Science.gov

Sample records for tertiary level science

  1. Creativity and Innovation in Science and Technology: Bridging the Gap between Secondary and Tertiary Levels of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramma, Yashwantrao; Samy, Martin; Gopee, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper stems from a study which was conducted as a means to first, find out whether there is a gap between the secondary and tertiary education levels, second identify any existing gap in Science and Technology education, and third, examine the impact of the above upon students' creativity and innovativeness at university level. The…

  2. Levelling Australian Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyke, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    Traces the development of Australia's binary system of higher education, in which universities granted degrees and colleges of advanced education (CAE's) and teachers colleges issued diplomas and certificates, through the rapid growth of the past 20 years as Commonwealth funding has raised the level of teachers colleges and of CAE's, which now…

  3. Sea-Level Changes during the Tertiary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Peter R.; Hardenbol, Jan

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are research procedures undertaken to determine the magnitude and timing of eustatic sea-level changes during the Tertiary Period. Data now becoming available give scientists a knowledge of conditions that may have been conducive to the formation of petroleum. (BT)

  4. CAL-laborate: A Collaborative Publication on the Use of Computer Aided Learning for Tertiary Level Physical Sciences and Geosciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Anne, Ed.; Sproats, Lee, Ed.; Sorensen, Stacey, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    The science community has been trying to use computers in teaching for many years. There has been much conformity in how this was to be achieved, and the wheel has been re-invented again and again as enthusiast after enthusiast has "done their bit" towards getting computers accepted. Computers are now used by science undergraduates (as well as…

  5. Students' Views of Science: A Comparison between Tertiary and Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Ghali

    2011-01-01

    There is relatively little research evidence that documents current students' views of science--particularly a comparison of secondary and tertiary science. Further, little is known about how students' views of science differ according to level of study. This study provides evidence of students' view of science from both school and university…

  6. Increasing Equity and Compensating Historically Academically Disadvantaged Students at a Tertiary Level: Benefits of a Science Foundation Programme as a Way of Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    An approach to remedy the scarcity of Black students within the sciences at southern African universities has been the development of access programmes. There has been little acknowledgement of the contribution of these access programmes in increasing the quantity and quality of graduates. The contribution made by the Science Foundation Programme…

  7. Attitudes of Tertiary Students towards a Group Project in a Science Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle, Emma K.; Dook, Jan; Mocerino, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the attitude of tertiary students, in a science discipline, towards completing collaborative learning tasks. Two samples of students, enrolled in different units across different tertiary institutions, were considered. Students in sample 1 were required to work in small groups to produce an information poster on an allocated…

  8. Preventing Problem Behaviors: Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Level Prevention Interventions for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Tary J.; Sugai, George

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to compare changes in social skills, problem behaviors, and academic competence for kindergarten or first grade students identified as being at risk for serious behavior problems who received primary, secondary, or tertiary level preventive interventions. Of the 93 participants in this study, 73% were male; 86% were…

  9. An Integrated Skills Approach Using Feature Movies in EFL at Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncay, Hidayet

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a case study based on an integrated skills approach using feature movies (DVDs) in EFL syllabi at the tertiary level. 100 students took part in the study and the data was collected through a three - section survey questionnaire: demographic items, 18 likert scale questions and an open-ended question. The data…

  10. Science Curriculum Guide, Level 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newark School District, DE.

    The third of four levels in a K-12 science curriculum is outlined. In Level 3 (grades 6-8), science areas include life science, earth science, and physical science (physics and chemistry). Conveniently listed are page locations for educational and instructional objectives, cross-referenced to science area (i.e., life science, animals, genetics)…

  11. Emotions or Science? Pre-Tertiary Males' Accounts of Psychology as a Subject Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Jenny; Sander, Paul; Williams, Stella; Jones, Tim

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that the number of males studying psychology in the UK, both at A-level and on degree courses, is disproportionately low compared to females. There is a paucity of research, however, which discusses how psychology is viewed by this group. The present study employed focus groups with 35 pre-tertiary males (some of whom were…

  12. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  13. A Holistic Approach To Preparing Disadvantaged Students To Succeed in Tertiary Science Studies Part II. Outcomes of the Science Foundation Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Diane J.

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on the implementation and results of the Science Foundation Programme (SFP), a year-long pre-degree program designed to identify academically talented but underprepared black students who want to pursue tertiary studies in science or applied science. (DDR)

  14. Dinoflagellate and calcareous nannofossil response to sea-level change in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Daniel; Moshkovitz, Shimon; Kramer, Cynthia

    1992-02-01

    Stratigraphic sections in south-central Alabama were studied to test palynological evidence of sea-level change across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. New evidence from both calcareous nannofossils and dinoflagellate cysts places the regional disconformity in Alabama (Type 1 sequence boundary) virtually at the K-T boundary. This suggests that sea-level fall may have contributed to the mass-extinction event. Dinofagellate diversity varies between systems tract components of coastal onlap. This parameter is useful for interpreting sea-level change in this part of the section, because dinoflagellates did not participate in the mass extinction. The iridium spikes in the roadcut near Braggs are of earliest Danian age and correlate in relative magnitude with the lower values reported from directly above the K-T boundary in the Gubbio stratotype section. Iridium was concentrated in marine flooding surfaces in episodes of higher productivity of algal organic matter at the time when the iridium-enriched ocean encroached on the shelf during the first Cenozoic episode of sea-level rise.

  15. Dinoflagellate and calcareous nannofossil response to sea-level change in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sections

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, D. ); Moshkovitz, S. ); Kramer, C. )

    1992-02-01

    Stratigraphic sections in south-central Alabama were studied to test palynological evidence of sea-level change across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. New evidence from both calcareous nannofossils and dinoflagellate cysts places the regional disconformity in Alabama (Type 1 sequence boundary) virtually at the K-T boundary. This suggests that sea-level fall may have contributed to mass-extinction event. Dinoflagellate diversity varies between systems tract components of coastal onlap. This parameter is useful for interpreting sea-level change in this part of the section, because dinoflagellates did not participate in the mass extinction. The iridium spikes in the roadcut near Braggs are of earliest Danian age and correlate in relative magnitude with the lower values reported from directly above the K-T boundary in the Gubbio stratotype section. Iridium was concentrated in marine flooding surfaces in episodes of higher productivity of algal organic matter at the time when the iridium-enriched ocean encroached on the shelf during the first Cenozoic episode of sea-level rise.

  16. Supporting Low Ability Learners in a Tertiary Level Compulsory English Programme Using CEFR Based Online Language Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Gavin; McKeurtan, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the processes, methods and results of using language software based on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) in a tertiary level institute in Japan in order to facilitate the learning of low ability learners of English. None of the learners were English majors, all were between the ages of 18 and 20,…

  17. A Changing Paradigm in Language Planning: English-Medium Instruction Policy at the Tertiary Level in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Nor Liza

    2013-01-01

    The literature shows that English-medium instruction (EMI) programmes at the tertiary level in various parts of the world have positioned EMI as a language-planning tool to promote students' mastery of English. English proficiency is believed to be intertwined with the overall economic development of a country. In addition to internationalising…

  18. "Digitize Me": Generating E-Learning Profiles for Media and Communication Students in a Jamaican Tertiary-Level Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart-McKoy, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an e-learning profile for a group of media and communication students enrolled in a Jamaican tertiary-level institution in order to make informed decisions most the appropriate [online] learning complement for these students. The objectives sought to determine the e-learning profile of media and…

  19. Associations between Psychosocial Aspects of English Classroom Environments and Motivation Types of Chinese Tertiary-Level English Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bi, Xuefei

    2015-01-01

    This study involved whether psychosocial aspects of English classroom environments had associations with the English learning motivation types of Chinese tertiary-level English majors based on a case study of approximate 1,000 English majors in their first 2 years at one of the key universities located in South China. Canonical correlation…

  20. The Effect of Using Concept Maps on Student Achievement in Selected Topics in Chemistry at Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Indra Sen; Moono, Karren

    2015-01-01

    The performance in chemistry at tertiary level in Zambia has not been as expected. It has therefore been a matter of concern. There has been a continuous focus on exploring new teaching strategies to improve the understanding of this difficult subject. This study investigated the effectiveness of composite use of concept maps and traditional…

  1. An Annotated Bibliography of Research into the Teaching and Learning of the Physical Sciences at the Higher Education Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David

    This document contains an annotated bibliography aimed at the teaching of the physical sciences at the tertiary level to those who wish to become more informed about teaching related research evidence and undertake science education research. The bibliography offers an overview of teaching and learning in the physical sciences and key references…

  2. A Study of First-Year Chemistry Students' Understanding of Solution Concentration at the Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on students' understanding of sugar concentration in aqueous solutions presented in two different modes: a visual submicroscopic mode for particles and a verbal mode referring to macroscopic amounts of sugar. One hundred and forty-five tertiary college students studying some form of first-year chemistry participated in the…

  3. Making a Map of Science: General Systems Theory as a Conceptual Framework for Tertiary Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulyaev, Sergei A.; Stonyer, Heather R.

    2002-01-01

    Develops an integrated approach based on the use of general systems theory (GST) and the concept of 'mapping' scientific knowledge to provide students with tools for a more holistic understanding of science. Uses GST as the core methodology for understanding science and its complexity. Discusses the role of scientific community in producing…

  4. School Department Dean Level Designee Level HEALTH SCIENCES

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    , Vice-Chairman Department of Oral Health Promotion and Community Outreach Kim Isringhausen, BS/DDS 09School Department Dean Level Designee Level HEALTH SCIENCES VP for Health Sciences - Campus Sheldon Success Lisa B. Webb, M.S. CRC Division for Health Sciences Diversity Kevin Harris, M.S.A. 09-10-2014 Page

  5. Self-Medication Practices with Antibiotics among Tertiary Level Students in Accra, Ghana: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Donkor, Eric S.; Tetteh-Quarcoo, Patience B.; Nartey, Patrick; Agyeman, Isaac O.

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of self-medication with antibiotics among tertiary level students in Accra (Ghana) and evaluate factors associated with the practice. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study and involved face-to-face interviews of 600 respondents selected by convenient sampling. Prevalence of self medication was 70% (95% CI: 66.3–73.7), and the practice was significantly lower among medically inclined students (OR: 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1–0.4, p < 0.001). Among the respondents who practiced self medication, the most common frequency of antibiotic usage was at intervals of one month (30%, 95% CI: 25.6–34.4%), and the most common antibiotic used was amoxacillin (23.9%, 95% CI: 21.0–26.8%). Treatment failure were reported by 35% (95% CI: 30.5–39.6%) of the respondents, and the main reasons cited for self medication were that, it was less expensive compared to medical care in the hospital and secondly, medical care in hospitals were associated with long delays. Forty nine percent (95% CI: 44.2–53.8%) of the respondents had poor knowledge about the health implications of irrational use of antibiotics, and 46% (95% CI: 41.2–50.8%) did not comply with the completion of the full course of antibiotics. Self medication among tertiary students in Accra is an important public health problem and this may reflect the situation among tertiary students in the whole of Ghana. PMID:23202760

  6. Challenges and Perspectives for Tertiary Level Hospitals in Bolivia: The case of Santa Cruz de La Sierra Department.

    PubMed

    Medici, André

    2015-01-01

    Current legislation transferred public tertiary hospitals in Bolivia from the Municipalities to the Regional Level. However, the Regional Governments are experiencing technical and financial constraints to reform infrastructure, modernize equipment and introduce reforms to allow better governance, management and sustainability of these hospitals. This articles summarizes the recent experience of the Government of Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Bolivia where five tertiary hospitals and blood bank (most of them in precarious working conditions) has been transferred in 2012 from the Municipal Government of Santa Cruz (the capital) to the Regional Government of Santa Cruz. To face the challenges, the Regional Government of Santa Cruz implement several improvements, such as contract new clinical and administrative personal, increases hospital budgetary autonomy, outsource hospitals' auxiliary services, take measures to eliminate waiting lists and make several new investments to modernize and equip the hospitals. The World Bank was contracted to evaluated the future financial sustainability of these investments and to advice the Government to propose changes to increase the hospitals' management performance. The article describes the remaining challenges in these hospitals and the proposals from the World Bank Study. In the area of quality of care, the main challenge is to improve client satisfaction and continuous outcomes monitoring and evaluation according quality standards. In the area of financing, the challenge is how to assure the sustainability of these hospitals with the current level of health financing and the insufficient financial transfers from the National Government. In the area of Governance, reforms to streamline and simplify internal processes need to be introduced in order to establish mechanisms to increase transparency and accountability, allowing the hospital to have a good administration and adequate participation of the main actors in the guidance of the institution. PMID:26521383

  7. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  8. The Effects of Extensive Reading via E-Books on Tertiary Level EFL Students' Reading Attitude, Reading Comprehension, and Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chin-Neng; Chen, Shu-Chu; Chen, Shu-Hui Eileen; Wey, Shyh-Chyi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of extensive reading of e-books on tertiary level EFL students' English reading attitude, reading comprehension and vocabulary. Eighty-nine participants were assigned in two groups, with 46 students in the experimental group and the other 43 students in the control group. In addition to a traditional…

  9. Aalborg Universitet Tertiary and secondary control levels for efficiency optimization and system damping

    E-print Network

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    theories to mimic the nature of synchronous generators which drop their frequency/voltage when active control level is added to regulate the output voltage drooped by the VRs. However, system dynamics

  10. Supporting Tertiary Students with Disabilities: Individualised and Institution-Level Approaches in Practice. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossey, Ellie; Chaffey, Lisa; Venville, Annie; Ennals, Priscilla; Douglas, Jacinta; Bigby, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This research explores the complex factors affecting the implementation of learning supports for students with disabilities or ongoing health conditions. It focuses on two types of learning support: (1) individualised reasonable adjustments; and (2) institution-level learning supports, the latter being available to all students. These supports can…

  11. Modeling Student Subject Choice at Secondary and Tertiary Level: A Cross-Section Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashworth, John; Evans, J. Lynne

    2001-01-01

    Provides cross-section data on British secondary level student choices that contributes to broader debates on why student numbers have been falling in economics, and why women are reluctant economists. Identifies the key factors: peer group effects, critical mass of women studying economics, positive role models, and teacher effects. (RLH)

  12. Research and Innovation in Physics Education: Transforming Classrooms, Teaching, and Student Learning at the Tertiary Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Pratibha

    2009-04-01

    It is well recognized that science and technology and the quality of scientifically trained manpower crucially determines the development and economic growth of nations and the future of humankind. At the same time, there is growing global concern about flight of talent from physics in particular, and the need to make physics teaching and learning effective and careers in physics attractive. This presentation presents the findings of seminal physics education research on students' learning that are impacting global praxis and motivating changes in content, context, instruments, and ways of teaching and learning physics, focusing on active learning environments that integrate the use of a variety of resources to create experiences that are both hands-on and minds-on. Initiatives to bring about innovative changes in a university system are described, including a triadic model that entails indigenous development of PHYSARE using low-cost technologies. Transfer of pedagogic innovations into the formal classroom is facilitated by professional development programs that provide experiential learning of research-based innovative teaching practices, catalyze the process of reflection through classroom research, and establish a collaborative network of teachers empowered to usher radical transformation.

  13. Complications of neck dissection at a tertiary level hospital: study of 30 cases.

    PubMed

    Masud, M K; Ahmad, S M; Karim, M A; Ferdouse, F; Fakir, A Y; Hanif, M A; Abdullah, M; Roy, A S

    2014-10-01

    Metastatic dissemination into lymph nodes of neck occurs frequently in head neck cancers which down grade the patient's curability and survival. Neck dissection is a curable option for its management. To evaluate the complications following different types of neck dissection. This cross sectional study was conducted among patients undergone different types of neck dissection due to cervical nodal metastasis and attended follow up during July 2010 to June 2011 in Department of ENTs and Head-Neck surgery Dhaka Medical College Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Among 30 selected patient, 23 were male (76.67%) and 7 were female (23.33%), age ranged from 31-72 years (Mean=59.1±5.44). In different modalities of neck dissection 11 were modified neck dissection (36.67%) and 10(33.33%) were radical neck dissection. Common indication was carcinoma of unknown origin (66.67%). Involved neck nodes were commonly level II-IV (69.99%). Nodal stage was N2(50%) and N3 (40%).Common immediate complications were bleeding 03(10%), facial oedema 02 (6.67%) and thoracic duct injury 02(6.67%). Intermediate complications were seroma 05(16.67%), wound infection 04(13.33%) and chylous fistula 02(6.67%), Late Complications were hypertrophic scar 07(23.33%) and shoulder syndrome 06(20%). Proper indications, skilled surgery along with early recognize and treatment in both early and late manifestations of neck dissection preventing its grave sequence. PMID:25481582

  14. Ciencia: Nivel A (Science: Level A).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duron, Dolores; And Others

    A teacher's manual was developed for an elementary level science course in Spanish as part of an immersion program for English speaking children. The Level A manual is designed for kindergarten and grade 1 pupils. The five units cover the basic concepts of the weather, colors, animals, plants, and the five senses. Each unit includes vocabulary,…

  15. The Importance of Production: An Expanding Focus in Secondary and Tertiary Science Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, T. S.

