in the medial gutter of the knee, as identified through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Eight patients with trapped medial meniscus tears were identified from a single surgeon’s academic orthopaedic sports medicine practice between January 2009 and January 2012. Each patient underwent clinical evaluation, MRI, and arthroscopic treatment for meniscus injury. Clinical notes, MRI images, radiology reports, and operative findings were reviewed and compared in a descriptive fashion. Results: Each patient displayed a positive clinical examination finding of medial knee pain inferior to the joint line with flexion and the application of valgus stress in the setting of a torn medial meniscus and intact medial collateral ligament (MCL). Preoperative MRI revealed a distinctive flap tear of the medial meniscus flipped inferiorly to lay trapped between the tibia and deep fibers of the MCL. On arthroscopy, flap tears were found displaced inferiorly and trapped in the medial gutter in 6 of the 8 patients. Displaced meniscal fragments in the remaining 2 patients were found within the medial compartment. Conclusion: Inferiorly displaced flap tears of the meniscus that have been displaced to the medial gutter can be localized through a careful examination technique. Clinical Relevance: Early identification of this injury pattern may help reduce the likelihood that the trapped fragment will be missed during arthroscopy. PMID:26675499

  5. Tensile properties of a morphologically split supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Tomoya; Hooke, Alexander W; Zhao, Kristin D; Goto, Akira; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-07-01

    The supraspinatus tendon consists morphologically of two sub-regions, anterior and posterior. The anterior sub-region is thick and tubular while the posterior is thin and strap-like. The purpose of this study was to compare the structural and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the supraspinatus tendon. The supraspinatus tendons from seven human cadaveric shoulders were morphologically divided into the anterior and posterior sub-regions. Length, width, and thickness were measured. A servo-hydraulic testing machine (MTS Systems Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) was used for tensile testing. The maximal load at failure, modulus of elasticity and ultimate tendon stress were calculated. Repeated measures were used for statistical comparisons. The mean anterior tendon cross-sectional area was 47.3 mm(2) and the posterior was 32.1 mm(2) . Failure occurred most often at the insertion site: anterior (5/7) and posterior (6/7). All parameters of the anterior sub-region were significantly greater than those of the posterior sub-region. The moduli of elasticity at the insertion site were 592.4 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 217.7 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.01). The ultimate failure loads were 779.2 N in the anterior sub-region and 335.6 N in the posterior (P = 0.003). The ultimate stresses were 22.1 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 11.6 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.008). We recognized that the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the SSP tendon have significantly different mechanical properties. In a future study, we need to evaluate how best to repair an SSP tendon considering these region-specific properties. PMID:24214830

  6. Influence of Energetic Ions on Tearing Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Huishan; Wang Shaojie; Xu Yinfeng; Cao Jintao; Li Ding

    2011-02-18

    In contrast with the stability effects of trapped energetic ions on tearing modes, the effects of circulating energetic ions (CEI) on tearing modes depend on the toroidal circulating direction, and are closely related to the momentum of energetic ions. CEI provide an additional source or sink of momentum to affect tearing modes. For co-CEI, tearing modes can be stabilized if the momentum of energetic ions is large enough. On the other hand, the growth of tearing modes can be enhanced by counter-CEI. Further, a possibility to suppress the island growth of neoclassical tearing modes by co-CEI is pointed out.

  7. Partial Tendon Release for Treatment of a Symptomatic Snapping Biceps Femoris Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Scott A.; Quach, Tony; McAllister, David R.

    2009-01-01

    Snapping of the biceps femoris tendon over the fibular head is an uncommon condition. Reported causes include an anomalous insertion of the tendon, trauma at the insertion site of the tendon, and an abnormality of the fibular head. This article reports a case of a painful snapping biceps femoris tendon in a patient without an anomalous tendon insertion or an abnormality of the fibular head. Partial release of the superior aspect of the tendon resulted in resolution of symptoms. PMID:23015904

  8. High incidence of acute full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri; Lunsjo, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Epidemiological studies of full-thickness rotator cuff tears (FTRCTs) have mainly investigated degenerative lesions. We estimated the population-based incidence of acute FTRCT using a new diagnostic model. Patients and methods During the period November 2010 through October 2012, we prospectively studied all patients aged 18–75 years with acute onset of pain after shoulder trauma, with limited active abduction, and with normal conventional radiographs. 259 consecutive patients met these inclusion criteria. The patients had a median age of 51 (18–75) years. 65% were males. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the clinical findings: group I, suspected FTRCT; group II, other specific diagnoses; and group III, sprain. Semi-acute MRI was performed in all patients in group I and in patients in group III who did not recover functionally. Results We identified 60 patients with FTRCTs. The estimated annual incidence of MRI-verified acute FTRCT was 16 (95% CI: 11–23) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 18–75 years and 25 (CI: 18–36) per 105 inhabitants for the population aged 40–75 years. The prevalence of acute FTRCT in the study group was 60/259 (23%, CI: 18–28). The tears were usually large and affected more than 1 tendon in 36 of these 60 patients. The subscapularis was involved in 38 of the 60 patients. Interpretation Acute FTRCTs are common shoulder injuries, especially in men. They are usually large and often involve the subscapularis tendon. PMID:25708526

