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Sample records for terminally ill patients

  1. [COMMUNICATION WITH TERMINALLY ILL PATIENT].

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    The communication is a essential therapeutic instrument in every process of relationship in the team patient-family, and mainly in the transmission of bad news. The communication is not just a simple transmission of information. It is a process whose goal is to enable the adaptation of the patient and family to their actual situation and where the "what", "how" and "how much do you want to know", are belonged to the own patient. Along this article, we will expose some thoughts that the team has to take into account when informing the patient. We are going to explain the SPIKES protocol, or its Spanish version EPICEE. 6-step protocol, based on those recommended by the experts to deliver bad news procedures. And finally we'll talk about the conspiracy of silence, one of the most common and difficult situations to handle in day to day due to paternalism by professionals and families, in which they prefer to hide the situation to the patient, thinking it's the best for him. PMID:26121886

  2. Pain relief in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Wilkinson, J M

    1989-12-01

    A systematic approach to identifying the cause of pain and rational use of drug therapy are keys to providing pain relief to cancer patients. Aspirin, acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective for mild to moderate pain, and they enhance the effectiveness of weak oral narcotics, such as codeine. For severe pain, morphine is the drug of choice. A variety of adjuvant drugs can be used to enhance the effect of narcotics and to treat specific side effects of the disease or of therapy. For the terminally ill patient, a peaceful death with dignity should always be possible. PMID:2573995

  3. Communicating with Terminally Ill Cancer Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjorleifsdottir, Elisabet; Carter, Diana E.

    2000-01-01

    Interviews with 12 fourth-year student nurses in Scotland indicated that they found communicating with terminally ill and dying patients and their families difficult. Although lectures on death and dying were helpful, support and guidance for dealing with these issues in clinical practice were needed. (SK)

  4. Gerontology & Policies for Not Treating Terminally Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, William H.

    Proposals have been developed to clarify physician responsibility in withholding treatment to terminally ill patients. These proposals seek to provide a legal shield against malpractice proceedings and to reduce confusion over how to resolve high medical costs through standardizing procedures for withholding treatment. When first published,…

  5. The question of disclosing the diagnosis to terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hartwich, P

    1979-07-01

    The question of disclosing the diagnosis to terminally ill patients was investigated by means of a semi-standardized interview of 56 subjects who had been 'told the truth' about their condition. The effects and interdependence of the factors of age, personality structure (EPI neuroticism scale), duration of knowledge, social contact, and religiousness, on the patient's ability to cope with the information were examined. The process of adjustment was assessed according to the stages proposed by Kübler-Ross (1969). Using the statistical model of path analysis, it was possible to evaluate these individual factors and present linearly their interrelationships. These results can offer medical staff the following guidelines: Three factors (a) advanced years, (b) good social contact, and (c) optimally unneurotic personality structure, provide the optimum conditions for a positive adjustment to the disclosure of a diagnosis of fatal illness. If, however, only one or two of these factors are involved, or if they are evident only to a slight degree, then conditions for telling the truth are less positive. On the other hand, in the case of (a) youth, (b) restricted social contact, and (c) a more markedly neurotic person, particular caution is recommended, since the danger of a negative reaction, and indeed even of suicide, must be reckoned with. PMID:496613

  6. Rough Set Theory based prognostication of life expectancy for terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Yalcin, Ali; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura E; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel knowledge discovery methodology that relies on Rough Set Theory to predict the life expectancy of terminally ill patients in an effort to improve the hospice referral process. Life expectancy prognostication is particularly valuable for terminally ill patients since it enables them and their families to initiate end-of-life discussions and choose the most desired management strategy for the remainder of their lives. We utilize retrospective data from 9105 patients to demonstrate the design and implementation details of a series of classifiers developed to identify potential hospice candidates. Preliminary results confirm the efficacy of the proposed methodology. We envision our work as a part of a comprehensive decision support system designed to assist terminally ill patients in making end-of-life care decisions. PMID:22255812

  7. Attitudes of Terminally Ill Patients toward Death and Dying in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olokor, Christiana O.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the attitudes of terminally ill patients toward death and dying. Four hospitals in Nigeria were randomly selected: University College Hospital, Ibadan; University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City; the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos; and Igbinedion Specialist Hospital, Okada, Benin City.…

  8. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  9. Educational needs of home caregivers of terminally ill patients: literature review.

    PubMed

    Thielemann, P

    2000-01-01

    Hospice care continues to be a rapidly growing philosophy of care at the end of life. One of the fundamental principles of hospice is the role of a primary caregiver to provide for the needs of the terminally ill loved one. Typically, a spouse, adult child, sibling, close friend, or significant other fills this role. Usually, the caregiver has no formal training in caregiving and is learning all aspects of providing for all the needs of the patient. This is an awesome responsibility and quite overwhelming for most caregivers. A research synthesis was completed to assess the educational needs of caregivers of terminally ill patients. The computerized literature search of several databases found very few studies on the educational needs of caregivers. The few studies that have been done have used both quantitative and qualitative approaches, using a variety of assessment tools, looking at several different populations, over varied time periods. In spite of the variety of methods and populations studied, all the studies came to similar conclusions. The needs of the studied caregivers fall into three main categories: needing information on meeting the physical needs of the patients, community resources, and the patient's illness. The findings provide a basis for further research to build a comprehensive educational program that maximizes the role of the caregivers of terminally ill patients. PMID:11883801

  10. Terminally ill patients' and lay-carers' perceptions and experiences of community-based services.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, N J; Payne, S A; Wiles, R A

    1999-02-01

    This paper reports on terminally ill patients' and their lay-carers' perceptions and experiences of community-based services. It forms part of a larger investigation which examined the extent of service provision and any perceived gaps and problems from the perspectives of both clients and providers of community-based assistance for the terminally ill. The participants were nine terminally ill patients and 12 lay-carers receiving community nursing care. Fifteen face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted to elicit their experiences and perceptions of the care being provided. Qualitative, thematic analysis was carried out on the audio-taped interviews. On the whole, respondents reported a high level of satisfaction and appreciation for the help provided. Several areas appeared more problematic, however, and warrant further consideration. These include perceptions of health professionals, particularly their role domains, power and expertise, and some of the practical disadvantages and problems faced by some patients and their families. These are illustrated and the implications for dying patients, their lay-carers and community-based health professionals are discussed. PMID:10197949

  11. Towards a classification model to identify hospice candidates in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Gil-Herrera, Eleazar; Yalcin, Ali; Tsalatsanis, Athanasios; Barnes, Laura E; Djulbegovic, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a Rough Set Theory (RST) based classification model to identify hospice candidates within a group of terminally ill patients. Hospice care considerations are particularly valuable for terminally ill patients since they enable patients and their families to initiate end-of-life discussions and choose the most desired management strategy for the remainder of their lives. Unlike traditional data mining methodologies, our approach seeks to identify subgroups of patients possessing common characteristics that distinguish them from other subgroups in the dataset. Thus, heterogeneity in the data set is captured before the classification model is built. Object related reducts are used to obtain the minimum set of attributes that describe each subgroup existing in the dataset. As a result, a collection of decision rules is derived for classifying new patients based on the subgroup to which they belong. Results show improvements in the classification accuracy compared to a traditional RST methodology, in which patient diversity is not considered. We envision our work as a part of a comprehensive decision support system designed to facilitate end-of-life care decisions. Retrospective data from 9105 patients is used to demonstrate the design and implementation details of the classification model. PMID:23366132

  12. Ethics of physiotherapy practice in terminally ill patients in a developing country, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chigbo, N N; Ezeome, E R; Onyeka, T C; Amah, C C

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy has been widely defined as a healthcare profession that assesses, diagnoses, treats, and works to prevent disease and disability through physical means. The World Confederation for Physical Therapy describes physiotherapy as providing services to people and populations to develop, maintain, and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. Physiotherapists working with terminally ill patients face a myriad of ethical issues which have not been substantially discussed in bioethics especially in the African perspective. In the face of resource limitation in developing countries, physiotherapy seems to be a cost-effective means of alleviating pain and distressing symptoms at the end-of-life, ensuring a more dignified passage from life to death, yet referrals to physiotherapy are not timely. Following extensive literature search using appropriate keywords, six core ethical themes related to physiotherapy in terminally ill patients were identified and using the four principles of bioethics (patient's autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice), an ethical analysis of these themes was done to highlight the ethical challenges of physiotherapists working in a typical African setting such as Nigeria. PMID:26620621

  13. Does Desire for Hastened Death Change in Terminally Ill Cancer Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Barry; Pessin, Hayley; Marziliano, Allison; Jacobson, Coleen; Sorger, Brooke; Abbey, Jennifer; Olden, Megan; Brescia, Robert; Breitbart, William

    2014-01-01

    Understanding why some terminally ill patients may seek a hastened death (a construct referred to as “desire for hastened death” or DHD) is critical to understanding how to optimize quality of life during an individual’s final weeks, months or even years of life. Although a number of predictor variables have emerged in past DHD research, there is a dearth of longitudinal research on how DHD changes over time and what factors might explain such changes. This study examined DHD over time in a sample of terminally ill cancer patients admitted to a palliative care hospital. A random sample of 128 patients who completed the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death (SAHD) at two time points approximately 2–4 weeks apart participated. Patients were categorized into one of four trajectories based on their SAHD scores at both time points: low (low DHD at T1 and T2), rising (low DHD at T1 and high DHD at T2), falling (high DHD at T1 and low DHD at T2) and high (high DHD at T1 and T2). Among patients who were low at T1, several variables distinguished between those who developed DHD and those who did not: physical symptom distress, depression symptom severity, hopelessness, spiritual well-being, baseline DHD, and a history of mental health treatment. However, these same medical and clinical variables did not distinguish between the falling and high trajectories. Overall, there appears to be a relatively high frequency of change in DHD, even in the last weeks of life. Interventions designed to target patients who are exhibiting subthreshold DHD and feelings of hopelessness may reduce the occurrence of DHD emerging in this population. PMID:24747154

  14. Recruiting terminally ill patients into non-therapeutic oncology studies: views of health professionals. | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Several themes emerged when interviews were conducted with clinician-researchers regarding their attitudes and concerns when recruiting terminally ill cancer patients into non-therapeutic research. The prominent themes were ethical considerations, patient-centered issues, and health professional issues. Promoting communication and autonomy and fostering familial support are important elements for overcoming patient-centered issues. Facilitating the doctor-patient relationship, using teamwork, and implementing educational programs were seen as key factors for dealing with health professional issues.

  15. Abandonment of terminally ill patients in the Byzantine era. An ancient tradition?

    PubMed Central

    Lascaratos, J; Poulakou-Rebelakou, E; Marketos, S

    1999-01-01

    Our research on the texts of the Byzantine historians and chroniclers revealed an apparently curious phenomenon, namely, the abandonment of terminally ill emperors by their physicians when the latter realised that they could not offer any further treatment. This attitude tallies with the mentality of the ancient Greek physicians, who even in Hippocratic times thought the treatment and care of the terminally ill to be a challenge to nature and hubris to the gods. Nevertheless, it is a very curious attitude in the light of the concepts of the Christian Byzantine physicians who, according to the doctrines of the Christian religion, should have been imbued with the spirit of philanthropy and love for their fellowmen. The meticulous analysis of three examples of abandonment of Byzantine emperors, and especially that of Alexius I Comnenus, by their physicians reveals that this custom, following ancient pagan ethics, in those times took on a ritualised form without any significant or real content. PMID:10390682

  16. Coping with Loneliness among the Terminally Ill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokach, Ami

    2007-01-01

    Loneliness is a universal phenomenon, and its pain is intensified by a diagnosis of a terminal illness. The present study is an investigation of the strategies used by patients with Multiple sclerosis (MS), by individuals diagnosed with cancer, and by the general population to cope with loneliness. Three hundred and twenty nine MS patients, 315…

  17. Death Education and Attitudes toward Euthanasia and Terminal Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagi, Mostafa H.; Lazerine, Neil G.

    1982-01-01

    Analyzed attitudes of 614 Protestant and Catholic Cleveland clergy toward terminal illness and euthanasia. Clergy responses revealed that, although eager to prolong life, terminally ill patients feared prolonged illness more than death. The controversial nature of euthanasia became more apparent with clergy who had more training in death…

  18. The Effect of Social Support and Meaning of Life on the Quality-of-Life Care for Terminally Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dobríková, Patricia; P?olková, Dušana; AlTurabi, Layla Khalil; West, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    This study examines the effect of 2 indicators on quality of life (QOL): social support and meaning of life for terminally ill patients. These 2 indicators are very important from a psychological and spiritual point of view. The findings suggest that there is a statistically significant correlation between meaning of life and QOL (r = .610, P < .001). Results have also demonstrated that more frequent patient visits increase the sense of life fulfillment for dying patients. A significant relationship exists in survival of life meaningfulness and satisfaction with social support. In conclusion, experiencing one's life as meaningful is positively related to the well-being for dying patients. Social support provided by a close relative had a positive influence on the patient's meaning of life and overall life satisfaction. PMID:25106419

  19. Factors influencing death at home in terminally ill patients with cancer: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Barbara; Higginson, Irene J

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the relative influence of different factors on place of death in patients with cancer. Data sources Four electronic databases—Medline (1966-2004), PsycINFO (1972-2004), CINAHL (1982-2004), and ASSIA (1987-2004); previous contacts with key experts; hand search of six relevant journals. Review methods We generated a conceptual model, against which studies were analysed. Included studies had original data on risk factors for place of death among patients, > 80% of whom had cancer. Strength of evidence was assigned according to the quantity and quality of studies and consistency of findings. Odds ratios for home death were plotted for factors with high strength evidence. Results 58 studies were included, with over 1.5 million patients from 13 countries. There was high strength evidence for the effect of 17 factors on place of death, of which six were strongly associated with home death: patients' low functional status (odds ratios range 2.29-11.1), their preferences (2.19-8.38), home care (1.37-5.1) and its intensity (1.06-8.65), living with relatives (1.78-7.85), and extended family support (2.28-5.47). The risk factors covered all groups of the model: related to illness, the individual, and the environment (healthcare input and social support), the latter found to be the most important. Conclusions The ne of factors that influence where patients with cancer die is complicated. Future policies and clinical practice should focus on ways of empowering families and public education, as well as intensifying home care, risk assessment, and training practitioners in end of life care. PMID:16467346

  20. TERMINAL ILLNESS IN AN INDIAN SETTING: PROBLEMS OF COMMUNICATION

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, R.; Singh, R.P.N.

    1988-01-01

    SUMMARY A study of 50 terminally ill cancer patients revealed that 52% were uninformed regarding their diagnosis and prognosis. In almost all cases the relatives had been adequately informed. No less than 82% of the terminally ill patients showed an awareness of the fatal prognosis. Most of the patients found the communication with the doctor and the relatives as unsatisfactory. Comparing this group with another group of non-terminal medically ill patients showed striking differences between the two groups. The findings are compared with those reported from the West and the implications of the above observations discussed. PMID:21927320

  1. Religious care required for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer from the perspective of bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Takuya; Ando, Michiyo; Morita, Tatsuya; Hirai, Kei; Kawamura, Ryo; Mitsunori, Miyashita; Sato, Kazuki; Shima, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the most suitable religious care for Japanese terminally ill patients with cancer based on the opinions of bereaved family members. A multicenter questionnaire survey on palliative care service was sent to 592 bereaved family members of patients with cancer who were admitted to palliative care units in Japan, and 430 responded by mail. In the section of the questionnaire about religious care, 382 responses were used for quantitative analysis, and 71 responses about religious care for qualitative analysis. In the current study, the 71 responses were grouped into families with and without a religion and were analyzed qualitatively. Families with a religion (N = 28) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care'' such as music or a religious event, ''Freedom of choice of kinds for religious care,'' ''Staff involvement of religious care,'' ''Meeting with a pastoral care workers,'' and ''Burden of offering a different kind of personal religion.'' In contrast, families without a religion (N = 44) chose answers such as ''Instrumental care,'' ''Freedom of choice whether patients receive religious care or not,'' ''Spiritual care,'' ''Not being able to accept religious care,'' and ''Burden of thinking about a religion and nuisance.'' These findings suggest that Japanese bereaved families with a religion generally regard religious care positively and prefer care through their own religion, whereas some families without a religion require religious care but some do not prefer it. PMID:19755629

  2. Assessment and management of pain in the terminally ill.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Shalini; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-06-01

    Regular assessment for the presence of pain and response to pain management strategies should be high priority in terminally ill patients. Pain management interventions are most effective when treatments are individualized based on the various physical and nonphysical components of pain at the end of life, and patients and family are educated and involved in the decision making. Opioids remain the cornerstone of pain management, and adjuvant analgesics and nonpharmacologic options are usually considered after relative stabilization of pain. This article describes the various issues that are pertinent to the assessment and treatment of pain in terminally ill patients. PMID:21628035

  3. The Creative Use of Psychotherapy with Terminally Ill with AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraenkel, William A.

    One clinical psychologist worked with terminally ill, end-stage Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients in a hospice type setting for an 18-month time period. Interventions included individual psychotherapy, mental status assessments, staff group sessions, and supportive services for families and significant others. During that time,…

  4. Intentions in wishes to die: analysis and a typology – A report of 30 qualitative case studies of terminally ill cancer patients in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Ohnsorge, K; Gudat, H; Rehmann-Sutter, C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the variations in and intentions of wishes to die (WTD) of palliative care cancer patients. Methods Thirty terminally ill cancer patients, their caregivers and relatives in a hospice, an oncology palliative care ward of a general hospital, and an outpatient palliative care service. 116 semistructured qualitative interviews analyzed by a combined approach using Grounded Theory and Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Results A WTD is dynamic and interactive. Its subjective phenomenology can be described by three aspects: intentions, motivations, and interactions. In this article, we present a typology of the possible intentions. We identified nine different (ideal) types of intentions that WTD statements might have, other than wishing to live and accepting death. Many WTD statements do not imply a desire to hasten death. The intentions of statements differ according to whether a WTD is related to as imaginary or as an action. Often WTD statements contain several partial wishes, which can be in tension with each other and form a dynamic, sometimes unstable equilibrium. Conclusions Terminally ill persons' WTD statements differ in their intention, and deeper knowledge about these differences is ethically relevant. PMID:24706488

  5. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certification of terminal illness. 418.22 Section... Certification of terminal illness. (a) Timing of certification—(1) General rule. The hospice must obtain written certification of terminal illness for each of the periods listed in § 418.21, even if a single...

  6. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certification of terminal illness. 418.22 Section... Certification of terminal illness. (a) Timing of certification—(1) General rule. The hospice must obtain written certification of terminal illness for each of the periods listed in § 418.21, even if a single...

  7. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certification of terminal illness. 418.22 Section... Certification of terminal illness. (a) Timing of certification—(1) General rule. The hospice must obtain written certification of terminal illness for each of the periods listed in § 418.21, even if a single...

  8. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certification of terminal illness. 418.22 Section... Certification of terminal illness. (a) Timing of certification—(1) General rule. The hospice must obtain written certification of terminal illness for each of the periods listed in § 418.21, even if a single...

  9. Health services utilization during terminal illness in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Reniers, Georges; Tesfai, Rebbeca

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We describe modern and alternative health services use in terminal illness of adults, and assess whether utilization patterns of TB/AIDS patients are distinct from those of patients suffering from other illnesses. Methods Data are from post-mortem interviews with close relatives or caretakers of the deceased. We provide descriptive statistics of health care utilization in adults and discuss their covariates in multivariate analyses. Results Over 85% of terminally sick patients visited a modern medical facility, but less than 40% spent more than 24 hours in a medical facility and only 25% died in one. Traditional healer (11%) and holy water (46%) visits offer a common treatment and healing alternative, but these visits do not co-vary in any consistent manner with the utilization of modern medical services. In terms of the cause of death, we find a higher contact rate with both modern and alternative medical service providers among TB/AIDS patients compared with those suffering from other medical conditions. The duration of illness seems to account for a good share of that variability. Other covariates of health services utilization are socio-economic status, education and age. Conclusions The contact rate of adults with modern medical facilities in terminal illness is almost universal, but their usage intensity is rather low. Alternative curative options are less commonly used, and do not exclude modern health services use. This suggests that both types of services are considered complements rather than alternatives for each other. Because the contact rate with health service providers is greatest for TB/AIDS patients, it is unlikely that HIV/AIDS-related stigma is an impediment to seeking care. We cannot exclude, however, that it delays health-seeking behaviour. PMID:19372240

  10. Autonomy and paternalism in geriatric medicine. The Jewish ethical approach to issues of feeding terminally ill patients, and to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosin, A J; Sonnenblick, M

    1998-01-01

    Respecting and encouraging autonomy in the elderly is basic to the practice of geriatrics. In this paper, we examine the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and "artificial" feeding in a geriatric unit in a general hospital subscribing to jewish orthodox religious principles, in which the sanctity of life is a fundamental ethical guideline. The literature on the administration of food and water in terminal stages of illness, including dementia, still shows division of opinion on the morality of withdrawing nutrition. We uphold the principle that as long as feeding by naso-gastric (N-G) or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) does not constitute undue danger or arouse serious opposition it should be given, without causing suffering to the patient. This is part of basic care, and the doctor has no mandate to withdraw this. The question of CPR still shows much discrepancy regarding elderly patients' wishes, and doctors' opinions about its worthwhileness, although up to 10 percent survive. Our geriatric patients rarely discuss the subject, but it is openly ventilated with families who ask about it, who are then involved in the decision-making, and the decision about CPR or "do-not-resuscitate" (DNR) is based on clinical and prognostic considerations. PMID:9549682

  11. Talking with a child about a parent's terminal illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... soon after you find out your cancer is terminal. Being included in this difficult transition can help ... Family Member Has Cancer: Dealing With a Parent's Terminal Illness. Available at: www.cancer.org/treatment/childrenandcancer/ ...

  12. The illness/non-illness model: hypnotherapy for physically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Navon, Shaul

    2014-07-01

    This article proposes a focused, novel sub-set of the cognitive behavioral therapy approach to hypnotherapy for physically ill patients, based upon the illness/non-illness psychotherapeutic model for physically ill patients. The model is based on three logical rules used in differentiating illness from non-illness: duality, contradiction, and complementarity. The article discusses the use of hypnotic interventions to help physically ill and/or disabled patients distinguish between illness and non-illness in their psychotherapeutic themes and attitudes. Two case studies illustrate that patients in this special population group can be taught to learn the language of change and to use this language to overcome difficult situations. The model suggests a new clinical mode of treatment in which individuals who are physically ill and/or disabled are helped in coping with actual motifs and thoughts related to non-illness or non-disability. PMID:25928487

  13. General practitioners' strategies and tactics of communication with the terminally ill.

    PubMed

    Todd, C; Still, A

    1993-09-01

    Interviews with 22 randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) investigated their communication with terminally ill patients. In interview analysis a conceptual distinction was drawn between objectives, strategies and tactics. When treating terminal patients, GPs expressed the objectives of keeping the patient comfortable, painfree, happy and maintaining dignity. A strategy is a plan and mode of approaching patients existing over an extended time period. Three strategies were described by GPs for use when interacting with terminally ill patients. These are characterized as 'try to disclose', 'let the patient decide' and 'avoid disclosing'. Tactics refer to behaviours used within a single consultation, as part of a strategy. Six tactics are described: evasion, denial, uncertainty, hints and prompts, euphemism and reassurance. Different strategies imply quite different forms of consultation. Thus to understand a consultation we must place it into the context of the series. PMID:7506681

  14. Experience with a Hospice-care Program for the Terminally Ill

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    A hospice-care program offers an opportunity to provide effective palliative care for patients terminally ill with malignant disease and to develop improved methods for coping with the problems of the dying patient. All patients for whom antitumor therapy does not offer a reasonable possibility of cure are eligible for Church Hospital's multidisciplinary program, the focus of which is on both the patient and his family. Acceptance by medical staff, patients and families has been enthusiastic. Both conventional and unconventional methods can be helpful in making terminally ill patients more comfortable. Much has been learned about the control of pain in such patients. Intestinal obstruction can often be managed non-operatively without the use of nasogastric tube. Other common symptoms such as weakness, anorexia, depression, dyspnea, etc. can be relieved with varying degrees of success. An objective of the program is to allow the patient to be at home for most of his terminal illness and to die there if possible. By utilizing patient and family instruction, visiting nurses and home health aides, approximately two-thirds of the patients in the program at any given time are at home. Basing the program in an acute care hospital has allowed coordination with the curative treatment of malignant disease and effective use of radiation and chemotherapy for palliative purposes. The organizational structure, financing, facilities and clinical experience with 100 consecutive patients of the Church Hospital hospice-care program are described. PMID:88209

  15. Teachers' Knowledge and Support Systems Regarding Students with Terminal Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Coleman, Mari Beth; Best, Sherwood J.; Emerson, Judith

    2013-01-01

    This study examined teachers' knowledge and support when working with students with terminal illness or having experienced a student death. One hundred and ninety teachers of students with physical or multiple disabilities responded to a 40 item questionnaire that was distributed nationally. Results indicated that teachers have greater knowledge…

  16. End-of-Life Care for Children with Terminal Illness (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Expect End-of-Life Care for Children With Terminal Illness KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Caring for a ... Child > End-of-Life Care for Children With Terminal Illness Print A A A Text Size What's ...

  17. What a wish to die can mean: reasons, meanings and functions of wishes to die, reported from 30 qualitative case studies of terminally ill cancer patients in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite research efforts over recent decades to deepen our understanding of why some terminally ill patients express a wish to die (WTD), there is broad consensus that we need more detailed knowledge about the factors that might influence such a wish. The objective of this study is to explore the different possible motivations and explanations of patients who express or experience a WTD. Methods Thirty terminally ill cancer patients, their caregivers and relatives; from a hospice, a palliative care ward in the oncology department of a general hospital, and an ambulatory palliative care service; 116 semi-structured qualitative interviews analysed using a complementary grounded theory and interpretive phenomenological analysis approach. Results Three dimensions were found to be crucial for understanding and analysing WTD statements: intentions, motivations and social interactions. This article analyses the motivations of WTD statements. Motivations can further be differentiated into (1) reasons, (2) meanings and (3) functions. Reasons are the factors that patients understand as causing them to have or accounting for having a WTD. These reasons can be ordered along the bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model. Meanings describe the broader explanatory frameworks, which explain what this wish means to a patient. Meanings are larger narratives that reflect personal values and moral understandings and cannot be reduced to reasons. Functions describe the effects of the WTD on patients themselves or on others, conscious or unconscious, that might be part of the motivation for a WTD. Nine typical ‘meanings’ were identified in the study, including “to let death put an end to severe suffering”, “to move on to another reality”, and – more frequently– “to spare others from the burden of oneself”. Conclusions The distinction between reasons, meanings and functions allows for a more detailed understanding of the motivation for the WTD statements of cancer patients in palliative care situations. Better understanding is crucial to support patients and their relatives in end-of-life care and decision making. More research is required to investigate the types of motivations for WTD statements, also among non-cancer patients. PMID:25161387

  18. [NURSING ACTION BEFORE THE TERMINAL PATIENT PHYSICAL CARE].

    PubMed

    Delgado Sevilla, David; Juarez Vela, Raúl; Pellicer García, Begoña; Redondo Castán, Luis Carlos; Ramón Arbués, Enrique; López Martín, Inmaculada; De Blas Gómez, Irene; Alburquerque Medina, Eulalia

    2014-11-01

    Palliative care is a group of actions performed by nurses in order to increase the comfort and well-being of patients with terminal illnesses. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines this term as: An approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual [1]. Cicely Mary Strode Saunders is considered as the precursor of the palliative care, who explained the need to change the Palliative Care Units in order to improve the quality of life of patients with terminal illnesses. Palliative care is necessary for patients with a terminal illness. In such cases, the life expectancy is less than six months. Human being is considered a biopsychosocial model. For this reason, the nurse must take into account all the requirements arising from these three dimensions of the human being. In this essay, we deal with palliative care in patients with terminal illnesses, considering the role of the nurse as an important reference when teaching palliative care to the main carer. PMID:26118206

  19. Health Care Reform and Concurrent Curative Care for Terminally Ill Children: A Policy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    Within the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 or health care reform, is a relatively small provision about concurrent curative care that significantly affects terminally ill children. Effective on March 23, 2010, terminally ill children, who are enrolled in a Medicaid or state Children’s Health Insurance Plans (CHIP) hospice benefit, may concurrently receive curative care related to their terminal health condition. The purpose of this article was to conduct a policy analysis of the concurrent curative care legislation by examining the intended goals of the policy to improve access to care and enhance quality of end of life care for terminally ill children. In addition, the policy analysis explored the political feasibility of implementing concurrent curative care at the state-level. Based on this policy analysis, the federal policy of concurrent curative care for children would generally achieve its intended goals. However, important policy omissions focus attention on the need for further federal end of life care legislation for children. These findings have implications nurses. PMID:22822304

  20. Relatives' Perspective on the Terminally Ill Patients Who Died after Euthanasia or Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Interview Study in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georges, Jean-Jacques; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.; Muller, Martien T.; van der Wal, Gerrit; van der Heide, Agnes; van der Maas, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    This study used retrospective interviews with 87 relatives to describe the experiences of patients who died by euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) in the Netherlands. Most of the patients suffered from cancer (85%). The relatives were most often a partner (63%) or a child (28%) of the patient. Before explicitly requesting EAS most…

  1. Sleep in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Weinhouse, Gerald L; Schwab, Richard J

    2006-05-01

    Critically ill patients are known to suffer from severely fragmented sleep with a predominance of stage I sleep and a paucity of slow wave and REM sleep. The causes of this sleep disruption include the intensive care unit (ICU) environment, medical illness, psychological stress, and many of the medications and other treatments used to help those who are critically ill. The clinical importance of this type of sleep disruption in critically ill patients, however, is not known. This article reviews the literature on sleep disruption in the ICU, the effects of sepsis on sleep, the effects of commonly used ICU medications on sleep, the relationship between sleep and sedation, and the literature on the biological and psychological consequences of sleep deprivation specifically as it relates to the critically ill. Finally, an integrative approach to improving sleep in the ICU is described. PMID:16774162

  2. [Patients' University, illness and learning].

    PubMed

    Tourette-Turgis, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    The Patients' University, a pilot project at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie, in Paris, enables patients-experts to follow a degree program in patient therapeutic education (University Diploma and Master). Recently, graduate patients and patients directly concerned proposed to co-create a new university certificate for treatment pathway coordinators for breast cancer, rounding out the 120-hour university certificate program on healthcare democracy and meeting the recommendations of the new cancer plan. PMID:26455618

  3. Physician acceptance of home care for terminally ill children.

    PubMed Central

    Edwardson, S R

    1985-01-01

    The study reported here explored the factors associated with the implementation of Martinson's model of home care and treatment for children in the terminal stages of illness with cancer. The model is described as an example of a health care strategy that was dramatically different from the prevalent model of care and may have conflicted with existing values. Data for the study were gathered from the hospital records of the children and from a survey of their oncologists. The findings suggest that physicians viewed the model of care as desirable and made their referral decisions on the basis of their judgment about whether the family in question was technically and emotionally capable of providing the care. PMID:3988531

  4. Music therapy with persons who are indigent and terminally ill.

    PubMed

    Mramor, K M

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the music therapy process specific to one subgroup of the general population identified as having terminal illness. This subgroup includes individuals who are impoverished, homeless, and do not have someone to provide them with care at the end of life. Based upon her clinical work at Malachi House, the author identified three distinct phases of the music therapy process with these individuals: engagement, relationship building, and actively dying. The progress of 50 residents through the therapy process was documented over a three-year period, as was the musical and nonmusical content of music therapy sessions. This paper reviews the results of the documentation recorded and offers case examples to represent each phase. PMID:11816760

  5. Patient Education for the Mentally Ill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Louise Harding

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the philosophy of the rehabilitation services department at McLean Hospital on patient education for the mentally ill, noting patient library collection and recommended resources on marital problems, sex education, drug manuals, and diagnostic and research findings. A list of magazines subscribed to, color code classification, and 23…

  6. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as “the forgotten electrolyte”, is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  7. Hypomagnesemia in Critically Ill Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Velissaris, Dimitrios; Karamouzos, Vassilios; Pierrakos, Charalampos; Aretha, Diamanto; Karanikolas, Menelaos

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg), also known as "the forgotten electrolyte", is the fourth most abundant cation overall and the second most abundant intracellular cation in the body. Mg deficiency has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many diseases. This article is a review of the literature regarding Mg abnormalities with emphasis on the implications of hypomagnesemia in critical illness and on treatment options for hypomagnesemia in critically ill patients with sepsis. Hypomagnesemia is common in critically ill patients, and there is strong, consistent clinical evidence, largely from observational studies, showing that hypomagnesemia is significantly associated with increased need for mechanical ventilation, prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. Although the mechanism linking hypomagnesemia with poor clinical outcomes is not known, experimental data suggest mechanisms contributing to such outcomes. However, at the present time, there is no clear evidence that magnesium supplementation improves outcomes in critically ill patients with hypomagnesemia. Large, well-designed clinical trials are needed to evaluate the role of magnesium therapy for improving outcomes in critically ill patients with sepsis. PMID:26566403

  8. Preparation for Counseling Adults with Terminal Illness: Personal and Professional Parallels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manis, Amie A.; Bodenhorn, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a review of the literature on counseling adults with terminal illness, particularly the literature on the nature of preparation that counselors and other professionals who attend to the needs of adults with a terminal illness require. The authors review information and findings from philosophical, psychological, practical,…

  9. Caregiver Grief in Terminal Illness and Bereavement: A Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldrop, Deborah P.

    2007-01-01

    Caregivers experience multiple losses during the downhill trajectory of a loved one's terminal illness. Using mixed methods, this two-stage study explored caregiver grief during a terminal illness and after the care recipient's death. Caregiver grief was a state of heightened responsiveness during end-stage care: anxiety, hostility, depression,…

  10. Finding Boundaries Inside Prison Walls: Case Study of a Terminally Ill Inmate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Mary-Frances

    2004-01-01

    The number of terminally ill prison inmates rises each year. Mental health professionals are uniquely prepared to provide therapy during the end-of-life process with their assessment, training, empathy, and communication skills. This case study examines the six-month therapy of one terminally ill inmate, using a client-centered approach. Drawing…

  11. End-of-Life Decision Making: A Preliminary Outline for Preparing Counselors to Work with Terminally Ill Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duba, Jill D.; Magenta, Mary

    2008-01-01

    End-of-life care is continuously becoming an issue of paramount importance given an increase in medical advances, the aging of the population, and the movement toward contributing toward a quality of life among terminally ill patients. However, there is a dearth in literature related to this topic specifically in terms of preparing counselors to…

  12. The search for a higher power among terminally ill people with no previous religion or belief.

    PubMed

    Collin, Margery

    2012-08-01

    In a palliative care setting, there is evidence from the practice of spiritual care delivery to suggest that some terminally ill patients may seek, with varying degrees of openness and articulation, to connect with a higher power, or God, despite having expressed no previous interest in religion or belief. Developing a better understanding of the thoughts and feelings of such patients requires insight into the initial triggers of their search. In this small qualitative study involving six patients, fear, hope, and a natural connection are posited as possible prompts. The results highlight the complexity of ambivalent feelings toward a transcendent being that can be the focus of anger and blame while simultaneously offering a source of comfort and hope for an afterlife. Moreover, the study revealed something of the extent to which health professionals may feel limited in facilitating necessary discussion by a need to protect patients and themselves from entering an unfamiliar and complex area. PMID:23123983

  13. Medication adherence for patients with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Upkar; Vetter, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Medication adherence has been studied for some time; however most research has focused on able-bodied patients or the elderly living independently. What has not been studied nearly as much is medication adherence for people with psychiatric or mental illnesses. In this paper, we present a framework that includes the specific challenges in medication adherence for patients with mental illness, algorithms and protocols for evaluating adherence, and some on-going work in developing effective solutions. The architectural framework and associated algorithms leverage the context-aware computing capabilities available on many mobile devices. The system is designed to be able to collect and offer situation-aware information on medication use and adherence for healthcare professionals and other designated persons. PMID:23366355

  14. Thyroid function in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Bianco, Antonio C; Langouche, Lies; Boelen, Anita

    2015-10-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) typically present with decreased concentrations of plasma tri-iodothyronine, low thyroxine, and normal range or slightly decreased concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone. This ensemble of changes is collectively known as non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). The extent of NTIS is associated with prognosis, but no proof exists for causality of this association. Initially, NTIS is a consequence of the acute phase response to systemic illness and macronutrient restriction, which might be beneficial. Pathogenesis of NTIS in long-term critical illness is more complex and includes suppression of hypothalamic thyrotropin-releasing hormone, accounting for persistently reduced secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone despite low plasma thyroid hormone. In some cases distinguishing between NTIS and severe hypothyroidism, which is a rare primary cause for admission to the ICU, can be difficult. Infusion of hypothalamic-releasing factors can reactivate the thyroid axis in patients with NTIS, inducing an anabolic response. Whether this approach has a clinical benefit in terms of outcome is unknown. In this Series paper, we discuss diagnostic aspects, pathogenesis, and implications of NTIS as well as its distinction from severe, primary thyroid disorders in patients in the ICU. PMID:26071885

  15. [Anemia and erythropoietin in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Baginski, S; Körner, R; Frei, U; Eckardt, K-U

    2003-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells is still associated with possible adverse effects and a residual risk of transmission of viral and nonviral diseases. In addition, there is an increasing shortage of blood supply worldwide. These two facts together with the success experienced in the treatment of various types of anemia with recombinant human EPO, have recently led to an increasing interest in the anemia of critically ill patients. As in the anemia of chronic diseases there are several reasons that contribute to the development of anemia in patients on intensive care units: pre-existing anemia, blood loss, reduced red cell life span, impaired iron availability and a direct inhibition of erythropoiesis by inflammatory cytokines. The implications of anemia for the progression and prognosis of critical illness are still unclear and the optimal treatment, including optimal "transfusion triggers" remains controversial. Recombinant human EPO has been proven to be effective in ameliorating the anemia of critical illness in several pilot studies and is currently being tested in larger trials. PMID:12865954

  16. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vitrat, Virginie; Hautefeuille, Serge; Janssen, Cécile; Bougon, David; Sirodot, Michel; Pagani, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients with infection in the intensive care unit (ICU) would certainly benefit from timely bacterial identification and effective antimicrobial treatment. Diagnostic techniques have clearly improved in the last years and allow earlier identification of bacterial strains in some cases, but these techniques are still quite expensive and not readily available in all institutions. Moreover, the ever increasing rates of resistance to antimicrobials, especially in Gram-negative pathogens, are threatening the outcome for such patients because of the lack of effective medical treatment; ICU physicians are therefore resorting to combination therapies to overcome resistance, with the direct consequence of promoting further resistance. A more appropriate use of available antimicrobials in the ICU should be pursued, and adjustments in doses and dosing through pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have recently shown promising results in improving outcomes and reducing antimicrobial resistance. The aim of multidisciplinary antimicrobial stewardship programs is to improve antimicrobial prescription, and in this review we analyze the available experiences of such programs carried out in ICUs, with emphasis on results, challenges, and pitfalls. Any effective intervention aimed at improving antibiotic usage in ICUs must be brought about at the present time; otherwise, we will face the challenge of intractable infections in critically ill patients in the near future. PMID:25349478

  17. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Cotta, M O; Roberts, J A; Lipman, J

    2015-12-01

    The judicious use of existing antibiotics is essential for preserving their activity against infections. In the era of multi-drug resistance, this is of particular importance in clinical areas characterized by high antibiotic use, such as the ICU. Antibiotic dose optimization in critically ill patients requires sound knowledge not only of the altered physiology in serious infections - including severe sepsis, septic shock and ventilator-associated pneumonia - but also of the pathogen-drug exposure relationship (i.e. pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic index). An important consideration is the fact that extreme shifts in organ function, such as those seen in hyperdynamic patients or those with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, can have an impact upon drug exposure, and constant vigilance is required when reviewing antibiotic dosing regimens in the critically ill. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remain important interventions in these patients; however, both of these treatments can have a profound effect on antibiotic exposure. We suggest placing emphasis on the use of therapeutic drug monitoring and dose individualization when optimizing therapy in these settings. PMID:26415688

  18. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness

    PubMed Central

    Cerimele, Joseph M.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Saxon, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared to the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques in implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider in treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  19. Nutritional support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author reviews the newer nutritional substrates in use or under investigation for enteral and parenteral nutrition. Management of the critically ill patient remains a significant challenge to clinicians, and it is hoped that dietary manipulations, such as those outlined, may augment host barriers and immune function and improve survival. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The role of nutrition in patient well-being has long been recognized, but until the past 25 years, the technology to artificially provide nutrients when patients could not eat was not developed. With current, new methods for enteral and vascular access, patients can be fed nonvolitionally with little difficulty. Continued efforts have been directed toward identifying optimal feeding formulations, which have resulted in a multitude of commercially available products. In the past several years, attention has been turned to evaluation of four specialized nutrients and the use of other substrates as pharmacologic agents. METHODS: Pertinent laboratory and clinical data were reviewed to present the pros and cons for each nutritive substrate. CONCLUSIONS: Medium-chain fatty acids, branched-chain amino acids, and glutamine have been shown to be of clinical benefit and should be in common use in the near future. Short-chain fatty acids still are under investigation. Albumin, vitamins E and C, arginine, glutamine, and omega-3 fatty acids show great promise as pharmacologic agents to manipulate the stress response. Nucleotides remain investigational. CONTENTS SUMMARY: The application of some new nutritional substrates for use in critically ill patients, both as caloric sources and as pharmacologic agents, are reviewed. PMID:7979608

  20. Nursing the chronically critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Carasa, Miriam; Nespoli, Grace

    2002-07-01

    The provision of care to the CCI patient is complex, challenging, and unique. The advanced practice nursing model at Mount Sinai Hospital is one successful care delivery model that fills the needs of both CCI patients and the nurses who work with them. The following transferable aspects of the RCU add to the unit's successful outcomes: (1) an interdisciplinary approach assures that all aspects of care are included in the clinical plan; (2) clinical care pathways, algorithms, and standard protocols based on physician, NP, and clinical nurse collaboration are successful management strategies; (3) formal discharge planning meetings with participation of patients, families, NPs, and social workers provide a forum for discharge planning and an avenue to address ethical issues such as advance directives, resuscitation status, and patient self-determination decisions; (4) full participation by nurses in all aspects of the unit's activities is a cost-effective strategy for maximizing positive outcomes for patients and their families. RCU patients and their families are in great need of emotional support. Patients have survived catastrophic illnesses, and are facing the arduous task of pulmonary rehabilitation as the desired outcome. Those patients unable to wean need to plan for a life dependent on ventilatory support. Presently in New York, there are not enough facilities to care for ventilator-dependent patients or patients who are weaned but in need of further pulmonary care and rehabilitation. The RCU LOS reflects this situation. Although a cost-benefit analysis is an effective way to evaluate the RCU program, the human element must not be forgotten. This is the daily challenge for the RCU staff and other health professionals engaged in the care of the CCI patient. Although the aim of this paper is to share the experience of patients and health care providers in the RCU, the reader should be aware that the RCU operates in the context of health care delivery at an academic health center in New York City. Our goal is to increase understanding of the challenges and opportunities present in the care of CCI patients and their families from the nursing perspective. Aspects of this model are adaptable to other health systems, and can be modified as appropriate. For example, in environments without NPs, trained RNs can collaborate with dedicated physicians to coordinate patients' care [1-3,8]. Other successful models use respiratory therapists to coordinate weaning protocols [9-12]. As we reflect on our experience, we hope to heighten the reader's awareness of CCI patients as thinking, feeling, and unique human beings. As Benner [31] suggested, we hope this paper will facilitate seeing the person beyond the disease. As limited financial resources increasingly affect health care, providing high-quality, cost-effective care to the CCI patient remains one of the greatest challenges for nurses and physicians in the United States. PMID:12140910

  1. Fear of Death, Mortality Communication, and Psychological Distress among Secular and Religiously Observant Family Caregivers of Terminal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachner, Yaacov G.; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality communication, fear of death, and…

  2. Pharmacotherapy for Hyperglycemia in Noncritically Ill Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Carlos E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Hyperglycemia in the hospital setting affects 38-46% of noncritically ill hospitalized patients. Evidence from observational studies indicates that inpatient hyperglycemia, in patients with and without diabetes, is associated with increased risks of complications and mortality. Substantial evidence indicates that correction of hyperglycemia through insulin administration reduces hospital complications and mortality in critically ill patients, as well as in general medicine and surgery patients. This article provides a review of the evidence on the different therapies available for hyperglycemia management in noncritically ill hospitalized patients. PMID:26246777

  3. Preparing Classroom Teachers for the Impending Death of a Student with Terminal Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Craig J.; Gourley, Junean Krajewski

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses students with terminal illnesses and the challenges teachers face in dealing with the issue of death. Classroom strategies for dealing with death are described and include using children's literature that explores death, using deaths of pets as teachable moments, and using children's films. (Contains references.) (CR)

  4. Ethical Guidelines for Counselors when Working with Clients with Terminal Illness Requesting Physician Aid in Dying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Layla J.; Piazza, Nick J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the American Counseling Association (ACA) introduced a new ethical standard for counselors working with clients with terminal illness who are considering hastened death options. The authors' purpose is to inform counselors of the Death With Dignity Act and explore relevant ethical guidelines in the "ACA Code of Ethics" (ACA, 2005).

  5. Storytelling by Adults Diagnosed with Terminal Illness: Narrative Identifying through Dialogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Michael Paul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dialogical qualitative research study was to gain insight into the process of storytelling with adults diagnosed with terminal illness as a way of making meaning of their experiences and lives. The study was informed by the conceptual frameworks of story, storytelling, and story listening which are grounded in the theory of…

  6. Many Critically Ill Patients Lack 'Do Not Resuscitate' Orders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_154752.html Many Critically Ill Patients Lack 'Do Not Resuscitate' Orders After surviving cardiac ... than one in four of all cardiac arrest patients had a DNR order prepared within 12 hours ...

  7. 42 CFR 418.22 - Certification of terminal illness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... recertification form, the physician must also sign immediately following the narrative in the addendum. (iii) The... clinical circumstances and cannot contain check boxes or standard language used for all patients....

  8. Treating nonthyroidal illness syndrome in the critically ill patient: still a matter of controversy.

    PubMed

    Bello, G; Paliani, G; Annetta, M G; Pontecorvi, A; Antonelli, M

    2009-08-01

    The nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is a clinical condition of abnormal thyroid function tests observed in patients with acute or chronic systemic illnesses. The laboratory parameters of NTIS usually include low serum levels of triiodothyronine, with normal or low levels of thyroxine and normal or low levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone. It is still a matter of controversy whether the NTIS represents a protective adaptation of the organism to a stressful event or a maladaptive response to illness that needs correction. Multiple studies have investigated the effect of thyroid hormone replacement therapy in certain clinical situations, such as caloric restriction, cardiac disease, acute renal failure, brain-dead potential donors, and burn patients. Treating patients with NTIS seems not to be harmful, but there is no persuasive evidence that it is beneficial. The administration of hypothalamic releasing factors in patients with NTIS appears to be safe and effective in improving metabolism and restoring the anterior pituitary pulsatile secretion in the chronic phase of critical illness. However, also this promising strategy needs to be explored further. Anyhow, an extremely prudent approach is needed if treatment is given. Much of the data appearing in the literature on the treatment of NTIS encourage further randomized controlled trials on large number of patients. At present, however, we believe that there is no indication for treating thyroid hormone abnormalities in critically ill patients until convincing proof of efficacy and safety is provided. PMID:19702524

  9. The pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient

    SciTech Connect

    Chernow, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers addressing the pharmacologic approach to the critically ill patient. Chapter topics include: Radiation injury; Red cell substitutes: a current appraisal; and Psychopharmacology in the ICU.

  10. Expanding the Use of Continuous Sedation Until Death: Moving Beyond the Last Resort for the Terminally Ill.

    PubMed

    LiPuma, Samuel H; DeMarco, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    As currently practiced, the use of continuous sedation until death (CSD) is controlled by clinicians in a way that may deny patients a key choice in controlling their dying process. Ethical guidelines from the American Medical Association and the American Academy of Pain Medicine describe CSD as a "last resort," and a position statement from the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine describe it as "an intervention reserved for extreme situations." Accordingly, patients must progress to unremitting pain and suffering and reach a last-resort stage before the option to pursue CSD is considered. Alternatively, we present and defend a new guideline in which decisionally capable, terminally ill patients who have a life expectancy of less than six months may request CSD before being subjected to the refractory suffering of a treatment of "last resort." PMID:26132059

  11. ???????????ILL????????

    E-print Network

    Ito, Michiko

    2011-10-01

    ? ???POD ???????? ILL ?????????? ? 6???????????????????ILL??? ?????????????????????????? ??31)?????? 10??? POD?????????? ?????? Purdue University??????????? ??????????? 2.410??????????POD ??????????????????????? 4.114 ????????????????????????32...??????????????????????? ????????????? 2011? 5? 31???????? STM?International Association of Scientific, Technical & Medical Publishers????????????????????? ?????????????????????????? ?????????????51)???????ILL ??? ?????????????????????????? ??? IFLA? International Federation...

  12. Assessment and treatment of hyperglycemia in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Marina Verçoza; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Fabbrin, Amanda Rodrigues; Santos, Manoella Freitas; Gerchman, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a commonly encountered issue in critically ill patients in the intensive care setting. The presence of hyperglycemia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, regardless of the reason for admission (e.g., acute myocardial infarction, status post-cardiovascular surgery, stroke, sepsis). However, the pathophysiology and, in particular, the treatment of hyperglycemia in the critically ill patient remain controversial. In clinical practice, several aspects must be taken into account in the management of these patients, including blood glucose targets, history of diabetes mellitus, the route of nutrition (enteral or parenteral), and available monitoring equipment, which substantially increases the workload of providers involved in the patients' care. This review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and monitoring of hyperglycemia in the critically ill adult patient. PMID:24770692

  13. Fathers struggling for relevance in the care of their terminally ill child.

    PubMed

    Laws, Tom

    Children with terminal illness receive substantial amounts of care from their parents within their home, a palliative care facility or general hospital. Whilst there is a long history of research exploring child and family experiences and coping styles within these settings, the focus has not been on fathers' participation in care-giving. This phenomenon can be explained by traditional sex-role socialisations whereby men are ostensibly conditioned as breadwinners and mothers remain embedded as the primary carers for children, particularly when illness arises. Nevertheless, nurses report that men do provide direct care-giving or seek to be more involved in caring for their child. This literature review offers opportunities for health professionals to reflect on the significance of gender in parenting the terminally ill child and to develop empathy for men experiencing difficulties in their role as care-givers. As there is little literature available on this topic, this paper portrays men's experiences and importantly the barriers they encounter in meeting their desire to care. The approach provides a suitable basis for developing a research agenda to promote competencies and relevance for fathers in their role as care-giver. PMID:15729796

  14. Difficulties of Diabetic Patients in Learning about Their Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean Francois

    2001-01-01

    Examines the difficulties experienced by diabetic patients in learning about their illness. Diabetic people (N=138) were questioned by means of a closed answer questionnaire. Results reveal that patients easily acquired manual skills, yet numerous learning difficulties were associated with the skills required to solve problems and make decisions,…

  15. A minimal model for glycemia control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Van Herpe, Tom; Pluymers, Bert; Espinoza, Marcelo; Van den Berghe, Greet; De Moor, Bart

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose a modified minimal model to be used for glycemia control in critically ill patients. For various reasons the Bergman minimal model is widely used to describe glucose and insulin dynamics. However, since this model is mostly valid in a rather restrictive setting, it might not be suitable to be used in a model predictive controller. Simulations show that the new model exhibits a similar glycemia behaviour but clinically more realistic insulin kinetics. Therefore it is potentially more suitable for glycemia control. The designed model is also estimated on a set of critically ill patients giving promising results. PMID:17946700

  16. Consent for Dental Therapy in Severely Ill Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litch, C. Scott; Liggett, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    Legal standards for informed consent are discussed in the context of dental care for the elderly and severely ill. Variations in state common law and legislation are analyzed, focusing on differences between practitioner-oriented and patient-oriented approaches to informed consent. Implications for educators and practitioners are examined.…

  17. Thirst in Critically Ill Patients: From Physiology to Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Shoshana; Stotts, Nancy; Puntillo, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients often have distressful episodes of severe thirst, but the underlying complex biochemical, neurohormonal regulatory controls that regulate this primal sensation have rarely been addressed by clinicians. Subtle changes in plasma osmolality are the most potent stimulus for thirst. In response to increases in osmolality, osmoreceptors activate release of the neurohormone vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone). The released vasopressin acts on the kidneys to conserve water to correct the hyperosmolar state. If this compensatory mechanism is unsuccessful, thirst arises to promote drinking. Thirst induced by marked volume loss, in contrast, is more closely related to the volemic and pressure changes regulated by the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system. Understanding the physiological mechanisms of thirst will help in understanding the pathophysiological consequences of underlying thirst-related disease and treatments in critically ill patients. Further clinical research is needed to elucidate the multiple inhibitory and excitatory neurohormonal stimuli that motivate patients’ intense desire for water. PMID:23817822

  18. Fluid and Electrolyte Disturbances in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Disturbances in fluid and electrolytes are among the most common clinical problems encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU). Recent studies have reported that fluid and electrolyte imbalances are associated with increased morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients. To provide optimal care, health care providers should be familiar with the principles and practice of fluid and electrolyte physiology and pathophysiology. Fluid resuscitation should be aimed at restoration of normal hemodynamics and tissue perfusion. Early goal-directed therapy has been shown to be effective in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. On the other hand, liberal fluid administration is associated with adverse outcomes such as prolonged stay in the ICU, higher cost of care, and increased mortality. Development of hyponatremia in critically ill patients is associated with disturbances in the renal mechanism of urinary dilution. Removal of nonosmotic stimuli for vasopressin secretion, judicious use of hypertonic saline, and close monitoring of plasma and urine electrolytes are essential components of therapy. Hypernatremia is associated with cellular dehydration and central nervous system damage. Water deficit should be corrected with hypotonic fluid, and ongoing water loss should be taken into account. Cardiac manifestations should be identified and treated before initiating stepwise diagnostic evaluation of dyskalemias. Divalent ion deficiencies such as hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia and hypophosphatemia should be identified and corrected, since they are associated with increased adverse events among critically ill patients. PMID:21468200

  19. On a personal note: a music therapist's reflections on working with those who are living with a terminal illness.

    PubMed

    Hartley, N A

    2001-01-01

    Music therapists are constantly called upon to justify their work through research projects and evaluation processes. Rarely do we get the opportunity to talk personally about our work, the effects it has on us as music therapists, indeed, as human beings. This paper traces my own journey as a music therapist working with the terminally ill. Using audio extracts of music improvised with patients at the end of their lives, the concept of "attention" in music is addressed and explored. The paper will investigate: a) What is the difference between the quality of attention that is available to ourselves and our patients "in" music, as opposed to other ways of being together?; b) What does musical experience, particularly when achieved through improvisation, enable us and our patients to be that we cannot achieve in other ways?; c) Can "being in music" with another person fulfill a sense of longing that is evident in people at the end of their lives? In her book Waiting For God, Simone Weil suggests, "Those who are unhappy have no need for anything else in this world other than people capable of giving them their attention..." (1). Can the improvisation of music offer a unique and uncomplicated medium for being close? PMID:11816752

  20. Management of Atrial Fibrillation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arrigo, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is common in ICU patients and is associated with a two- to fivefold increase in mortality. This paper provides a reappraisal of the management of AF with a special focus on critically ill patients with haemodynamic instability. AF can cause hypotension and heart failure with subsequent organ dysfunction. The underlying mechanisms are the loss of atrial contraction and the high ventricular rate. In unstable patients, sinus rhythm must be rapidly restored by synchronised electrical cardioversion (ECV). If pharmacological treatment is indicated, clinicians can choose between the rate control and the rhythm control strategy. The optimal substance should be selected depending on its potential adverse effects. A beta-1 antagonist with a very short half-life (e.g., esmolol) is an advantage for ICU patients because the effect of beta-blockade on cardiovascular stability is unpredictable in those patients. Amiodarone is commonly used in the ICU setting but has potentially severe cardiac and noncardiac side effects. Digoxin controls the ventricular response at rest, but its benefit decreases in the presence of adrenergic stress. Vernakalant converts new-onset AF to sinus rhythm in approximately 50% of patients, but data on its efficacy and safety in critically ill patients are lacking. PMID:24527212

  1. Association between illness severity and timing of initial enteral feeding in critically ill patients: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early enteral nutrition is recommended in cases of critical illness. It is unclear whether this recommendation is of most benefit to extremely ill patients. We aim to determine the association between illness severity and commencement of enteral feeding. Methods One hundred and eight critically ill patients were grouped as “less severe” and “more severe” for this cross-sectional, retrospective observational study. The cut off value was based on Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score 20. Patients who received enteral feeding within 48?h of medical intensive care unit (ICU) admission were considered early feeding cases otherwise they were assessed as late feeding cases. Feeding complications (gastric retention/vomiting/diarrhea/gastrointestinal bleeding), length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, ventilator-associated pneumonia, hospital mortality, nutritional intake, serum albumin, serum prealbumin, nitrogen balance (NB), and 24-h urinary urea nitrogen data were collected over 21?days. Results There were no differences in measured outcomes between early and late feedings for less severely ill patients. Among more severely ill patients, however, the early feeding group showed improved serum albumin (p?=?0.036) and prealbumin (p?=?0.014) but worsened NB (p?=?0.01), more feeding complications (p?=?0.005), and prolonged ICU stays (p?=?0.005) compared to their late feeding counterparts. Conclusions There is a significant association between severity of illness and timing of enteral feeding initiation. In more severe illness, early feeding was associated with improved nutritional outcomes, while late feeding was associated with reduced feeding complications and length of ICU stay. However, the feeding complications of more severely ill early feeders can be handled without significantly affecting nutritional intake and there is no eventual difference in length of hospital stay or mortality between groups. Consequently, early feeding shows to be a more beneficial nutritional intervention option than late feeding in patients with more severe illness. PMID:22554240

  2. New-onset atrial fibrillation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Sibley, Stephanie; Muscedere, John

    2015-01-01

    New-onset atrial fibrillation is a common problem in critically ill patients, with reported incidence ranging from 5% to 46%. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The present review summarizes studies investigating new-onset atrial fibrillation conducted in the critical care setting, focusing on the etiology, management of the hemodynamically unstable patient, rate versus rhythm control, ischemic stroke risk and anticoagulation. Recommendations for an approach to management in the intensive care unit are drawn from the results of these studies. PMID:26057373

  3. Outcomes of critically ill cancer patients with Acinetobacter baumannii infection

    PubMed Central

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Correa-García, Paulina; García-Guillén, Francisco J; González-Herrera, María O; Pérez-Alonso, Américo; Texcocano-Becerra, Julia; Herrera-Gómez, Angel; Cornejo-Juárez, Patricia; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe the intensive care unit (ICU) outcomes of critically ill cancer patients with Acinetobacter baumannii (AB) infection. METHODS: This was an observational study that included 23 consecutive cancer patients who acquired AB infections during their stay at ICU of the National Cancer Institute of Mexico (INCan), located in Mexico City. Data collection took place between January 2011, and December 2012. Patients who had AB infections before ICU admission, and infections that occurred during the first 2 d of ICU stay were excluded. Data were obtained by reviewing the electronic health record of each patient. This investigation was approved by the Scientific and Ethics Committees at INCan. Because of its observational nature, informed consent of the patients was not required. RESULTS: Throughout the study period, a total of 494 critically ill patients with cancer were admitted to the ICU of the INCan, 23 (4.6%) of whom developed AB infections. Sixteen (60.9%) of these patients had hematologic malignancies. Most frequent reasons for ICU admission were severe sepsis or septic shock (56.2%) and postoperative care (21.7%). The respiratory tract was the most frequent site of AB infection (91.3%). The most common organ dysfunction observed in our group of patients were the respiratory (100%), cardiovascular (100%), hepatic (73.9%) and renal dysfunction (65.2%). The ICU mortality of patients with 3 or less organ system dysfunctions was 11.7% (2/17) compared with 66.6% (4/6) for the group of patients with 4 or more organ system dysfunctions (P = 0.021). Multivariate analysis identified blood lactate levels (BLL) as the only variable independently associated with in-ICU death (OR = 2.59, 95%CI: 1.04-6.43, P = 0.040). ICU and hospital mortality rates were 26.1% and 43.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The mortality rate in critically ill patients with both HM, and AB infections who are admitted to the ICU is high. The variable most associated with increased mortality was a BLL ? 2.6 mmol/L in the first day of stay in the ICU. PMID:26261778

  4. Patient and spouse illness beliefs and quality of life in prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lisa M.; Mohamed, Nihal E.; Winkel, Gary; Diefenbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among married prostate cancer (PC) patients, the spouse is often the primary provider of emotional support and personal care. However, few studies have investigated spouses’ illness beliefs (i.e., about disease duration and treatment control) and their impact on patients’ quality of life (QOL). Spouses’ beliefs about disease duration (timeline) were hypothesised to mediate relationships between spouses’ treatment control beliefs and patients’ QOL six months later. Methods Fifty-three patients, who underwent localised treatment for PC, and their spouses, completed an illness beliefs measure (the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire). Patients completed a QOL measure (the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – General) six months later. Results Spouse timeline beliefs mediated the association between spouse treatment control beliefs and patient QOL six months later (total indirect effect = ?0.71, 95% CI 0.02-2.03). That is, spouse beliefs that the treatment would control their loved one's illness led to beliefs that the disease would be of shorter duration, which in turn led to improved patient QOL six months later. This relationship did not occur with patients’ beliefs. Conclusions Results highlight the important influence of spouse illness beliefs over time on patient QOL with implications for clinical care and dyadic research. PMID:22971045

  5. Bilateral Diaphragmatic Paralysis in a Patient With Critical Illness Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Chen; Lin, Meng-Chih; Liaw, Mei-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis (BDP) manifests as respiratory muscle weakness, and its association with critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) was rarely reported. Here, we present a patient with BDP related to CIP, who successfully avoided tracheostomy after diagnosis and management. A 71-year-old male presented with acute respiratory failure after sepsis adequately treated. Repeated intubation occurred because of carbon dioxide retention after each extubation. After eliminating possible factors, septic shock-induced respiratory muscle weakness was suspected. Physical examination, a nerve conduction study, and chest ultrasound confirmed our impression. Pulmonary rehabilitation and reconditioning exercises were arranged, and the patient was discharged with a diagnosis of BDP. The diagnosis of BDP is usually delayed, and there are only sporadic reports on its association with polyneuropathy, especially in patients with preserved limb muscle function. Therefore, when physicians encounter patients that are difficult to wean from mechanical ventilation, CIP associated with BDP should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26252301

  6. Estimating Kidney Function in the Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Seller-Pérez, Gemma; Herrera-Gutiérrez, Manuel E.; Maynar-Moliner, Javier; Sánchez-Izquierdo-Riera, José A.; do Pico, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is an accepted measure for assessment of kidney function. For the critically ill patient, creatinine clearance is the method of reference for the estimation of the GFR, although this is often not measured but estimated by equations (i.e., Cockroft-Gault or MDRD) not well suited for the critically ill patient. Functional evaluation of the kidney rests in serum creatinine (Crs) that is subjected to multiple external factors, especially relevant overhydration and loss of muscle mass. The laboratory method used introduces variations in Crs, an important fact considering that small increases in Crs have serious repercussion on the prognosis of patients. Efforts directed to stratify the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) have crystallized in the RIFLE or AKIN systems, based in sequential changes in Crs or urine flow. These systems have provided a common definition of AKI and, due to their sensitivity, have meant a considerable advantage for the clinical practice but, on the other side, have introduced an uncertainty in clinical research because of potentially overestimating AKI incidence. Another significant drawback is the unavoidable period of time needed before a patient is classified, and this is perhaps the problem to be overcome in the near future. PMID:23862059

  7. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  8. ACR Appropriateness Criteria acute respiratory illness in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Heitkamp, Darel E; Albin, Matthias M; Chung, Jonathan H; Crabtree, Traves P; Iannettoni, Mark D; Johnson, Geoffrey B; Jokerst, Clinton; McComb, Barbara L; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Ravenel, James G

    2015-05-01

    The respiratory system is often affected by complications of immunodeficiency, typically manifesting clinically as acute respiratory illness. Ongoing literature reviews regarding the appropriateness of imaging in these patients are critical, as advanced medical therapies including stem cell transplantation, chemotherapy, and immunosuppressive therapies for autoimmune disease continue to keep the population of immunosuppressed patients in our health care system high. This ACR Appropriateness Criteria topic describes clinical scenarios of acute respiratory illness in immunocompromised patients with cough, dyspnea, chest pain, and fever, in those with negative, equivocal, or nonspecific findings on chest radiography, in those with multiple, diffuse, or confluent opacities on chest radiography, and in those in whom noninfectious disease is suspected. The use of chest radiography, chest computed tomography, transthoracic needle biopsy, and nuclear medicine imaging is discussed in the context of these clinical scenarios. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or is not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:25837591

  9. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-09-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p?< ?0.0500) higher in sepsis than in trauma, whereas platelet count and plasma fibrinogen were significantly lower in multiple trauma. Activation markers of coagulation were elevated in both groups, however, thrombin-antithrombin-complex was significantly higher in multiple trauma. DIC scores of 5 were not exceeded in any of the two groups. Analysing the influences on mortality (11/34; 32.35% ), which was not different in both groups, non-survivors were significantly older, had significantly higher multiple organ failure (MOF) scores, lactate, abnormal prothrombin times and lower C1-inhibitor activities, even more pronounced in early deaths, than survivors. In septic non-survivors protein C was significantly lower than in trauma. We conclude from these data that activation of the complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients. MOF score, lactate, C1-inhibitor and prothrombin time have been the only statistically significant predictors for lethal outcome suggesting that organ function, microcirculation, haemostasis and inflammatory response are essential elements of the pathomechanism and clinical course of diseases among critically ill patients. PMID:26410872

  10. Communication with patients suffering from serious physical illness.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Luigi; Caruso, Rosangela; Costantini, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Communication is the corner stone of the relationship with the patient in all medical settings with the main aims of creating a good inter-personal relationship, exchanging information, and making treatment-related decisions. In a rapidly changing cultural and social context, the paternalistic approach of doctors knowing the best and deciding what should be done for a patient has been replaced by a shared decision-making approach, with patients being advised to educate themselves, ask questions and influence the course of the discussion with their doctors. Thus, a need for an improvement in the communication skills of physicians is extremely important for patients affected by serious physical illness (e.g. cancer, HIV infection, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). Certain attitudes, behaviour and skills (e.g. capacity to impart confidence, being empathetic, providing a 'human touch', relating on a personal level, being forthright, being respectful, and being thorough) are part of effective communication. However, some specific aspects influencing doctor-patient communication and relationships, such as personality variables, coping and attachment styles, as well as cultural factors, should also be taken in to account. The development of training curricula to help doctors acquire proper skills in communication is mandatory, since research has shown that training in communication may facilitate the effectiveness of a doctor-patient relationship and the patient's satisfaction with care and give a general sense of humanity, which is easily lost in a biotechnologically oriented medicine. PMID:25832510

  11. Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Teodoro; Bonet, Alfonso; Rubio, Mercedes; Mateo, Dolores; Farré, Mercé; Acosta, José Antonio; Blesa, Antonio; Montejo, Juan Carlos; de Lorenzo, Abelardo García; Mesejo, Alfonso

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Liver dysfunction associated with artificial nutrition in critically ill patients is a complication that seems to be frequent, but it has not been assessed previously in a large cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of incidence in 40 intensive care units. Different liver dysfunction patterns were defined: (a) cholestasis: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l, gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, or bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl; (b) liver necrosis: aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l, plus bilirubin of more than 1.2 mg/dl or international normalized ratio of more than 1.4; and (c) mixed pattern: alkaline phosphatase of more than 280 IU/l or gamma-glutamyl-transferase of more than 50 IU/l, plus aspartate aminotransferase of more than 40 IU/l or alanine aminotransferase of more than 42 IU/l. Results Seven hundred and twenty-five of 3,409 patients received artificial nutrition: 303 received total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and 422 received enteral nutrition (EN). Twenty-three percent of patients developed liver dysfunction: 30% in the TPN group and 18% in the EN group. The univariate analysis showed an association between liver dysfunction and TPN (p < 0.001), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score on admission (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.001), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and malnutrition (p < 0.01). In the multivariate analysis, liver dysfunction was associated with TPN (p < 0.001), sepsis (p < 0.02), early use of artificial nutrition (p < 0.03), and calculated energy requirements of more than 25 kcal/kg per day (p < 0.05). Conclusion TPN, sepsis, and excessive calculated energy requirements appear as risk factors for developing liver dysfunction. Septic critically ill patients should not be fed with excessive caloric amounts, particularly when TPN is employed. Administering artificial nutrition in the first 24 hours after admission seems to have a protective effect. PMID:17254321

  12. Evolving concepts of hemodynamic monitoring for critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamzaoui, Olfa; Monnet, Xavier; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    The last decades have been characterized by a continuous evolution of hemodynamic monitoring techniques from intermittent toward continuous and real-time measurements and from an invasive towards a less invasive approach. The latter approach uses ultrasounds and pulse contour analysis techniques that have been developed over the last 15 years. During the same period, the concept of prediction of fluid responsiveness has also been developed and dynamic indices such as pulse pressure variation, stroke volume variation, and the real-time response of cardiac output to passive leg raising or to end-expiration occlusion, can be easily obtained and displayed with the minimally invasive techniques. In this article, we review the main hemodynamic monitoring devices currently available with their respective advantages and drawbacks. We also present the current viewpoint on how to choose a hemodynamic monitoring device in the most severely ill patients and especially in patients with circulatory shock. PMID:25878430

  13. Acute surgical illness in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Kudsk, K A; Tranbaugh, R F; Sheldon, G F

    1981-07-01

    Acute abdominal pain frequently accompanies sickle cell crisis. The character of this pain may be difficult to discriminate from acute surgical processes such as acute cholecystitis or appendicitis. Seven patients with sickle cell disease presenting with abdominal pain underwent surgery. Review of the medical records demonstrated a characteristic pattern of presentation consistent from crisis to crisis. When patients with known sickle cell disease present with symptoms of abdominal pain, (1) the character of the symptoms, (2) precipitating events, (3) white blood cell count, (4) bilirubin, and (5) fever should be compared with those characteristics in previous crises. Deviation from previous patterns suggests an illness caused by problems other than sickel cell crisis. PMID:7258505

  14. Scoring Systems in Assessing Survival of Critically Ill ICU Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sekulic, Ana D.; Trpkovic, Sladjana V.; Pavlovic, Aleksandar P.; Marinkovic, Olivera M.; Ilic, Aleksandra N.