    1983-01-01

    Encourages science educators to consider engaging students in science projects resulting in socially useful products. Educational presentations meant to perform social functions (soft products) and preparation/execution of environmental manipulations (hard products) such as pollution analysis, plant breeding, or administering medical tests are…

  16. Level of Motivation Amongst Health Personnel Working in A Tertiary Care Government Hospital of New Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Poonam; Singhal, Ashok K.; Gadpayle, Adesh K.; Sachdeva, Sandeep; Padaria, Rabindra

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To assess the level and factors of motivation amongst permanent government employees working in a tertiary health care institution. Material and Methods: A sample of 200 health personnel (50 in each category) i.e. doctors, nurses, technician, and support staff were contacted through face to face interview. Motivation was measured as the degree to which an individual possessed various identified motivation domains like Drive, Control, Challenge, Relationship and Rewards. Each domain was represented by 4 dimensions- accordingly a closed-ended statement represented each of these dimensions and responses were assessed on a Likert based scale. Data management was done using SPSS, ver. 19. Results: The average age for different health personnel were: Doctors 48.68 (±8.53), nurses 40.72 (±7.76), technician 38.4 (±10.65) and support staff 43.24 (±9.52) years. The average year of work experience was: Doctor 19.09 (±9.77), nurses 17.2 (±8.420), technician 14.84 (±10.45), support staff 18.24 (±10.28). A comparison of overall motivation index (mean score) revealed that nurse had highest level (3.47), followed by support staff (3.46), doctor (3.45) and technician (3.43). Based on their individual mean scores, the healthcare providers were categorised into three different levels of motivation and it was found that majority of the health personnel i.e.70% of support staff, 62% nurse, 56% doctor and technician, had high to very high level of motivation index. The mean scores for all the five factors as well as their respective ranks were also found out and it was deduced that “relationship” assumed first rank for doctors (mean score: 3.71) and technician (mean score: 3.75), whereas “control” assumed greatest significance for nurses (mean score, 3.62) and support staff (mean scores, 3.61). Based upon the mean scores, “reward” assumed third rank among all the four categories. Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to test if the different categories of health personnel varied with respect to five factors of motivation and it was found that their orientation towards the various motivational components differed significantly only with respect to Drive (P < 0.01). Conclusion: There is scope for enhancing staff motivation. PMID:25364148

  17. A study of understanding: Alchemy, abstraction, and circulating reference in tertiary science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, Brett W.

    Understanding is widely touted to be of paramount importance for education. This is especially true in science education research and development where understanding is heralded as one of the cornerstones of reform. Teachers are expected to teach for understanding and students are expected to learn with understanding. This dissertation is an empirical study of the concept of understanding. After analyzing various constructions of understanding in current U.S. education literature, I suggest that understanding is defined by five distinct features---they are knowledge (or knowledge base), coherence, transfer, extrapolation, and cognition--- and that these features are heavily informed and shaped by the psychological sciences. This relationship is neither good nor bad, I argue, but it means that teaching for and learning with understanding are not heavily informed and shaped by, for example, the natural sciences. Drawing from historical, philosophical, and anthropological perspectives of science, but especially from the work of Bruno Latour, I enact a radical revision(ing) of psychological notions such as "abstraction" and "transfer." The two main purposes of this re-visioning are (1) to draw critical attention to particular characteristics of a cognitive learning theory that emphasizes abstract concepts, and (2) to align many of the principles and tools used in science education more closely with those used in empirical scientific research. Finally, by bringing some examples of teaching and learning from an undergraduate biology classroom into conversation with both psychological and empirical practices and perspectives, I suggest that problematizing the current construction of understanding creates much needed room in mainstream science education for more empirical forms of learning and styles of teaching. A shift to such forms and styles, I conclude, should prove to be more inclusive and less constraining for both students and teachers.

  18. Tertiary Education in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Portugal's tertiary education sector has expanded significantly over the last 20 years, but participation and overall educational attainment levels remain below European standards and enrolment rates have begun to decline. The OECD review recommends that Portugal's national government should focus on strategic direction and leave higher education…

  19. Tertiary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Davies, D. R.; Dent, C. E.; Watson, Lyal

    1968-01-01

    In our first 200 cases of primary hyperparathyroidism confirmed by operation 12 were also shown to have a long history either of a malabsorption syndrome or of chronic renal-glomerular failure. We consider that they first went through a phase of secondary hyperparathyroidism, during which one or more of the glands became autonomous adenamata. This then produced the biochemical changes of “primary” hyperparathyroidism, necessitating excision of the adenoma. This condition is best described as “tertiary” hyperparathyroidism. The transition from secondary to tertiary hyperparathyroidism occurred in four of the 12 patients while under our observation. We think the same process can be traced retrospectively in the other eight cases. The concept of tertiary hyperparathyroidism may help to explain the high incidence of other diseases in association with primary hyperparathyroidism. The behaviour of the parathyroid glands provides a valuable model for the investigation of tumour formation in man. All states occurred in our patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, from normal through hyperplasia to adenoma formation and finally to parathyroid carcinoma. PMID:5691200

  20. BIOLOGICAL & GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES LEVEL 01 (LOWER GROUND FLOOR)

    E-print Network

    Lennard, William N.

    / BIOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level / BIOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level / BIOLOGICAL AND GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 05/02/2012ACCESSIBILITY WESTERN FLOOR PLAN SUPPORT SERVICES BUILDING Level

  1. Eighth Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for eighth grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, eighth grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  2. Fifth Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for fifth grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, fifth grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  3. First Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for first grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, first grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  4. Fourth Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for fourth grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, fourth grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  5. Seventh Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for seventh grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, seventh grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  6. Kindergarten Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for kindergarten students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, kindergarten benchmarks, assessments, and…

  7. Second Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for second grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, second grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  8. Third Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for third grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, third grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  9. Sixth Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for sixth grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, sixth grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  10. Descriptive Epidemiology of Unintentional Burn Injuries Admitted to a Tertiary-Level Government Hospital in Nepal: Gender-Specific Patterns.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narayan Prasad; Duke, Janine M; Lama, Bir Bahadur; Thapa, Buland; Dahal, Peeyush; Bariya, Nara Devi; Marston, Wendy; Wallace, Hilary J

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of unintentional adult burn injury admissions in a tertiary hospital in Nepal, from 2002 to 2013, focusing on gender-specific patterns. Chi-square tests and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests were performed. There were 819 unintentional burn admissions: 52% were male and 58% younger than 35 years. The median percentage total body surface area burned (interquartile range) was greater in females than in males (P < .001): 28% (17-40) versus 20% (12-35), and female mortality was higher (32% vs 11%). A higher proportion females were illiterate than males (48% vs 17%). Burns occurred at home (67%), work (28%), and public places (5%); gender-specific patterns were observed. Flame burns accounted for 77%, electricity 13%, and scalds 8%. Kerosene (31%) and biomass (27%) were the major fuels. Cooking, heating, and lighting were the main activities associated with burn injury. Results support interventions to reduce the use of open fires and kerosene and to promote electrical safety. PMID:25957289

  11. Factors Influencing Exemplary Science Teachers' Levels of Computer Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakverdi, Meral; Dana, Thomas M.; Swain, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine exemplary science teachers' use of technology in science instruction, factors influencing their level of computer use, their level of knowledge/skills in using specific computer applications for science instruction, their use of computer-related applications/tools during their instruction, and their…

  12. Nonadherence to anti-HIV medication is associated with higher level of anxiety: Experience from a tertiary care hospital of Odisha

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Mousumee; Swain, Trupti Rekha; Mohanty, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To correlate the level of anxiety with nonadherence to antiretroviral medication. Materials and Methods: This observational, cross-sectional, hospital-based study was conducted in 78 patients attending antiretroviral therapy (ART) center of a tertiary care hospital of Odisha. The study duration was 6 months. Patients were designated as nonadherent by referring to the white card. Utilization of ART drugs and adverse drug reactions were included in a predesigned format. The anxiety level of all included patients was scored as per Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale. Mean anxiety score of the adherent group was compared with that of the nonadherent group. Possible causes of nonadherence leading to high anxiety level were evaluated. Results: 46% of patients in the nonadherent group had very severe, 17% had moderate to severe, 28% had mild to moderate and 9% had a mild level of anxiety. In the adherent group, however, mild to moderate level of anxiety was observed only in 10% patients. Conclusions: Anxiety is associated with sub-optimal medication adherence in HIV infected patients.

  13. Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency

    E-print Network

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    QAA":1111 ` Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency MEMORANDUM OF COOPERATION between Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, Australia and the Quality Assurance Education Quality and Standards Agency, 1 of Level 14, 530 Collins Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3001

  14. Becoming an Urban School Middle-Level Science Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanpierre, Bobby

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to document the journey of three novice career change science inductees as they became middle-level science teachers in urban low socioeconomic status (SES) schools and included post-internship employment status data on all nine science teachers who completed the alternative certification program, up to the time…

  15. Field Trips as Cognitive Motivators for High Level Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Marlene M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a composite example of field trips from several years of traveling to Yellowstone with high school biology students, the author illustrates how to raise the cognitive level of science instruction and student learning through science field trips. The author examines what teachers can do to raise the level of both teaching and learning in all…

  16. High sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke and subtypes: A study from a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Jaydip Ray; Mridula, Kandadai Rukmini; Umamahesh, Matapathi; Swathi, Alluri; Balaraju, Banda

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke is a heterogeneous disease with several risk factors. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a marker for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Recent studies have shown that high hsCRP level is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. The objective of our study was to investigate the association of high hsCRP (> 3 mg/L) levels with ischemic stroke and its subtypes in Indian patients. Methods We recruited 210 consecutive acute stroke patients and 150 age and sex matched controls. Stroke patients were admitted within 72 hours of onset, at Yashoda Hospital, Hyderabad, India. The study period was from January 2011 to December 2012. All patients underwent tests as per standard protocol for stroke workup. Serum hsCRP level was assessed in all stroke patients and controls on the day of admission. Results The mean hsCRP was significantly higher in stroke patients (3.8 ± 2.5) than controls (1.8 ± 1.5) (P < 0.001). High hsCRP had higher frequency in stroke patients 130 (61.9%) compared to controls 10 (6.6%), P < 0.001. High hsCRP level was more prevalent in the stroke subtypes of cardioembolic stroke (83.3%) and large artery atherosclerosis (72%). High hsCRP level was significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.001), age (P = 0.01), and mortality (0.04). After adjustment of regression analysis it was observed that high level hsCRP is independently associated with acute ischemic stroke (Odds 4.5; 95% CI: 2.5-12.2); especially the stroke subtypes of cardioembolic stroke, (odds ratio 3.4, 95% CI: 1.9-10.5) and large artery atherosclerosis (odds ratio 2.1, 95% CI: 1.5-3.8). Conclusion High hsCRP level is strongly associated with and an independent predictor of acute ischemic stroke. The association was found in all ischemic stroke subtypes. PMID:24250912

  17. Determinants of symptom profile and severity of conduct disorder in a tertiary level pediatric care set up: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprakash, R.; Rajamohanan, K.; Anil, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Conduct disorders (CDs) are one of the most common causes for referral to child and adolescent mental health centers. CD varies in its environmental factors, symptom profile, severity, co-morbidity, and functional impairment. Aims: The aim was to analyze the determinants of symptom profile and severity among childhood and adolescent onset CD. Settings and Design: Clinic based study with 60 consecutive children between 6 and 18 years of age satisfying International Classification of Disease-10 Development Control Rules guidelines for CD, attending behavioral pediatrics unit outpatient. Materials and Methods: The family psychopathology, symptom severity, and functional level were assessed using parent interview schedule, revised behavioral problem checklist and Children's Global Assessment Scale. Statistical Analysis: The correlation and predictive power of the variables were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 version. Results: There was significant male dominance (88.3%) with boy girl ratio 7.5:1. Most common comorbidity noticed was hyperkinetic disorders (45%). Childhood onset group was more predominant (70%). Prevalence of comorbidity was more among early onset group (66.7%) than the late-onset group (33.3%). The family psychopathology, symptom severity, and the functional impairment were significantly higher in the childhood onset group. Conclusion: The determinants of symptom profile and severity are early onset (childhood onset CD), nature, and quantity of family psychopathology, prevalence, and type of comorbidity and nature of symptom profile itself. The family psychopathology is positively correlated with the symptom severity and negatively correlated with the functional level of the children with CD. The symptom severity was negatively correlated with the functional level of the child with CD. PMID:25568472

  18. Project Water Science. General Science High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water Education Foundation, Sacramento, CA.

    This teacher's guide presents 12 hands-on laboratory activities for high school science classes that cover the environmental issue of water resources in California. The activities are separated into three sections. Five activities in the section on water quality address the topics of groundwater, water hardness, bottled water, water purity, and…

  19. Chemical Literacy Levels of Science and Mathematics Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celik, Suat

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate Turkish science and mathematics teacher candidates' levels of attainment in chemical literacy. These candidates had all studied the new Turkish chemistry curriculum in high school. The sample of the study consisted of 112 students, who were first-year students in the Department of Secondary Science

  20. Predictors of student success in entry-level science courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mamta K.

    Although the educational evaluation process is useful and valuable and is supported by the Higher Education Act, a strong research base for program evaluation of college entry-level science courses is still lacking. Studies in science disciplines such as, biology, chemistry, and physics have addressed various affective and demographic factors and their relationships to student achievement. However, the literature contains little information that specifically addresses student biology content knowledge skills (basics and higher order thinking skills) and identifies factors that affect students' success in entry-level college science courses. These gate-keeping courses require detailed evaluation if the goal of an institution is to increase students' performance and success in these courses. These factors are, in fact, a stepping stone for increasing the number of graduates in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) majors. The present study measured students' biology content knowledge and investigated students' performance and success in college biology, chemistry, and physics entry-level courses. Seven variables---gender, ethnicity, high school Grade Point Average (GPA), high school science, college major, school financial aid support, and work hours were used as independent variables and course final performance as a dichotomous dependent variable. The sample comprised voluntary student participants in entry-level science courses. The study attempted to explore eight research questions. Content knowledge assessments, demographic information analysis, multiple regression analysis, and binary logistic regression analysis were used to address research questions. The results suggested that high school GPA was a consistently good predictor of students' performance and success in entry-level science courses. Additionally, high school chemistry was a significant predictor variable for student success in entry-level biology and chemistry courses. Similarly, students' performance and success in entry-level physics courses were influenced by high school physics. Finally, the study developed student success equation with high school GAP and high school chemistry as good predictors of students' success in entry-level science courses.

  1. BEST: Bilingual environmental science training: Kindergarten level

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This booklet is one of a series of bilingual guides to environmental-science learning activities for students to do at home. Lesson objectives, materials required, procedure, vocabulary, and subjects integrated into the lesson are described in English for each lesson. A bilingual glossary, alphabetized by English entries, with Spanish equivalents in both English and Spanish, follows the lesson descriptions, and is itself followed by a bibliography of English-language references. This booklet includes descriptions of six lessons covering the senses of touch and sight, the sense of smell, how to distinguish living and non-living things, cell structures, the skeletal system, and the significance of food groups. 8 figs.