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Conservative Treatment and Arthroscopic Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Do, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Bo Ram; Noh, Jee Hyun; Choi, Soo Hyun; Chung, Sun Gun; Lee, Shi-Uk; Choi, Ji Eun; Kim, Seihee; Kim, Min Jee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair in patients with a rotator cuff tear. Methods In this retrospective study, patients aged >50 years with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear were reviewed. The rotator cuff tendons were evaluated using ultrasonography, shoulder magnetic resonance imaging or MR arthrography, and the patients with either a high-grade partial-thickness or small-to-medium-sized (≤3 cm) full-thickness tear were included in this study. The primary outcome measures were a pain assessment score and range of motion (ROM) at 1-year follow-up. The secondary outcomes were the rate of tear progression or retear along with the rate of symptom aggravation after the treatments. Results A total of 357 patients were enrolled, including 183 patients that received conservative treatment and 174 patients who received an arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score (p<0.001) and the ROM in forward flexion (p<0.001) were significantly improved in both groups. The ROM in internal rotation did not significantly change after conservative treatment and arthroscopic repair. The pain assessment score and ROM were not significantly different between the two groups. Retear was observed in 9.6% of patients who had an arthroscopic repair and tear progression was found in 6.7% of those who underwent conservative treatment. The proportion of aggravation for pain and ROM did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusion The effectiveness of conservative treatment is not inferior to arthroscopic repair for patients >50 years old with a less than medium-sized rotator cuff tear in a 1-year follow-up period. Further study is warranted to find the optimal combination of conservative treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. PMID:27152275

  10. Exercise Therapy for Total Tear of Rotator Cuff: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Akbari, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is one of the most common problems in ages older than 60 years of age. Rotator cuff pathology is the most common etiology of shoulder pain. Most of rotator cuff pathologies are treated conservatively in old ages and exercise therapy is not an accepted intervention for management of rotator cuff tear yet. Case presentation The case was a man of 53 years age with shoulder pain who had total tear of supraspinatus tendon and biceps tendinitis in the right shoulder. He had regularly gone swimming, mountain climbing and running in the last 10 years. The case was managed by exercise therapy for 3 months and physical modalities for 20 sessions. Shoulder pain and his function and right shoulder range of motion increased after 3 months. Para clinical findings did not change after treatment, though. The improvements continued 15 months after the beginning of the treatment. Conclusion Exercise therapy was very effective for improving pain and function in total tear of supraspinatus tendon and tendinitis of biceps. PMID:24868434

  11. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  12. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  13. Sonographic findings during and after Platelet Rich Plasma injections in tendons

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Michele; Verna, Sandra; Di Gregorio, Patrizia; Salini, Vincenzo; Schiavone, Cosima

    2014-01-01

    Summary Platelet rich plasma has been used in the treatment of tendinopathies, but the sonographic modifications of tendons have received less attention. In this paper we report the results of an ultrasound evaluation, performed during and after plasma injection, in patients with tendinopathy. The sonographic abnormalities and neovascularization were registered in twenty tendons. Three plasma injections (once a week) were performed, and a rehabilitation program was recommended. Pain and patients’ satisfaction were evaluated. During the injections plasma spread along the collagen fibers, and an intratendineous cleft produced by the injected volume was observed. At 12 months two tendons regained a normal echotexture, while neovessels were absent in seven. The remaining tendons showed less abnormalities and neovascularization in comparison with baseline. The clinical improvement was earlier and more consistent. The discrepancy between the ultrasound and clinical results may be explained by the peculiar modalities of tendon healing induced by plasma administration. PMID:24932444