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine which of the most commonly used scoring systems for evaluation of critically ill patients in the ICU is the best and simplest to use in our hospital. Material/Methods This prospective study included 60 critically ill patients. After admittance to the ICU, APACHE II, SAPS II, and MPM II0 were calculated. During further treatment in the ICU, SOFA and MPM II were calculated at 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h and 7 days after admittance using laboratory and radiological measures. Results In comparison with survivors, non-survivors were older (p<0.01) and spent significantly more days on mechanical ventilation (p<0.01). ARDS was significantly more common in patients who survived compared to those who did not (chi-square=7.02, p<0.01), which is not the case with sepsis (chi-square=0.388, p=0.53). AUROC SAPS II was 0.690, and is only slightly higher than the other 2 AUROC incipient scoring systems, MPM II and APACHE II (0.654 and 0.623). The APACHE II has the highest specificity (81.8%) and MPM II the highest sensitivity (85.2%). MPM II7day AUROC (1.0) shows the best discrimination between patients who survived and those who did not. MPM II48 (0.836), SOFA72 (0.821) and MPM II72 (0.817) also had good discrimination scores. Conclusions APACHE II and SAPS II measured on admission to the ICU were significant predictors of complications. MPM II7day has the best discriminatory power, followed by SOFA7day and MPM II48. MPM II7day has the best calibration followed by SOFA7day and APACHE II. PMID:26336861

  15. Delirium in critically ill patients: epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Zaal, Irene J; Slooter, Arjen J C

    2012-07-30

    Delirium is commonly observed in critically ill patients and is associated with negative outcomes. The pathophysiology of delirium is not completely understood. However, alterations to neurotransmitters, especially acetylcholine and dopamine, inflammatory pathways and an aberrant stress response are proposed mechanisms leading to intensive care unit (ICU) delirium. Detection of delirium using a validated delirium assessment tool makes early treatment possible, which may improve prognosis. Patients at high risk of delirium, especially those with cognitive decline and advanced age, should be identified in the first 24 hours of admission to the ICU. Whether these high-risk patients benefit from haloperidol prophylaxis deserves further study. The effectiveness of a multicomponent, non-pharmacological approach is shown in non-ICU patients, which provides proof of concept for use in the ICU. The few studies on this approach in ICU patients suggest that the burden of ICU delirium may be reduced by early mobility, increased daylight exposure and the use of earplugs. In addition, the combined use of sedation, ventilation, delirium and physical therapy protocols can reduce the frequency and severity of adverse outcomes and should become part of routine practice in the ICU, as should avoidance of deliriogenic medication such as anticholinergic drugs and benzodiazepines. Once delirium develops, symptomatic treatment with antipsychotics is recommended, with haloperidol being the drug of first choice. However, there is limited evidence on the safety and effectiveness of antipsychotics in ICU delirium. PMID:22804788

  16. Plasma Catalytic Iron, AKI, and Death among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rajapurkar, Mohan; Lele, Suhas S.; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Waikar, Sushrut S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Catalytic iron has been hypothesized to be a key mediator of AKI. However, the association between plasma catalytic iron levels and AKI has not been well studied in humans. Design, settings, participants, & measurements A single-center, prospective, nonconsecutive cohort study of 121 critically ill patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) between 2008 and 2012 was performed. Plasma catalytic iron, free hemoglobin, and other iron markers were measured on ICU days 1 and 4. The primary end point was in-hospital mortality or AKI requiring RRT. Secondary end points included mortality (assessed during hospitalization, at 30 days, and 1 year) and incident AKI, defined by modified Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Results ICU day 1 plasma catalytic iron levels were higher among patients who reached the primary end point (median, 0.74 µmol/l [interquartile range, 0.31–3.65] versus 0.29 µmol/l [0.22–0.46]; P<0.01). ICU day 1 plasma catalytic iron levels were associated with number of packed red blood cell transfusions before ICU arrival (rs=0.29; P<0.001) and plasma free hemoglobin levels on ICU day 1 (rs=0.32; P<0.001). Plasma catalytic iron levels on ICU day 1 were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality or AKI requiring RRT, even after adjusting for age, enrollment eGFR, and number of packed red blood cell transfusions before ICU arrival (13 events; adjusted odds ratio per 1-SD higher ln[catalytic iron], 3.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.79 to 6.20). ICU day 1 plasma catalytic iron levels were also significantly associated with incident AKI, RRT, hospital mortality, and 30-day mortality. Conclusions Among critically ill patients, elevated plasma catalytic iron levels on arrival to the ICU are associated with a greater risk of incident AKI, RRT, and hospital mortality. PMID:25189925

  17. A comparison of patients with illness phobia and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Noyes, R; Wesner, R B; Fisher, M M

    1992-01-01

    Fourteen subjects with illness phobia, a subtype of hypochondriasis, were compared with an equal number of subjects with panic disorder who had been matched for age and sex. The illness phobic subjects differed from panic subjects in not having spontaneous panic attacks or agoraphobic symptoms, the characteristic features of panic disorder. The onset of illness phobia was related to experience with illness in half the subjects. Half of the illness phobic subjects also had family histories of anxiety disorders. The results suggest that illness phobia is distinct from panic disorder and that it is a disorder in which environmental and genetic factors are etiologically important. PMID:1539109

  18. Duration of Illness and Treatment Effects on Hippocampal Volume in Male Patients with Schizophrenia

    E-print Network

    Gerig, Guido

    1 Duration of Illness and Treatment Effects on Hippocampal Volume in Male Patients. However, the cause and timing of this pathomorphologic feature of the illness is not known. Aims To examine the relationship of duration of illness and treatment effects on hippocampal volumes in male

  19. Candida glabrata candidemia: An emerging threat in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Gupta, Anu; Varma, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Candidemia is an important nosocomial blood stream infection in critically ill patients. Although several studies have addressed candidemia, very few have reviewed the impact of Candida glabrata candidemia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients. Materials and Methods: The medical records of ICU patients between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. The epidemiology, clinical features and mortality related risk factors among our adult ICU patients were seen. Results: Among 144 episodes of candidemia, C. glabrata (n = 26; 18.05%) was the third most common species isolated. The incidence of C. glabrata candidemia was 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The most common risk factors were prior exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics (100%), central venous catheter (100%), mechanical ventilation (76.9%), diabetes mellitus (50%), age >65 years (46.15%). Urine (23%) was the most common source of C. glabrata candidemia. Overall in hospital 30 days mortality rate due to C. glabrata fungemia was 53.8%. Patients who were treated with fluconazole showed better outcome than patients treated with amphotericin B. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the significantly associated with mortality in our study. Conclusion: Candida glabrata was the 3rd most common Candida causing candidemia in our ICUs with a incidence of 0.21/1000 ICU admissions. The outcome of ICU acquired C. glabrata candidemia was poor with 30 days mortality rate of 53.8%. Renal failure requiring hemodialysis was the only risk factor associated with mortality. Further studies are required to identify the other risk factors associated with mortality in C. glabrata candidemia. PMID:25810610

  20. Overnight hospitalization of acutely ill day hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Turner, V E; Hoge, M A

    1991-06-01

    As the trend toward community-based treatment of the seriously mentally ill has continued, partial hospital programs have admitted an increasing number of highly symptomatic individuals. As a result, patient crises occur more often in these programs, and staff have had to develop novel crisis intervention strategies that do not rely on standard hospital care. One such strategy involves the use of "overnight hospitalization" or a "backup bed" to provide temporary safety and clinical management with the goal of returning the patient to the partial hospital within 24 hr. Given the lack of data on this intervention the present study was designed to provide further information about the implementation and effectiveness of this clinical strategy. The authors outline the rationale and procedures for a backup bed system and provide data on outcome that is drawn from an examination of backup bed utilization in a public-sector mental-health setting over a 1-year period. Clinical implications of the findings for future use of overnight hospitalization with partial hospital patients are reviewed. PMID:10114455

  1. Fear of death, mortality communication, and psychological distress among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bachner, Yaacov G; O'Rourke, Norm; Carmel, Sara

    2011-02-01

    Previous research suggests that caregivers and terminally ill patients face substantial difficulties discussing illness and death. Existing research, however, has focused primarily on the experience of patients. The current study compared responses as well as the relative strength of association between mortality comunication, fear of death, and psychological distress (i.e., depressive symptomatology, emotional exhaustion) among secular and religiously observant family caregivers of terminally ill cancer patients. A total of 236 participants were recruited over 18 months within the first year of caregiver bereavement. Retrospectively reported mortality communication was statistically greater among secular caregivers; in contrast, both fear of death and depressive symptoms were greater among the religiously observant. Path analyses subsequently revealed notable differences between groups. Among secular caregivers, a significant inverse relationship between mortality communication and the two indices of caregiver distress emerged. In contrast, the association between mortality communication and psychological distress among the religious was moderated by these caregivers' fear of death. The results of this study suggest that fear of death is a significant predictor of psychological distress among religiously observant caregivers of terminal cancer patients (i.e., fear of their own death as elicited by the caregiving role). Fostering morality communication between secular caregivers and patients would appear to be one means of reducing the likelihood of clinically significant psychological distress. This may be insufficient among religiously observant caregivers, however, for whom fear of death may first need to be redressed. PMID:24501834

  2. Does Mental Illness Stigma Contribute to Adolescent Standardized Patients' Discomfort With Simulations of Mental Illness and Adverse Psychosocial Experiences?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Mark D.; Johnson, Samantha; Niec, Anne; Pietrantonio, Anna Marie; High, Bradley; MacMillan, Harriet; Eva, Kevin W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Adolescent mental illness stigma-related factors may contribute to adolescent standardized patients' (ASP) discomfort with simulations of psychiatric conditions/adverse psychosocial experiences. Paradoxically, however, ASP involvement may provide a stigma-reduction strategy. This article reports an investigation of this hypothetical…

  3. Diagnostic value of terminal ileum biopsies in patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosal appearance

    PubMed Central

    Velidedeo?lu, Mehmet; Enes Ar?kan, A.; Ka?an Zengin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the necessity of obtaining routine ileal biopsy during colonoscopy in the patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosal appearance if the inflammatory bowel disease is not considered. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed for 57 patients who were referred to a private hospital for colonoscopy between January 2008 and February 2009, in whom terminal ileum intubation was achieved and an abnormal appearance was observed. Results: There were 33 men and 24 women; the mean age was 44.12±11.42 years. In 22 patients, the abnormality was ulcers and/or erosions. In 10 patients, there were mucosal nodularity and in 24, the finding was erythema. The time to reach to ileum from cecum was 28.78±24.30 s. The mean length of the examined ileum was 12.93±6.05 cm. There was no difference between groups according to distance covered in the ileum for diagnostic yield, but going further than 2 cm was important. Conclusion: There should be no need to obtain routine biopsy in patients with abnormal terminal ileum mucosa appearance, when inflammatory bowel disease is not considered. In these patients, histopathology also reveals non-specific ileitis. Furthermore, in these patients, the macroscopic pathological diagnosis overlaps the histopathology, and it has a low diagnostic yield and lower clinical significance. PMID:26504419

  4. Illness perception of dropout patients followed up at bipolar outpatient clinic, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Oflaz, Serap; Guveli, Hulya; Kalelioglu, Tevfik; Akyaz?, Senem; Y?ld?zhan, Eren; K?l?c, Kas?m Candas; Basyigit, Sehnaz; Ozdemiroglu, Filiz; Akyuz, Fatma; Gokce, Esra; Bag, Sevda; Kurt, Erhan; Oral, Esat Timucin

    2015-06-01

    Dropout is a common problem in the treatment of psychiatric illnesses including bipolar disorders (BD). The aim of the present study is to investigate illness perceptions of dropout patients with BD. A cross sectional study was done on the participants who attended the Mood Disorder Outpatient Clinic at least 3 times from January 2003 through June 2008, and then failed to attend clinic till to the last one year, 2009, determined as dropout. Thirty-nine dropout patients and 39 attendent patients with BD were recruited for this study. A sociodemographic form and brief illness perception questionnaire were used to capture data. The main reasons of patients with BD for dropout were difficulties of transport (31%), to visit another doctor (26%), giving up drugs (13%) and low education level (59%) is significant for dropout patients. The dropout patients reported that their illness did not critically influence their lives, their treatment had failed to control their illnesses, they had no symptoms, and that their illness did not emotionally affect them. In conclusion, the nonattendance of patients with serious mental illness can result in non-compliance of therapeutic drug regimens, and a recurrence of the appearance symptoms. The perception of illness in dropout patients with BD may be important for understanding and preventing nonattendance. PMID:25921931

  5. Mentally ill Medicare patients less likely than others to receive certain types of surgery.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Cai, Xueya; Du, Hang; Glance, Laurent G; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Cram, Peter; Mukamel, Dana B

    2011-07-01

    Mentally ill people may face barriers to receiving elective surgical procedures as a result of societal stigma and the cognitive, behavioral, and interpersonal deficits associated with mental illness. Using data from a cohort of elderly Medicare beneficiaries in 2007, we examined whether the mentally ill have less access than people without mental illness to several common procedures that are typically not for emergencies and are performed at the discretion of the provider and the patient. Results suggest that Medicare patients with mental illness are 30-70 percent less likely than others to receive these "referral-sensitive" surgical procedures. Those who did undergo an elective procedure generally experienced poorer outcomes both in the hospital and after discharge. Efforts to improve access to and outcomes of nonpsychiatric care for mentally ill patients are warranted. PMID:21734205

  6. Chronic illness and the physician-patient relationship: a response to the Hastings Center's "ethical challenges of chronic illness".

    PubMed

    Moros, D A; Rhodes, R; Baumrin, B; Strain, J J

    1991-04-01

    The following article is a response to the position paper of the Hastings Center, "Ethical Challenges of Chronic Illness", a product of their three year project on Ethics and Chronic Care. The authors of this paper, three prominent bioethicists, Daniel Callahan, Arthur Caplan, and Bruce Jennings, argue that there should be a different ethic for acute and chronic care. In pressing this distinction they provide philosophical grounds for limiting medical care for the elderly and chronically ill. We give a critical survey of their position and reject it as well as any attempt to characterize the physician-patient relationship as a commercial contract. We emphasize, as central features of good medical practice, a commitment to be the patient's agent and a determination to acquire and be guided by knowledge. These commitments may sometimes conflict with efforts to have the physician serve as an instrument of social and economic policies limiting medical care. PMID:1905745

  7. Assessing Patient Management Plans of Doctors and Medical Students: An Illness Script Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monajemi, Alireza; Schmidt, Henk G.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Illness script theory offers explanations for expert-novice differences in clinical reasoning. However, it has mainly focused on diagnostic (Dx) performance, while patient management (Mx) has been largely ignored. The aim of the present study was to show the role of Mx knowledge in illness script development and how it relates to…

  8. Psychometric Evaluation of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale for Patients with Mental Illnesses: Measurement Invariance across Time

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Cheng; Wu, Tsung-Hsien; Chen, Chih-Yin; Wang, Jung-Der; Lin, Chung-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background The current investigation examined the psychometric properties of the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) scale in a sample of patients with mental illness. In addition to the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity that previous studies have tested for the ISMI, we extended the evaluation to its construct validity and measurement invariance using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Methods Three hundred forty-seven participants completed two questionnaires (i.e., the ISMI and the Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale [DSSS]), and 162 filled out the ISMI again after 50.23±31.18 days. Results The results of this study confirmed the frame structure of the ISMI; however, the Stigma Resistance subscale in the ISMI seemed weak. In addition, internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity were all satisfactory for all subscales and the total score of the ISMI, except for Stigma Resistance (??=?0.66; ICC?=?0.52, and r?=?0.02 to 0.06 with DSSS). Therefore, we hypothesize that Stigma Resistance is a new concept rather than a concept in internalized stigma. The acceptable fit indices supported the measurement invariance of the ISMI across time, and suggested that people with mental illness interpret the ISMI items the same at different times. Conclusion The clinical implication of our finding is that clinicians, when they design interventions, may want to use the valid and reliable ISMI without the Stigma Resistance subscale to evaluate the internalized stigma of people with mental illness. PMID:24887440

  9. Heat-related illness in Jinshan District of Shanghai: A retrospective analysis of 70 patients

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-chun; Gao, Xia; Liu, Guo-ping; Wang, Wei; Shen, Jun-mei; Xu, Ming-jia; Shen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with heat-related illness, and guide the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of heat-related illness. METHODS: From June 2013 to August 2013, seventy patients with heat-related illness were treated at Jinshan Hospital of Fudan University, and their epidemiological characteristics, laboratory results, treatment and prognosis were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: In the 70 patients, 18 patients suffered from heat stroke and 52 patients from non-heat stroke. When the environmnent temperature was above 35 °C, the body temperature of the patients began to increase markedly. The patients with heat stroke were significantly older than those with non-heat stroke (P<0.05). The body temperature, heart rate, blood glucose, blood lactate dehydrogenase and blood creatine kinase in the patients with heat stroke were higher than those in the patients with non-heat stroke (P<0.05). Blood lactate dehydrogenase and blood creatine kinase were positively correlated with body temperature (r=0.801). CONCLUSION: When the environmental temperature goes above 35 °C, heat-related illness should be prevented, especially in the elderly. The body temperature, heart rate, blood glucose, blood lactate dehydrogenase and blood creatine kinase in patients with heat stroke are higher than those in patients with non-heat stroke. Blood lactate dehydrogenase and blood creatine kinase are positively correlated with body temperature, but their relationship with heat-related illness awaits further study. PMID:25548603

  10. Outcome of critically ill patients with acute kidney injury using the akin criteria

    E-print Network

    Mandelbaum, Tal

    Objective: Acute kidney injury affects 5% to 7% of all hospitalized patients with a much higher incidence in the critically ill. The Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a definition in which serum creatinine rises (>0.3 ...

  11. Comorbidity Profile and Health Care Utilization in Elderly Patients with Serious Mental Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Hendrie, Hugh C.; Hay, Don; Lane, Kathleen A.; Gao, Sujuan; Purnell, Christianna; Munger, Stephanie; Smith, Faye; Dickens, Jeanne; Boustani, Malaz A.; Callahan, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Patients with serious mental illness are living longer. Yet there remain few studies that focus on health care utilization and its relationship to comorbidities in these elderly mentally ill patients. Design Comparative study. Information on demographics, comorbidities and health care utilization were taken from an electronic medical record system. Setting Wishard Health Services senior care and community mental health clinics. Participants Patients age 65 years and over-255 patients with serious mental illness (schizophrenia, major recurrent depression and bipolar illness) attending a mental health clinic and a representative sample of 533 non-demented patients without serious mental illness attending primary care clinics. Results Patients having serious mental illness had significantly higher rates of medical emergency room visits (p=0.0027) and significantly longer lengths of medical hospitalizations (p<0.0001) than did the primary care control group. The frequency of medical comorbidities such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, thyroid disease, and cancer were not significantly different between the groups. Hypertension was lower in the mentally ill group (p<0.0001). Reported falls (p<0.0001), diagnoses of substance abuse (p=0.02), and alcoholism (p=0.0016) were higher in the seriously mentally ill. The differences in health care utilization between the groups remained significant after adjusting for comorbidity levels, lifestyle factors, and attending primary care. Conclusions Our findings of higher rates of emergency care, longer hospitalizations, and increased frequency of falls, substance abuse, and alcoholism suggest the elderly seriously mentally ill remain a vulnerable population requiring an integrated model of health care. PMID:24206938

  12. Supporting Cancer Patients in Illness Management: Usability Evaluation of a Mobile App

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, David R; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobile phones and tablets currently represent a significant presence in people’s everyday lives. They enable access to different information and services independent of current place and time. Such widespread connectivity offers significant potential in different app areas including health care. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the usability of the Connect Mobile app. The mobile app enables mobile access to the Connect system, an online system that supports cancer patients in managing health-related issues. Along with symptom management, the system promotes better patient-provider communication, collaboration, and shared decision making. The Connect Mobile app enables access to the Connect system over both mobile phones and tablets. Methods The study consisted of usability tests of a high fidelity prototype with 7 cancer patients where the objectives were to identify existing design and functionality issues and to provide patients with a real look-and-feel of the mobile system. In addition, we conducted semistructured interviews to obtain participants’ feedback about app usefulness, identify the need for new system features and design requirements, and measure the acceptance of the mobile app and its features within everyday health management. Results The study revealed a total of 27 design issues (13 for mobile apps and 14 for tablet apps), which were mapped to source events (ie, errors, requests for help, participants' concurrent feedback, and moderator observation). We also applied usability heuristics to identify violations of usability principles. The majority of violations were related to enabling ease of input, screen readability, and glanceability (15 issues), as well as supporting an appropriate match between systems and the real world (7 issues) and consistent mapping of system functions and interactions (4 issues). Feedback from participants also showed the cancer patients’ requirements for support systems and how these needs are influenced by different context-related factors, such as type of access terminal (eg, desktop computer, tablet, mobile phone) and phases of illness. Based on the observed results, we proposed design and functionality recommendations that can be used for the development of mobile apps for cancer patients to support their health management process. Conclusions Understanding and addressing users’ requirements is one of the main prerequisites for developing useful and effective technology-based health interventions. The results of this study outline different user requirements related to the design of the mobile patient support app for cancer patients. The results will be used in the iterative development of the Connect Mobile app and can also inform other developers and researchers in development, integration, and evaluation of mobile health apps and services that support cancer patients in managing their health-related issues. PMID:25119490

  13. Assessment of pain and other symptoms in Mexican patients with advanced illness.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias-Gómez, Alfredo; Hernández-Martínez, Eva E; Ruiz-Ramírez, S; López Collada-Estrada, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. During this stage, several symptoms appear and contribute to a decrement in the quality of life. We performed a retrospective study evaluating medical records of terminally ill patients who attended a specialized pain and palliative medicine service. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) was used to document symptoms intensity. Data analysis was carried out at two times: the initial assessment and the last visit before death. We analyzed thirty-eight cases of which 58% were women (22 cases) and the mean age of the sample was 60.7 years (SD: 15.6). All cases had an oncologic disease classified as end-stage cancer and were considered as palliative patients. Symptom intensity was documented by the ESAS in two different moments: pain 3.7 (SD: 3.2) vs. 4.1 (SD: 3.4), nausea 1.4 (SD: 3.2) vs. 1.8 (SD: 3.3), depression 3.4 (SD: 3.4) vs. 4.3 (SD: 3.7), anxiety 3 (SD: 3.5) vs. 2.4 (SD: 3.6), weakness 4.8 (SD: 3.5) vs. 6.2 (SD: 3.6), dyspnea 1.1 (SD: 2.7) vs. 2.8 (SD: 3.4), anorexia 3.5 (SD: 3.7) vs. 4.7 (SD: 3.8), and somnolence 2.6 (SD: 3.5) vs. 4.9 (SD: 3.5). Statistical significance was found in weakness, dyspnea, and somnolence. We found the ESAS a useful tool for symptom assessment. In this study, we document the prevalence of symptoms at the end of life in a Spanish-speaking country. Physicians trained in pain and palliative medicine managed those symptoms, and we observed that symptoms maintained the same intensity. There is the possibility that the intervention made by those clinicians modified the symptomatic outcome in those patients. Evaluation of effective protocols for symptom management at the end of life is needed. PMID:25313923

  14. Abnormal illness behavior of patients with functional somatic symptoms: relation to psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Kuroki, T; Koizumi, S

    2001-01-01

    Functional somatic symptoms are highly associated with hypochondriasis, anxiety, and depressive disorders. Despite the absence of an organic disorder, underlying psychological distress of patients with functional somatic symptoms may result in abnormal illness behavior such as inadequate treatment seeking or overuse of medical services. Using the Illness Behavior Questionnaire (IBQ), we examined the illness behavior of Japanese patients visiting a general medicine clinic whose physical symptoms were considered functional. We used the General Health Questionnaire-30 to classify patients with functional somatic symptoms as those with and without psychological distress. Patients with distress (n=35) reported more physical complaints and higher IBQ scores than did patients without distress (n=22). The IBQ profile of patients with psychological distress was identical to that of patients diagnosed with either hypochondriasis or major depression. The illness behavior of patients without psychological distress was indistinguishable from that of patients whose physical symptoms were attributed to organic disease. These results further support the hypothesis that functional somatic symptoms may be associated with hypochondriasis and major depression, the pathology of which may contribute to the development of abnormal illness behavior. PMID:11543849

  15. Violent victimization of adult patients with severe mental illness: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Latalova, Klara; Kamaradova, Dana; Prasko, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this paper are to review data on the prevalence and correlates of violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness, to critically evaluate the literature, and to explore possible approaches for future research. PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched using several terms related to severe mental illness in successive combinations with terms describing victimization. The searches identified 34 studies. Nine epidemiological studies indicate that patients with severe mental illness are more likely to be violently victimized than other community members. Young age, comorbid substance use, and homelessness are risk factors for victimization. Victimized patients are more likely to engage in violent behavior than other members of the community. Violent victimization of persons with severe mental illness has long-term adverse consequences for the course of their illness, and further impairs the quality of lives of patients and their families. Victimization of persons with severe mental illness is a serious medical and social problem. Prevention and management of victimization should become a part of routine clinical care for patients with severe mental illness. PMID:25336958

  16. The effects of death education on nurses' attitudes toward caring for terminally ill persons and their families.

    PubMed

    Frommelt, K H

    1991-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effectiveness of an education program on nurses' attitudes toward caring for terminally ill persons and their family members. The program, based on the hospice concept of care, included a didactic section based on Kubler-Ross' stages of death and dying, and a role-play model designed by the researcher. Data were collected from 34 licensed nurses, aged 18 to 65, practicing in the midwestern United States. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was designed by the researcher to assess nurses' attitudes. The FATCOD was found to be a valid and reliable tool. All nurses completed the tool before and after the education program (pre-test, post-test). Compared by a t-test, the scores for the nurses were significantly higher after participation in the educational program. The t-value was found to be 2.97, significant at the less than 0.01 level, 2-tailed probability = 0.006. These findings support the hypothesis that nurses have a more positive attitude toward caring for terminally ill persons and their family members after participation in the program, than the same nurses had before participating in the program. Demographic information including age, years of experience in nursing, highest degree held, basic type of nursing preparation and previous education on death and dying were analyzed to determine their relationship to the nurses' attitudes. The only information which demonstrated any significant relationship to the nurses' attitudes was that of previous education on death and dying. These were computed by an analysis of variance (ANOVA) F = 3.22, F prob = 0.04, significant at less than 0.05 level.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1742142

  17. Rehabilitation of Critical Illness Polyneuropathy and Myopathy Patients: An Observational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Primoz; Vidmar, Gaj; Kuret, Zala; Bizovicar, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy (CIPNM) frequently develops in patients hospitalized in intensive care units. The number of patients with CIPNM admitted to inpatient rehabilitation is increasing. The aim of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the outcome of their rehabilitation. Twenty-seven patients with CIPNM were included in…

  18. Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness among Schizophrenic Patients and Their Families (Comparative Study)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmoud, Sahar; Zaki, Rania A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a comparative study aiming to assess the extent of internalized stigma of mental illness among patients with schizophrenia & identify stigma as perceived by family members caring schizophrenic patients. The study was conducted in two settings 1st clinic was outpatient clinic for psychiatric patient affiliated to Abbasia…

  19. Personality Change Pre- to Post- Loss in Spousal Caregivers of Patients with Terminal Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Benjamin P.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Fagerlin, Angela; Mohile, Supriya G.; Epstein, Ronald M.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Personality is relatively stable in adulthood but could change in response to life transitions, such as caring for a spouse with a terminal illness. Using a case-control design, spousal caregivers (n=31) of patients with terminal lung cancer completed the NEO-FFI twice, 1.5 years apart, before and after the patient’s death. A demographically-matched sample of community controls (n=93) completed the NEO-FFI on a similar timeframe. Based on research and theory, we hypothesized that bereaved caregivers would experience greater changes than controls in interpersonal facets of extraversion (sociability), agreeableness (prosocial, nonantagonistic), and conscientiousness (dependability). Consistent with hypotheses, bereaved caregivers experienced an increase in interpersonal orientation, becoming more sociable, prosocial, and dependable (Cohen’s d = .48?.67), though there were no changes in nonantagonism. Changes were not observed in controls (ds ? .11). These initial findings underscore the need for more research on the effect of life transitions on personality. PMID:25614779

  20. [Work disability in long-term illness--Part 2: Termination of employment].

    PubMed

    Hennies, G

    1993-10-01

    If the employment has terminated and the performance capacity of the employee is no longer up to demands made by his last job, the second consideration in respect of his disablement concerns the following points: similar work to be performed within the narrow framework of his former in case of compensation payment because of unemployment: activities within the framework of jobs he can be judged to perform, as laid down by German labour legislation in respect of compensation payments to the unemployed. The compulsory sickness body will have to clarify by expertising which activities can be considered as yardsticks from a medical point of view. PMID:8268702

  1. A meta-ethnographic synthesis on phenomenographic studies of patients' experiences of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Röing, Marta; Sanner, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach developed within an educational framework, focusing on the qualitative experience of learning. It is also being used, to a lesser degree, in healthcare research. In the present study, we conducted a meta-ethnographic synthesis of phenomenographic studies on chronic illness, in order to give a broader perspective of how chronic illness can be experienced. Our aim was not to describe patients' various individual experiences of illness, but instead to identify the different ways chronic illness can be experienced by patients. Our synthesis and phenomenographic interpretation of 12 selected articles found that patients' experiences of chronic illness can be described in terms of a different lived body, a struggle with threat to identity and self-esteem, a diminished lifeworld, and a challenging reality. These experiences relate to each other in a process of recurring loops, where the different ways of experiencing continue to influence each other over time. According to these findings, the use of phenomenography as a research approach has the potential to add to the understanding of how chronic illness can be experienced. Patients may benefit from seeing that their illness can be experienced in many different ways and that it has many aspects, which then can lead to a better understanding and coping with their illness. We suggest that it may be worthwhile to expand the scope of phenomenography outside pedagogics. This presupposes a revision of the application to include a wider and more comprehensive description, for instance, of the different ways illness and healthcare phenomena can be experienced, and how these different ways are related to each other, with less focus on hierarchical relations. PMID:25690674

  2. A meta-ethnographic synthesis on phenomenographic studies of patients’ experiences of chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    Röing, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach developed within an educational framework, focusing on the qualitative experience of learning. It is also being used, to a lesser degree, in healthcare research. In the present study, we conducted a meta-ethnographic synthesis of phenomenographic studies on chronic illness, in order to give a broader perspective of how chronic illness can be experienced. Our aim was not to describe patients’ various individual experiences of illness, but instead to identify the different ways chronic illness can be experienced by patients. Our synthesis and phenomenographic interpretation of 12 selected articles found that patients’ experiences of chronic illness can be described in terms of a different lived body, a struggle with threat to identity and self-esteem, a diminished lifeworld, and a challenging reality. These experiences relate to each other in a process of recurring loops, where the different ways of experiencing continue to influence each other over time. According to these findings, the use of phenomenography as a research approach has the potential to add to the understanding of how chronic illness can be experienced. Patients may benefit from seeing that their illness can be experienced in many different ways and that it has many aspects, which then can lead to a better understanding and coping with their illness. We suggest that it may be worthwhile to expand the scope of phenomenography outside pedagogics. This presupposes a revision of the application to include a wider and more comprehensive description, for instance, of the different ways illness and healthcare phenomena can be experienced, and how these different ways are related to each other, with less focus on hierarchical relations. PMID:25690674

  3. Schizophrenia is a major mental illness that has a great impact on patients and their environment. One of the

    E-print Network

    Deco, Gustavo

    Schizophrenia is a major mental illness that has a great impact on patients and their environment of the illness. There are three main types of symptoms: cognitive, negative and positive. The cognitive symptoms

  4. Terminal 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Terminal boxes maintain room temperature by modulating supply air temperature and airflow in building HVAC systems. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences often supply inadequate airflow to a conditioned space, resulting in occupant...

  5. Illness perceptions mediate the relationship between depression and quality of life in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shallcross, Amanda J; Becker, Danielle A; Singh, Anuradha; Friedman, Daniel; Montesdeoca, Jacqueline; French, Jacqueline; Devinsky, Orrin; Spruill, Tanya M

    2015-11-01

    The current study examined whether negative illness perceptions help explain the link between depression and quality of life. Seventy patients with epilepsy completed standardized self-report questionnaires measuring depression, illness perception, and quality of life (QOL). Illness perception statistically mediated the relationship between depression and QOL (Indirect effect (CI; confidence interval) = -.72, lower limit = -1.7, upper limit = -.22, p < .05). Results held with and without adjusting for potential confounding variables (age, sex, ethnicity, income, and seizure frequency) and when operationalizing depression as a continuous variable that indexed severity of symptoms or as a dichotomous variable that indexed criteria consistent with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. This study is the first to suggest that illness perceptions may be a useful target in screening and intervention approaches in order to improve QOL among low-income, racially/ethnically diverse patients with epilepsy. PMID:26391533

  6. Physicians' Nonverbal Rapport Building and Patients' Talk About the Subjective Component of Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Ashley P.; Parrott, Roxanne L.

    2001-01-01

    Considers how physicians' nonverbal communication is sometimes associated with patients' affective satisfaction. Examines the relationship between physicians' nonverbal rapport building and patients' disclosure of information related to the subjective component of illness. Considers implications for understanding the role of physicians' nonverbal…

  7. Dental Hygiene Students' Preparation for Treatment of Patients with Mental Illnesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Sherry; Reveal, Marge

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 138 dental hygiene programs gathered information on didactic and clinical experiences for preparing students to treat patients with mental illnesses. Although most curricula addressed the issue, inadequate time was allotted. Over half did not provide oral care to these patients; few felt the community's need was met. (MSE)

  8. Biomarkers in Hepatic Disease: A Review Focused on Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Kubilay, Nejla Zeynep; Sengel, Buket Erturk; Wood, Kenneth E; Layon, A Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The ability to make a diagnosis early and appropriately is paramount for the survival of the critically ill ICU patient. Along with the myriad physical examination and imaging modalities available, biomarkers provide a window on the disease process. Herein we review hepatic biomarkers in the context of the critical care patient. PMID:25324195

  9. Acceptance of illness and satisfaction with life among malaria patients in rivers state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health condition is one of the basic factors affecting satisfaction with life, and the level of illness acceptance. The purpose of the study was to analyse the level of illness acceptance, the level of satisfaction with life among malaria patients, and the level of trust placed in the physician and the nurse. Methods The study employs the method of diagnostic survey based on standardised AIS and SWLS scales, as well as Anderson and Dedrick’s PPTS and PNTS scales. Results The average AIS level was 12 points, while the average level of SwL at the SWLS scale was 16.5 points. The average level of trust in the physician and the nurse amounted to 50.6 points and 51.4 points, respectively. The correlation between the level of illness acceptance and self-evaluated satisfaction with life was statistically significant, with R?=?0.56. The marital status influenced the level of illness acceptance with p?illness acceptance with p?patients did not accept their illness, while the level of satisfaction with life was low. The majority of respondents trusted their physician and nurse. There is a statistically significant correlation between the level of illness acceptance and the self-evaluated satisfaction with life. The marital status had a statistically significant effect on the acceptance of illness and the satisfaction with life. The individuals who had a job demonstrated higher levels of quality of life and illness acceptance. PMID:24885562

  10. Measuring Hospital Inefficiency: The Effects of Controlling for Quality and Patient Burden of Illness

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Ryan L; Rosko, Michael D; Wong, Herbert S

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of employing a variety of controls for hospital quality and patient burden of illness on the mean estimated inefficiency and relative ranking of hospitals generated by stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Study Setting This study included urban U.S. hospitals in 20 states operating in 2001. Data Design/Data Collection We took hospital data for 1,290 hospitals from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey and the Medicare Cost Reports. We employed a variety of controls for hospital quality and patient burden of illness. Among the variables we used were a subset of the quality indicators generated from the application of the Patient Safety Indicator and Inpatient Quality Indicator modules of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Quality Indicator software to the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), State Inpatient Databases. Measures of a component of patient burden of illness came from the application of the Comorbidity Software to HCUP data. Data Analysis We used SFA to estimate hospital cost-inefficiency. We tested key assumptions of the SFA model with likelihood ratio tests. Principal Findings The measures produced by the Comorbidity Software appear to account for variations in patient burden of illness that had previously been masquerading as inefficiency. Outcome measures of quality can provide useful insight into a hospital's operations but may have little impact on estimated inefficiency once controls for structural quality and patient burden of illness have been employed. Conclusions Choices about controlling for quality and patient burden of illness can have a nontrivial impact on mean estimated hospital inefficiency and the relative ranking of hospitals generated by SFA. PMID:18783458

  11. Effectiveness of long-term acute care hospitalization in elderly patients with chronic critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Werner, Rachel M.; David, Guy; Have, Thomas R. Ten; Benson, Nicole M.; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background For patients recovering from severe acute illness, admission to a long-term acute care hospital (LTAC) is an increasingly common alternative to continued management in an intensive care unit. Objective To examine the effectiveness of LTAC transfer in patients with chronic critical illness. Research Design Retrospective cohort study in United States hospitals from 2002 to 2006. Subjects Medicare beneficiaries with chronic critical illness, defined as mechanical ventilation and at least 14 days of intensive care. Measures Survival, costs and hospital readmissions. We used multivariate analyses and instrumental variables to account for differences in patient characteristics, the timing of LTAC transfer and selection bias. Results A total of 234,799 patients met our definition of chronic critical illness. Of these, 48,416 (20.6%) were transferred to an LTAC. In the instrumental variable analysis, patients transferred to an LTAC experienced similar survival compared to patients who remained in an intensive care unit (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.01, p=0.27). Total hospital-related costs in the 180 days following admission were lower among patients transferred to LTACs (adjusted cost difference = -$13,422, 95% CI: -26,662 to -223, p=0.046). This difference was attributable to a reduction in skilled nursing facility admissions (adjusted admission rate difference = -0.591 (95% CI: -0.728 to -0.454, p <0.001). Total Medicare payments were higher (adjusted cost difference = $15,592, 95% CI: 6,343 to 24,842, p=0.001). Conclusions Patients with chronic critical illness transferred to LTACs experience similar survival compared with patients who remain in intensive care units, incur fewer health care costs driven by a reduction in post-acute care utilization, but invoke higher overall Medicare payments. PMID:22874500

  12. Use of complementary and alternative therapies to promote sleep in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Richards, Kathy; Nagel, Corey; Markie, Megan; Elwell, Jean; Barone, Claudia

    2003-09-01

    The efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies for sleep promotion in critically ill patients is largely unexamined. We found only seven studies (three on environmental interventions and one each on massage, music therapy, therapeutic touch, and, melatonin) that examined the effect of complementary and alternative therapies. A number of studies, however, have shown that massage, music therapy. and therapeutic touch promote relaxation and comfort in critically ill patients, which likely leads to improved sleep. Massage, music therapy, and therapeutic touch are safe for critically ill patients and should be routinely applied by ICU nurses who have received training on how to administer these specialized interventions. Environmental interventions, such as reducing noise, playing white noise such as ocean sounds, and decreasing interruptions to sleep for care, also are safe and logical interventions that ICU nurses should use to help patients sleep. Progressive muscle relaxation has been extensively studied and shown to be efficacious for improving sleep in persons with insomnia; however, progressive muscle relaxation requires that patients consciously attend to relaxing specific muscle groups and practice these techniques, which may be difficult for critically 11 patients. We do not currently recommend aromatherapy and alternative sedatives, such as valerian and melatonin, for sleep promotion in critically ill patients because the safety of these substances is unclear. In summary, we recommend that ICU nurses implement music therapy, environmental interventions, therapeutic touch, and relaxing massage to promote sleep in critically ill patients. These interventions are safe and may improve patient sleep, although randomized controlled trials are needed to test their efficacy. Aromatherapy and alternative sedatives require further investigation to determine their safety and efficacy. PMID:12943139

  13. Hsp72 Is a Novel Biomarker to Predict Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E.; Salas-Nolasco, Omar I.; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Casas-Aparicio, Gustavo; Irizar-Santana, Sergio; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Bobadilla, Norma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates the course of disease in critically ill patients. Efforts to change its clinical course have failed because of the fail in the early detection. This study was designed to assess whether heat shock protein (Hsp72) is an early and sensitive biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) compared with kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) biomarkers. Methods A total of 56 critically ill patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these patients, 17 developed AKI and 20 were selected as controls. In AKI patients, Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 were measured from 3 days before and until 2 days after the AKI diagnosis and in no-AKI patients at 1, 5 and 10 days after admission. Biomarker sensitivity and specificity were determined. To validate the results obtained with ROC curves for Hsp72, a new set of critically ill patients was included, 10 with AKI and 12 with no-AKI patients. Results Urinary Hsp72 levels rose since 3 days before the AKI diagnosis in critically ill patients; this early increase was not seen with any other tested biomarkers. Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 significantly increased from 2 days before AKI and remained elevated during the AKI diagnosis. The best sensitivity/specificity was observed in Kim-1 and Hsp72: 83/95% and 100/90%, respectively, whereas 1 day before the AKI diagnosis, the values were 100/100% and 100/90%, respectively. The sensibility, specificity and accuracy in the validation test for Hsp72 were 100%, 83.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Conclusions The biomarker Hsp72 is enough sensitive and specific to predict AKI in critically ill patients up to 3 days before the diagnosis. PMID:25313566

  14. Diaphragm weakness in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Studies indicate that mechanically ventilated patients develop significant diaphragm muscle weakness, but the etiology of weakness and its clinical impact remain incompletely understood. We assessed diaphragm strength in mechanically ventilated medical ICU patients, correlated the development of diaphragm weakness with multiple clinical parameters, and examined the relationship between the level of diaphragm weakness and patient outcomes. Methods Transdiaphragmatic twitch pressure (PdiTw) in response to bilateral magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves was measured. Diaphragm weakness was correlated with the presence of infection, blood urea nitrogen, albumin, and glucose levels. The relationship of diaphragm strength to patient outcomes, including mortality and the duration of mechanical ventilation for successfully weaned patients, was also assessed. Results We found that infection is a major risk factor for diaphragm weakness in mechanically ventilated medical ICU patients. Outcomes for patients with severe diaphragm weakness (PdiTw <10 cmH2O) were poor, with a markedly increased mortality (49%) compared to patients with PdiTw ?10 cmH2O (7% mortality, P = 0.022). In addition, survivors with PdiTw <10 cmH2O required a significantly longer duration of mechanical ventilation (12.3 ± 1.7 days) than those with PdiTw ?10 cmH2O (5.5 ± 2.0 days, P = 0.016). Conclusions Infection is a major cause of severe diaphragm weakness in mechanically ventilated patients. Moreover, diaphragm weakness is an important determinant of poor outcomes in this patient population. PMID:23786764

  15. [Engaging patients with serious mental illness in care services by Critical Time Intervention].

    PubMed

    van der Plas, Annicka G M; Abdoelbasier, Saoed; van Hemert, Albert M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with serious mental illness who are difficult to engage in services often face multiple complex problems, like homelessness, debts, and poor hygiene and social skills. Critical Time Intervention (CTI) is a time-limited, manual-guided case management approach intended to enhance continuity of care for mentally ill patients. We present two patients who received intensive outpatient CTI care. A 42-year-old woman diagnosed with depression and addiction to alcohol and medication and a 38-year-old man diagnosed with autism were offered practical and emotional support while they became linked to a long term support system. CTI offers pro-active case management where the patient lives, taking into account the patient's strengths and informal support system. CTI is especially suited for patients relatively new to psychiatric care, who would not engage in services without support. PMID:20456789

  16. Management of critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes: The need for personalised therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Palash; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Deane, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    Critical illness in patients with pre-existing diabetes frequently causes deterioration in glycaemic control. Despite the prevalence of diabetes in patients admitted to hospital and intensive care units, the ideal management of hyperglycaemia in these groups is uncertain. There are data that suggest that acute hyperglycaemia in critically ill patients without diabetes is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Exogenous insulin to keep blood glucose concentrations < 10 mmol/L is accepted as standard of care in this group. However, preliminary data have recently been reported that suggest that chronic hyperglycaemia may result in conditioning, which protects these patients against damage mediated by acute hyperglycaemia. Furthermore, acute glucose-lowering to < 10 mmol/L in patients with diabetes with inadequate glycaemic control prior to their critical illness appears to have the capacity to cause harm. This review focuses on glycaemic control in critically ill patients with type 2 diabetes, the potential for harm from glucose-lowering and the rationale for personalised therapy. PMID:26069718

  17. Anemia and blood transfusion in the critically ill patient: role of erythropoietin

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Critically ill patients receive an extraordinarily large number of blood transfusions. Between 40% and 50% of all patients admitted to intensive care units receive at least 1 red blood cell (RBC) unit during their stay, and the average is close to 5 RBC units. RBC transfusion is not risk free. There is little evidence that 'routine' transfusion of stored allogeneic RBCs is beneficial to critically ill patients. The efficacy of perioperative recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has been demonstrated in a variety of elective surgical settings. Similarly, in critically ill patients with multiple organ failure, rHuEPO therapy will also stimulate erythropoiesis. In a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, therapy with rHuEPO resulted in a significant reduction in RBC transfusions. Despite receiving fewer RBC transfusions, patients in the rHuEPO group had a significantly greater increase in hematocrit. Strategies to increase the production of RBCs are complementary to other approaches to reduce blood loss in the intensive care unit, and they decrease the transfusion threshold in the management of all critically ill patients. PMID:15196323

  18. Ketoconazole hepatotoxicity in a patient treated for environmental illness and systemic candidiasis

    SciTech Connect

    Brusko, C.S.; Marten, J.T. )

    1991-12-01

    Environmental illness, a hypothesized disease caused by exposure to substances such as combustion products, pesticides, food additives, and Candida albicans, is discussed. The case of a patient with environmental illness and systemic candidiasis for six weeks with ketoconazole, liver enzyme concentrations increased. One month after discontinuation of ketoconazole, the liver enzyme concentrations decreased; however, over the next five months, liver enzymes and bilirubin increased. The patient developed encephalopathy and eventually was transferred to a medical center for possible liver transplant. A review of the literature pertaining to ketoconazole hepatotoxicity is also presented.16 references.

  19. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Aji, Budi; Yamamoto, Shelby Suzanne; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from extended family members, donations from neighbors and the community, and additional benefits from employers. However, insured households overall had positive perceptions of insurance. PMID:25308817

  20. Clinical review: Use of helium-oxygen in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gainnier, Marc; Forel, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Use of helium-oxygen (He/O2) mixtures in critically ill patients is supported by a reliable and well understood theoretical rationale and by numerous experimental observations. Breathing He/O2 can benefit critically ill patients with severe respiratory compromise mainly by reducing airway resistance in obstructive syndromes such as acute asthma and decompensated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the benefit from He/O2 in terms of respiratory mechanics diminishes rapidly with increasing oxygen concentration in the gaseous mixture. Safe use of He/O2 in the intensive care unit requires specific equipment and supervision by adequately experienced personnel. The available clinical data on inhaled He/O2 mixtures are insufficient to prove that this therapy has benefit with respect to outcome variables. For these reasons, He/O2 is not currently a standard of care in critically ill patients with acute obstructive syndromes, apart from in some, well defined situations. Its role in critically ill patients must be more precisely defined if we are to identify those patients who could benefit from this therapeutic approach. PMID:17210068

  1. Imprecision in medical communication: study of a doctor talking to patients with serious illness.

    PubMed Central

    Skelton, J R; Murray, J; Hobbs, F D

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty is believed to be a central feature in illness experiences. Conversations between a consultant hematologist and 61 seriously ill patients were transcribed, entered on a database and scrutinized for patterns of language uncertainty by linguistic concordancing analysis. Transcripts were then discussed in detail with the hematologist, and techniques of protocol analysis were used to gain insight into his thought processes during consultations. The main findings were that the doctor used many more expressions of uncertainty than did patients: that evaluative terms were widely used to reassure rather than to worry patients; and that patients and doctor together used certain key terms ambiguously, in a manner which allowed the doctor to feel that facts were not misrepresented while perhaps permitting the patient to feel reassured. PMID:10692882

  2. Redox Changes Induced by General Anesthesia in Critically Ill Patients with Multiple Traumas

    PubMed Central

    Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sandesc, Dorel; Dumache, Raluca; Nartita, Radu; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Alina Carmen; Luca, Loredana; Vernic, Corina; Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea

    2015-01-01

    The critically ill polytrauma patient is a constant challenge for the trauma team due to the complexity of the complications presented. Intense inflammatory response and infections, as well as multiple organ dysfunctions, significantly increase the rate of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Moreover, due to the physiological and biochemical imbalances present in this type of patients, the bioproduction of free radicals is significantly accelerated, thus installing the oxidative stress. In the therapeutic management of such patients, multiple surgical interventions are required and therefore they are being subjected to repeated general anesthesia. In this paper, we want to present the pathophysiological implications of oxidative stress in critically ill patients with multiple traumas and the implications of general anesthesia on the redox mechanisms of the cell. We also want to summarize the antioxidant treatments able to reduce the intensity of oxidative stress by modulating the biochemical activity of some cellular mechanisms. PMID:26693352

  3. Content Analysis of the Dreams of Dying Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth-Marnat, Gary

    1987-01-01

    Investigated dream content of 104 dreams from nine terminally ill patients with estimated life expectancy of one year or less. Found differences between dreams of terminally ill and dreams of physically healthy individuals, suggesting an adaptive withdrawal and process of social and emotional disengagement by terminally ill individuals. (Author/NB)

  4. Caregivers' difficulties in activating long-term mental illness patients with low self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Erdner, A; Magnusson, A

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to describe psychiatric caregivers' perceptions of self-esteem and activities for patients with long-term mental illness. The study design used a qualitative approach, based on an open lifeworld perspective. A total of 13 caregivers at four psychiatric hospital units in a large Swedish city were interviewed about their views on patients' physical activity and/or other pastimes, as well as their self-esteem and its bearing on the patients' well-being. According to the caregivers, it is up to the patients themselves to decide what they wish to occupy themselves with. In the same time the caregivers' opinions are that patients have difficulties to occupy themselves. The caregivers believe that patients' disability is based in a lack of self-esteem, commitment and capacity to realize their wishes. The caregivers in this study argue that activities are valuable for self-esteem and physical health of people with long-term mental illness. The caregivers consider that it is the patient's responsibility to initiate their needs of activities. This means that the caregivers do not use their knowledge about the importance of activities for the patient's health. Search terms: activity, caregivers, mental illness. PMID:22070619

  5. Feeding critically ill patients the right 'whey': thinking outside of the box. A personal view.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E

    2015-12-01

    Atrophy of skeletal muscle mass is an almost universal problem in survivors of critical illness and is associated with significant short- and long-term morbidity. Contrary to common practice, the provision of protein/amino acids as a continuous infusion significantly limits protein synthesis whereas intermittent feeding maximally stimulates skeletal muscle synthesis. Furthermore, whey-based protein (high in leucine) increases muscle synthesis compared to soy or casein-based protein. In addition to its adverse effects on skeletal muscle synthesis, continuous feeding is unphysiological and has adverse effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and gastrointestinal function. I propose that critically ill patients' be fed intermittently with a whey-based formula and that such an approach is likely to be associated with better glycemic control, less hepatic steatosis and greater preservation of muscle mass. This paper provides the scientific basis for my approach to intermittent feeding of critically ill patients. PMID:26055186

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A CRITICALLY ILL PATIENT INPUT-OUTPUT MODEL

    E-print Network

    of carbohydrates, proteins and fat) and daily interruption of caloric intake) has a profound 14th IFAC Symposium reduction in mor- tality and morbidity. As an example, the number of deaths in patients who required Berghe et al., 2003), which requires important expertise from nurses and doctors. The protocol requires

  7. Heart-related anxieties in relation to general anxiety and severity of illness in cardiology patients.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, Beate; Glatz, Johannes; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Absence of an adequate reason for anxiety is a criterion for pathological anxiety. However, the presence of danger or fear-provoking stimuli may even be a risk factor for anxiety and does not exclude that there is additionally pathological anxiety too. The question is, to what degree can heart-related anxiety be explained by the severity of illness or trait anxiety? Two hundred and nine patients (37.8% women) from a cardiology inpatient unit completed the Heart-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Progression-Anxiety-Questionnaire, Job-Anxiety-Scale and the State-Trait-Anxiety-Inventory. The severity of cardiac illness was rated by the treating cardiologists using the Multidimensional Severity of Morbidity Rating. Time absent from work due to sickness was assessed as an indicator for illness-related impairment. Heart anxiety was significantly related to progression anxiety and, to a lesser extent, trait anxiety and indicators of subjective symptoms of somatic illness. No association was found with medical ratings for prognosis, multimorbidity, or reduction in life expectancy. Heart-related anxiety is a symptom of an anxiety disorder. Although partially dependent on subjective suffering, it cannot be explained by the severity of medical illness. Treatment of health-related anxieties should focus on how to cope with subjective symptoms of illness. PMID:23473360

  8. Modalities of Invasive Arterial Pressure Monitoring in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, Gwenaëlle; Gritti, Karine; Carré, Cécile; Fleury, Nadège; Lang, Annie; Courau-Courtois, Josette; Bedos, Jean-Pierre; Legriel, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    Few studies assessed modalities of invasive arterial pressure monitoring (IAPM). We evaluated effects on measured values of various combinations of transducer level, catheter access site, and patient position. Prospective observational study in consecutive adults admitted to a French intensive care unit in 2009 to 2011 and fulfilling our inclusion criteria. Four combinations (B–E) of transducer level, catheter access site, and patient position were compared with a reference combination (A) (A: patient supine with all catheters in the same plane and a single transducer level (M) for zero point reference (Z) aligned on the phlebostatic axis; B: 45° head-of-bed elevation with M and Z aligned on the phlebostatic axis; C: 45° head-of-bed elevation with M aligned on the catheter access site and Z on the phlebostatic axis; D: 45° head-of-bed elevation with M and Z aligned on the catheter access site; and E: 45° head-of-bed elevation with M aligned on the phlebostatic axis and Z on the catheter access site). We included 103 patients, 68 men and 35 women, with a median age of 69 years (interquartile range [IQR], 56–78); at inclusion, 91 (88.3%) received mechanical ventilation, 45 (43.7%) catecholamines, and 66 (64.1%) sedation. The IAPM access site was femoral in 49 (47.6%) and radial in 54 (52.4%) patients, with 62 of 103 (60.2%) catheters on the right side. Measured absolute mean arterial pressure values were significantly higher with 3 study combinations (C–E) than with the reference combination (A). After adjustment, the differences versus A (median, 83 [IQR, 74–92]?mm Hg) remained significant for D (median, 91 [IQR, 85–100]?mm Hg, P?patients in the 45° head-of-bed elevation position, aligning the Z on the phlebostatic axis provides values that are not significantly different from those obtained using the reference supine modality. PMID:26426625

  9. Blood Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients Tom Van Herpe, Ph.D.,1,2

    E-print Network

    22 Blood Glucose Measurements in Critically Ill Patients Tom Van Herpe, Ph.D.,1,2 and Dieter) blood glucose, (Hct) hematocrit, (ICU) intensive care unit, (ISO) International Organization for Standardization, (NICE-SUGAR) Normoglycemia in Intensive Care Evaluation and Survival Using Glucose Algorithm

  10. Hospice Comics: Representations of Patient and Family Experience of Illness and Death in Graphic Novels.

    PubMed

    Czerwiec, Mk; Huang, Michelle N

    2014-08-20

    Non-fiction graphic novels about illness and death created by patients and their loved ones have much to teach all readers. However, the bond of empathy made possible in the comic form may have special lessons for healthcare providers who read these texts and are open to the insights they provide. PMID:25138207

  11. HEART DISEASE PATIENTS' AVERTING BEHAVIOR, COSTS OF ILLNESS, AND WILLINGNESS TO PAY

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    HEART DISEASE PATIENTS' AVERTING BEHAVIOR, COSTS OF ILLNESS, AND WILLINGNESS TO PAY TO AVOID ANGINA community exposure to carbon monoxide and the occurrence of cardiac health symptoms, including angina pectoris, in male research subjects with demonstrable ischemic heart disease (atherosclerotic disease

  12. Adults Living with Limited Literacy and Chronic Illness: Patient Education Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Judy; Taylor, Maurice C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how Canadian adults living with limited literacy and chronic illness made meaning of their patient education experiences. The study used a hermeneutic phenomenological research design and employed three data sources over a nine-month period. Data was interpreted and analyzed as it was collected,…

  13. Assessing Capacity in Psychiatric Patients With Acute Medical Illness Who Refuse Care

    PubMed Central

    Spike, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Three cases are presented that demonstrate the difficulty of assessing medical decision-making capacity in patients with psychiatric illness who are refusing care. Health professionals often assess capacity differently in practice. Provided their patients have some understanding of their illness and have some plans for meeting basic needs, psychiatrists are often inclined to give patients the freedom to refuse care even if they do not exhibit a full understanding of the medical facts of their case and why they are refusing it. Adult medicine physicians, in contrast, are inclined to require patients to state a more complete understanding of the benefits and burdens of evaluation and treatment before allowing them to refuse care when their refusals might result in adverse medical outcomes. The 3 cases exemplify the tension between these approaches and highlight the role of hospital ethics consultation in addressing this conflict. PMID:25834754

  14. Current concepts in combination antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Widespread emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens is a problem of global dimension. MDR infections are difficult to treat and frequently associated with high mortality. More than one antibiotic is commonly used to treat such infections, but scientific evidence does not favor use of combination therapy in most cases. However, there are certain subgroups where combination therapy may be beneficial, e.g. sepsis due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, and patients with multiple organ failure. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to clearly define the role of combination therapy in these subgroups. PMID:24914260

  15. Fluid and electrolyte overload in critically ill patients: An overview.

    PubMed

    Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Gobatto, André Luiz Nunes; Melro, Lívia Maria Garcia; Maciel, Alexandre Toledo; Park, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    Fluids are considered the cornerstone of therapy for many shock states, particularly states that are associated with relative or absolute hypovolemia. Fluids are also commonly used for many other purposes, such as renal protection from endogenous and exogenous substances, for the safe dilution of medications and as "maintenance" fluids. However, a large amount of evidence from the last decade has shown that fluids can have deleterious effects on several organ functions, both from excessive amounts of fluids and from their non-physiological electrolyte composition. Additionally, fluid prescription is more common in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome whose kidneys may have impaired mechanisms of electrolyte and free water excretion. These processes have been studied as separate entities (hypernatremia, hyperchloremic acidosis and progressive fluid accumulation) leading to worse outcomes in many clinical scenarios, including but not limited to acute kidney injury, worsening respiratory function, higher mortality and higher hospital and intensive care unit length-of-stays. In this review, we synthesize this evidence and describe this phenomenon as fluid and electrolyte overload with potentially deleterious effects. Finally, we propose a strategy to safely use fluids and thereafter wean patients from fluids, along with other caveats to be considered when dealing with fluids in the intensive care unit. PMID:25938027

  16. Fluid and electrolyte overload in critically ill patients: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Gobatto, André Luiz Nunes; Melro, Lívia Maria Garcia; Maciel, Alexandre Toledo; Park, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Fluids are considered the cornerstone of therapy for many shock states, particularly states that are associated with relative or absolute hypovolemia. Fluids are also commonly used for many other purposes, such as renal protection from endogenous and exogenous substances, for the safe dilution of medications and as “maintenance” fluids. However, a large amount of evidence from the last decade has shown that fluids can have deleterious effects on several organ functions, both from excessive amounts of fluids and from their non-physiological electrolyte composition. Additionally, fluid prescription is more common in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome whose kidneys may have impaired mechanisms of electrolyte and free water excretion. These processes have been studied as separate entities (hypernatremia, hyperchloremic acidosis and progressive fluid accumulation) leading to worse outcomes in many clinical scenarios, including but not limited to acute kidney injury, worsening respiratory function, higher mortality and higher hospital and intensive care unit length-of-stays. In this review, we synthesize this evidence and describe this phenomenon as fluid and electrolyte overload with potentially deleterious effects. Finally, we propose a strategy to safely use fluids and thereafter wean patients from fluids, along with other caveats to be considered when dealing with fluids in the intensive care unit. PMID:25938027

  17. Self-Management: Enabling and empowering patients living with cancer as a chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    McCorkle, Ruth; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Mark; Schulman-Green, Dena; Schilling, Lynne S.; Lorig, Kate; Wagner, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    With recent improvements in early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, people with cancer are living longer, and their cancer may be managed as a chronic illness. Cancer as a chronic illness places new demands on patients and families to manage their own care, and it challenges old paradigms that oncology's work is done after treatment. As a chronic illness, however, cancer care occurs on a continuum that stretches from prevention to the end of life, with early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship in between. In this paper, we review self-management interventions that enable patients and families to participate in managing their care along this continuum. We review randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions with cancer patients and families in the treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life phases of the cancer-care continuum. We also present the Chronic Care Model as a model of care that oncology practices can use to enable and empower patients and families to engage in self-management. We conclude that, the need for a common language by which to speak about self-management and a common set of self-management actions for cancer care notwithstanding, oncology practices can now build strong relationships with their patients and formulate mutually-agreed upon care plans that enable and empower patients to care for themselves in the way they prefer. PMID:21205833

  18. Long term follow up of severely ill patients who underwent urgent cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, D.; Fitzgerald, M.; Wright, C.; Sparrow, J.; Pepper, J.; Yacoub, M.; Fox, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess long term survival (> 5 years) and quality of life in severely ill patients referred for urgent cardiac transplantation. SETTING--Tertiary referral centres: before transplantation at the National Heart Hospital (late 1984 to end 1986); after transplantation at Harefield Hospital. SUBJECTS--Eighteen patients (15 men; three women) who had required intensive support in hospital before cardiac transplantation and were alive at short term follow up. INTERVENTIONS--Intravenous infusions of cardiac drugs (mean 2.2 infusions), intravenous diuretics (17 patients), and many other drugs before transplantation. Intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (four patients), temporary pacing (two), and resuscitation from cardiac arrest (three). Patients had specialised nursing care on a medical intensive care unit in almost every case. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Long term survival in patients after urgent cardiac transplantation and perceived quality of life. RESULTS--Of 18 patients who were alive at short term follow up (mean (range) 19.4 (10-33) months), 14 were still alive in 1992 (69 (61-83) months). Ten still worked full time, and 11 reported no restrictions in their daily activities. Three of four patients who died in the intervening period survived > 5 years after transplantation. Overall, 17 of 18 patients survived at least 5 years. CONCLUSIONS--In severely ill patients who undergo urgent cardiac transplantation and survive in the short term, long term (5-7 year) survival and quality of life seem good. PMID:8435650

  19. Use of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for the Assessment of Nutritional Status in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoojin; Kwon, Oran; Shin, Cheung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in the critically ill patients and known to cause a variety of negative clinical outcomes. However, various conventional methods for nutrition assessment have several limitations. We hypothesized that body composition data, as measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), may have a significant role in evaluating nutritional status and predicting clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. We gathered clinical, biochemical, and BIA data from 66 critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit. Patients were divided into three nutritional status groups according to their serum albumin level and total lymphocyte counts. The BIA results, conventional indicators of nutrition status, and clinical outcomes were compared and analyzed retrospectively. Results showed that the BIA indices including phase angle (PhA), extracellular water (ECW), and ECW/total body water (TBW) were significantly associated with the severity of nutritional status. Particularly, PhA, an indicator of the health of the cell membrane, was higher in the well-nourished patient group, whereas the edema index (ECW/TBW) was higher in the severely malnourished patient group. PhA was positively associated with albumin and ECW/TBW was negatively associated with serum albumin, hemoglobin, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In non-survivors, PhA was significantly lower and both ECW/TBW and %TBW/fat free mass were higher than in survivors. In conclusion, several BIA indexes including PhA and ECW/TBW may be useful for nutritional assessment and represent significant prognostic factors in the care of critically ill patients. PMID:25713790

  20. Management of acute cholecystitis in critically ill patients: contemporary role for cholecystostomy and subsequent cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Morse, Bryan C; Smith, J Brandon; Lawdahl, Richard B; Roettger, Richard H

    2010-07-01

    The diagnosis of acute cholecystitis in critically ill patients carries a high mortality rate. Although decompression and drainage of the gallbladder through a cholecystostomy tube may be used as a temporary treatment of acute cholecystitis in this population, there is still some debate about the management of the tube and the subsequent need for a cholecystectomy. This series evaluates the clinical course and outcomes of critically ill patients who underwent the insertion of cholecystostomy tubes for the initial treatment of acute cholecystitis. This is a retrospective review of critically ill patients admitted to the hospital intensive care unit who were diagnosed with acute cholecystitis and underwent a cholecystostomy tube as a temporary treatment for the disease. Patients were identified through the Greenville Hospital System electronic medical records coding database. Medical records were reviewed for demographic data, diagnoses, imaging, complications, and outcomes. From January 2002 through June 2008, 50 patients were identified for the study. The mean age was 72 +/- 11 years, and the majority (66%) were men. The following comorbidities were found: severe cardiovascular disease (40 patients), respiratory failure (30 patients), and multisystem organ dysfunction (30 patients). The mean intensive care unit length of stay (LOS) was 16 +/- 9 days, and the mean hospital LOS was 28 +/- 27 days. At 30 days, the morbidity associated with the cholecystostomy tube itself was 4 per cent, but overall in-hospital morbidity and mortality rates were 62 and 50 per cent, respectively. Of the 25 patients who survived longer than 30 days, 12 retained their cholecystostomy tubes until they underwent cholecystectomy (four open, seven laparoscopic). All of the remaining 13 patients had their cholecystostomy tubes removed, and eight developed recurrent cholecystitis. Of these patients with recurrent of cholecystitis, five had cholecystectomy or repeat cholecystostomy, but the remaining three patients died. Although this is a small patient population, these data suggest that, in critically ill patients, cholecystostomy tubes should remain in place until the patient is deemed medically suitable to undergo cholecystectomy. Removal of the cholecystostomy tube without subsequent cholecystectomy is associated with a high incidence of recurrent cholecystitis and devastating consequences. PMID:20698375

  1. [Pulmonary-renal crosstalk in the critically ill patient].