  2. Exposure to carbon monoxide, methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene levels inside vehicles traveling on an urban area in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jo, W K; Park, K H

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to allow systematic comparison of exposure on public (40-seater buses) and private (four passengers cars) transport modes for carbon monoxide (CO), methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), and benzene by carrying out simultaneous measurements along the same routes. There were statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the concentrations of all target compounds among the three microenvironments; inside autos; inside buses; and in ambient air. The target compounds were significantly correlated for all the three environments, with at least p < 0.05. The in-vehicle concentrations of MTBE and benzene were significantly higher (p < 0.0001), on the average 3.5 times higher, in the car with a carbureted engine than in the other three electronic fuel-injected cars. On the other hand, the CO concentrations were not significantly different among the four cars. The in-auto MTBE levels (48.5 micrograms/m3 as a median) measured during commutes in this study was 2-3 times higher than the New Jersey and Connecticut's results. The in-auto concentration of CO (4.8 ppm as a median) in this study was comparable with those in later studies in some American cities, but much lower than those in earlier studies in other American cities. The in-bus CO concentration was 3.6 ppm as a median. As a median, the in-auto concentration of benzene was 44.9 micrograms/m3, while the in-bus concentration 17.0 micrograms/m3. The in-auto/in-bus exposure ratios for all the target compounds was 31-40% higher than the corresponding concentration ratios, due to the higher travel speed on buses in the specified commute route as compared to the autos. PMID:9577748

  3. The elementary level science methods course: Breeding ground of an apprehension toward science? a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duschl, Richard A.

    Ethnographic research methodologies were used to examine the training of elementary education majors in science in an attempt to gain insight on whether or not their training in science contributes to the apprehension elementary teachers have toward science. The field study consisted of 14 weeks of weekly observations in the elementary education majors science methods class. Interviews with the students and the instructors as well as survey instruments to assess students' preparation in science were used. Two different approaches to the study of science, one content oriented, the other process oriented, may contribute to the students' confusion, insecurity, and avoidance of science. The students' perception that science is learning content, an objective of introductory level science courses, and the science methods class's objectives of teaching science as a process sets up an antagonistic dilemma between the two. Such antagonistic dilemma may be manifest in the lack of instructional time accorded to science by elementary educators. The type of science experiences an individual encounters influences their perceptions. To offset student perceptions developed in science courses which stress principally content, the students need science experiences which truly represent science as inquiry. New strategies for the training of elementary education majors in science need to be examined.

  4. Turkish Pre-Service Elementary Science Teachers' Scientific Literacy Level and Attitudes toward Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavas, Pinar Huyuguzel; Ozdem, Yasemin; Cavas, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Jale; Ertepinar, Hamide

    2013-01-01

    In order to educate elementary students scientifically literate as expected in the science curricula in many countries around the world, science teachers need to be equipped with the diverse aspects of scientific literacy. This study investigates whether pre-service elementary science teachers at universities in Turkey have a satisfactory level of…

  5. Trends in Enrollment, Graduation and Staffing of Science and Technology Education in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions: A Gender Participation Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aderemi, H. O.; Hassan, O. M.; Siyanbola, W. O.; Taiwo, K.

    2013-01-01

    Prominence has been given to science and technology (S&T) education of women in recent years. This is because they constitute a critical mass of non-harnessed potentials in the country that if given the opportunity, would contribute to national development. Thus the objective of this work was to study the enrollment, graduation and staffing…

  6. Issues of Identity and African Unity Surrounding the Introduction of an Exogenous African Language, Swahili, at Tertiary Level in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildsmith-Cromarty, Rosemary; Conduah, Aloysius N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examines the attitudes of university students and immigrants to the introduction of Swahili at a tertiary institution in South Africa. Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey and interviews with questions that covered the domains in which Swahili could be most useful, who should learn it and the reasons…

  7. Investigation of Inquiry-based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science teachers conceptualize "inquiry-based instruction?" 2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? And 3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the connection between science instruction and student learning? The participants within this research study represent 33 percent of teachers in grades 5 through 9 within six school districts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Of the 12 consent forms originally obtained, 10 teachers completed all three phases of the data collection, including the online survey, participation in focus groups, and teacher self-reflection. 60 percent of the participants taught only science, and 40 percent taught all content areas. Of the ten participants, 50 percent were certified teachers of science and 50 percent were certified as teachers of elementary education. 70 percent of the research participants reflected having obtained a master's, with 60 percent of these degrees being received in areas of education, and 10 percent in the area of science. The research participants have a total of 85 collective years of experience as professional educators, with the average years of experience being 8.5 years. Analysis of data revealed three themes related to research question #1) How do middle-level science teachers conceptualize inquiry-based instruction? and sub-question #1) How do middle-level science teachers characterize effective instruction? The themes that capture the essence of teachers' formulation of inquiry-based instruction that emerged in this study were student centered, problem solving, and hands-on . Analysis of data revealed one theme related to research question #2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? and topical sub-question #2) How do middle level science teachers structure instruction. The theme that emerged was needs of students. Analysis of the data revealed one theme related to research question #3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the relationship between science instruction and student learning? and topical sub-question #3) How do middle level science teachers view their role in relation to student learning? This theme is meaning making. Analysis of the data related to meaning making revealed two sub-themes of application and relationships. It is clear that middle level science teachers have a vision for inquiry-based science instruction, but implementation is inhibited by a variety of factors including curricular programming that is very broad and lacks depth, the scheduling of time and resources for science, and the absence of a clear model of inquiry-based instruction. In addition, only one participant referenced students investigating their own authentic questions and no participants reflected on the importance of students using evidence in their explanations of scientific phenomenon. Additionally, participants continually reflected on the needs of their students informing instructional practices, and it is wondered if there is a clear understanding among middle level teachers of how students learn science. Real world applications were recognized as important within science learning and the researcher questions whether teachers of science have adequate opportunities to explore real world application of science concepts throughout their careers in order to foster connections within the classroom. These findings support the need for strong, job-embedded professional development, the cultivation of learning communities dedicated to the investigation and implementation of inquiry-based science, the focusing of curricular programming to allow for in depth investigation of scientific concep

  8. West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gillham, Travis; Yannimaras, Demetrios

    1999-11-03

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity drainage. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid. In Gulf Coast oil reservoirs with pronounced bed dip, reservoir performance has shown that gravity drainage recoveries average 80% to 90% of the original oil in place while water drive recoveries average 50% to 60% of the original oil in place. The target for tertiary oil recovery with the Double Displacement Process is the incremental oil between the 50% to 60% water drive recoveries and the 80% to 90% gravity drainage recoveries. The use of air injection in this process combines the benefits of air's low cost and universal accessibility with the potential for improved oil recovery resulting from spontaneous in situ combustion. If successful, this project will demonstrate that utilizing air injection in the Double Displacement Process will result in an economically viable tertiary process in many Gulf Coast oil reservoirs where other tertiary processes are presently uneconomic. The West Hackberry Tertiary Project receives matching funds from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the DOE's Class 1 Program for the development of advance recovery technologies in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. In addition, the Petroleum Engineering Department at Louisiana State University (LSU) provides independent study and technology transfer.

  9. Investigation of Inquiry-Based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    2012-01-01

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science

  10. Human health screening level risk assessments of tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC): calculated acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) and Hazard Quotient (HQ) values based on toxicity and exposure scenario evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bus, James S; Banton, Marcy I; Faber, Willem D; Kirman, Christopher R; McGregor, Douglas B; Pourreau, Daniel B

    2015-02-01

    A screening level risk assessment has been performed for tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC) examining its primary uses as a solvent in industrial and consumer products. Hazard quotients (HQ) were developed by merging TBAC animal toxicity and dose-response data with population-level, occupational and consumer exposure scenarios. TBAC has a low order of toxicity following subchronic inhalation exposure, and neurobehavioral changes (hyperactivity) in mice observed immediately after termination of exposure were used as conservative endpoints for derivation of acute and chronic reference concentration (RfC) values. TBAC is not genotoxic but has not been tested for carcinogenicity. However, TBAC is unlikely to be a human carcinogen in that its non-genotoxic metabolic surrogates tertiary-butanol (TBA) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) produce only male rat ?-2u-globulin-mediated kidney cancer and high-dose specific mouse thyroid tumors, both of which have little qualitative or quantitative relevance to humans. Benchmark dose (BMD)-modeling of the neurobehavioral responses yielded acute and chronic RfC values of 1.5 ppm and 0.3 ppm, respectively. After conservative modeling of general population and near-source occupational and consumer product exposure scenarios, almost all HQs were substantially less than 1. HQs exceeding 1 were limited to consumer use of automotive products and paints in a poorly ventilated garage-sized room (HQ = 313) and occupational exposures in small and large brake shops using no personal protective equipment or ventilation controls (HQs = 3.4-126.6). The screening level risk assessments confirm low human health concerns with most uses of TBAC and indicate that further data-informed refinements can address problematic health/exposure scenarios. The assessments also illustrate how tier-based risk assessments using read-across toxicity information to metabolic surrogates reduce the need for comprehensive animal testing. PMID:25629921

  11. Advancing the Science of Community-Level Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Beehler, Sarah; Deutsch, Charles; Green, Lawrence W.; Hawe, Penelope; McLeroy, Kenneth; Miller, Robin Lin; Rapkin, Bruce D.; Schensul, Jean J.; Schulz, Amy J.; Trimble, Joseph E.

    2011-01-01

    Community interventions are complex social processes that need to move beyond single interventions and outcomes at individual levels of short-term change. A scientific paradigm is emerging that supports collaborative, multilevel, culturally situated community interventions aimed at creating sustainable community-level impact. This paradigm is rooted in a deep history of ecological and collaborative thinking across public health, psychology, anthropology, and other fields of social science. The new paradigm makes a number of primary assertions that affect conceptualization of health issues, intervention design, and intervention evaluation. To elaborate the paradigm and advance the science of community intervention, we offer suggestions for promoting a scientific agenda, developing collaborations among professionals and communities, and examining the culture of science. PMID:21680923

  12. STEM: Science Technology Engineering Mathematics. State-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Melton, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) state-level analysis provides policymakers, educators, state government officials, and others with details on the projections of STEM jobs through 2018. This report delivers a state-by-state snapshot of the demand for STEM jobs, including: (1) The number of forecast net new and…

  13. GNVQ science at advanced level: motivation and self-esteem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, J.

    1995-07-01

    An interview study carried out in the pilot year of the new GNVQ in science at A-level has shown that the use of grading criteria, which require independent learning, as a method of assessment is better for students' motivation and self-esteem.

  14. Striped tertiary storage arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drapeau, Ann L.

    1993-01-01

    Data stripping is a technique for increasing the throughput and reducing the response time of large access to a storage system. In striped magnetic or optical disk arrays, a single file is striped or interleaved across several disks; in a striped tape system, files are interleaved across tape cartridges. Because a striped file can be accessed by several disk drives or tape recorders in parallel, the sustained bandwidth to the file is greater than in non-striped systems, where access to the file are restricted to a single device. It is argued that applying striping to tertiary storage systems will provide needed performance and reliability benefits. The performance benefits of striping for applications using large tertiary storage systems is discussed. It will introduce commonly available tape drives and libraries, and discuss their performance limitations, especially focusing on the long latency of tape accesses. This section will also describe an event-driven tertiary storage array simulator that is being used to understand the best ways of configuring these storage arrays. The reliability problems of magnetic tape devices are discussed, and plans for modeling the overall reliability of striped tertiary storage arrays to identify the amount of error correction required are described. Finally, work being done by other members of the Sequoia group to address latency of accesses, optimizing tertiary storage arrays that perform mostly writes, and compression is discussed.

  15. Kinetics and capacities of phosphorus sorption to tertiary stage wastewater alum solids, and process implications for achieving low-level phosphorus effluents.

    PubMed

    Maher, Chris; Neethling, J B; Murthy, Sudhir; Pagilla, Krishna

    2015-11-15

    The role of adsorption and/or complexation in removal of reactive or unreactive effluent phosphorus by already formed chemical precipitates or complexes has been investigated. Potential operational efficiency gains resulting from age of chemically precipitated tertiary alum sludge and the recycle of sludge to the process stream was undertaken at the Iowa Hill Water Reclamation Facility which employs the DensaDeg(®) process (IDI, Richmond, VA) for tertiary chemical P removal to achieve a filtered final effluent total phosphorus concentration of <30 ?g/L. The effect of sludge solids age was found to be insignificant over the solids retention time (SRT) of 2-8 days, indicating that the solids were unaffected by the aging effects of decreasing porosity and surface acidity. The bulk of solids inventory was retained in the clarifier blanket, providing no advantage in P removal from increased solids inventory at higher SRTs. When solids recycle was redirected from the traditional location of the flocculation reactor to a point just prior to chemical addition in the chemical mixing reactor, lower effluent soluble P concentrations at lower molar doses of aluminum were achieved. At laboratory scale, the "spent" or "waste" chemical alum sludge from P removal showed high capacity and rapid kinetics for P sorption from real wastewater effluents. Saturation concentrations were in the range of 8-29 mg soluble reactive P/g solids. Higher saturation concentrations were found at higher temperatures. Alum sludge produced without a coagulant aid polymer had a much higher capacity for P sorption than polymer containing alum sludge. The adsorption reaction reached equilibrium in less than 10 min with 50% or greater removal within the first minute. PMID:26331896

  16. American Tertiary mollusks of the genus Clementia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodring, W.P.

    1927-01-01

    Aside from its value as an aid in determining the age of Tertiary beds, the chief interest of the genus Clementia lies in the anomalous features of its present and former distribution. An attempt is made in this paper to trace its geologic history, to point out its paleobiologic significance, and to describe all the known American Tertiary species. The fossils from Colombia used in preparing this report were collected during explorations made under the direction of Dr. 0. B. Hopkins, chief geologist of the Imperial Oil Co. (Ltd.), who kindly donated them to the United States National Museum. Dr. T. Wayland Vaughan, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, furnished information relating to specimens collected by him in Mexico. Dr. Bruce L. Clark, of the University of California; Dr. G. Dallas Hanna, of the California Academy of Sciences; Dr. H. A. Pilsbry, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences; and Dr. W. D. Matthew, of the American Museum of Natural History, generously loaned type specimens and other material. Doctor Clark and Doctor Hanna also gave information concerning the Tertiary species from California. Mr. Ralph B. Stewart, of the University of California, read the manuscript, and I have taken advantage of his suggestions. I am also indebted to Mr. L. R. Cox, of the British Museum, for information relating to the fossil species from Persia, Zanzibar, and Burma, and to Dr. Axel A. Olsson, of the International Petroleum Co., for data concerning undescribed Tertiary species from Peru.

  17. Tertiary oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Byham, D. E.

    1985-03-05

    An improved method for the recovery of tertiary oil from oil formations containing connate waters having a high brine concentration. A stable alcohol external microemulsion is formed from specific brine-soluble surfactants and alcohols for employment as a chemical slug. Such a microemulsion may be used to efficiently and effectively recover tertiary oil from formations in high brine concentrations. Specific examples of surfactants which may be employed to form the microemulsions of the present invention include amphoteric surfactants such as bis-2-hydroxyethylcocoamine propane sulfonate and bis-2-hydroxyethyloctadecyl amine propane sulfonate.

  18. Policy Innovation and Tertiary Education Graduation Rates: A Cross-Country Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Jennifer A.; Yu, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This study extends Trow's theory of higher education development to examine changes in national-level tertiary education graduation rates. Applying Trow's framework we arrive at three stages: (1) elite systems with gross tertiary graduation rates less than 15%, (2) massified systems with gross tertiary graduation rates between 15% and 50%, and (3)…

  19. ALICE: Project Overview and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soummer, Remi; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Brendan Hagan, J.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Rajan, Abhijith; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine; Debes, John H.; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Schneider, Glenn; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Mawet, Dimitri; Marois, Christian; Barman, Travis

    2015-01-01

    We report on the status of the ALICE project (Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments), which consists in a consistent reanalysis of the entire HST-NICMOS coronagraphic archive. Over the last two years, we have developed a sophisticated pipeline able to handle the data of the 400 stars of the archive. This pipeline builds on the Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm, and was completed in the fall of 2014. We discuss the first processing and analysis results of the overall reduction campaign. As we will deliver high-level science products to the STScI MAST archive, we are defining a new standard format for high-contrast science products, which will be compatible with every new high-contrast imaging instrument (GPI, SPHERE, P1640, CHARIS, etc.) and used by the JWST coronagraphs. We present here the specifications of this standard.