  14. Faster Movement Speed Results in Greater Tendon Strain during the Loaded Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Jacob E.; Newton, Robert U.; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tendon dynamics influence movement performance and provide the stimulus for long-term tendon adaptation. As tendon strain increases with load magnitude and decreases with loading rate, changes in movement speed during exercise should influence tendon strain. Methods: Ten resistance-trained men [squat one repetition maximum (1RM) to body mass ratio: 1.65 ± 0.12] performed parallel-depth back squat lifts with 60% of 1RM load at three different speeds: slow fixed-tempo (TS: 2-s eccentric, 1-s pause, 2-s concentric), volitional-speed without a pause (VS) and maximum-speed jump (JS). In each condition joint kinetics, quadriceps tendon length (LT), patellar tendon force (FT), and rate of force development (RFDT) were estimated using integrated ultrasonography, motion-capture, and force platform recordings. Results: Peak LT, FT, and RFDT were greater in JS than TS (p < 0.05), however no differences were observed between VS and TS. Thus, moving at faster speeds resulted in both greater tendon stress and strain despite an increased RFDT, as would be predicted of an elastic, but not a viscous, structure. Temporal comparisons showed that LT was greater in TS than JS during the early eccentric phase (10–14% movement duration) where peak RFDT occurred, demonstrating that the tendon's viscous properties predominated during initial eccentric loading. However, during the concentric phase (61–70 and 76–83% movement duration) differing FT and similar RFDT between conditions allowed for the tendon's elastic properties to predominate such that peak tendon strain was greater in JS than TS. Conclusions: Based on our current understanding, there may be an additional mechanical stimulus for tendon adaptation when performing large range-of-motion isoinertial exercises at faster movement speeds.

  15. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  16. Acute Medial Plantar Fascia Tear.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Stephanie C; Mazzola, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    A 32-year-old man who participated in competitive soccer came to physical therapy via direct access for a chief complaint of plantar foot pain. The clinical examination findings and mechanism of injury raised a concern for a plantar fascia tear, so the patient was referred to the physician and magnetic resonance imaging was obtained. The magnetic resonance image confirmed a high-grade, partial-thickness, proximal plantar fascia tear with localized edema at the location of the medial band. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(6):495. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0409. PMID:27245491

  17. Tear exchange and contact lenses: A review

    PubMed Central

    Muntz, Alex; Subbaraman, Lakshman N.; Sorbara, Luigina; Jones, Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Tear exchange beneath a contact lens facilitates ongoing fluid replenishment between the ocular surface and the lens. This exchange is considerably lower during the wear of soft lenses compared with rigid lenses. As a result, the accumulation of tear film debris and metabolic by-products between the cornea and a soft contact lens increases, potentially leading to complications. Lens design innovations have been proposed, but no substantial improvement in soft lens tear exchange has been reported. Researchers have determined post-lens tear exchange using several methods, notably fluorophotometry. However, due to technological limitations, little remains known about tear hydrodynamics around the lens and, to-date, true tear exchange with contact lenses has not been shown. Further knowledge regarding tear exchange could be vital in aiding better contact lens design, with the prospect of alleviating certain adverse ocular responses. This article reviews the literature to-date on the significance, implications and measurement of tear exchange with contact lenses. PMID:25575892

  18. [Erythropoietin levels in human tear fluid].

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Iu M; Rykun, V S; Bagautdinov, D E; Romanenko, E A

    2010-11-01

    Erythropoietin level was evaluated in blood plasma and tear fluid of humans with normal functions of eye and normal blood characteristics. We examined 21 patients. Principle ability of erythropoietin level detection in patient's tear fluid ascertained. PMID:21427970

  19. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Harris, Joshua D; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  20. Proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture, subscapularis tendon rupture, and medial dislocation of the long head of the biceps tendon in an adult after traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Bryan M.; Harris, Joshua D.; Forsythe, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of the coracobrachialis is a rare entity, in isolation or in combination with other muscular or tendinous structures. When described, it is often a result of direct trauma to the anatomic area resulting in rupture of the muscle belly. The authors present a case of a 57-year-old female who suffered a proximal coracobrachialis tendon rupture from its origin at the coracoid process, with concomitant subscapularis tear and medial dislocation of the long head of biceps tendon after first time traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation. Two weeks after injury, magnetic resonance imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed during combined arthroscopic and open technique. Soft-tissue tenodesis of coracobrachialis to the intact short head of the biceps, tenodesis of the long head of biceps to the intertubercular groove, and double-row anatomic repair of the subscapularis were performed. The patient did well postoperatively, and ultimately at 6 months follow-up, she was without pain, and obtained 160° of active forward elevation, 45° of external rotation, internal rotation to T8, 5/5 subscapularis and biceps strength. Scoring scales had improved from the following preoperative to final follow-up: American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, 53.33-98.33; constant, 10-100; visual analogue scale-pain, 4-0. DASH score was 5. PMID:25937715

  1. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  2. 49 CFR 178.818 - Tear test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Tear test. (a) General. The tear test must be conducted for the qualification of all flexible IBC design types. (b) Special preparation for the tear test. The flexible IBC must be filled to not less than... method. Once the IBC is placed on the ground, a 100-mm (4-inch) knife score, completely penetrating...