    PubMed

    Donoso F, Alejandro; Arriagada S, Daniela; Cruces R, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of renal replacement therapy, mortality of acute renal failure remains high, especially when occurring simultaneously with distant organic failure as it is in the case of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this update, birideccional deleterious relationship between lung and kidney on the setting of organ dysfunction is reviewed, which presents important clinical aspects of knowing. Specifically, the renal effects of acute respiratory distress syndrome and the use of positive-pressure mechanical ventilation are discussed, being ventilator induced lung injury one of the most common models for studying the lung-kidney crosstalk. The role of renal failure induced by mechanical ventilation (ventilator-induced kidney injury) in the pathogenesis of acute renal failure is emphasized. We also analyze the impact of the acute renal failure in the lung, recognizing an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability, inflammation, and alteration of sodium and water channels in the alveolar epithelial. This conceptual model can be the basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies to use in patients with multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. PMID:26338439

  2. Nutrition therapy in critically ill patients- a review of current evidence for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Ridley, Emma; Gantner, Dashiell; Pellegrino, Vincent

    2015-08-01

    The provision of nutrition to critically ill patients is internationally accepted as standard of care in intensive care units (ICU). Nutrition has the potential to positively impact patient outcomes, is relatively inexpensive compared to other commonly used treatments, and is increasingly identified as a marker of quality ICU care. Furthermore, we are beginning to understand its true potential, with positive and deleterious consequences when it is delivered inappropriately. As with many areas of medicine the evidence is rapidly changing and often conflicting, making interpretation and application difficult for the individual clinician. This narrative review aims to provide an overview of the major evidence base on nutrition therapy in critically ill patients and provide practical suggestions. PMID:25616601

  3. Hemoglobin levels and transfusions in neurocritically ill patients: a systematic review of comparative studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Accumulating evidence suggests that, in critically ill patients, a lower hemoglobin transfusion threshold is safe. However, the optimal hemoglobin level and associated transfusion threshold remain unknown in neurocritically ill patients. Methods We conducted a systematic review of comparative studies (randomized and nonrandomized) to evaluate the effect of hemoglobin levels on mortality, neurologic function, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, and multiple organ failure in adult and pediatric neurocritically ill patients. We searched MEDLINE, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Google Scholar. Studies focusing on any neurocritical care conditions were included. Data are presented by using odds ratios for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences for continuous outcomes. Results Among 4,310 retrieved records, six studies met inclusion criteria (n = 537). Four studies were conducted in traumatic brain injury (TBI), one in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and one in a mixed population of neurocritically ill patients. The minimal hemoglobin levels or transfusion thresholds ranged from 7 to 10 g/dl in the lower-Hb groups and from 9.3 to 11.5 g/dl in the higher-Hb groups. Three studies had a low risk of bias, and three had a high risk of bias. No effect was observed on mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, or multiple organ failure. In studies reporting on length of stay (n = 4), one reported a significant shorter ICU stay (mean, -11.4 days (95% confidence interval, -16.1 to -6.7)), and one, a shorter hospital stay (mean, -5.7 days (-10.3 to -1.1)) in the lower-Hb groups, whereas the other two found no significant association. Conclusions We found insufficient evidence to confirm or refute a difference in effect between lower- and higher-Hb groups in neurocritically ill patients. Considering the lack of evidence regarding long-term neurologic functional outcomes and the high risk of bias of half the studies, no recommendation can be made regarding which hemoglobin level to target and which associated transfusion strategy (restrictive or liberal) to favor in neurocritically ill patients. PMID:22471943

  4. Predictive Factors for Hospitalization of Patients with Heat Illness in Yamaguchi, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Todani, Masaki; Oda, Yasutaka; Kaneko, Tadashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive factors for the hospitalization of patients who presented with mild to moderate heat illness at an emergency department. We conducted a retrospective survey of hospitals with an emergency department in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The survey questionnaire entries included patient age, sex, use of an ambulance, vital signs, blood examination conducted at the emergency department, the length of hospitalization, and outcome. We analyzed the predictive factors for hospitalization in patients with heat illness. A total of 127 patients were analyzed. Of these, 49 (37%) were admitted, with 59% discharged on the day following admission. In univariate analysis, the following inpatient characteristics were predictive for hospitalization: old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, elevated body temperature, increased serum C-reactive protein, and increased blood urea nitrogen. In logistic regression multivariate analysis, the following were predictive factors for hospitalization: age of ? 65 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42–17.00), body temperature (OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.14–3.41), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16–0.98), and creatinine (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.23–6.94). The results suggest that the elderly with hyperthermia, disturbance of consciousness, and elevated serum creatinine have an increased risk for hospitalization with heat illness. PMID:26393633

  5. Predictive Factors for Hospitalization of Patients with Heat Illness in Yamaguchi, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Todani, Masaki; Oda, Yasutaka; Kaneko, Tadashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive factors for the hospitalization of patients who presented with mild to moderate heat illness at an emergency department. We conducted a retrospective survey of hospitals with an emergency department in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The survey questionnaire entries included patient age, sex, use of an ambulance, vital signs, blood examination conducted at the emergency department, the length of hospitalization, and outcome. We analyzed the predictive factors for hospitalization in patients with heat illness. A total of 127 patients were analyzed. Of these, 49 (37%) were admitted, with 59% discharged on the day following admission. In univariate analysis, the following inpatient characteristics were predictive for hospitalization: old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, elevated body temperature, increased serum C-reactive protein, and increased blood urea nitrogen. In logistic regression multivariate analysis, the following were predictive factors for hospitalization: age of ? 65 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42-17.00), body temperature (OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.14-3.41), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16-0.98), and creatinine (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.23-6.94). The results suggest that the elderly with hyperthermia, disturbance of consciousness, and elevated serum creatinine have an increased risk for hospitalization with heat illness. PMID:26393633

  6. Frequency and outcome of patients with nonthyroidal illness syndrome in a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Plikat, Katharina; Langgartner, Julia; Buettner, Roland; Bollheimer, L Cornelius; Woenckhaus, Ulrike; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Wrede, Christian E

    2007-02-01

    Acute and chronic critical conditions are associated with reduced serum levels of free triiodothyronine (FT(3)), free thyroxine FT(4), and thyrotropin, known as nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS). It is still controversial whether these changes reflect a protective mechanism or a maladaptive process during prolonged illness. However, larger studies to determine the prevalence of the NTIS and its association with outcome in medical intensive care units (ICUs) are missing. Complete thyroid hormone levels from 247 of 743 patients admitted to our ICU between October 2002 and February 2004 were retrospectively evaluated. From these patients, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, ICU mortality, length of stay, mechanical ventilation, and concomitant medication were recorded. Ninety-seven patients (44.1%) had low FT(3) levels indicating an NTIS, either with normal (23.6%) or reduced (20.5%) serum thyrotropin levels. Of 97 patients with NTIS, 24 (23.3%) also showed reduced serum FT(4) levels. The NTIS was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health II scores, mortality, length of stay, and mechanical ventilation. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combination of low FT(3) and low FT(4) was an independent risk factor for survival. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome is frequent at a medical ICU. A reduction of FT(4) together with FT(3) is associated with an increase in mortality and might reflect a maladaptive process, thereby worsening the disease. PMID:17224339

  7. Personal Prayer in Patients Dealing with Chronic Illness: A Review of the Research Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jors, Karin; Baumann, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background. Prayer is commonly used among patients for health purposes. Therefore, this review focused on three main questions: (1) why do people turn to prayer in times of illness?, (2) what are the main topics of their prayers?, and (3) how do they pray? Method. We undertook a systematic review of the literature by searching the databases PubMed, Medline, and PsycINFO. The following inclusion criteria were used: (1) participants in the study were patients dealing with an illness, (2) the study examined the use of private rather than intercessory prayer, and (3) the content and purpose of prayer rather than its effects were investigated. Results. 16 articles were included in the final review. Participants suffered from a variety of chronic diseases, mostly cancer. Five main categories for the reasons and topics of prayer were found: (1) disease-centered prayer, (2) assurance-centered prayer, (3) God-centered prayer, (4) others-centered prayer, and (5) lamentations. Among these, disease-centered prayer was most common. Conclusions. Although most patients with chronic diseases do pray for relief from their physical and mental suffering, the intention of their prayers is not only for healing. Rather, prayer can be a resource that allows patients to positively transform the experience of their illness. PMID:25815041

  8. Activated Protein Synthesis and Suppressed Protein Breakdown Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, Jakob G.; Nedergaard, Anders; Reitelseder, Søren; Mikkelsen, Ulla R.; Dideriksen, Kasper J.; Agergaard, Jakob; Kreiner, Frederik; Pott, Frank C.; Schjerling, Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) and forkhead box O (FoxO) pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with healthy controls. Methodology/Principal Findings ICU patients were systemically inflamed, moderately hyperglycemic, received insulin therapy, and showed a tendency to lower plasma branched chain amino acids compared with controls. Using Western blotting we measured Akt, GSK3?, mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6k), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and muscle ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1); and by RT-PCR we determined mRNA expression of, among others, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), FoxO 1, 3 and 4, atrogin1, MuRF1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-?) and myostatin. Unexpectedly, in critically ill ICU patients Akt-mTOR-S6k signaling was substantially higher compared with controls. FoxO1 mRNA was higher in patients, whereas FoxO3, atrogin1 and myostatin mRNAs and MuRF1 protein were lower compared with controls. A moderate correlation (r2?=?0.36, p<0.05) between insulin infusion dose and phosphorylated Akt was demonstrated. Conclusions/Significance We present for the first time muscle protein turnover signaling in critically ill ICU patients, and we show signaling pathway activity towards a stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and a somewhat inhibited proteolysis. PMID:21483870

  9. Investigational tests and treatments performed in terminal stage cancer patients in two weeks before death: Turkish oncology group (TOG) study.

    PubMed

    Türker, ?brahim; Kömürcü, ?eref; Ar?can, Ali; Doruk, Hatice; Özy?lkan, Özgür; Co?kun, Hasan ?enol; Colak, Dil?en; Üçgül Çavu?o?lu, Emel; Ata, Alper; Sezer, Ahmet; Ye?il Ç?nk?r, Havva; ?enler, Filiz Cay; Arpac?, Fikret

    2014-12-01

    Although more palliative care is necessary for terminally ill cancer patients, excess investigational tests, invasive procedures, and treatments are given instead. Between November 2009 and December 2013, six hundred and twenty-four patients with end-stage cancer who were died at inpatient setting evaluated retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, sites of tumor and metastasis, tests and invasive procedures, treatments performed in the last 2 weeks before death were collected from the hospital files and analyzed. Median age of 624 patients was 58 (range 16-96) years. More than half of the patients (370, 59.3%) were men. The most frequent cancer sites were gastrointestinal (GI) system (32.2%), lung (24.0%), and breast (11.1%). Frequent metastatic sites were liver (34.8%), bone (31.5%), lung (23.3%), and/or brain (16.9%). Causes of death were respiratory failure, infections, and/or liver failure in 49.9, 23.9, and 19.4% of patients, respectively. Radiological tests performed in the last 2 weeks before death were ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scan in 25.6, 16.3, 11.4, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. Treatments received were intravenous (i.v) serum infusion, blood transfusion, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), human albumin infusion in 55.9, 44.1, 34.9, and 9.5% of patients, respectively. Invasive procedures such as invasive pain relief, terminal sedation, and chemotherapy performed in 12.6, 4.4, and 10.0% of patients, respectively. Central venous catheter application, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and GI endoscopy were applied in 41.7, 9.8, 5.6, and 3.4% of the patients, respectively. Radiological tests, invasive procedures, TPN, and human albumin transfusion were used excessively in terminal stage cancer patients in our medical oncology inpatient clinics. Invasive pain relief and terminal sedation were still underused in our cancer clinics. There is an urgent need in developing national palliative care program to improve the understanding of end-of-life care in our medical oncology clinics. PMID:25412940

  10. Physiological effects of nonthyroidal illness syndrome in patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Spratt, D I; Frohnauer, M; Cyr-Alves, H; Kramer, R S; Lucas, F L; Morton, J R; Cox, D F; Becker, K; Devlin, J T

    2007-07-01

    In a prospective randomized placebo-controlled study, we assessed potential physiological effects of nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) in acute illness. Coronary artery bypass graft surgery was employed as a prospective model of acute illness and NTIS. Triiodothyronine (T(3)) or placebo was infused for 24 h after surgery, with a T(3) dose selected to maintain postoperative serum T(3) concentrations at preoperative levels. Patients were evaluated before coronary artery bypass graft and during the postoperative period. Cardiovascular function was monitored with Swan-Ganz catheter measurements and ECG. Urinary nitrogen excretion and L-[1-(13)C]leucine flux were used to evaluate protein metabolism. Serum measurements of relevant hormones, iron, and total iron-binding capacity were used to assess effects on sex steroid, growth hormone axis, and iron responses to illness. Cardiovascular function was not affected by T(3) infusion, except for a transient higher cardiac index in the T(3) group 6 h after surgery (3.04 +/- 0.12 for T(3) and 2.53 +/- 0.08 for placebo, P = 0.0016). Protein metabolism was not affected; changes in urinary nitrogen excretion and L-[1-(13)C]leucine flux were equivalent in the two groups (P = 0.35 and P = 0.95, respectively). No differences were observed in changes in testosterone, estrogens, growth hormone, insulin-like growth hormone I, iron, or total iron-binding capacity between T(3) and placebo groups. We conclude that, in the early stages of major illness, the decrease in circulating T(3) concentrations in NTIS has only a minimal transient physiological impact on cardiac function and plays no significant role in protecting against protein catabolism or modulating other endocrine responses or iron responses to illness. PMID:17426111

  11. Use of an Electronic Patient Portal Among the Chronically Ill: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona; Kröger, Virpi

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic patient portals may enhance effective interaction between the patient and the health care provider. To grasp the full potential of patient portals, health care providers need more knowledge on which patient groups prefer electronic services and how patients should be served through this channel. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how chronically ill patients’ state of health, comorbidities, and previous care are associated with their adoption and use of a patient portal. Methods A total of 222 chronically ill patients, who were offered access to a patient portal with their health records and secure messaging with care professionals, were included in the study. Differences in the characteristics of non-users, viewers, and interactive users of the patient portal were analyzed before access to the portal. Patients’ age, gender, diagnoses, levels of the relevant physiological measurements, health care contacts, and received physiological measurements were collected from the care provider’s electronic health record. In addition, patient-reported health and patient activation were assessed by a survey. Results Despite the broad range of measures used to indicate the patients’ state of health, the portal user groups differed only in their recorded diagnosis for hypertension, which was most common in the non-user group. However, there were significant differences in the amount of care received during the year before access to the portal. The non-user group had more nurse visits and more measurements of relevant physiological outcomes than viewers and interactive users. They also had fewer referrals to specialized care during the year before access to the portal than the two other groups. The viewers and the interactive users differed from each other significantly in the number of nurse calls received, the interactive users having more calls than the viewers. No significant differences in age, gender, or patient activation were detected between the user groups. Conclusions Previous care received by the patient is an important predictor for the use of a patient portal. In a group of patients with a similar disease burden, demand for different types of health services and preferences related to the service channel seem to contribute to the choice to use the patient portal. Further research on patient portal functionalities and their potential to meet patient needs by complementing or substituting for traditional health care services is suggested. PMID:25488754

  12. Association of obesity with increased mortality in the critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Aldawood, A; Arabi, Y; Dabbagh, O

    2006-10-01

    The impact of obesity on critical care outcomes has been an issue for debate in the literature. Variable data and conflicting results have been reported. The purpose of our study is to examine the impact of obesity on the outcome of patients admitted to a tertiary closed Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in Saudi Arabia. Data was obtained from a prospectively collected database from September 2001 to May 2004. Patients younger than 18, those with burns, brain death and readmissions were excluded. The study population was stratified into six groups according to their Body Mass Index (BMI). Primary endpoints were ICU and hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation and ICU length of stay. A total of 1835 patients were included in the analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar among the six groups including severity of illness scores, reflected by Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The ICU mortality was not statistically different among the groups. Hospital mortality was lower in patients with BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2 and BMI >40 kg/m2 compared to those with BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m2. Multivariate analysis showed that a BMI >40 kg/m2 was an independent predictor of lower hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.28-0.92, P 0.025) after adjustment for other confounding factors. In conclusion, mortality of obese critically ill patients was not higher than patients with normal weight. In fact, the hospital mortality was lower for patients with BMI >40 kg/m2 compared to the normal BMI group despite similar severity of illness. Obesity might have a protective effect, although further studies are needed to substantiate this finding. PMID:17061639

  13. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome and euthyroid sick syndrome in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Golombek, Sergio G

    2008-12-01

    This article reviews the pathophysiology of non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) and euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS), a multifactorial phenomenon characterized by suppression of thyroid hormone levels that has been described in several disease states, probably due to different causes in different patients. It also describes the laboratory values of thyroid function tests (TFTs), relevant animal studies, the association of NTIS and ESS with cardiovascular problems and sepsis, and the rationale for treatment. PMID:19007679

  14. Population Pharmacokinetics in China: The Dynamics of Intravenous Voriconazole in Critically Ill Patients with Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenying; Xie, Hui; Liang, Fenghua; Meng, Dongmei; Rui, Jianzhong; Yin, Xueyan; Zhang, Tiantian; Xiao, Xianglin; Cai, Shaohui; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic research in China on the use of voriconazole in critically ill adult patients with different pulmonary diseases remains to be explored. This study evaluated the population pharmacokinetics of the use of voriconazole (VRC) in critically ill patients to determine covariate effects on VRC pharmacokinetics by NONMEM, which could further optimize VRC dosing in this population. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination best fit the data, giving 4.28?L/h clearance and 93.4?L volume of distribution of VRC. The model variability, described as an approximate percentage coefficient of interindividual variability in clearance and volume of distribution, was 72.94% and 26.50%, respectively. A significant association between Cmin and drug response or grade 2 hepatotoxicity was observed (p=0.002, <0.001, respectively, 1.5-4.0?µg/mL) via logistic multivariate regression. Monte Carlo simulations at 100, 150, 200, and 250?mg dosage predicted effectiveness at 45.99%, 99.76%, 98.76%, and 67.75% within the 1.5-4.0?µg/mL range, suggesting that a 150 or 200?mg intravenous dose twice daily is best suited to achieve the target steady state trough concentration range in critically ill patients with pulmonary disease. PMID:26133710

  15. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide as an early prognostic factor in cancer patients developing septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mokart, Djamel; Sannini, Antoine; Brun, Jean-Paul; Faucher, Marion; Blaise, Didier; Blache, Jean-Louis; Faucher, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The overall prognosis of critically ill patients with cancer has improved during the past decade. The aim of this study was to identify early prognostic factors of intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in patients with cancer. Methods We designed a prospective, consecutive, observational study over a one-year period. Fifty-one cancer patients with septic shock were enrolled. Results The ICU mortality rate was 51% (26 deaths). Among the 45 patients who benefited from transthoracic echocardiography evaluation, 17 showed right ventricular dysfunction, 18 showed left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, 18 showed left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and 11 did not show any cardiac dysfunction. During the first three days of ICU course, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels were significantly higher in patients presenting cardiac dysfunctions compared to patients without any cardiac dysfunction. Multivariate analysis discriminated early prognostic factors (within the first 24 hours after the septic shock diagnosis). ICU mortality was independently associated with NT-proBNP levels at day 2 (odds ratio, 1.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.004 to 1.32; p = 0.022). An NT-proBNP level of more than 6,624 pg/ml predicted ICU mortality with a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 77%, a positive predictive value of 79%, a negative predictive value of 85%, and an accuracy of 81%. Conclusion We observed that critically ill cancer patients with septic shock have an approximately 50% chance of survival to ICU discharge. NT-proBNP was independently associated with ICU mortality within the first 24 hours. NT-proBNP could be a useful tool for detecting high-risk cancer patients within the first 24 hours after septic shock diagnosis. PMID:17359530

  16. Determination of cardiac output in critically ill patients by dual beam Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Looyenga, D S; Liebson, P R; Bone, R C; Balk, R A; Messer, J V

    1989-02-01

    Recent technology in Doppler echocardiography has produced a dual beam Doppler instrument that is capable of insonating the total cross-sectional area of the ascending aorta. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this instrument in measuring cardiac output in critically ill patients by comparing results with those of the thermodilution-derived cardiac output. A technically adequate Doppler cardiac output measurement was attained in 71 (91%) of 78 patients. The range of thermodilution-derived cardiac output measurements was from 1.58 to 11.70 liters/min. To maximize thermodilution cardiac output reliability, several measurements were made for each patient. Those patients in whom the difference between the highest and lowest measurement varied by less than 10% from the averaged results were accepted into the 50 patient study. There was significant correlation between dual beam Doppler- and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (r = 0.96, SEE = 0.55 liters/min, p less than 0.0001). This study demonstrates that dual beam Doppler ultrasound is a promising noninvasive method of measuring cardiac output in the critically ill patient. PMID:2913112

  17. Colistin: recent data on pharmacodynamics properties and clinical efficacy in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulos, Argyris S; Falagas, Matthew E

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical studies performed in a large number of patients showed that colistin "forgotten" for several decades revived for the management of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) and had acceptable effectiveness and considerably less toxicity than that reported in older publications. Colistin is a rapidly bactericidal antimicrobial agent that possesses a significant postantibiotic effect against MDR Gram-negative pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The optimal colistin dosing regimen against MDR GNB is still unknown in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship of colistin is urgently needed to determine the optimal dosing regimen. Although pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data in ICU patients are scarce, recent evidence shows that the pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of colistimethate sodium and colistin in critically ill patients differ from those previously found in other groups, such as cystic fibrosis patients. The AUC:MIC ratio has been found to be the parameter best associated with colistin efficacy. To maximize the AUC:MIC ratio, higher doses of colistimethate sodium and alterations in the dosing intervals may be warranted in the ICU setting. In addition, the development of colistin resistance has been linked to inadequate colistin dosing. This enforces the importance of colistin dose optimization in critically ill patients. Although higher colistin doses seem to be beneficial, the lack of colistin pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data results in difficulty for the optimization of daily colistin dose. In conclusion, although colistin seems to be a very reliable alternative for the management of life-threatening nosocomial infections due to MDR GNB, it should be emphasized that there is a lack of guidelines regarding the ideal management of these infections and the appropriate colistin doses in critically ill patients with and without multiple organ failure. PMID:21906382

  18. Augmented renal clearance in critically ill patients: incidence, associated factors and effects on vancomycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Campassi, María Luz; Gonzalez, María Cecilia; Masevicius, Fabio Daniel; Vazquez, Alejandro Risso; Moseinco, Miriam; Navarro, Noelia Cintia; Previgliano, Luciana; Rubatto, Nahuel Paolo; Benites, Martín Hernán; Estenssoro, Elisa; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Objective An augmented renal clearance has been described in some groups of critically ill patients, and it might induce sub-optimal concentrations of drugs eliminated by glomerular filtration, mainly antibiotics. Studies on its occurrence and determinants are lacking. Our goals were to determine the incidence and associated factors of augmented renal clearance and the effects on vancomycin concentrations and dosing in a series of intensive care unit patients. Methods We prospectively studied 363 patients admitted during 1 year to a clinical-surgical intensive care unit. Patients with serum creatinine >1.3mg/dL were excluded. Creatinine clearance was calculated from a 24-hour urine collection. Patients were grouped according to the presence of augmented renal clearance (creatinine clearance >120mL/min/1.73m2), and possible risk factors were analyzed with bivariate and logistic regression analysis. In patients treated with vancomycin, dosage and plasma concentrations were registered. Results Augmented renal clearance was present in 103 patients (28%); they were younger (48±15 versus 65±17 years, p<0.0001), had more frequent obstetric (16 versus 7%, p=0.0006) and trauma admissions (10 versus 3%, p=0.016) and fewer comorbidities. The only independent determinants for the development of augmented renal clearance were age (OR 0.95; p<0.0001; 95%CI 0.93-0.96) and absence of diabetes (OR 0.34; p=0.03; 95%CI 0.12-0.92). Twelve of the 46 patients who received vancomycin had augmented renal clearance and despite higher doses, had lower concentrations. Conclusions In this cohort of critically ill patients, augmented renal clearance was a common finding. Age and absence of diabetes were the only independent determinants. Therefore, younger and previously healthy patients might require larger vancomycin dosing. PMID:24770684

  19. The effects of motivation feedback in patients with severe mental illness: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jochems, Eline C; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Dam, Arno; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Mulder, Cornelis L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of providing clinicians with regular feedback on the patient’s motivation for treatment in increasing treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness. Methods Design: cluster randomized controlled trial (Dutch Trials Registry NTR2968). Participants: adult outpatients with a primary diagnosis of a psychotic disorder or a personality disorder and their clinicians, treated in 12 community mental health teams (the clusters) of two mental health institutions in the Netherlands. Interventions: monthly motivation feedback (MF) generated by clinicians additional to treatment as usual (TAU) and TAU by the community mental health teams. Primary outcome: treatment engagement at patient level, assessed at 12 months by clinicians. Randomization: teams were allocated to MF or TAU by a computerized randomization program that randomized each team to a single treatment by blocks of varying size. All participants within these teams received similar treatment. Clinicians and patients were not blind to treatment allocation at the 12-month assessment. Results The 294 randomized patients (148 MF, 146 TAU) and 57 clinicians (29 MF, 28 TAU) of 12 teams (6 MF, 6 TAU) were analyzed according to the intention-to-treat principle. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups on treatment engagement were found (adjusted mean difference =0.1, 95% confidence interval =?2.2 to 2.3, P=0.96, d=0). Preplanned ancillary analyses showed statistically significant interaction effects between treatment group and primary diagnosis on treatment motivation and quality of life (secondary outcomes), which were beneficial for patients with a primary diagnosis of a personality disorder but not for those with a psychotic disorder. There were no reports of adverse events. Conclusion The current findings imply that monitoring and discussing the patient’s motivation is insufficient to improve motivation and treatment engagement, and suggests that more elaborate interventions for severe mental illness patients are needed. PMID:26715847

  20. Perfectionism, Type D personality, and illness-related coping styles in cardiac rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasegaram, Shamila; Flett, Gordon L; Madan, Mina; Oh, Paul; Marzolini, Susan; Reitav, Jaan; Hewitt, Paul L; Sturman, Edward D

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the associations among trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, Type D personality, and illness-specific coping styles in 100 cardiac rehabilitation patients. Participants completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Perfectionistic Self-Presentation Scale, the Type D Scale-14, and the Coping with Health Injuries and Problems Scale. Correlational analyses established that emotional preoccupation coping was associated with trait perfectionism, perfectionistic self-presentation, and Type D personality. Perfectionism was linked with both facets of the Type D construct (negative emotionality and social inhibition). Our results suggest that perfectionistic Type D patients have maladaptive coping with potential negative implications for their cardiac rehabilitation outcomes. PMID:23493864

  1. Prevention and diagnosis of venous thromboembolism in critically ill patients: a Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Deborah; McMullin, Joseph; Hodder, Richard; Heule, Mark; Pinilla, Jaime; Dodek, Peter; Stewart, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) confers considerable morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, although few studies have focused on the critically ill population. The objective of this study was to understand current approaches to the prevention and diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) among patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Design Mailed self-administered survey of ICU Directors in Canadian university affiliated hospitals. Results Of 29 ICU Directors approached, 29 (100%) participated, representing 44 ICUs and 681 ICU beds across Canada. VTE prophylaxis is primarily determined by individual ICU clinicians (20/29, 69.0%) or with a hematology consultation for challenging patients (9/29, 31.0%). Decisions are usually made on a case-by-case basis (18/29, 62.1%) rather than by preprinted orders (5/29, 17.2%), institutional policies (6/29, 20.7%) or formal practice guidelines (2/29, 6.9%). Unfractionated heparin is the predominant VTE prophylactic strategy (29/29, 100.0%) whereas low molecular weight heparin is used less often, primarily for trauma and orthopedic patients. Use of pneumatic compression devices and thromboembolic stockings is variable. Systematic screening for DVT with lower limb ultrasound once or twice weekly was reported by some ICU Directors (7/29, 24.1%) for specific populations. Ultrasound is the most common diagnostic test for DVT; the reference standard of venography is rarely used. Spiral computed tomography chest scans and ventilation–perfusion scans are used more often than pulmonary angiograms for the diagnosis of PE. ICU Directors recommend further studies in the critically ill population to determine the test properties and risk:benefit ratio of VTE investigations, and the most cost-effective methods of prophylaxis in medical–surgical ICU patients. Interpretation Unfractionated subcutaneous heparin is the predominant VTE prophylaxis strategy for critically ill patients, although low molecular weight heparin is prescribed for trauma and orthopedic patients. DVT is most often diagnosed by lower limb ultrasound; however, several different tests are used to diagnose PE. Fundamental research in critically ill patients is needed to help make practice evidence-based. PMID:11737922

  2. Proteins and amino acids are fundamental to optimal nutrition support in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Weijs, Peter J M; Cynober, Luc; DeLegge, Mark; Kreymann, Georg; Wernerman, Jan; Wolfe, Robert R

    2014-01-01

    Proteins and amino acids are widely considered to be subcomponents in nutritional support. However, proteins and amino acids are fundamental to recovery and survival, not only for their ability to preserve active tissue (protein) mass but also for a variety of other functions. Understanding the optimal amount of protein intake during nutritional support is therefore fundamental to appropriate clinical care. Although the body adapts in some ways to starvation, metabolic stress in patients causes increased protein turnover and loss of lean body mass. In this review, we present the growing scientific evidence showing the importance of protein and amino acid provision in nutritional support and their impact on preservation of muscle mass and patient outcomes. Studies identifying optimal dosing for proteins and amino acids are not currently available. We discuss the challenges physicians face in administering the optimal amount of protein and amino acids. We present protein-related nutrition concepts, including adaptation to starvation and stress, anabolic resistance, and potential adverse effects of amino acid provision. We describe the methods for assessment of protein status, and outcomes related to protein nutritional support for critically ill patients. The identification of a protein target for individual critically ill patients is crucial for outcomes, particularly for specific subpopulations, such as obese and older patients. Additional research is urgently needed to address these issues. PMID:25565377

  3. [What it means for patients to have their illness experiences published in the Internet].

    PubMed

    Lucius-Hoene, G; Groth, S; Becker, A-K; Dvorak, F; Breuning, M; Himmel, W

    2013-06-01

    of the study was to explore meaning and consequences for patients for having their illness experiences published in the internet. Patients who participated in the establishment of a research-based internet website on illness experiences were interviewed about their experiences of taking part in the project. 14 patients with diabetes and 29 patients with chronic pain participated in the follow-up. They were interviewed with an open narrative and semi-structured approach about their motives and experiences of taking part in the project and the impact of the publication on them. Interview transcripts were coded and aggregated in a computer-assisted thematic analysis. Patients unanimously evaluated their participation positively. Many of them reported that it had been an intense and relevant experience, which equalled an intervention. They conveyed that the special effort of the researchers to establish a trustful and caring relationship had proven of value and led to a high identification of the participants with the aims of the website. PMID:23761208

  4. Clergy-laity support and patients’ mood during serious illness: A cross-sectional epidemiologic study

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Judith C.; Wood, Laura; Steinhauser, Karen; Olson, Maren K.; Lindquist, Jennifer H.; Tulsky, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Religious participation is positively associated with mental health, but attendance at worship services declines during serious illness. This study assessed whether home visits by clergy or laity provide benefits to seriously ill patients who may have difficulty attending religious services. Design and sample A cross-sectional study design nested in an observational epidemiologic cohort study. The regionally-representative sample of patients had metastatic lung, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer (n=70), Class III and IV congestive heart failure (n=70), or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with hypercapnea (n=70) and observed regarding clergy-laity support in their naturalistic environments. Measures Dependent variable: 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies – Depression scale. Independent variable: A one-item question measuring how much helpful support patients received from clergy or other persons from church, temple, synagogue, or mosque Covariates: demographic, health, social support, religiousness. Analysis Descriptive, bivariate, and general linear models Results Depressed mood was negatively associated with clergy-laity support in a non-linear pattern. Depressed mood was also positively associated with functional deficits and a lifetime history of difficulties related to religious involvement. Conclusions In lieu of worship attendance when people are sick, home visits by members of a patient’s religious community may bolster mood by providing continuity of instrumental, emotional, and spiritual support. PMID:21838948

  5. Factors Related to the Differential Preference for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Between Patients With Terminal Cancer and That of Their Respective Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Cheol; Keam, Bhumsuk; Kim, Young Ae; Yun, Young Ho

    2016-02-01

    There is little information regarding concordance between preferences for end-of-life care of terminally ill patients with cancer and those of their family caregivers. A cross-sectional exploration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) preference in 361 dyads was conducted. Patients or family caregivers who were willing to approve CPR were compared with dyads who did not support CPR. The patient's quality of life was more associated with family caregiver's willingness than patient's willingness. A patient was more likely to prefer CPR than their caregiver in dyads of females and emotionally stable patients. A family caregiver showed stronger support for CPR if the patient had controlled pain or stable health and the family caregiver had not been counseled for CPR. Communications should be focused on these individuals to improve the planning of end-of-life care. PMID:25138648

  6. Entropy correlates with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankur; Singh, Preet Mohinder; Trikha, Anjan; Rewari, Vimi; Chandralekha

    2014-04-01

    Sedation is routinely used in intensive care units. However due to absence of objective scoring systems like Bispectral Index and entropy our ability to regulate the degree of sedation is limited. This deficiency is further highlighted by the fact that agitation scores used in intensive care units (ICU) have no role in paralyzed patients. The present study compares entropy as a sedation scoring modality with Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS) in mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients in an ICU. Twenty-seven, mechanically ventilated, critically ill patients of either sex, 16-65 years of age, were studied over a period of 24 h. They received a standard sedation regimen consisting of a bolus dose of propofol 0.5 mg/kg and fentanyl 1 lg/kg followed by infusions of propofol and fentanyl ranging from 1.5 to 5 mg/kg/h and 0.5 to 2.0 lg/kg/h, respectively. Clinically relevant values of RASS for optimal ICU sedation (between 0 and -3) in non-paralyzed patients were compared to corresponding entropy values, to find if any significant correlation exists between the two. These entropy measurements were obtained using the Datex-Ohmeda-M-EntropyTM module. This module is presently not approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for monitoring sedation in ICU. A total of 527 readings were obtained. There was a statistically significant correlation between the state entropy (SE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.334, p\\0.0001]; response entropy (RE) and RASS [Spearman's rho/rs = 0.341, p\\0.0001]). For adequate sedation as judged by a RASS value of 0 to -3, the mean SE was 57.86 ± 16.50 and RE was 67.75 ± 15.65. The present study illustrates that entropy correlates with RASS (between scores 0 and -3) when assessing the level of sedation in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. PMID:24122077

  7. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Pain in Critically Ill Cancer Patients: A Prospective Nonrandomized Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mayank; Sahi, Malvinder Singh; Bhargava, AK; Talwar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pain is a distressing symptom common to all stages and ubiquitous at all levels of care in cancer patients. However, there is a lack of scientific literature on prevalence, severity, predictors, and the quality of pain in cancer patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Objectives: To elucidate the prevalence of pain, moderate to severe pain, neuropathic pain, chronic pain, and pain as the most distressing symptom in critically ill-cancer patients at the time of ICU admission. Methods: We prospectively interviewed 126 patients within first 24 h of admission to a medical ICU. The patients were assessed for the presence of pain, its severity, sites, duration, nature, and its impact as a distressing symptom. Numerical Rating Scale and self-report version of Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms were used to elucidate intensity of pain and neuropathic pain, respectively. Demographic characteristics such as age and sex, primary site, and stage of cancer were considered for a possible correlation with the prevalence of pain. Results: Of 126 patients included in the study 95 (75.40%), 79 (62.70%), 34 (26.98%), and 17 (13.49%) patients had pain, moderate-severe, chronic, and neuropathic pain, respectively. The average duration of pain was 171.16 ± 716.50 days. Totally, 58 (46.03%) and 42 (42.01%) patients had at least one and more than equal to 2 neuropathic pain symptoms, respectively. The primary malignancies associated with the highest prevalence of pain were genitourinary, hematological, and head and neck whereas breast and lung cancers were associated with the highest prevalence of neuropathic and chronic pain, respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of pain among critically ill-cancer patients is high. Assessment for pain at the time of ICU admission would ensure appropriate assessment for the presence, type, severity, and the significance imparted to it. PMID:26600692

  8. The Impact of Pain Assessment on Critically Ill Patients' Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Evanthia; Hadjibalassi, Maria; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Andreou, Panayiota; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D. E.

    2015-01-01

    In critically ill patients, pain is a major problem. Efficient pain management depends on a systematic, comprehensive assessment of pain. We aimed to review and synthesize current evidence on the impact of a systematic approach to pain assessment on critically ill patients' outcomes. A systematic review of published studies (CINAHL, PUBMED, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and COCHRANE databases) with predetermined eligibility criteria was undertaken. Methodological quality was assessed by the EPHPP quality assessment tool. A total of 10 eligible studies were identified. Due to big heterogeneity, quantitative synthesis was not feasible. Most studies indicated the frequency, duration of pain assessment, and types of pain assessment tools. Methodological quality assessment yielded “strong” ratings for 5/10 and “weak” ratings for 3/10 studies. Implementation of systematic approaches to pain assessment appears to associate with more frequent documented reports of pain and more efficient decisions for pain management. There was evidence of favorable effects on pain intensity, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, mortality, adverse events, and complications. This systematic review demonstrates a link between systematic pain assessment and outcome in critical illness. However, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions. More high quality randomized clinical studies are needed. PMID:26558273

  9. Birthdates of patients affected by mental illness and solar activity: A study from Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Borelli, Albacenzina; Bellomo, Antonello; Lepore, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    PurposeThis epidemiologic study tested an hypothesized association between the year of birth of persons with major mental illnesses and solar activity over the past century. MethodsWe collected data on diagnoses and birthdates of psychiatric patients born between 1926 and 1975 (N = 1954) in south Italy for comparison to yearly solar activity as registered by the International Observatories. ResultsWe found a strong inverse correlation between high solar activity (HSA) and incidence of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in a 20-year period whereas the incidence of non-affective/non-psychotic disorders was moderately associated with HSA in the same period. ConclusionsInterpretation of the observed correlations between HSA during years of birth and the incidence of mental illnesses remains unclear, but the findings encourage further study.

  10. Assessment of candidemia-attributable mortality in critically ill patients using propensity score matching analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Candidemia in critically ill patients is usually a severe and life-threatening condition with a high crude mortality. Very few studies have focused on the impact of candidemia on ICU patient outcome and attributable mortality still remains controversial. This study was carried out to determine the attributable mortality of ICU-acquired candidemia in critically ill patients using propensity score matching analysis. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted of all consecutive non-neutropenic adult patients admitted for at least seven days to 36 ICUs in Spain, France, and Argentina between April 2006 and June 2007. The probability of developing candidemia was estimated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Each patient with ICU-acquired candidemia was matched with two control patients with the nearest available Mahalanobis metric matching within the calipers defined by the propensity score. Standardized differences tests (SDT) for each variable before and after matching were calculated. Attributable mortality was determined by a modified Poisson regression model adjusted by those variables that still presented certain misalignments defined as a SDT > 10%. Results Thirty-eight candidemias were diagnosed in 1,107 patients (34.3 episodes/1,000 ICU patients). Patients with and without candidemia had an ICU crude mortality of 52.6% versus 20.6% (P < 0.001) and a crude hospital mortality of 55.3% versus 29.6% (P = 0.01), respectively. In the propensity matched analysis, the corresponding figures were 51.4% versus 37.1% (P = 0.222) and 54.3% versus 50% (P = 0.680). After controlling residual confusion by the Poisson regression model, the relative risk (RR) of ICU- and hospital-attributable mortality from candidemia was RR 1.298 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88 to 1.98) and RR 1.096 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.69), respectively. Conclusions ICU-acquired candidemia in critically ill patients is not associated with an increase in either ICU or hospital mortality. PMID:22698004

  11. Coagulation Disorders and Bleedings in Critically Ill Patients With Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Valade, Sandrine; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Boutboul, David; Zafrani, Lara; Stepanian, Alain; Canet, Emmanuel; Lemiale, Virginie; Venot, Marion; Veyradier, Agnès; Mariotte, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reactive hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a life-threatening condition related to a cytokine storm leading to multiorgan dysfunction. A better understanding of coagulation disorders, frequently reported in HLH patients, may improve outcomes. Critically ill HLH patients managed in a multidisciplinary national reference center were retrospectively included. Relationships between coagulation disorders, severe bleedings, and outcomes were assessed. One hundred and seventeen patients fulfilled the HLH 2004 criteria. The most common HLH etiology was hematologic conditions (73%), followed by infectious diseases (20%), systemic rheumatic diseases (5%), and undetermined HLH etiology (3%). All patients exerted thrombocytopenia. Coagulation disorders were diagnosed in 79 (68%) patients (61 had hypofibrinogenemia?patients. Coagulation disorders were more frequent in immunocompromised patients, those with histological/cytological feature of hemophagocytosis, those with the highest ferritin concentrations, and in patients with HLH not related to infection. These patients were more prone to receive mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, or renal replacement therapy. Twenty-six (22%) patients presented severe bleeding complications, including 5 patients dying from hemorrhagic shock. Strikingly, the only coagulation parameter significantly associated with severe bleeding was low fibrinogen with a cutoff value of 2?g/L (P?=?0.03). Overall, 33 (28%) patients died in the ICU and hospital mortality was 44%. Coagulation disorders were associated with higher mortality, especially fibrinogen??6 (OR 3.04 [1.32–6.98]), and age?>?46 years (OR 2.26 [1.02–5.04]). Up to two-third of critically ill HLH patients present with coagulation disorders. Hypofibrinogenemia or DIC was found in half of the patients and low PT in 40%. These patients require more life support and have a higher mortality rate. Fibrinogen <2?g/L is associated with the occurrence of severe bleeding and mortality. PMID:26448017

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Ampicillin/Sulbactam in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury undergoing Extended Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Johan M.; Broll, Michael; Kaever, Volkhard; Burhenne, Heike; Hafer, Carsten; Clajus, Christian; Knitsch, Wolfgang; Burkhardt, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives The fixed antibacterial combination of ampicillin and sulbactam is frequently used for various infections. Intact kidneys eliminate approximately 71% of ampicillin and 78% of sulbactam. Patients on thrice-weekly low-flux hemodialysis exhibit an ampicillin t1/2 of 2.3 hours on and 17.4 hours off dialysis. Despite its frequent use in intensive care units, there are no available dosing recommendations for patients with AKI undergoing renal replacement therapy. The aims of this study were to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ampicillin/sulbactam in critically ill patients with AKI undergoing extended dialysis (ED) and to establish a dosing recommendation for this treatment method. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Twelve critically ill patients with anuric AKI being treated with ED were enrolled in a prospective, open-label, observational pharmacokinetic study. Pharmacokinetics after a single dose of ampicillin/sulbactam (2 g/1 g) was obtained in 12 patients. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics after 4 days of twice-daily ampicillin/sulbactam (2 g/1 g) was obtained in three patients. Results The mean dialyzer clearance for ampicillin/sulbactam was 80.1±7.7/83.3±12.1 ml/min. The t1/2 of ampicillin and sulbactam in patients with AKI undergoing ED were 2.8±0.8 hours and 3.5±1.5 hours, respectively. There was no significant accumulation using a twice-daily dosage of 2 g/1 g ampicillin/sulbactam. Conclusions Our data suggest that in patients treated with ED using a high-flux dialyzer (polysulphone, 1.3 m2; blood and dialysate flow, 160 ml/min; treatment time, 480 minutes), a twice-daily dosing schedule of at least 2 g/1 g ampicillin/sulbactam, with one dose given after ED, should be used to avoid underdosing. PMID:22223613

  13. The Pursuit of Preventive Care for Chronic Illness: Turning Healthy People into Chronic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kreiner, Meta J.; Hunt, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Preventive health care has become prominent in clinical medicine in the United States, emphasizing risk assessment and control, rather than addressing the signs and symptoms of pathology. Current clinical guidelines, reinforced by evidence-based decision aids and quality of care assessment, encourage clinicians to focus on maintaining rigid test thresholds which are based on population norms. While achieving these goals may benefit the total population, this may be of no benefit or even harmful to individual patients. In order to explore how this phenomenon is manifest in clinical care, and consider some factors that promote and sustain this trend, we analyze observations of over 100 clinical consultations, and open-ended interviews with 58 primary care clinicians and 70 of their patients. Both clinicians and patients equated at-risk states with illness, and viewed the associated interventions not as prevention, but as treatment. This conflation of risk and disease redefines clinical success such that reducing the threat of anticipated future illness requires acceptance of aggressive treatments and any associated adverse effects in the present. While the expanding emphasis on preventive medicine may improve the health profile of the total population, the implications of these innovations for the well-being of individual patients merits careful reconsideration. PMID:24372285

  14. Diagnostic ability of hand-held echocardiography in ventilated critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Vignon, Philippe; Chastagner, Catherine; François, Bruno; Martaillé, Jean-François; Normand, Sandrine; Bonnivard, Michel; Gastinne, Hervé

    2003-01-01

    Study objectives To compare the diagnostic capability of recently available hand-held echocardiography (HHE) and of conventional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) used as a gold standard in critically ill patients under mechanical ventilation. Design A prospective and descriptive study. Setting The general intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Patients All mechanically ventilated patients requiring a TTE study with a full-feature echocardiographic platform (Sonos 5500®; Philips Medical Systems, Andover, MA, USA) also underwent an echocardiographic examination using a small battery-operated device (33 × 23 cm2, 3.5 kg) (Optigo®; Philips Medical Systems). Interventions Each examination was performed independently by two intensivists experienced in echocardiography and was interpreted online. For each patient, the TTE videotape was reviewed by a cardiologist experienced in echocardiography and the final interpretation was used as a reference diagnosis. Results During the study period, 106 TTE procedures were performed in 103 consecutive patients (age, 59 ± 18 years; Simplified Acute Physiology Score, 46 ± 14; body mass index, 26 ± 9 kg/m2; positive end-expiratory pressure, 8 ± 4 cmH2O). The number of acoustic windows was comparable using HHE and TTE (233/318 versus 238/318, P = 0.72). HHE had a lower overall diagnostic capacity than TTE (199/251 versus 223/251 clinical questions solved, P = 0.005), mainly due to its lack of spectral Doppler capability. In contrast, diagnostic capacity based on two-dimensional imaging was comparable for both approaches (129/155 versus 135/155 clinical questions solved, P = 0.4). In addition, HHE and TTE had a similar therapeutic impact in 45 and 47 patients, respectively (44% versus 46%, P = 0.9). Conclusions HHE appears to have a narrower diagnostic field when compared with conventional TTE, but promises to accurately identify diagnoses based on two-dimensional imaging in ventilated critically ill patients. PMID:12974974

  15. How aminoglycosides are used in critically ill patients in a teaching hospital in North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehifar, Ebrahim; Eslami, Gohar; Ahangar, Nematollah; Rafati, Mohammad Reza; Eslami, Shafagh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Resistance to antimicrobial agents including aminoglycosides (AGs) is a great concern that is mainly related to inappropriate use. Since there were not adequate data regarding how rationally AGs are being prescribed in our critically ill patients, this study was conducted to determine the main issues in the area of appropriate use of this antibiotic class. Methods: One hundred patients who were in the intensive care units (ICUs) of Imam Khomeini Teaching Hospital from February 2012 to August 2012 were included. A data gathering form was prepared based upon the recommendations provided by Up-to-date (20.1) 2012 and Medscape 2013. All demographic characteristics and other information about time of beginning and duration of dosage, interval of administration of AGs and creatinine (Cr) level were collected. In statistical analysis, SPSS Version 16 software was used. Independent samples t-test was used to compare the quantitative and chi-square for qualitative variables. Results: Sixty six (66%) of patients received gentamicin and 38% received amikacin. In 27% of patients, serum creatinine (Cr) had been checked before and after AGs administration and 4 patients had no renal function monitoring. Monitoring of serum concentration and Cr clearance estimation was not carried out for any patients. Culture and laboratory sensitivity tests were done on 17 patients and E-coli (57%) was the most common isolated organism. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that majority of the hospitalized patients in the ICU and the dosage of AGs had not been adjusted to renal function.

  16. Prognostic value of circulating DNA levels in critically ill and trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Ikuta, Nilo; Simon, Daniel; Regner, Andrea Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The number of studies investigating circulating nucleic acids as potential biomarkers has increased in recent years. The detection of such biomarkers is a minimally invasive alternative for the diagnosis and prognosis of various clinical conditions. The value of circulating DNA levels as a predictive biomarker has been demonstrated in patients suffering from numerous acute pathologies that have a high risk of intensive care needs and in-hospital deaths. The mechanism by which circulating DNA levels increase in patients with these conditions remains unclear. In this review, we focused on the potential use of this biomarker for prognosis prediction in critically ill and trauma patients. The literature review was performed by searching MedLine using PubMed in the English language. PMID:25295826

  17. Prognostic value of circulating DNA levels in critically ill and trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Ikuta, Nilo; Simon, Daniel; Regner, Andrea Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The number of studies investigating circulating nucleic acids as potential biomarkers has increased in recent years. The detection of such biomarkers is a minimally invasive alternative for the diagnosis and prognosis of various clinical conditions. The value of circulating DNA levels as a predictive biomarker has been demonstrated in patients suffering from numerous acute pathologies that have a high risk of intensive care needs and in-hospital deaths. The mechanism by which circulating DNA levels increase in patients with these conditions remains unclear. In this review, we focused on the potential use of this biomarker for prognosis prediction in critically ill and trauma patients. The literature review was performed by searching MedLine using PubMed in the English language. PMID:25295826

  18. Bypassing non-adherence via PEG in a critically ill HIV-1-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Leipe, J; Hueber, A J; Rech, J; Harrer, T

    2008-08-01

    This case study describes a 44-year-old, chronically non-adherent, HIV-infected male with relapsing, life threatening toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) and other recurring opportunistic infections. Non-adherence resulted in critical illness, suppressed CD4 lymphocyte count and elevated viral load. In order to bypass the patient's complete psychological aversion to taking medication, and after exhausting various psychological interventions, a percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG) tube was inserted for delivery of indispensable medication. During the 15-month follow-up the patient was adherent, exhibiting a consistently undetectable viral load, high CD4 count and a remission of the opportunistic infections. This is an interesting case study demonstrating life-saving and long-term benefit of PEG in an exceptional setting, which has implications for future research and treatment of non-adherent HIV-infected patients. PMID:18608059

  19. New Colistin Population Pharmacokinetic Data in Critically Ill Patients Suggesting an Alternative Loading Dose Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Grégoire, N.; Mimoz, O.; Mégarbane, B.; Comets, E.; Chatelier, D.; Lasocki, S.; Gauzit, R.; Balayn, D.; Gobin, P.; Marchand, S.

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest as the last-line defense therapy against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), an inactive prodrug, and it was shown that due to slow CMS conversion, colistin plasma concentrations increase very slowly after treatment initiation, which constitutes the rationale for a loading dose in critically ill patients. However, faster CMS conversion was observed in healthy volunteers but using a different CMS brand, which may also have a major impact on colistin pharmacokinetics. Seventy-three critically ill patients not undergoing dialysis received multiple doses of CMS. The CMS concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and a pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach. We confirmed that CMS renal clearance and colistin concentrations at steady state are mostly governed by creatinine clearance, but we predict a typical maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) of colistin close to 2 mg/liter, occurring 3 h after an initial dose of 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS. Accordingly, the estimated colistin half-life (t1/2) was relatively short (3.1 h), with rapid attainment of steady state. Our results are only partially consistent with other recently published results. We confirm that the CMS maintenance dose should be adjusted according to renal function in critically ill patients. However, much higher than expected colistin concentrations were observed after the initial CMS dose, with rapid steady-state achievement. These discrepancies challenge the pharmacokinetic rationale for a loading dose, which may still be appropriate for rapid bacterial eradication and an improved clinical cure rate. PMID:25267662

  20. New colistin population pharmacokinetic data in critically ill patients suggesting an alternative loading dose rationale.