  20. Smart Utilization of Tertiary Instructional Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John; Tee, Singwhat

    2010-01-01

    This empirical research surveys first year tertiary business students across different campuses regarding their perceived views concerning traditional, blended and flexible instructional approaches. A structural equation modeling approach shows traditional instructional modes deliver lower levels of student-perceived learning quality, learning…

  1. "Doing Science" through Discourse-in-Interaction: Young Children's Science Investigations at the Early Childhood Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siry, Christina; Ziegler, Gudrun; Max, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This research investigates the interconnectedness of scientific inquiring at the early childhood level, as we explore the discourse-in-interaction processes occurring within small inquiry groups of 5- and 6-year-old children. The rationale behind this research is to explore the nature of science-related discourse, and to that end, this work…

  2. Estonian Science and Non-Science Students' Attitudes towards Mathematics at University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldo, Indrek; Reiska, Priit

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the attitudes and beliefs towards studying mathematics by university level students. A total of 970 randomly chosen, first year, Estonian bachelor students participated in the study (of which 498 were science students). Data were collected using a Likert-type scale questionnaire and analysed with a respect to field of…

  3. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Environmental Science. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit and its activities focuses on environmental pollution and hazards. Optional excursions are suggested for students who wish to study an area in greater depth. An introduction describes the problem…

  4. CONVENTIONAL TERTIARY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tertiary treatment on effluent from the EPA-DC Pilot Plant's step aeration activated sludge system included two-stage or single-stage lime clarification, air stripping of ammonia, dual-media filtration, neutralization, and activated carbon adsorption. With a good secondary efflue...

  5. HANOVER PARK TERTIARY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    During a one year study, four tertiary treatment units were tested and evaluated. Three of the units were deep-bed filters which were used to treat secondary plant effluent. The types of filters used were: (1) an upflow filter with a sand media, (2) a downflow gravity filter with...

  6. A multi-level systems perspective for the science of team science.

    PubMed

    Börner, Katy; Contractor, Noshir; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J; Fiore, Stephen M; Hall, Kara L; Keyton, Joann; Spring, Bonnie; Stokols, Daniel; Trochim, William; Uzzi, Brian

    2010-09-15

    This Commentary describes recent research progress and professional developments in the study of scientific teamwork, an area of inquiry termed the "science of team science" (SciTS, pronounced "sahyts"). It proposes a systems perspective that incorporates a mixed-methods approach to SciTS that is commensurate with the conceptual, methodological, and translational complexities addressed within the SciTS field. The theoretically grounded and practically useful framework is intended to integrate existing and future lines of SciTS research to facilitate the field's evolution as it addresses key challenges spanning macro, meso, and micro levels of analysis. PMID:20844283

  7. A Multi-Level Systems Perspective for the Science of Team Science

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Katy; Contractor, Noshir; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly J.; Fiore, Stephen M.; Hall, Kara L.; Keyton, Joann; Spring, Bonnie; Stokols, Daniel; Trochim, William; Uzzi, Brian

    2012-01-01

    This Commentary describes recent research progress and professional developments in the study of scientific teamwork, an area of inquiry termed the “science of team science” (SciTS, pronounced “sahyts”). It proposes a systems perspective that incorporates a mixed-methods approach to SciTS that is commensurate with the conceptual, methodological, and translational complexities addressed within the SciTS field. The theoretically grounded and practically useful framework is intended to integrate existing and future lines of SciTS research to facilitate the field’s evolution as it addresses key challenges spanning macro, meso, and micro levels of analysis. PMID:20844283

  8. Approaching Gender Parity: Women in Computer Science at Afghanistan's Kabul University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plane, Jandelyn

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the representation of women in computer science at the tertiary level through data collected about undergraduate computer science education at Kabul University in Afghanistan. Previous studies have theorized reasons for underrepresentation of women in computer science, and while many of these reasons are indeed present in…

  9. A Study of the Competencies Needed of Entry-Level Academic Health Sciences Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philbrick, Jodi Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the professional and personal competencies that entry-level academic health sciences librarians should possess from the perspectives of academic health sciences library directors, library and information sciences (LIS) educators who specialize in educating health sciences librarians, and individuals who…

  10. Investigation of Primary Education Second Level Students' Motivations toward Science Learning in Terms of Various Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert Çibik, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the primary education second level students' motivations towards science learning in terms of various factors. Within the research, the variation of the total motivational scores in science learning according to the gender, class, socio-economic levels, success in science-technology course and…

  11. Science self-efficacy of African Americans enrolled in freshman level physical science courses in two historically black institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prihoda, Belinda Ann

    2011-12-01

    Science education must be a priority for citizens to function and be productive in a global, technological society. African Americans receive fewer science degrees in proportion to the Caucasian population. The primary purposes of this study were to determine the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American nonscience majors, the difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors, the relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, the relationship between gender and science self-efficacy score, and the relationship between science self-efficacy score and course withdrawal. This study utilized a Likert survey instrument. All participants were enrolled in freshman level courses in the physical sciences at a historically black institution: a college or university. Participants completed the pretest survey within two weeks after the 12th class day of the semester. Initially, 458 participants completed the pretest survey. The posttest was administered within two weeks before the final exam. Only 245 participants completed the posttest survey. Results indicate that there is a difference in science self-efficacy of science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant difference between the pretest and posttest science self-efficacy scores of African-American science majors and nonscience majors. There was no significant relationship between science self-efficacy and course grade, gender and science self-efficacy score, and course withdrawal and science self-efficacy score.

  12. Practical Considerations for Integrating Alternate Reality Gaming into Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocchi, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I present my experience with integrating an alternate reality gaming (ARG) framework into a pre-service science teacher education course. My goal is to provide an account of my experiences that can inform other science education practitioners at the tertiary and secondary levels that wish to adopt a similar approach in their…

  13. Science Teachers' Views about the Science Fair at Primary Education Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2013-01-01

    Science fair is an environment where students present their scientific research projects. Opinions of science teachers who participated as a mentor in science fair are important for determining of the science fair quality and its contribution of science education. The aim of study was to determine science teachers' views about the science fair at…

  14. Campaign-level science traceability for Earth observation system architecting

    E-print Network

    Seher, Theodore K. (Theodore Kimball)

    2009-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey of 2007 presented a comprehensive vision for the evolution of space-based Earth Science resources. The practical development of the Decadal campaign, however, has highlighted four challenges ...

  15. Is This the End of the English Tradition of Practical A-Level Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Ian

    2014-01-01

    From September 2015, schools in England will be teaching new A-level science specifications that have been developed by examination boards to encompass new higher levels of demand developed by the Department for Education. Integral to these new specifications is a radical change to the contribution of practical science to the A-level grade of the…

  16. Ethiopian Tertiary dike swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    Mapping of the Ethiopian rift and Afar margins revealed the existence of Tertiary dike swarms. The structural relations of these swarms and the fed lava pile to monoclinal warping of the margins partly reflect a style of continental margin tectonics found in other parts of the world. In Ethiopia, however, conjugate dike trends appear to be unusually strongly developed. Relation of dikes to subsequent margin faulting is ambiguous, and there are instances where the two phenomena are spatially separate and of differing trends. There is no evidence for lateral migration with time of dike injection toward the rift zone. No separate impingement of Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and African rift system stress fields on the Ethiopian region can be demonstrated from the Tertiary dike swarms. Rather, a single, regional paleostress field existed, suggestive of a focus beneath the central Ethiopian plateau. This stress field was dominated by tension: there is no cogent evidence for shearing along the rift margins. A gentle compression along the rift floor is indicated. A peculiar sympathy of dike hade directions at given localities is evident.

  17. Teaching Geologic/Earth Science Remote Sensing at the Collegiate and the Secondary School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes util satellite photography, satellite remote sensing, and high altitude aircraft photography for teaching environmental and ecological aspects of earth science at the secondary or college levels. (SL)

  18. Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education. Directions in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Bank, Washington, DC.

    This report describes how tertiary education contributed to building up a country's capacity for participation in an increasingly knowledge-based world economy and investigates policy options for tertiary education. The report draws on ongoing World Bank research and analysis on the dynamics of knowledge economies and on science and technology…

  19. Quaternary Science Reviews 24 (2005) 19631968 Quaternary coastal morphology and sea-level

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    2005-01-01

    Quaternary Science Reviews 24 (2005) 1963­1968 Editorial Quaternary coastal morphology and sea-level timescales. The position of sea level (ultimate base level) and changes of sea level over geological geomorphological and environmental change in adjacent landscapes. Sea level determines the lower limit

  20. Multiple-Choice Exams: An Obstacle for Higher-Level Thinking in Introductory Science Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.

    2012-01-01

    Learning science requires higher-level (critical) thinking skills that need to be practiced in science classes. This study tested the effect of exam format on critical-thinking skills. Multiple-choice (MC) testing is common in introductory science courses, and students in these classes tend to associate memorization with MC questions and may not…

  1. CodingisCoolLevel1 A Nuts & Bolts Introduction to Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    CodingisCool­Level1 A Nuts & Bolts Introduction to Computer Science A Workshop for High School Students in Grades 10th-12th This two-day workshop will introduce computer science and coding to high school students using AppInventor and mobile apps. No prior background in computer science or coding

  2. Staying in the Science Stream: Patterns of Participation in A-Level Science Subjects in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes patterns of participation and attainment in A-level physics, chemistry and biology from 1961 to 2009. The A level has long been seen as an important gateway qualification for higher level study, particularly in the sciences. This long-term overview examines how recruitment to these three subjects has changed in the context of…

  3. A-Level Science--What Value Practical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The Qualifications Regulator in England (Ofqual) has decided that with the implementation of revised (linear) science specifications, first teaching from September 2015, the assessment of practical skills will not contribute to the overall qualification grade. This could have significant implications for post-16 science teaching. The decision was…

  4. Unified Science Approach K-12, Proficiency Levels 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oickle, Eileen M., Ed.

    Presented is the second part of the K-12 unified science materials used in the public schools of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Detailed descriptions are made of the roles of students and teachers, purposes of the bibliography, major concepts in unified science, processes of inquiry, a scheme and model for scientific literacy, and program…

  5. Unified Science Approach K-12, Proficiency Levels 1-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oickle, Eileen M., Ed.

    Presented are first-revision materials of the K-12 unified science program implemented in the public schools of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Detailed descriptions are given of the roles of students and teachers, purposes of bibliography, major concepts in unified science, processes of inquiry, scheme and model for scientific literacy, and…

  6. Tertiary serpentinite tectonics in northern Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, F.; Draper, G.

    1985-01-01

    At least 4 types of serpentinite bodies are found in N. Hispaniola, by different inclusion and Tertiary deformation styles: (1) Narrow slivers occurring on Tertiary faults, rarely containing inclusions, which occur throughout the region. (2) Massive fractured serpentinites associated with a Cretaceous volcanic plutonic and metamorphic basement, and containing rodingite dikes, occurs in the Puerto Plata region. (3) Massive, fractured, but coherent bodies containing Tertiary limestone clasts which apparently the same as nearby limestone overlying the serpentinite occur west of Puerto Plata. (4) Diapirically emplaced bodies in the Gaspar Hernandez region containing both brecciated and massive zones and containing a variety of inclusions. Type 4 bodies protrude into the clastic Upper Eocene Altamira Fm. The most common tectonic inclusions in these bodies are rounded cobbles of diorite and gabbro. Amphibolites are also common, but friable greenschists and blueschists are rare, as are blocks of clastic sediments. The authors suggest that large blocks of the Altamira Fm. were incorporated into the serpentinite during their past Eocene diapirism and that these blocks were deformed in a brittle manner into gouge zones by internal movements in the diapir. Type 4 serpentinites may therefore have incorporated inclusions at high crustal levels by brittle processes. Type 2 bodies, in contrast, may have incorporated inclusions by ductile flow of serpentinite at lower crustal levels. Type 33 bodies are the most enigmatic. They may be sedimentary, but alternatively may have incorporated limestone in a gouge (as for type 4), which has later healed to a coherent mass.

  7. Effective science teachers' professional development: A multiple-case study of district-level science supervisors' perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaben, Chris Jay

    At its heart, science teachers' professional development is about continual growth and improvement (Yager, 2005). Conducting research to understand what constitutes effective professional development is inherently complex (Hewson, 2007). The imperative to link research on professional development to student achievement (Fishman, Marx, Best, & Tal, 2003) increases complexity of research on the topic. These complexities require multiple research approaches and indicate that all stakeholders could provide insights to identify what constitutes effective professional development. District-level science supervisors' voices are missing from the data on effective science teachers' professional development and this provides a potential gap in the literature (Banilower, Heck, & Weiss, 2007; Elmore & Burney, 1999; Shroyer, Miller, Hernandez, & Dunn, 2007). The purpose of this multiple-case study was to gather information from six district-level science supervisors from six different school districts in six different states to gain a deeper understanding of their insights on what constitutes effective professional development. The empirical data examined in this study resulted from interviews, participant drawings, observations, and document review. The major finding was that the district-level science supervisors mostly confirmed what was known in the field. However, this finding could be used in a variety of ways to support future research; such as providing a potential data source to corroborate self-reported teacher survey data. The findings from this study also identified a few nuances to what is known about effective science teachers' professional development research. Specifically, a finding suggests that researchers may need to reconceptualize the amount of time before which science teachers' professional development can impact student achievement. Another nuance identified relates to the, already known, understanding that district-level science supervisors' beliefs (Borman, 2005) and position power can impact their actions (Spillane, 2000). This nuance suggests that district-level science supervisors may desire that the teachers in their districts teach as they taught. If so, future research should identify what teaching approaches the district-level science supervisors utilized when they were teaching.

  8. Astronomical terms and names as an indicator of the science level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    The connection between the science level and the system of corresponding terms is considered. It is noted that the treasure of terms in the national language should depend on the level of given science. The issue of astronomical terms' origination in antique and modern Armenian is considered.

  9. Communicating Ocean Science at the Lower-Division Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Ocean Literacy for Youth, Publics, Professionals, and Scientists (POLYPPS) is an NSF-funded collaboration between the University of Hawai`i and the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE) - California, which is based at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California - Berkeley. One of the objectives of this project is to instutionalize ocean science communications courses at colleges and universities in Hawai`i. Although the focus of most of these communications courses has been on training graduate students and scientists, lower-division students interested in the ocean sciences are finding this background helpful. At the University of Hawai`i Maui College there are several marine science courses and certificate programs that require students to interact with the public through internships, research assistantships, and course-related service-learning projects. Oceanography 270, Communicating Ocean Science, is now offered to meet the needs of these students who engage with the public in informal educational settings. Other students who enroll in this course have a general interest in the marine environment and are considering careers in K-12 formal education. This course gives this group of students an opportunity to explore formal education by assisting classroom teachers and preparing and presenting problem-based, hands-on, inquiry activities. Employers at marine-related businesses and in the tourist industry have welcomed this course with a focus on communication skills and indicate that they prefer to hire local people with strong backgrounds in marine and natural sciences. A basic premise of POLYPPS is that science education must draw not only from the latest advances in science and technology but also from the cultural contexts in which the learners are embedded and that this will achieve increased understanding and stewardship of ocean environments. Students in Oceanography 270 integrate traditional Hawaiian knowledge into their activities and presentations with the advice of local practitioners who share their experiences for incorporating both Hawaiian ways of learning and environmental practices.

  10. What Makes Science Relevant?: Student Perceptions of Multimedia Case Learning in Ecology and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Bjorn H. K.; Lundeberg, Mary A.; Bergland, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The perception of science as boring is a major issue for teachers at all instructional levels. Tertiary classes especially suffer from a reputation for being dry, instructor-centered, and irrelevant to the lives of students. However, previous research has shown that science can be interesting to students if it is presented in such a manner as to…

  11. Connecting Teachers and Students with Science and Scientists: The Science Learning Hub

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Beverley; Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister

    2010-01-01

    National and international data is raising concerns about levels of student interest and engagement in science in school and student retention into tertiary study. For today's students the Internet plays an important role as a source of information and means for communication with peers. This paper reports on a Ministry of Research Technology and…

  12. A Critical Appraisal of State Level Science Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Baiju K.

    2007-01-01

    Science exhibitions are really great opportunities to students as well as teachers to disseminate knowledge that they have, and to experience a variety of new inventions and innovations that also need wide dissemination. The great significance of exhibition is that it fosters acquisition of different process skills leading to the development of…

  13. Discovering Animal Ways, Elementary School Science, Level Three, Teaching Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Helen E.