  3. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  4. Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Intratendinous Partial-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jian; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Background: Partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are being diagnosed more often because of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Compared with articular and bursal side tears, there have been few studies about evaluating the clinical and structural outcomes after intratendinous tear repair. Methods: From 2008 to 2012, 33 consecutive patients with intratendinous PTRCTs underwent arthroscopic repair. All of them were retrospectively evaluated. The University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and constant scores were evaluated before operation and at the final follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was determined using MRI according to Sugaya's classification. Results: At the 2-year follow-up, the average UCLA score increased from 16.7 ± 1.9 to 32.5 ± 3.5, and the constant score increased from 66.2 ± 10.5 to 92.4 ± 6.9 (P < 0.001). Twenty seven patients received follow-up MRI examinations at an average of 15.2 months after surgery. Of these 27 patients, 22 (81.5%) had a healed tendon, and five patients had partial tears. There was no association between functional and anatomic results. Conclusions: For intratendinous PTRCT, clinical outcomes and tendon healing showed good results at a minimum 2-year after arthroscopic repair. PMID:26021507

  5. Investigation of spherical tearing mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, John M.; Miller, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to better understand tearing and reconnection in genuinely three-dimensional configurations. We have identified an equilibrium model that should contain the required features. Three papers have been written and a fourth is in preparation. They are listed in the bibliography.

  6. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  7. Common Disorders of the Achilles Tendon

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress on the tendon too quickly, leading to micro-injury of the tendon fibers. Due to this ... with over-pronation or gait abnormalities, custom orthotic devices may be prescribed. Night splints. Night splints help ...

  8. Glenoid labrum tears related to the long head of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J R; Carson, W G; McLeod, W D

    1985-01-01

    Tears of the glenoid labrum were observed in 73 baseball pitchers and other throwing athletes who underwent arthroscopic examination of the dominant shoulder. Most of the tears were located over the anterosuperior portion of the glenoid labrum near the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps muscle into the glenoid. At arthroscopy, the tendon of the long head of the biceps appeared to originate through and be continuous with the superior portion of the glenoid labrum. In many cases it appeared to have pulled the anterosuperior portion of the labrum off the glenoid. This observation was verified at arthroscopy by viewing the origin of the biceps tendon into the glenoid labrum as the muscle was electrically stimulated. With stimulation of the muscle, the tendinous portion became quite taut, particularly near its attachment to the glenoid labrum, and actually lifted the labrum off the glenoid. Three-dimensional high-speed cinematography with computer analysis revealed that the moment acting about the elbow joint to extend the joint through an arc of about 50 degrees was in excess of 600 inch-pounds. The extremely high velocity of elbow extension which is generated must be decelerated through the final 30 degrees of elbow extension. Of the muscles of the arm that provide the large deceleration forces in the follow-through phase of throwing, only the biceps brachii traverses both the elbow joint and the shoulder joint. Additional forces are generated in the biceps tendon in its function as a "shunt" muscle to stabilize the glenohumeral joint during the throwing act.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4051091

  9. Biomechanical evaluation of a single-row versus double-row repair for complete subscapularis tears.

    PubMed

    Wellmann, Mathias; Wiebringhaus, Philipp; Lodde, Ina; Waizy, Hazibullah; Becher, Christoph; Raschke, Michael J; Petersen, Wolf

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare a single-row repair and a double-row repair technique for the specific characteristics of a complete subscapularis lesion. Ten pairs of human cadaveric shoulder human shoulder specimens were tested for stiffness and ultimate tensile strength of the intact tendons in a load to failure protocol. After a complete subscapularis tear was provoked, the specimens were assigned to two treatment groups: single-row repair (1) and a double-row repair using a "suture bridge" technique (2). After repair cyclic loading a subsequent load to failure protocol was performed to determine the ultimate tensile load, the stiffness and the elongation behaviour of the reconstructions. The intact subscapularis tendons had a mean stiffness of 115 N/mm and a mean ultimate load of 720 N. The predominant failure mode of the intact tendons was a tear at the humeral insertion site (65%). The double-row technique restored 48% of the ultimate load of the intact tendons (332 N), while the single-row technique revealed a significantly lower ultimate load of 244 N (P = 0.001). In terms of the stiffness, the double-row technique showed a mean stiffness of 81 N/mm which is significantly higher compared to the stiffness of the single-row repairs of 55 N/mm (P = 0.001). The double-row technique has been shown to be stronger and stiffer when compared to a conventional single-row repair. Therefore, this technique is recommended from a biomechanical point of view irrespectively if performed by an open or arthroscopic approach. PMID:19693488

  10. Silastic tendon graft: its role in neglected tendon repair.

    PubMed

    LaBarbiera, A P; Solitto, R J

    1990-01-01

    A case history is presented of the repair of a neglected traumatic tendon laceration by the use of a permanent Silastic tendon implant, originally manufactured for hand surgery by a staged procedure. Stage I consists of implantation of the Silastic implant and allowance of a 2- to 3-month period for the production of a pseudosheath. Stage II consists of removal of the implant after using it to guide an auto- or allograft, through the newly formed pseudosheath for attachment to the anastomotic sites. PMID:2258563