    PubMed

    Grégoire, N; Mimoz, O; Mégarbane, B; Comets, E; Chatelier, D; Lasocki, S; Gauzit, R; Balayn, D; Gobin, P; Marchand, S; Couet, W

    2014-12-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest as the last-line defense therapy against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. It is administered as colistin methanesulfonate (CMS), an inactive prodrug, and it was shown that due to slow CMS conversion, colistin plasma concentrations increase very slowly after treatment initiation, which constitutes the rationale for a loading dose in critically ill patients. However, faster CMS conversion was observed in healthy volunteers but using a different CMS brand, which may also have a major impact on colistin pharmacokinetics. Seventy-three critically ill patients not undergoing dialysis received multiple doses of CMS. The CMS concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and a pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach. We confirmed that CMS renal clearance and colistin concentrations at steady state are mostly governed by creatinine clearance, but we predict a typical maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) of colistin close to 2 mg/liter, occurring 3 h after an initial dose of 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS. Accordingly, the estimated colistin half-life (t1/2) was relatively short (3.1 h), with rapid attainment of steady state. Our results are only partially consistent with other recently published results. We confirm that the CMS maintenance dose should be adjusted according to renal function in critically ill patients. However, much higher than expected colistin concentrations were observed after the initial CMS dose, with rapid steady-state achievement. These discrepancies challenge the pharmacokinetic rationale for a loading dose, which may still be appropriate for rapid bacterial eradication and an improved clinical cure rate. PMID:25267662

  1. Utility of flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy for critically ill pediatric patients: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Field-Ridley, Aida; Sethi, Viyeka; Murthi, Shweta; Nandalike, Kiran; Li, Su-Ting T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic yield, therapeutic efficacy, and rate of adverse events related to flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FFB) in critically ill children. METHODS: We searched PubMed, SCOPUS, OVID, and EMBASE databases through July 2014 for English language publications studying FFB performed in the intensive care unit in children < 18 years old. We identified 666 studies, of which 89 full-text studies were screened for further review. Two reviewers independently determined that 27 of these studies met inclusion criteria and extracted data. We examined the diagnostic yield of FFB among upper and lower airway evaluations, as well as the utility of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). RESULTS: We found that FFB led to a change in medical management in 28.9% (range 21.9%-69.2%) of critically ill children. The diagnostic yield of FFB was 82% (range 45.2%-100%). Infectious organisms were identified in 25.7% (17.6%-75%) of BALs performed, resulting in a change of antimicrobial management in 19.1% (range: 12.2%-75%). FFB successfully re-expanded atelectasis or removed mucus plugs in 60.3% (range: 23.8%-100%) of patients with atelectasis. Adverse events were reported in 12.9% (range: 0.5%-71.4%) of patients. The most common adverse effects of FFB were transient hypotension, hypoxia and/or bradycardia that resolved with minimal intervention, such as oxygen supplementation or removal of the bronchoscope. Serious adverse events were uncommon; 2.1% of adverse events required intervention such as bag-mask ventilation or intubation and atropine for hypoxia and bradycardia, normal saline boluses for hypotension, or lavage and suctioning for hemorrhage. CONCLUSION: FFB is safe and effective for diagnostic and therapeutic use in critically ill pediatric patients. PMID:25685726

  2. Increased mortality among the critically ill patients admitted on weekends: a global trend.

    PubMed

    Degenhardt, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Critical illness and injury have no concept of time and do not always occur within regular business hours or at times conducive to optimal hospital function. In fact, it is a global trend that critically ill patients admitted to hospitals on weekends suffer higher mortality rates than those admitted during the week. Using a Canadian nursing lens, it is clear that there are some obvious differences in hospital function on weekends that include decreased hospital staffing, access to diagnostic services, intensivist coverage and the reluctance of patients to seek care on weekends. However, the exact differences contributing to the increased mortality in this patient population on weekends and the solutions remain unclear in the literature, and further research is needed. Possible solutions include moving to a "closed" ICU system, increasing nurse staffing, intensivist coverage and diagnostic accessibility, and creating a true seven-day hospital system. Finally, it is unclear exactly how to solve the nurse staffing portion of this problem, as it appears internally linked to the nursing profession and externally to hospital management, recruiting difficulties and financial restraints, and a problem that will take more than change in nursing management strategy to resolve. PMID:21941813

  3. Convulsions in a critically ill patient on hemodialysis: Possible role of low dose colistin

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Kanwalpreet; Kohli, Rahul; Kaur, Basjinder; Garg, Sidhartha; Shrivastava, Anupam; Kumar, Manender

    2014-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens in intensive care units has led to the revival of colistin. Colistin had gone into disrepute in early 1970s because of numerous reports of adverse renal and neurological effects. The renewed interest in colistin has also revived the discussion about its toxicity. The neurotoxicity reported in literature is usually with higher doses of colistin. We present a case report of seizures in a critically ill-patient, possibly with low dose colistin. A 47-year-old hypertensive female with chronic kidney disease-5 with sepsis on colistimethate sodium 1 million units (80 mg), intravenous once daily, developed paresthesias and seizures on 12th day of therapy, which were subsequently controlled after withdrawl of the drug. To conclude, colistin should be considered as a cause of convulsions in critically ill-patients with renal failure, even when given in low dose and patient receiving intermittent hemodialysis, when other obvious causes have been ruled out. When possible, cessation of therapy may be considered. PMID:25190957

  4. Convulsions in a critically ill patient on hemodialysis: Possible role of low dose colistin.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Kanwalpreet; Kohli, Rahul; Kaur, Basjinder; Garg, Sidhartha; Shrivastava, Anupam; Kumar, Manender

    2014-07-01

    The increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens in intensive care units has led to the revival of colistin. Colistin had gone into disrepute in early 1970s because of numerous reports of adverse renal and neurological effects. The renewed interest in colistin has also revived the discussion about its toxicity. The neurotoxicity reported in literature is usually with higher doses of colistin. We present a case report of seizures in a critically ill-patient, possibly with low dose colistin. A 47-year-old hypertensive female with chronic kidney disease-5 with sepsis on colistimethate sodium 1 million units (80 mg), intravenous once daily, developed paresthesias and seizures on 12(th) day of therapy, which were subsequently controlled after withdrawl of the drug. To conclude, colistin should be considered as a cause of convulsions in critically ill-patients with renal failure, even when given in low dose and patient receiving intermittent hemodialysis, when other obvious causes have been ruled out. When possible, cessation of therapy may be considered. PMID:25190957

  5. Clinical Conundrums in Management of Hypothyroidism in Critically Ill Geriatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Vishal; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Sehgal, Rinku; Bajaj, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articles in various international and national bibliographic indices were extensively searched with an emphasis on thyroid and hypothyroid disorders, hypothyroidism in elderly hospitalized patients, hypothyroidism in critically ill geriatric population, thyroxine in elderly hypothyroid, drug interactions and thyroid hormones, and thyroid functions in elderly. Evidence acquisition: Entrez (including PubMed), NIH.gov, Medscape.com, WebMD.com, MedHelp.org, Search Medica, MD consult, yahoo.com, and google.com were searched. Manual search was performed on various textbooks of medicine, critical care, pharmacology, and endocrinology. Results: Thyroid function tests in elderly hospitalized patients must be interpreted with circumspection. The elderly are often exposed to high iodide content and critical care settings. This may occur because of either decreased iodine excretion or very high intake of iodine. This is especially true for elderly population with underlying acute or chronic kidney diseases or both. Amiodarone, with a very high iodine content, is also often used in this set of population. Moreover, other medications including iodinated contrast are often used in the critical care settings. These may affect different steps of thyroid hormone metabolism, and thereby complicate the interpretation of thyroid function tests. Conclusions: The current review is aimed at analyzing and managing various clinical aspects of hypothyroidism in hospitalized elderly, and critically ill geriatric patients. PMID:24719636

  6. Innate immunity gene expression changes in critically ill patients with sepsis and disease-related malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Sarnecka, Agnieszka; D?browska, Aleksandra; Kosa?ka, Katarzyna; Wachowska, Ewelina; Ba?an, Barbara J.; Jankowska, Marta; Korta, Teresa; Niewi?ski, Grzegorz; Ka?ski, Andrzej; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Ma?gorzata; Omidi, Mohammad; Majewska, Krystyna; S?otwi?ska, Sylwia M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was an attempt to determine whether the expression of genes involved in innate antibacterial response (TL R2, NOD 1, TRAF6, HMGB 1 and Hsp70) in peripheral blood leukocytes in critically ill patients, may undergo significant changes depending on the severity of the infection and the degree of malnutrition. The study was performed in a group of 128 patients with infections treated in the intensive care and surgical ward. In 103/80.5% of patients, infections had a severe course (sepsis, severe sepsis, septic shock, mechanical ventilation of the lungs). Clinical monitoring included diagnosis of severe infection (according to the criteria of the ACC P/SCC M), assessment of severity of the patient condition and risk of death (APACHE II and SAPS II), nutritional assessment (NRS 2002 and SGA scales) and the observation of the early results of treatment. Gene expression at the mRNA level was analyzed by real-time PCR. The results of the present study indicate that in critically ill patients treated in the IC U there are significant disturbances in the expression of genes associated with innate antimicrobial immunity, which may have a significant impact on the clinical outcome. The expression of these genes varies depending on the severity of the patient condition, severity of infection and nutritional status. Expression disorders of genes belonging to innate antimicrobial immunity should be diagnosed as early as possible, monitored during the treatment and taken into account during early therapeutic treatment (including early nutrition to support the functions of immune cells). PMID:26648775

  7. Assessing the Immune Status of Critically Ill Trauma Patients by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuethe, Joshua W.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael; Johnson, Bobby L.; Midura, Emily F.; Caldwell, Charles C.; St. Pierre Schneider, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background Unintentional injury or trauma remains the leading cause of death among young adults. About one fifth of these trauma patients require care in an intensive care unit (ICU) due to severity of injuries and comorbidities. Patients hospitalized in an ICU are at increased risk for nosocomial infections, such as urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and wound infections. Many of these patients will develop sepsis or septic shock, and some will progress to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. The balance between the pro-inflammatory and counter-inflammatory immune response appears to be a driving factor in this progression. At present, there is no proposed method for the timely detection of the immune status in trauma patients; making rational decisions to use immune-altering therapies difficult. Objective We demonstrate that flow cytometry, with its capabilities to characterize and/or enumerate (a) leukocyte subtypes; (b) leukocyte activation markers; (c) leukocyte-derived cytokines and microvesicles; and (d) leukocyte function is well suited to monitor the immune status of critically ill trauma patients. Methods Information for the review was obtained from the extant literature. Discussion We suggest that flow cytometry is a research method that might aid nurse scientists in investigating the immune status of critically ill patients, the recovery status of conditions—such as hemorrhagic shock and tissue injury—and the relationship between cancer disease progression and symptoms. Therefore, flow cytometry has the potential to broaden nursing research priority areas so that a comprehensive approach to understanding the cellular response is attained. PMID:25350542

  8. Is massage beneficial to critically ill patients in intensive care units? A critical review.

    PubMed

    Hill, C F

    1993-06-01

    In today's society there is an ever-increasing awareness of the availability of complementary therapies, both inside and outside the National Health Service (NHS). The following paper is based on a literature review to discover whether the experiences of critically ill patients in a high-technology environment may be improved by the incorporation of therapeutic massage into their nursing care, thus helping them to cope more effectively with the barrage of unfamiliarity, technology and impersonality that Intensive Care Units (ICUs) often exude. PMID:8329840

  9. "Shotgunning" in a population of patients with severe mental illness and comorbid substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Christopher; Goldberg, Richard; Tapscott, Stephanie; Medoff, Deborah; Rosenberg, Stanley; Dixon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "Shotgunning" refers to the practice of one individual forcibly exhaling smoke into the mouth of another, and may increase the risk of transmission of respiratory pathogens. The extent of shotgunning among individuals with co-occurring serious mental illness and substance use is unknown. We included questions about shotgunning in an interview of 236 participants of a study testing a model to prevent and treat HIV and hepatitis. Shotgunning was common (61% [145/236]) and correlated with increased substance use severity and several high-risk behaviors. Only 8% (11/145) understood that shotgunning could transmit disease. Further research and patient education on shotgunning is warranted. PMID:22332854

  10. A well-being support program for patients with severe mental illness: a service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk of cardiovascular disease is increased in patients with severe mental illness (SMI) dramatically reducing life expectancy. Method A real world pragmatic service evaluation of a Well-Being Support Program (WSP) was conducted. This was a four-session package delivered over a one-year period by mental health practitioners that had received additional training in providing physical health assessment and intervention. Patients' physical health was screened and appropriate one-to-one and group intervention was offered. Results 212 mental health practitioners were trained in the WSP and 782 patients were enrolled on the program. The majority of our sample was overweight or obese; 66% had a Body Mass Index (BMI) >25. Lifestyle risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) were common and the patients had low self esteem. The average number of formally recorded well-being sessions attended was 2.10. Just under a quarter of those patients enrolled in the program completed. The only cardiovascular risk factor that significantly altered in patients that completed the program was BMI. The qualitative feedback about the program was largely positive. Conclusions The need to intervene to enhance the physical health of people with SMI is beyond doubt. Maintaining patient engagement in a physical health improvement program is challenging. Regular comprehensive physical health monitoring is necessary to establish the benefit of intervention and increase life expectancy and well-being in this population. PMID:21418627

  11. Outcome of Critically ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury using the AKIN Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Mandelbaum, Tal; Scott, Daniel J; Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G.; Malhotra, Atul; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Howell, Michael D.; Talmor, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Objective Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects 5–7% of all hospitalized patients with a much higher incidence in the critically ill. The Acute Kidney Injury Network proposed a definition in which serum creatinine rises (>0.3mg/dl) and/or oliguria (<0.5/ml/kg/h) for a period of 6 hours are used to detect AKI. Accurate urine output measurements as well as serum creatinine values from our database were used to detect patients with AKI and calculate their corresponding mortality risk and length of stay. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting 7 intensive care units at, a large, academic, tertiary medical center. Patients Adult patients without evidence of end stage renal disease, with more than 2 creatinine measurements and at least a 6 hours urine output recording, who were admitted to the ICU between 2001 and 2007. Interventions Medical records of all the patients were reviewed. Demographic information, lab results, charted data, discharge diagnoses, physiological data and patient outcomes were extracted from the MIMIC-II database using a SQL query. Measurements and main results From 19,677 adult patient records, 14,524 patients met the inclusion criteria. 57% developed AKI during their ICU stay. In-hospital mortality rates were: 13.9%, 16.4%, 33.8% for AKI 1, 2 and 3 respectively compared to only 6.2% in patients without AKI (p<0.0001). After adjusting for multiple covariates AKI was associated with increased hospital mortality (OR 1.4 and 1.3 for AKI1 and AKI2 and 2.5 for AKI3; p<0.0001). Using multivariate logistic regression, we found that in patients who developed AKI, urine output alone was a better mortality predictor than creatinine alone or the combination of both. Conclusions More than 50% of our critically ill patients developed some stage of AKI resulting in stage-wise increased mortality risk. However, the mortality risk associated with AKI stages 1 and 2 does not differ significantly. In light of these findings reevaluation of the AKIN staging criteria should be considered. PMID:21765352

  12. Variations in Patients' Assessment of Chronic Illness Care across Organizational Models of Primary Health Care: A Multilevel Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Feldman, Debbie Ehrmann; Lemieux, Valérie; Tourigny, André; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Tousignant, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To measure patients' assessment of chronic illness care and its variation across primary healthcare (PHC) models. Methods: We recruited 776 patients with diabetes, heart failure, arthritis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease from 33 PHC clinics. Face-to-face interviews, followed by a telephone interview at 12 months, were conducted using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC). Multilevel regression was used in the analysis. Results: The mean PACIC score was low at 2.5 on a scale of 1 to 5. PACIC scores were highest among patients affiliated with family medicine groups (mean, 2.78) and lowest for contact models (mean, 2.35). Patients with arthritis and older persons generally reported a lower assessment of chronic care. Conclusion: Family medicine groups represent an integrated model of PHC associated with higher levels of achievement in chronic care. Variations across PHC organizations suggest that some models are more appropriate for improving management of chronic illness. PMID:23968619

  13. Clinical review: Practical approach to hyponatraemia and hypernatraemia in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances in sodium concentration are common in the critically ill patient and associated with increased mortality. The key principle in treatment and prevention is that plasma [Na+] (P-[Na+]) is determined by external water and cation balances. P-[Na+] determines plasma tonicity. An important exception is hyperglycaemia, where P-[Na+] may be reduced despite plasma hypertonicity. The patient is first treated to secure airway, breathing and circulation to diminish secondary organ damage. Symptoms are critical when handling a patient with hyponatraemia. Severe symptoms are treated with 2 ml/kg 3% NaCl bolus infusions irrespective of the supposed duration of hyponatraemia. The goal is to reduce cerebral symptoms. The bolus therapy ensures an immediate and controllable rise in P-[Na+]. A maximum of three boluses are given (increases P-[Na+] about 6 mmol/l). In all patients with hyponatraemia, correction above 10 mmol/l/day must be avoided to reduce the risk of osmotic demyelination. Practical measures for handling a rapid rise in P-[Na+] are discussed. The risk of overcorrection is associated with the mechanisms that cause hyponatraemia. Traditional classifications according to volume status are notoriously difficult to handle in clinical practice. Moreover, multiple combined mechanisms are common. More than one mechanism must therefore be considered for safe and lasting correction. Hypernatraemia is less common than hyponatraemia, but implies that the patient is more ill and has a worse prognosis. A practical approach includes treatment of the underlying diseases and restoration of the distorted water and salt balances. Multiple combined mechanisms are common and must be searched for. Importantly, hypernatraemia is not only a matter of water deficit, and treatment of the critically ill patient with an accumulated fluid balance of 20 litres and corresponding weight gain should not comprise more water, but measures to invoke a negative cation balance. Reduction of hypernatraemia/hypertonicity is critical, but should not exceed 12 mmol/l/day in order to reduce the risk of rebounding brain oedema. PMID:23672688

  14. Co-enrollment of critically ill patients into multiple studies: patterns, predictors and consequences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Research on co-enrollment practices and their impact are limited in the ICU setting. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe patterns and predictors of co-enrollment of patients in a thromboprophylaxis trial, and 2) to examine the consequences of co-enrollment on clinical and trial outcomes. Methods In an observational analysis of an international thromboprophylaxis trial in 67 ICUs, we examined the co-enrollment of critically ill medical-surgical patients into more than one study, and examined the clinical and trial outcomes among co-enrolled and non-co-enrolled patients. Results Among 3,746 patients enrolled in PROTECT (Prophylaxis for ThromboEmbolism in Critical Care Trial), 713 (19.0%) were co-enrolled in at least one other study (53.6% in a randomized trial, 37.0% in an observational study and 9.4% in both). Six factors independently associated with co-enrollment (all P < 0.001) were illness severity (odds ratio (OR) 1.35, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 1.53 for each 10-point Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score increase), substitute decision-makers providing consent, rather than patients (OR 3.31, 2.03 to 5.41), experience of persons inviting consent (OR 2.67, 1.74 to 4.11 for persons with > 10 years' experience compared to persons with none), center size (all ORs > 10 for ICUs with > 15 beds), affiliation with trials groups (OR 5.59, 3.49 to 8.95), and main trial rather than pilot phase (all ORs > 8 for recruitment year beyond the pilot). Co-enrollment did not influence clinical or trial outcomes or risk of adverse events. Conclusions Co-enrollment was strongly associated with features of the patients, research personnel, setting and study. Co-enrollment had no impact on trial results, and appeared safe, acceptable and feasible. Transparent reporting, scholarly discourse, ethical analysis and further research are needed on the complex topic of co-enrollment during critical illness. PMID:23298553

  15. Application of a modified sequential organ failure assessment score to critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ñamendys-Silva, S.A.; Silva-Medina, M.A.; Vásquez-Barahona, G.M.; Baltazar-Torres, J.A.; Rivero-Sigarroa, E.; Fonseca-Lazcano, J.A.; Domínguez-Cherit, G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the usefulness of the Mexican sequential organ failure assessment (MEXSOFA) score for assessing the risk of mortality for critically ill patients in the ICU. A total of 232 consecutive patients admitted to an ICU were included in the study. The MEXSOFA was calculated using the original SOFA scoring system with two modifications: the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was replaced with the SpO2/FiO2 ratio, and the evaluation of neurologic dysfunction was excluded. The ICU mortality rate was 20.2%. Patients with an initial MEXSOFA score of 9?points or less calculated during the first 24?h after admission to the ICU had a mortality rate of 14.8%, while those with an initial MEXSOFA score of 10?points or more had a mortality rate of 40%. The MEXSOFA score at 48?h was also associated with mortality: patients with a score of 9?points or less had a mortality rate of 14.1%, while those with a score of 10?points or more had a mortality rate of 50%. In a multivariate analysis, only the MEXSOFA score at 48?h was an independent predictor for in-ICU death with an OR = 1.35 (95%CI = 1.14-1.59, P < 0.001). The SOFA and MEXSOFA scores calculated 24?h after admission to the ICU demonstrated a good level of discrimination for predicting the in-ICU mortality risk in critically ill patients. The MEXSOFA score at 48?h was an independent predictor of death; with each 1-point increase, the odds of death increased by 35%. PMID:23369978

  16. How to communicate with patients about future illness progression and end of life: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Ruth; Land, Victoria; Seymour, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Conversation and discourse analytic research has yielded important evidence about skills needed for effective, sensitive communication with patients about illness progression and end of life. Objectives To: ??Locate and synthesise observational evidence about how people communicate about sensitive future matters; ??Inform practice and policy on how to provide opportunities for talk about these matters; ??Identify evidence gaps. Design Systematic review of conversation/discourse analytic studies of recorded interactions in English, using a bespoke appraisal approach and aggregative synthesis. Results 19 publications met the inclusion criteria. We summarised findings in terms of eight practices: ‘fishing questions’—open questions seeking patients’ perspectives (5/19); indirect references to difficult topics (6/19); linking to what a patient has already said—or noticeably not said (7/19); hypothetical questions (12/19); framing difficult matters as universal or general (4/19); conveying sensitivity via means other than words, for example, hesitancy, touch (4/19); encouraging further talk using means other than words, for example, long silences (2/19); and steering talk from difficult/negative to more optimistic aspects (3/19). Conclusions Practices vary in how strongly they encourage patients to engage in talk about matters such as illness progression and dying. Fishing questions and indirect talk make it particularly easy to avoid engaging—this may be appropriate in some circumstances. Hypothetical questions are more effective in encouraging on-topic talk, as is linking questions to patients’ cues. Shifting towards more ‘optimistic’ aspects helps maintain hope but closes off further talk about difficulties: practitioners may want to delay doing so. There are substantial gaps in evidence. PMID:25344494

  17. Duration of antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients with bloodstream infections: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Havey, Thomas C; Fowler, Robert A; Pinto, Ruxandra; Elligsen, Marion; Daneman, Nick

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal duration of antibiotic treatment for bloodstream infections is unknown and understudied. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of critically ill patients with bloodstream infections diagnosed in a tertiary care hospital between March 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011 was undertaken. The impact of patient, pathogen and infectious syndrome characteristics on selection of shorter (?10 days) or longer (>10 days) treatment duration, and on the number of antibiotic-free days, was examined. The time profile of clinical response was evaluated over the first 14 days of treatment. Relapse, secondary infection and mortality rates were compared between those receiving shorter or longer treatment. RESULTS: Among 100 critically ill patients with bloodstream infection, the median duration of antibiotic treatment was 11 days, but was highly variable (interquartile range 4.5 to 17 days). Predictors of longer treatment (fewer antibiotic-free days) included foci with established requirements for prolonged treatment, underlying respiratory tract focus, and infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas species. Predictors of shorter treatment (more antibiotic-free days) included vascular catheter source and bacteremia with coagulase-negative staphylococci. Temperature improvements plateaued after the first week; white blood cell counts, multiple organ dysfunction scores and vasopressor dependence continued to decline into the second week. Among 72 patients who survived to 10 days, clinical outcomes were similar between those receiving shorter and longer treatment. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic treatment durations for patients with bloodstream infection are highly variable and often prolonged. A randomized trial is needed to determine the duration of treatment that will maximize cure while minimizing adverse consequences of antibiotics. PMID:24421823

  18. Regional citrate anticoagulation for RRTs in critically ill patients with AKI.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Santo; Pistolesi, Valentina; Tritapepe, Luigi; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic complications have been reported in up to 30% of critically ill patients with AKI undergoing RRT with systemic anticoagulation. Because bleeding is associated with significantly increased mortality risk, strategies aimed at reducing hemorrhagic complications while maintaining extracorporeal circulation should be implemented. Among the alternatives to systemic anticoagulation, regional citrate anticoagulation has been shown to prolong circuit life while reducing the incidence of hemorrhagic complications and lowering transfusion needs. For these reasons, the recently published Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Kidney Injury have recommended regional citrate anticoagulation as the preferred anticoagulation modality for continuous RRT in critically ill patients in whom it is not contraindicated. However, the use of regional citrate anticoagulation is still limited because of concerns related to the risk of metabolic complications, the complexity of the proposed protocols, and the need for customized solutions. The introduction of simplified anticoagulation protocols based on citrate and the development of dialysis monitors with integrated infusion systems and dedicated software could lead to the wider use of regional citrate anticoagulation in upcoming years. PMID:24993448

  19. Invasive candidiasis as a cause of sepsis in the critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Delaloye, Julie; Calandra, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an increasingly frequent etiology of sepsis in critically ill patients causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Candida species are by far the predominant agent of fungal sepsis accounting for 10% to 15% of health-care associated infections, about 5% of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock and are the fourth most common bloodstream isolates in the United States. One-third of all episodes of candidemia occur in the intensive care setting. Early diagnosis of invasive candidiasis is critical in order to initiate antifungal agents promptly. Delay in the administration of appropriate therapy increases mortality. Unfortunately, risk factors, clinical and radiological manifestations are quite unspecific and conventional culture methods are suboptimal. Non-culture based methods (such as mannan, anti-mannan, ?-d-glucan, and polymerase chain reaction) have emerged but remain investigational or require additional testing in the ICU setting. Few prophylactic or pre-emptive studies have been performed in critically ill patients. They tended to be underpowered and their clinical usefulness remains to be established under most circumstances. The antifungal armamentarium has expanded considerably with the advent of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, the newest triazoles and the echinocandins. Clinical trials have shown that the triazoles and echinocandins are efficacious and well tolerated antifungal therapies. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of invasive candidiasis have been published by the European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of North America. PMID:24157707

  20. Association between statin therapy and outcomes in critically ill patients: a nested cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The effect of statin therapy on mortality in critically ill patients is controversial, with some studies suggesting a benefit and others suggesting no benefit or even potential harm. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between statin therapy during intensive care unit (ICU) admission and all-cause mortality in critically ill patients. Methods This was a nested cohort study within two randomised controlled trials conducted in a tertiary care ICU. All 763 patients who participated in the two trials were included in this study. Of these, 107 patients (14%) received statins during their ICU stay. The primary endpoint was all-cause ICU and hospital mortality. Secondary endpoints included the development of sepsis and severe sepsis during the ICU stay, the ICU length of stay, the hospital length of stay, and the duration of mechanical ventilation. Multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for clinically and statistically relevant variables. Results Statin therapy was associated with a reduction in hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.99). Statin therapy was associated with lower hospital mortality in the following groups: patients >58 years of age (aOR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.97), those with an acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) score >22 (aOR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.31-0.96), diabetic patients (aOR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.30-0.90), patients on vasopressor therapy (aOR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.29-0.97), those admitted with severe sepsis (aOR = 0.22, 95% CI 0.07-0.66), patients with creatinine ?100 ?mol/L (aOR = 0.14, 95% CI 0.04-0.51), and patients with GCS ?9 (aOR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.17-0.71). When stratified by statin dose, the mortality reduction was mainly observed with statin equipotent doses ?40 mg of simvastatin (aOR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.28-1.00). Mortality reduction was observed with simvastatin (aOR = 0.37, 95% CI 0.17-0.81) but not with atorvastatin (aOR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.84-1.46). Statin therapy was not associated with a difference in any of the secondary outcomes. Conclusion Statin therapy during ICU stay was associated with a reduction in all-cause hospital mortality. This association was especially noted in high-risk subgroups. This potential benefit needs to be validated in a randomised, controlled trial. PMID:21819615

  1. Non-invasive monitoring of oxygen delivery in acutely ill patients: new frontiers.

    PubMed

    Perel, Azriel

    2015-12-01

    Hypovolemia, anemia and hypoxemia may cause critical deterioration in the oxygen delivery (DO2). Their early detection followed by a prompt and appropriate intervention is a cornerstone in the care of critically ill patients. And yet, the remedies for these life-threatening conditions, namely fluids, blood and oxygen, have to be carefully titrated as they are all associated with severe side-effects when administered in excess. New technological developments enable us to monitor the components of DO2 in a continuous non-invasive manner via the sensor of the traditional pulse oximeter. The ability to better assess oxygenation, hemoglobin levels and fluid responsiveness continuously and simultaneously may be of great help in managing the DO2. The non-invasive nature of this technology may also extend the benefits of advanced monitoring to wider patient populations. PMID:26380992

  2. [Music therapy used on a patient in the terminal stage of cancer who narrated a tale based on her fantasy].

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    Music therapy was used on a patient in the terminal stage of cancer who described a fantastic tale built around her imagined pregnancy. We believe that psychiatric intervention was successful through the introduction of music therapy as part of her palliative treatment. Particularly notable in this case was that the patient dealt with the development of ascites by telling a fantastic tale related to a pregnancy--i.e., becoming pregnant with the therapist's child. Her tale started by statements such as "I am pregnant and suffering from morning sickness" and "I am in the third month of pregnancy with the child of my therapist." This progressed in parallel with the actual changes in her physiological symptoms. Among the attending physician, the patient, and her family, this imaginary tale was an important means of communication. The theme of pregnancy, love, and family developed from an unconscious dynamic process between the physician and patient, which could be interpreted as a family-related story originating in the mind of a terminally ill patient. Through this family romance with a major theme of pregnancy, the patient was able to sense her physical crises. This process may be thought of as a product of the so-called "mythgenerating capacity" under limited conditions, which was proposed by Ellenberger. Being aware of this situation, the attending physician and others in charge of her care did not insist on negating her story: instead they accepted her fantasy, and through it they succeeded in establishing psychiatric communications. The process may be considered a form of the narrative approach that is currently attracting attention. In this example, the "process of mourning" and "stages of accepting death" in the terminal state found an outlet in the creation of a fantasy. We believe that this case illustrates the important role of communication between the physician and a patient through the acceptance by the former of a fantastic tale given by the latter; and of a psychotherapeutic intervention, i.e., a sincere interaction between them through music therapy. PMID:14560594

  3. Alignment of patient and primary care practice member perspectives of chronic illness care: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known as to whether primary care teams’ perceptions of how well they have implemented the Chronic Care Model (CCM) corresponds with their patients’ own experience of chronic illness care. We examined the extent to which practice members’ perceptions of how well they organized to deliver care consistent with the CCM were associated with their patients’ perceptions of the chronic illness care they have received. Methods Analysis of baseline measures from a cluster randomized controlled trial testing a practice facilitation intervention to implement the CCM in small, community-based primary care practices. All practice “members” (i.e., physician providers, non-physician providers, and staff) completed the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC) survey and adult patients with 1 or more chronic illnesses completed the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire. Results Two sets of hierarchical linear regression models accounting for nesting of practice members (N?=?283) and patients (N?=?1,769) within 39 practices assessed the association between practice member perspectives of CCM implementation (ACIC scores) and patients’ perspectives of CCM (PACIC). ACIC summary score was not significantly associated with PACIC summary score or most of PACIC subscale scores, but four of the ACIC subscales [Self-management Support (p?patient characteristics. The magnitude of the coefficients, however, indicates that the level of association is weak. Conclusions The ACIC and PACIC scales appear to provide complementary and relatively unique assessments of how well clinical services are aligned with the CCM. Our findings underscore the importance of assessing both patient and practice member perspectives when evaluating quality of chronic illness care. Trial registration NCT00482768 PMID:24678983

  4. Can non-thyroid illness syndrome predict mortality in lung cancer patients? A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Zehra Asuk; Kirakli, Cenk; Yilmaz, Ufuk; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to evaluate the incidence of non-thyroid illness syndrome (NTIS) among patients diagnosed as lung cancer and its association with the stage of the disease, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score, nutritional parameters, and survival. We enrolled 120 patients that 71 of them with newly diagnosed and staged non-small cell lung cancer and 49 of them small-cell lung cancer. The cases were examined for thyroid function tests, ECOG performance score, and nutritional evaluation before treatment. Also, cases were evaluated for their overall survival rates. NTIS was identified in 30 (42 %) of the 71 non-small cell lung cancer patients and 22 (44 %) of the 49 small-cell lung cancer patients. NTIS was more frequent among advanced stage of cases. Serum albumin level, cholesterol level, lymphocyte level, and body mass index were detected to be significantly low and ECOG performance score was significantly high in cases with NTIS when compared to cases without NTIS. NTIS was found to be negatively correlated with body mass index, ECOG performance score, and serum albumin level, and it was positively correlated with disease stage. NTIS was detected significantly as a poor prognostic factor for lung cancer. NTIS was frequently seen in cases with non-small cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. NTIS can be used as a predictor of poor prognosis for lung cancer patients. PMID:24832769

  5. Relief of emotional symptoms in elderly patients with terminal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, T

    1988-07-01

    Effective palliative care is one of the most valuable skills a physician may acquire. It involves not only control of physical symptoms, but relief of emotional symptoms. Relief of emotional symptoms requires truth telling in a context of supportive, skillful communication. Important communication skills include empathy, legitimation, support, partnership, and respect. Using these skills and the development of a limited treatment plan, along with pharmacological intervention, when necessary, to treat anxiety, depression, and confusion, may provide a significant measure of relief for the suffering that often accompanies terminal cancer. PMID:3290059

  6. The Effect of a Patient Portal With Electronic Messaging on Patient Activation Among Chronically Ill Patients: Controlled Before-and-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that providing patients with access to their medical records and secure messaging with health care professionals improves health outcomes in chronic care by encouraging and activating patients to manage their own condition. Objectives The aim was to evaluate the effect of access to a patient portal on patient activation among chronically ill patients. Further, the relationship between temporal proximity of a severe diagnosis and patient activation were assessed. Methods A total of 876 chronically ill patients from public primary care were allocated to either an intervention group receiving immediate access to a patient portal that included their medical records, care plan, and secure messaging with a care team, or to a control group receiving usual care. Patient Activation Measure (PAM) at baseline and at 6-month follow-up was obtained from 80 patients in the intervention group and 57 patients in the control group; thus, a total of 137 patients were included in the final analysis. Results No significant effect of access to patient portal on patient activation was detected in this study (F 1,133=1.87, P=.17, ?2=0.01). Patients starting at a lower level of activation demonstrated greater positive change in activation compared to patients starting at higher levels of activation in both the intervention and control groups. Further, patients diagnosed with a severe diagnosis during the intervention showed greater positive change in patient activation compared to patients whose last severe diagnosis was made more than 2 years ago. The results also suggest that the intervention had greatest effect on patients starting at the highest level of patient activation (difference in change of patient activation=4.82, P=.13), and among patients diagnosed within a year of the intervention (difference in change of patient activation=7.65, P=.12). Conclusions Time since last severe diagnosis and patient activation at baseline may affect changes in patient activation, suggesting that these should be considered in evaluation of activating chronic care interventions and in the specification of possible target groups for these interventions. This may be relevant in designing services for a heterogeneous group of patients with a distinct medical history and level of activation. PMID:25413368

  7. Use of Opiates to Manage Pain in the Seriously and Terminally Ill Patient

    MedlinePLUS

    ... misconceptions about the use of opiates for pain management, among health care professionals as well as among the public, that ... continuing education programs are being offered to practicing health care ... a right to expect expert management of pain. Tell your doctor if you or ...

  8. Functional evolution of critically ill patients undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Fernanda Murata; Yamaguti, Wellington Pereira; Onoue, Mirian Akemi; Mendes, Juliana Mesti; Pedrosa, Renata Santos; Maida, Ana Lígia Vasconcellos; Kondo, Cláudia Seiko; de Salles, Isabel Chateaubriand Diniz; de Brito, Christina May Moran; Rodrigues, Miguel Koite

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluation of the functional outcomes of patients undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol for critically ill patients from admission to discharge from the intensive care unit. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted that included 463 adult patients with clinical and/or surgical diagnosis undergoing an early rehabilitation protocol. The overall muscle strength was evaluated at admission to the intensive care unit using the Medical Research Council scale. Patients were allocated to one of four intervention plans according to the Medical Research Council score, the suitability of the plan’s parameters, and the increasing scale of the plan expressing improved functional status. Uncooperative patients were allocated to intervention plans based on their functional status. The overall muscle strength and/or functional status were reevaluated upon discharge from the intensive care unit by comparison between the Intervention Plans upon admission (Planinitial) and discharge (Planfinal). Patients were classified into three groups according to the improvement of their functional status or not: responsive 1 (Planfinal > Planinitial), responsive 2 (Planfinal = Planinitial) and unresponsive (Planfinal < Planinitial). Results In total, 432 (93.3%) of 463 patients undergoing the protocol responded positively to the intervention strategy, showing maintenance and/or improvement of the initial functional status. Clinical patients classified as unresponsive were older (74.3 ± 15.1 years of age; p = 0.03) and had longer lengths of intensive care unit (11.6 ± 14.2 days; p = 0.047) and hospital (34.5 ± 34.1 days; p = 0.002) stays. Conclusion The maintenance and/or improvement of the admission functional status were associated with shorter lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays. The results suggest that the type of diagnosis, clinical or surgical, fails to define the positive response to an early rehabilitation protocol. PMID:26340157

  9. Adaptation and validation of the patient assessment of chronic illness care in the French context

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases are major causes of disability worldwide with rising prevalence. Most patients suffering from chronic conditions do not always receive optimal care. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been developed to help general practitioners making quality improvements. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire was increasingly used in several countries to appraise the implementation of the CCM from the patients’ perspective. The objective of this study was to adapt the PACIC questionnaire in the French context and to test the validity of this adaptation in a sample of patients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods The PACIC was translated into French language using a forward/backward procedure. The French version was validated using a sample of 150 patients treated for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and having multiple chronic co-morbidities. Several forms of validity were analysed: content; face; construct; and internal consistency. The construct validity was investigated with an exploratory factorial analysis. Results The French-version of the PACIC consisted in 18 items, after merging two pairs of items due to redundancy. The high number of items exhibiting floor/ceiling effects and the non-normality of the ratings suggested that a 5-points rating scale was somewhat inappropriate to assess the patients’ experience of care. The construct validity of the French-PACIC was verified and resulted in a bi-dimensional structure. Overall this structure showed a high level of internal consistency. The PACIC score appeared to be significantly related to the age and self-reported health of the patients. Conclusions A French-version of the PACIC questionnaire is now available to evaluate the patients’ experience of care and to monitor the quality improvements realised by the medical structures. This study also pointed out some methodological issues about the PACIC questionnaire, related to the format of the rating scale and to the structure of the questionnaire. PMID:24947538

  10. Safety of performing fiberoptic bronchoscopy in critically ill hypoxemic patients with acute respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Cracco, Christophe; Fartoukh, Muriel; Prodanovic, Hélène; Azoulay, Elie; Chenivesse, Cécile; Lorut, Christine; Beduneau, Gaëtan; Bui, Hoang Nam; Taille, Camille; Brochard, Laurent; Demoule, Alexandre; Maitre, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Background Safety of fibreoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) in nonintubated critically ill patients with acute respiratory failure have not been extensively evaluated. We aimed to measure the incidence of intubation and need to increase ventilatory support following FOB and to identify predictive factors of this event. Methods A prospective multicenter observational study was carried out in 8 French adult intensive care units. 169 FOB performed in patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio equal or less than 300 were analyzed. Our main end point was intubation rate. The secondary end point was rate of increased ventilatory support defined as greater than a 50% increase in oxygen requirement, the need to start non invasive-positive pressure ventilation (NI-PPV) or increase NI-PPV support. Results Within 24 hours, an increase in ventilatory support was required following 59 (35%) bronchoscopies, of which 25 (15%) led to endotracheal intubation. The existence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR:5.2 [1.6–17.8], p=0.007) or immunosuppression (OR : 5.4 [1.7–17.2], p=0.004) were significantly associated with the need for intubation in multivariable analysis. None of the baseline physiological parameters including the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was associated with intubation. Conclusion Bronchoscopy is often followed by an increase in ventilatory support in hypoxemic critically ill patients, but less frequently by the need for intubation. COPD, immunosuppression are associated with a need for invasive ventilation in the following 24 hours. PMID:23070123

  11. Sources of Stress in Nursing Terminal Patients in a Hospice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Toft, Pamela; Anderson, James G.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated sources of stress experienced by hospice nurses. Stress sources included: physical characteristics of the unit as well as staffing policies designed to improve the quality of care; procedures followed in admitting patients; policies related to the preparation of meals and open visitation; and greater involvement with the patient and…

  12. Psychological process from hospitalization to death among uninformed terminal liver cancer patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yuko; Hagihara, Akihito; Kobori, Eiko; Nakayama, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    Background Although the attitude among doctors toward disclosing a cancer diagnosis is becoming more positive, informing patients of their disease has not yet become a common practice in Japan. We examined the psychological process, from hospitalization until death, among uninformed terminal cancer patients in Japan, and developed a psychological model. Methods Terminal cancer patients hospitalized during the recruiting period voluntarily participated in in-depth interviews. The data were analyzed by grounded theory. Results Of the 87 uninformed participants at the time of hospitalization, 67% (N = 59) died without being informed of their diagnosis. All were male, 51–66 years of age, and all experienced five psychological stages: anxiety and puzzlement, suspicion and denial, certainty, preparation, and acceptance. At the end of each stage, obvious and severe feelings were observed, which were called "gates." During the final acceptance stage, patients spent a peaceful time with family, even talking about their dreams with family members. Conclusion Unlike in other studies, the uninformed patients in this study accepted death peacefully, with no exceptional cases. Despite several limitations, this study showed that almost 70% of the uninformed terminal cancer patients at hospitalization died without being informed, suggesting an urgent need for culturally specific and effective terminal care services for cancer patients in Japan. PMID:16948863

  13. Intensive insulin treatment in critically ill trauma patients normalizes glucose by reducing endogenous glucose production.

    PubMed

    Thorell, Anders; Rooyackers, Olav; Myrenfors, Peter; Soop, Mattias; Nygren, Jonas; Ljungqvist, Olle H

    2004-11-01

    Critical illness is associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Intensive insulin treatment to normalize blood glucose during feeding has been shown to improve morbidity and mortality in patients in intensive care. The mechanisms behind the glucose-controlling effects of insulin in stress are not well understood. Six previously healthy, severely traumatized patients (injury severity score > 15) were studied early (24-48 h) after trauma. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) and whole-body glucose disposal (WGD) were measured (6,6-(2)H(2)-glucose) at basal, during total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and during TPN plus insulin to normalize blood glucose (TPN+I). Six matched volunteers served as controls. At basal and TPN, concentrations of glucose and insulin were higher in patients (P < 0.05). During TPN+I, insulin concentrations were 30-fold higher in patients. At basal, WGD and EGP were 30% higher in patients (P < 0.05). During TPN, EGP decreased in both groups but less in patients, resulting in 110% higher EGP than controls (P < 0.05). Normoglycemia coincided with reduced EGP, resulting in similar rates in both groups. WGD did not change during TPN or TPN+I and was not different between the groups. In conclusion, in healthy subjects, euglycemia is maintained during TPN at physiological insulin concentrations by a reduction of EGP, whereas WGD is maintained at basal levels. In traumatized patients, hyperglycemia is due to increased EGP. In contrast to controls, normalization of glucose concentration during TPN needs high insulin infusion rates and is accounted for by a reduction in EGP, whereas WGD is not increased. PMID:15531485

  14. Reduced Serum Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Indicates Severe Systemic Inflammation in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zivkovic, Aleksandar R.; Schmidt, Karsten; Sigl, Annette; Decker, Sebastian O.; Brenner, Thorsten; Hofer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is an immune response to a nonspecific insult of either infectious or noninfectious origin and remains a challenge in the intensive care units with high mortality rate. Cholinergic neurotransmission plays an important role in the regulation of the immune response during inflammation. We hypothesized that the activity of butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) might serve as a marker to identify and prognose systemic inflammation. By using a point-of-care-testing (POCT) approach we measured BChE activity in patients with severe systemic inflammation and healthy volunteers. We observed a decreased BChE activity in patients with systemic inflammation, as compared to that of healthy individuals. Furthermore, BChE activity showed an inverse correlation with the severity of the disease. Although hepatic function has previously been found essential for BChE production, we show here that the reduced BChE activity associated with systemic inflammation occurs independently of and is thus not caused by any deficit in liver function in these patients. A POCT approach, used to assess butyrylcholinesterase activity, might further improve the therapy of the critically ill patients by minimizing time delays between the clinical assessment and treatment of the inflammatory process. Hence, assessing butyrylcholinesterase activity might help in early detection of inflammation. PMID:25762852

  15. Do not drown the patient: appropriate fluid management in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Polderman, Kees H; Varon, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Administering intravenous fluids to support the circulation in critically ill patients has been a mainstay of emergency medicine and critical care for decades, especially (but not exclusively) in patients with distributive or hypovolemic shock. However, in recent years, this automatic use of large fluid volumes is beginning to be questioned. Analysis from several large trials in severe sepsis and/or acute respiratory distress syndrome have shown independent links between volumes of fluid administered and outcome; conservative fluid strategies have also been associated with lower mortality in trauma patients. In addition, it is becoming ever more clear that central venous pressure, which is often used to guide fluid administration, is a completely unreliable parameter of volume status or fluid responsiveness. Furthermore, 2 recently published large multicenter trials (ARISE and ProCESS) have discredited the "early goal-directed therapy" approach, which used prespecified targets of central venous pressure and venous saturation to guide fluid and vasopressor administration. This article discusses the risks of "iatrogenic submersion" and strategies to avoid this risk while still giving our patients the fluids they need. The key lies in combining good clinical judgement, awareness of the potential harm from excessive fluid use, restraint in reflexive administration of fluids, and use of data from sophisticated monitoring tools such as echocardiography and transpulmonary thermodilution. Use of smaller volumes to perform fluid challenges, monitoring of extravascular lung water, earlier use of norepinephrine, and other strategies can help further reduce morbidity and mortality from severe sepsis. PMID:25698681

  16. Goal-Oriented Respiratory Management for Critically Ill Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, Carmen Sílvia Valente; Matos, Gustavo Faissol Janot; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    This paper, based on relevant literature articles and the authors' clinical experience, presents a goal-oriented respiratory management for critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that can help improve clinicians' ability to care for these patients. Early recognition of ARDS modified risk factors and avoidance of aggravating factors during hospital stay such as nonprotective mechanical ventilation, multiple blood products transfusions, positive fluid balance, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and gastric aspiration can help decrease its incidence. An early extensive clinical, laboratory, and imaging evaluation of “at risk patients” allows a correct diagnosis of ARDS, assessment of comorbidities, and calculation of prognostic indices, so that a careful treatment can be planned. Rapid administration of antibiotics and resuscitative measures in case of sepsis and septic shock associated with protective ventilatory strategies and early short-term paralysis associated with differential ventilatory techniques (recruitment maneuvers with adequate positive end-expiratory pressure titration, prone position, and new extracorporeal membrane oxygenation techniques) in severe ARDS can help improve its prognosis. Revaluation of ARDS patients on the third day of evolution (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), biomarkers and response to infection therapy) allows changes in the initial treatment plans and can help decrease ARDS mortality. PMID:22957224

  17. The Effects of Group Psychoeducational Programme on Attitude toward Mental Illness in Families of Patients with Schizophrenia, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Farnaz; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Hosseinzadeh, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Family members often play a vital role as caregivers in the lives of individuals with schizophrenia. Results of the studies showed that family invironment is the most important determinint of patients outcomes like as quality of life, relapse, adherence. This study aimed to determine the effect of group psychoeducational programme on attitude towards mental illness in families of patients with schizophrenia. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 74 families who have schizophrenic patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards during sampling were selected by convenience sampling method. Then the sample was randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The families of experimental group received 8 continuous 90-minute 3 times a week psychoeducational sessions. Family attitude towards mental illness was measured using the questionnaire of Opinion about Mental Illnesses (OMI) before and after intervention. Data analysis was conducted using ?2 test, independent t-test, and paired t-test on SPSS software version 13. Results: The results showed that majority of the families had negative attitude towards mental illness (88.90%). In addition, the results showed that there was significant difference between different dimensions of attitude towards mental illness before and after psychoeducation in the experimental group. The mean score of families' post-test in the experimental group increased compared to control group 108.86 (14.9), vs. 88.86 (7.5). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that psychoeducation improves family attitude towards mental illness. Training methods like group psych education for the families of mental patients can be effective on their attitudes towards mental illness. PMID:26464841

  18. Evaluation of the pressure ulcers risk scales with critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study 1

    PubMed Central

    Borghardt, Andressa Tomazini; do Prado, Thiago Nascimento; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Rogenski, Noemi Marisa Brunet; Bringuente, Maria Edla de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: to evaluate the accuracy of the Braden and Waterlow risk assessment scales in critically ill inpatients. METHOD: this prospective cohort study, with 55 patients in intensive care units, was performed through evaluation of sociodemographic and clinical variables, through the application of the scales (Braden and Waterlow) upon admission and every 48 hours; and through the evaluation and classification of the ulcers into categories. RESULTS: the pressure ulcer incidence was 30.9%, with the Braden and Waterlow scales presenting high sensitivity (41% and 71%) and low specificity (21% and 47%) respectively in the three evaluations. The cut off scores found in the first, second and third evaluations were 12, 12 and 11 in the Braden scale, and 16, 15 and 14 in the Waterlow scale. CONCLUSION: the Braden scale was shown to be a good screening instrument, and the Waterlow scale proved to have better predictive power. PMID:25806628

  19. Rethinking the patient: using Burden of Treatment Theory to understand the changing dynamics of illness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In this article we outline Burden of Treatment Theory, a new model of the relationship between sick people, their social networks, and healthcare services. Health services face the challenge of growing populations with long-term and life-limiting conditions, they have responded to this by delegating to sick people and their networks routine work aimed at managing symptoms, and at retarding – and sometimes preventing – disease progression. This is the new proactive work of patient-hood for which patients are increasingly accountable: founded on ideas about self-care, self-empowerment, and self-actualization, and on new technologies and treatment modalities which can be shifted from the clinic into the community. These place new demands on sick people, which they may experience as burdens of treatment. Discussion As the burdens accumulate some patients are overwhelmed, and the consequences are likely to be poor healthcare outcomes for individual patients, increasing strain on caregivers, and rising demand and costs of healthcare services. In the face of these challenges we need to better understand the resources that patients draw upon as they respond to the demands of both burdens of illness and burdens of treatment, and the ways that resources interact with healthcare utilization. Summary Burden of Treatment Theory is oriented to understanding how capacity for action interacts with the work that stems from healthcare. Burden of Treatment Theory is a structural model that focuses on the work that patients and their networks do. It thus helps us understand variations in healthcare utilization and adherence in different healthcare settings and clinical contexts. PMID:24969758

  20. Waiting times in the ambulatory sector - the case of chronically Ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims First, the influence of determinants on the waiting times of chronically ill patients in the ambulatory sector is investigated. The determinants are subdivided into four groups: (1) need, (2) socio-economic factors, (3) health system and (4) patient time pressures. Next, the influence of waiting times on the annual number of consultations is examined to assess whether the existing variation in waiting times influences the frequency of medical examinations. The waiting times of chronically ill patients are analysed since regular ambulatory care for this patient group could both improve treatment outcomes and lower costs. Data sources Individual data from the 2010 Representative Survey conducted by the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KBV) together with regional data from the Federal Office of Construction and Regional Planning. Study design This is a retrospective observational study. The dependent variables are waiting times in the ambulatory sector and the number of consultations of General Practitioners (GPs) and specialist physicians in the year 2010. The explanatory variables of interest are ‘need’ and ‘health system’ in the first model and ‘length of waiting times’ in the second. Negative binomial models with random effects are used to estimate the incidence rate ratios of increased waiting times and number of consultations. Subsequently, the models are stratified by urban and rural areas. Results In the pooled regression the factor ‘privately insured’ shortens the waiting time for treatment by a specialist by approximately 28% (about 3 days) in comparison with members of the statutory health insurance system. The category of insurance has no influence on the number of consultations of GPs. In addition, the regression results stratified by urban and rural areas show that in urban areas the factor ‘privately insured’ reduces the waiting time for specialists by approximately 35% (about 3.3 days) while in rural areas there is no evidence of statistical influence. In neither of the models, however, does the waiting time have a documentable effect on the number of consultations in the ambulatory sector. Conclusions In our random sample, characteristics of the health care system have an influence on the waiting time for specialists, but the waiting time has no documentable effect on the number of consultations in the ambulatory sector. In the present analysis this applies to consultations of both GPs and specialists. Nevertheless, it does not rule out the possibility that the length of waiting times might influence the treatment outcomes of certain patient populations. PMID:24020453

  1. The Association Between Comorbid Illness, Colonization Status, and Acute Hospitalization in Patients Receiving Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Verceles, Avelino C; Lechner, Elizabeth J; Halpin, David; Scharf, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Long-term acute care (LTAC) hospitals provide specialized care for survivors of critical illness who require prolonged mechanical ventilation. These chronically ill patients often have multiple comorbidities and are colonized with antibiotic-resistant organisms. We investigated the association of comorbidities and colonization status with outcomes in patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation in an LTAC facility. We hypothesized that comorbidity burden and colonization with multiple drug resistant organisms would be associated with worse clinical outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective, cohort study of 157 mechanically ventilated subjects in an urban LTAC facility admitted from January 2007 to September 2009. Comorbidity burden was documented from pre-admission data using the Charlson Comorbidity Index. Colonization data were obtained from surveillance cultures. Outcomes studied included transfer back to acute care facilities, stay, and ventilator weaning status. RESULTS Within 60 days, 58.6% of subjects were transferred back to an acute care facility. The most common reason for transfer was infection/sepsis (37%). The Charlson Comorbidity Index of subjects transferred to acute care, versus those who were not, was 4.9 ± 3.1 versus 3.6 ± 2.7 (P = .01), an odds ratio of 1.1 for each 1-point increase in Charlson Comorbidity Index (95% CI 1.03–1.71, P = .02). Colonization with acinetobacter was associated with higher incidence of transfer (71% vs 51%, P = .01). The odds ratio for transfer to acute care was 1.3 for each additional organism colonizing a subject (95% CI 1.11–1.53, P = .006). CONCLUSIONS Higher comorbidity burden and colonization status were associated with increased risk of transfer to acute care. Further investigation is needed to clarify this relationship between comorbidity burden and colonization with change in clinical status. PMID:22709565

  2. What really matters in end-of-life discussions? Perspectives of patients in hospital with serious illness and their families

    PubMed Central

    You, John J.; Dodek, Peter; Lamontagne, Francois; Downar, James; Sinuff, Tasnim; Jiang, Xuran; Day, Andrew G.; Heyland, Daren K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The guideline-recommended elements to include in discussions about goals of care with patients with serious illness are mostly based on expert opinion. We sought to identify which elements are most important to patients and their families. Methods: We used a cross-sectional study design involving patients from 9 Canadian hospitals. We asked older adult patients with serious illness and their family members about the occurrence and importance of 11 guideline-recommended elements of goals-of-care discussions. In addition, we assessed concordance between prescribed goals of care and patient preferences, and we measured patient satisfaction with goals-of-care discussions using the Canadian Health Care Evaluation Project (CANHELP) questionnaire. Results: Our study participants included 233 patients (mean age 81.2 yr) and 205 family members (mean age 60.2 yr). Participants reported that clinical teams had addressed individual elements of goals-of-care discussions infrequently (range 1.4%–31.7%). Patients and family members identified the same 5 elements as being the most important to address: preferences for care in the event of life-threatening illness, values, prognosis, fears or concerns, and questions about goals of care. Addressing more elements was associated with both greater concordance between patients’ preferences and prescribed goals of care, and greater patient satisfaction. Interpretation: We identified elements of goals-of-care discussions that are most important to older adult patients in hospital with serious illness and their family members. We found that guideline-recommended elements of goals-of-care discussions are not often addressed by health care providers. Our results can inform interventions to improve the determination of goals of care in the hospital setting. PMID:25367427

  3. [Ophtalmoscopic examination in critically ill non-neutropenic patients: Candida endophtalmitis].

    PubMed

    Pérez Blázquez, Eugenio

    2006-03-01

    Invasive Candida (IC) infection is the most common cause of endogenous endophthalmitis. Ocular candidiasis develops within three days and at least two weeks of fungemia. There are two characteristic ocular signs: Candida chorioretinitis defined as retina and choroid lesions without vitreal involvement, and Candida endophthalmitis defined as chorioretinitis with extension into the vitreous with characteristic fluffy balls. The most common initial visual symptoms are blurred vision and floaters. Amphotericin B, fluconazole and voriconazole are effective in the treatment of chorioretinitis; however, when vitreous is involved vitrectomy seems necessary. Early antifungal systemic treatment at first evidence of infection in patients at risk of IC, appears to decrease dramatically the incidence of endogenous fungal endophthalmitis, probably healing minimal chorioretinal infections. Routine ophthalmoscopic examination seems of little value in patients with positive blood culture, with early implementation of antifungal treatment, without symptoms of ocular infection and without impairment of the level of consciousness during the episode. However, periodic ophthalmoscopic examination should be performed in children with candidemia and critically ill patients with documented deep Candida infection. PMID:16499424

  4. Quality of life and social integration of severely mentally ill patients: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed Central

    Tempier, R; Mercier, C; Leouffre, P; Caron, J

    1997-01-01

    The quality of life concept serves to measure functional changes and program outcome. Patients with schizophrenia have an improved prognosis. Is quality of life improving over time, and if so, over what period? These questions were addressed in a longitudinal study where subjective quality of life (SQOL) was rated by severely mentally ill patients living in the community and using support services located in an outlying area of Quebec. The Satisfaction for Life Domains Scale (SLDS) (Baker and Intagliata 1982) measuring SQOL as a whole and in specific domains (for example, housing, finances, social relationships) was repeated over a period of 7 y. Results show that SQOL ratings received the same scores after 7 y. Functional status was decreased, while social integration improved and more services were used. The results could be due to sample characteristics or to the ambiguity of the SQOL construct. In our opinion, extensive community-based support services may have played a key role in the maintenance of patient's quality of life. PMID:9262047

  5. Person-Centered Psychopathology of Schizophrenia: Building on Karl Jaspers’ Understanding of Patient’s Attitude Toward His Illness

    PubMed Central

    Stanghellini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In this article, building on and extending Jaspers’ concept of the “patient’s attitude toward his illness” we draw attention to the active role that the person, as a self-interpreting agent engaged in a world shared with other persons, has in interacting with his/her basic disorder and in the shaping of psychopathological syndromes. This person-centered approach helps us to see patients as meaning-making entities rather than passive individuals and their attempt at self-understanding as not necessarily pathological and potentially adaptive. We describe 3 contemporary resources for a person-centered psychopathology: dialectical psychopathology, contemporary approaches to the meanings-causes debate, and value-based practice. Each of these provides a theoretical framework and practical resources for understanding the diversity of schizophrenic phenotypes, including symptom presentation, course, and outcome as a consequence of the different ways people with schizophrenia seek to make sense of the basic changes in self and world experiences. A person-centered approach, in building on patients’ individual values and experiences as key aspects of their self-understanding of their psychosis, supports recovery and development of self-management skills. PMID:23314193

  6. Prevalence and impact of late defecation in the critically ill, thermally injured adult patient.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Scott T; Lundy, Jonathan B; Chung, Kevin K; Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Burns, Christopher J; Shields, Beth A; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of late defecation (absence of laxation for more than 6 days after admission) as an indicator of lower-gastrointestinal (GI) tract dysfunction in burn patients. In addition, the authors wanted to determine whether the addition of polyethylene glycol 3350 to the standard bowel regimen led to improvement in markers of lower-GI function and outcomes. The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of patients admitted to the burn intensive care unit during a 26-month period. Inclusion criteria were 20% or more TBSA burn, requirement for mechanical ventilation, and age over 18 years. Of 83 patients included, the prevalence of late defecation was 36.1% (n = 30). There was no association between late defecation and mortality. Patients with late defecation had more frequent episodes of constipation after first defecation (P =.03), of feeding intolerance (P =.007), and received total parenteral nutrition more frequently (P =.005). The addition of polyethylene glycol to the standard bowel regimen did not affect markers of lower-GI function. Late defecation occurs in more than one third of critically ill burn patients. Late defecation was associated with ongoing lower-GI dysfunction, feeding intolerance, and the use of total parenteral nutrition. The causal relationship between these problems has not been determined. A prospective study at the authors' institution is currently planned to attempt to validate late defecation as a marker of lower-GI tract dysfunction, determine its relationship to various outcomes, and determine risk factors for its development. PMID:23877139

  7. Clinical review: Helmet and non-invasive mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) has proved to be an excellent technique in selected critically ill patients with different forms of acute respiratory failure. However, NIV can fail on account of the severity of the disease and technical problems, particularly at the interface. The helmet could be an alternative interface compared to face mask to improve NIV success. We performed a clinical review to investigate the main physiological and clinical studies assessing the efficacy and related issues of NIV delivered with a helmet. A computerized search strategy of MEDLINE/PubMed (January 2000 to May 2012) and EMBASE (January 2000 to May 2012) was conducted limiting the search to retrospective, prospective, nonrandomized and randomized trials. We analyzed 152 studies from which 33 were selected, 12 physiological and 21 clinical (879 patients). The physiological studies showed that NIV with helmet could predispose to CO2 rebreathing and increase the patients' ventilator asynchrony. The main indications for NIV were acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (community-acquired pneumonia, postoperative and immunocompromised patients) and hypercapnic acute respiratory failure. In 9 of the 21 studies the helmet was compared to a face mask during either continous positive airway pressure or pressure support ventilation. In eight studies oxygenation was similar in the two groups, while the intubation rate was similar in four and lower in three studies for the helmet group compared to face mask group. The outcome was similar in six studies. The tolerance was better with the helmet in six of the studies. Although these data are limited, NIV delivered by helmet could be a safe alternative to the face mask in patients with acute respiratory failure. PMID:23680299

  8. Study of multiparameter respiratory pattern complexity in surgical critically ill patients during weaning trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Separation from mechanical ventilation is a difficult task, whereas conventional predictive indices have not been proven accurate enough, so far. A few studies have explored changes of breathing pattern variability for weaning outcome prediction, with conflicting results. In this study, we tried to assess respiratory complexity during weaning trials, using different non-linear methods derived from theory of complex systems, in a cohort of surgical critically ill patients. Results Thirty two patients were enrolled in the study. There were 22 who passed and 10 who failed a weaning trial. Tidal volume and mean inspiratory flow were analyzed for 10 minutes during two phases: 1. pressure support (PS) ventilation (15-20 cm H2O) and 2. weaning trials with PS: 5 cm H2O. Sample entropy (SampEn), detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) exponent, fractal dimension (FD) and largest lyapunov exponents (LLE) of the two respiratory parameters were computed in all patients and during the two phases of PS. Weaning failure patients exhibited significantly decreased respiratory pattern complexity, reflected in reduced sample entropy and lyapunov exponents and increased DFA exponents of respiratory flow time series, compared to weaning success subjects (p < 0.001). In addition, their changes were opposite between the two phases of the weaning trials. A new model including rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI), its product with airway occlusion pressure at 0.1 sec (P0.1), SampEn and LLE predicted better weaning outcome compared with RSBI, P0.1 and RSBI* P0.1 (conventional model, R2 = 0.874 vs 0.643, p < 0.001). Areas under the curve were 0.916 vs 0.831, respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusions We suggest that complexity analysis of respiratory signals can assess inherent breathing pattern dynamics and has increased prognostic impact upon weaning outcome in surgical patients. PMID:21255420

  9. Powerlessness in Terminal Care of Demented Patients: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerlund, Britt Mari; Norberg, Astrid

    1990-01-01

    Interviewed five caregiving nursing staff members involved in dementia care concerning their ambivalent feelings toward spoon-feeding a severely demented patient. Although tube-feeding was regarded as an easier way to provide nourishment, spoon-feeding was preferred because it provided more human contact and love. (Author/NB)

  10. Challenges and Potential Solutions – Individualised Antibiotic Dosing at the Bedside for Critically Ill Patients: a structured review

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jason A.; Aziz, Mohd Hafiz Abdul; Lipman, Jeffrey; Mouton, Johan W.; Vinks, Alexander A.; Felton, Timothy W.; Hope, William W.; Farkas, Andras; Neely, Michael N.; Schentag, Jerome J.; Drusano, George; Frey, Otto R.; Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Kuti, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infections in critically ill patients are associated with persistently poor clinical outcomes. These patients have severely altered and variable antibiotic pharmacokinetics and are infected by less susceptible pathogens. Antibiotic dosing that does not account for these features is likely to result in sub-optimal outcomes. In this paper, we review the patient- and pathogen-related challenges that contribute to inadequate antibiotic dosing and discuss how a process for individualised antibiotic therapy, that increases the accuracy of dosing, can be implemented to further optimise care for the critically ill patient. The process for optimised antibiotic dosing firstly requires determination of the physiological derangements in the patient that can alter antibiotic concentrations including altered fluid status, microvascular failure, serum albumin concentrations as well as altered renal and hepatic function. Secondly, knowledge of the susceptibility of the infecting pathogen should be determined through liaison with the microbiology laboratory. The patient and pathogen challenges can then be solved by combining susceptibility data with measured antibiotic concentration data (where possible) into a clinical dosing software. Such software uses pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) models from critically ill patients to accurately predict the dosing requirements for the individual patient with the aim of optimising antibiotic exposure and maximising effectiveness. PMID:24768475

  11. Access to Mobile Communication Technology and Willingness to Participate in Automated Telemedicine Calls Among Chronically Ill Patients in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Avelares, Milton O.; Milton, Evan C.; Lange, Ilta; Fajardo, Roosevelt

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Patients in underdeveloped countries may be left behind by advances in telehealthcare. We surveyed chronically ill patients with low incomes in Honduras to measure their use of mobile technologies and willingness to participate in mobile disease management support. Materials and Methods: 624 chronically ill primary care patients in Honduras were surveyed. We examined variation in telephone access across groups defined by patients' sociodemographic characteristics, diagnoses, and access to care. Logistic regression was used to identify independent correlates of patients' interest in automated telephonic support for disease management. Results: Participants had limited education (mean 4.8 years), and 65% were unemployed. Eighty-four percent had telephone access, and 78% had cell phones. Most respondents had voicemail (61%) and text messaging (58%). Mobile technologies were particularly common among patients who had to forego clinic visits and medications due to cost concerns (each p?patients (>80%) reported that they would be willing to receive automated calls focused on appointment reminders, medication adherence, health status monitoring, and self-care education. Patients were more likely to be willing to participate in automated telemedicine services if they had to cancel a clinic appointment due to transportation problems or forego medication due to cost pressures. Conclusions: Even in this poor region of Honduras, most chronically ill patients have access to mobile technology, and most are willing to participate in automated telephone disease management support. Given barriers to in-person care, new models of mobile healthcare should be developed for chronically ill patients in developing countries. PMID:21062234

  12. Combined Intravenous and Intraventricular Administration of Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients with Central Nervous System Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ziaka, Mairi; Markantonis, Sophia L.; Fousteri, Marizoza; Zygoulis, Paris; Panidis, Dimitris; Karvouniaris, Marios; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2013-01-01

    Colistin pharmacokinetics were prospectively studied after intravenous administration of colistin methanesulphonate in critically ill patients without central nervous system infection (controls, n = 5) and in patients with external ventricular drain-associated ventriculitis after intravenous administration (EVDViv, n = 3) or combined intravenous/intraventricular administration (EVDVcomb, n = 4). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum colistin concentration ratios were higher in EVDViv than in control patients (11% versus 7%, P ? 0.05) and in EVDVcomb compared to all other patients (P < 0.0001). CSF colistin concentrations above the MIC of 0.5 ?g/ml were achieved only in EVDVcomb patients. PMID:23335739

  13. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury. PMID:25607268

  14. Illness perception and fibromyalgia impact on female patients from Spain and the Netherlands: do cultural differences exist?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Montero, Pedro J; Van Wilgen, C Paul; Segura-Jiménez, Victor; Carbonell-Baeza, Ana; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in illness perception and overall impact on fibromyalgia females from Spain and the Netherlands. A total of 325 fibromyalgia females from Spain (54.3 ± 7.1 years) and the Netherlands (51.8 ± 7.2 years) participated in the study. Illness perception and impact of fibromyalgia were assessed by the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, respectively. Spanish fibromyalgia females perceived more symptoms related to their fibromyalgia (identity) such as nausea, breathlessness, wheezing or fatigue (P < 0.001) and had greater emotional representation (P < 0.01). Dutch fibromyalgia females experienced less timeline (acute/chronic) and consequences (all, P < 0.05), had a better cyclical timeline, personal control, treatment control and illness coherence (all, P < 0.001). Spanish fibromyalgia females reported higher impact of fibromyalgia than Dutch females (61.2 + 14.8 vs. 54.9 + 16.4, respectively; P < 0.001), but the effect size was small (Cohen's d = 0.41) . Impact of fibromyalgia and negative views of fibromyalgia were higher in Spanish fibromyalgia females, whereas Dutch fibromyalgia females presented higher score of positive beliefs about the controllability of the illness. Psychological interventions which help patients to cope with their illness perception might lead to an improvement of the impact of the disease on fibromyalgia females. PMID:25969339

  15. Prediction scores do not correlate with clinically adjudicated categories of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Katsios, CM; Donadini, M; Meade, M; Mehta, S; Hall, R; Granton, J; Kutsiogiannis, J; Dodek, P; Heels-Ansdell, D; McIntyre, L; Vlahakis, N; Muscedere, J; Friedrich, J; Fowler, R; Skrobik, Y; Albert, M; Cox, M; Klinger, J; Nates, J; Bersten, A; Doig, C; Zytaruk, N; Crowther, M; Cook, DJ

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction scores for pretest probability of pulmonary embolism (PE) validated in outpatient settings are occasionally used in the intensive care unit (ICU). OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the correlation of Geneva and Wells scores with adjudicated categories of PE in ICU patients. METHODS: In a randomized trial of thromboprophylaxis, patients with suspected PE were adjudicated as possible, probable or definite PE. Data were then retrospectively abstracted for the Geneva Diagnostic PE score, Wells, Modified Wells and Simplified Wells Diagnostic scores. The chance-corrected agreement between adjudicated categories and each score was calculated. ANOVA was used to compare values across the three adjudicated PE categories. RESULTS: Among 70 patients with suspected PE, agreement was poor between adjudicated categories and Geneva pretest probabilities (kappa 0.01 [95% CI ?0.0643 to 0.0941]) or Wells pretest probabilities (kappa ?0.03 [95% CI ?0.1462 to 0.0914]). Among four possible, 16 probable and 50 definite PEs, there were no significant differences in Geneva scores (possible = 4.0, probable = 4.7, definite = 4.5; P=0.90), Wells scores (possible = 2.8, probable = 4.9, definite = 4.1; P=0.37), Modified Wells (possible = 2.0, probable = 3.4, definite = 2.9; P=0.34) or Simplified Wells (possible = 1.8, probable = 2.8, definite = 2.4; P=0.30). CONCLUSIONS: Pretest probability scores developed outside the ICU do not correlate with adjudicated PE categories in critically ill patients. Research is needed to develop prediction scores for this population. PMID:24083302

  16. Physical Activity on Medical Prescription: A Qualitative Study of Factors Influencing Take-Up and Adherence in Chronically Ill Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparini, William; Knobé, Sandrine; Didierjean, Romaine

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to determine the effects of an innovative public health programme offering physical and sports activities on medical prescription to chronically ill patients. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with programme participants at two time points: at the start of their activity (n?=?33) and 3?months after the…

  17. High Seroprevalence of Antibodies against Spotted Fever and Scrub Typhus Bacteria in Patients with Febrile Illness, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Thiga, Jacqueline W.; Mutai, Beth K.; Eyako, Wurapa K.; Ng’ang’a, Zipporah; Jiang, Ju; Richards, Allen L.

    2015-01-01

    Serum samples from patients in Kenya with febrile illnesses were screened for antibodies against bacteria that cause spotted fever, typhus, and scrub typhus. Seroprevalence was 10% for spotted fever group, <1% for typhus group, and 5% for scrub typhus group. Results should help clinicians expand their list of differential diagnoses for undifferentiated fevers. PMID:25811219

  18. Promotora assisted depression care among predominately Hispanic patients with concurrent chronic illness: Public care system clinical trial design.