    This pilot teaching unit is one of a series developed for use in elementary school science programs. This unit is designed to promote children's natural curiosity and to help those who show a reluctance to work with animals to overcome some of their fears. The student activities employ important scientific processes, such as observation,…

  14. Science, Levels 7-12. Secondary Core Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Board of Education, Salt Lake City. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This document presents the core science curriculum standards which must be completed by all students as a requisite for graduation from Utah's secondary schools. Contained within are the elementary and secondary school program of studies and high school graduation requirements. Each course entry for grades 7-12 contains: course title, unit of…

  15. CalfScience: Extension Education at Many Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale A.; Tellessen, Kathlyn; Sischo, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The issue of antimicrobial resistance in food animal agriculture was addressed by conducting clinical trials to assess alternatives to antimicrobials in dairy calf-raising and developing outreach to three different audiences. Current research was integrated into Extension programs for calf-raisers, animal science and veterinary students, and food…

  16. Computers and Traditional Teaching Practices: Factors Influencing Middle Level Students' Science Achievement and Attitudes about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Arthur Louis; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Stoddard, Elizabeth R.; Wrobel, Jerzy M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association of middle school student science achievement and attitudes toward science with student-reported frequency of using computers to learn science and other classroom practices. Baseline comparison data were collected on the frequency of student-centred teaching practices (e.g. the use of group…

  17. The Science Advancement through Group Engagement Program: Leveling the Playing Field and Increasing Retention in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Donna M.; Curtin-Soydan, Amanda J.; Canelas, Dorian A.

    2014-01-01

    How can colleges and universities keep an open gateway to the science disciplines for the least experienced first-year science students while also maintaining high standards that challenge the students with the strongest possible high school backgrounds? The Science Advancement through Group Engagement (SAGE) project targets cohorts of less…

  18. A Comparison of Social Science Textbook Readability and Students' Reading Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Brenda S.; Wilkie, Carolyn J.

    The first phase of a study investigating textbook readability and students' reading levels used three traditional formulas to assess the readability levels of 51 primary textbooks from college introductory social science courses in 7 disciplines. The second phase investigated the relationship between the readability levels of students' texts,…

  19. CodingisCoolLevel2 More Advanced Techniques in Computer Science

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    to create visual sketches · Using Processing to control Finch robots · One day of guided coding usingCodingisCool­Level2 More Advanced Techniques in Computer Science A Workshop for High School Students in Grades 11th-12th This two-day workshop introduces computer science principles using

  20. Classroom-Based Science Research at the Introductory Level: Changes in Career Choices and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Melinda; Dunbar, David; Ratmansky, Lisa; Boyd, Kimberly; Lopatto, David

    2011-01-01

    Our study, focused on classroom-based research at the introductory level and using the Phage Genomics course as the model, shows evidence that first-year students doing research learn the process of science as well as how scientists practice science. A preliminary but notable outcome of our work, which is based on a small sample, is the change in…

  1. Even Low Levels of Alcohol during Pregnancy Can Affect Fetal Brain Development. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Effects of Prenatal Alcohol Exposure on GABAergic Neurons" (V. C. Cuzone; P. W. L. Yeh; Y. Yanagawa; K. Obata; and H. H. Yeh). Study results indicate that even exposure to low levels of alcohol during…

  2. MIDDLE LEVEL (Grades 5-8) TEACHER EDUCATION English, Mathematics, Science, or History Comprehensive

    E-print Network

    MIDDLE LEVEL (Grades 5-8) TEACHER EDUCATION English, Mathematics, Science, or History Comprehensive Comprehensive, or Science. In addition to basic skills and general education, candidates will complete two 18 of the candidates is rounded out with strong emphasis on pedagogy--literacy, diversity, ethics, and pedagogical

  3. Widening Access to Tertiary Education for Women in Ghana through Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwapong, Olivia Adwoa Tiwaah Frimpong

    2007-01-01

    Distance education (DE) is seen as a tool for widening access to education at all levels. It is an educational tool that breaks most of the divides in education--age, gender, race, income, space, time etc. For the past decades, irrespective of the extensive expansion of tertiary institutions in the country, provision of tertiary education in Ghana…

  4. Inside the Collaborative Inter-Arts Improvisatory Process: Tertiary Music Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blom, Diana

    2012-01-01

    While research has explored aspects of inter-arts collaboration at professional and primary level, there is little on inter-arts collaboration in the tertiary environment. This article explores aspects of the learning of tertiary music students undertaking a short-term collaborative inter-arts improvisation project with dance and theater peers,…

  5. The Petasis Reaction: Microscale Synthesis of a Tertiary Amine Antifungal Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroluk, Katherine J.; Jackson, Derek A.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Students prepare a tertiary amine antifungal analog in an upper-level undergraduate organic laboratory. A microscale Petasis reaction is performed to generate a liquid compound readily characterized via IR and proton NMR spectroscopy. The biological relevance of the product is highlighted, with the tertiary amine scaffold being an important…

  6. Willing and Enabled: The Academic Outcomes of a Tertiary Enabling Program in Regional Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrewartha, Lisa; Harvey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the achievement levels of students undertaking the Tertiary Enabling Program (TEP) at La Trobe University. The TEP is an alternative pathway program that traverses multiple institutions, campuses, and disciplinary areas, and is designed to prepare a diverse student cohort for tertiary study. The Program integrates several…

  7. The levels of edit. [technical writing in science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanburen, R.; Buehler, M. F.; Wallenbrock, D. (editor)

    1976-01-01

    The editorial process is analyzed, and five levels of edit are identified. These levels represent cumulative combinations of nine types of edit: (1) coordination, (2) policy, (3) integrity, (4) screening, (5) copy clarification, (6) Mechanical Style, (7) Language, and (9) substantive. The levels and types of edit, although developed for specific use with external reports at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, cover the general range of technical editing, especially as it applies to an in-house technical publications organization. Each type of edit is set forth in terms of groups of actions to be performed by the editor. The edit-level concept has enhanced understanding and communication among editors, authors, and publications managers concerning the specific editorial work to be done on each manuscript. It has also proved useful as a management tool for estimating and monitoring cost.

  8. Long-Term Ecological Research and Network-Level Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Scott L.; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-08-01

    With every passing year, the effects of global environmental change are becoming more pervasive and are occurring at a more accelerated pace. Climate change, land use change, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, ocean acidification and sea level rise, loss of biodiversity, and homogenization of Earth's ecosystems are all manifestations of human activities. These short- and long-term effects of environmental changes continue to mount.

  9. Teachers' beliefs about science teaching and context factors: Implications for teaching and learning science at the middle school level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pea, Celeste H.

    Current research shows that teachers' beliefs have been virtually ignored in science education reform efforts spearheaded by the development of national, state, and local standards. Since the aim of science education reform is to improve scientific literacy for all students, increasingly, researchers are questioning the lack of attention to teachers' beliefs and are calling for more research to examine teachers' beliefs and the influence of school environmental factors on their classroom practices. The purpose of this study was to explore, investigate, and analyze data that might reveal middle school science teachers' beliefs about science teaching and how school environmental factors influence their classroom behavior. The mixed methods study was conducted in a large urban/suburban county in an eastern state in the United States. Data were collected through a Likert-style survey and interview and observation sessions. Ninety-one middle school science teachers completed the survey. Three teachers from the survey sample also participated in the interview and observation sessions. The findings from the quantitative and qualitative data indicated that most of the middle school science teachers in this study believed that science teaching should be student-centered, and science instruction should be based on an inquiry-based approach to teaching and learning. They also believed that the state and county standards were the most important factors in helping teachers to use inquiry-based instructional strategies to teach science. In addition to the science standards, the middle school science teachers believed that peer and principal support were critical to their success as teachers, and that instructional materials and supplies were readily available to help them teach science. The findings from the study indicated that few school environmental factors affected the middle school teachers' classroom practices. However, time (to participate in more professional activities and to complete class work), student level of maturity to do inquiry, and students taking responsibility for their own learning were identified as school environmental factors teachers believed hindered their effectiveness as teachers. The research findings confirmed findings from earlier studies that some teachers' beliefs are inconsistent with their practices. Although most of the teachers responded or were observed using nontraditional practices, the inconsistency that was observed between some teachers' stated beliefs and their practices supports the idea that it may be difficult to achieve scientific literacy for all students. Since current science reform marks a sharp departure from the way science was taught in the past, more research is needed to help determine why this inconsistency continues to exist.

  10. A Summary of Research in Science Education for the Years of 1968-69, College Level Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koran, John J., Jr.

    A review of 132 research documents is presented for the purpose of describing and categorizing research and development in science instruction on the college level. The documents are limited to publications, dissertation abstracts, and abstracted research and development reports, primarily appearing during 1968-69. Descriptions are made concerning…

  11. Optical sensing systems for primary-level science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markey, Adam; Tyers, Bernard; Shepherd, Roderick; McEvoy, Aisling K.; MacCraith, Brian D.; Mikhak, Bakhtiar; Strohecker, Carol

    2003-03-01

    In the last three years, a number of Irish primary schools have been using LEGO Mindstorms technology in order to investigate the use of project-based learning as an alternative teaching tool. This has involved the use of LEGO bricks combined with standard electronic motors and some commercial sensors (e.g. temperature). In order to develop this project into the area of science education, we have developed a range of miniaturized optical sensors, which are compatible with the LEGO platform. This paper describes two such sensors that have been developed and fabricated for use with the LEGO platform, a collaboration between the MIT Media Lab and the National Centre for Sensor Research. In particular a working oxygen sensor has been designed and fabricated. The principal design features were compatibility with the programmable LEGO platforms and robustness for classroom use. This sensor uses the method of intensity quenching to determine oxygen concentration. In addition, simple color sensors have been produced. The aim of developing such sensors is to familiarize students with the concept of colour detection and to introduce them to the basic principles of spectroscopy. The performance of both sensor types and preliminary classroom results are reported.

  12. Volume Manager: A High-Level VR Tool Department of Computing Science

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Chris

    Volume Manager: A High-Level VR Tool Chris Shaw Department of Computing Science University by most VR systems [Shaw92]. The programmer need only provide the simulation and geometric component for his or her VR application, and the tools handle the remaining low-level tasks. While this work

  13. Effects of Brain-Based Learning Approach on Students' Motivation and Attitudes Levels in Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akyurek, Erkan; Afacan, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of brain-based learning approach on attitudes and motivation levels in 8th grade students' science classes. The main reason for examining attitudes and motivation levels, the effect of the short-term motivation, attitude shows the long-term effect. The pre/post-test control group research model…

  14. An Examination of Tertiary Students' Desire to Found an Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birdthistle, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, the paper aims to identify and explain the behaviour and intentions of students in their decision to start entrepreneurial activities and establish an enterprise. Second, the paper aims to identify whether students in tertiary level institutions in Ireland display the personality traits of an…

  15. Tertiary Institutions, Entrepreneurship Education and Youth Empowerment in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olasunkanmi, Abari Ayodeji; Olufunke, Oyetola Idowu; Adetayo, Okunuga Adedapo

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship Education has recently become a global phenomenon in the development of world youths for self employment and self-reliance. The Nigerian nation cannot afford to be left out and left behind in this new trend in education both at the secondary and tertiary levels. However, while the Universal Basic Education (UBE) curriculum has…

  16. “Elegant Tool” Delivers Genome-Level Science for Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Keith Arterburn

    2014-06-01

    Now, a ‘disruptive, virtual scientific simulation tool’ delivers a new, genome-level investigation for electrolytes to develop better, more efficient batteries. Dr. Kevin Gering, an Idaho National Laboratory researcher, has developed the Advanced Electrolyte Model (AEM), a copyrighted molecular-based simulation tool that has been scientifically proven and validated using at least a dozen ‘real-world’ physical metrics. Nominated for the 2014 international R&D 100 Award, AEM revolutionizes electrolyte materials selection, optimizing combinations and key design elements to make battery design and experimentation quick, accurate and responsive to specific needs.

  17. Tertiary Storage Digital Video Archives

    E-print Network

    for Digital Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3 Digital Video Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.3.1 Standards for Digital Video Compression . . . . . . . . . . . 20 3 Storage TechnologiesTertiary Storage in Digital Video Archives Olav Sandst°a Department of Computer and Information

  18. Differential workload calculation and its impact on lab science instruction at the community college level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Beth Nichols

    The calculation of workload for science instructors who teach classes with laboratory components at the community college level is inconsistent. Despite recommendations from the National Research Council (1996) and the large body of evidence which indicates that activity-based instruction produces greater learning gains than passive, lecture-based instruction, many community colleges assign less value to the time spent in science lab than in lecture in workload calculations. This discrepancy is inconsistent with both current state and nation-wide goals of science excellence and the standards set by the American Chemical Society (2009) and the American Association of Physics Teachers (2002). One implication of this differential lab-loading policy is that the science instructors must teach more hours per week to make the same workload as their colleagues in other disciplines which have no formal laboratory activities. Prior to this study, there was no aggregate data regarding the extent of this policy at the community college level nor of its possible impact upon instruction. The input of full-time two-year college members of four different professional science organizations was solicited and from their responses, it is clear that differential loading of lab hours is common and widely variable. A majority of the respondents to this study had their hours in lab assigned less credit than their hours in lecture, with multiple perceived impacts upon lab preparation, assistance, revision, and follow-up activities. In combination with open-ended comments made by study participants, the results suggest that science instructors do perceive impacts upon their ability to teach science labs in a pedagogically current and challenging manner when their hours spent in lab instruction are counted for less than their hours in lecture. It is hoped that the information from this study will be used to implement improvements in the working conditions needed to advance science instruction and student science outcomes at the community college level.

  19. Major in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Sample Curricula: No Previous College-Level Math

    E-print Network

    California at Irvine, University of

    -Level Math Year Fall Spring Freshman Math 1A Math 1B CS 61A CS 61B/L Science Elective EE 16A** HumanitiesMajor in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences Sample Curricula: No Previous College/SS/R&C* Humanities/SS/R&C Sophomore Math 53 Math 54 Physics 7A Physics 7B EE 16B CS 61C/L Humanities/SS (3 units

  20. From inside the black box: Teacher perceptions of science instruction at the elementary level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, Cynthia D.

    Science education reform projects aimed at elementary school children arose in the 1960's. The most prevalent of these reforms utilized the inquiry, or hands-on, science method. Billions of dollars have been invested in these reforms. Yet, reports indicate that science is not being taught at the level one might expect in elementary schools. This research was an analysis of the problems and concerns teachers at one school district faced as they tried to implement and sustain elementary inquiry science instruction. The district chosen was a large suburban district in the Western United States. The population was ninety percent Caucasian with a slightly more ethnically diverse school population. This district was chosen because it had an elementary science program for over twenty years and had received national acclaim for that program. The district had a stable and homogeneous staff there was a low administrator and teacher turnover rate and the elementary teaching population was ninety percent Caucasian and ninety percent female. Interviews with administrators and teachers were conducted. Data were collected from focus groups of teachers and science partners. Observations of elementary science classroom instruction and professional development sessions were made. Results of this research indicated that one important key to elementary science reform rests in the hands of teachers. Once the door to the classroom is closed, the teacher can decide to teach or not to teach science. The findings of this research illustrate that teachers hold ideas about science and science instruction that are antithetical to some tenets of inquiry science. Until these ideas are addressed it will be difficult, if not impossible, to implement a systemic elementary inquiry science program. This study demonstrates that professional development for elementary teachers in science needs to change from a focus on the mechanical usage of individual units to a focus on teacher expectations for student achievement. Professional development for teachers in inquiry science must address the cognitive foundations for inquiry science and the benefits students derive from this educational approach. Institutions delivering pre-service training for elementary teachers in science must change the curriculum to reflect these needs.

  1. Protodeboronation of tertiary boronic esters: asymmetric synthesis of tertiary alkyl stereogenic centers.

    PubMed

    Nave, Stefan; Sonawane, Ravindra P; Elford, Tim G; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2010-12-01

    While tertiary boranes undergo efficient protodeboronation with carboxylic acids, tertiary boronic esters do not. Instead, we have discovered that CsF with 1.1 equiv of H2O (on tertiary diarylalkyl boronic esters) or TBAF·3H2O (on tertiary aryldialkyl boronic esters) effect highly efficient protodeboronation of tertiary boronic esters with essentially complete retention of configuration. Furthermore, substituting D2O for H2O provides ready access to deuterium-labeled enantioenriched tertiary alkanes. The methodology has been applied to a short synthesis of the sesquiterpene, (S)-turmerone. PMID:21080646

  2. Predicting Scientific Understanding of Prospective Elementary Teachers: Role of Gender, Education Level, Courses in Science, and Attitudes toward Science and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David D.; Morris, John D.

    2005-01-01

    A multiple regression analysis of the relationship between prospective teachers' scientific understanding and Gender, Education Level (High School, College), Courses in Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science, Astronomy, and Agriculture), Attitude Towards Science, and Attitude Towards Mathematics is reported. Undergraduate elementary…

  3. An Overview of the Science Activities of the NASA Sea Level Change Team (N-SLCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    In 2014, NASA established the Sea Level Change Team (N-SLCT) through selections of principal investigators and their teams via a call for proposals for 3-year investigations. The team has four principle objectives: 1) improve our understanding of current and future sea level rise and its regional variation, 2) improve our understanding of changes in ice mass, both from the polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers, 3) produce new datasets useful to the sea level science research community, and 4) develop a NASA web portal to disseminate sea level research results from NASA's research programs. There are 20 N-SLCT principal investigators - 9 investigators (and their teams) were selected to cover the four research areas discussed above, plus an additional 11 investigators were selected that are involved in other NASA programs involved in sea level research. This talk will summarize the research activities of the N-SLCT, the plan for the web portal, and the scientists involved in each of these activities. Early science results will be discussed and used to describe the team activities. In addition, potential interactions between the N-SLCT and the sea level science community will be discussed.

  4. A substantive-level theory of highly regarded secondary biology teachers' science teaching orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichsen, Patricia Jean

    Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been used as a heuristic for examining a specialized knowledge base for teaching. One proposed overarching component within the PCK model for science teaching is teaching orientations, defined as teachers' knowledge and beliefs about the purposes and goals for teaching science at a particular grade level. Nine different orientations to teaching science have been identified in the science education literature, yet there are few empirical studies specifically examining science teachers' orientations. This qualitative case study re-examines science teaching orientations using grounded theory methods. The study focused on the nature and sources of the science teaching orientations held by four highly-regarded secondary biology teachers. Data collection consisted of a card-sorting task, semi-structured interviews, and classroom observations. Inductive data analysis led to the construction of a substantive-level theory of science teaching orientations. In regard to the nature of science teaching orientations, the use of central and peripheral goals, as well as the means of achieving these goals, better represents the complex nature of science teaching orientations. Although the participants were secondary biology teachers, they held more general teaching orientations than science-specific orientations. The participants held goals in the affective domain, e.g., the development of positive attitudes toward biology, as well as general schooling goals, including preparing students for college and the development of life skills. Although each participant held science content goals, these goals were not always a central component of their teaching orientation. In addition, goals and purposes shape the means that a teacher chooses, but a limited repertoire of means can also restrict the teacher's purposes and goals. In regard to the sources of teaching orientations, participants were influenced by a multitude of factors, including prior work experiences and professional development. Professional development served as a feedback loop, as participants selected professional development that re-enforced their teaching orientation. The school context, with its perceived time constraints, was another contributing factor. The participants' teaching orientations were strongly influenced by their daily interactions with students. The teachers' beliefs about learners and learning were major sources of their teaching orientations. Implications are given for practice, research and policy.

  5. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Crusty Problems. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on processes that shape the earth. Optional excursions, in addition to the activities, are suggested for students who wish to study an area in greater depth on an individualized basis. An…

  6. Journal of Vegetation Science 24 (2013) 332343 Community-level consequences of cattle grazing for an

    E-print Network

    Cushman, J. Hall

    2013-01-01

    Journal of Vegetation Science 24 (2013) 332­343 Community-level consequences of cattle grazing by cattle mediate the composition of a coastal grassland community and do native and exotic taxa from/spring grazing by cattle (average of 0.75 cow-calf pairsÁhaÀ1 ) on species richness and percentage cover

  7. Differential Workload Calculation and Its Impact on Lab Science Instruction at the Community College Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Beth Nichols

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of workload for science instructors who teach classes with laboratory components at the community college level is inconsistent. Despite recommendations from the National Research Council (1996) and the large body of evidence which indicates that activity-based instruction produces greater learning gains than passive, lecture-based…

  8. Career Indecision Levels of Students Enrolled in a College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esters, Levon T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of career indecision of students enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University. A primary goal of this research was to explore the construct of career indecision using the three factor structure identified by Kelly and Lee (2002). The factors of interest in…

  9. Using Reading Grade Level to Assess Readability of Selected Plant and Soil Science Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graveel, John G.; Fribourg, Henry A.

    1987-01-01

    Reported is a study designed to determine whether reading grade level (RGL) assessment techniques used for elementary and secondary education textbooks would discriminate among plant and soil science textbooks. The study was to select the RGL indices suited to quantify the readability of these sources, and to identify the factors affecting…

  10. Computational techniques in tribology and material science at the atomic level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Bozzolo, G. H.

    1992-01-01

    Computations in tribology and material science at the atomic level present considerable difficulties. Computational techniques ranging from first-principles to semi-empirical and their limitations are discussed. Example calculations of metallic surface energies using semi-empirical techniques are presented. Finally, application of the methods to calculation of adhesion and friction are presented.

  11. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: In Orbit. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). This unit focuses on the properties of sunlight, the use of spectrums and spectroscopes, the heat and energy of the sun, the measurement of astronomical distances, and the size of the sun. Optimal…

  12. The Development of Multi-Level Audio-Visual Teaching Aids for Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, William D.

    The project consisted of making a multi-level teaching film titled "Rocks and Minerals of the Ouachita Mountains," which runs for 25 minutes and is in color. The film was designed to be interesting to earth science students from junior high to college, and consists of dialogue combined with motion pictures of charts, sequential diagrams, outcrops,…

  13. Factors Influencing Pre-Service Science Teachers' Imagination at the Microscopic Level in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the mental images at the microscopic level of matter created by 22 preservice science teachers in Oman. Participants were encouraged during a guided imagery session to construct mental images for a scenario written about the explanation of the reaction of sodium in water. They were then asked to describe what they envisioned in…

  14. Gender Balance Action Plan Gender imbalance in the mathematical sciences at all levels of seniority has

    E-print Network

    Gender Balance Action Plan Gender imbalance in the mathematical sciences at all levels of seniority advisor. Require programme proposals and final reports to contain summary statistics on gender. Director Officer· Information Officer· Environment and Communication Create a pleasant gender-neutral working

  15. Pedagogical Issues in Teaching Upper-Level Science Courses at a "Community University"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deutch, Charles E.; Jurutka, Peter W.; Marshall, Pamela A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors teach upper-level science courses in cell biology, genetics, and biochemistry at a public, four-year "community university" that serves a demographically diverse population of traditional and nontraditional students. In this article, they describe some of the issues they have found to be particularly significant at their "community…

  16. Cretaceous-Tertiary findings, paradigms and problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Officer, C. B.; Drake, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    The asteroid hypothesis has stimulated numerous studies of the paleontological record at Cretaceous/Tertiary time as well as of geological indicators of environmental crisis preserved in the rock record. Both extinctions and geological anomalies often occur at times that do not appear to be synchronous or instantaneous. The record includes paleontological indicators of dinosaurs, terrestrial flora, marine planktonic organisms, and shallow water marine macrofauna and geological phenomena include occurrences of iridium and other platinum metals, trace elements, clay mineralogy, shocked minerals, soot, microspherules, and isotopes of osmium, strontium and carbon. These findings are reviewed in the context of the alternate hypotheses of an exogenic cause, involving either a single asteroid impact or multiple commentary impacts, and an endogenic cause, involving intense global volcanism and major sea level regression.

  17. Endosymbiotic Gene Transfer in Tertiary Plastid-Containing Dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Imanian, Behzad; Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Shinichiro

    2014-01-01

    Plastid establishment involves the transfer of endosymbiotic genes to the host nucleus, a process known as endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). Large amounts of EGT have been shown in several photosynthetic lineages but also in present-day plastid-lacking organisms, supporting the notion that endosymbiotic genes leave a substantial genetic footprint in the host nucleus. Yet the extent of this genetic relocation remains debated, largely because the long period that has passed since most plastids originated has erased many of the clues to how this process unfolded. Among the dinoflagellates, however, the ancestral peridinin-containing plastid has been replaced by tertiary plastids on several more recent occasions, giving us a less ancient window to examine plastid origins. In this study, we evaluated the endosymbiotic contribution to the host genome in two dinoflagellate lineages with tertiary plastids. We generated the first nuclear transcriptome data sets for the “dinotoms,” which harbor diatom-derived plastids, and analyzed these data in combination with the available transcriptomes for kareniaceans, which harbor haptophyte-derived plastids. We found low level of detectable EGT in both dinoflagellate lineages, with only 9 genes and 90 genes of possible tertiary endosymbiotic origin in dinotoms and kareniaceans, respectively, suggesting that tertiary endosymbioses did not heavily impact the host dinoflagellate genomes. PMID:24297445

  18. An initial needs assessment of science inquiry curriculum practices at a local level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottingham, Susan M.

    Frequently, students learn in science classes taught like traditional reading courses in which reading texts and answering questions is the main activity. The problem at one southern middle school is that students are not developing an understanding of science concepts and are doing poorly on standardized testing. Students are seldom given the opportunity model scientific inquiry methods that promote experiential learning in the classroom. The purpose of this project was to create a curriculum for inquiry science (IS) instruction at the seventh-grade level to increase student understanding of science concepts after conducting an initial needs assessment to guide deploying the intervention. Research guiding the IS movement at the national level suggests that many teachers use only the textbook and students do not apply what they have learned. Factors affecting this problem include a lack of integrated curricula for IS learning and teacher understanding and confidence in IS skills. A constructivist view of student learning served as the conceptual framework. The needs analysis for the project questioned if teachers were willing to adopt the IS method and prepared to conduct it through a quantitative survey research design. Results indicated that all teachers supported the IS approach, however it was infrequently used in instruction and only two of five teachers were somewhat comfortable with their IS skills. The local IS project draws from empirically tested elements to develop an integrated IS curricula aligned to the state science criterion. The curricula will be supported through a concurrently deployed professional learning community to support teacher professional development and confidence. This project can positively impact social change by increasing science related academic performance, and ultimately, interest in careers in science among middle school students.

  19. The National Curriculum: A Study to Compare Levels of Attainment with Data from APU Science Surveys (1980-4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Compared are the levels of attainment for the Science in the National Curriculum assessment in Great Britain in 1989 and the performance of students on the application of science concepts part of the Assessment of Performance Unit-Science carried out in 1980-84. (KR)

  20. Entry Level Image Science and Software Engineer Positions Available UTC Aerospace Systems (UTAS) has a number of entry-level full-time positions available now for

    E-print Network

    Salvaggio, Carl

    Entry Level Image Science and Software Engineer Positions Available UTC Aerospace Systems (UTAS both algorithm development and applied image science specialties. Software Engineer position seeks.utcaerospacesystemscareers.com/jobs/descriptions/image-scientist--westford-ma-job-4990187 Software Engineer (image processing focus): http://www.utcaerospacesystemscareers.com/jobs/descriptions/associate-software-engineer

  1. Tertiary hyperparathyroidism resistant to cinacalcet treatment.

    PubMed

    Okada, Manabu; Tominaga, Yoshihiro; Izumi, Kumiko; Nobata, Hironobu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Tsujita, Makoto; Goto, Norihiko; Nanmoku, Koji; Watarai, Toshihiko; Uchida, Kazuharu

    2011-06-01

    Cinacalcet hydrochloride (cinacalcet) has been reported to be efficacious for patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism (THPT). We experienced five patients with THPT requiring parathyroidectomy (PTx) because of resistance to cinacalcet treatment and investigated their clinical characteristics and clinical course. The maximum diameter of the parathyroid gland estimated by ultrasonography before renal transplantation was evaluated. Serum total calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and creatinine (Cr) levels were investigated every three months after the administration of cinacalcet and at PTx. After surgery, the Cr levels were followed. In all five patients, at least one parathyroid gland had a largest diameter of more than 1 cm, and the mean diameter was 18.7 mm (range 14.9-24.1 mm). Intact PTH and ALP levels gradually increased after the initiation of cinacalcet and the Cr levels transiently increased after PTx. These findings suggest that the existence of a severely enlarged nodular hyperplastic gland is a main factor involved in resistance to cinacalcet. PMID:21595850

  2. Linguistic Resources Used in Grade 8 Students' Submicro Level Explanations—Science Items from TIMSS 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frändberg, Birgitta; Lincoln, Per; Wallin, Anita

    2013-12-01

    Explanations involving submicro levels of representation are central to science education, but known to be difficult for students in secondary school. This study examines students' written explanations of physical and chemical phenomena regarding matter and changes in matter, in a large-scale test. This is done in order to understand linguistic challenges in constructing submicro level explanations involving the particle model of matter. Drawing from systemic functional linguistics, the lexicogrammatics used in explanations for realising experiential meaning in student explanations were analysed. We used answers to two partly constructed response items from the Swedish part of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Studies 2007, grade 8, to sort out explanations referring to the particle model of matter. These answers (86 from 954) were analysed regarding choices of vocabulary and grammar to distinguish between macro and submicro level of representation. The results show that students use a wide variety of lexicogrammatical resources to realise what happens on both macro and submicro level of representation, with greater diversity of verbs on the submicro level of explanation. The results suggest an uncertainty about the distinction between macro and submicro level of explanation.

  3. The Cretaceous-Tertiary transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Officer, C. B.; Drake, C. L.

    1983-03-01

    The time duration of fossil sequences in six cores taken during the deep-sea drilling project are compared with magnetic reversal evidence in consideration of the source of the iridium anomaly in the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) transition. Evidence has been found for a complete transition from Cretaceous to Tertiary taxa in a period of 100,000 yr. The K-T nannofossil transition is connected to the 29N polarity sequence in one deep sea core, and 29R in cores taken in Italy. Comparison of the sea bed cores with four cores taken in Italy and Spain suggest that the transition of fauna was discontinuous over a period of time, and not due to a single event. An examination of the iridium abundance as a function of depth, the differences in flux outputs, variations in the noble metal abundances normalized to extraterrestrial concentrations, the conceivable effects of a reducing environment, and the clay mineralogy of the boundary layer clays all indicate that a single catastrophic event was not responsible for the iridium anomaly.

  4. Tertiary hypothyroidism in a dog

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    A nine-year-old male entire Labrador was diagnosed with pituitary dependent hyperadrenocorticism. Following seven months of successful mitotane therapy, the dog presented with marked weight gain, seborrhoea and alopecia. Routine clinicopathological analyses revealed marked hypercholesterolaemia. Serum total and free thyroxine (T4) concentrations were below their respective reference ranges. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (cTSH) concentration was within reference range. TSH and thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) response tests revealed adequate stimulation of total T4 in both, and cTSH in the latter test. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass arising from the pituitary fossa, with suprasellar extension. A diagnosis of tertiary hypothyroidism was made. Following four weeks of levothyroxine therapy, circulating cholesterol concentration had declined, weight loss had ensued and dermatological abnormalities had improved. Euthanasia was performed four months later due to the development of neurological signs. A highly infiltrative pituitary adenoma, with effacement of the overlying hypothalamus was identified on post mortem examination. Tertiary hypothyroidism has not been previously reported in dogs. PMID:21851691

  5. Science education in the Republic of Ireland: At first and second levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, B.

    1995-06-01

    In recent years, the geoscience community around the world has been faced with a new series of critical problems associated with the management of waste and protection of the environment. One of the most pressing issues facing our civilization today is the production of enough science capability in geology, hydrogeology, engineering, and biology to meet the demand for the solution of these problems. Many countries are developing special programs similar to those in the United States of the National Academy of sciences, American Geological Institute, Geological Society of America, and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. The editors of Environmental Geology have decided to begin a series of articles for the “Views and News” section of the journal on programs of this type being implemented around the world. The first of this series is by geoscientist Breda Naughton, Assistant Chief Executive for the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment, titled “Science Education in the Republic of Ireland: At First and Second Levels,” which follows. The overall education policy of the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) for first and second level education is to provide a balanced education for our young people which will contribute to their full development as individuals and give them the knowledge, skills, and competencies that will enable them to live productive and creative lives. Science is seen as an essential component of such an education in today's world.

  6. Development of an instrument for measuring cognitive conflict in secondary-level science classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyoungho; Kwon, Jaesool; Park, Sang-Suk; Kim, Jung-Whan; Kwon, Hyeok-Gu; Park, Hac-Kyoo

    2003-08-01

    Based on conceptual change theory, cognitive conflict is known as an important factor in conceptual change even though there are still questions about its positive and negative effects on science learning. However, there is no reliable method by which to assess the cognitive conflict students experience in their learning. The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument for measuring secondary students' cognitive conflict levels as they learned science. The results of this study indicate that our instrument is a valid and reliable tool for measuring cognitive conflict levels. Factor analysis supported the model that cognitive conflict consists of four constructs: recognition of an anomalous situation, interest, anxiety, and cognitive reappraisal of the conflict situation. Implications for instruction and possibilities for future research are discussed.