    PubMed

    Ell, Kathleen; Aranda, María P; Wu, Shinyi; Oh, Hyunsung; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Guterman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Depression frequently negatively affects patient overall self-care and social stress management within United States safety net care systems. Rates of major depression are significantly high among low-income predominantly Hispanic/Latino with chronic illness, such as diabetes and heart disease. The study design of the A Helping Hand to Activate Patient-Centered Depression Care among Low-income Patients (AHH) randomized clinical trial aims to enhance patient depression care receipt and overall bio-psychosocial self-care management. The AHH trial is conducted in collaboration with three Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (DHS) safety net clinics that provide Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care. The study compares AHH intervention (AHH) in which community-based bilingual promotoras provide in-person or telephone patient engagement and intervention aimed to reduce the burden and strain on patients, families, and care providers by assessing, enhancing, and facilitating patient depression and co-morbid illness self-care management skill, and activating patient communication with clinic medical providers versus DHS PCMH team usual care (PCMHUC). AHH independent bilingual recruiters screened 1957 and enrolled 348 predominantly Hispanic/Latino patients, of whom 296 (85%) had diabetes, 14 (4%) with heart disease, and 38 (11%) with both diseases. Recruiters identified depressed patients by baseline Patient Health Questionnaire-9 scores of 10 or more, completed baseline assessments, and randomized patients to either AHH or PCMHUC study group. The comprehensive assessments will be repeated at 6 and 12months by an independent bilingual follow-up interviewer. Baseline and outcome data include mental health assessment and treatment receipt, co-morbid illness self-care, social relationships, and environmental stressor assessments. PMID:26600285

  19. International recommendations for glucose control in adult non diabetic critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this research is to provide recommendations for the management of glycemic control in critically ill patients. Methods Twenty-one experts issued recommendations related to one of the five pre-defined categories (glucose target, hypoglycemia, carbohydrate intake, monitoring of glycemia, algorithms and protocols), that were scored on a scale to obtain a strong or weak agreement. The GRADE (Grade of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system was used, with a strong recommendation indicating a clear advantage for an intervention and a weak recommendation indicating that the balance between desirable and undesirable effects of an intervention is not clearly defined. Results A glucose target of less than 10 mmol/L is strongly suggested, using intravenous insulin following a standard protocol, when spontaneous food intake is not possible. Definition of the severe hypoglycemia threshold of 2.2 mmol/L is recommended, regardless of the clinical signs. A general, unique amount of glucose (enteral/parenteral) to administer for any patient cannot be suggested. Glucose measurements should be performed on arterial rather than venous or capillary samples, using central lab or blood gas analysers rather than point-of-care glucose readers. Conclusions Thirty recommendations were obtained with a strong (21) and a weak (9) agreement. Among them, only 15 were graded with a high level of quality of evidence, underlying the necessity to continue clinical studies in order to improve the risk-to-benefit ratio of glucose control. PMID:20840773

  20. Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) in Type 2 Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Aung, Eindra; Ostini, Remo; Dower, Jo; Donald, Maria; Coll, Joseph R; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A R

    2014-11-01

    The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) was designed to measure care congruent with several elements of the chronic care model (CCM), including self-management support and delivery system design. However, support for the a priori 5-subscale structure of the PACIC in previous research has been conflicting. Thus, we aim to investigate psychometric characteristics of the PACIC including the content and stability of its construct over time. A population-based prospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes was conducted in Queensland, Australia, from 2008 (N = 3,761) to 2010 (N = 3,040). Participants completed annually the 20-item PACIC as well as measures of providers' adherence to guideline-recommended self-management support activities. We used exploratory factor analysis to determine its factor structure and examined internal consistency as well as agreement between the PACIC at baseline with repeated measurements at follow-up after 1 and 2 years. We also determined a criterion-related validity using multinomial logistic regression to explore PACIC's association with providers' self-management support. A one-factor structure was deemed optimal according to our findings. High internal consistency and moderate agreement within the scales over time were observed. Higher PACIC scores predicted better providers' self-management support. In conclusion, the PACIC is a reliable, valid, and reproducible instrument for assessment of diabetes care, and we recommend its promotion and use as a single scale rather than subscales as originally proposed. PMID:25380699

  1. The experience of communication difficulties in critically ill patients in and beyond intensive care: Findings from a larger phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Tembo, Agness C; Higgins, Isabel; Parker, Vicki

    2015-06-01

    Communication difficulties in intensive care units (ICU) with critically ill patients have been well documented for more than three decades. However, there is only a paucity of literature that has explored communication difficulties beyond the ICU environment. This paper discusses the experience of communication difficulties in critically ill patients in ICU and beyond as part of findings from a larger study that explored the lived experiences of critically ill patients in ICU in the context of daily sedation interruption (DSI). The aim of the study was to describe the lived experience of people who experienced critical illness in ICU using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach in the DSI context. Twelve participants aged between 20 and 76 years with an ICU stay ranging from 3 to 36 days were recruited from a 16 bed ICU in a large regional referral hospital in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Participants were intubated, mechanically ventilated and subjected to (DSI) during their critical illness in ICU. In-depth face to face interviews with participants were conducted at two weeks after discharge from ICU and at six to eleven months later. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Thematic analysis using van Manen's (1990) method was completed. The overarching theme; 'Being in limbo' and subthemes 'Being disrupted'; 'Being imprisoned' and 'Being trapped' depict the main elements of the experience. This paper discusses communication difficulties in critically ill patients as one of the main findings relating to the theme 'Being trapped'. Participants' reports of communication difficulties in ICU are similar to those reported by patients in other studies where DSI was not used. However, not many studies have reported ongoing communication difficulties after ICU hospitalisation. Recommendations are made for new models of care and support to mitigate critically ill patients' communication concerns in ICU and for further research into the causes and treatment to benefit this group of patients. Most importantly, extra care is recommended not to damage vocal cords during intubation and cuff inflation in the course of mechanical ventilation. PMID:25486970

  2. Predicting Premature Termination within a Randomized Controlled Trial for Binge-Eating Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluckiger, Christoph; Meyer, Andrea; Wampold, Bruce E.; Gassmann, Daniel; Messerli-Burgy, Nadine; Munsch, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the dropout rates of efficacious forms of psychotherapy for patients with binge eating disorder (BED) is an unsolved problem within this increasing population. Up until now the role of psychotherapy process characteristics as predictors of premature termination has not been investigated in the BED literature. Within a randomized…

  3. The Adolescent with a Life-Threatening Illness: Cultural Myths and Social Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nannis, Ellen D.; And Others

    This paper discusses the attitudes of terminally ill adolescent patients towards their illness and their behaviors during their treatment. Preliminary results are reported on an ongoing study of 12 boys and six girls (age 8-21) with metastatic pediatric solid tumors and lymphomas that failed to respond to conventional treatment. Interviews of…

  4. Outcome of postoperative critically ill patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: an observational retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Gettings, Elise M; Brush, Kathryn A; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Hurford, William E

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is described as a decrease in platelet count associated with heparin administration and is an immune-mediated adverse drug reaction that can cause both arterial and venous thromboses. It can be a life-threatening complication of heparin exposure. Little data concerning incidence, predisposing factors, or outcome in critically ill surgical patients are available. Methods All critically ill, postoperative patients admitted between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2001, to a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) who tested positive by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the HIT antibody (HPIA; Diagnostica Stago, Inc., Parsippany, NJ, USA) were identified. Patient risk factors and outcomes were abstracted retrospectively from the medical record and compared with those from control patients matched for age, gender, diagnosis, severity of illness, and date of SICU admission. Results Two hundred and ten patients out of 2,046 patients (10%) admitted to the SICU had HIT assays performed. Nineteen patients (0.9% of admissions; 9% of tested individuals) had positive tests. HIT-antibody-positive patients, compared with 19 matched controls, had an increased risk of death or major thrombotic complications (37% versus 10%; P < 0.05) and prolonged length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay (20 days versus 10 days; P < 0.05). Exposure to heparin via intravascular flushes alone was sufficient to generate HIT antibodies in 12 of 19 (63%) patients. Five patients received platelet transfusions after the diagnosis of HIT was known; four of these patients died. Conclusion Heparin flushes were the most common cause of HIT in this study. HIT-antibody-positive patients had an increased risk of death or major complications and a prolonged length of ICU stay. Platelet transfusions often were administered despite a positive HIT test result and were associated with a high mortality rate. Treatment algorithms that minimize exposure to heparin and contraindicate platelet transfusions merit further study. PMID:17109753

  5. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  6. High dose tigecycline in critically ill patients with severe infections due to multidrug-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The high incidence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria among patients admitted to ICUs has determined an increase of tigecycline (TGC) use for the treatment of severe infections. Many concerns have been raised about the efficacy of this molecule and increased dosages have been proposed. Our purpose is to investigate TGC safety and efficacy at higher than standard doses. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of prospectively collected data in the ICU of a teaching hospital in Rome. Data from all patients treated with TGC for a microbiologically confirmed infection were analyzed. The safety profile and efficacy of high dosing regimen use were investigated. Results Over the study period, 54 patients (pts) received TGC at a standard dose (SD group: 50 mg every 12 hours) and 46 at a high dose (HD group: 100 mg every 12 hours). Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter.baumannii (blaOXA-58 and blaOXA-23 genes) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (blaKPC-3 gene) were the main isolated pathogens (n?=?79). There were no patients requiring TGC discontinuation or dose reduction because of adverse events. In the ventilation-associated pneumonia population (VAP) subgroup (63 patients: 30 received SD and 33 HD), the only independent predictor of clinical cure was the use of high tigecycline dose (odds ratio (OR) 6.25; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.59 to 24.57; P?=?0.009) whilst initial inadequate antimicrobial treatment (IIAT) (OR 0.18; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.68; P?=?0.01) and higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (OR 0.66; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.87; P?=?0.003) were independently associated with clinical failure. Conclusions TGC was well tolerated at a higher than standard dose in a cohort of critically ill patients with severe infections. In the VAP subgroup the high-dose regimen was associated with better outcomes than conventional administration due to Gram-negative MDR bacteria. PMID:24887101

  7. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly imperative in certain clinical situations characterized by hypoalbuminemia (e.g., burn patients). PMID:21194458

  8. Population pharmacokinetics and dose simulation of vancomycin in critically ill patients during high-volume haemofiltration.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Leslie; Andresen, Max; Downey, Patricio; Gai, Maria Nella; Regueira, Tomás; Bórquez, Tamara; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to describe the population pharmacokinetics of vancomycin in critically ill patients with refractory septic shock undergoing continuous venovenous high-volume haemofiltration (HVHF) and to define appropriate dosing for these patients. This was a prospective pharmacokinetic study in the ICU of a university hospital. Eight blood samples were taken over one vancomycin dosing interval. Samples were analysed by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Non-linear mixed-effects modelling was used to describe the population pharmacokinetics. Dosing simulations were used to define therapeutic vancomycin doses for different HVHF settings. Nine patients were included (five male). The mean weight and SOFA score were 70 kg and 11, respectively. Mean HVHF settings were: blood flow rate, 240 mL/min; and haemofiltration exchange rate, 100 mL/kg/h. A linear two-compartment model with zero-order input adequately described the data. Mean parameter estimates were: clearance, 2.9 L/h; volume of distribution of central compartment (V(1)), 11.8L; volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V(2)), 18.0 L; and intercompartmental clearance, 9.3 L/h. HVHF intensity was strongly associated with vancomycin clearance (P < 0.05) and was a covariate in the final model. Simulations indicate that after a loading dose, vancomycin doses required for different HVHF intensities would be 750 mg every 12h (q12h) for 69 mL/kg/h, 1000 mg q12h for 100 mL/kg/h and 1500 mg q12h for 123 mL/kg/h. Continuous infusion would also be a valuable administration strategy. In conclusion, variable and much higher than standard vancomycin doses are required to achieve therapeutic concentrations during different HVHF settings. PMID:24837847

  9. Risk Factors for the First Episode of Klebsiella pneumoniae Resistant to Carbapenems Infection in Critically Ill Patients: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mantzarlis, Konstantinos; Makris, Demosthenes; Manoulakas, Efstratios; Karvouniaris, Marios; Zakynthinos, Epaminondas

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To identify risk factors for the first episode of Klebsiella Pneumonia resistant to carbapenems (KPRC) infection in critically ill patients. Design, Setting, and Methods. This prospective cohort study was conducted in a 12-bed general Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in a University Hospital on ICU patients who required mechanical ventilation (MV) for >48 hours during a 12-month period. Clinical and microbiologic data were studied. Characteristics of KPRC patients were compared with those of critically ill patients who presented nonmultidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections or no documented infection at all. Results. Twenty-five patients presented KPRC infection, 18 presented non-MDR bacterial infection, and 39 patients presented no infection. Compared to patients without documented infection or infected by non MDR bacteria, patients with KPRC infection had received more frequently or for longer duration antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria (carbapenems, colistin P < 0.05). Duration of colistin administration prior to KPRC isolation was independently associated with increased frequency of KPRC infection (odds ratio, 1.156 per day; 95% confidence interval, 1.010 to 1.312; P = 0.025). KPRC patients stayed longer in the ICU and received mechanical ventilation and sedation for longer periods and presented increased mortality (P < 0.05). Conclusion. KPRC infection is an emerging problem which might be more common in patients with previous use of antibiotics and especially colistin. PMID:24455733

  10. Surgical treatments for patients with terminal heart failure: mechanical support compared with transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis P

    2014-12-01

    Heart transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for patients with terminal end-stage heart failure. Although results reported have been excellent, older recipients and donors associated with significant comorbidities are now the rule rather than the exception. Moreover, heart failure has become a significant public health problem with a growing population of patients in countries unable to answer the demand for transplantation. An emerging answer to this dilemma comes from results reported with the use of continuous flow pumps where patient survival approaches 80% one and 2 years after implantation in selected patients. Is it time to triage patients to continuous flow pumps? Should we recommend continuous flow pump implantations in patients with various comorbidities, and offer transplantation to a selected group of patients who will reach the long-term benefit of the procedure? PMID:25284807

  11. Mental Illness, Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Multiple Disabilities...Whose Patient, Whose Treatment Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciacca, Kathleen

    This paper reviews issues in the provision of services to individuals who are mentally ill chemical abusers and addicted (MICAA). Introductory material defines this population and notes that these people are frequently ineligible for services aimed at either mental illness or chemical abuse alone. Service provisions within the psychiatric/mental…

  12. Albumin concentration significantly impacts on free teicoplanin plasma concentrations in non-critically ill patients with chronic bone sepsis.

    PubMed

    Brink, A J; Richards, G A; Lautenbach, E E G; Rapeport, N; Schillack, V; van Niekerk, L; Lipman, J; Roberts, J A

    2015-06-01

    The impact of decreased serum albumin concentrations on free antibiotic concentrations in non-critically ill patients is poorly described. This study aimed to describe the pharmacokinetics of a high-dose regimen of teicoplanin, a highly protein-bound antibiotic, in non-critically ill patients with hypoalbuminaemia. Ten patients with chronic bone sepsis and decreased serum albumin concentrations (<35 g/L) receiving teicoplanin 12 mg/kg 12-hourly intravenously for 48 h followed by 12 mg/kg once daily were enrolled. Surgical debridement was performed on Day 3. Samples of venous blood were collected pre-infusion and post-infusion during the first 4 days of therapy. Total and free teicoplanin concentrations were assayed using validated chromatographic methods. The median serum albumin concentration for the cohort was 18 (IQR 15-24) g/L. After 48 h, the median (IQR) free trough (fC(min)) and total trough (tC(min)) concentrations were 2.90 (2.67-3.47) mg/L and 15.54 (10.28-19.12) mg/L, respectively, although trough concentrations declined thereafter. Clearance of the free concentrations was significantly high relative to the total fraction at 38.6 (IQR 29.9-47.8) L/h and 7.0 (IQR 6.8-9.8) L/h, respectively (P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that whereas total teicoplanin concentration did not impact on free concentrations (P=0.174), albumin concentration did (P<0.001). This study confirms the significant impact of hypoalbuminaemia on free concentrations of teicoplanin in non-critically ill patients, similar to that in critically ill patients. Furthermore, the poor correlation with total teicoplanin concentration suggests that therapeutic drug monitoring of free concentrations should be used in these patients. PMID:25819167

  13. Interprofessional Communication Skills Training for Serious Illness: Evaluation of a Small-Group, Simulated Patient Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Alison M.; Engelberg, Ruth A.; Back, Anthony L.; Ford, Dee W.; Downey, Lois; Shannon, Sarah E.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Edlund, Barbara; Christianson, Phyllis; Arnold, Richard W.; O'Connor, Kim; Kross, Erin K.; Reinke, Lynn F.; Cecere Feemster, Laura; Fryer-Edwards, Kelly; Alexander, Stewart C.; Tulsky, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Communication with patients and families is an essential component of high-quality care in serious illness. Small-group skills training can result in new communication behaviors, but past studies have used facilitators with extensive experience, raising concerns this is not scalable. Objective: The objective was to investigate the effect of an experiential communication skills building workshop (Codetalk), led by newly trained facilitators, on internal medicine trainees' and nurse practitioner students' ability to communicate bad news and express empathy. Design: Trainees participated in Codetalk; skill improvement was evaluated through pre- and post- standardized patient (SP) encounters. Setting and subjects: The subjects were internal medicine residents and nurse practitioner students at two universities. Intervention and measurements: The study was carried out in anywhere from five to eight half-day sessions over a month. The first and last sessions included audiotaped trainee SP encounters coded for effective communication behaviors. The primary outcome was change in communication scores from pre-intervention to post-intervention. We also measured trainee characteristics to identify predictors of performance and change in performance over time. Results: We enrolled 145 trainees who completed pre- and post-intervention SP interviews—with participation rates of 52% for physicians and 14% for nurse practitioners. Trainees' scores improved in 8 of 11 coded behaviors (p<0.05). The only significant predictors of performance were having participated in the intervention (p<0.001) and study site (p<0.003). The only predictor of improvement in performance over time was participating in the intervention (p<0.001). Conclusions: A communication skills intervention using newly trained facilitators was associated with improvement in trainees' skills in giving bad news and expressing empathy. Improvement in communication skills did not vary by trainee characteristics. PMID:24180700

  14. Quality of life as medicine: a pilot study of patients with chronic illness and pain.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav; Anderson, Niels Jørgen

    2003-06-16

    An intensive 5-day quality-of-life (QoL) session was constructed based on a psychosomatic model. The session was comprised of teaching on philosophy of life, psychotherapy, and body therapy. The three elements were put together in such a way that they mutually supported each other. The synergy attained was considerable. The pilot study demonstrated that in the course of only 1 week, patients had time to revise essential life-denying views and to integrate important, unfinished life events involving negative feelings. Consequently, the patients became more present in the body's blocked-off areas and subjectively healthier. Nineteen persons with chronic illness and pain (fibromyalgia, chronic tiredness, whiplash, mild depression, and problems involving pain in arms and legs including osteoarthritis), and unemployed for 5-7 years attended the course. In the week before and after the 5-day course, the participants completed the validated SEQOL (Self-Evaluation of Quality of Life Questionnaire) including questions on self-evaluated health and the unvalidated "Self-Evaluation of Working-Life Quality Questionnaire" (SEQWL). This pilot study was without a control group or clinical control. As far as diagnoses were concerned, the group was inhomogeneous. Common for the group was a low QoL, poor quality of working life QWL, and numerous health problems. The study showed an 11.2% improvement in QoL (p < 0.05), a 6.3% improvement in QWL (p < 0.05), and a 12.0% improvement in self-perceived physical health (p = 0.08). There was a 17.3% improvement in self-perceived psychological health (p < 0.05) and satisfaction with health in general improved by 21.4% (p < 0.05). Symptoms like pain were almost halved and several of the participants were free of pain for the first time in years. In conclusion it seemed that the combination of training in philosophy of life, psychotherapy, and body therapy can give patients a large, fast, and efficient improvement in QoL, QWL, and health. It is not known if these changes will be permanent and if all kinds of patients with different health problems will gain from this cure. Further research should be conducted. PMID:12847301

  15. Economics of dialysis dependence following renal replacement therapy for critically ill acute kidney injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Ethgen, Olivier; Schneider, Antoine G.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The obective of this study was to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing intermittent with continuous renal replacement therapy (IRRT versus CRRT) as initial therapy for acute kidney injury (AKI) in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods Assuming some patients would potentially be eligible for either modality, we modeled life year gained, the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and healthcare costs for a cohort of 1000 IRRT patients and a cohort of 1000 CRRT patients. We used a 1-year, 5-year and a lifetime horizon. A Markov model with two health states for AKI survivors was designed: dialysis dependence and dialysis independence. We applied Weibull regression from published estimates to fit survival curves for CRRT and IRRT patients and to fit the proportion of dialysis dependence among CRRT and IRRT survivors. We then applied a risk ratio reported in a large retrospective cohort study to the fitted CRRT estimates in order to determine the proportion of dialysis dependence for IRRT survivors. We conducted sensitivity analyses based on a range of differences for daily implementation cost between CRRT and IRRT (base case: CRRT day $632 more expensive than IRRT day; range from $200 to $1000) and a range of risk ratios for dialysis dependence for CRRT as compared with IRRT (from 0.65 to 0.95; base case: 0.80). Results Continuous renal replacement therapy was associated with a marginally greater gain in QALY as compared with IRRT (1.093 versus 1.078). Despite higher upfront costs for CRRT in the ICU ($4046 for CRRT versus $1423 for IRRT in average), the 5-year total cost including the cost of dialysis dependence was lower for CRRT ($37 780 for CRRT versus $39 448 for IRRT on average). The base case incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that CRRT dominated IRRT. This dominance was confirmed by extensive sensitivity analysis. Conclusions Initial CRRT is cost-effective compared with initial IRRT by reducing the rate of long-term dialysis dependence among critically ill AKI survivors. PMID:25326472

  16. Is Admission Serum Sodium Concentration a Clinical Predictor for the Outcome of Therapy in Critically Ill Poisoned Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi-Mood, Nastaran; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Hosseini, Hossein; Soltaninejad, Forough; Massoumi, Gholamreza; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Yaraghi, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disorders of serum sodium concentration are some of the most electrolyte abnormalities in the intensive care unit (ICU) patients. These disorders adversely affect the function of vital organs and are associated with increased hospital mortality. Purpose: In the present study we aimed to evaluate the effects of serum sodium concentration abnormalities at the time of hospital admission on the clinical outcome of therapy in a cohort of critically ill poisoned patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 184 critically ill poisoned patients aged >18 years and in the first 8 hours of their poisoning, hospitalized in the ICU of a tertiary care university hospital (Isfahan, Iran) between 2010-2012, were evaluated at the admission time and 24 hours later for serum sodium concentration abnormalities and its relationship with age, gender, consciousness status, ingested drugs and clinical outcome of therapy. The clinical outcome was considered as recovery and mortality. Logistic Regression analysis was performed for predictive variables including serum sodium concentration abnormalities in patients’ clinical outcome. Findings: On admission, 152 patients (82.6%) were eunatremic, 21 patients (11.4%) were hyponatremic and 11 patients (6%) were hypernatremic. In the second day eunatremia, hyponatremia and hypernatremia was observed in 84.4%, 13% and 2.2% respectively. Age (OR=1.92; CI=1.18-3.12) and severity of toxicity (OR=1.32; CI=1.12-2.41) were predicting factors of mortality in ICU poisoning patients. Conclusions: Serum sodium concentration abnormalities are prevalent in critically ill poisoned patient but do not seem to have a predictive value for the clinical outcome of therapy. PMID:26543310

  17. [Sharing information of urological cancer patient in terminal stage using Cybozulive® for home medical care].

    PubMed

    Yumura, Yasushi; Hattori, Yusuke; Gobara, Ayako; Takamoto, Daiji; Yasuda, Kengo; Nakamura, Masafumi; Noguchi, Kazumi; Asahina, Kan; Kamijo, Takeo

    2014-09-01

    It is very important to share patient information because home patient care involves several different specialties of care. We introduced Cybozulive ® , a cloud-based free groupware, for 14 terminal-stage patients with urological cancer to share information among doctors and co-medical staff. This system enables access to patient information regardless of time and place. Of the 14 patients (mean age 74.4 years), 11 died of cancer. The average period in which Cybozulive® was used for the patients was 210 days. The average number of entries to the electronic bulletin board in this period was 88.4. We were able to obtain more information about the patients from the website. There was no difference in the average number of times that the patient consulted the out patient clinic before and after the introduction of Cybozulive® (before 7.0 ; after 6.3). After introduction of this system, eleven patients were hospitalized in our department 21 times. Eighteen of these 21 times, since we had acquired patient information from the website beforehand, there was a quick response for management of the emergency admission. This system could be used to construct a network for home care and may be helpful for sharing patient information in homecare. PMID:25293794

  18. [Effect of increasing protein ingestion on the nitrogen balance of mechanically ventilated critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition].

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, A; Verbeek, M J; Schreurs, V V; Akkermans, L M; Vos, A

    1993-01-01

    The amount of protein recommended to minimise N loss in critically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) varies in the literature. Therefore, we studied the effect of increased protein intake on the N balance, administering TPN with either 1.2 g protein/kg/day (low N diet) or 1.8 g protein/kg/day (high N diet). Fifteen mechanically ventilated critically ill patients were studied in a surgical intensive care unit. After at least two days of standard TPN, patients were randomly assigned to either the low or the high N diet. Ten patients were studied on the low N diet and 11 on the high N diet; 6 patients were studied on both diets. Nonprotein energy was supplied according to estimated energy requirements. For five consecutive days, the N balance was measured daily. Total urinary nitrogen (TUN) was analysed using the Kjeldahl method. There was no difference in N balance between the groups. On the low N diet, N balance was -0.113 +/- 0.088 and on the high N diet -0.113 +/- 0.109 g N/kg/day. In patients studied twice, N balance was -0.087 +/- 0.054 and -0.050 +/- 0.060 g N/kd/day respectively. Results of a previous pilot study showed that in 20 similar patients the N balance became 80% less negative (from -5.7 +/- 5.1 to -1.1 +/- 8.2 g N/day) when protein intake was increased from 0.9 to 1.5 g/kg/day. Since these results are consistent with other studies, we conclude that the optimal range of protein supply in this type of critically ill patients is approximately 1.1-1.5 g protein/kg/day. PMID:8334179

  19. Isolation of Aspergillus spp. from the respiratory tract in critically ill patients: risk factors, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Garnacho-Montero, José; Amaya-Villar, Rosario; Ortiz-Leyba, Carlos; León, Cristóbal; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Nolla-Salas, Juan; Iruretagoyena, José R; Barcenilla, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Our aims were to assess risk factors, clinical features, management and outcomes in critically ill patients in whom Aspergillus spp. were isolated from respiratory secretions, using a database from a study designed to assess fungal infections. Methods A multicentre prospective study was conducted over a 9-month period in 73 intensive care units (ICUs) and included patients with an ICU stay longer than 7 days. Tracheal aspirate and urine samples, and oropharyngeal and gastric swabs were collected and cultured each week. On admission to the ICU and at the initiation of antifungal therapy, the severity of illness was evaluated using the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. Retrospectively, isolation of Aspergillus spp. was considered to reflect colonization if the patient did not fulfil criteria for pneumonia, and infection if the patient met criteria for pulmonary infection and if the clinician in charge considered the isolation to be clinically valuable. Risk factors, antifungal use and duration of therapy were noted. Results Out of a total of 1756 patients, Aspergillus spp. were recovered in 36. Treatment with steroids (odds ratio = 4.5) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio = 2.9) were significantly associated with Aspergillus spp. isolation in multivariate analysis. In 14 patients isolation of Aspergillus spp. was interpreted as colonization, in 20 it was interpreted as invasive aspergillosis, and two cases were not classified. The mortality rates were 50% in the colonization group and 80% in the invasive infection group. Autopsy was performed in five patients with clinically suspected infection and confirmed the diagnosis in all of these cases. Conclusion In critically ill patients, treatment should be considered if features of pulmonary infection are present and Aspergillus spp. are isolated from respiratory secretions. PMID:15987390

  20. Microsoft Word - illness_representations.doc

    Cancer.gov

    Illness Representations Michael A. Diefenbach, Ph.D. General Description and Theoretical Background Illness representations are patients’ beliefs and expectations about an illness or somatic symptom. Illness representations are central to Leventhal’s

  1. Patient and prisoner experiences : major mental illness and masculinity in the context of violent offending behaviour 

    E-print Network

    Haddow, Christine

    2013-11-26

    Traditional understandings of violence by the mentally disordered largely look to mental illness to explain such behaviour. More recently, research has begun to examine the role of alternative factors in driving violent ...

  2. Risk Models of Operative Morbidities in 16,930 Critically Ill Surgical Patients Based on a Japanese Nationwide Database

    PubMed Central

    Saze, Zenichiro; Miyata, Hiroaki; Konno, Hiroyuki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Anazawa, Takayuki; Tomotaki, Ai; Wakabayashi, Go; Mori, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to evaluate preoperative variables predictive of lethal morbidities in critically ill surgical patients at a national level. There is no report of risk stratification for morbidities associated with mortality in critically ill patients with acute diffuse peritonitis (ADP). We examined data from 16,930 patients operated during 2011 and 2012 in 1546 different hospitals for ADP identified in the National Clinical Database of Japan. We analyzed morbidities significantly associated with operative mortality. Based on 80% of the population, we calculated independent predictors for these morbidities. The risk factors were validated using the remaining 20%. The operative mortality was 14.1%. Morbidity of any grade occurred in 40.2% of patients. Morbidities correlated with mortality, including septic shock, progressive renal insufficiency, prolonged ventilation >48 hours, systemic sepsis, central nervous system (CNS) morbidities, acute renal failure and pneumonia, and surgical site infection (SSI), were selected for risk models. A total of 18 to 29 preoperative variables were selected per morbidity and yielded excellent C-indices for each (septic shock: 0.851; progressive renal insufficiency: 0.878; prolonged ventilation >48?h: 0.849; systemic sepsis: 0.839; CNS morbidities: 0.848; acute renal failure: 0.868; pneumonia: 0.830; and SSI: 0.688). We report the first risk stratification study on lethal morbidities in critically ill patients with ADP using a nationwide surgical database. These risk models will contribute to patient counseling and help predict which patients require more aggressive surgical and novel pharmacological interventions. PMID:26222854

  3. Clinical performance of the Sofia™ Influenza A+B FIA in adult patients with influenza-like illness.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Lee, Jacob; Kim, Hye Lim; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-10-01

    The Sofia™ Influenza A+B FIA demonstrated 74.0% sensitivity and 95.4% specificity for influenza A in patients with influenza-like illness in 2012-2013 season. It yielded higher sensitivity than SD Bioline Influenza Ag A/B/A(H1N1/2009) (54.1%) for influenza A (P<0.01). The Sofia™ Influenza A+B FIA might be useful for rapid diagnosis of influenza. PMID:26184128

  4. Urinary L-FABP predicts poor outcomes in critically ill patients with early acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Parr, Sharidan K; Clark, Amanda J; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi K; Wickersham, Nancy E; Ware, Lorraine B; Ikizler, T Alp; Siew, Edward D

    2015-03-01

    Biomarker studies for early detection of acute kidney injury (AKI) have been limited by nonselective testing and uncertainties in using small changes in serum creatinine as a reference standard. Here we examine the ability of urine L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin-18 (IL-18), and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) to predict injury progression, dialysis, or death within 7 days in critically ill adults with early AKI. Of 152 patients with known baseline creatinine examined, 36 experienced the composite outcome. Urine L-FABP demonstrated an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) of 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.70-0.86), which improved to 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.75-0.90) when added to the clinical model (AUC-ROC of 0.74). Urine NGAL, IL-18, and KIM-1 had AUC-ROCs of 0.65, 0.64, and 0.62, respectively, but did not significantly improve discrimination of the clinical model. The category-free net reclassification index improved with urine L-FABP (total net reclassification index for nonevents 31.0%) and urine NGAL (total net reclassification index for events 33.3%). However, only urine L-FABP significantly improved the integrated discrimination index. Thus, modest early changes in serum creatinine can help target biomarker measurement for determining prognosis with urine L-FABP, providing independent and additive prognostic information when combined with clinical predictors. PMID:25229339

  5. The Association of Health Literacy with Illness and Medication Beliefs among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Minal S.; Federman, Alex D.; Krauskopf, Katherine; Wolf, Michael; O’Conor, Rachel; Martynenko, Melissa; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy is associated with low adherence to self-management in many chronic diseases. Additionally, health beliefs are thought to be determinants of self-management behaviors. In this study we sought to determine the association, if any, of health literacy and health beliefs among elderly individuals with COPD. Methods We enrolled a cohort of patients with COPD from two academic urban settings in New York, NY and Chicago, IL. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Using the framework of the Self-Regulation Model, illness and medication beliefs were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analyses, with corresponding Cohen’s d effect sizes, and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationships between HL and illness and medication beliefs. Results We enrolled 235 participants, 29% of whom had low health literacy. Patients with low health literacy were more likely to belong to a racial minority group (p<0.001), not be married (p = 0.006), and to have lower income (p<0.001) or education (p<0.001). In unadjusted analyses, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe they will always have COPD (p = 0.003, Cohen’s d = 0.42), and were more likely to be concerned about their illness ((p = 0.04, Cohen’s d = 0.17). In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and other health beliefs, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe that they will always have COPD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.94). In addition, the association of low health literacy with expressed concern about medications remained significant (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05–1.37) though the association of low health literacy with belief in the necessity of medications was no longer significant (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82–1.04). Conclusions In this cohort of urban individuals with COPD, low health literacy was prevalent, and associated with illness beliefs that predict decreased adherence. Our results suggest that targeted strategies to address low health literacy and related illness and medications beliefs might improve COPD medication adherence and other self-management behaviors. PMID:25915420

  6. Outcomes and organ dysfunctions of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ranzani, O T; Battaini, L C; Moraes, C E; Prada, L F L; Pinaffi, J V; Giannini, F P; Shinjo, S K; Azevedo, L C P; Park, M

    2011-11-01

    Our objective was to compare the pattern of organ dysfunctions and outcomes of critically ill patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with patients with other systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD). We studied 116 critically ill SRD patients, 59 SLE and 57 other-SRD patients. The SLE group was younger and included more women. Respiratory failure (61%) and shock (39%) were the most common causes of ICU admission for other-SRD and SLE groups, respectively. ICU length-of-stay was similar for the two groups. The 60-day survival adjusted for the groups' baseline imbalances was not different (P = 0.792). Total SOFA scores were equal for the two groups at admission and during ICU stay, although respiratory function was worse in the other-SRD group at admission and renal and hematological functions were worse in the SLE group at admission. The incidence of severe respiratory dysfunction (respiratory SOFA >2) at admission was higher in the other-SRD group, whereas severe hematological dysfunction (hematological SOFA >2) during ICU stay was higher in the SLE group. SLE patients were younger and displayed a decreased incidence of respiratory failure compared to patients with other-SRDs. However, the incidences of renal and hematological failure and the presence of shock at admission were higher in the SLE group. The 60-day survival rates were similar. PMID:22002091

  7. Higher incidence of acute kidney injury with intravenous colistimethate sodium compared with polymyxin B in critically ill patients at a tertiary care medical center.

    PubMed

    Akajagbor, Darowan S; Wilson, Sharon L; Shere-Wolfe, Kapana D; Dakum, Paul; Charurat, Manhattan E; Gilliam, Bruce L

    2013-11-01

    Nephrotoxicity was assessed in 173 critically ill patients receiving intravenous colistin or polymyxin B; it occurred in 60.4% and 41.8%, respectively. Further investigation is necessary to elucidate the reason for the difference in nephrotoxicity observed between the groups and to assess the impact of severity of illness and dosing/administration. PMID:23840000

  8. Malignant ascites in patients with terminal cancer is effectively treated with permanent peritoneal catheter

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Frank V.; Madsen, Hans Henrik Torp

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant ascites is a pathological condition caused by intra- or extra-abdominal disseminated cancer. The object of treatment is palliation. In search of an effective and minimally invasive palliative treatment of malignant ascites placement of a permanent intra peritoneal catheter has been suggested. Purpose To evaluate our experiences with treatment of malignant ascites by implantation of a permanent PleurX catheter. Material and Methods A retrospective study was conducted, comprising 20 consecutive patients with terminal cancer, who had a permanent PleurX catheter implanted because of malignant ascites in the period from February to November 2014. Using the patients’ medical records, we retrieved data on patients and procedures. Results The technical success rate was 100%. Catheter patency was 95.2%, one catheter was removed due to dislocation. Ten patients (50.0%) experienced minor adverse events. No procedural difficulties were reported and there was no need for additional treatment of malignant ascites after catheter implantation. Median residual survival after catheter implantation was 27 days. Conclusion Implantation of a permanent PleurX catheter is a minimally invasive and effective procedure with only minor adverse events and a high rate of catheter patency in patients with malignant ascites caused by terminal cancer disease. PMID:26346641

  9. The Association of Types of Training and Practice Settings with Doctors’ Empathy and Patient Enablement among Patients with Chronic Illness in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Kenny; Fung, Colman S. C.; Wong, Carmen K. M.; Lam, Augustine T.; Mercer, Stewart W.; Wong, Samuel Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The increase in non-communicable disease (NCD) is becoming a global health problem and there is an increasing need for primary care doctors to look after these patients although whether family doctors are adequately trained and prepared is unknown. Objective This study aimed to determine if doctors with family medicine (FM) training are associated with enhanced empathy in consultation and enablement for patients with chronic illness as compared to doctors with internal medicine training or without any postgraduate training in different clinic settings. Methods This was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey using the validated Chinese version of the Consultation and Relational Empathy (CARE) Measure as well as Patient Enablement Instrument (PEI) for evaluation of quality and outcome of care. 14 doctors from hospital specialist clinics (7 with family medicine training, and 7 with internal medicine training) and 13 doctors from primary care clinics (7 with family medicine training, and 6 without specialist training) were recruited. In total, they consulted 823 patients with chronic illness. The CARE Measure and PEI scores were compared amongst doctors in these clinics with different training background: family medicine training, internal medicine training and those without specialist training. Generalized estimation equation (GEE) was used to account for cluster effects of patients nested with doctors. Results Within similar clinic settings, FM trained doctors had higher CARE score than doctors with no FM training. In hospital clinics, the difference of the mean CARE score for doctors who had family medicine training (39.2, SD = 7.04) and internal medicine training (35.5, SD = 8.92) was statistically significant after adjusting for consultation time and gender of the patient. In the community care clinics, the mean CARE score for doctors with family medicine training and those without specialist training were 32.1 (SD = 7.95) and 29.2 (SD = 7.43) respectively, but the difference was not found to be significant. For PEI, patients receiving care from doctors in the hospital clinics scored significantly higher than those in the community clinics, but there was no significant difference in PEI between patients receiving care from doctors with different training backgrounds within similar clinic setting. Conclusion Family medicine training was associated with higher patient perceived empathy for chronic illness patients in the hospital clinics. Patient enablement appeared to be associated with clinic settings but not doctors’ training background. Training in family medicine and a clinic environment that enables more patient doctor time might help in enhancing doctors’ empathy and enablement for chronic illness patients. PMID:26658427

  10. Heat Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dangerous levels and you can develop a heat illness. Most heat illnesses occur from staying out in ... Heat-related illnesses include Heatstroke - a life-threatening illness in which body temperature may rise above 106° ...

  11. Prophylactic plasma and platelet transfusion in the critically Ill patient: just useless and expensive or even harmful?

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Saner, Fuat H

    2015-01-01

    It is still common practice to correct abnormal standard laboratory test results, such as increased INR or low platelet count, prior to invasive interventions, such as tracheostomy, central venous catheter insertion or liver biopsy, in critically ill patients. Data suggest that 30-90 % of plasma transfused for these indications is unnecessary and puts the patient at risk. Plasma transfusion is associated with a high risk of transfusion-associated adverse events such as transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), and anaphylaxis/allergic reactions. Therefore, the avoidance of inappropriate plasma transfusion bears a high potential of improving patient outcomes. The prospective study by Durila et al., published recently in BMC Anesthesiology, provides evidence that tracheostomies can be performed without prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients despite increased INR in case of normal thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results. Thromboelastometry-based restrictive transfusion management helped avoid unnecessary plasma and platelet transfusion, and should reduce the incidence of transfusion-related adverse events and transfusion-associated hospital costs. Therefore, the authors believe that thromboelastometry-based strategies should be implemented to optimize patient blood management in perioperative medicine. PMID:26054337

  12. Simplified electrophysiological evaluation of peripheral nerves in critically ill patients: the Italian multi-centre CRIMYNE study

    PubMed Central

    Latronico, Nicola; Bertolini, Guido; Guarneri, Bruno; Botteri, Marco; Peli, Elena; Andreoletti, Serena; Bera, Paola; Luciani, Davide; Nardella, Anna; Vittorielli, Elena; Simini, Bruno; Candiani, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Critical illness myopathy and/or neuropathy (CRIMYNE) is frequent in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Although complete electrophysiological tests of peripheral nerves and muscles are essential to diagnose it, they are time-consuming, precluding extensive use in daily ICU practice. We evaluated whether a simplified electrophysiological investigation of only two nerves could be used as an alternative to complete electrophysiological tests. Methods In this prospective, multi-centre study, 92 ICU patients were subjected to unilateral daily measurements of the action potential amplitude of the sural and peroneal nerves (compound muscle action potential [CMAP]). After the first ten days, complete electrophysiological investigations were carried out weekly until ICU discharge or death. At hospital discharge, complete neurological and electrophysiological investigations were performed. Results Electrophysiological signs of CRIMYNE occurred in 28 patients (30.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 21.9% to 40.4%). A unilateral peroneal CMAP reduction of more than two standard deviations of normal value showed the best combination of sensitivity (100%) and specificity (67%) in diagnosing CRIMYNE. All patients developed the electrophysiological signs of CRIMYNE within 13 days of ICU admission. Median time from ICU admission to CRIMYNE was six days (95% CI five to nine days). In 10 patients, the amplitude of the nerve action potential dropped progressively over a median of 3.0 days, and in 18 patients it dropped abruptly within 24 hours. Multi-organ failure occurred in 21 patients (22.8%, 95% CI 15.4% to 32.4%) and was strongly associated with CRIMYNE (odds ratio 4.58, 95% CI 1.64 to 12.81). Six patients with CRIMYNE died: three in the ICU and three after ICU discharge. Hospital mortality was similar in patients with and without CRIMYNE (21.4% and 17.2%; p = 0.771). At ICU discharge, electrophysiological signs of CRIMYNE persisted in 18 (64.3%) of 28 patients. At hospital discharge, diagnoses in the 15 survivors were critical illness myopathy (CIM) in six cases, critical illness polyneuropathy (CIP) in four, combined CIP and CIM in three, and undetermined in two. Conclusion A peroneal CMAP reduction below two standard deviations of normal value accurately identifies patients with CRIMYNE. These should have full neurological and neurophysiological evaluations before discharge from the acute hospital. PMID:17254336

  13. Associations Between Prolonged Intubation and Developing Post-extubation Dysphagia and Aspiration Pneumonia in Non-neurologic Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Park, Young Sook; Song, You Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the associations between the duration of endotracheal intubation and developing post-extubational supraglottic and infraglottic aspiration (PEA) and subsequent aspiration pneumonia. Methods This was a retrospective observational study from January 2009 to November 2014 of all adult patients who had non-neurologic critical illness, required endotracheal intubation and were referred for videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Demographic information, intensive care unit (ICU) admission diagnosis, severity of critical illness, duration of endotracheal intubation, length of stay in ICU, presence of PEA and severity of dysphagia were reviewed. Results Seventy-four patients were enrolled and their PEA frequency was 59%. Patients with PEA had significantly longer endotracheal intubation durations than did those without (median [interquartile range]: 15 [9-21] vs. 10 [6-15] days; p=0.02). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the endotracheal intubation duration was significantly associated with PEA (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.18; p=0.04). Spearman correlation analysis of intubation duration and dysphagia severity showed a positive linear association (r=0.282, p=0.02). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of endotracheal intubation duration for developing PEA and aspiration pneumonia were 0.665 (95% CI, 0.542-0.788; p=0.02) and 0.727 (95% CI, 0.614-0.840; p=0.001), respectively. Conclusion In non-neurologic critically ill patients, the duration of endotracheal intubation was independently associated with PEA development. Additionally, the duration was positively correlated with dysphagia severity and may be helpful for identifying patients who require a swallowing evaluation after extubation. PMID:26605174

  14. Person-centered osteopathic practice: patients’ personality (body, mind, and soul) and health (ill-being and well-being)

    PubMed Central

    Nima, Ali A.; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. Osteopathic philosophy and practice are congruent with the biopsychosocial model, a patient-centered approach when treating disease, and the view of the person as a unity (i.e., body, mind, and soul). Nevertheless, a unity of being should involve a systematic person-centered understanding of the patient’s personality as a biopsychosociospiritual construct that influences health (i.e., well-being and ill-being). We suggest Cloninger’s personality model, comprising temperament (i.e., body) and character (i.e., mind and soul), as a genuine paradigm for implementation in osteopathic practice. As a first step, we investigated (1) the relationships between personality and health among osteopathic patients, (2) differences in personality between patients and a control group, and (3) differences in health within patients depending on the presenting problem and gender. Method. 524 osteopathic patients in Sweden (age mean = 46.17, SD = 12.54, 388 females and 136 males) responded to an online survey comprising the Temperament and Character Inventory and measures of health (well-being: life satisfaction, positive affect, harmony in life, energy, and resilience; ill-being: negative affect, anxiety, depression, stress, and dysfunction and suffering associated to the presenting problem). We conducted two structural equation models to investigate the association personality-health; graphically compared the patients’ personality T-scores to those of the control group and compared the mean raw scores using t-tests; and conducted two multivariate analyses of variance, using age as covariate, to compare patients’ health in relation to their presenting problem and gender. Results. The patients’ personality explained the variance of all of the well-being (R2 between .19 and .54) and four of the ill-being (R2 between .05 and .43) measures. Importantly, self-transcendence, the spiritual aspect of personality, was associated to high levels of positive emotions and resilience. Osteopathic patients, compared to controls, scored higher in six of the seven personality dimensions. These differences were, however, not considerably large (divergences in T-scores were <1 SD, Cohen’s d between 0.12 and 0.40). Presenting problem and gender did not have an effect on any of the health measures. Conclusion. The patient’s personality as a ternary construct (i.e., body, mind, and soul), which is in line with osteopathy, is associated to both well-being and ill-being. The lack of substantial differences in personality between patients and controls implies that the patients had not any personality disorders. Hence, osteopaths might, with proper education, be able to coach their patients to self-awareness. The lack of differences in health variables between osteopathic patients with different presenting problems suggests that practitioners should focus on the person’s health regardless of the type of presenting problem. PMID:26528411

  15. “Because Somebody Cared about Me. That's How It Changed Things”: Homeless, Chronically Ill Patients’ Perspectives on Case Management

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth; Tamayo, Aracely; Fernandez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    Background Case management programs for chronically ill, homeless people improve health and resource utilization by linking patients with case managers focused on improving management of medical and psychosocial problems. Little is known about participants’ perspectives on case management interventions. Methods This qualitative study used in-depth, one-on-one interviews to understand the impact of a case management program from the perspective of participants. A standardized interview guide with open-ended questions explored experiences with the case management program and feelings about readiness to leave the program. Results Four recurrent themes emerged: (1) Participants described profound social isolation prior to case management program enrollment; (2) Participants perceived that caring personal relationships with case managers were key to the program; (3) Participants valued assistance with navigating medical and social systems; and (4) Participants perceived that their health improved through both the interpersonal and the practical aspects of case management. Conclusions Chronically ill, homeless people enrolled in a case management program perceived that social support from case managers resulted in improved health. Programs for this population should consider explicitly including comprehensive social support interventions. Further research on case management should explore the impact of different types of social support on outcomes for homeless chronically ill patients. PMID:23029350

  16. Does Beta-lactam Pharmacokinetic Variability in Critically Ill Patients Justify Therapeutic Drug Monitoring? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics in intensive care patients may be profoundly altered due to the dynamic, unpredictable pathophysiological changes that occur in critical illness. For many drugs, significant increases in the volume of distribution and/or variability in drug clearance are common. When “standard” beta-lactam doses are used, such pharmacokinetic changes can result in subtherapeutic plasma concentrations, treatment failure, and the development of antibiotic resistance. Emerging data support the use of beta-lactam therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and individualized dosing to ensure the achievement of pharmacodynamic targets associated with rapid bacterial killing and optimal clinical outcomes. The purpose of this work was to describe the pharmacokinetic variability of beta-lactams in the critically ill and to discuss the potential utility of TDM to optimize antibiotic therapy through a structured literature review of all relevant publications between 1946 and October 2011. Only a few studies have reported the utility of TDM as a tool to improve beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients. Moreover, there is little agreement between studies on the pharmacodynamic targets required to optimize antibiotic therapy. The impact of TDM on important clinical outcomes also remains to be established. Whereas TDM may be theoretically rational, clinical studies to assess utility in the clinical setting are urgently required. PMID:22839761

  17. Does Beta-lactam Pharmacokinetic Variability in Critically Ill Patients Justify Therapeutic Drug Monitoring? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Roberts, Michael S; Peake, Sandra L; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics in intensive care patients may be profoundly altered due to the dynamic, unpredictable pathophysiological changes that occur in critical illness. For many drugs, significant increases in the volume of distribution and/or variability in drug clearance are common. When "standard" beta-lactam doses are used, such pharmacokinetic changes can result in subtherapeutic plasma concentrations, treatment failure, and the development of antibiotic resistance. Emerging data support the use of beta-lactam therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) and individualized dosing to ensure the achievement of pharmacodynamic targets associated with rapid bacterial killing and optimal clinical outcomes. The purpose of this work was to describe the pharmacokinetic variability of beta-lactams in the critically ill and to discuss the potential utility of TDM to optimize antibiotic therapy through a structured literature review of all relevant publications between 1946 and October 2011. Only a few studies have reported the utility of TDM as a tool to improve beta-lactam dosing in critically ill patients. Moreover, there is little agreement between studies on the pharmacodynamic targets required to optimize antibiotic therapy. The impact of TDM on important clinical outcomes also remains to be established. Whereas TDM may be theoretically rational, clinical studies to assess utility in the clinical setting are urgently required. PMID:22839761

  18. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    PubMed Central

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, P?nar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics including Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, body mass index (BMI), and thyroid hormones 24 h after ICU admission. The presence of pulmonary infection was also recorded. The primary outcome was prolonged weaning, defined as patients who failed at least three weaning attempts or required > 7 days of weaning after the first spontaneous breathing trial. Results: Of the 127 patients studied, 64 had normal thyroid function tests and 61 had NTIS. Patients with NTIS had significantly higher APACHE II scores, prolonged weaning, and pulmonary infection. Patients with NTIS had a higher risk for prolonged weaning (odds ratio, OR = 3.21; 95% CI = 1.31-7.83).The presence of pulmonary infection was also an independent risk factors for prolonged weaning. Conclusions: NTIS may be an independent predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated COPD patients. PMID:26309710

  19. Vulnerability and access to care for South Asian Sikh and Muslim patients with life limiting illness in Scotland: prospective longitudinal qualitative study 

    E-print Network

    Bhopal, Raj; Worth, A; Irshad, T; Brown, D; Lawton, J; Grant, E; Murray, S; Kendall, M; Adam, J; Gardee, R; Sheikh, A

    2009-02-03

    Objectives To examine the care experiences of South Asian Sikh and Muslim patients in Scotland with life limiting illness and their families and to understand the reasons for any difficulties with access to services and how these might be overcome...

  20. Has Stewart approach improved our ability to diagnose acid-base disorders in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Masevicius, Fabio D; Dubin, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    The Stewart approach-the application of basic physical-chemical principles of aqueous solutions to blood-is an appealing method for analyzing acid-base disorders. These principles mainly dictate that pH is determined by three independent variables, which change primarily and independently of one other. In blood plasma in vivo these variables are: (1) the PCO2; (2) the strong ion difference (SID)-the difference between the sums of all the strong (i.e., fully dissociated, chemically nonreacting) cations and all the strong anions; and (3) the nonvolatile weak acids (Atot). Accordingly, the pH and the bicarbonate levels (dependent variables) are only altered when one or more of the independent variables change. Moreover, the source of H+ is the dissociation of water to maintain electroneutrality when the independent variables are modified. The basic principles of the Stewart approach in blood, however, have been challenged in different ways. First, the presumed independent variables are actually interdependent as occurs in situations such as: (1) the Hamburger effect (a chloride shift when CO2 is added to venous blood from the tissues); (2) the loss of Donnan equilibrium (a chloride shift from the interstitium to the intravascular compartment to balance the decrease of Atot secondary to capillary leak; and (3) the compensatory response to a primary disturbance in either independent variable. Second, the concept of water dissociation in response to changes in SID is controversial and lacks experimental evidence. In addition, the Stewart approach is not better than the conventional method for understanding acid-base disorders such as hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis secondary to a chloride-rich-fluid load. Finally, several attempts were performed to demonstrate the clinical superiority of the Stewart approach. These studies, however, have severe methodological drawbacks. In contrast, the largest study on this issue indicated the interchangeability of the Stewart and conventional methods. Although the introduction of the Stewart approach was a new insight into acid-base physiology, the method has not significantly improved our ability to understand, diagnose, and treat acid-base alterations in critically ill patients. PMID:25685724

  1. Treatment of Immunocompromised, Critically Ill Patients with Influenza A H1N1 Infection with a Combination of Oseltamivir, Amantadine, and Zanamivir

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Wouter J.; Kromdijk, Wiete; van den Broek, Marcel P. H.; Haas, Pieter-Jan A.; Minnema, Monique C.; Boucher, Charles A.; de Lange, Dylan W.; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of complications of influenza virus infection. We report on two critically ill patients on immunosuppressive medication with influenza pneumonia. In both patients, oseltamivir monotherapy did not result in clearance of the virus after 18 and five days, respectively. After adding zanamivir and amantadine to the treatment, PCRs on pharyngeal and/or plasma specimens turned negative in both patients after four and three days, respectively. We suggest, that in critically ill patients with influenza A H1N1 infection, treatment efficacy should be monitored closely and treatment with a combination of antiviral drugs should be considered. PMID:26346659

  2. Uncertainty about the safety of supplemental glutamine: an editorial on “A randomized trial of glutamine and antioxidants in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Mulherin, Diana Wells

    2015-01-01

    Previously small randomized clinical trials and several meta-analyses have suggested improved patient outcomes from parenteral glutamine supplementation. A recent large multi-center randomized trial conducted in critically ill patients with documented multiple organ failure at enrollment demonstrated an increase in mortality among those receiving supplemental glutamine. This article discusses the discrepancies in trial outcomes and the risks associated with glutamine administration during critical illness. PMID:25713807

  3. N-Acetylcysteine Administration Prevents Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vidart, Josi; Wajner, Simone Magagnin; Leite, Rogério Sarmento; Manica, André; Schaan, Beatriz D.; Larsen, P. Reed

    2014-01-01

    Context: The acute phase of the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is characterized by low T3 and high rT3 levels, affecting up to 75% of critically ill patients. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a causative factor of the disturbed peripheral thyroid hormone metabolism. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent intracellular antioxidant, can prevent NTIS in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Design: This was a randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Settings: Consecutive patients admitted to the emergency and intensive care units of two tertiary hospitals in southern Brazil were recruited. Patients and intervention included 67 patients were randomized to receive NAC or placebo during 48 hours. Baseline characteristics and blood samples for thyroid hormones and oxidative parameters were collected. Main Outcome: Variation of serum T3 and rT3 levels was measured. Results: Baseline characteristics were similar between groups (all P > .05). T3 levels decreased in the placebo group at 12 hours of follow-up (P = .002) but not in NAC-treated patients (P = .10). Baseline rT3 levels were elevated in both groups and decreased over the initial 48 hours in the NAC-treated patients (P = .003) but not in the control group (P = .75). The free T4 and TSH levels were virtually identical between the groups throughout the study period (P > .05). Measurement of total antioxidant status and total carbonyl content demonstrated that oxidative balance was deranged in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas NAC corrected these alterations (P < .001). Conclusions: NAC administration prevents the derangement in thyroid hormone concentrations commonly occurring in the acute phase of acute myocardial infarction, indicating that oxidative stress is involved in the NTIS pathophysiology. PMID:25148231

  4. Person-centered osteopathic practice: patients' personality (body, mind, and soul) and health (ill-being and well-being).

    PubMed

    Fahlgren, Elin; Nima, Ali A; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Osteopathic philosophy and practice are congruent with the biopsychosocial model, a patient-centered approach when treating disease, and the view of the person as a unity (i.e., body, mind, and soul). Nevertheless, a unity of being should involve a systematic person-centered understanding of the patient's personality as a biopsychosociospiritual construct that influences health (i.e., well-being and ill-being). We suggest Cloninger's personality model, comprising temperament (i.e., body) and character (i.e., mind and soul), as a genuine paradigm for implementation in osteopathic practice. As a first step, we investigated (1) the relationships between personality and health among osteopathic patients, (2) differences in personality between patients and a control group, and (3) differences in health within patients depending on the presenting problem and gender. Method. 524 osteopathic patients in Sweden (age mean = 46.17, SD = 12.54, 388 females and 136 males) responded to an online survey comprising the Temperament and Character Inventory and measures of health (well-being: life satisfaction, positive affect, harmony in life, energy, and resilience; ill-being: negative affect, anxiety, depression, stress, and dysfunction and suffering associated to the presenting problem). We conducted two structural equation models to investigate the association personality-health; graphically compared the patients' personality T-scores to those of the control group and compared the mean raw scores using t-tests; and conducted two multivariate analyses of variance, using age as covariate, to compare patients' health in relation to their presenting problem and gender. Results. The patients' personality explained the variance of all of the well-being (R (2) between .19 and .54) and four of the ill-being (R (2) between .05 and .43) measures. Importantly, self-transcendence, the spiritual aspect of personality, was associated to high levels of positive emotions and resilience. Osteopathic patients, compared to controls, scored higher in six of the seven personality dimensions. These differences were, however, not considerably large (divergences in T-scores were <1 SD, Cohen's d between 0.12 and 0.40). Presenting problem and gender did not have an effect on any of the health measures. Conclusion. The patient's personality as a ternary construct (i.e., body, mind, and soul), which is in line with osteopathy, is associated to both well-being and ill-being. The lack of substantial differences in personality between patients and controls implies that the patients had not any personality disorders. Hence, osteopaths might, with proper education, be able to coach their patients to self-awareness. The lack of differences in health variables between osteopathic patients with different presenting problems suggests that practitioners should focus on the person's health regardless of the type of presenting problem. PMID:26528411

  5. Malnutrition at the Time of Surgery Affects Negatively the Clinical Outcome of Critically Ill Patients with Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shpata, Vjollca; Prendushi, Xhensila; Kreka, Manika; Kola, Irena; Kurti, Floreta; Ohri, Ilir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition is a frequent concomitant of surgical illness, especially in gastrointestinal cancer surgery. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in the GI cancer patients and its relation with clinical outcome. We also examined associations between the energy balance and clinical outcomes in these patients. Methods: Prospective study on 694 surgical patients treated in the ICU of the UHC of Tirana. Patients were divided into well-nourished and malnourished groups according to their nutritional status. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the effect of malnutrition and cumulated energy balance on clinical outcome. Results: The prevalence of pre-operative malnutrition was 65.3% for all surgical patients and 84.9% for gastrointestinal cancer patients. Malnutrition, as analyzed by a multivariate logistic regression model, is an independent risk factor for higher complications, infections, and mortality, longer stay in the ventilator and ICU. Also this model showed that cumulated energy balance correlated with infections, and mortality and was independently associated with the length ventilator and ICU stay. Conclusion: This study shows that malnutrition is a significant problem in surgical patients, especially in patients with gastrointestinal cancer. Malnutrition and cumulated energy deficit in gastro-intestinal surgery patients with malignancy is an independent risk factor on increased post-operative morbidity and mortality. PMID:25568549

  6. Pilot and Revision of a Basal-Bolus Dosing Guideline for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Noncritically Ill Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Germin; Davanos, Evangelia; Muzykovsky, Karina; Rubin, Rochelle

    2015-12-01

    The use of basal-bolus insulin (BBI) regimens for the treatment of inpatient hyperglycemia has become standard of care. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a newly piloted dosing guideline and utilize the results to adjust it prior to its implementation hospital-wide. This was an institutional review board approved, prospective, and multiphase study. An interdisciplinary team was developed and created a dosing guideline, which was followed by a 3-month, single-unit pilot of the guideline in noncritically ill adult patients. The resulting data were used to revise the guideline. Forty-three patients were included. There was a significant decrease in median blood glucose (BG) with use of the guideline (219 mg/dL [162-281] vs 190 mg/dL [136-246], P < .05) in patients not utilizing it. There was also a significant increase in the number of values within the target range of 70 to 180 mg/dL (30.2% vs 41.4%, P < .05). Moreover, there was comparable hypoglycemia before and after the intervention (1.6% vs 2.4%, P = .51). Based on these results, the dosing factor used for the total daily dose of insulin was increased in certain populations. Use of a BBI dosing guideline is safe and effective in decreasing BG values in noncritically ill patients at our institution. PMID:25292441

  7. Anticoagulation Strategies in Venovenous Hemodialysis in Critically Ill Patients: A Five-Year Evaluation in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Kabisch, Björn; Wurm, Karin; Ebert, Katharina; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Renal failure is a common complication among critically ill patients. Timing, dosage, and mode of renal replacement (RRT) are under debate, but also anticoagulation strategies and vascular access interfere with dialysis success. We present a retrospective, five-year evaluation of patients requiring RRT on a multidisciplinary 50-bed surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital with special regard to anticoagulation strategies and vascular access. Anticoagulation was preferably performed with unfractionated heparin or regional citrate application (RAC). Bleeding and suspected HIT-II were most common causes for RAC. In CVVHD mode filter life span was significantly longer under RAC compared to heparin or other anticoagulation strategies (P = 0.001). Femoral vascular access was associated with reduced filter life span (P = 0.012), especially under heparin anticoagulation (P = 0.015). Patients on RAC had higher rates of metabolic alkalosis (P = 0.001), required more transfusions (P = 0.045), and showed higher illness severity measured by SOFA scores (P = 0.001). RRT with unfractionated heparin represented the most common anticoagulation strategy in this study population. However, patients with bleeding risk and severe organ dysfunction were more likely placed on RAC. Citrate provided longer filter life spans regardless of vascular access site. Attention has to be paid to metabolic disturbances. PMID:25548793

  8. Facial Emotion Processing in Acutely Ill and Euthymic Patients with Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenkel, Lindsay S.; Pavuluri, Mani N.; Herbener, Ellen S.; Harral, Erin M.; Sweeney, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Past investigations indicate facial emotion-processing abnormalities in pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) subjects. However, the extent to which these deficits represent state- and trait-related factors is unclear. We investigated facial affect processing in acutely ill and clinically stabilized children with PBD and matched healthy…

  9. sRAGE in diabetic and non-diabetic critically ill patients: effects of intensive insulin therapy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hyperglycemia represents an independent prognostic factor in critically ill non-diabetic patients but not in those with diabetes. In this context, there is an ongoing debate on the benefit of an intensive insulin therapy, particularly in diabetic patients. We tested the hypothesis that expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), an important signal transduction receptor that elicits long-lasting nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) activation, may underlie this difference. RAGE expression is regulated by multiple ligands, including high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1), and is reflected by its released soluble form (sRAGE). Methods A predesigned analysis was conducted of prospectively collected samples from 76 hyperglycemic critically ill patients (33 type-2 diabetes, 43 non-diabetes) aged ?18 years with blood glucose of > 6.1 mmol/L enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing intensive insulin therapy with conventional insulin therapy. sRAGE and its ligand HMGB-1 together with IL-6, and soluble thrombomodulin (as markers of inflammation and endothelial cell injury, respectively) were evaluated in ICU, at Days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Plasma samples from 18 healthy subjects were used as controls. Results Both diabetic and non-diabetic hyperglycemic patients showed increased plasma sRAGE, HMGB-1 and soluble thrombomodulin levels at the time of admission to ICU. Plasma IL-6 concentration was only increased in non-diabetic patients. Plasma levels of sRAGE were higher in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Intensive insulin therapy resulted in a significant decrease of sRAGE and thrombomodulin at Day 7, in diabetic but not in non-diabetic patients. Circulating sRAGE levels correlated positively with IL-6 and soluble thrombomodulin levels and inversely with HMGB-1. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that sRAGE remains independently correlated with HMGB-1 only in diabetic patients. Neither sRAGE nor any inflammatory markers are associated with mortality. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that sRAGE release, time-course and response to intensive insulin therapy differ between hyperglycemic diabetic and non-diabetic critically ill patients. Whether this difference underlies the dissimilarity in clinical outcome of hyperglycemia in these two conditions warrants further studies. PMID:21871056

  10. The impact of deep vein thrombosis in critically ill patients: a meta-analysis of major clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Malato, Alessandra; Dentali, Francesco; Siragusa, Sergio; Fabbiano, Francesco; Kagoma, Yoan; Boddi, Maria; Gensini, Gian Franco; Peris, Adriano; Crowther, Mark; Napolitano, Mariasanta

    2015-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients appear to be at high risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism during their stay in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, little is known about the clinical course of venous thromboembolism in the ICU setting. We therefore evaluated, through a systematic review of the literature, the available data on the impact of a diagnosis of DVT on hospital and ICU stay, duration of mechanical ventilation and mortality in critically ill patients. We also tried to determine whether currently adopted prophylactic measures need to be revised and improved in the ICU setting. Materials and methods MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched up to week 4 of June 2012. Two reviewers selected studies and extracted data. Pooled results are reported as relative risks and weighted mean differences and are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Seven studies for a total of 1,783 patients were included. A diagnosis of DVT was frequent in these patients with a mean rate of 12.7% (95% CI: 8.7–17.5%). DVT patients had longer ICU and hospital stays compared to those without DVT (7.28 days; 95% CI: 1.4–13.15; and 11.2 days; 95% CI: 3.82–18.63 days, respectively). The duration of mechanical ventilation was significantly increased in DVT patients (weighted mean difference: 4.85 days; 95% CI: 2.07–7.63). DVT patients had a marginally significant increase in the risk of hospital mortality (relative risk 1.31; 95% CI: 0.99–1.74; p=0.06), and a not statistically significant increase in the risk of ICU mortality (RR 1.64; 95% CI: 0.91–2.93; p=0.10). Conclusions A diagnosis of DVT upon ICU admission appears to affect clinically important outcomes including duration of ICU and hospital stay and hospital mortality. Larger, prospective studies are warranted. PMID:26513770

  11. Preliminary Report of a Palliative Care and Case Management Project in an Emergency Department for Chronically Ill Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Arthur; Simpson, Janice; Persaud, Judy; Huvane, Bernadette; McAllen, Susan; Davitt, Michelle; McHugh, Marlene; Hutcheson, Allen; Karakas, Serife; Higgins, Philip; Selwyn, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Palliative Care Service at Montefiore Medical Center (MMC) established a pilot project in the emergency department (ED) to identify chronically ill older adults in need of palliative care, homecare, and hospice services and to link such patients with these services. Two advance practice nurses conducted consultations on elderly patients who were found to have one or more “palliative care triggers” on initial screening. A standardized medical record abstraction form was developed. Service utilization and survival were evaluated using the Clinical Information Systems of MMC. Activity of daily living items were developed from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set and the Palliative Care Performance Scale (PPS). Risk factors for hospitalization and use of the ED were taken from the SIGNET model risk screening tool. Physical and emotional symptoms were evaluated using the 28-item Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale short form. Preliminary outcomes and characteristics are presented for 291 patients who completed the intake needs assessment questionnaire. Almost one third (30.9%) of the study cohort died during the project period. Most of the deaths occurred beyond the medical center (7.7% died in the medical center and 23.3% outside the medical center). Thirty percent of patients who died were enrolled on a hospice. Survival time was predicted by the presence of dyspnea, clinician prediction of death on the current hospitalization, psychosocial distress, and PPS scores. Chronically ill patients visiting an urban community ED had complex medical and psychosocial problems with limited support systems and homecare services. Significant proportions of such patients can be expected to have limited likelihood of survival. The presence of palliative homecare and hospice outreach services in the ED in urban community hospitals may provide an effective strategy for linkage of elderly patients at the end of life with otherwise underutilized services. PMID:18363108

  12. The process of recovery of people with mental illness: The perspectives of patients, family members and care providers: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is a qualitative design study that examines points of divergence and convergence in the perspectives on recovery of 36 participants or 12 triads. Each triad comprising a patient, a family member/friend, a care provider and documents the procedural, analytic of triangulating perspectives as a means of understanding the recovery process which is illustrated by four case studies. Variations are considered as they relate to individual characteristics, type of participant (patient, family, member/friend and care provider), and mental illness. This paper which is part of a larger study and is based on a qualitative research design documents the process of recovery of people with mental illness: Developing a Model of Recovery in Mental Health: A middle range theory. Methods Data were collected in field notes through semi-structured interviews based on three interview guides (one for patients, one for family members/friends, and one for caregivers). Cross analysis and triangulation methods were used to analyse the areas of convergence and divergence on the recovery process of all triads. Results In general, with the 36 participants united in 12 triads, two themes emerge from the cross-analysis process or triangulation of data sources (12 triads analysis in 12 cases studies). Two themes emerge from the analysis process of the content of 36 interviews with participants: (1) Revealing dynamic context, situating patients in their dynamic context; and (2) Relationship issues in a recovery process, furthering our understanding of such issues. We provide four case studies examples (among 12 cases studies) to illustrate the variations in the way recovery is perceived, interpreted and expressed in relation to the different contexts of interaction. Conclusion The perspectives of the three participants (patients, family members/friends and care providers) suggest that recovery depends on constructing meaning around mental illness experiences and that the process is based on each person's dynamic context (e.g., social network, relationship), life experiences and other social determinants (e.g., symptoms, environment). The findings of this study add to existing knowledge about the determinants of the recovery of persons suffering with a mental illness and significant other utilizing public mental health services in Montreal, Canada. PMID:20540771

  13. How do we use therapeutic drug monitoring to improve outcomes from severe infections in critically ill patients?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gloria; Sime, Fekade Bruck; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2014-01-01

    High mortality and morbidity rates associated with severe infections in the critically ill continue to be a significant issue for the healthcare system. In view of the diverse and unique pharmacokinetic profile of drugs in this patient population, there is increasing use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in attempt to optimize the exposure of antibiotics, improve clinical outcome and minimize the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Despite this, a beneficial clinical outcome for TDM of antibiotics has only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides in a general hospital patient population. Clinical outcome studies for other antibiotics remain elusive. Further, there is significant variability among institutions with respect to the practice of TDM including the selection of patients, sampling time for concentration monitoring, methodologies of antibiotic assay, selection of PK/PD targets as well as dose optimisation strategies. The aim of this paper is to review the available evidence relating to practices of antibiotic TDM, and describe how TDM can be applied to potentially improve outcomes from severe infections in the critically ill. PMID:25430961

  14. Fungal colonization and/or infection in non-neutropenic critically ill patients: results of the EPCAN observational study.

    PubMed

    León, C; Alvarez-Lerma, F; Ruiz-Santana, S; León, M A; Nolla, J; Jordá, R; Saavedra, P; Palomar, M

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to determine the incidence of fungal colonization and infection in non-neutropenic critically ill patients and to identify factors favoring infection by Candida spp. A total of 1,655 consecutive patients (>18 years of age) admitted for > or = 7 days to 73 medical-surgical Spanish intensive care units (ICUs) participated in an observational prospective cohort study. Surveillance samples were obtained once a week. One or more fungi were isolated in different samples in 59.2% of patients, 94.2% of which were Candida spp. There were 864 (52.2%) patients with Candida spp. colonization and 92 (5.5%) with proven Candida infection. In the logistic regression analysis risk factors independently associated with Candida spp. infection were sepsis (odds ratio [OR] = 8.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.07-13.6), multifocal colonization (OR = 3.49, 95% CI 1.74-7.00), surgery (OR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.27-3.30), and the use of total parenteral nutrition (OR = 4.37, 95% CI 2.16-8.33). Patients with Candida spp. infection showed significantly higher in-hospital and intra-ICU mortality rates than those colonized or non-colonized non-infected (P < 0.001). Fungal colonization, mainly due to Candida spp., was documented in nearly 60% of non-neutropenic critically ill patients admitted to the ICU for more than 7 days. Proven candidal infection was diagnosed in 5.5% of cases. Risk factors independently associated with Candida spp. infection were sepsis, multifocal colonization, surgery, and the use of total parenteral nutrition. PMID:18758831

  15. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  16. Efficacy and safety of anidulafungin in elderly, critically ill patients with invasive Candida infections: a post hoc analysis.

    PubMed

    Dimopoulos, George; Paiva, José-Artur; Meersseman, Wouter; Pachl, Jan; Grigoras, Ioana; Sganga, Gabriele; Montravers, Philippe; Auzinger, Georg; Sá, Marcio Borges; Miller, Paul J; Mar?ek, Tomas; Kantecki, Michal; Ruhnke, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Post hoc analysis of a non-comparative, prospective, multicentre, phase IIIb study was performed to compare efficacy and safety of anidulafungin in elderly (?65 years) versus non-elderly (<65 years) Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with candidaemia/invasive candidiasis (C/IC). Adult ICU patients with confirmed C/IC meeting ?1 of the following criteria were enrolled: post-abdominal surgery; solid tumour; renal/hepatic insufficiency; solid organ transplantation; neutropenia; age ?65 years. Patients received anidulafungin (200 mg on Day 1, 100 mg/day thereafter) for ?10 days followed by optional azole step-down therapy for a total treatment duration of 14-56 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was global (clinical and microbiological) response at the end of all therapy (EOT). Primary efficacy analysis was performed in the modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population (n=170), excluding unknown and missing responses. In total, 80 patients (47.1%) were aged ?65 years and 90 (52.9%) were aged <65 years; the mean age difference between the two groups was 21.9 years. Global success at EOT in mITT patients was similar in elderly (68.1%) and non-elderly (70.7%) patients (P=0.719). However, global success rates were significantly lower in elderly versus non-elderly patients at 2 and 6 weeks after EOT (P=0.045 and P=0.016, respectively). Ninety-day survival was significantly lower (P=0.006) for elderly (42.8%) versus non-elderly patients (63.3%). The incidence and profile of adverse events were similar in elderly and non-elderly patients. Anidulafungin was effective and safe for treatment of C/IC in elderly ICU patients, despite higher baseline severity of illness scores. PMID:22998997

  17. The pain, agitation, and delirium practice guidelines for adult critically ill patients: a post-publication perspective.

    PubMed

    Skrobik, Yoanna; Chanques, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The recently published Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Pain, Agitation, and Delirium in Adult Patients in the Intensive Care Unit differ from earlier guidelines in the following ways: literature searches were performed in eight databases by a professional librarian; psychometric validation of assessment scales was considered in their recommendation; discrepancies in recommendation votes by guideline panel members are available in online supplements; and all recommendations were made exclusively on the basis of evidence available until December of 2010. Pain recognition and management remains challenging in the critically ill. Patient outcomes improve with routine pain assessment, use of co-analgesics and administration as well as dose adjustment of opiates to patient needs. Thoracic epidurals help ease patients undergoing abdominal aortic surgery. Little data exists to guide clinicians as to the type or dose of co-analgesics; no opiate choice is associated with better patient outcomes. Lighter or no sedation is beneficial, and interruption is desirable in patients who require deep sedation for specific pathologic states. Delirium screening is probably useful; no treatment modality can be unequivocally recommended, and the benefit of prophylaxis is established only for early mobilization. The details of these recommendations, as well as more recent publications that complement the guidelines, are provided in this commentary. PMID:23547921

  18. Psychological support based on positive suggestions in the treatment of a critically ill ICU patient – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Zsófia; Fritúz, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    This case report describes the way psychological support based on positive suggestions (PSBPS) was added to the traditional somatic treatment of an acute pancreatitis 36-year-old male patient. Psychological support based on positive suggestions (PSBPS) is a new adjunct therapeutic tool focused on applying suggestive techniques in medical settings. The suggestive techniques usually applied with critically ill patients are based on a number of pre-prepared scripts like future orientation, reframing, positivity, supporting autonomy, etc., and other, very unique and personalized interventions, which are exemplified with verbatim quotations. We describe the way several problems during treatment of intensive care unit (ICU) patients were solved using suggestive methods: uncooperativeness, difficulties of weaning, building up enteral nutrition, supporting recovery motivation, and so on, which permanently facilitated the patient’s medical state: the elimination of gastrointestinal bleeding, recovery of the skin on the abdomen, etc. Medical effects follow-up data at 10 months show that the patient recovered and soon returned to his original work following discharge. PMID:24381733

  19. A multiplex nested PCR for the detection and identification of Candida species in blood samples of critically ill paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nosocomial candidaemia is associated with high mortality rates in critically ill paediatric patients; thus, the early detection and identification of the infectious agent is crucial for successful medical intervention. The PCR-based techniques have significantly increased the detection of Candida species in bloodstream infections. In this study, a multiplex nested PCR approach was developed for candidaemia detection in neonatal and paediatric intensive care patients. Methods DNA samples from the blood of 54 neonates and children hospitalised in intensive care units with suspected candidaemia were evaluated by multiplex nested PCR with specific primers designed to identify seven Candida species, and the results were compared with those obtained from blood cultures. Results The multiplex nested PCR had a detection limit of four Candida genomes/mL of blood for all Candida species. Blood cultures were positive in 14.8% of patients, whereas the multiplex nested PCR was positive in 24.0% of patients, including all culture-positive patients. The results obtained with the molecular technique were available within 24 hours, and the assay was able to identify Candida species with 100% of concordance with blood cultures. Additionally, the multiplex nested PCR detected dual candidaemia in three patients. Conclusions Our proposed PCR method may represent an effective tool for the detection and identification of Candida species in the context of candidaemia diagnosis in children, showing highly sensitive detection and the ability to identify the major species involved in this infection. PMID:25047415

  20. Diurnal salivary cortisol measurement in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit in critically ill acute trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Bartanusz, Viktor; Corneille, Michael G; Sordo, Salvador; Gildea, Marianne; Michalek, Joel E; Nair, Prakash V; Stewart, Ronald M; Jezova, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Acute trauma patients represent a specific subgroup of the critically ill population due to sudden and dramatic changes in homeostasis and consequently extreme demands on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Salivary cortisol is an accepted surrogate for serum free cortisol in the assessment of HPA axis function. The purpose of this study was (1) to establish the feasibility of salivary cortisol measurement in acute trauma patients in the neurosurgical-surgical intensive care unit (NSICU), and (2) to determine the diurnal pattern of salivary cortisol in the acute phase after injury. Saliva from 50 acute trauma patients was prospectively collected twice a day at 6AM and 4PM during the first week after injury in the NSICU. Mean PM cortisol concentrations were significantly higher in subjects versus controls (p<0.001). Subjects failed to develop the expected PM versus AM decrease in cortisol concentration seen in controls (p=0.005). Salivary cortisol did not vary significantly with baseline Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), Injury Severity Score, sex, injury type, ethnicity, or age. When comparing mean AM and PM salivary cortisol by GCS severity category (GCS ?8 and GCS >8) the AM salivary cortisol was significantly higher in patients with GCS ?8 (p=0.002). The results show a loss of diurnal cortisol variation in acute trauma patient in the NSICU during the first week of hospitalization. Patients with severe brain injury had higher morning cortisol levels than those with mild/moderate brain injury. PMID:25065844

  1. Lack of apparent antipsychotic effect of the D1-dopamine receptor antagonist SCH39166 in acutely ill schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, P; Smith, L; Farde, L; Härnryd, C; Sedvall, G; Wiesel, F A

    1995-10-01

    SCH 39166 is the first selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist developed for the treatment of schizophrenic patients. To examine potential antipsychotic effect, tolerability and safety, SCH 39166 was given orally to 17 acutely ill drug free schizophrenic patients (DSMIIIR) in an open 4-week study. Doses were escalated from 10 to 100 mg b.i.d. according to a fixed schedule over 17 days and remained at 100 mg b.i.d. for another 11 days. The drug was withdrawn prematurely in ten patients because of deterioration or refusal to take SCH 39166. In the nine patients participating for more than 2 weeks, none had an apparent reduction of BPRS or CGI scores. Side effects were agitation, akathisia and emesis in single patients. After withdrawal of SCH 39166 of the patients improved when treated with classical neuroleptics or clozapine. The result of the study does not support the prediction that selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonism will produce antipsychotic effects in schizophrenia. PMID:8584611

  2. Tissue perfusion and oxygenation to monitor fluid responsiveness in critically ill, septic patients after initial resuscitation: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Klijn, Eva; van Velzen, Marit H N; Lima, Alexandre Pinto; Bakker, Jan; van Bommel, Jasper; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-12-01

    Fluid therapy after initial resuscitation in critically ill, septic patients may lead to harmful overloading and should therefore be guided by indicators of an increase in stroke volume (SV), i.e. fluid responsiveness. Our objective was to investigate whether tissue perfusion and oxygenation are able to monitor fluid responsiveness, even after initial resuscitation. Thirty-five critically ill, septic patients underwent infusion of 250 mL of colloids, after initial fluid resuscitation. Prior to and after fluid infusion, SV, cardiac output sublingual microcirculatory perfusion (SDF: sidestream dark field imaging) and skin perfusion and oxygenation (laser Doppler flowmetry and reflectance spectroscopy) were measured. Fluid responsiveness was defined by a ?5 or 10 % increase in SV upon fluids. In responders to fluids, SDF-derived microcirculatory and skin perfusion and oxygenation increased, but only the increase in cardiac output, mean arterial and pulse pressure, microvascular flow index and relative Hb concentration and oxygen saturation were able to monitor a SV increase. Our proof of principle study demonstrates that non-invasively assessed tissue perfusion and oxygenation is not inferior to invasive hemodynamic measurements in monitoring fluid responsiveness. However skin reflectance spectroscopy may be more helpful than sublingual SDF. PMID:25599945

  3. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products in critically ill patients and its associations with other clinical markers and 28-day mortality

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanzi; Zhong, Jiwen; Xiang, Yang; Zeng, Fan; Cai, Dehong; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the possible associations between serum levels of soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) and specific clinical markers and prognosis in critically ill patients diagnosed with stress hyperglycemia. Patients and methods A total of 70 critically ill patients and 25 normal controls were recruited for this study. Serum levels of sRAGE and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Additional data on other clinical markers were obtained from patient records in the intensive care unit. Comparisons of sRAGE and AGEs levels between groups were assessed by t-test. The relationships between sRAGE and other clinical markers were assessed by Pearson’s correlation analyses and multiple linear regression analyses. Risk factors for prognosis, such as 28-day mortality were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Results Serum sRAGE and AGEs levels were significantly higher in critically ill patients, compared to normal controls (P<0.05). The increase in serum sRAGE levels was significantly correlated with AGEs levels, interleukin-6 levels, and the sequential organ failure assessment score (P<0.01). Using multiple linear regression analysis, the association between AGEs and sRAGE remained significant after adjustment of other clinical factors. However, there were no significant correlations between sRAGE levels and patient outcome in these critically ill patients. Conclusion Serum sRAGE levels were significantly elevated in critically ill patients and positively correlated with higher AGEs levels, but sRAGE levels were not associated with increased mortality, suggesting sRAGE levels are not a predictor of prognosis in critically ill patients. PMID:25429209

  4. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Rafael; Jara, Jorge; Armero, Julio; Lozano, Celina

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded) patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season. PMID:26485296

  5. Augmented renal clearance in critically ill patients: etiology, definition and implications for beta-lactam dose optimization.

    PubMed

    Sime, Fekade Bruck; Udy, Andrew A; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-10-01

    The renal clearance of antibiotics may be elevated in some critically ill patients. This paper reviews this recently described phenomenon, referred to as augmented renal clearance (ARC). ARC is considered to be driven by pathophysiological elevation of glomerular filtration, and is defined as a creatinine clearance >130mL/min/173m(2). This in turn promotes very low antibiotic concentrations. This effect may lead to adverse clinical outcomes, particularly with beta-lactam antibiotics, as they require prolonged exposure for optimal antibacterial activity. The use of extended or continuous infusions is an effective strategy to improve exposure. However, because the effect of ARC is potentially quite variable, regular therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) may be necessary to ensure all patients achieve effective concentrations. PMID:26119486

  6. Relationship Between the Prognostic Expectations of Seriously Ill Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis and Their Nephrologists

    PubMed Central

    Wachterman, Melissa W.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Davis, Roger B.; Cohen, Robert A.; Waikar, Sushrut S.; Phillips, Russell S.; McCarthy, Ellen P.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients undergoing hemodialysis have an annual mortality rate exceeding 20%, comparable to many types of cancer. Past research has shown that patients with cancer overestimate their likelihood of survival relative to their physicians, but this relationship has not been examined in patients with noncancer diagnoses. Perceptions of prognosis and transplant candidacy may influence goals of care. OBJECTIVES To compare the perceptions of hemodialysis patients and their nephrologists concerning prognosis and the likelihood of transplant; to follow actual survival; and to explore the relationship between patients’ expectations and their goals of care. DESIGN We completed a medical record abstraction to estimate 1-year mortality risk among patients who underwent dialysis at any time from November 1, 2010, through September 1, 2011. We then conducted in-person interviews with eligible patients whose predicted 1-year mortality, based on validated prognostic tools, was at least 20%. We also interviewed their nephrologists. We compared patients’ and physicians’ expectations about 1- and 5-year survival and transplant candidacy and measured the association between patients’ expectations and goals of care. We then followed actual survival using Kaplan-Meier methods. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Two dialysis units in Boston. Two hundred seven patients undergoing hemodialysis included in the medical record review, with 62 eligible patients interviewed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Predicted 1-year mortality risk using validated prognostic tools; actual survival; patients’ and physicians’ expectations about 1-year survival and likelihood of transplant; and patients’ goals of care. RESULTS Of the 207 hemodialysis patients, 72.5% had a predicted 1-year mortality of at least 20%. Of the 80 patients eligible for interview, 62 participated (response rate, 78%). Patients were significantly more optimistic than their nephrologists about 1- and 5-year survival (P < .001 for both) and were more likely to think they were transplant candidates (37 [66%] vs 22 [39%] [P = .008]). Of the 81% of patients reporting a 90% chance or greater of being alive at 1 year, 18 (44%) preferred care focused on extending life, even if it meant more discomfort, compared with 1 (9%) among patients reporting a lower chance of survival (P = .045). Actual survival was 93% at 1 year but decreased to 79% by 17 months and 56% by 23 months. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Hemodialysis patients are more optimistic about prognosis and transplant candidacy than their nephrologists. In our sample, patients’ expectations about 1-year survival were more accurate than those of their nephrologists, but their longer-term survival expectations dramatically overestimated even their 2-year survival rates. Patients’ prognostic expectations are associated with their treatment preferences. Our findings suggest the need for interventions to help providers communicate effectively with patients about prognosis. PMID:23712681

  7. U-shape relationship of white blood cells with acute kidney injury and mortality in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Seok; Ahn, Shin Young; Ryu, Jiwon; Baek, Seon Ha; Kim, Kwang-il; Chin, Ho Jun; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Kim, Sejoong

    2014-01-01

    Low or high counts of white blood cells (WBCs) and WBC subtypes can be a predictor of morbidity and mortality in several clinical settings. However, the correlations of WBC and its subtypes with acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality remain unresolved in critically ill patients. The counts of WBC and subtypes, such as neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte, and eosinophil, were measured in 2,079 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) from June 2004 through June 2010. The non-linear relationship between WBC counts and AKI risk was initially explored by a restricted cubic spline analysis. The odds ratios (ORs) for AKI and 1-year mortality were calculated after adjustment for multiple covariates. The relationship between WBC counts and AKI risk was U-shaped. Accordingly, we divided patients into quintiles according to the counts of WBC or subtypes. The 1(st) and 5(th) quintiles of WBC counts had greater ORs for AKI (1.42 and 2.05, respectively) and mortality (1.40 and 1.36, respectively) compared with the 3(rd) quintile. After stratification by WBC subtype, the 5(th) quintile of neutrophil counts and the 1(st) quintiles of lymphocyte and monocyte counts tended to have higher ORs for AKI (1.69, 1.40, and 1.77, respectively). For mortality, the 1(st) quintiles of neutrophil, lymphocyte, and eosinophil counts were associated with higher mortality compared with the 3(rd) quintile (the ORs were 1.48, 1.57, and 1.42, respectively). Both leukopenia and leukocytosis are associated with AKI and mortality risk in critically ill patients. This result may be attributable to the change in the subtype counts. PMID:24621861

  8. [Spiritual care of a terminal liver cancer patient: a nursing experience].

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Chi

    2010-04-01

    Death, an unavoidable event in the human experience, causes physical as well as mental and spiritual suffering. This paper reports on a nursing experience giving spiritual care to a terminal liver cancer patient between January 17 and February 9, 2009. Eleven nursing logs were used as the source of data for daily information. During the care period, patient religious needs featured prominently, including his desire to become a Christian and his eagerness to know about and help in the arrangement of his funeral. Taking the initiative, the nurse helped link him with religious resources, arranged a minister for his baptism ceremony, had the priest explain funeral proceedings, and assisted with the completion of his entrusted plans. The function of this nursing care intervention was to provide a personal touch to a patient who was in desperate need of warm spiritual care. It is hoped that this report can help caregivers increase their sensitivity toward patient spiritual needs and enhance routine nursing care quality. PMID:20405396

  9. Improving Communication About Serious Illness

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Critical Illness; Chronic Disease; Terminal Care; Palliative Care; Communication; Advance Care Planning; Neoplasm Metastasis; Lung Neoplasms; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Heart Failure; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic

  10. Hospital-Based Surveillance for Infectious Etiologies Among Patients with Acute Febrile Illness in Georgia, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Kuchuloria, Tinatin; Imnadze, Paata; Mamuchishvili, Nana; Chokheli, Maiko; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Endeladze, Marina; Mshvidobadze, Ketevan; Gatserelia, Lana; Makhviladze, Manana; Kanashvili, Marine; Mikautadze, Teona; Nanuashvili, Alexander; Kiknavelidze, Khatuni; Kokaia, Nora; Makharadze, Manana; Clark, Danielle V; Bautista, Christian T; Farrell, Margaret; Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Maksoud, Mohamed Abdel; Pimentel, Guillermo; House, Brent; Hepburn, Matthew J; Rivard, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Information on the infectious causes of undifferentiated acute febrile illness (AFI) in Georgia is essential for effective treatment and prevention. In May 2008, a hospital-based AFI surveillance was initiated at six hospitals in Georgia. Patients aged ? 4 years with fever ? 38°C for ? 48 hours were eligible for surveillance. Blood culture and serologic testing were conducted for Leptospira spp., Brucella spp., West Nile virus (WNV), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Coxiella burnetii, tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), hantavirus, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), and Rickettsia typhi. Of 537 subjects enrolled, 70% were outpatients, 54% were males, and the mean age was 37 years. Patients reported having fatigue (89%), rigors (87%), sweating (83%), pain in joints (49%), and sleep disturbances (42%). Thirty-nine (7%) patients were seropositive for R. typhi, 37 (7%) for Brucella spp., 36 (7%) for TBEV, 12 (2%) for Leptospira spp., 10 (2%) for C. burnetii, and three (0.6%) for S. Typhi. None of the febrile patients tested positive for WNV antibodies. Of the patients, 73% were negative for all pathogens. Our results indicate that most of the targeted pathogens are present in Georgia, and highlight the importance of enhancing laboratory capacity for these infectious diseases. PMID:26438032

  11. Large differences in cost of illness and wellbeing between patients with fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain, or ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Boonen, A; van den Heuvel, R; van Tubergen, A; Goossens, M; Severens, J; van der Heijde, D; van der Linden, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cost of illness of three musculoskeletal conditions in relation to general wellbeing. Methods: Patients with fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain (CLBP), and ankylosing spondylitis who were referred to a specialist and participated in three randomised trials completed a cost diary for the duration of the study, comprising direct medical and non-medical resource utilisation and inability to perform paid and unpaid work. Patients rated perceived wellbeing (0–100) at baseline. Univariate differences in costs between the groups were estimated by bootstrapping. Regression analyses assessed which variables, in addition to the condition, contributed to costs and wellbeing. Results: 70 patients with fibromyalgia, 110 with chronic low back pain, and 111 with ankylosing spondylitis provided data for the cost analyses. Average annual disease related total societal costs per patient were €7813 for fibromyalgia, €8533 for CLBP, and €3205 for ankylosing spondylitis. Total costs were higher for fibromyalgia and CLBP than for ankylosing spondylitis, mainly because of cost of formal and informal care, aids and adaptations, and work days lost. Wellbeing was lower in fibromyalgia (mean, 48) and low back pain (mean, 42) than in ankylosing spondylitis (mean, 67). No variables other than diagnostic group contributed to differences in costs or wellbeing. Conclusions: In patients under the care of a specialist, there were marked differences in costs and wellbeing between those with fibromyalgia or CLBP and those with ankylosing spondylitis. In particular, direct non-medical costs and productivity costs were higher in fibromyalgia and CLBP. PMID:15271773

  12. Hepatitis C Treatment Eligibility and Comorbid Medical Illness in Methadone Maintenance (MMT) and Non-MMT Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Batki, Steven L.; Canfield, Kelly M.; Smyth, Emily; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Levine, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Comorbid medical illness is common in patients with chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection and those in methadone treatment (MMT), yet little is known about the impact of medical comorbidity on HCV treatment eligibility in MMT versus non-MMT patients. Methods Medical illness and HCV treatment eligibility were compared in a case-control study of MMT and non-MMT patients with untreated chronic HCV matched for age, gender, and race. Comorbid diseases, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) scores, and HCV treatment eligibility rates were compared in 80 MMT patients entering an HCV treatment trial and 80 non-MMT patients entering HCV treatment in an urban gastroenterology clinic. Results Comorbid chronic medical conditions were present in 91% of MMT and 85% of non-MMT patients. Patients in both groups had an average of 3 medical conditions; the overall CIRS medical severity level was mild-moderate. Despite similar medical severity in both groups, a significantly higher proportion (77%) of non-MMT patients than MMT patients (56%) were eligible for HCV treatment [p ?.01]. Specific comorbid medical and psychiatric illness led to ineligibility in only 18% of MMT and 16% of non-MMT patients. However, failure to complete the medical evaluation process was significantly [p ? .001] more likely to cause ineligibility among MMT patients (19%) than non-MMT patients (0%). Conclusions HCV patients -- whether MMT or non-MMT -- had similar levels of comorbid medical diseases of a mild-moderate severity, yet fewer MMT than non-MMT patients were eligible for HCV treatment. The most common reason for HCV treatment ineligibility in MMT patients was failure to complete the required medical evaluation process. PMID:20635285

  13. How User Characteristics Affect Use Patterns in Web-Based Illness Management Support for Patients with Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cvancarova, Milada; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Moore, Shirley M; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Background Frequently eHealth applications are not used as intended and they have high attrition rates; therefore, a better understanding of patients’ need for support is warranted. Specifically, more research is needed to identify which system components target different patient groups and under what conditions. Objective To explore user characteristics associated with the use of different system components of a Web-based illness management support system for cancer patients (WebChoice). Methods For this secondary post hoc analysis of a large randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which WebChoice was tested among 325 breast cancer and prostate cancer patients who were followed with repeated measures for 1 year, usage patterns of 162 cancer patients in the intervention arm with access to WebChoice were extracted from the user log. Logistic regression was performed to identify patterns of associations between system use and patient characteristics. Latent class analyses (LCA) were performed to identify associations among the use of different system components and levels of social support, symptom distress, depression, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life. Results Approximately two-thirds (103/162, 63.6%) of the patients logged on to WebChoice more than once, and were defined as users. A high level of computer experience (odds ratio [OR] 3.77, 95% CI 1.20-11.91) and not having other illnesses in addition to cancer (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.02-4.34) increased the overall probability of using WebChoice. LCA showed that both men with prostate cancer and women with breast cancer who had low scores on social support accompanied with high levels of symptom distress and high levels of depression were more likely to use the e-message component. For men with prostate cancer, these variables were also associated with high use of the self-management advice component. We found important differences between men with prostate cancer and women with breast cancer when associations between WebChoice use and each user characteristic were analyzed separately. High use of all components was associated with low levels of social support among women with breast cancer, but not among men with prostate cancer. High use of e-messages, advice, and the discussion forum were associated with high levels of depression among women with breast cancer, but not among men with prostate cancer. For men with prostate cancer (but not women with breast cancer), high use of symptom assessments, advice, and the discussion forum were associated with high levels of symptom distress. However, it is unclear whether these findings can be attributed to differences related to diagnosis, gender, or both. Conclusions This study provides evidence that different user characteristics are associated with different use patterns. Such information is crucial to target Web-based support systems to different patient groups. LCA is a useful technique to identify subgroups of users. In our study, e-messages and self-management advice were highly used components for patients who had low levels of social support and high illness burden, suggesting that patients with these characteristics may find such tools particularly useful. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00710658; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00710658 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6EmEWZiwz) PMID:23454601

  14. Relationships between Auditory Event-Related Potentials and Mood State, Medication, and Comorbid Psychiatric Illness in Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fridberg, Daniel J.; Hetrick, William P.; Brenner, Colleen A.; Shekhar, Anantha; Steffen, Ashley N.; Malloy, Frederick W.; O’Donnell, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) exhibit aberrations in auditory event-related potentials (ERPs), although the relationship between these measures and mood state at testing, comorbid psychiatric illness, presence of psychotic features, and medication usage are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between these factors and auditory ERP measures in BD patients. Methods An auditory “oddball” discrimination task was used to elicit ERPs from sixty-nine patients with type I BD and 52 healthy controls. Patients were placed into subgroups based upon their mood state at testing (euthymic or symptomatic), and ANOVA was used to compare amplitude and peak latency measures from the N100, P200, N200, and P300 ERP components across subgroups. Multiple regression was used to investigate relationships between ERP measures and comorbid psychiatric diagnosis, history of psychotic features, and medication status. Results Relative to healthy control participants, euthymic and symptomatic BD patients exhibited reduced P300 and P200 amplitude, but ERP measures did not differ among BD patients on the basis of mood status. A history of a comorbid anxiety disorder was associated with reduced N200 peak latency, but prolonged P300 peak latency among BD patients. No other relationships between clinical variables and ERP measures were significant. Conclusions The results suggest that disrupted auditory attention may be observed in BD patients regardless of their mood state at testing, medication status, or history of psychosis. These results extend previous findings, and provide further evidence for aberrations in the P300 ERP as an endophenotype for BD. PMID:19922554

  15. Association between prehospital vitamin D status and incident acute respiratory failure in critically ill patients: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Thickett, David R; Moromizato, Takuhiro; Litonjua, Augusto A; Amrein, Karin; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Lee-Sarwar, Kathleen A; Mogensen, Kris M; Purtle, Steven W; Gibbons, Fiona K; Camargo, Carlos A; Giovannucci, Edward; Christopher, Kenneth B

    2015-01-01

    Objective We hypothesise that low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels before hospitalisation are associated with increased risk of acute respiratory failure. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Medical and Surgical Intensive care units of two Boston teaching hospitals. Patients 1985 critically ill adults admitted between 1998 and 2011. Interventions None. Measurements and main results The exposure of interest was prehospital serum 25(OH)D categorised as ?10?ng/mL, 11–19.9?ng/mL, 20–29.9?ng/mL and ?30?ng/mL. The primary outcome was acute respiratory failure excluding congestive heart failure determined by International Classification of Diseases Ninth Edition (ICD-9) coding and validated against the Berlin Definition of acute respiratory sistress syndrome. Association between 25(OH)D and acute respiratory failure was assessed using logistic regression, while adjusting for age, race, sex, Deyo-Charlson Index and patient type (medical vs surgical). In the cohort, the mean age was 63?years, 45% were male and 80% were white; 25(OH)D was ?10?ng/mL in 8% of patients, 11–19.9?ng/mL in 24%, 20–29.9?ng/mL in 24% and ?30?ng/mL in 44% of patients. Eighteen per cent (n=351) were diagnosed with acute respiratory failure. Compared to patients with 25(OH)D ?30?ng/mL, patients with lower 25(OH)D levels had significantly higher adjusted odds of acute respiratory failure (?10?ng/mL, OR=1.84 (95% CI 1.22 to 2.77); 11–19.9?ng/mL, OR=1.60 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.15); 20–29.9?ng/mL, OR=1.37 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.86)). Conclusions Prehospital 25(OH)D was associated with the risk of acute respiratory failure in our critically ill patient cohort. PMID:26113982

  16. New Guidelines for Assessment of Malnutrition in Adults: Obese Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, Kasuen; O'Leary-Kelley, Colleen

    2015-08-01

    Recently released recommendations for detection and documentation of malnutrition in adults in clinical practice define 3 types of malnutrition: starvation related, acute disease or injury related, and chronic disease related. The first 2 are more easily recognized, but the third may be more often unnoticed, particularly in obese patients. Critical care patients tend to be at high risk for malnutrition and thus require a thorough nutritional assessment. Compared with patients of earlier times, intensive care unit patients today tend to be older, have more complex medical and comorbid conditions, and often are obese. Missed or delayed detection of malnutrition in these patients may contribute to increases in hospital morbidity and longer hospital stays. Critical care nurses are in a prime position to screen patients at risk for malnutrition and to work with members of the interprofessional team in implementing nutritional intervention plans. PMID:26232799

  17. Implications of Augmented Renal Clearance on Drug Dosing in Critically Ill Patients: A Focus on Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Athena L V; Shea, Katherine M; Roberts, Kirsten M; Daley, Mitchell J

    2015-11-01

    Augmented renal clearance (ARC) has been reported in approximately 30-65% of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) despite the presence of a normal serum creatinine concentration. In certain ICU patient populations (e.g., patients with sepsis or trauma), the incidence increases to roughly 50-85%. Risk factors for ARC include the following: age younger than 50-55 years, male sex, higher diastolic blood pressure, fewer comorbidities, and a lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) or modified Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at ICU admission. In addition, patient populations with the highest reported incidence of ARC include those with major trauma, sepsis, traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and central nervous system infection. Due to the high incidence of ARC in patients with a normal serum creatinine concentration, clinicians should consider screening ICU patients deemed high risk by using the ARC scoring system or the identification and assessment algorithm provided in this review. In addition, an 8-hour continuous urine collection should be considered to assess a measured creatinine clearance for evaluating the necessity of medication dosage adjustments. There is a clear association between ARC and subtherapeutic antibiotic concentrations as well as literature suggesting worse clinical outcomes; thus, the risk of underdosing antibiotics in a patient with ARC could increase the risk of treatment failure. This review examines strategies to overcome ARC and summarizes current pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic literature in patients with ARC in an effort to provide dosing guidance for this patient population. PMID:26598098

  18. Competing Risk Analysis for Evaluation of Dalteparin Versus Unfractionated Heparin for Venous Thromboembolism in Medical-Surgical Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guowei; Cook, Deborah J.; Levine, Mitchell A.H.; Guyatt, Gordon; Crowther, Mark; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Holbrook, Anne; Lamontagne, Francois; Walter, Stephen D.; Ferguson, Niall D.; Finfer, Simon; Arabi, Yaseen M.; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Cooper, D. Jamie; Thabane, Lehana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Failure to recognize the presence of competing risk or to account for it may result in misleading conclusions. We aimed to perform a competing risk analysis to assess the efficacy of the low molecular weight heparin dalteparin versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) in venous thromboembolism (VTE) in medical-surgical critically ill patients, taking death as a competing risk. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized study of the Prophylaxis for Thromboembolism in Critical Care Trial (PROTECT) database. A total of 3746 medical-surgical critically ill patients from 67 intensive care units (ICUs) in 6 countries receiving either subcutaneous UFH 5000 IU twice daily (n?=?1873) or dalteparin 5000 IU once daily plus once-daily placebo (n?=?1873) were included for analysis. A total of 205 incident proximal leg deep vein thromboses (PLDVT) were reported during follow-up, among which 96 were in the dalteparin group and 109 were in the UFH group. No significant treatment effect of dalteparin on PLDVT compared with UFH was observed in either the competing risk analysis or standard survival analysis (also known as cause-specific analysis) using multivariable models adjusted for APACHE II score, history of VTE, need for vasopressors, and end-stage renal disease: sub-hazard ratio (SHR)?=?0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70–1.21, P-value?=?0.56 for the competing risk analysis; hazard ratio (HR)?=?0.92, 95% CI: 0.68–1.23, P-value?=?0.57 for cause-specific analysis. Dalteparin was associated with a significant reduction in risk of pulmonary embolism (PE): SHR?=?0.54, 95% CI: 0.31–0.94, P-value?=?0.02 for the competing risk analysis; HR?=?0.51, 95% CI: 0.30–0.88, P-value?=?0.01 for the cause-specific analysis. Two additional sensitivity analyses using the treatment variable as a time-dependent covariate and using as-treated and per-protocol approaches demonstrated similar findings. This competing risk analysis yields no significant treatment effect on PLDVT but a superior effect of dalteparin on PE compared with UFH in medical-surgical critically ill patients. The findings from the competing risk method are in accordance with results from the cause-specific analysis. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00182143 PMID:26356708

  19. Secondary Sclerosing Cholangitis in Critically Ill Patients: Clinical Presentation, Cholangiographic Features, Natural History, and Outcome: A Series of 16 Cases.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Silke; Veltzke-Schlieker, Wilfried; Adler, Andreas; Schott, Eckart; Eurich, Dennis; Faber, Wladimir; Neuhaus, Peter; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Secondary sclerosing cholangitis in critically ill patients (SSC-CIP) is an important differential diagnosis in patients presenting with cholestasis and PSC-like cholangiographic changes in endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). As a relatively newly described entity, SSC-CIP is still underdiagnosed, and the diagnosis is often delayed. The present study aims to improve the early detection of SSC-CIP and the identification of its complications.A total of 2633 records of patients who underwent or were listed for orthotopic liver transplantation at the University Hospital Charité, Berlin, were analyzed retrospectively. The clinical presentation and outcome (mean follow-up 62.7 months) of the 16 identified SSC-CIP cases were reviewed.Cholestasis was the first sign of SSC-CIP. GGT was the predominant enzyme of cholestasis. Hypercholesterolemia occurred in at least 75% of the patients. SSC-CIP provoked a profound weight loss (mean 18?kg) in 94% of our patients. SSC-CIP was diagnosed by ERC in all patients. The 3 different cholangiographic features detected correspond roughly to the following stages: (I) evidence of biliary casts, (II) progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts, and (III) picture of pruned tree. Biliary cast formation is a hallmark of SSC-CIP and was seen in 87% of our cases. In 75% of the patients, the clinical course was complicated by cholangiosepsis, cholangitic liver abscesses, acalculous cholecystitis, or gallbladder perforation. SSC-CIP was associated with worse prognosis; transplant-free survival was ?40 months (mean).Because of its high rate of serious complications and unfavorable prognosis, it is imperative to diagnose SSC-CIP early and to differentiate SSC-CIP from other types of sclerosing cholangitis. Specific characteristics enable identification of SSC-CIP. Early cooperation with a transplant center and special attention to biliary complications are required after diagnosis of SSC-CIP. PMID:26656347

  20. [Specifics of working with chronic mentally ill patients in Specialised Social Help Services--experiences in training and supervision meetings].

    PubMed

    Paszko, Jolanta; Wnek, Beata; Za?uska, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Information was presented on the development and efficiency of The Specialised Psychiatric Social Help Services for the mentally ill in Poland. It took into consideration the specifics of this work and formal requirements for special training of the staff. The experiences of the 3.5 years of work of the specialised services in the Warszawa Targówek district (October 1997 - June 2001) were discussed. Organisational solutions and basic data about clients and staff and establishments and experiences coming from training and supervision meetings were discussed. Problems and difficulties most often experienced by the staff workers at their work with chronic mentally ill patients were described. Consideration was put from one side on the big rotation of the staff and from the other on the need of the extension of the theoretical and practical knowledge as well as of supervision and support was often mentioned in the questionnaire. A need of elaborating the programme of training and professional courses for workers of the specialised psychiatric social help services was also pointed out. PMID:15523937

  1. Clinical Illness and Outcomes in Patients with Ebola in Sierra Leone

    PubMed Central

    Schieffelin, J.S.; Shaffer, J.G.; Goba, A.; Gbakie, M.; Gire, S.K.; Colubri, A.; Sealfon, R.S.G.; Kanneh, L.; Moigboi, A.; Momoh, M.; Fullah, M.; Moses, L.M.; Brown, B.L.; Andersen, K.G.; Winnicki, S.; Schaffner, S.F.; Park, D.J.; Yozwiak, N.L.; Jiang, P.-P.; Kargbo, D.; Jalloh, S.; Fonnie, M.; Sinnah, V.; French, I.; Kovoma, A.; Kamara, F.K.; Tucker, V.; Konuwa, E.; Sellu, J.; Mustapha, I.; Foday, M.; Yillah, M.; Kanneh, F.; Saffa, S.; Massally, J.L.B.; Boisen, M.L.; Branco, L.M.; Vandi, M.A.; Grant, D.S.; Happi, C.; Gevao, S.M.; Fletcher, T.E.; Fowler, R.A.; Bausch, D.G.; Sabeti, P.C.; Khan, S.H.; Garry, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Limited clinical and laboratory data are available on patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD). The Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone, which had an existing infrastructure for research regarding viral hemorrhagic fever, has received and cared for patients with EVD since the beginning of the outbreak in Sierra Leone in May 2014. METHODS We reviewed available epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory records of patients in whom EVD was diagnosed between May 25 and June 18, 2014. We used quantitative reverse-transcriptase–polymerase-chain-reaction assays to assess the load of Ebola virus (EBOV, Zaire species) in a subgroup of patients. RESULTS Of 106 patients in whom EVD was diagnosed, 87 had a known outcome, and 44 had detailed clinical information available. The incubation period was estimated to be 6 to 12 days, and the case fatality rate was 74%. Common findings at presentation included fever (in 89% of the patients), headache (in 80%), weakness (in 66%), dizziness (in 60%), diarrhea (in 51%), abdominal pain (in 40%), and vomiting (in 34%). Clinical and laboratory factors at presentation that were associated with a fatal outcome included fever, weakness, dizziness, diarrhea, and elevated levels of blood urea nitrogen, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine. Exploratory analyses indicated that patients under the age of 21 years had a lower case fatality rate than those over the age of 45 years (57% vs. 94%, P = 0.03), and patients presenting with fewer than 100,000 EBOV copies per milliliter had a lower case fatality rate than those with 10 million EBOV copies per milliliter or more (33% vs. 94%, P = 0.003). Bleeding occurred in only 1 patient. CONCLUSIONS The incubation period and case fatality rate among patients with EVD in Sierra Leone are similar to those observed elsewhere in the 2014 outbreak and in previous outbreaks. Although bleeding was an infrequent finding, diarrhea and other gastrointestinal manifestations were common. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:25353969

  2. Chronic Critical Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... others remain critically ill and need a breathing machine for a long time. But we are learning how to take better care of patients with ... critical illness and their families. We are also learning more about what to ... they still need a breathing machine even after weeks in the ICU. For most ...

  3. Acute Respiratory Failure in Critically Ill Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zafrani, Lara; Lemiale, Virginie; Lapidus, Nathanael; Lorillon, Gwenael; Schlemmer, Benoît; Azoulay, Elie

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic known or unknown interstitial lung disease (ILD) may present with severe respiratory flares that require intensive management. Outcome data in these patients are scarce. Patients and Methods Clinical and radiological features were collected in 83 patients with ILD-associated acute respiratory failure (ARF). Determinants of hospital mortality and response to corticosteroid therapy were identified by logistic regression. Results Hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 41% and 54% respectively. Pulmonary hypertension, computed tomography (CT) fibrosis and acute kidney injury were independently associated with mortality (odds ratio (OR) 4.55; 95% confidence interval (95%CI) (1.20–17.33); OR, 7.68; (1.78–33.22) and OR 10.60; (2.25–49.97) respectively). Response to steroids was higher in patients with shorter time from hospital admission to corticosteroid therapy. Patients with fibrosis on CT had lower response to steroids (OR, 0.03; (0.005–0.21)). In mechanically ventilated patients, overdistension induced by high PEEP settings was associated with CT fibrosis and hospital mortality. Conclusion Mortality is high in ILD-associated ARF. CT and echocardiography are valuable prognostic tools. Prompt corticosteroid therapy may improve survival. PMID:25115557

  4. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in critically ill surgical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Delfino Duarte, Pericles Almeida; Fumagalli, Andreia Cristina; Wandeur, Vanessa; Becker, Delmiro

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) is an early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) due to various etiologies. On the other hand, N-GAL is also elevated in patients with acute inflammatory conditions and in several solid neoplasms. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of N-GAL as a predictor of AKI and mortality in oncological surgical patients postoperatively in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: This was a prospective cohort observation study on adult cancer patients submitted to elective or emergency surgeries and admitted in the ICU. Urinary N-GAL was measured at the first 2 h after admission. AKI incidence and other complications were assessed, including hospital mortality. Results: A total of 22 patients were assessed (77% male, age 52.8 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II] 17.3) in whom the most frequent site of cancer was the gastrointestinal tract. AKI incidence was 13.6%. Urinary N-GAL was a predictor of AKI (22.0 ng/ml in patients without AKI vs. 239.1 ng/ml in patients with AKI, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the main predictors of AKI were age, APACHE II, and N-GAL. N-GAL was also higher, although not statistically significant in patients who died in the hospital. Conclusions: In oncological postoperative patients admitted to the ICU, urinary N-GAL was an independent predictor of AKI; moreover, its level was higher in the deceased patients. PMID:25983430

  5. Cardiovascular health monitoring in patients with psychotic illnesses: A project to investigate and improve performance in primary and secondary care

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Rakesh Narendra; Ledingham, David

    2013-01-01

    Patients with psychotic illnesses are predicted to die 15 years younger than the national average. The chief cause is cardiovascular disease (1). Evidence-based guidelines including those produced by the National Institute of Health and clinical Excellence and the Quality Outcomes Framework, recommend regular monitoring of their cardiovascular risk (2,3,4). Primary health care audits were undertaken in an urban and a rural setting. These looked at the proportion of patients who had their physical health regularly monitored in line with NICE guidelines. Following an audit in general practice, it became clear that there was a group of patients that were chronic non-attenders. It was not clear whether these patients were the responsibility of the general practices or psychiatric services. An audit in secondary care then looked at the level of cardiovascular health monitoring in that setting, and the communication of results to primary care. These audits demonstrated that monitoring of cardiovascular health did not meet standards as set by NICE. Further to this, communication of findings between primary and secondary care was also poor. Primary care interventions included setting up Alert reminder boxes on the computer system and sending invitations for clinic attendance to ‘at risk’ patients. In secondary care interventions included redesign of the patient lists to include a way of monitoring cardiovascular health and generation of a new discharge summary to facilitate communication of cardiovascular indicators to primary care. These interventions have resulted in marked improvements in cardiovascular health monitoring in primary care, however, there is still room for considerable improvement. Discussions about further intervention strategies, and further audit cycles, are ongoing.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of imipenem in critically ill patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia and evaluation of dosage regimens

    PubMed Central

    Couffignal, Camille; Pajot, Olivier; Laouénan, Cédric; Burdet, Charles; Foucrier, Arnaud; Wolff, Michel; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Mentré, France; Massias, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Aims Significant alterations in the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antimicrobials have been reported in critically ill patients. We describe PK parameters of imipenem in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia and evaluate several dosage regimens. Methods This French multicentre, prospective, open-label study was conducted in ICU patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by Gram-negative bacilli, who empirically received imipenem intravenously every 8?h. Plasma imipenem concentrations were measured during the fourth imipenem infusion using six samples (trough, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 8?h). Data were analysed with a population approach using the stochastic approximation expectation maximization algorithm in Monolix?4.2. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to evaluate the following six dosage regimens: 500, 750 or 1000?mg with administration every 6 or 8?h. The pharmacodynamic target was defined as the probability of achieving a fractional time above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of >40%. Results Fifty-one patients were included in the PK analysis. Imipenem concentration data were best described by a two-compartment model with three covariates (creatinine clearance, total bodyweight and serum albumin). Estimated clearance (between-subject variability) was 13.2?l?h?1 (38%) and estimated central volume 20.4?l (31%). At an MIC of 4??g?ml?1, the probability of achieving 40% fractional time > MIC was 91.8% for 0.5?h infusions of 750?mg every 6?h, 86.0% for 1000?mg every 8?h and 96.9% for 1000?mg every 6?h. Conclusions This population PK model accurately estimated imipenem concentrations in ICU patients. The simulation showed that for these patients, the best dosage regimen of imipenem is 750?mg every 6?h and not 1000?mg every 8?h. PMID:24903189

  7. Caring for critically ill patients with advanced COPD at the end of life: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Goodridge, Donna; Duggleby, Wendy; Gjevre, John; Rennie, Donna

    2008-06-01

    Providing expert critical care for the high acuity patient with a diagnosis of COPD at the end of life is both complex and challenging. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine intensive care unit (ICU) clinicians' perspectives on the obstacles to providing quality care for individuals with COPD who die within the critical care environment. Transcripts of three focus groups of ICU clinicians were analyzed using thematic analysis. The three themes of "managing difficult symptoms", "questioning the appropriateness of life-sustaining care" and "conflicting care priorities" were noted to be significant challenges in providing high quality end of life care to this population. Difficulties in palliating dyspnea and anxiety were associated with caregiver feelings of helplessness, empathy and fears about "killing the patient". A sense of futility, concerns about "torturing the patient" and questions about the patient/family's understanding of treatment pervaded much of the discourse about caring for people with advanced COPD in the ICU. The need to prioritize care to the most unstable ICU patients meant that patients with COPD did not always receive the attention clinicians felt they should ideally have. Organizational support must be made available for critical care clinicians to effectively deal with these issues. PMID:18313923

  8. The impact of illness in patients with moderate to severe gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Dika, Samer; Guyatt, Gordon H; Armstrong, David; Degl'innocenti, Alessio; Wiklund, Ingela; Fallone, Carlo A; Tanser, Lisa; van Zanten, Sander Veldhuyzen; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Wahlqvist, Peter; Chiba, Naoki; Barkun, Alan N; Austin, Peggy; Schünemann, Holger J

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease. It impairs health related quality of life (HRQL). However, the impact on utility scores and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe GERD is not well known. Methods We analyzed data from 217 patients with moderate to severe GERD (mean age 50, SD 13.7) across 17 Canadian centers. Patients completed three utility instruments – the standard gamble (SG), the feeling thermometer (FT), and the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI 3) – and several HRQL instruments, including Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD) and the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (SF-36). All patients received a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole 40 mg daily, for four to six weeks. Results The mean scores on a scale from 0 (dead) to 1 (full health) obtained for the FT, SG, and HUI 3 were 0.67 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.70), 0.76 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.80), and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.82) respectively. The mean scores on the SF-36 were lower than the previously reported Canadian and US general population mean scores and work productivity was impaired. Conclusion GERD has significant impact on utility scores, HRQL, and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe disease. Furthermore, the FT and HUI 3 provide more valid measurements of HRQL in GERD than the SG. After treatment with esomeprazole, patients showed improved HRQL. PMID:16004616

  9. Reliability and Validity of the Korean Version of the Modified Adult Attachment Scale for the Use of Medically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Byunggu; Rim, Hyo-Deog

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Modified Experiences in Close Relationships (ECR-M36) scale was developed for medically ill, older individuals in 2008 (Toronto, Canada, department of psychosocial oncology and palliative care, Princess Margaret Hospital). The scale has displayed satisfactory reliability and validity. This study aimed to test the reliability and validity of the Korean version of Modified Experiences in Close Relationships (K-ECR-M36) questionnaire in female patients with breast cancer. Methods A total of 199 post-operative breast cancer patients completed the K-ECR-M36 as well as other psychological measures including the Revised Adult Attachment Scale (RAAS), World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Abbreviated Version (WHOQOL-BREF), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The reliability and validity of the K-ECR-M36 were evaluated. Explorative factor analysis was conducted to identify the factor structure of the K-ECR-M36. Results The K-ECR-M36 showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's ?=0.87) and reasonable test-retest reliability (r=0.752, p<0.001). The total as well as avoidance and anxiety subscales demonstrated construct validity with the RAAS, the HADS, and the WHOQOL-BREF. Factor analysis revealed four-factor structure which was originally proposed by Brennan, Clark, and Shaver (1998). Conclusion These findings support that the K-ECR-M36 has satisfactory reliability, validity and factor structure among patients with breast cancer. PMID:26508959

  10. Person-centered psychopathology of schizophrenia: building on Karl Jaspers' understanding of patient's attitude toward his illness.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Giovanni; Bolton, Derek; Fulford, William K M

    2013-03-01

    In this article, building on and extending Jaspers' concept of the "patient's attitude toward his illness" we draw attention to the active role that the person, as a self-interpreting agent engaged in a world shared with other persons, has in interacting with his/her basic disorder and in the shaping of psychopathological syndromes. This person-centered approach helps us to see patients as meaning-making entities rather than passive individuals and their attempt at self-understanding as not necessarily pathological and potentially adaptive. We describe 3 contemporary resources for a person-centered psychopathology: dialectical psychopathology, contemporary approaches to the meanings-causes debate, and value-based practice. Each of these provides a theoretical framework and practical resources for understanding the diversity of schizophrenic phenotypes, including symptom presentation, course, and outcome as a consequence of the different ways people with schizophrenia seek to make sense of the basic changes in self and world experiences. A person-centered approach, in building on patients' individual values and experiences as key aspects of their self-understanding of their psychosis, supports recovery and development of self-management skills. PMID:23314193

  11. Pandemic and post-pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) infection in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a vast amount of information published regarding the impact of 2009 pandemic Influenza A (pH1N1) virus infection. However, a comparison of risk factors and outcome during the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period has not been described. Methods A prospective, observational, multi-center study was carried out to evaluate the clinical characteristics and demographics of patients with positive RT-PCR for H1N1 admitted to 148 Spanish intensive care units (ICUs). Data were obtained from the 2009 pandemic and compared to the 2010-2011 post-pandemic period. Results Nine hundred and ninety-seven patients with confirmed An/H1N1 infection were included. Six hundred and forty-eight patients affected by 2009 (pH1N1) virus infection and 349 patients affected by the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period were analyzed. Patients during the post-pandemic period were older, had more chronic comorbid conditions and presented with higher severity scores (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA)) on ICU admission. Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period received empiric antiviral treatment less frequently and with delayed administration. Mortality was significantly higher in the post-pandemic period. Multivariate analysis confirmed that haematological disease, invasive mechanical ventilation and continuous renal replacement therapy were factors independently associated with worse outcome in the two periods. HIV was the only new variable independently associated with higher ICU mortality during the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period. Conclusion Patients from the post-pandemic Influenza (H1N1)v infection period had an unexpectedly higher mortality rate and showed a trend towards affecting a more vulnerable population, in keeping with more typical seasonal viral infection. PMID:22126648

  12. Anetoderma in a patient with terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects.

    PubMed

    Connor, Cody J; Shchelochkov, Oleg A; Ciliberto, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Terminal osseous dysplasia with pigmentary defects (TODPD) is a rare, X-linked syndrome classically characterized by distal limb anomalies, pigmented skin defects of the face, and recurrent digital fibromas. X-inactivation plays a major role in determining the range of phenotypic expression. Thus, patients can demonstrate a wide spectrum of disease severity, making accurate diagnosis more challenging. Recent studies have identified a FLNA c.5217G>A mutation as the cause of TODPD, allowing for diagnostic genetic testing. We present a case of molecularly confirmed TODPD in a girl with the 47,XXX chromosomal complement and deformities of the hands and feet, craniofacial abnormalities, and discolored, linear facial lesions. Skin biopsy of the patient's facial lesion revealed absent papillary dermal elastic fibers, consistent with anetoderma, which contrasts with the dermal hypoplasia described in the only other such facial biopsy reported in the literature. The finding of absent elastic fibers in the skin lesions suggests that mutated filamin A, in part, exerts its effects through dysregulated elastin biology, which may explain the nature of many connective tissue pleotropic effects in FLNA-related disorders. PMID:26059211

  13. Long-Term Survival in Older Critically Ill Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jinn-Ing; Smith, Maureen A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare survival in older patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with those not requiring ICU care and to assess the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV) and percutaneous gastrostomy tubes (PEG) on long-term mortality. Design Multi-center retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services covering 93 metropolitan counties primarily in the Eastern half of the United States. Patients 31,301 patients discharged with acute ischemic stroke in 2000. Interventions None Measurements Mortality from the time of index hospitalization up to the end of the follow-up period of 12 months. Information was also gathered on use of mechanical ventilation, percutaneous gastrostomy, sociodemographic variables and a host of comorbid conditions. Main Results 26% of all patients with acute ischemic stroke required ICU admission. The crude death rate for ICU stroke patients was 21% at 30 days and 40% at 1-year follow-up. At 30 days, after adjustment of sociodemographic variables and comorbidities, ICU patients had a 29% higher mortality hazard compared to non-ICU patients. Mechanical ventilation was associated with a five-fold higher mortality hazard (hazard ratio 5.59, confidence interval 4.93–6.34). The use of PEG was not associated with mortality at 30 days. By contrast, at 1-year follow up in 30-day survivors, ICU admission was not associated with mortality hazard (hazard ratio 1.01; 95% confidence interval 0.93–1.09). Mechanical ventilation still had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio 1.88, 95% confidence interval 1.57–2.25), and PEG patients had a 2.59 fold greater mortality hazard (95% confidence interval 2.38–2.82). Conclusions Both short-term and long-term mortality in older patients with acute ischemic stroke admitted to ICUs is lower than previously reported. The need for MV and PEG are markers for poor long-term outcome. Future research should focus on the identification of clinical factors that lead to increased mortality in long-term survivors and efforts to reduce those risks. PMID:19661805

  14. Impact of empirical antimicrobial therapy on the outcome of critically ill patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Asiri, Abdulaziz M.; Shimemri, Abdullah; Tamim, Hani M.; Al Johani, Sameera M.; Al Dabbagh, Tarek; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Empirical antimicrobial therapy (EAT) for Acinetobacter infections may not be appropriate as it tends to be multidrug-resistant. This study evaluated the relationship between appropriate EAT and the outcomes of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with Acinetobacter bacteremia. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of patients admitted to a medical-surgical ICU (2005-2010) and developed Acinetobacter bacteremia during the stay. Patients were categorized according to EAT appropriateness, defined as administration of at least one antimicrobial agent to which the Acinetobacter was susceptible before susceptibility results were known. The relation between EAT appropriateness and outcomes was evaluated. RESULTS: Sixty patients developed Acinetobacter bacteremia in the 6-year period (age = 50 ± 19 years; 62% males; Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score = 28 ± 9; 98.3% with central lines; 67% in shock and 59% mechanically ventilated) on average on day 23 of ICU and day 38 of hospital stay. All isolates were resistant to at least three of the tested antimicrobials. Appropriate EAT was administered to 60% of patients, mostly as intravenous colistin. Appropriate EAT was associated with lower ICU mortality risk (odds ratio: 0.15; 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.96) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In this 6-year cohort, Acinetobacter bacteremia was related to multidrug-resistant strains. Appropriate EAT was associated with decreased ICU mortality risk.