  7. Mixed-Sector Tertiary Education. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    This research overview provides the key messages arising from two related projects investigating tertiary education institutions that have recently begun to offer tertiary programs outside the sector of their initial establishment and the sector of the majority of their enrolments. These are TAFE institutes offering higher education programs,…

  8. Tertiary Education and Training in Australia, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents information on tertiary education and training during 2010, including statistics on participation and outcomes. The definition of tertiary education and training adopted for this publication is formal study in vocational education and training (VET) and higher education, including enrolments in Australian Qualifications…

  9. Tertiary-spectrum manipulation in apochromats.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, J

    1992-05-01

    By combining achromatic and superachromatic lens groups we may achieve improved tertiary-spectrum residuals in apochromatic systems. The application of this technique is reported. The significance of a secondary spectrum and a tertiary spectrum in lens design is also reviewed. PMID:20720877

  10. Asymmetric synthesis of tertiary thiols and thioethers

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Summary Enantiomerically pure tertiary thiols provide a major synthetic challenge, and despite the importance of chiral sulfur-containing compounds in biological and medicinal chemistry, surprisingly few effective methods are suitable for the asymmetric synthesis of tertiary thiols. This review details the most practical of the methods available. PMID:21647256

  11. Adapting Cooperative Learning in Tertiary ELT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ning, Huiping

    2011-01-01

    An updated guideline for tertiary ELT in China has shifted the emphasis to the development of learners' ability to communicate in English. Using group work and getting learners actively involved in the actual use of English are highlighted more than before. This article focuses on adapting cooperative learning methods for ELT with tertiary

  12. Understanding Secondary-Tertiary Transition in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Megan; Lovric, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    In Clark and Lovric ("Suggestion for a theoretical model for secondary-tertiary transition in mathematics", "Math. Educ. Res. J." 20(2) (2008), pp. 25-37) we began developing a model for the secondary-tertiary transition in mathematics, based on the anthropological notion of a rite of passage. We articulated several reasons why we believe that the…

  13. Classroom-Based Science Research at the Introductory Level: Changes in Career Choices and Attitude

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Melinda; Dunbar, David; Ratmansky, Lisa; Lopatto, David

    2011-01-01

    Our study, focused on classroom-based research at the introductory level and using the Phage Genomics course as the model, shows evidence that first-year students doing research learn the process of science as well as how scientists practice science. A preliminary but notable outcome of our work, which is based on a small sample, is the change in student interest in considering different career choices such as graduate education and science in general. This is particularly notable, as previous research has described research internships as clarifying or confirming rather than changing undergraduates’ decisions to pursue graduate education. We hypothesize that our results differ from previous studies of the impact of engaging in research because the students in our study are still in the early stages of their undergraduate careers. Our work builds upon the classroom-based research movement and should be viewed as encouraging to the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education movement advocated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Science Foundation, and other undergraduate education stakeholders. PMID:21885824

  14. Classroom-based science research at the introductory level: changes in career choices and attitude.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Melinda; Dunbar, David; Ratmansky, Lisa; Boyd, Kimberly; Lopatto, David

    2011-01-01

    Our study, focused on classroom-based research at the introductory level and using the Phage Genomics course as the model, shows evidence that first-year students doing research learn the process of science as well as how scientists practice science. A preliminary but notable outcome of our work, which is based on a small sample, is the change in student interest in considering different career choices such as graduate education and science in general. This is particularly notable, as previous research has described research internships as clarifying or confirming rather than changing undergraduates' decisions to pursue graduate education. We hypothesize that our results differ from previous studies of the impact of engaging in research because the students in our study are still in the early stages of their undergraduate careers. Our work builds upon the classroom-based research movement and should be viewed as encouraging to the Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education movement advocated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Science Foundation, and other undergraduate education stakeholders. PMID:21885824

  15. Pedagogical Reflections by Secondary Science Teachers at Different NOS Implementation Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Clough, Michael P.; Olson, Joanne K.

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated what 13 secondary science teachers at various nature of science (NOS) instruction implementation levels talked about when they reflected on their teaching. We then determined if differences exist in the quality of those reflections between high, medium, and low NOS implementers. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What do teachers talk about when asked general questions about their pedagogy and NOS pedagogy and (2) what qualitative differences, if any, exist within variables across teachers of varying NOS implementation levels? Evidence derived from these teachers' reflections indicated that self-efficacy and perceptions of general importance for NOS instruction were poor indicators of NOS implementation. However, several factors were associated with the extent that these teachers implemented NOS instruction, including the utility value they hold for NOS teaching, considerations of how people learn, understanding of NOS pedagogy, and their ability to accurately and deeply self-reflect about teaching. Notably, those teachers who effectively implemented the NOS at higher levels value NOS instruction for reasons that transcend immediate instructional objectives. That is, they value teaching NOS for achieving compelling ends realized long after formal schooling (e.g., lifelong socioscientific decision-making for civic reasons), and they deeply reflect about how to teach NOS by drawing from research about how people learn. Low NOS implementers' simplistic notions and reflections about teaching and learning appeared to be impeding factors to accurate and consistent NOS implementation. This study has implications for science teacher education efforts that promote NOS instruction.

  16. Research in Science Education, 1994. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (25th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, July 10-13, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains 41 papers, 10 abstracts/research notes, and an after-dinner speech "The Book of Genesis and the Chronicles of the People of ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association). Paper titles include: "Improving students' understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in first-year Biochemistry at tertiary level"; "Students'…

  17. The photophysics of tertiary aliphatic amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cureton, Clifford G.; Hara, Kiyoaki; O'Connor, Desmond V.; Phillips, David

    1981-12-01

    The fluorescence properties of the three simple tertiary amines, trimethylamine (TMA), triethylamine (TEA), and tri- n-propylamine (TPA) have been investigated in the vapour phase with particular reference to the effect of varying the excitation energy. For excitation into the lowest energy absorption band, attributed to an n ? 3s Rydberg excitation, single exponential decay characteristics were observed, whereas at higher energies simultaneous excitation of n ? 3s and n ? 3p excitations resulted in dual exponential decay. This is explained on the basis of different distributions of emitting vibronic levels of the lower Rydberg state being produced by internal conversion from the n ? 3p upper state from those produced upon direct excitation of the lower state followed by partial redistribution. As would be expected form this analysis, rate constants for radiative decay of both sets of levels are found to be identical in TMA and TEA, whereas the rate constants for non-radiative decay, assumed to be decomposition, are not identical for the two sets of levels. The analysis permits separation of the overlapping absorptions of the n ? 3s and n ? 3p Rydberg transitions in TMA and TEA.

  18. Life Science Teachers' Discourse on Assessment: A Valuable Insight into the Variable Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halinen, Katrianna; Ruohoniemi, Mirja; Katajavuori, Nina; Virtanen, Viivi

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' conceptions of teaching, including assessment practices, are substantial in directing student learning. Our article refers to assessment at tertiary level biological education. We studied life science (more specifically microbiology-related) teachers' assessment discourse describing how they understood assessment as part of…

  19. The HST Frontier Fields: High-Level Science Data Products and Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto; Barker, Elizabeth; Borncamp, David; Gunning, Heather; Hilbert, Bryan; Khandrika, Harish; Lucas, Ray A.; Ogaz, Sara; Porterfield, Blair; Grogin, Norman A.; Robberto, Massimo; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2015-08-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, probing the most distant galaxies currently observable. HST observations for this program have so far been obtained on Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223, with ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W) on both the main cluster and the parallel field in each case, while the remaining two clusters are scheduled to be completed within the next year. The high-level science data products are presented here, including all the full-depth distortion-corrected mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The resulting high-level science products are delivered via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to the community on a rapid timescale to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  20. Measuring Computer Science Knowledge Level of Hungarian Students Specialized in Informatics with Romanian Students Attending a Science Course or a Mathematics-Informatics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiss, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of Information Technology knowledge of Hungarian and Romanian students was made with the help of a self developed web based Informatics Test. The goal of this research is an analysis of the Computer Science knowledge level of Hungarian and Romanian students attending a Science course or a Mathematics-Informatics course. Analysed was…

  1. Extraterrestrial cause for the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, L. W.; Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H. V.

    1980-01-01

    Direct physical evidence is presented for an unusual event at exactly the time of extinctions in the planktonic realm. Deep-sea limestones exposed in Italy, Denmark, and New Zealand indicate iridium increases of about 30, 160, and 20 times, respectively, above the background level at precisely the time of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinctions, 65 million years ago. Reasons are given that this iridium is of extraterrestrial origin, but did not come from a nearby supernova. A hypothesis is set forth which accounts for the extinctions and the iridium observations. One prediction of this hypothesis is verified, that the chemical composition of the boundary clay, which is thought to come from the stratospheric dust, is markedly different from that of clay mixed with the chemically similar Cretaceous and Tertiary limestones.

  2. Teach Me to Write; but Respec' Meh Right: A Critical Exploration of Vernacular Accommodation in Tertiary Education for All in Trinidad and Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figuera, Renée; Ferreira, Leiba-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Education for All policy of the Government Assistance for Tuition Expenses (GATE) in Trinidad and Tobago, more tertiary level classrooms have been furnished with mixed linguistic and academic abilities and have accommodated more non-traditional tertiary-level entrants into the educational system. The expansion of the…

  3. Older Australian's Motivation for University Enrollment and Their Perception of the Role of Tertiary Education in Promoting Healthy Aging: A National Cross-Sectional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownie, Sonya

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the characteristics of older Australian university students (aged 60+ years); to identify the factors that motivate late-life, tertiary-level learning; and to capture older students' views about the role of tertiary-level learning in promoting healthy aging. In 2012, an invitation to participate in the…

  4. High Interest - Low Vocabulary Science Books, Reading Level Grades 1-4 (Prepared for the Remedial Reading Teacher).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gott, Margaret E., Comp.; Wailes, James R., Comp.

    This booklist is intended for elementary school science students with high interest and low vocabulary skills. The Spache Readability Scale, Dale-Chall formula, sentence structure, paragraph flow, illustration, and diagram analysis or publishers stated grade level were used to determine grade level designations. The included interest level varies…

  5. A Science Faculty's Transformation of Nature of Science Understanding into His Teaching Graduate Level Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Sevgi

    2015-01-01

    This is an interpretive case study to examine the teaching of an experienced science faculty who had a strong interest in teaching undergraduate and graduate science courses and nature of science specifically. It was interested in how he transformed knowledge from his experience as a scientist and his ideas about nature of science into forms…

  6. Using Science Teaching Case Narratives to Evaluate the Level of Acceptance of Scientific Inquiry Teaching in Preservice Elementary Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagler, Ron

    2010-03-01

    The National Science Education Standards have outlined flexible processes children perform when engaging in scientific inquiry. Cases narratives are a common component of many university science education courses but rarely are they used as a tool to evaluate the preservice teachers within these courses. This article describes the construction of a positive and negative science teaching case narrative. These case narratives can be used to evaluate the level of acceptance of scientific inquiry teaching in preservice elementary teachers.

  7. Science and Technology Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moonen, Jean-Marie; Buono, Nicolas; Handfield, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    These four articles relate to science and technology infrastructure for secondary and tertiary institutions. The first article presents a view on approaches to teaching science in school and illustrates ideal science facilities for secondary education. The second piece reports on work underway to improve the Science Complex at the "Universite du…

  8. A Balancing Act in the Third Space: Graduate-Level Earth Science in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirakparvar, N. Alex

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a museum-based urban teacher-residency (UTR) program's approach to building subject-specific content knowledge and research experience in Earth Science teacher candidates. In the museum-based program, graduate-level science courses and research experiences are designed and implemented specifically for the UTR by active Earth…

  9. Elementary Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Science: Role of Grade Level, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaarslan, Guliz; Sungur, Semra

    2011-01-01

    This study examined grade level and gender difference with respect to elementary students' science and technology self-efficacy. Additionally, relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and self-efficacy was examined. A total of 145 elementary students participated in the study. Self efficacy towards Science and Technology Scale was used to…

  10. Hierarchical Effects of School-, Classroom-, and Student-Level Factors on the Science Performance of Eighth-Grade Taiwanese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Liang-Ting; Yang, Chih-Chien

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to understand the effect of student-, classroom-, and school-level factors on the science performance of 8th-grade Taiwanese students in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011 by using multilevel analysis. A total of 5,042 students from 153 classrooms of 150 schools participated in the TIMSS…

  11. VISIT OF A CHINESE DELEGATION TO FABI On Friday 28 September 2007 a high level Forestry Science and Technology

    E-print Network

    VISIT OF A CHINESE DELEGATION TO FABI On Friday 28 September 2007 a high level Forestry Science species are living. Efforts of research and development for the six forestry programmes are aimed Institute of Forestry Sciences (HIFS) has departments for project information and management, coastal

  12. Teaching English as a Second Language: A Handbook for Science. Curriculum Bulletin Number 75CBM5, Secondary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azios, Maria Leticia; And Others

    This course guide is intended for classroom use by teachers of secondary level science to Spanish-speaking students of English as a second language (ESL). Both science instruction and acquisition of English scientific terminology are emphasized, within the framework of increasing overall student proficiency in English. The book is prefaced with a…

  13. A Comparative Study of Turkish Elementary and Science Education Major Students' Knowledge Levels at the Popular Biotechnological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Lutfullah; Darcin, Emine Selcen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge levels of popular biotechnological issues of Turkish science and elementary teacher candidates. A questionnaire was administered during 2006-2007 school term to 336 students pursuing their education in the departments of science and elementary education in two Turkish universities. The…

  14. The Science-Policy Link: Stakeholder Reactions to the Uncertainties of Future Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, H.; Bye, B.

    2011-12-01

    Policy makers and stakeholders in the coastal zone are equally challenged by the risk of an anticipated rise of coastal Local Sea Level (LSL) as a consequence of future global warming. Many low-lying and often densely populated coastal areas are under risk of increased inundation. More than 40% of the global population is living in or near the coastal zone and this fraction is steadily increasing. A rise in LSL will increase the vulnerability of coastal infrastructure and population dramatically, with potentially devastating consequences for the global economy, society, and environment. Policy makers are faced with a trade-off between imposing today the often very high costs of coastal protection and adaptation upon national economies and leaving the costs of potential major disasters to future generations. They are in need of actionable information that provides guidance for the development of coastal zones resilient to future sea level changes. Part of this actionable information comes from risk and vulnerability assessments, which require information on future LSL changes as input. In most cases, a deterministic approach has been applied based on predictions of the plausible range of future LSL trajectories as input. However, there is little consensus in the scientific community on how these trajectories should be determined, and what the boundaries of the plausible range are. Over the last few years, many publications in Science, Nature and other peer-reviewed scientific journals have revealed a broad range of possible futures and significant epistemic uncertainties and gaps concerning LSL changes. Based on the somewhat diffuse science input, policy and decision makers have made rather different choices for mitigation and adaptation in cases such as Venice, The Netherlands, New York City, and the San Francisco Bay area. Replacing the deterministic, prediction-based approach with a statistical one that fully accounts for the uncertainties and epistemic gaps would provide a different kind of science input to policy makers and stakeholders. Like in many other insurance problems (for example, earthquakes), where deterministic predictions are not possible and decisions have to be made on the basis of statistics and probabilities, the statistical approach to coastal resilience would require stakeholders to make decisions on the basis of probabilities instead of predictions. The science input for informed decisions on adaptation would consist of general probabilities of decadal to century scale sea level changes derived from paleo records, including the probabilities for large and rapid rises. Similar to other problems where the appearance of a hazard is associated with a high risk (like a fire in a house), this approach would also require a monitoring and warning system (a "smoke detector") capable of detecting any onset of a rapid sea level rise.

  15. "Actually, I 'May' Be Clever Enough to Do It". Using Identity as a Lens to Investigate Students' Trajectories towards Science and University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krogh, Lars Brian; Andersen, Hanne Moeller

    2013-01-01

    We have followed a group of students in the potential pipeline for science through their last years of upper secondary school and in the context of a university mentorship program. The student group is defined by their choice of Mathematics at A-level which is mandatory for admission to tertiary STEM education in Denmark. Rich data (repeated…

  16. Tertiary aralkyl urethanes and isocyanates derived therefrom

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.; Chang, L.W.; Forgione, P.S.

    1984-03-27

    Production of tertiary aralkyl isocyanates, such as tetramethyl xylylene diisocyanates, by thermal cracking of corresponding urethanes formed by addition of corresponding olefins and carbamic acid esters at moderate temperatures and in the presence of acid catalyst.