  15. Serum visfatin concentration in acutely ill and weight-recovered patients with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Maria; King, Joseph A; Ritschel, Franziska; Döpmann, Johanna; Bühren, Katharina; Seitz, Jochen; Roessner, Veit; Westphal, Sabine; Egberts, Karin; Burghardt, Roland; Wewetzer, Christoph; Fleischhaker, Christian; Hebebrand, Johannes; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    Visfatin is a recently described protein that is thought to regulate the process of adipocyte differentiation. Findings suggest that visfatin may be actively involved in the control of weight regulatory networks. However, to what extent and which role it plays in eating disorders is still poorly understood, as mixed results have been reported. The aim of the current study was to investigate serum visfatin concentrations on a cross sectional sample between acute anorexia nervosa patients (n=44), weight recovered patients (n=13) and healthy controls (n=46) and a longitudinal sample of acute patients (n=57) during weight recovery at three different time-points. Results did not show significant differences in visfatin between the three groups; however, acute patients showed a higher visfatin/BMI-SDS ratio than controls and recovered patients. Longitudinal results revealed an increase of visfatin levels during therapy. Our results suggest that high ratios of visfatin/BMI-SDS could be a state marker in acute anorexia nervosa, displaying a compensatory mechanism of the individual to maintain normal visfatin levels under malnourished conditions. PMID:25617618

  16. The predicting ability of serum potassium to assess the duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Javdan, Zahra; Talakoub, Reihanak; Honarmand, Azim; Golparvar, Mohammad; Farsani, Enayatolah Yadollahi

    2015-01-01

    Background: No previous study has been done to evaluate the admission serum potassium level as a predictor of morbidity or need for mechanical ventilation. The aim of this study is to determine the predictive ability of serum potassium on admission, in critically ill trauma patients, and to evaluate the relation of the potassium level to organ failure, length of stay, ventilator need, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: A prospective, observational study was done on 100 patients >16 years old, admitted to the Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Units (ICU), for over one year. Patients were classified into Group A: Patients who required equal or less than five days of mechanical ventilation and Group B: Patients who required more than five days of mechanical ventilation. The total serum potassium concentrations were measured and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was recorded at the time of admission to the ICU, when connected to the ventilator, and then at the time of weaning from the ventilator. Results: There was no significant difference between the Serum K concentrations between the two groups, on admission. However, there were significant difference between the Serum K concentrations at times of receiving and weaning from mechanical ventilation (MV) between the two groups. We found the best cut-off point of 3.45 for serum potassium concentration, to predict the need for longer duration of MV. Conclusion: Development of hypokalemia during an ICU stay is associated with the need for mechanical ventilation. Monitoring of the serum potassium levels may be a good prognostic factor for the requirement of mechanical ventilation. PMID:26322281

  17. Perspectives on care and communication involving incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, relatives and professionals: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Our aim was to obtain a clearer picture of the relevant care experiences and care perceptions of incurably ill Turkish and Moroccan patients, their relatives and professional care providers, as well as of communication and decision-making patterns at the end of life. The ultimate objective is to improve palliative care for Turkish and Moroccan immigrants in the Netherlands, by taking account of socio-cultural factors in the guidelines for palliative care. Methods A systematic literature review was undertaken. The data sources were seventeen national and international literature databases, four Dutch journals dedicated to palliative care and 37 websites of relevant national and international organizations. All the references found were checked to see whether they met the structured inclusion criteria. Inclusion was limited to publications dealing with primary empirical research on the relationship between socio-cultural factors and the health or care situation of Turkish or Moroccan patients with an oncological or incurable disease. The selection was made by first reading the titles and abstracts and subsequently the full texts. The process of deciding which studies to include was carried out by two reviewers independently. A generic appraisal instrument was applied to assess the methodological quality. Results Fifty-seven studies were found that reported findings for the countries of origin (mainly Turkey) and the immigrant host countries (mainly the Netherlands). The central themes were experiences and perceptions of family care, professional care, end-of-life care and communication. Family care is considered a duty, even when such care becomes a severe burden for the main female family caregiver in particular. Professional hospital care is preferred by many of the patients and relatives because they are looking for a cure and security. End-of-life care is strongly influenced by the continuing hope for recovery. Relatives are often quite influential in end-of-life decisions, such as the decision to withdraw or withhold treatments. The diagnosis, prognosis and end-of-life decisions are seldom discussed with the patient, and communication about pain and mental problems is often limited. Language barriers and the dominance of the family may exacerbate communication problems. Conclusions This review confirms the view that family members of patients with a Turkish or Moroccan background have a central role in care, communication and decision making at the end of life. This, in combination with their continuing hope for the patient’s recovery may inhibit open communication between patients, relatives and professionals as partners in palliative care. This implies that organizations and professionals involved in palliative care should take patients’ socio-cultural characteristics into account and incorporate cultural sensitivity into care standards and care practices. PMID:22985103

  18. Boerhaave Syndrome, Pneumothorax, and Chylothorax in a Critically Ill Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Mohsin; Rafiq, Arsalan; Venkatram, Sindhaghatta; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant, variably expressed multisystem disease. The predominant pulmonary features of TSC are identical to those of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Pneumothorax, multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia, and chylothorax are rare complications of TSC. We report a young male with pneumothorax, lung nodules, and chylous effusion who developed empyema thoracis after esophageal rupture. Hospital course was complicated by respiratory failure. Family opted to transfer to hospice care. Chylothorax is a rare complication of TSC with few scattered reports mostly in female patients. Patients with TSC are usually managed by multispecialists and it is important to be aware of the rare pulmonary manifestations of this disease. A male patient with TSC having lung nodules presenting with chylothorax and empyema thoracis from Boerhaave syndrome makes our case unique. PMID:26550497

  19. Impact of Hypoalbuminemia on Voriconazole Pharmacokinetics in Critically Ill Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wauters, Joost; Vercammen, Ine; de Loor, Henriette; Maertens, Johan; Lagrou, Katrien; Annaert, Pieter; Spriet, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Setting the adequate dose for voriconazole is challenging due to its variable pharmacokinetics. We investigated the impact of hypoalbuminemia (<35 g/liter) on voriconazole pharmacokinetics in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients treated with voriconazole (20 samples in 13 patients) as well as in plasma samples from ICU patients that had been spiked with voriconazole at concentrations of 1.5 mg/liter, 2.9 mg/liter, and 9.0 mg/liter (66 samples from 22 patients). Plasma albumin concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 38.7 g/liter. Total voriconazole concentrations in adult ICU patients treated with voriconazole ranged from 0.5 to 8.7 mg/liter. Unbound and bound voriconazole concentrations were separated using high-throughput equilibrium dialysis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSMS). Multivariate analysis revealed a positive relationship between voriconazole plasma protein binding and plasma albumin concentrations (P < 0.001), indicating higher unbound voriconazole concentrations with decreasing albumin concentrations. The correlation is more pronounced in the presence of elevated bilirubin concentrations (P = 0.05). We therefore propose to adjust the measured total voriconazole concentrations in patients with abnormal plasma albumin and total serum bilirubin plasma concentrations who show adverse events potentially related to voriconazole via a formula that we developed. Assuming 50% protein binding on average and an upper limit of 5.5 mg/liter for total voriconazole concentrations, the upper limit for unbound voriconazole concentrations is 2.75 mg/liter. Alterations in voriconazole unbound concentrations caused by hypoalbuminemia and/or elevated bilirubin plasma concentrations cannot be countered immediately, due to the adult saturated hepatic metabolism. Consequently, increased unbound voriconazole concentrations can possibly cause adverse events, even when total voriconazole concentrations are within the reference range. PMID:25182655

  20. Assessing nutrition in the critically ill elderly patient: A comparison of two screening tools

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Few malnutrition screening tests are validated in the elderly Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patient. Aim: Having previously established malnutrition as a cause of higher mortality in this population, we compared two screening tools in elderly patients. Subjects and Methods: For this prospective study, 111 consecutive patients admitted to the ICU and > 65 years underwent the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), and the Geriatric Nutrition Risk Index (GNRI) screening tests. Statistical Analysis: Standard definition of malnutrition risk was taken as the gold standard to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the tools. The k statistic was calculated to measure the agreement between the tools. The Shrout classification was used to interpret its values. Results: The mean age of the patients screened was 74.7 ± 8.4 (65–97 years). The standard definition, MUST and GNRI identified 52.2%, 65.4%, and 64.9% to be malnourished, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the tests were 96.5% computed tomography (CI) (87.9–99.5%) and 72.3% CI (57.5–84.5%) for MUST and 89.5% CI (75.2–96.7%) and 55.0% CI (75.2–96.9%) for GNRI, respectively. Screening was not possible by GNRI and MUST tool in 31% versus 4% of patients, respectively. The agreement between the tools was moderate for Standard-MUST k = 0.65 and MUST-GNRI k = 0.60 and fair for Standard-GNRI k = 0.43. Conclusions: The risk of malnutrition is high among our patients as identified by all the tools. Both GNRI and MUST showed a high sensitivity with MUST showing a higher specificity and greater applicability. PMID:26430337

  1. Is the tyramine test for depressive illness useful in elderly patients?

    PubMed

    Arnold, E; Fineberg, N; Hannah, P; Glover, V; Pitt, B; Sandler, M

    1992-09-01

    There were no significant differences in tyramine sulphate excretion following tyramine ingestion between elderly depressed, demented or control patient groups, in contrast with younger subjects where this test is a trait marker for unipolar endogenous depression. There are inherent problems in urine collection studies in the elderly and the results may have been influenced by the medication that elderly patients have to take for other disorders. This study suggests that the tyramine test is unlikely to be of clinical usefulness in the over 65 age group. PMID:1430663

  2. Along the Cancer Continuum: Integrating Therapeutic Support and Bereavement Groups for Children and Teens of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Biank, Nancee M.

    2009-01-01

    Family life is altered irrevocably when a young parent is diagnosed with or dies from cancer. This article tracks the genesis and transformation of a comprehensive psychoeducational support and bereavement program for children, adolescents, and parents affected by cancer. From the inception of the program, families with parents in active treatment…

  3. Postextubation laryngeal edema and stridor resulting in respiratory failure in critically ill adult patients: updated review.

    PubMed

    Pluijms, Wouter A; van Mook, Walther Nka; Wittekamp, Bastiaan Hj; Bergmans, Dennis Cjj

    2015-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation. PMID:26395175

  4. Half of the family members of critically ill patients experience excessive daytime sleepiness

    PubMed Central

    Verceles, Avelino C.; Corwin, Douglas S.; Afshar, Majid; Friedman, Eliot B.; McCurdy, Michael T.; Shanholtz, Carl; Oakjones, Karen; Zubrow, Marc T.; Titus, Jennifer; Netzer, Giora

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleepiness and fatigue are commonly reported by family members of intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Sleep deprivation may result in cognitive deficits. Sleep deprivation and cognitive blunting have not been quantitatively assessed in this population. We sought to determine the proportion of family members of ICU patients that experience excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep-associated functional impairment, and cognitive blunting. Methods Multicenter, cross-sectional survey of family members of patients admitted to ICUs at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University Hospital, and Christiana Hospital. Family members of ICU patients were evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, a validated survey assessing sleepiness in everyday situations (normal, less than 10); the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-10 (FOSQ-10), a questionnaire quantifying the impact of sleepiness on daily activities (normal, at least 17.9); and psychomotor vigilance testing, a test of cognitive function, in relation to sleep deprivation (normal mean reaction time less than 500 ms). Results A total of 225 family members were assessed. Of these, 50.2 % (113/225) had Epworth scores consistent with excessive daytime sleepiness. Those with sleepiness experienced greater impairment in performing daily activities by FOSQ-10 (15.6 ± 3.0 vs 17.4 ± 2.2, p < 0.001). Cognitive blunting was found in 13.3 % (30/225) of family members and 15.1 % (14/93) of surrogate decision-makers. Similar rates of cognitive blunting as reported by mean reaction time of at least 500 ms were found among family members whether or not they reported sleepiness (15.0 % (17/113) vs. 11.6 % (13/112), p = 0.45). Conclusions Half of the family members of ICU patients suffer from excessive daytime sleepiness. This sleepiness is associated with functional impairment, but not cognitive blunting. PMID:24898893

  5. Do heart and respiratory rate variability improve prediction of extubation outcomes in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged ventilation and failed extubation are associated with increased harm and cost. The added value of heart and respiratory rate variability (HRV and RRV) during spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs) to predict extubation failure remains unknown. Methods We enrolled 721 patients in a multicenter (12 sites), prospective, observational study, evaluating clinical estimates of risk of extubation failure, physiologic measures recorded during SBTs, HRV and RRV recorded before and during the last SBT prior to extubation, and extubation outcomes. We excluded 287 patients because of protocol or technical violations, or poor data quality. Measures of variability (97 HRV, 82 RRV) were calculated from electrocardiogram and capnography waveforms followed by automated cleaning and variability analysis using Continuous Individualized Multiorgan Variability Analysis (CIMVA™) software. Repeated randomized subsampling with training, validation, and testing were used to derive and compare predictive models. Results Of 434 patients with high-quality data, 51 (12%) failed extubation. Two HRV and eight RRV measures showed statistically significant association with extubation failure (P <0.0041, 5% false discovery rate). An ensemble average of five univariate logistic regression models using RRV during SBT, yielding a probability of extubation failure (called WAVE score), demonstrated optimal predictive capacity. With repeated random subsampling and testing, the model showed mean receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (ROC AUC) of 0.69, higher than heart rate (0.51), rapid shallow breathing index (RBSI; 0.61) and respiratory rate (0.63). After deriving a WAVE model based on all data, training-set performance demonstrated that the model increased its predictive power when applied to patients conventionally considered high risk: a WAVE score >0.5 in patients with RSBI >105 and perceived high risk of failure yielded a fold increase in risk of extubation failure of 3.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2 to 5.2) and 3.5 (95% CI 1.9 to 5.4), respectively. Conclusions Altered HRV and RRV (during the SBT prior to extubation) are significantly associated with extubation failure. A predictive model using RRV during the last SBT provided optimal accuracy of prediction in all patients, with improved accuracy when combined with clinical impression or RSBI. This model requires a validation cohort to evaluate accuracy and generalizability. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01237886. Registered 13 October 2010. PMID:24713049

  6. Gradual sucrose gastric loading test: A method for the prediction of nonsuccess gastric enteral feeding in critically ill surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Chittawatanarat, Kaweesak; Sathornviriyapong, Suun; Polbhakdee, Yaowalak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intolerance of gastric enteral feeding (GEN) commonly occurs in surgical Intensive Care Unit (SICU). A liquid containing sugar could prolong gastric emptying time. This study was to propose a method for prediction of nonsuccess GEN using gastric volume after loading (GVAL) following gradual sucrose gastric loading. Materials and Methods: Mechanical ventilator supported and hemodynamically stable patients in SICU were enrolled. About 180-240 min before the GEN starting, a sucrose solution (12.5%; 450 mosmole/kg, 800 mL) was administered via gastric feeding tube over 30 min with 45° head upright position. GVAL was measured at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after loading. GEN success status using clinical criteria was assessed at 72 h after the starting GEN protocol. The receiving operating characteristic (ROC) and c statistic were used for discrimination at each time point of GVAL. Results: A total of 32 patients were enrolled and completed the protocol. 14 patients (43.7%) were nonsuccessful GEN. The nonsuccess group was found to have significantly more GVAL than the other group at all-time points during the test (P < 0.05). The most discriminating point of GVAL for the prediction of nonsuccess was 150 mL at 120 min after loading with a sensitivity of 92.3%, specificity of 88.9%, positive predictive value of 85.7%, negative predictive value of 94.1%, and ROC area 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.91–1.00). Conclusion: A high GVAL following sucrose gastric loading test might be a method to predict nonsuccess GEN in critically ill surgical patients. PMID:25722551

  7. Goal-directed diuresis: A case — control study of continuous furosemide infusion in critically ill trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Daniel Dante; Van Der Wilden, Gwendolyn M.; Cropano, Catrina; Chang, Yuchiao; King, David R.; De Moya, Marc; Fagenholz, Peter; Kaafarani, Haytham; Lee, Jarone; Velmahos, George

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excessive crystalloid administration is common and associated with negative outcomes in critically ill trauma patients. Continuous furosemide infusion (CFI) to remove excessive fluid has not been previously described in this population. We hypothesized that a goal-directed CFI is more effective for fluid removal than intermittent bolus injection (IBI) diuresis without excess incidence of hypokalemia or renal failure. Materials and Methods: CFI cases were prospectively enrolled between November 2011 and August 2012, and matched to historic IBI controls by age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and net fluid balance (NFB) at diuresis initiation. Paired and unpaired analyses were performed to compare groups. The primary endpoints were net fluid balance, potassium and creatinine levels. Secondary endpoints included intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS), ventilator-free days (VFD), and mortality. Results: 55 patients were included, with 19 cases and 36 matched controls. Mean age was 54 years, mean ISS was 32.7, and mean initial NFB was +7.7 L. After one day of diuresis with CFI vs. IBI, net 24 h fluid balance was negative (?0.55 L vs. +0.43 L, P = 0.026) only for the CFI group, and there was no difference in potassium and creatinine levels. Cumulative furosemide dose (59.4mg vs. 25.4mg, P < 0.001) and urine output (4.2 L vs. 2.8 L, P < 0.001) were also significantly increased with CFI vs. IBI. There were no statistically significant differences in ICU LOS, hospital LOS, VFD, or mortality. Conclusions: Compared to IBI, goal-directed diuresis by CFI is more successful in achieving net negative fluid balance in patients with fluid overload with no detrimental side effects on renal function or patient outcome. PMID:25709251

  8. Height measurement in the critically ill patient: A tall order in the critical care unit

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Ramesh; Ranganathan, Lakshmi; Nirmal, Vipin; Kameshwaran, J.; Sheela, C. V.; Renuka, M. V.; Ramakrishnan, Nagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Height measurement in the critical care unit is necessary for estimating ideal body weight and providing titrated patient care. In this study, we compare three methods of height assessment and evaluate their level of correlation and inter-observer reproducibility. Heights of 100 consecutive patients were assessed independently by two nurses by supine, four point, and arm span methods. Paired sample t-test, one-way analysis of variance, Tukey's honestly significant difference post-hoc analysis and Bland–Altman plots were performed to assess agreement between measurements. Arm span method showed higher mean height compared to supine and four point methods. Mean heights derived by supine and four point measurements were similar to each other but were significantly different from that of arm span method (P < 0.001). Inter-observer correlation of the measured heights was very good among all three methods. The supine method seems to be easy, accurate, and reproducible in our study.

  9. Colistin Population Pharmacokinetics after Application of a Loading Dose of 9 MU Colistin Methanesulfonate in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Friberg, Lena E; Pontikis, Konstantinos; Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Tsagkari, Vasiliki; Galani, Lamprini; Kostakou, Eirini; Baziaka, Fotini; Paskalis, Charalambos; Koutsoukou, Antonia; Giamarellou, Helen

    2015-12-01

    Colistin has been revived, in the era of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative infections, as the last-resort treatment in critically ill patients. Recent studies focusing on the optimal dosing strategy of colistin have demonstrated the necessity of a loading dose at treatment initiation (D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, L. E. Friberg, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, I. Tsangaris, I. Karaiskos, G. Poulakou, F. Kontopidou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and H. Giamarellou, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53:3430-3436, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01361-08; A. F. Mohamed, I. Karaiskos, D. Plachouras, M. Karvanen, K. Pontikis, B. Jansson, E. Papadomichelakis, A. Antoniadou, H. Giamarellou, A. Armaganidis, O. Cars, and L. E. Friberg, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 56:4241- 4249, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.06426-11; S. M. Garonzik, J. Li, V. Thamlikitkul, D. L. Paterson, S. Shoham, J. Jacob, F. P. Silveira, A. Forrest, and R. L. Nation, Antimicrob Agents Chemother 55:3284-3294, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01733-10). In 19 critically ill patients with suspected or microbiologically documented infections caused by XDR Gram-negative strains, a loading dose of 9 MU colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) (?270 mg colistin base activity) was administered with a maintenance dose of 4.5 MU every 12 h, commenced after 24 h. Patients on renal replacement were excluded. CMS infusion was given over 30 min or 1 h. Repeated blood sampling was performed after the loading dose and after the 5th or 6th dose. Colistin concentrations and measured CMS, determined after hydrolization to colistin and including the partially sulfomethylated derivatives, were determined with a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted in NONMEM with the new data combined with data from previous studies. Measured colistimethate concentrations were described by 4 compartments for distribution and removal of sulfomethyl groups, while colistin disposition followed a 1-compartment model. The average observed maximum colistin A plus B concentration was 2.65 mg/liter after the loading dose (maximum time was 8 h). A significantly higher availability of the measured A and B forms of colistimethate and colistin explained the higher-than-expected concentrations in the present study compared to those in previous studies. Creatinine clearance was a time-varying covariate of colistimethate clearance. The incidence of acute renal injury was 20%. PMID:26369974

  10. Effects of patient-directed music intervention on anxiety and sedative exposure in critically ill patients receiving mechanical-ventilatory support: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chlan, Linda L.; Weinert, Craig R.; Heiderscheit, Annie; Tracy, Mary Fran; Skaar, Debra J.; Guttormson, Jill L.; Savik, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Context Alternatives to sedative medications are needed to reduce anxiety in mechanically ventilated patients. Music is an integrative therapy without adverse effects that may alleviate the anxiety associated with ventilatory support. Objective To test whether patient-directed, self-initiated music listening can reduce anxiety and sedative exposure during ventilatory support in critically ill patients as compared with 2 control conditions. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized, controlled trial that enrolled 373 ICU patients from the Minneapolis-St. Paul area receiving acute mechanical-ventilatory support for respiratory failure between September 2006 and March 2011. Patients were Caucasian (86%), female (52%), with mean age 59 (SD 14), APACHE III 63 (SD 21.6), on protocol 5.7 (SD 6.4) days. Intervention Patients (1) self-initiated music listening (patient-directed music; PDM) with preferred selections tailored by a music therapist whenever desired while receiving ventilatory support, (2) self-initiated use of noise-abating headphones (HP), or (3) received usual ICU care (UC). Main Outcome Measures Daily assessments of anxiety (100-mm visual analog scale) and two aggregate measure of sedative exposure (sedation intensity and sedation frequency). Results Mixed-models analysis showed that PDM patients had decreased levels of anxiety compared with the UC group of ?19.5 (p=.003). By the fifth study day anxiety was reduced by 36.5% in PDM patients. The interaction between treatment and time showed PDM significantly reduced both measures of sedative exposure. PDM reduced sedation intensity by ?.18 (?.36, ?.004) points per day and frequency by ?.21 (?.37, ?.05) points per day compared to UC (p = .05, .01 respectively). PDM reduced sedation frequency by ?.18 (?.36, ?.004) points per day compared to HP (p = .04). By the fifth study day, PDM patients received two fewer sedative doses (reduction of 38%) and had a reduction of 36% in sedation intensity. There was no significant decline in sedation intensity compared to HP (p = .32). Conclusions Among ICU patients receiving acute ventilatory support for respiratory failure, self-initiated music resulted in greater reduction in anxiety compared with usual care. Concurrently, PDM resulted in greater reduction in sedation frequency compared with usual care or self-initiated noise-abating headphones, and greater reduction in sedation intensity compared with usual care. Combining a modest reduction in sedative exposure while maintaining a lower level of anxiety, PDM is an ideal non-pharmacological intervention to improve patients' tolerance of mechanical ventilation. PMID:23689789

  11. A minimal model for glycemia control in critically ill patients Tom Van Herpe, Bert Pluymers, Marcelo Espinoza, Greet Van den Berghe, and Bart De Moor

    E-print Network

    minimal model to be used for glycemia control in critically ill patients. For various reasons the Bergman], Parker et al. [8], among others). The Bergman model (also well known as "minimal model") is characterized been introduced in [3]. II. THE MINIMAL MODEL In this section the original Bergman model and its

  12. Severe respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus, in a patient transferred to the United Kingdom from the Middle East, September 2012.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, A; Chand, M A; Brown, C S; Aarons, E; Tong, C; Langrish, C; Hoschler, K; Brown, K; Galiano, M; Myers, R; Pebody, R G; Green, H K; Boddington, N L; Gopal, R; Price, N; Newsholme, W; Drosten, C; Fouchier, R A; Zambon, M

    2012-01-01

    Coronaviruses have the potential to cause severe transmissible human disease, as demonstrated by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak of 2003. We describe here the clinical and virological features of a novel coronavirus infection causing severe respiratory illness in a patient transferred to London, United Kingdom, from the Gulf region of the Middle East. PMID:23078800

  13. Religiousness, religious coping with illness, and psychological function among Polish elderly patients with osteoarthritis undergoing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Stecz, Patryk; Kocur, Józef

    2015-04-01

    To determine the influence of religious coping and religiousness on the psychological functioning of Polish patients before and after arthroplasty, a prospective study was performed. Out of a pool of 102 potential participants, a total of 61 (34 females, 27 males) completed a purposely created survey, Brief-COPE followed by preoperative and postoperative Perceived Stress Scale, State Trait Anxiety Inventory and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Religious coping was not associated with: (1) perceived stress before or after surgery; (2) preoperative or postoperative anxiety; (3) life satisfaction. A two-factor ANOVA has shown that religious coping controlled by religiousness was related to better psychological functioning. Between- and within-subjects effects were observed for improvement in life satisfaction measured by split-plot ANOVA, which suggests (p < 0.05) that such improvement was greater among subjects of higher religious orientation. We concluded that religious strategies in dealing with stress measured by Brief-COPE were least likely to benefit patients of low-religious orientation. The study demonstrated the importance of core religious beliefs in predicting benefits derived from religiousness in the face of a crisis. This study showed that regardless of its effectiveness, turning to religion is common among Polish patients about to undergo surgery for osteoarthritis of the hip. PMID:24563370

  14. Urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in severely ill patients in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Mattede, Maria das Graças Silva; Piras, Cláudio; Mattede, Kelly Dematte Silva; Ferrari, Aline Trugilho; Baldotto, Lorena Simões; Assbu, Michel Silvestre Zouain

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence of urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. in an intensive care unit. Methods This descriptive observational study was conducted in an intensive care unit between 2007 and 2009. All consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit with a confirmed diagnosis were evaluated. Results Twenty patients presented with urinary tract infections due to Trichosporon spp. The prevalence was higher among men (65%) and among individuals > 70 years of age (55%). The mortality rate was 20%. The average intensive care unit stay was 19.8 days. The onset of infection was associated with prior use of antibiotics and was more frequent in the fall and winter. Conclusion Infection due to Trichosporon spp. was more common in men and among those > 70 years of age and was associated with the use of an indwelling urinary catheter for more than 20 days and with the use of broadspectrum antibiotics for more than 14 days. In addition, patients with urinary infection due to Trichosporon spp. were most often hospitalized in intensive care units in the fall and winter periods. PMID:26465246

  15. Performance of a new oxygen delivery device for potentially infectious critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Y Y; Kwok, W H; Gomersall, C D

    2013-10-01

    In patients with highly contagious diseases that are spread by respiratory droplets or air-borne particles, the use of high-flow oxygen may carry a significant risk of nosocomial transmission. We tested a new oxygen delivery device designed to address these problems by simulating 108 patients with sepsis and respiratory failure. The device being tested consisted of an airtight mask, a bacterial and viral filter, a T-shaped reservoir (50 and 100 ml) and oxygen delivery tubing connected directly to the mask. When tested with a 50-ml reservoir, a high fractional oxygen concentration was achieved: mean (SD) 0.83 (0.11) at a flow of 15 l.min(-1) oxygen. The 50-ml reservoir, when compared with the 100-ml reservoir, was associated with reduced carbon dioxide rebreathing (mean (SD) inspired fractional carbon dioxide concentration 2.5 (1.0) vs 3.0 (1.1), respectively, p = 0.009) and reduced inspiratory resistive work of breathing (mean (SD) 1.0 (0.6) J.l(-1) vs 1.2 (0.5) J.l(-1), respectively, p = 0.028). However, rebreathing and work of breathing were relatively high if a high respiratory rate was simulated. We conclude that the novel oxygen device we describe, equipped with the 50-ml T-shaped reservoir, is suitable for potentially infectious patients with type-1 respiratory failure but without marked tachypnoea. PMID:23902163

  16. Economic factors influencing the implementation of community care for severely ill schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Lien, Lars

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of long-term schizophrenic patients are discharged from hospitals and taken care of in the community. This change in tendency has both a professional and economical side. The beneficial outcome of community care is well established. The aim of this paper is to appraise the economical implications and possibilities of community care compared to standard hospital care. The price elasticity for mental health services is higher than for other medical services. The demand for mental health care can not be directly compared with the demand for other types of care. This is due to lack of information on what is defined as good quality treatment in care and to define who is the demander of mental health care. Due to lack of defined demand and externalities encountered in the care for psychiatric patients, psychiatric treatment must be seen as a good that warrants government involvement in the financing and delivery of the service. The number in need of community care is estimated to be 12 per 100,000. To find the allocative efficiency in spending of resources on mental health care, it is important to look for the right balance between hospital and community care. There is evidence to assume that community care is more cost effective than hospital-based care. This does not apply to the most disabled schizophrenic patients where the costs are higher and outcome is the same. It is important to measure the costs incurred to family and friends when the total costs of community care are calculated and to find technically efficient production. The literature indicates that the physician/non-physician ratio has been too high. There are reports of dis-economies of scale, but economies of scope might be apparent. There are strong arguments in favour of state provision of psychiatric care for schizophrenic patients most in need. Otherwise the mental health care sector must be regulated with incentives that serve the need of the patients and encourage the most cost-effective treatment. Due to the risk of opportunism, specific assets and bounded rationality contracting involving clinical services should be avoided. PMID:15881822

  17. Antibiotic Prescriptions in Critically-Ill Patients: A Latin American Experience

    PubMed Central

    Curcio, D

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is widely acknowledged that the presence of infection is an important outcome determinant for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In fact, antibiotics are one of the most common therapies administered in the ICU settings. Aim: To evaluate the current usage of antibiotics in Latin American ICUs. Subjects and Methods: A one-day p-oint prevalence study to investigate the patterns of antibiotic was undertaken in 72 Latin American (LA) ICUs. Data was analyzed using the Statistix 8 statistical software, version 2.0 (USA). Results were expressed as proportions. When applicable, two tailed hypothesis testing for difference in proportions was used (Proportion Test); a P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of 704 patients admitted, 359 received antibiotic treatment on the day of the study (51%), of which 167/359 cases (46.5%) were due to hospital-acquired infections. The most frequent infection reorted was nosocomial pneumonia (74/359, 21%). Only in 264/359 patients (73.5%), cultures before starting antibiotic treatment were performed. Thirty-eight percent of the isolated microorganisms were Enterobacteriaceae extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing, 11% methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 10% carbapenems-resistant non-fermentative Gram-negatives. The antibiotics most frequently prescribed were carbapenems (125/359, 35%), alone or in combination with vancomycin or other antibiotic. There were no significant differences in the “restricted” antibiotic prescription (carbapenems, vancomycin, piperacillin–tazobactam, broad-spectrum cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, tigecycline and linezolid) between patients with APACHE II score at the beginning of the antibiotic treatment <15 [83/114 (72.5%)] and ?15 [179/245 (73%)] (P = 0.96). Only 29% of the antibiotic treatments were cultured directed (104/359). Conclusion: Carbapenems (alone or in combination) were the most frequently prescribed antibiotics in LA ICUs. However, the problem of carbapenem resistance in LA requires that physicians improve the use of this class of antibiotics. Our findings show that our web-based method for collection of one-day point prevalence was implemented successfully. However, based on the limitations of the model used, the results of this study must be taken with caution. PMID:23919194

  18. Alexithymia: Should This Personality Disorder Be Considered During Treatment of Patients With Mental Illness?

    PubMed

    Reeves, Roy R; Johnson-Walker, Deidra

    2015-08-01

    Alexithymia is characterized by impairment of an individual's ability to experience, identify, and express emotions, and is associated with impaired emotional intelligence and an externally oriented cognitive style. There has been increasing interest in the phenomenon, with numerous peer-reviewed articles published recently. Alexithymia may occur in patients with many psychiatric disorders, and more severe alexithymia is related to worse outcome. However, many clinicians remain unaware of the issue. The current article discusses alexithymia and its importance in the field of mental health. PMID:26268478

  19. End-of-life issues in the acute and critically ill patient

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Eric A; Marco, Catherine A

    2009-01-01

    The challenges of end-of-life care require emergency physicians to utilize a multifaceted and dynamic skill set. Such skills include medical therapies to relieve pain and other symptoms near the end-of-life. Physicians must also demonstrate aptitude in comfort care, communication, cultural competency, and ethical principles. It is imperative that emergency physicians demonstrate a fundamental understanding of end-of-life issues in order to employ the versatile, multidisciplinary approach required to provide the highest quality end-of-life care for patients and their families. PMID:19386133

  20. [Exploring and Responding to a Wish to Hasten Death of a patient with Advanced Illness].

    PubMed

    Mazzocato, Claudia; Séchaud, Laurence

    2015-02-25

    It is not uncommon for patients with an advanced disease to express a desire to their physician to hasten their death. Recent studies show that the motivation of such a desire is multifactorial and multidimensional, including depression, physical, psycho-social and spiritual suffering, fears about the process of dying and/or misunderstandings about the options for end-of-life care. The objective of this paper is to propose to the physician how to explore the dimensions of this request and some elements to answer it. PMID:25711787

  1. Clinical significance of ischemia modified albumin in critically ill patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, A K; Anand, Usha

    2015-04-01

    The study was conducted on 38 patients admitted into the intensive care unit with a provisional diagnosis of sepsis and 25 apparently healthy volunteers as controls. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) was assayed by an electrochemiluminescence method. Serum ischemia modified albumin (IMA), expressed as absorbance units was assayed by the albumin cobalt binding test. Patients with sepsis had significantly higher IMA levels (1.087 ± 0.786) as compared with those without sepsis (0.085 ± 0.234) with a p value <0.0001. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) plot showed a sensitivity of 100 % and a specificity of 86.2 %. The area under the curve of the ROC plot was 0.917 with a p value of <0.0001. The higher levels of IMA serve to highlight the occurrence of ischemic damage which could be a prelude to poorer prognosis. The performance characteristics of IMA warrants its inclusion along with PCT as a parameter in the diagnosis of sepsis. PMID:25883428

  2. Targeted metabolomics for discrimination of systemic inflammatory disorders in critically ill patients[S

    PubMed Central

    Schmerler, Diana; Neugebauer, Sophie; Ludewig, Katrin; Bremer-Streck, Sibylle; Brunkhorst, Frank Martin; Kiehntopf, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) remains a major problem in intensive care units with high morbidity and mortality. The differentiation between noninfectious and infectious etiologies of this disorder is challenging in routine clinical practice. Many biomarkers have been suggested for this purpose; however, sensitivity and specificity even of high-ranking biomarkers remain insufficient. Recently, metabolic profiling has attracted interest for biomarker discovery. The objective of this study was to identify metabolic biomarkers for differentiation of SIRS/sepsis. A total of 186 meta-bolites comprising six analyte classes were determined in 143 patients (74 SIRS, 69 sepsis) by LC-MS/MS. Two markers (C10:1 and PCaaC32:0) revealed significantly higher concentrations in sepsis. A classification model comprising these markers resulted in 80% and 70% correct classifications in a training set and a test set, respectively.This study demonstrates that acylcarnitines and glycerophosphatidylcholines may be helpful for differentiation of infectious from noninfectious systemic inflammation due to their significantly higher concentration in sepsis patients. Considering the well known pathophysiological relevance of lipid induction by bacterial components, metabolites as identified in this study are promising biomarker candidates in the differential diagnosis of SIRS and sepsis. PMID:22581935

  3. Methemoglobinemia in critically ill patients during extended hemodialysis and simultaneous disinfection of the hospital water supply

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate the cause of methemoglobinemia in patients undergoing extended daily hemodialysis/hemodiafiltration we analyzed the relationship between methemoglobinemia and the water disinfection schedule of the hospital. Methods We reviewed all arterial blood gas analyses, obtained over a one-year period, in patients undergoing extended hemodialysis/hemodiafiltration, and compared the methemoglobin concentrations obtained on the days when the water supply was disinfected, using a hydrogen peroxide/silver ion preparation, with data measured on disinfection-free days. Results The evaluation of 706 measurements revealed a maximum methemoglobin fraction of 1.0 (0.8; 1.2) % (median and 25th; 75th percentiles) during hemodialysis/hemodiafiltration on the disinfection-free days. The methemoglobin fraction increased to 5.9 (1.3; 8.4) % with a maximal value of 12.2% on the days of water disinfection (P < 0.001 compared to disinfection-free days). Spot checks on hydrogen peroxide concentrations in the water supply, the permeate, and the dialysate, using a semi-quantitative test, demonstrated levels between 10 and 25 mg/l during water disinfection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that even a regular hospital water disinfection technique can be associated with significant methemoglobinemia during extended hemodialysis. Clinicians should be aware of this potential hazard. PMID:19821985

  4. Clinical review: Ethics and end-of-life care for critically ill patients in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Critical care medicine in China has made great advances in recent decades. This has led to an unavoidable issue: end-of-life ethics. With advances in medical technology and therapeutics allowing the seemingly limitless maintenance of life, the exact time of death of an individual patient is often determined by the decision to limit life support. How to care for patients at the end of life is not only a medical problem but also a social, ethical, and legal issue. A lot of factors, besides culture, come into play in determining a person’s ethical attitudes or behaviors, such as experience, education, religion, individual attributes, and economic considerations. Chinese doctors face ethical problems similar to those of their Western counterparts; however, since Chinese society is different from that of Western countries in cultural traditions, customs, religious beliefs, and ethnic backgrounds, there is a great difference between China and the Western world in regard to ethics at the end of life, and there is also a huge controversy within China. PMID:24313980

  5. Economic and humanistic burden of illness in generalized anxiety disorder: an analysis of patient survey data in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Toghanian, Samira; DiBonaventura, Marco; Järbrink, Krister; Locklear, Julie C

    2014-01-01

    Background Whilst studies suggest that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) represents a considerable health care burden in Europe, there is a paucity of published evidence. This study investigated the burden of illness associated with GAD across five European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK). Methods Information from the 2008 European National Health and Wellness Survey database was analyzed. Bivariate, multivariate, and cost analyses were used to compare patients with GAD and propensity-matched controls. Results Compared with non-GAD controls, patients with GAD had more comorbidities and were more likely to smoke but less likely to be employed, use alcohol, or take exercise. They also had significantly worse health-related quality of life, and significantly greater work impairment and resource use, which increased as GAD severity increased. Within-country analyses demonstrated results similar to those for the five European countries overall, with the largest differences in resource use between patients with GAD and non-GAD controls documented in France and Germany. The average mean differences in direct costs were relatively small between the GAD groups and controls; however, indirect costs differed substantially. Costs were particularly high in Germany, mainly due to higher salaries leading to higher costs associated with absence from work. The limitation of this study was that the data were from a self-reported Internet survey, making them subject to reporting bias and possibly sample bias. Conclusion Across all five European countries, GAD had a significant impact on work impairment, resource use, and economic costs, representing a considerable individual and financial burden that increased with severity of disease. These data may help us to understand better the burden and costs associated with GAD. PMID:24729720

  6. Oesophageal bezoar as a complication of enteral nutrition in critically ill patients. Two case studies.

    PubMed

    Gil-Almagro, Fernanda; Carmona-Monge, Francisco Javier

    2016-02-01

    Enteral nutrition has a relatively low incidence of major complications. The most common complications are mechanical problems, bronchoaspiration and diarrhoea. A rare complication associated with the use of enteral nutrition is oesophageal bezoar. A bezoar is a body of undigested and partially digested matter in the gastrointestinal tract. The main risks factors are gastric motility dysfunction and the use of opiates or sucralfate. The aim of this paper was to present two cases of oesophageal obstruction resulting from the formation of bezoars due to enteral nutrition. Both patients experienced prolonged stays in the intensive care unit and were receiving enteral nutrition, and both cases involved an obstruction of the nasogastric tube and the regurgitation of solid chunks of enteral nutrition through the mouth and the nose. Impactions of solidified enteral nutrition in the distal parts of the oesophagus were confirmed with gastroscopies. Enzymatic complexes containing papain, cellulose, pancreatin, pepsin and diastase were used to successfully dissolve the bezoars in both cases. PMID:26531231

  7. Feasibility and safety of early combined cognitive and physical therapy for critically ill medical and surgical patients: the Activity and Cognitive Therapy in ICU (ACT-ICU) trial

    PubMed Central

    Brummel, N.E.; Girard, T.D.; Ely, E.W.; Pandharipande, P.P.; Morandi, A.; Hughes, C.G.; Graves, A.J.; Shintani, A.K.; Murphy, E.; Work, B.; Pun, B.T.; Boehm, L.; Gill, T.M.; Dittus, R.S.; Jackson, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Cognitive impairment after critical illness is common and debilitating. We developed a cognitive therapy program for critically ill patients and assessed the feasibility and safety of administering combined cognitive and physical therapy early during a critical illness. METHODS We randomized 87 medical and surgical ICU patients with respiratory failure and/or shock in a 1:1:2 manner to three groups: usual care, early once-daily physical therapy, or early once-daily physical therapy plus a novel, progressive, twice-daily cognitive therapy protocol. Cognitive therapy included orientation, memory, attention, and problem solving exercises, and other activities. We assessed feasibility outcomes of the early cognitive plus physical therapy intervention. At 3-months, we also assessed cognitive, functional and health-related quality of life outcomes. Data are presented as median [interquartile range] or frequency (%). RESULTS Early cognitive therapy was a delivered to 41/43 (95%) of cognitive plus physical therapy patients on 100% [92–100%] of study days beginning 1.0 [1.0–1.0] day following enrollment. Physical therapy was received by 17/22 (77%) of usual care patients, by 21/22 (95%) of physical therapy only patients and 42/43 (98%) of cognitive plus physical therapy patients on 17% [10–26%], 67% [46–87%] and 75% [59–88%] of study days, respectively. Cognitive, functional and health-related quality of life outcomes did not differ between groups at 3-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS This pilot study demonstrates that early rehabilitation can be extended beyond physical therapy to include cognitive therapy. Future work to determine optimal patient selection, intensity of treatment and benefits of cognitive therapy in the critically ill is needed. PMID:24257969

  8. Clinical Usefulness of Procalcitonin and C-Reactive Protein as Outcome Predictors in Critically Ill Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeong-Am; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Daesang; Park, Chi-Min; Suh, Gee Young; Jeon, Kyeongman; Cho, Joongbum; Baek, Sun Young; C. Carriere, Keumhee; Chung, Chi Ryang

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are the most frequently used biomarkers in sepsis. We investigated changes in PCT and CRP concentrations in critically ill patients with sepsis to determine which biochemical marker better predicts outcome. We retrospectively analyzed 171 episodes in 157 patients with severe sepsis and septic shock who were admitted to the Samsung Medical Center intensive care unit from March 2013 to February 2014. The primary endpoint was patient outcome within 7 days from ICU admission (treatment failure). The secondary endpoint was 28-day mortality. Severe sepsis was observed in 42 (25%) episodes from 41 patients, and septic shock was observed in 129 (75%) episodes from 120 patients. Fifty-five (32%) episodes from 42 patients had clinically-documented infection, and 116 (68%) episodes from 99 patients had microbiologically-documented infection. Initial peak PCT and CRP levels were not associated with treatment failure and 28-day mortality. However, PCT clearance (PCTc) and CRP (CRPc) clearance were significantly associated with treatment failure (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively) and marginally significant with 28-day mortality (p = 0.064 and p = 0.062, respectively). The AUC for prediction of treatment success was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.82) for PCTc and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.61–0.81) for CRPc. The AUC for survival prediction was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.66–0.88) for PCTc and 0.77 (95% CI, 0.67–0.88) for CRPc. Changes in PCT and CRP concentrations were associated with outcomes of critically ill septic patients. CRP may not be inferior to PCT in predicting outcome in these patients. PMID:26367532

  9. What Level of Self-Care Agency in Mental Illness? The Factors Affecting Self-Care Agency and Self-Care Agency in Patients with Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Çiftçi, Bahar; Y?ld?r?m, Naci; ?ahin Altun, Özlem; Av?ar, Gülçin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate self-care agency and the factors affecting self-care agency in patients with psychiatric disorders. The population of the study comprised patients diagnosed with mental disorders at the clinics of psychiatry in Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital and Atatürk University Research Hospital. Patient information forms and the Self-Care Agency Scale were used to collect the study data. Psychiatric nurse collected the data from the patients face to face. This study determined that the average age of the patients was determined to be 32.19±1.11. The findings indicated that the mean self-care agency level of the patients was 79.3±23.2. It was also found that the differences between sex, educational status, socio-economic status, and self-care agency levels were statistically significant (p<0.05). In conclusion, the patients' self-care agency levels were determined to be mid-level. The findings suggest that people with mental disorders have difficulty identifying their need for self-care. Thus, periodic training programs are necessary to increase self-care levels and further research studies of this type should be done on larger groups. PMID:26577549

  10. Diagnostic Overshadowing and Other Challenges Involved in the Diagnostic Process of Patients with Mental Illness Who Present in Emergency Departments with Physical Symptoms – A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Shefer, Guy; Henderson, Claire; Howard, Louise M.; Murray, Joanna; Thornicroft, Graham

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative study in the Emergency Departments (EDs) of four hospitals in order to investigate the perceived scope and causes of ‘diagnostic overshadowing’ – the misattribution of physical symptoms to mental illness – and other challenges involved in the diagnostic process of people with mental illness who present in EDs with physical symptoms. Eighteen doctors and twenty-one nurses working in EDs and psychiatric liaisons teams in four general hospitals in the UK were interviewed. Interviewees were asked about cases in which mental illness interfered with diagnosis of physical problems and about other aspects of the diagnostic process. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically. Interviewees reported various scenarios in which mental illness or factors related to it led to misdiagnosis or delayed treatment with various degrees of seriousness. Direct factors which may lead to misattribution in this regard are complex presentations or aspects related to poor communication or challenging behaviour of the patient. Background factors are the crowded nature of the ED environment, time pressures and targets and stigmatising attitudes held by a minority of staff. The existence of psychiatric liaison team covering the ED twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, can help reduce the risk of misdiagnosis of people with mental illness who present with physical symptoms. However, procedures used by emergency and psychiatric liaison staff require fuller operationalization to reduce disagreement over where responsibilities lie. PMID:25369130

  11. Scalable Predictive Analysis in Critically Ill Patients Using a Visual Open Data Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Poucke, Sven Van; Zhang, Zhongheng; Schmitz, Martin; Vukicevic, Milan; Laenen, Margot Vander; Celi, Leo Anthony; Deyne, Cathy De

    2016-01-01

    With the accumulation of large amounts of health related data, predictive analytics could stimulate the transformation of reactive medicine towards Predictive, Preventive and Personalized (PPPM) Medicine, ultimately affecting both cost and quality of care. However, high-dimensionality and high-complexity of the data involved, prevents data-driven methods from easy translation into clinically relevant models. Additionally, the application of cutting edge predictive methods and data manipulation require substantial programming skills, limiting its direct exploitation by medical domain experts. This leaves a gap between potential and actual data usage. In this study, the authors address this problem by focusing on open, visual environments, suited to be applied by the medical community. Moreover, we review code free applications of big data technologies. As a showcase, a framework was developed for the meaningful use of data from critical care patients by integrating the MIMIC-II database in a data mining environment (RapidMiner) supporting scalable predictive analytics using visual tools (RapidMiner's Radoop extension). Guided by the CRoss-Industry Standard Process for Data Mining (CRISP-DM), the ETL process (Extract, Transform, Load) was initiated by retrieving data from the MIMIC-II tables of interest. As use case, correlation of platelet count and ICU survival was quantitatively assessed. Using visual tools for ETL on Hadoop and predictive modeling in RapidMiner, we developed robust processes for automatic building, parameter optimization and evaluation of various predictive models, under different feature selection schemes. Because these processes can be easily adopted in other projects, this environment is attractive for scalable predictive analytics in health research. PMID:26731286

  12. A mathematical model for predicting glucose levels in critically-ill patients: the PIGnOLI model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glycemic control is of paramount importance in the intensive care unit. Presently, several BG control algorithms have been developed for clinical trials, but they are mostly based on experts’ opinion and consensus. There are no validated models predicting how glucose levels will change after initiating of insulin infusion in critically ill patients. The study aimed to develop an equation for initial insulin dose setting. Methods. A large critical care database was employed for the study. Linear regression model fitting was employed. Retested blood glucose was used as the independent variable. Insulin rate was forced into the model. Multivariable fractional polynomials and interaction terms were used to explore the complex relationships among covariates. The overall fit of the model was examined by using residuals and adjusted R-squared values. Regression diagnostics were used to explore the influence of outliers on the model. Main Results. A total of 6,487 ICU admissions requiring insulin pump therapy were identified. The dataset was randomly split into two subsets at 7 to 3 ratio. The initial model comprised fractional polynomials and interactions terms. However, this model was not stable by excluding several outliers. I fitted a simple linear model without interaction. The selected prediction model (Predicting Glucose Levels in ICU, PIGnOLI) included variables of initial blood glucose, insulin rate, PO volume, total parental nutrition, body mass index (BMI), lactate, congestive heart failure, renal failure, liver disease, time interval of BS recheck, dextrose rate. Insulin rate was significantly associated with blood glucose reduction (coefficient: ?0.52, 95% CI [?1.03, ?0.01]). The parsimonious model was well validated with the validation subset, with an adjusted R-squared value of 0.8259. Conclusion. The study developed the PIGnOLI model for the initial insulin dose setting. Furthermore, experimental study is mandatory to examine whether adjustment of the insulin infusion rate based on PIGnOLI will benefit patients’ outcomes. PMID:26082861

  13. Is Omega-3 Fatty Acids Enriched Nutrition Support Safe for Critical Ill Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Jiang, Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Tao, Ye-Xuan; Cai, Bin; Liu, Jie; Yang, Hao; Lu, Charles Damien; Zeng, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the effects of omega-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (FA) enriched nutrition support on the mortality of critically illness patients. Methods: Databases of Medline, ISI, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedicine Database were searched and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. We enrolled RCTs that compared fish oil enriched nutrition support and standard nutrition support. Major outcome is mortality. Methodological quality assessment was conducted based on Modified Jadad’s score scale. For control heterogeneity, we developed a method that integrated I2 test, nutritional support route subgroup analysis and clinical condition of severity. RevMan 5.0 software (The Nordic Cochrane Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark) was used for meta-analysis. Results: Twelve trials involving 1208 patients that met all the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity existed between the trials. A random model was used, there was no significant effect on mortality RR, 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.62, 1.09), p = 0.18. Knowing that the route of fish oil administration may affect heterogeneity, we categorized the trials into two sub-groups: parenteral administration (PN) of omega-3 and enteral administration (EN) of omega-3. Six trials administered omega-3 FA through PN. Pooled results indicated that omega-3 FA had no significant effect on mortality, RR 0.76, 95% CI (0.52, 1.10), p = 0.15. Six trials used omega-3 fatty acids enriched EN. After excluded one trial that was identified as source of heterogeneity, pooled data indicated omega-3 FA enriched EN significant reduce mortality, RR=0.69, 95% CI [0.53, 0.91] (p = 0.007). Conclusion: Omega-3 FA enriched nutrition support is safe. Due to the limited sample size of the included trials, further large-scale RCTs are needed. PMID:24886987

  14. A mathematical model for predicting glucose levels in critically-ill patients: the PIGnOLI model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glycemic control is of paramount importance in the intensive care unit. Presently, several BG control algorithms have been developed for clinical trials, but they are mostly based on experts' opinion and consensus. There are no validated models predicting how glucose levels will change after initiating of insulin infusion in critically ill patients. The study aimed to develop an equation for initial insulin dose setting. Methods. A large critical care database was employed for the study. Linear regression model fitting was employed. Retested blood glucose was used as the independent variable. Insulin rate was forced into the model. Multivariable fractional polynomials and interaction terms were used to explore the complex relationships among covariates. The overall fit of the model was examined by using residuals and adjusted R-squared values. Regression diagnostics were used to explore the influence of outliers on the model. Main Results. A total of 6,487 ICU admissions requiring insulin pump therapy were identified. The dataset was randomly split into two subsets at 7 to 3 ratio. The initial model comprised fractional polynomials and interactions terms. However, this model was not stable by excluding several outliers. I fitted a simple linear model without interaction. The selected prediction model (Predicting Glucose Levels in ICU, PIGnOLI) included variables of initial blood glucose, insulin rate, PO volume, total parental nutrition, body mass index (BMI), lactate, congestive heart failure, renal failure, liver disease, time interval of BS recheck, dextrose rate. Insulin rate was significantly associated with blood glucose reduction (coefficient: -0.52, 95% CI [-1.03, -0.01]). The parsimonious model was well validated with the validation subset, with an adjusted R-squared value of 0.8259. Conclusion. The study developed the PIGnOLI model for the initial insulin dose setting. Furthermore, experimental study is mandatory to examine whether adjustment of the insulin infusion rate based on PIGnOLI will benefit patients' outcomes. PMID:26082861

  15. Enhanced Protein-Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding (PEPuP) protocol in critically ill surgical patients: a multicentre prospective evaluation.

    PubMed

    Declercq, B; Deane, A M; Wang, M; Chapman, M J; Heyland, D K

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal levels of feeding in critically ill patients are associated with poor clinical outcomes. The Enhanced Protein-Energy Provision via the Enteral Route Feeding (PEPuP) protocol was developed to improve nutritional delivery in the critically ill and has been studied in several hospitals. However, the experience with this protocol in surgical patients is limited to date. The objective of this analysis was to describe the experience with this protocol in surgical patients. We analysed observational patient data obtained from the 2013 International Nutrition Survey. We compared nutritional practices and outcomes of patients admitted for surgical and medical reasons to ICUs in sites that implemented the PEPuP protocol. We used surgical ICU patients in non-PEPuP sites as a concurrent control group. In sites that implemented the PEPuP protocol, surgical patients received a smaller proportion of prescribed calories (43% versus 61%, P=0.004) and protein (38% versus 57%, P=0.002) compared to medical patients. When compared to the cohort of surgical patients from control sites, the surgical patients from PEPuP sites received similar amounts of calories and protein. Although surgical PEPuP patients were more likely to receive trophic and volume-based feeds compared to surgical patients in control sites, other aspects of the PEPuP protocol were not adequately implemented. We conclude that nutritional delivery to surgical patients remains inadequate and the PEPuP protocol seems ineffective in improving nutritional intake in this population. Further research to determine methods of optimising PEPuP protocol implementation and adherence in surgery patients is needed. PMID:26673594

  16. The RIFLE versus AKIN classification for incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury in critical ill patients: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jiachuan; Tang, Xi; Hu, Zhangxue; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity and accuracy of the Risk/Injury/Failure/Loss/End-stage (RIFLE) versus acute kidney injury Network (AKIN) criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients remains uncertain. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the incidence and prognostic value of the RIFLE versus AKIN criteria for AKI in critically ill patients. Literatures were identified by searching Medline, Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database. Nineteen studies with 171,889 participants were included. The pooled estimates of relative risk (RR) were analyzed. We found that the RIFLE and AKIN criteria is different for the incidence of AKI in intensive care unit (ICU) patients (P?=?0.02, RR?=?0.88), while not for cardiac surgery patients (P?=?0.30, RR?=?0.93). For AKI-related hospital mortality, the AKIN criteria did not show a better ability in predicting hospital mortality in either ICU (P?=?0.19, RR?=?1.01) or cardiac surgery patients (P?=?0.61, RR?=?0.98) compared to RIFLE criteria. Our findings supported that the AKIN criteria can identify more patients in classifying AKI compared to RIFLE criteria, but not showing a better ability in predicting hospital mortality. Moreover, both RIFLE and AKIN criteria for AKI in cardiac surgery patients had better predictive ability compared with the ICU patients. PMID:26639440

  17. The RIFLE versus AKIN classification for incidence and mortality of acute kidney injury in critical ill patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiachuan; Tang, Xi; Hu, Zhangxue; Nie, Ling; Wang, Yiqin; Zhao, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    The sensitivity and accuracy of the Risk/Injury/Failure/Loss/End-stage (RIFLE) versus acute kidney injury Network (AKIN) criteria for acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients remains uncertain. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the incidence and prognostic value of the RIFLE versus AKIN criteria for AKI in critically ill patients. Literatures were identified by searching Medline, Embase, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database. Nineteen studies with 171,889 participants were included. The pooled estimates of relative risk (RR) were analyzed. We found that the RIFLE and AKIN criteria is different for the incidence of AKI in intensive care unit (ICU) patients (P?=?0.02, RR?=?0.88), while not for cardiac surgery patients (P?=?0.30, RR?=?0.93). For AKI-related hospital mortality, the AKIN criteria did not show a better ability in predicting hospital mortality in either ICU (P?=?0.19, RR?=?1.01) or cardiac surgery patients (P?=?0.61, RR?=?0.98) compared to RIFLE criteria. Our findings supported that the AKIN criteria can identify more patients in classifying AKI compared to RIFLE criteria, but not showing a better ability in predicting hospital mortality. Moreover, both RIFLE and AKIN criteria for AKI in cardiac surgery patients had better predictive ability compared with the ICU patients. PMID:26639440

  18. Aspects of Spirituality in Medical Doctors and Their Relation to Specific Views of Illness and Dealing with Their Patients' Individual Situation

    PubMed Central

    Büssing, Arndt; Hirdes, Almut Tabea; Baumann, Klaus; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Heusser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We intended to analyse which aspects of spirituality are of relevance for medical doctors in a mostly secular society and how their spiritual/religious attitudes are related to specific views of illness, their dealing with patients' individual situation, and finally physicians' life satisfaction. Data from an anonymous survey enrolling 237 medical doctors from Germany (mean age 45.7 ± 9.6, 58% male, 42% female) indicated that secular forms of spirituality scored highest, while specific religious orientation had the lowest scores. Physicians with a specific specialization in complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) or anthroposophic medicine differed from their conventional counterparts with respect to specific aspects of spirituality; however, the specific views associated with these specialisations were only weakly to moderately correlated with physicians' view on the meaning of illness and how they assume that they would deal with their patients' individual situation. Of interest, the specific aspects of spirituality were negatively correlated with the view of “illness as a meaningless interruption” of life, indicating that physicians with a spiritual attitude would see illness also as a chance for an “individual development” and associated with a “biographical meaning” rather than just a “useless interruption” of life. PMID:23956779

  19. Circulating soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor is stably elevated during the first week of treatment in the intensive care unit and predicts mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction suPAR is the soluble form of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), which is expressed in various immunologically active cells. High suPAR serum concentrations are suggested to reflect the activation of the immune system in circumstances of inflammation and infection, and have been associated with increased mortality in different populations of non-intensive care patients. In this study we sequentially analyzed suPAR serum concentrations within the first week of intensive care in a large cohort of well characterized intensive care unit (ICU) patients, in order to investigate potential regulatory mechanisms and evaluate the prognostic significance in critically ill patients. Methods A total of 273 patients (197 with sepsis, 76 without sepsis) were studied prospectively upon admission to the medical intensive care unit (ICU), on Day 3 and Day 7, and compared to 43 healthy controls. Clinical data, various laboratory parameters as well as investigational inflammatory cytokine profiles were assessed. Patients were followed for approximately one year. Results Upon admission to the ICU suPAR serum concentrations were elevated in critically ill patients as compared with healthy controls. In sepsis patients suPAR levels were higher than in non-sepsis patients (with or without systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)). During the first week after admission to the ICU serum suPAR concentrations remained stably elevated. suPAR serum concentrations measured upon admission were closely and independently correlated to various laboratory parameters, specifically biomarkers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor (TNF), C-reactive protein (CRP)), hepatic and renal dysfunction. High suPAR levels at admission and at Day 3 were a strong independent predictor for both ICU and long-term mortality in critically ill patients. Conclusions In sepsis and non-sepsis patients suPAR serum concentrations are increased upon admission to the ICU, likely reflecting the activation state of the immune system, and remain stably elevated in the initial course of treatment. Low suPAR levels are a positive predictor of ICU- and overall survival in critically ill patients, including sepsis and non-sepsis patients. Aside from its value as a promising new prognostic biomarker, both experimental and clinical studies are required in order to understand the specific effects and regulatory mechanisms of suPAR in SIRS and sepsis, and may reveal new therapeutic options. PMID:21324198

  20. The "re-entry group"--a transitional therapeutic framework for mentally ill patients discharged from the hospital to community clinics.

    PubMed

    Karniel-Lauer, E; Szor, H; Livne, S; Melamed, Y; Spiro, S; Elizur, A

    2000-11-01

    An effective transition of the psychiatric patient from the hospital to the community clinic is vital to the continuity of care. This study shows a short-term group, the "re-entry group," to be more effective in this transition than are patients discharged from a psychiatric hospital by the traditional process. We used a psychoeducational approach to facilitate active participation and compliance with outpatient therapy. Outcome variables included absorption of patients into the clinic, continued therapy, compliance with treatment, rehospitalization, level of knowledge regarding illness and medication, quality of rehabilitation, and attitude towards treatment. PMID:11143835

  1. Risks and Benefits of Low Molecular-Weight Heparin and Target-Specific Oral Anticoagulant Use for Thromboprophylaxis in Medically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Hale, Genevieve; Brenner, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Venous thromboembolism is the third most common cardiovascular disease and a major cause of inpatient mortality as over 50 % of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism are undetected in medically treated patients. Several agents are approved for thromboprophylaxis, including warfarin, unfractionated heparin, low molecular-weight heparins, fondaparinux, and target-specific oral anticoagulants. The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the increased risk of venous thromboembolism in medically ill patients and the literature surrounding the efficacy and tolerability of low molecular-weight heparins and target-specific oral anticoagulants for this indication. PubMed, MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and clinicaltrials.gov were used as search engines in the literature review. Search limits included articles containing human subjects, scholarly (peer-reviewed) journals written in English, and publication dates from 2004 to 2014. Animal studies, non-English articles, and publications dated prior to 2004 were excluded. Recurrent venous thromboembolism remains an ongoing problem affecting thousands of people in the non-surgical population annually. With limited data, it is not likely that target-specific oral anticoagulants will soon replace low molecular-weight heparins or even be considered an alternative until efficacy and tolerability have been established. Until further evidence is disclosed, low molecular-weight heparins and fondaparinux (in the absence of renal dysfunction and low body weight) should continue to be utilized as first-line agents for thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients. The use of apixaban and rivaroxaban is discouraged for thromboprophylaxis in medically ill patients. PMID:25957095

  2. Description of behaviors in nonverbal critically ill patients with a traumatic brain injury when exposed to common procedures in the intensive care unit: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Le, Quynh; Gélinas, Céline; Arbour, Caroline; Rodrigue, Nathalie

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral indicators are strongly recommended for pain assessment in nonverbal patients. Although pain-related behaviors have been studied in critically ill patients, those with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been either excluded or underrepresented. Because these patients also likely experience pain, research is urgently needed to generate knowledge in this field. This pilot study aimed to explore pain-related behaviors of critically ill TBI patients when exposed to common procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU), using video recording at the bedside and a newly developed coding system. Ten TBI patients hospitalized in the ICU participated. A 44-item behavioral checklist created from existing tools was used as a coding system to identify behaviors before, during, and 20 minutes after a nociceptive procedure (turning) and a nonnociceptive procedure (noninvasive blood pressure [NIBP]). Patients were video recorded to check for interrater agreement between two trained observers. TBI patients exhibited more behaviors during turning than at rest or during NIBP (p < .001). The following behaviors were observed during turning: levator contraction (n = 7), frowning (n = 5), opening eyes (n = 5), weeping eyes (n = 5), raising eyebrows (n = 5), activating the ventilator alarms (n = 7), and muscle tension (n = 5). No change in behaviors was noted during NIBP. After educational training and using videos, the average percentage of agreement for observed behaviors between two trained research assistants was 96%. Pain in critically ill TBI patients can be detrimental to health and recovery. ICU clinicians should be aware of pain-related behaviors to enable better detection and treatment in this highly vulnerable group. PMID:24315278

  3. Fixed-Dose Subcutaneous Methylnaltrexone in Patients with Advanced Illness and Opioid-Induced Constipation: Results of a Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study and Open-Label Extension

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Charles V.; Israel, Robert J.; Barrett, Andrew C.; Paterson, Craig; Forbes, William P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone (MNTX), dosed based on body weight, is efficacious and well tolerated in inducing bowel movements in patients with advanced illness and opioid-induced constipation (OIC); however, fixed-dose administration of MNTX may improve ease of administration. Objective: The study objective was to assess safety and efficacy of fixed-dose MNTX in two phase 4 trials. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (RCT), patients with advanced illness and OIC received MNTX (8?mg or 12?mg by body weight [38?kg to <62?kg or ?62?kg, respectively]) or placebo every other day (QOD) for two weeks. Patients completing the RCT could enroll in an open-label extension (OLE) study with MNTX administered as needed (PRN). The primary endpoint was percentage of patients with a rescue-free bowel movement (RFBM) within four hours after ?2 of the first 4 doses in the first week. Results: In the RCT, 116 and 114 patients received MNTX and placebo, respectively, and 149 patients continued to the OLE study. The percentage of patients achieving primary endpoint was 62.9% and 9.6% for MNTX and placebo groups, respectively (p<0.0001). Median time to RFBM after the first dose was 0.8 hour and 23.6 hours in MNTX and placebo groups, respectively (p<0.0001). Efficacy results during the OLE study were consistent with the RCT. MNTX demonstrated a favorable safety profile in the RCT and OLE study. Conclusion: Fixed-dose MNTX administered QOD in the RCT and PRN in the OLE study demonstrated robust efficacy and was well tolerated in treating OIC in patients with advanced illness. PMID:25973526

  4. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered cefoperazone and sulbactam when given in combination to infected, seriously ill, elderly patients.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J I; Jauregui, L E; Bachmann, K A; Martin, M E; Reitberg, D P

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone and sulbactam in combination were evaluated in six, elderly, seriously ill patients treated with the drug combination for intra-abdominal infections. After giving informed consent, three males and three females aged 63.5 to 77.5 (mean 67.9) years and weighing 54.5 to 86.8 (mean, 67.6) kg were treated with cefoperazone (2.0 g) and sulbactam (1.0 g) infused intravenously every 12 h for at least 5 days. Cefoperazone and sulbactam pharmacokinetics were characterized on both days 1 and 5 of treatment. Eleven serial blood samples were obtained just prior to and following dose 1 on days 1 and 5 of treatment. Mean estimates of cefoperazone maximal concentration in plasma (Cmax), area under the curve of drug concentration in plasma versus time (AUC), half-life (t 1/2), apparent volume of distribution by the area method (Varea), apparent volume of distribution at steady state (Vss), and total body clearance (CL) for day 1 (day 5) were 297.5 237.5) micrograms/ml, 1,247 (1,063) micrograms.h/ml, 7.0 (4.9) h, 16.1 (13.4) liter, 13.1 (14.4) liter, and 28.9 (34.2) ml/min, respectively. Day 1 (day 5) mean values for sulbactam Cmax, AUC, t 1/2, Varea, Vss, and CL were 110.3 (78.0) micrograms/ml, 228 (217) micrograms.h/ml, 3.4 (2.5) h, 26.1 (18.5) liter, 18.9 (15.4) liter, and 97 (94) ml/min, respectively. Both drugs evidenced slower elimination and greater pharmacokinetic variability in these patients compared with values previously reported for normal volunteers. As patients improved during the course of therapy, the only pharmacokinetic parameter significantly changed between days 1 and 5 was a shortened sulbactam t 1/2. Our inability to find substantial evidence of pharmacokinetic normalization may have been related to sample size and study duration. Both drugs were present in potentially therapeutic concentrations for the entire 12-h dosing interval, but without undue accumulation from days 1 to 5. PMID:3395103

  5. The Deyo-Charlson and Elixhauser-van Walraven Comorbidity Indices as predictors of mortality in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Ladha, Karim S; Zhao, Kevin; Quraishi, Sadeq A; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Klein, Eric N; Seethala, Raghu; Lee, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our primary objective was to compare the utility of the Deyo-Charlson Comorbidity Index (DCCI) and Elixhauser-van Walraven Comorbidity Index (EVCI) to predict mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Setting Observational study of 2 tertiary academic centres located in Boston, Massachusetts. Participants The study cohort consisted of 59?816 patients from admitted to 12 ICUs between January 2007 and December 2012. Primary and secondary outcome For the primary analysis, receiver operator characteristic curves were constructed for mortality at 30, 90, 180, and 365?days using the DCCI as well as EVCI, and the areas under the curve (AUCs) were compared. Subgroup analyses were performed within different types of ICUs. Logistic regression was used to add age, race and sex into the model to determine if there was any improvement in discrimination. Results At 30?days, the AUC for DCCI versus EVCI was 0.65 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.67) vs 0.66 (95% CI 0.65 to 0.66), p=0.02. Discrimination improved at 365?days for both indices (AUC for DCCI 0.72 (95% CI 0.71 to 0.72) vs AUC for EVCI 0.72 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.72), p=0.46). The DCCI and EVCI performed similarly across ICUs at all time points, with the exception of the neurosciences ICU, where the DCCI was superior to EVCI at all time points (1-year mortality: AUC 0.73 (95% CI 0.72 to 0.74) vs 0.68 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.70), p=0.005). The addition of basic demographic information did not change the results at any of the assessed time points. Conclusions The DCCI and EVCI were comparable at predicting mortality in critically ill patients. The predictive ability of both indices increased when assessing long-term outcomes. Addition of demographic data to both indices did not affect the predictive utility of these indices. Further studies are needed to validate our findings and to determine the utility of these indices in clinical practice. PMID:26351192

  6. Association of Over-The-Counter Pharmaceutical Sales with Influenza-Like-Illnesses to Patient Volume in an Urgent Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Timothy Y.; Sanders, Jason L.; Tsui, Fu-Chiang; Espino, Jeremy U.; Dato, Virginia M.; Suyama, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We studied the association between OTC pharmaceutical sales and volume of patients with influenza-like-illnesses (ILI) at an urgent care center over one year. OTC pharmaceutical sales explain 36% of the variance in the patient volume, and each standard deviation increase is associated with 4.7 more patient visits to the urgent care center (p<0.0001). Cross-correlation function analysis demonstrated that OTC pharmaceutical sales are significantly associated with patient volume during non-flu season (p<0.0001), but only the sales of cough and cold (p<0.0001) and thermometer (p<0.0001) categories were significant during flu season with a lag of two and one days, respectively. Our study is the first study to demonstrate and measure the relationship between OTC pharmaceutical sales and urgent care center patient volume, and presents strong evidence that OTC sales predict urgent care center patient volume year round. PMID:23555647

  7. Voodoo illness.

    PubMed

    Campinha-Bacote, J

    1992-01-01

    Healthcare providers must familiarize themselves with specific culture-bound syndromes and their manifestations in order to provide quality care to culturally diverse clients seeking healthcare services. Voodoo illness is one of several culture-bound syndromes that nurses need to be familiar with, for an inability to understand voodoo illness may result in the client's death (voodoo death). PMID:1542554

  8. Red cell distribution width improves the simplified acute physiology score for risk prediction in unselected critically ill patients

    E-print Network

    Hunzike, Sabina

    Introduction: Recently, red cell distribution width (RDW), a measure of erythrocyte size variability, has been shown to be a prognostic marker in critical illness. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adding ...

  9. Serum Vitamin D levels at admission predict the length of intensive care unit stay but not in-hospital mortality of critically ill surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Nafiseh; Khalili, Hossein; Mohammadi, Mostafa; Abdollahi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Objective: There is few data regarding the correlation between serum Vitamin D level and unfavorable intensive care unit (ICU) outcome in postsurgical patients. In this study, correlation between serum 25(OH)D level and length of ICU stay and in-hospital mortality has been evaluated in critically ill surgical patients. Methods: Serum 25(OH)D has been evaluated in 70 surgical, critically ill patients. Demographic, laboratory, and clinical data of the patients were collected. Correlation between serum 25(OH) D level and duration of ICU stay and hospital mortality was evaluated using two-factor analysis of covariance. Multivariable Cox-regression analysis was used for adjusting the effect of season of blood sampling and type of surgery on the main variables. For all the analyses, P values less than or equal to 0.05 were considered as statistically significant. Findings: Serum 25(OH)D deficiency was identified in 52 (74.3%) of the patients. Patients with serum Vitamin D levels < 30 ng/ml had longer length of ICU stay than those with serum Vitamin D levels ? 30 ng/ml (7.8 ± 5.1 vs. 4.05 ± 2.12 days, P = 0.003). Although hospital mortality was more common in Vitamin D deficient patients than sufficient ones (25% in deficient group versus 22.2% in sufficient group), there was no significant difference regarding hospital mortality rate between the groups. Conclusion: Statistically significant association was found between low 25(OH)D level and increased length of ICU stay in critically ill surgical patients. It could be explained by favorable effects of Vitamin D on immune system functions, reducing tissue dysfunction, and risk of organ failure and overall complications. However, there was no correlation between serum Vitamin D level and patients’ in-hospital mortality. Further, well-designed prospective clinical studies with adequate sample size are needed to evaluate correlation between serum Vitamin D level and mortality in critically ill patients.

  10. Impact of migration on illness experience and help-seeking strategies of patients from Turkey and Bosnia in primary health care in Basel.

    PubMed

    Gilgen, D; Maeusezahl, D; Salis Gross, C; Battegay, E; Flubacher, P; Tanner, M; Weiss, M G; Hatz, C

    2005-09-01

    Migration, particularly among refugees and asylum seekers, poses many challenges to the health system of host countries. This study examined the impact of migration history on illness experience, its meaning and help-seeking strategies of migrant patients from Bosnia and Turkey with a range of common health problems in general practice in Basel, Switzerland. The Explanatory Model Interview Catalogue, a data collection instrument for cross-cultural research which combines epidemiological and ethnographic research approaches, was used in semi-structured one-to-one patient interviews. Bosnian patients (n=36) who had more traumatic migration experiences than Turkish/Kurdish (n=62) or Swiss internal migrants (n=48) reported a larger number of health problems than the other groups. Psychological distress was reported most frequently by all three groups in response to focussed queries, but spontaneously reported symptoms indicated the prominence of somatic, rather than psychological or psychosocial, problems. Among Bosnians, 78% identified traumatic migration experiences as a cause of their illness, in addition to a range of psychological and biomedical causes. Help-seeking strategies for the current illness included a wide range of treatments, such as basic medical care at private surgeries, outpatients department in hospitals as well as alternative medical treatments among all groups. Findings provide a useful guide to clinicians who work with migrants and should inform policy in medical care, information and health promotion for migrants in Switzerland as well as further education of health professionals on issues concerning migrants health. PMID:15774332

  11. Exploration of experiences in therapeutic groups for patients with severe mental illness: development of the Ferrara group experiences scale (FE- GES)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Group therapies are routinely provided for patients with severe mental illness. The factors important to the group experience of patients are still poorly understood and are rarely measured. To support further research and practice, we aimed to develop a questionnaire that captures how patients experience groups within a community mental health context. Methods An initial pool of 39 items was conceptually generated to assess different aspects of group experiences. Items were completed by 166 patients with severe mental illness attending group therapies in community mental health services in Italy. Patients with different psychiatric diagnoses who attended at least 5 group sessions were included. An exploratory factor analysis was used to identify different dimensions of group experiences and to reduce the number of items for each dimension. Results The resulting questionnaire has five subscales: 1) sharing of emotions and experiences, 2) cognitive improvement, 3) group learning, 4) difficulties in open expression and 5) relationships. Each subscale has 4 items. The scale and sub-scales have good internal consistency. Conclusions The Ferrara Group Experiences Scale is conceptually derived and assesses dimensions of group experience that are theoretically and practically relevant. It is brief, easy to use and has good psychometric properties. After further validation, the scale may be used for research into patient experiences across different group therapy modalities and for evaluation in routine care. PMID:24083824

  12. Pregnancy termination in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension or eclampsia at less than 22 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Sampson, M B; Thomason, J L; Tomasi, A M; Work, B A

    1982-06-15

    3 patients with fetal death, 2 of whom had pregnancy-induced hypertension and a third with eclampsia had pregnancy termination before 22 weeks' gestation with vaginal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) suppositories, without complication. PGE2 has a hypotensive action, decreasing blood pressure by arteriolar dilation and blocking the angiotensin-induced rise in blood pressure in the pregnant rhesus monkey and should be useful abortifacient in patients with hypertension including preeclampsia and eclampsia. One patient received magnesium sulfate and the other 2 received hydralazine and methyldopa during PGE2 administration which could alter mean arterial pressure (MAP). MAPs remained stable and dropped slightly after PGE2 administration in the 2nd and 3rd patients. These outcomes suggest that PGE2 suppositories can be used to terminate 2nd trimester pregnancy in cases of hypertension and eclampsia when routine medical management is ineffective or when fetal death occurs although caution is advised since severe hypotension can occur with PGE2 administration. PMID:6953765

  13. Correction of vitamin D deficiency in critically ill patients - VITdAL@ICU study protocol of a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes including increased morbidity and mortality in the general population and in critically ill patients. However, no randomized controlled trial has evaluated so far whether treatment with sufficiently large doses of vitamin D can improve clinical outcome of patients in an intensive care setting. Methods/design The VITdAL@ICU trial is an investigator-initiated, non-commercial, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. This study compares high-dose oral cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) versus placebo treatment in a mixed population of 480 critically ill patients with low 25-hydroxyvitamin-D levels at study enrollment (? 20ng/ml). Following an initial loading dose of 540,000 IU of vitamin D3, patients receive 90,000 IU of vitamin D3 on a monthly basis for 5 months. The study is designed to compare clinical outcome in the two study arms with the primary endpoint being length of hospital stay. Secondary endpoints include among others length of ICU stay, the percentage of patients with 25(OH)D levels > 30 ng/ml at day 7, ICU and hospital mortality and duration of mechanical ventilation. We describe here the VITdAL@ICU study protocol for the primary report. Discussion This trial is designed to evaluate whether high-dose vitamin D3 is able to improve morbidity and mortality in a mixed population of adult critically ill patients and correct vitamin D deficiency safely. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01130181 PMID:23134762

  14. Should highly active antiretroviral therapy be prescribed in critically ill HIV-infected patients during the ICU stay? A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) remains controversial. We evaluate impact of HAART prescription in HIV-infected patients admitted to the ICU of Tourcoing Hospital from January 2000 to December 2009. Results There were 91 admissions concerning 85 HIV-infected patients. Reasons for ICU admission were an AIDS-related diagnosis in 46 cases (51%). Fifty two patients (57%) were on HAART at the time of ICU admission, leading to 21 immunovirologic successes (23%). During the ICU stay, HAART was continued in 29 patients (32%), and started in 3 patients (3%). Only one patient experienced an adverse event related to HAART. Mortality rate in ICU and 6 months after ICU admission were respectively 19% and 27%. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative unajusted survival probability over 6 months were higher in patients treated with HAART during the ICU stay (Log rank: p?=?0.04). No benefit of HAART in ICU was seen in the adjusted survival proportion at 6 months or during ICU stay. Prescription of HAART during ICU was associated with a trend to lower incidence of new AIDS-related events at 6 months (respectively 17% and 34% with and without HAART, p?=?0.07), and with higher incidence of antiretroviral resistance after ICU stay (respectively 25% and 7% with and without HAART, p?=?0.02). Conclusions Our results suggest a lower death rate over 6 months in critically ill HIV-infected patients taking HAART during ICU stay. The optimal time to prescribe HAART in critically ill patients needs to be better defined. PMID:23020962

  15. Foodborne Illness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... people in the U.S. get sick from contaminated food. Common culprits include bacteria, parasites and viruses. Symptoms ... are the most common cause of foodborne illness. Foods may have some bacteria on them when you ...

  16. Influence of sustained low-efficiency diafiltration (SLED-f) on interstitial fluid concentrations of fluconazole in a critically ill patient: Use of microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Sinnollareddy, Mahipal G; Roberts, Michael S; Lipman, Jeffrey; Peake, Sandra L; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication in critically ill patients, and hybrid techniques including sustained low-efficiency dialysis/diafiltration (SLED-f) are being increasingly utilised in intensive care units. Most fungal infections occur in the interstitial fluid (ISF) of tissues and successful treatment of a fungal infection relies on the ability of an antifungal agent to achieve adequate concentrations at the site of infection. Tissue distribution of antimicrobials is impaired in critically ill patients owing to a variety of disease-related physiological changes, e.g. sepsis. Fluconazole is a widely used antifungal agent used to treat Candida spp. infections in critically ill patients. The implications for ISF concentrations of enhanced elimination during renal replacement therapy have not yet been reported for fluconazole. The aim of this single-patient case report was to describe the influence of SLED-f on subcutaneous (SC) ISF concentrations of fluconazole and the implications for achieving pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets. Serial blood and ISF samples were collected at pre- and post-filter ports within the SLED-f circuit and subcutaneously inserted microdialysis probe, respectively. Fluconazole concentrations were measured using a validated chromatography method. The SC ISF-to-plasma partition coefficient of fluconazole in this patient was 0.91, indicating rapid equilibrium. SC ISF fluconazole concentrations consistently decreased after initiating SLED-f. The majority of the fluconazole was eliminated from the SC ISF as a result of redistribution. Considering the extensive tissue re-distribution of fluconazole and observed elimination from tissue compartments, higher doses may be required to treat deep-seated fungal infections. PMID:25888463

  17. The comparison of extemporaneous preparations of omeprazole, pantoprazole oral suspension and intravenous pantoprazole on the gastric pH of critically ill-patients

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Yasamin; Fahimi, Fanak; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Stress-related mucosal disease occurs in many critically ill-patients within 24 h of admission. Proton pump inhibitor therapy has been documented to produce more potent inhibition of gastric acid secretion than histamine 2 receptor antagonists. This study aimed to compare extemporaneous preparations of omeprazole, pantoprazole oral suspension and intravenous (IV) pantoprazole on the gastric pH in intensive care unit patients. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized single-blind-study. Patients of ? 16 years of age with a nasogastric tube, who required mechanical ventilation for ? 48 h, were eligible for inclusion. The excluded patients were those with active gastrointestinal bleeding, known allergy to omeprazole and pantoprazole and those intolerant to the nasogastric tube. Fifty-six patients were randomized to treatment with omeprazole suspension 2 mg/ml (40 mg every day), pantoprazole suspension 2 mg/ml (40 mg every day) and IV pantoprazole (40 mg every day) for up to 14 days. Gastric aspirates were sampled before and 1-2.5 h after the drug administration for the pH measurement using an external pH meter. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 21.0). Results: In this study, 56 critically ill-patients (39 male, 17 female, mean age: 61.5 ± 15.65 years) were followed for the control of the gastric pH. On each of the 14 trial days the mean of the gastric pH alteration was significantly higher in omeprazole and pantoprazole suspension-treated patients than in IV pantoprazole-treated patients (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Omeprazole and pantoprazole oral suspension are more effective than IV pantoprazole in increasing the gastric pH. PMID:25624646

  18. The use of bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA) to guide fluid management, resuscitation and deresuscitation in critically ill patients: a bench-to-bedside review.

    PubMed

    Malbrain, Manu L N G; Huygh, Johan; Dabrowski, Wojciech; De Waele, Jan J; Staelens, Anneleen; Wauters, Joost

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a positive fluid balance on morbidity and mortality has been well established. However, little is known about how to monitor fluid status and fluid overload. This narrative review summarises the recent literature and discusses the different parameters related to bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA) and how they might be used to guide fluid management in critically ill patients. Definitions are listed for the different parameters that can be obtained with BIA; these include among others total body water (TBW), intracellular water (ICW), extracellular water (ECW), ECW/ICW ratio and volume excess (VE). BIA allows calculation of body composition and volumes by means of a current going through the body considered as a cylinder. Reproducible measurements can be obtained with tetrapolar electrodes with two current and two detection electrodes placed on hands and feet. Modern devices also apply multiple frequencies, further improving the accuracy and reproducibility of the results. Some pitfalls and conditions are discussed that need to be taken into account for correct BIA interpretation. Although BIA is a simple, noninvasive, rapid, portable, reproducible, and convenient method of measuring body composition and fluid distribution with fewer physical demands than other techniques, it is still unclear whether it is sufficiently accurate for clinical use in critically ill patients. However, the potential clinical applications are numerous. An overview regarding the use of BIA parameters in critically ill patients is given, based on the available literature. BIA seems a promising tool if performed correctly. It is non-invasive and relatively inexpensive and can be performed at bedside, and it does not expose to ionising radiation. Modern devices have very limited between-observer variations, but BIA parameters are population-specific and one must be aware of clinical situations that may interfere with the measurement such as visible oedema, nutritional status, or fluid and salt administration. BIA can help guide fluid management, resuscitation and de-resuscitation. The latter is especially important in patients not progressing spontaneously from the Ebb to the Flow phase of shock. More research is needed in critically ill patients before widespread use of BIA can be suggested in this patient population. PMID:25432557

  19. A feasible strategy for preventing blood clots in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (FBI): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous pharmacokinetic trials suggested that 40 mg subcutaneous enoxaparin once daily provided inadequate thromboprophylaxis for intensive care unit patients. Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism and yet are often excluded from these trials. We hypothesized that for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury receiving continuous renal replacement therapy, a dose of 1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily would improve thromboprophylaxis without increasing the risk of bleeding. In addition, we seek to utilize urine output prior to discontinuing dialysis, and low neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in dialysis-free intervals, as markers of renal recovery. Methods/Design In a multicenter, double-blind randomized controlled trial in progress at three intensive care units across Denmark, we randomly assign eligible critically ill adults with acute kidney injury into a treatment (1 mg/kg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) or control arm (40 mg enoxaparin subcutaneously once daily) upon commencement of continuous renal replacement therapy. We calculated that with 133 patients in each group, the study would have 80% power to show a 40% reduction in the relative risk of venous thromboembolism with 1 mg/kg enoxaparin, at a two-sided alpha level of 0.05. An interim analysis will be conducted after the first 67 patients have been included in each group. Enrolment began in March 2013, and will continue for two years. The primary outcome is the occurrence of venous thromboembolism. Secondary outcomes include anti-factor Xa activity, bleeding, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, filter lifespan, length of stay, ventilator free days, and mortality. We will also monitor neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and urine volume to determine whether they can be used as prognostic factors for renal recovery. Discussion Critically ill unit patients with acute kidney injury present a particular challenge in the provision of thromboprophylaxis. This study hopes to add to the growing evidence that the existing recommendation of 40 mg enoxaparin is inadequate and that 1 mg/kg is both safe and effective for thromboprophylaxis. In addition, the study seeks to identify predictors of renal recovery allowing for the proper utilization of resources. Trial Registration EU Clinical Trials Register: EudraCT number: 2012-004368-23, 25 September 2012. PMID:24925372

  20. Re-evaluating currently available data and suggestions for planning randomised controlled studies regarding the use of hydroxyethyl starch in critically ill patients - a multidisciplinary statement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is a commonly used colloid in critically ill patients. However, its safety has been questioned in recent studies and meta-analyses. Methods We re-evaluated prospective randomised controlled trials (RCT) from four meta-analyses published in 2013 that compared the effect of HES with crystalloids in critically ill patients, focusing on the adherence to 'presumably correct indication'. Regarding the definition of 'presumably correct indication', studies were checked for the following six criteria (maximum six points): short time interval from shock to randomisation (<6 h), restricted use for initial volume resuscitation, use of any consistent algorithm for haemodynamic stabilisation, reproducible indicators of hypovolaemia, maximum dose of HES, and exclusion of patients with pre-existing renal failure or renal replacement therapy. Results Duration of fluid administration ranged from 90 min up to a maximum of 90 days. Four studies considered follow-up until 90-day mortality, three studies 28-/30-day mortality, whereas four studies reported only early mortality. Included studies showed a large heterogeneity of the indication score ranging between 1 and 4 points with a median (25%; 75% quartile) of 4 (2; 4). Conclusions The most important question, whether or not HES may be harmful when it is limited to immediate haemodynamic stabilisation, cannot be answered yet in the absence of any study sufficiently addressing this question. In order to overcome the limitations of most of the previous studies, we now suggest an algorithm emphasising the strict indication of HES. Additionally, we give a list of suggestions that should be adequately considered in any prospective RCT in the field of acute volume resuscitation in critically ill patients. PMID:23890518

  1. Predicting Post-Treatment-Initiation Alcohol Use among Patients with Severe Mental Illness and Alcohol Use Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradizza, Clara M.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Vincent, Paula C.; Stasiewicz, Paul R.; Connors, Gerard J.; Mercer, Nicole D.

    2009-01-01

    Few investigators studying alcohol abuse among individuals with a severe mental illness (SMI) have examined predictors of posttreatment alcohol outcomes. In the present study, a multivariate approach based on a theoretical model was used to study the relationship between psychosocial factors and post-treatment-initiation alcohol use. Predictors of…

  2. Prophylactic lithium treatment and cognitive performance in patients with a long history of bipolar illness: no simple answers in complex disease-treatment interplay.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, Andrea; Alda, Martin; Young, Trevor; MacQueen, Glenda; Rybakowski, Janusz; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Simhandl, Christian; König, Barbara; Hajek, Tomas; O'Donovan, Claire; Wittekind, Dirk; von Quillfeldt, Susanne; Ploch, Jana; Sauer, Cathrin; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with bipolar disorder (BD) is not restricted to symptomatic phases. It is also present in euthymia. There is evidence of differences in the brain's structure between bipolar patients and healthy individuals, as well as changes over time in patients. Lithium constitutes the gold standard in long-term prophylactic treatment. Appropriate therapy that prevents new episodes improves the disease's course and reduces the frequency of harmful outcomes. Interestingly, preclinical data suggest that lithium has a (additional) neuroprotective effect. There is limited data on its related effects in humans and even less on its long-term application. In this multi-center cross-sectional study from the International Group for the Study of Lithium-treated Patients (IGSLi), we compared three groups: bipolar patients without long-term lithium treatment (non-Li group; <3 months cumulative lithium exposure, ?24 months ago), bipolar patients with long-term lithium treatment (Li group, ongoing treatment ?24 months), and healthy subjects (controls). Strict inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined; the inclusion criteria for patients were diagnosis of BD types I or II, duration of illness ?10 years, ?5 episodes in patient's history and a euthymic mood state. Neurocognitive functioning was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), and a visual backward masking (VBM) task. A total of 142 subjects were included, 31 in the non-Li and 58 in the Li group, as well as 53 healthy controls. Treated patients with long-standing BD and controls did not differ significantly in overall cognitive functioning and verbal learning, recall, and recognition; regardless of whether lithium had been part of the treatment. Patients, however, demonstrated poorer early visual information processing than healthy controls, with the lithium-treated patients performing worse than those without. Our data suggest that bipolar patients with a long illness history and effective prophylactic treatment do not reveal significantly impaired general cognitive functioning or verbal learning and memory. However, they are worse at processing early visual information. Accompanying volumetric and spectroscopic data suggest cell loss in patients not treated with lithium that may be counterbalanced by long-term lithium treatment. PMID:25540718

  3. Comparison of N-Terminal Pro B-Natriuretic Peptide and Echocardiographic Indices in Patients with Mitral Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hajsadeghi, Shokoufeh; Samiei, Niloufar; Moradi, Masoud; Majid, Maleki; Kashani, Ladan; Amani, Afsaneh; Salami, Arezoo; Asefi, Melika; Farsi, Negin

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Echocardiographic indices can form the basis of the diagnosis of systolic and diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in patients with Mitral regurgitation (MR). However, using echocardiography alone may bring us to a diagnostic dead-end. The aim of this study was to compare N-Terminal pro B-natriuretic peptide (BNP) and echocardiographic indices in patients with mitral regurgitation. Methods: 2D and Doppler echocardiography and BNP serum level were obtained from 54 patients with organic mild, moderate and severe MR. Results: BNP levels were increased with symptoms in patients with mitral regurgitation (NYHAI: 5.7 ± 1.1, NYHAII: 6.9 ± 1.5, NYHAIII: 8.3 ± 2 pg/ml, P < 0.001). BNP plasma level were significantly correlated with MPI (myocardial performance index) (r = 0.399, P = 0.004), and following echocardiographic indices: LVEDV (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), LVESV (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), LVEDD (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), LVESD (r = 0.54, P < 0.001), dp/dt (r = ?0.32, P = 0.019) and SPAP (r = 0.4, P = 0.006). Conclusion: The present study showed that BNP may be useful in patients with MR and may confirm echocardiographic indices. PMID:21151851

  4. Impairment of small somatic and autonomic nerve fibres in intensive care unit patients with severe sepsis and critical illness polyneuropathy – a single center controlled observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Axonal damage in large myelinated nerve fibres occurs in about 70% of patients with severe sepsis, known as critical illness polyneuropathy and contributes significantly to an increased short- and long-term morbidity and mortality in this population. Among other pathophysiological mechanisms, autonomic dysregulation, characterized by high concentrations of circulating catecholamines in the presence of impaired sympathetic modulation of heart and vessels have been discussed. We hypothesize that autonomic small fibre neuropathy play an important role in autonomic failure. Methods/Design Single center, non-randomized, controlled, observational study. Skin biopsies of patients with severe sepsis and/or septic shock are compared with those of age-matched controls. In order to assess impairment of small nerve fibres, skin biopsies are taken at onset of severe sepsis, and two and 16 weeks later. Intraepidermal nerve fibre densities are histologically analyzed using anti protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 immunostaining. In addition, standardized clinical examinations, as Medical Research Council (MRC) scores of muscle strength, Rankin scores, and standardized nerve conduction studies of the right median nerve, the right tibial nerve, the left fibular nerve, and both sural nerves are performed, to identify critical illness polyneuropathy and to neurophysiologically quantify the damage of large nerve fibres. Discussion The study will allow to describe the frequency of small fibre neuropathy in patients with severe sepsis up to four months after onset of severe sepsis and to evaluate its relationship to critical illness polyneuropathy. Trial registration The trial has been registered to the German Clinical Trials Register. The trial registration number is DRKS-ID: DRKS00000642. PMID:24176121

  5. Risk of Acute Lung Injury/Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Critically Ill Adult Patients with Pre-Existing Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Quan-Cheng; Sun, Tong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of pre-existing diabetes on the development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) in critically ill patients remains unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of cohort studies to evaluate the risk of ALI/ARDS in critically ill patients with and without pre-existing diabetes. Materials and Methods We searched PubMed and Embase from the inception to September 2013 for cohort studies assessing the effect of pre-existing diabetes on ALI/ARDS occurrence. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using random- or fixed-effect models when appropriate. Results Seven cohort studies with a total of 12,794 participants and 2,937 cases of pre-existing diabetes, and 2,457 cases of ALI/ARDS were included in the meta-analysis. A fixed-effects model meta-analysis showed that pre-existing diabetes was associated with a reduced risk of ALI/ARDS (OR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.55–0.80; p<0.001), with low heterogeneity among the studies (I2?=?18.9%; p?=?0.286). However, the asymmetric funnel plot and Egger's test (p?=?0.007) suggested publication bias may exist. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that pre-existing diabetes was associated with a decreased risk of ALI/ARDS in critically ill adult patients. However, the result should be interpreted with caution because of the potential bias and confounding in the included studies. PMID:24587357

  6. Implementation of chronic illness care in German primary care practices – how do multimorbid older patients view routine care? A cross-sectional study using multilevel hierarchical modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In primary care, patients with multiple chronic conditions are the rule rather than the exception. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) is an evidence-based framework for improving chronic illness care, but little is known about the extent to which it has been implemented in routine primary care. The aim of this study was to describe how multimorbid older patients assess the routine chronic care they receive in primary care practices in Germany, and to explore the extent to which factors at both the practice and patient level determine their views. Methods This cross-sectional study used baseline data from an observational cohort study involving 158 general practitioners (GP) and 3189 multimorbid patients. Standardized questionnaires were employed to collect data, and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) questionnaire used to assess the quality of care received. Multilevel hierarchical modeling was used to identify any existing association between the dependent variable, PACIC, and independent variables at the patient level (socio-economic factors, weighted count of chronic conditions, instrumental activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, graded chronic pain, no. of contacts with GP, existence of a disease management program (DMP) disease, self-efficacy, and social support) and the practice level (age and sex of GP, years in current practice, size and type of practice). Results The overall mean PACIC score was 2.4 (SD 0.8), with the mean subscale scores ranging from 2.0 (SD 1.0, subscale goal setting/tailoring) to 3.5 (SD 0.7, delivery system design). At the patient level, higher PACIC scores were associated with a DMP disease, more frequent GP contacts, higher social support, and higher autonomy of past occupation. At the practice level, solo practices were associated with higher PACIC values than other types of practice. Conclusions This study shows that from the perspective of multimorbid patients receiving care in German primary care practices, the implementation of structured care and counseling could be improved, particularly by helping patients set specific goals, coordinating care, and arranging follow-up contacts. Studies evaluating chronic care should take into consideration that a patient’s assessment is associated not only with practice-level factors, but also with individual, patient-level factors. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN89818205. PMID:25098231

  7. Comparison of Intrapulmonary and Systemic Pharmacokinetics of Colistin Methanesulfonate (CMS) and Colistin after Aerosol Delivery and Intravenous Administration of CMS in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boisson, Matthieu; Jacobs, Matthieu; Grégoire, Nicolas; Gobin, Patrice; Marchand, Sandrine; Mimoz, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Colistin is an old antibiotic that has recently gained a considerable renewal of interest for the treatment of pulmonary infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Nebulization seems to be a promising form of administration, but colistin is administered as an inactive prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS); however, differences between the intrapulmonary concentrations of the active moiety as a function of the route of administration in critically ill patients have not been precisely documented. In this study, CMS and colistin concentrations were measured on two separate occasions within the plasma and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of critically ill patients (n = 12) who had received 2 million international units (MIU) of CMS by aerosol delivery and then intravenous administration. The pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted using a population approach and completed by pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) modeling and simulations. The ELF colistin concentrations varied considerably (9.53 to 1,137 mg/liter), but they were much higher than those in plasma (0.15 to 0.73 mg/liter) after aerosol delivery but not after intravenous administration of CMS. Following CMS aerosol delivery, typically, 9% of the CMS dose reached the ELF, and only 1.4% was presystemically converted into colistin. PK-PD analysis concluded that there was much higher antimicrobial efficacy after CMS aerosol delivery than after intravenous administration. These new data seem to support the use of aerosol delivery of CMS for the treatment of pulmonary infections in critical care patients. PMID:25267660

  8. A Comparative Study of Nurses as Case Manager and Telephone Follow-up on Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Severe Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Nojomi, Marzieh; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Mottaghipour, Yasaman; Zahiroddin, Alireza; Kangrani, Hamed Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Providing community-based mental health services is crucial and is an agreed plan between the Iranian Mental Health Office and the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean (affiliated with WHO). The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of home-visit clinical case-management services on the hospitalization rate and other clinical outcomes in patients with severe mental illness. Methods: A total of 182 patients were randomly allocated into three groups, namely, home-visit (n=60), telephone follow-up (n=61) and as-usual care (n=61) groups. Trained nurses as clinical case-managers provided home-visit services and the telephone follow-up tasks. Hospitalization rate as a measure of recurrence, as well as burden, knowledge, general health condition of caregivers with positive/negative symptoms, satisfaction, quality of life, and social skills of the consumers were assessed as the main and secondary outcomes, respectively. Results: Most clinical variables were improved in both intervention groups compared with the control group. During the one year follow-up, the rate of rehospitalization for the telephone follow-up and as-usual groups were respectively 1.5 and 2.5 times higher than the home-visit group. Conclusion: Trained clinical case-managers are capable of providing continuous care services to patients with severe mental illness. The telephone follow-up services could also have beneficiary outcome for the consumers, their caregivers, and the health system network. PMID:26722141

  9. Intra-abdominal hypertension does not predict renal recovery or in-hospital mortality in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyo Jeong; Yang, Jihyun; Kim, Sun Chul; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Won-Yong; Kim, Hyoung-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Although emerging evidence suggests that intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is a predictor of the development of acute kidney injury (AKI), it remains unclear whether the presence of IAH is a predictor of prognosis in patients with AKI. The purpose of this study was to assess whether the presence of IAH could predict prognosis in critically ill patients with AKI. The prognostic value of urinary biomarkers was also determined. Methods In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 57 patients with established AKI, who were admitted to the intensive care unit between February 2012 and June 2014. IAH was defined as a sustained elevation in intra-abdominal pressure of ?12 mmHg, in three consecutive measurements performed daily on the first 3 days. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), liver-type fatty acid-binding protein, and simplified acute physiology score II score at the time of admission were also examined. Results IAH was observed in 78.9% of patients. The in-hospital mortality was 21.1%, and renal recovery during hospitalization was achieved in 40.4% of patients. Although high urinary NGAL [odds ratio (OR), 1.015] and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (OR, 1.003) were found to be independent predictors of renal recovery, IAH was not. High urinary NGAL (OR, 1.003) and a high simplified acute physiology score II score (OR, 1.102) were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality, while IAH or urinary liver-type fatty acid-binding protein was not. Conclusion Although IAH is prevalent in critically ill patients with AKI, it did not predict AKI prognosis. However, urinary NGAL was found to be a useful predictor of both renal recovery and in-hospital mortality. PMID:26484030

  10. Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A New Method of Treatment for Major Depression in Patients With Chronic Medical Illness

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Michelle J.; Koenig, Harold G.; Robins, Clive J.; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F.; Cohen, Harvey J.; King, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients’ spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  11. Physical illness in patients with severe mental disorders. I. Prevalence, impact of medications and disparities in health care

    PubMed Central

    DE HERT, MARC; CORRELL, CHRISTOPH U.; BOBES, JULIO; CETKOVICH-BAKMAS, MARCELO; COHEN, DAN; ASAI, ITSUO; DETRAUX, JOHAN; GAUTAM, SHIV; MÖLLER, HANS-JURGEN; NDETEI, DAVID M.; NEWCOMER, JOHN W.; UWAKWE, RICHARD; LEUCHT, STEFAN

    2011-01-01

    The lifespan of people with severe mental illness (SMI) is shorter compared to the general population. This excess mortality is mainly due to physical illness. We report prevalence rates of different physical illnesses as well as important individual lifestyle choices, side effects of psychotropic treatment and disparities in health care access, utilization and provision that contribute to these poor physical health outcomes. We searched MEDLINE (1966 – August 2010) combining the MeSH terms of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder with the different MeSH terms of general physical disease categories to select pertinent reviews and additional relevant studies through cross-referencing to identify prevalence figures and factors contributing to the excess morbidity and mortality rates. Nutritional and metabolic diseases, cardiovascular diseases, viral diseases, respiratory tract diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, sexual dysfunction, pregnancy complications, stomatognathic diseases, and possibly obesity-related cancers are, compared to the general population, more prevalent among people with SMI. It seems that lifestyle as well as treatment specific factors account for much of the increased risk for most of these physical diseases. Moreover, there is sufficient evidence that people with SMI are less likely to receive standard levels of care for most of these diseases. Lifestyle factors, relatively easy to measure, are barely considered for screening; baseline testing of numerous important physical parameters is insufficiently performed. Besides modifiable lifestyle factors and side effects of psychotropic medications, access to and quality of health care remains to be improved for individuals with SMI. PMID:21379357

  12. Religiously integrated cognitive behavioral therapy: a new method of treatment for major depression in patients with chronic medical illness.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Michelle J; Koenig, Harold G; Robins, Clive J; Nelson, Bruce; Shaw, Sally F; Cohen, Harvey J; King, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Intervention studies have found that psychotherapeutic interventions that explicitly integrate clients' spiritual and religious beliefs in therapy are as effective, if not more so, in reducing depression than those that do not for religious clients. However, few empirical studies have examined the effectiveness of religiously (vs. spiritually) integrated psychotherapy, and no manualized mental health intervention had been developed for the medically ill with religious beliefs. To address this gap, we developed and implemented a novel religiously integrated adaptation of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of depression in individuals with chronic medical illness. This article describes the development and implementation of the intervention. First, we provide a brief overview of CBT. Next, we describe how religious beliefs and behaviors can be integrated into a CBT framework. Finally, we describe Religiously Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (RCBT), a manualized therapeutic approach designed to assist depressed individuals to develop depression-reducing thoughts and behaviors informed by their own religious beliefs, practices, and resources. This treatment approach has been developed for 5 major world religions (Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism), increasing its potential to aid the depressed medically ill from a variety of religious backgrounds. PMID:25365155

  13. Motivation and treatment engagement intervention trial (MotivaTe-IT): the effects of motivation feedback to clinicians on treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment disengagement and non-completion poses a major problem for the successful treatment of patients with severe mental illness. Motivation for treatment has long been proposed as a major determinant of treatment engagement, but exact mechanisms remain unclear. This current study serves three purposes: 1) to determine whether a feedback intervention based on the patients’ motivation for treatment is effective at improving treatment engagement (TE) of severe mentally ill patients in outpatient psychiatric treatment, 2) to gather insight into motivational processes and possible mechanisms regarding treatment motivation (TM) and TE in this patient population and 3) to determine which of three theories of motivation is most plausible for the dynamics of TM and TE in this population. Methods/design The Motivation and Treatment Engagement Intervention Trial (MotivaTe-IT) is a multi-center cluster randomized trial investigating the effectiveness of feedback generated by clinicians regarding their patients’ treatment motivation upon the patients’ TE. The primary outcome is the patients’ TE. Secondary outcomes are TM, psychosocial functioning and quality of life. Patients whose clinicians generate monthly motivation feedback (additional to treatment as usual) will be compared to patients who receive treatment as usual. An estimated 350 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, with psychotic disorders and/or severe personality disorders will be recruited from outpatient community mental health care. The randomization will be performed by a computerized randomization program, with an allocation ratio of 1:1 (team vs. team or clinician vs. clinician) and patients, but not clinicians, will be blind to treatment allocation at baseline assessment. Due to the nature of the trial, follow-up assessment can not be blinded. Discussion The current study can provide important insights regarding motivational processes and the way in which motivation influences the treatment engagement and clinical outcomes. The identification of possible mechanisms through which changes in the outcomes occur, offers a tool for the development of more effective future interventions to improve TM and TE. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials NTR2968 PMID:23176560

  14. Alpha-Synuclein Pathology in Sensory Nerve Terminals of the Upper Aerodigestive Tract of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Liancai; Chen, Jingming; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Nyirenda, Themba; Benson, Brian; Gupta, Fiona; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H.; Caviness, John N.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan; Samanta, Johan E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is common in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and causes significant morbidity and mortality. PD dysphagia has usually been explained as dysfunction of central motor control, much like other motor symptoms that are characteristic of the disease. However, PD dysphagia does not correlate with severity of motor symptoms nor does it respond to motor therapies. It is known that PD patients have sensory deficits in the pharynx, and that impaired sensation may contribute to dysphagia. However, the underlying cause of the pharyngeal sensory deficits in PD is not known. We hypothesized that PD dysphagia with sensory deficits may be due to degeneration of the sensory nerve terminals in the upper aerodigestive tract (UAT). We have previously shown that Lewy-type synucleinopathy (LTS) is present in the main pharyngeal sensory nerves of PD patients, but not in controls. In this study, the sensory terminals in UAT mucosa were studied to discern the presence and distribution of LTS. Whole-mount specimens (tongue-pharynx-larynx-upper esophagus) were obtained from 10 deceased human subjects with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed PD (five with dysphagia and five without) and four age-matched healthy controls. Samples were taken from six sites and immunostained for phosphorylated ?-synuclein (PAS). The results showed the presence of PAS-immunoreactive (PAS-ir) axons in all the PD subjects and in none of the controls. Notably, PD patients with dysphagia had more PAS-ir axons in the regions that are critical for initiating the swallowing reflex. These findings suggest that Lewy pathology affects mucosal sensory axons in specific regions of the UAT and may be related to PD dysphagia. PMID:26041249

  15. Altruism in Terminal Cancer Patients and Rapid Tissue Donation Program: Does the Theory Apply?

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Devin; Pratt, Christie; Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Guerra, Lucy; Schabath, Matthew B; Leon, Marino E; Haura, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Rapid Tissue Donation (RTD) is an advancing oncology research procedure for collecting tumors, metastases, and unaffected tissue 2 to 6 hours after death. Researchers can better determine rates of progression, response to treatment, and polymorphic differences among patients. Cancer patients may inquire about posthumous body donation for research to offer a personal contribution to research; however, there are barriers to recruiting for an RTD program. Physicians must reassure the patient that their treatment options and quality of care will not be compromised due to participating in RTD. In this commentary we discuss how theories of altruism may explain cancer patients’ desire to participate in an RTD program, the ethical concerns of health care professionals and patients and the use of altruism as a recruitment strategy. We offer recommendations for examining the cultural and ethical climate of the institution prior to initiating such a program such as examining the relationship of healthcare professionals and patients, identifying ethical concerns, and examining ways to promote acceptance and buy-in across professionals, patients, and families. PMID:23539332

  16. Compassionate Care of the Terminally Ill

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Jeff C.; Stern, Theodore A.

    2003-01-01

    The Psychiatric Consultation Service at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) sees medical and surgical inpatients with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and conditions. Such consultations require the integration of medical and psychiatric knowledge. During their thrice-weekly rounds, Dr. Huffman and Dr. Stern discuss the diagnosis and management of conditions confronted. These discussions have given rise to rounds reports that will prove useful for clinicians practicing at the interface of medicine and psychiatry. PMID:15154024

  17. Therapy of 1,025 severely ill patients with complicated infections in a German multicenter study: safety profile and efficacy of tigecycline in different treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Bodmann, Klaus-Friedrich; Heizmann, Wolfgang R; von Eiff, Christof; Petrik, Christian; Löschmann, Peter-Andreas; Eckmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This large prospective non-interventional study investigated the effects of tigecycline either as single agent or in combination with other antimicrobial agents in 1,025 patients treated in clinical routine at German hospitals. Sixty-five percent of the patients had APACHE II scores > 15, indicating high overall disease severity. Complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) or complicated skin and skin tissue infections (cSSTI) were the most common indications, with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium and Escherichia coli being the most frequently isolated pathogens. Clinical success was reported at the end of tigecycline therapy in 74.2% of the total population, in 75.4% of the cIAI and in 82.2% of the cSSTI patients. The subpopulation (28.0% of the patients) infected with multidrug-resistant pathogens (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, extended-spectrum ?-lactamase producers and vancomycin-resistant enterococci) were treated with similar success rates as the overall population. Tigecycline was generally well tolerated. Drug-related adverse events (AEs) were reported in 7.7% of the total population; 2.5% had serious AEs mostly attributable to inefficacy of therapy or deterioration of the disease. Mortality rates were consistent with the types of infection and severity of illness. There was no indication of excessive mortality associated with tigecycline as had been suggested in previously performed meta-analyses. In this large non-interventional study performed in the clinical routine setting, tigecycline achieved favorable clinical success rates in a patient population with high severity of illness and a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens and showed a good safety and tolerability profile. PMID:23052187

  18. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration: A randomised controlled trial of continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus administration.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Janattul-Ain; Roberts, Darren M; Udy, Andrew A; Mat-Nor, Mohd-Basri; Mohamad-Nor, Fariz-Safhan; Wallis, Steven C; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2015-07-01

    Here we describe the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin administered by continuous infusion (CI) versus intermittent bolus (IB) dosing in critically ill patients receiving continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH) and compare the frequency of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic (PK/PD) target attainment with each dosing strategy. This was a prospective pharmacokinetic trial in 16 critically ill patients with severe sepsis or septic shock undergoing CVVH and randomised to receive either CI or IB administration of a standard daily dose of piperacillin/tazobactam (11.25g/day on Day 1 followed by 9g/day). Serial blood samples were measured on two occasions. Piperacillin pharmacokinetics were calculated using a non-compartmental approach. Blood concentrations were compared with established PK/PD targets. On occasion 1 (Days 1-3 of therapy), IB administration resulted in significantly higher piperacillin peak concentrations (169 vs. 89mg/L; P=0.002), whereas significantly higher steady-state concentrations were observed in CI patients (83 vs. 57mg/L; P=0.04). Total clearance and clearance not mediated by CVVH were significantly higher with CI administration [median (interquartile range), 1.0 (0.7-1.1) and 0.8 (0.6-1.0)mL/kg/min; P=0.001 and 0.001, respectively]. The estimated unbound piperacillin concentrations were four times above the target susceptibility breakpoint (16mg/L) for the entire dosing interval (100%fT>4xMIC) in 87.5% of patients receiving CI administration (sampling occasion 1), compared with 62.5% of IB patients achieving the desired target (50%fT>4xMIC). Compared with IB dosing, and despite similar CVVH settings, CI administration of piperacillin results in a pharmacokinetic profile that may optimise outcomes for less susceptible pathogens. PMID:25881872

  19. Evaluation of an in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation facility for body composition studies in critically ill intensive care patients: results on 41 normals

    SciTech Connect

    Beddoe, A.H.; Streat, S.J.; Hill, G.L.

    1984-03-01

    A programme of metabolic and nutritional research is being undertaken in critically ill patients requiring intensive care. Central to this research is the measurement of the three nutritionally important compartments of body composition, protein, fat, and water by a combination of tritium dilution and prompt gamma in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA). In this paper a calibration technique is presented that enables absolute estimates of total body nitrogen (TBN) to be made using prompt gamma IVNAA in critically ill patients with gross abnormalities in body composition, especially in their state of hydration. This technique, which is independent of skinfold anthropometry and does not make a priori assumptions about the ratios of major body compartments, has been applied to 41 normal volunteers and the derived values for nitrogen compared with values obtained by applying three currently used calibration methods to the same experimental data. The empirical equations relate TBN in normal people to age, height, weight and sex. The mean ratios of experimental to predicted TBN (with SEMs) are 1.013 +/- 0.017 and 1.002 +/- 0.014, respectively. Mean values of the ratio of TBN to fat-free mass (0.0340 +/- 0.0004) and of total body water to fat-free mass (0.716 +/- 0.002) agree closely with values reported elsewhere for normals by a variety of techniques including chemical analysis. Finally, TBN results based on the four different calibration methods are presented for five surgical patients, demonstrating the importance of the calibration method on estimates of TBN in patients with abnormal body composition. It is concluded that this technique will provide accurate estimates of the total body content of protein, water, and fat in intensive care patients.

  20. Medical disclosure and refugees. Telling bad news to Ethiopian patients.

    PubMed Central

    Beyene, Y

    1992-01-01

    The strong value in American medical practice placed on the disclosure of terminal illness conflicts with the cultural beliefs of many recent refugees and immigrants to the United States, who often consider frank disclosure inappropriate and insensitive. What a terminally ill person wants to hear and how it is told are embedded in culture. For Ethiopians, "bad news" should be told to a family member or close friend of the patient who will divulge information to the patient at appropriate times and places and in a culturally approved and recognized manner. Being sensitive to patients' worldviews may reduce the frustration and conflict experienced by both refugees and American physicians. PMID:1413779

  1. Attitudes towards euthanasia in severely ill and dementia patients and cremation in Cyprus: a population-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Population studies on end-of-life decisions have not been conducted in Cyprus. Our study aim was to evaluate the beliefs and attitudes of Greek Cypriots towards end-of-life issues regarding euthanasia and cremation. Methods A population-based telephone survey was conducted in Cyprus. One thousand randomly selected individuals from the population of Cyprus age 20 years or older were invited to participate. Beliefs and attitudes on end-of-life decisions were collected using an anonymous and validated questionnaire. Statistical analyses included cross-tabulations, Pearson’s chi-square tests and multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models. Results A total of 308 males and 689 females participated in the survey. About 70% of the respondents did not support euthanasia for people with incurable illness and/or elders with dementia when requested by them and 77% did not support euthanasia for people with incurable illness and/or elders with dementia when requested by relatives. Regarding cremation, 78% were against and only 14% reported being in favor. Further statistical analyses showed that male gender, being single and having reached higher educational level were factors positively associated with support for euthanasia in a statistically significant fashion. On the contrary, the more religiosity expressed by study participants, the less support they reported for euthanasia or cremation. Conclusions The vast majority of Greek Cypriots does not support euthanasia for people with incurable illness and/or elders with dementia and also do not support cremation. Certain demographic characteristics such as age and education have a positive influence towards attitudes for euthanasia and cremation, while religiosity exerts a strong negative influence on the above. Family bonding as well as social and cultural traditions may also play a role although not comprehensively evaluated in the current study. PMID:24060291

  2. Illness Perception and Clinical Treatment Experiences in Patients with M. Maroteaux-Lamy (Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VI) and a Turkish Migration Background in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Dilger, Hansjörg; Leissner, Linn; Bosanska, Lenka; Lampe, Christina; Plöckinger, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by a mutation of the gene for arylsulfatase B (ASB). Of the thirty-one patients registered in Germany, almost fifty percent have a Turkish migration background. MPS VI is treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), which is time-consuming and expensive. Methods This interdisciplinary study explored the illness perceptions and clinical treatment experiences among ten MPS VI patients with a Turkish migration background in two centers for metabolic diseases (Berlin and Mainz, Germany). The clinical treatment situation was observed and semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and health care personnel, in addition to participatory observation in four patients' everyday environments in Berlin. The data from the interviews, patient records, and personal field notes were encoded, cross-related, and analyzed. Results Patients' acknowledgement of the disease and coping strategies are influenced predominantly by the perception of their individual health status and the handling of the disease within their family. Patients' willingness to cooperate with treatment strategies is further modified by their knowledge of the disease and the relationships with their health care providers. In this analysis, cultural factors turned out to be marginally relevant. Conclusion As with other chronic and debilitating diseases, effective treatment strategies have to reach beyond delivering medication. Health care providers need to strengthen the support for patients with a migration background. In this regard, they should respect the patients' cultural and social background and their personal perception of the disease and the therapy. Yet structural and social aspects (clinical setting, family and educational background) may be more crucial here than “cultural barriers.” PMID:23826140

  3. Cryptic terminal rearrangement of chromosome 22q13.32 detected by FISH in two unrelated patients.

    PubMed Central

    Doheny, K F; McDermid, H E; Harum, K; Thomas, G H; Raymond, G V

    1997-01-01

    Two unrelated patients with cryptic subtelomeric deletions of 22q13.3 were identified using FISH with the commercially available Oncor probe, D22S39. Proband 1 was found to have a derivative chromosome 22 resulting from the unbalanced segregation of a t(1;22)(q44;q13.32) in her mother. Additional FISH analysis of proband 1 and her mother placed the breakpoint on chromosome 22 in this family proximal to D22S55 and D22S39 and distal to D22S45. We have mapped D22S39 to within 170 kb of D22S21 using pulsed field gel electrophoresis. D22S21 is genetically mapped between D22S55 and D22S45. These data indicate that the deletion in proband 1 is smaller than in eight of nine reported del(22)(q13.3) patients. Probands 1 and 2 share features of hypotonia, developmental delay, and expressive language delay, also seen in previously reported del(22)(q13.3) patients, although proband 1 appears to be more mildly affected. Proband 1 is also trisomic for the region 1q44-->qter. This very small duplication has been previously reported only once and the patient had idiopathic mental retardation. This is the first report where 22q13.3 terminal deletion patients have been identified through the use of FISH, and the first report of a deletion of this region occurring because of missegregation of a parental balanced cryptic translocation. We feel that investigation of the frequency of del(22)(q13.3) in the idiopathic mentally retarded population is warranted and may be aided by the ability to use a commercially available probe (D22S39), which is already currently in use in a large number of cytogenetic laboratories. Images PMID:9279755

  4. [Operative treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with terminal chronic renal insufficiency in programmed hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Zavgorodni?, S N

    2001-12-01

    The phosphorous-calcic metabolism disorders and secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPTH) occurs nearly in all patients, to whom programmed hemodialysis (PHD) is applied. In majority of observations these disorders become compensated while administration of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3), calcitriol and etc. In 23 patients surgical treatment was performed to correct these disorders. Performance of subtotal parathyroidectomy (STPTHE) had promoted biochemical indexes normalization and the secondary HPTH clinical manifestations regression. The medicamental therapy nonefficacy, progressing osteoporosis, cutaneous itch, which is not connected the PHD procedure, raising of content of the ionized calcium and the alkaline phosphatase activity as well in the blood serum constitute indications for the STPTHE conduction. PMID:11944272

  5. In-Frame Deletion and Missense Mutations of the C-Terminal Helicase Domain of SMARCA2 in Three Patients with Nicolaides-Baraitser Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, D.; Endele, S.; Azzarello-Burri, S.; Hoyer, J.; Zweier, M.; Schanze, I.; Schmitt, B.; Rauch, A.; Reis, A.; Zweier, C.

    2012-01-01

    Using high-resolution molecular karyotyping with SNP arrays to identify candidate genes for etiologically unexplained intellectual disability, we identified a 32-kb de novo in-frame deletion of the C-terminal helicase domain of the SMARCA2 gene in a patient with severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, sparse hair, prominent joints, and distinct facial anomalies. Sequencing of the gene in patients with a similar phenotype revealed de novo missense mutations in this domain in 2 further patients, pointing to a crucial role of the SMARCA2 C-terminal helicase domain. The clinical features observed in all 3 patients are typical of Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome, an only rarely reported syndrome with mainly moderate to severe intellectual disability. Notably, one of our patients with a p.Gly1132Asp mutation showed typical morphological features but an exceptional good development with borderline overall IQ and learning difficulties, thus expanding the phenotypic spectrum of Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome. PMID:22822383

  6. A hierarchy of personal agency for people with life-limiting illness.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ann; Carrick, Lorna; Elliott, Robert

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to discover how individuals diagnosed with a life-limiting illness experienced themselves as agents, even in the face of death. In this qualitative, multiple case study design, 4 female outpatient hospice patients with terminal illnesses received humanistic counseling to explore their experiences of themselves and their illness. A graded set of 8 levels of personal agency emerged from analyses of the texts of their sessions, ranging from a passive, objectified nonagentic mode to an active, autonomous fully agentic mode, with multiple subcategories representing further gradations within levels. Our results are consistent with guidelines for supportive and palliative care with advanced cancer, which specify that dying patients' needs be assessed and that they be involved in decisions about their care. PMID:24052428

  7. Incidence of influenza-like illness into a cohort of patients affected by chronic inflammatory rheumatism and treated with biological agents.

    PubMed

    Bello, S L; Serafino, L; Bonali, C; Terlizzi, N; Fanizza, C; Anecchino, C; Lapaldula, G

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI), from October 2009 to May 2010, in a group of patients suffering from chronic inflammatory rheumatism and treated with biological therapies. At the end of 2009-2010 influenza season, 159 patients under biological therapies answered to a questionnaire distributed 8 months before and were deeply interviewed. The group included 69 men and 90 women (mean age 47.6); forty-nine suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, 61 with psoriatic arthritis, 32 with ankylosing spondylitis and 17 with other spondyloarthritis; 146 patients were treated with anti-TNF-?, 7 with rituximab and 6 with abatacept; 128 patients assumed DMARDs and 72 patients assumed low dose of steroids. A case of ILI was identified by anamnestic findings and according to the case definitions commonly used in Europe. Seventeen percent of the considered population reported at least one episode of ILI during the monitoring period; none of the patients during the acute influenza attack suffered particularly severe symptoms and no one was hospitalized due to complications. Despite the diversity among the considered subgroups, the statistical analysis did not show any significant difference when incidence of ILI was considered for different disease, different biological agent and different association therapy. None of the examined variables resulted statistically significant concerning the relative risk evaluation. The incidence of ILI into a cohort of 159 patients treated with biological agents during the influenza season 2009-2010 resulted higher than the value reported in a wide sample of Italian population in the same period. However, the pandemic impact was not heavy among the studied patients, considering that no important complications or hospitalizations have been reported. PMID:23256105

  8. Violence and Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Rueve, Marie E.; Welton, Randon S.

    2008-01-01

    Violence attracts attention in the news media, in the entertainment business, in world politics, and in countless other settings. Violence in the context of mental illness can be especially sensationalized, which only deepens the stigma that already permeates our patients’ lives. Are violence and mental illness synonymous, connected, or just coincidental phenomena? This article reviews the literature available to address this fundamental question and to investigate other vital topics, including etiology, comorbidity, risk factor management, and treatment. A psychiatrist who is well versed in the recognition and management of violence can contribute to the appropriate management of dangerous behaviors and minimize risk to patients, their families, mental health workers, and the community as a whole. PMID:19727251

  9. Clinical and microbiological efficacy of continuous versus intermittent application of meropenem in critically ill patients: a randomized open-label controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Meropenem bactericidal activity depends on the time when the free drug concentrations remain above the minimum inhibitory concentration of pathogens. The goal of this study was to compare clinical and bacteriological efficacy of continuous meropenem infusion versus bolus administration in critically ill patients with severe infection, and to evaluate the safety of both dosing regimens. Methods Patients admitted to the interdisciplinary Intensive Care Unit (ICU) who suffered from severe infections and received meropenem were randomized either in the Infusion group (n = 120) or in the Bolus group (n = 120). Patients in the Infusion group received a loading dose of 2 g of meropenem followed by a continuous infusion of 4 g of meropenem over 24 hours. Patients in the Bolus group were given 2 g of meropenem over 30 minutes every 8 hours. Clinical and microbiological outcome, safety, meropenem-related length of ICU and hospital stay, meropenem-related length of mechanical ventilation, duration of meropenem treatment, total dose of meropenem, and ICU and in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Clinical cure at the end of meropenem therapy was comparable between both groups (83.0% patients in the Infusion vs. 75.0% patients in the Bolus group; P = 0.180). Microbiological success rate was higher in the Infusion group as opposed to the Bolus group (90.6% vs. 78.4%; P = 0.020). Multivariate logistic regression identified continuous administration of meropenem as an independent predictor of microbiological success (OR = 2.977; 95% CI = 1.050 to 8.443; P = 0.040). Meropenem-related ICU stay was shorter in the Infusion group compared to the Bolus group (10 (7 to 14) days vs. 12 (7 to 19) days; P = 0.044) as well as shorter duration of meropenem therapy (7 (6 to 8) days vs. 8 (7 to 10) days; P = 0.035) and lower total dose of meropenem (24 (21 to 32) grams vs. 48 (42 to 60) grams; P < 0.0001). No severe adverse events related to meropenem administration in either group were observed. Conclusions Continuous infusion of meropenem is safe and, in comparison with higher intermittent dosage, provides equal clinical outcome, generates superior bacteriological efficacy and offers encouraging alternative of antimicrobial therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:22742765

  10. What contributes to good patient outcomes in the home treatment of the severely mentally ill: study protocol of a multi-centre analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background While evidence is available that home treatment could be effective for treating severe mental illness, there is a lack of evidence on what exactly makes home treatment effective. The study presented here aims to develop recommendations for structures and processes in home treatment that are necessary for its effectiveness. Methods/Design 14 provider networks of home treatment for severe mental illness will be analyzed and compared according to their structures, processes and patient-related outcomes. Data will be drawn from health care claims data, routine assessments of psychosocial functioning, and from questionnaires on structures and processes. The primary outcome will be psychosocial functioning; secondary outcomes, quality of life and days spent in hospital. The relation between structures and processes on one hand side and outcomes on the other side will be identified by multilevel analysis. In addition, focus groups with patients, relatives and network staff will be held to add further insight into relevant processes. All networks will receive individual quality reports, providing them with feedback on the results of this research and benchmarking them against the average. Based on this research, recommendations for processes and structures of home treatment will be developed. Discussion The research will use longitudinal data on outcomes routinely assessed since 2009 and claims data. Routine data is also used for the assessment of structures and processes. By way of additional questionnaires developed in discussion with providers, further relevant factors can be included. The approach of this study becomes more comprehensive by conducting focus groups with patients, relatives and providers and by having the chance to evaluate the results with the networks by providing feedback of results. Several factors such as outcomes related to regional availability of hospital beds or size of networks might limit this study. PMID:24192048

  11. A Framework for Ethical Decision-Making with Dying Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafer, Barbara H.; Lee, Sandra S.

    The field of death and dying has become an important area for the development of both research and clinical technique. Psychologists in increasing numbers work in hospital and hospice settings, and therapists treat terminally ill patients and/or their families. Greater attention is being paid to the needs and rights of these patients and families,…

  12. Risk factors for acute kidney injury in critically ill patients receiving high intravenous doses of colistin methanesulfonate and/or other nephrotoxic antibiotics: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Use of colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) was abandoned in the 1970s because of excessive nephrotoxicity, but it has been reintroduced as a last-resort treatment for extensively drug-resistant infections caused by gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia). We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate risk factors for new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill patients receiving high intravenous doses of colistin methanesulfonate and/or other nephrotoxic antibiotics. Methods The cohort consisted of 279 adults admitted to two general ICUs in teaching hospitals between 1 April 2009 and 30 June 2011 with 1) no evidence on admission of acute or chronic kidney disease; and 2) treatment for more than seven days with CMS and/or other nephrotoxic antimicrobials (NAs, that is, aminoglycosides, glycopeptides). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors associated with this outcome. Results The 279 cases that met the inclusion criteria included 147 patients treated with CMS, alone (n = 90) or with NAs (n = 57), and 132 treated with NAs alone. The 111 (40%) who developed AKI were significantly older and had significantly higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) scores than those who did not develop AKI, but rates of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and congestive heart failure were similar in the two groups. The final logistic regression model showed that in the 147 patients who received CMS alone or with NAs, onset of AKI during the ICU stay was associated with septic shock and with SAPS II scores ?43. Similar results were obtained in the 222 patients treated with CMS alone or NAs alone. Conclusions In severely ill ICU patients without pre-existing renal disease who receive CMS high-dose for more than seven days, CMS therapy does not appear to be a risk factor for this outcome. Instead, the development of AKI was strongly correlated with the presence of septic shock and with the severity of the patients as reflected by the SAPS II score. PMID:23945197

  13. Anti-seizure prophylaxis in critically ill patients with traumatic brain injury in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, K; Milne, D; Edwards, S; Chapman, M J; Shakib, S

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this prospective observational study were to determine the proportion of patients with traumatic brain injury who received effective anti-seizure prophylaxis. The study was conducted in a tertiary level ICU of a major trauma referral centre between February 2012 and August 2013. A total of 2361 patients were admitted to the ICU in this study period, of whom125 patients (index) with traumatic head injury were included in this study. The patients had a mean age of 45 years (SD=19), a mean score on the Glasgow Coma Scale of 9 (SD=4), a mean injury severity score of 27 (SD=13) and a mean APACHE III score of 55 (SD=27). Only 13.6 % (17 of 125) of patients were given anti-seizure prophylaxis and phenytoin levels were measured in 9.6% (12 of 125). Although all 12 patients achieved an effective concentration for phenytoin therapy (>40 µmol/l) after the loading dose, no patient had their target concentration consistently maintained in the recommended therapeutic range (40 to 80 µmol/l) throughout the seven-day monitoring period. There was wide fluctuation in phenytoin levels in the patients in this study. Twenty-two (18%) of the index patients had post-traumatic seizures, indicating a high prevalence for this study. Poor compliance with guidelines could possibly explain this phenomenon. Future studies are needed to look at the dosing and monitoring of phenytoin and/or alternative anti-seizure prophylaxis in patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:26310417

  14. A Tool to Assess Mobility Status in Critically Ill Patients: The Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of early mobilization for adult patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are reduced length of ICU and hospital stays, fewer readmissions to the ICU, decreased duration of mechanical ventilation, fewer days of detrimental bedrest, minimal adverse or unsafe events, and improved walking distance. Because there are no available tools to specifically measure mobility status of patients in the ICU setting, there is an urgent need to create a reliable tool that measures and standardizes the assessment of mobility status for these patients. The purpose of this study was to describe the development of this novel ICU-specific tool to assess a patient’s mobility status, examine the initial reliability of the tool, and address its clinical application. The Perme ICU Score was quickly and easily administered by physical therapists. Overall, the inter-rater agreement was 94%. A total of six items had kappa values of < .6, and these low scores may have been the result of the procedure to collect inter-rater scores, wherein one rater assisted with the activity while a second rater observed. In order to improve reliability, the authors developed directions to standardize the assessment. The Perme ICU Mobility Score is a tool developed to measure the patient’s mobility status starting with the ability to follow commands and culminating in the distance walked in two minutes. Preliminary data suggest that the validity of this tool is supported by expert concurrence, its overall reliability is high, and its clinical use is acceptable. PMID:24932363

  15. Procalcitonin Kinetics in the First 72 Hours Predicts 30-Day Mortality in Severely Ill Septic Patients Admitted to an Intermediate Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Mancini, Antonio; Antonielli, Elisa; Luise, Fabio; Sammicheli, Lucia; Turchi, Valerio; Para, Ombretta; Bacci, Francesca; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of morbidity and mortality among critically ill patients, thus the identification of prognostic factors is crucial to determine their outcome. In this study, we explored the value of procalcitonin (PCT) variation in predicting 30-day mortality in patients with sepsis admitted to an intermediate care unit. Methods This prospective observational study enrolled 789 consecutive patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to a medical intermediate care unit between November 2012 and February 2014. Kinetics of PCT expressed as percentage were defined by the variation between admission and 72 hours, and 24 and 72 hours; they were defined as ?-PCT0-72h and ?-PCT24-72h, respectively. Results The final study group of 144 patients featured a mean age of 73 ± 14 years, with a high prevalence of comorbidities (Charlson index greater than 6 in 39%). Overall, 30-day mortality was 28.5% (41/144 patients). A receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis identified a decrease of ?-PCT0-72h less than 15% (area under the curve: 0.75; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67 - 0.82) and a decrease of ?-PCT24-72h less than 20% (area under the curve: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.74 - 0.92) as the most accurate cut-offs in predicting mortality. Decreases of ?-PCT0-72h less than 15% (HR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.6 - 9.5; P < 0.0001) and ?-PCT