  17. The Cretaceous/Tertiary Extinction Controversy Reconsidered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Kevin; Nienstedt, Jeffrey

    1986-01-01

    Reviews varying positions taken in the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/Y) extinction controversy. Analyzes and contests the meteoritic impact theory known as the Alvarez Model. Presents an alternative working hypothesis explaining the K/T transition. (ML)

  18. Moving toward equitable, systemic science education reform: The synergy among science education and school-level reforms in an urban middle school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Mary Kathryn

    The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the relationships among school-level and science education reform efforts and how, collectively, they contribute to the progress of equitable, systemic science education reform. A case study research design was employed to gather both qualitative and quantitative data between 1995 and 1999. The site of this study is a non-selective, urban middle school in a large district that participated in several reform efforts. These reforms include both efforts focused on school-level change and efforts focused on change in science teaching and learning. Its program incorporates aspects of several school-level reforms---from the underlying Paideia philosophy, to structural characteristics of middle schools, to site-based decision-making, to its status as a magnet school, to its participation as a professional development school. Further, the participation of all science teachers in the intensive, standards-based professional development offered by Ohio's systemic reform of mathematics and science created a critical mass of reform-oriented teachers who supported one another as they incorporated reform-based practices into their teaching. The interplay of the reform efforts has manifested in a high level of science achievement in comparison to the school's district. Addressing the third component of O'Day and Smith's model for systemic reform, the need for school-level change to enable implementation of curriculum frameworks and aligned policies, this study illustrates two important points. First, the high-quality teacher professional development increased teachers' capacity to change their practices by enhancing their knowledge of and skills in implementing standards-based teaching practices. Second, because of the synchrony among the school-level reforms and between the school-level and science education reforms, the context of Webster provided a supportive environment in which lasting changes in science teaching and learning were implemented. Science education reform efforts were mediated by the school's context to create an environment in which the reform practices could be implemented and sustained. Using Kahle's (1998) Equity Metric, this study demonstrates that the synergy of the policies and practices of school-level and science education reforms can contribute to the progress of equitable, systemic science education reform.

  19. Latitudinal gradients in tertiary molluscan faunas of the Pacific coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Addicott, W.O.

    1970-01-01

    Tertiary molluscan faunas of the middle latitudes of the marginal eastern North Pacific are characterized by warm-water taxa whose descendants now live in more southerly latitudes. A series of profiles in which cumulative percentages of warm-water faunal elements are plotted against latitude show progressive northward decreases in the percentage of these elements in the faunas of Pacific coast Tertiary stages. Systematic changes in the relative position of these latitudinal gradients during the Middle and Late Tertiary are related to climatic change in the Pacific Basin. Widespread tropical marine climate in the middle latitudes of the eastern North Pacific during the Eocene is indicated by widespread faunal units characterized by high levels of taxonomic diversity. Succeeding Early Oligocene faunas are less diverse, suggesting cooler climatic conditions. Unusually low representations of warm-water genera characterize the molluscan faunas of the Acila shumardi Zone in central California (latitude 34??-37??N). The anomalously cool-water aspect of these faunas may record the occurrence of upwelling along a bold linear segment of the Pacific coast. During the Late Oligocene or the Early Miocene, they are replaced by faunas of unusually warm-water aspect resulting in positive anomalies in Miocene latitudinal faunal gradients in central California. The Miocene anomalies seem to result from the development of an irregular Neogene coastline with extensive, newly established shallow-water embayments. ?? 1970.

  20. Technology Readiness Level Assessment Process as Applied to NASA Earth Science Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Romero, Raul A.; Dempsey, James A.; Carey, John P.; Cline, Helmut P.; Lively, Carey F.

    2015-01-01

    Technology assessments of fourteen science instruments were conducted within NASA using the NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metric. The instruments were part of three NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey missions in pre-formulation. The Earth Systematic Missions Program (ESMP) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG), composed of members of three NASA Centers, provided a newly modified electronic workbook to be completed, with instructions. Each instrument development team performed an internal assessment of its technology status, prepared an overview of its instrument, and completed the workbook with the results of its assessment. A team from the ESMP SEWG met with each instrument team and provided feedback. The instrument teams then reported through the Program Scientist for their respective missions to NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) on technology readiness, taking the SEWG input into account. The instruments were found to have a range of TRL from 4 to 7. Lessons Learned are presented; however, due to the competition-sensitive nature of the assessments, the results for specific missions are not presented. The assessments were generally successful, and produced useful results for the agency. The SEWG team identified a number of potential improvements to the process. Particular focus was on ensuring traceability to guiding NASA documents, including the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The TRL Workbook has been substantially modified, and the revised workbook is described.

  1. Participatory System Science: Multi-Level Comprehension Through a Game-like Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatland, D. R.; Kuntz, L.

    2012-12-01

    Participatory System Science: Multi-Level Comprehension Through a Game-like Process We built a time-series game that permits the player to make water management decisions concerning the Skagit River (north-central Washington state) every five years for 60 years. This work was inspired by the integrative efforts of the Skagit Climate Science Consortium and the Climate Impacts Group at the University of Washington. Our principle guiding concepts have been - Construct a reasonable system description with -- wherever possible -- Events / Consequences rendered both visually and in terms of financial impact. - Base the system description on peer reviewed publications - Emphasize both connection and absence of connection between player Actions and subsequent Consequences in the catchment basin. Player choices center around dam flow levels and steps to mitigate negative impacts of sediment transport into the lower (populated) reaches of the Skagit River and into Puget Sound (levees, new dams, estuary restoration, etcetera). With this work we hope to explore scientific results in public awareness by engaging the game Player as a problem solver.

  2. Topological constraints are major determinants of tRNA tertiary structure and dynamics and provide basis for tertiary folding cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Mustoe, Anthony M.; Brooks, Charles L.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that basic steric and connectivity constraints encoded at the secondary structure level are key determinants of 3D structure and dynamics in simple two-way RNA junctions. However, the role of these topological constraints in higher order RNA junctions remains poorly understood. Here, we use a specialized coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to directly probe the thermodynamic contributions of topological constraints in defining the 3D architecture and dynamics of transfer RNA (tRNA). Topological constraints alone restrict tRNA's allowed conformational space by over an order of magnitude and strongly discriminate against formation of non-native tertiary contacts, providing a sequence independent source of folding specificity. Topological constraints also give rise to long-range correlations between the relative orientation of tRNA's helices, which in turn provides a mechanism for encoding thermodynamic cooperativity between distinct tertiary interactions. These aspects of topological constraints make it such that only several tertiary interactions are needed to confine tRNA to its native global structure and specify functionally important 3D dynamics. We further show that topological constraints are conserved across tRNA's different naturally occurring secondary structures. Taken together, our results emphasize the central role of secondary-structure-encoded topological constraints in defining RNA 3D structure, dynamics and folding. PMID:25217593

  3. Multi-Level Evaluation of Cooperative Research Centers: Bridging between the Triple Helix and the Science of Team Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Denis O.; Sundstrom, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Two emergent conceptual models for fostering the development of innovative technology through applied science at Cooperative Research Centers (CRCs)--the Triple Helix and the science of team science--have proved highly productive in stimulating research into how the innovation process works. Although the two arenas for fostering innovation have…

  4. Achievement motivation level in students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences and its influential factors

    PubMed Central

    KAVOUSIPOUR, SOMAYEH; NOORAFSHAN, ALI; POURAHMAD, SAEEDEH; DEHGHANI-NAZHVANI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many studies have investigated the relationship between motivation and educational outcomes. The present study was conducted to determine whether the students’ motivation in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) decreases during educational years. Methods: 770 students in SUMS were selected by multi-stage stratified random sampling from each field and entrance year. The first questionnaire contained 57 questions on the effect of economic, social, educational, geographical and personality factors on the students’ motivation. The second one was based on 50 incomplete sentences. The validity and reliability of these questionnaires were approved by the experts and Cronbach's Alpha coefficients (85% and 90%, respectively). In this cross-sectional study, ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square tests were applied for data analysis at the 0.05 significance level. Results: Six factors with the most effect on academic motivation were "family attitudes", "getting good jobs in future", "respect for themselves", " the ability to learn", "believing their role in victory and defeat" and "the tendency toward optimism about themselves". In addition, comparing professional doctorate and basic sciences’ results revealed no significant relationship between academic motivation and educational years (F=0.819, p=0.397). But comparing field by field showed that Dentistry and Hospital Management and Medical Information (HMMI) had a significant decrease in motivation score by increase in educational years (F=3.991, p=0.015). Conclusion: Achievement motivation level in SUMS students was higher than average and did not decrease during educational years. Also, the results showed that personal, social and educational related factors affected motivation level more than economic and environmental factors. PMID:25587552

  5. Project-Based Learning as a Vehicle for Teaching Science at the University Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, A. R.; Wade, P.

    2012-12-01

    In a typical science course learning is teacher directed. Students are presented with knowledge and concepts via textbooks and lecture and then given the opportunity to apply them. Project-based learning (PBL) creates a context and reason to learn information and concepts. In PBL, learning is student directed and teacher facilitated. Students take ownership of their learning by finding, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of resources and via interaction between each other. In PBL, the project is central rather than peripheral to the curriculum. It is not just an activity that provides examples, additional practice or applications of the course content, but rather, the vehicle through which major concepts are discovered. The PBL process requires students to do revision and reflection encouraging them to think about what and how they are learning. PBL projects also allow students to develop important life-work skills such as collaboration, communication and critical thinking within the discipline. We have employed PBL in both Liberal Arts courses for non-science majors and upper division courses for science students. Three examples will be discussed. The first will be the production of video documentaries in a non-science major course; the second, a student generated electronic textbook in a 300-level energy course for science students; and lastly, a student designed analysis project in a chemistry major capstone laboratory course. The product in each of these examples was used to deliver knowledge to others in the class as well as members of the public providing motivation for students to do high-quality work. In our examples, student documentaries are publicly screened as part of a university-wide Academic Excellence Showcase; the student generated electronic textbook is available for public use on the internet; and the results of the student designed analysis were communicated to the real-world clients via letters and reports. We will discuss various technology tools employed in these projects such as the internet, wikis for collaborative writing, bookmarking management tools for sharing literature resources, photo sharing sites, and electronic literature searching tools. Also described will be assessment methods to gauge how the projects affected student learning.

  6. Lecturers' Job Satisfaction in a Public Tertiary Institution in Singapore: Ambivalent and Non-Ambivalent Relationships between Job Satisfaction and Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Emily Pakivathy; Phua, Seok Kheng

    2011-01-01

    Increasing lecturer turnover rates and fewer qualified recruits choosing a career in academia threaten the integrity of the tertiary education system in Singapore. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the relationship between lecturers' job satisfaction levels in a public tertiary institution and selected demographic variables. The study…

  7. From Ramachandran Maps to Tertiary Structures of Proteins.

    PubMed

    DasGupta, Debarati; Kaushik, Rahul; Jayaram, B

    2015-08-27

    Sequence to structure of proteins is an unsolved problem. A possible coarse grained resolution to this entails specification of all the torsional (?, ?) angles along the backbone of the polypeptide chain. The Ramachandran map quite elegantly depicts the allowed conformational (?, ?) space of proteins which is still very large for the purposes of accurate structure generation. We have divided the allowed (?, ?) space in Ramachandran maps into 27 distinct conformations sufficient to regenerate a structure to within 5 Å from the native, at least for small proteins, thus reducing the structure prediction problem to a specification of an alphanumeric string, i.e., the amino acid sequence together with one of the 27 conformations preferred by each amino acid residue. This still theoretically results in 27(n) conformations for a protein comprising "n" amino acids. We then investigated the spatial correlations at the two-residue (dipeptide) and three-residue (tripeptide) levels in what may be described as higher order Ramachandran maps, with the premise that the allowed conformational space starts to shrink as we introduce neighborhood effects. We found, for instance, for a tripeptide which potentially can exist in any of the 27(3) "allowed" conformations, three-fourths of these conformations are redundant to the 95% confidence level, suggesting sequence context dependent preferred conformations. We then created a look-up table of preferred conformations at the tripeptide level and correlated them with energetically favorable conformations. We found in particular that Boltzmann probabilities calculated from van der Waals energies for each conformation of tripeptides correlate well with the observed populations in the structural database (the average correlation coefficient is ?0.8). An alpha-numeric string and hence the tertiary structure can be generated for any sequence from the look-up table within minutes on a single processor and to a higher level of accuracy if secondary structure can be specified. We tested the methodology on 100 small proteins, and in 90% of the cases, a structure within 5 Å is recovered. We thus believe that the method presented here provides the missing link between Ramachandran maps and tertiary structures of proteins. A Web server to convert a tertiary structure to an alphanumeric string and to predict the tertiary structure from the sequence of a protein using the above methodology is created and made freely accessible at http://www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/proteomics/rm2ts.jsp. PMID:26098815

  8. The clinical application of electrolaryngography in a tertiary children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Lesley; Hartley, Benjamin E J

    2010-07-01

    The assessment and management of children's voice disorders poses clinical challenges at many levels. Accurate diagnosis and treatment requires access to a range of tools and methods appropriate for use with paediatrics. The application of electrolaryngography to the management of children's voice disorders in a tertiary children's hospital is described, with examples drawn from four case studies. Measures of fundamental frequency, contact quotient, and irregularity are used routinely to clarify the nature of the vocal impairment and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time displays provide biofeedback to assist the development of new skills within therapy programmes. PMID:20536377

  9. An investigation of factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlenga, Francis Howard

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe. The study was conducted at one of the Primary School Teachers' Colleges in Zimbabwe. A sample of two hundred and thirty-eight female student teachers was used in the study. Of these one hundred and forty-two were non-science majors who had been randomly selected, forty-one were science majors and forty-five were math majors. Both science and math majors were a convenient sample because the total enrollment of the two groups was small. All the subjects completed a survey questionnaire that had sixty-eight items. Ten students from the non-science majors were selected for individual interviews and the same was done for the science majors. A further eighteen were selected from the non-science majors and divided into three groups of six each for focus group interviews. The same was done for the science majors. The interviews were audio taped and transcribed. Data from the survey questionnaires were analyzed using Binary Logistic Regression which predicted factors that affected students' choice of science as a major. The transcribed interview data were analyzed used using domain, taxonomic and componential analyses. Results of the study indicated that elementary female students' choice of science as a major at college level is affected by students' attitudes toward science, teacher behavior, out-of-school experiences, role models, gender stereotyping, parental influence, peer influence, in-school experiences, and societal expectations, namely cultural and social expectations.

  10. Using High Level Literacy Techniques to Teach Astronomy to Non-Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, C. A.; Ratay, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a discussion of an introductory-level college astronomy class which significantly relied on reading and writing assignments to deliver basic content knowledge and provide a basis for deeper analysis of the material. As opposed to the traditional problem-set method of homework, students were required to read popular articles from magazines and newspapers related to the content presented in class and then prepare responses. Responses ranged from methodological analysis to using the readings to create original science journalism. Other forms of assessment indicated that students benefitted from this type of course design. We propose that given the background of students in this type of course, the course design is better suited to engage students in the material and provides a better assessment of student achievement.

  11. Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE). Candidates point sources and high-level science products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Elodie; Chen, C.; Debes, J. H.; Golimowski, D. A.; Hagan, J.; Hines, D. C.; Lonsdale, S.; Marois, C.; Mawet, D.; Mittal, T.; Moerchen, M.; N'Diaye, M.; Perrin, M. D.; Pueyo, L.; Rajan, A.; Reid, I. N.; Schneider, G.; Wolff, S.; Soummer, R.

    2014-01-01

    The Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments (ALICE) project (HST/AR program 12652; PI Soummer) is currently conducting a comprehensive and consistent reprocessing of HST-NICMOS coronagraphic survey data to search for point sources and disks using advanced PSF subtraction. The Karhunen-Loeve Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm based on principal component analysis was developed for this project. We present the main concept for the pipeline, reduction strategy, and PSF subtraction implementation and performance. The ALICE pipeline was designed to process automatically approximately 400 targets in the NICMOS coronagraphic archive, and to deliver High-Level Science Products (HLSPs) back to the MAST archive at STScI. The HLSPs are defined in collaboration with other similar projects to define a standard format for high-contrast imaging. We present and discuss the ALICE point source candidates detected in the NICMOS archive together with a statistical analysis of the population of background objects.

  12. Integrating Hands-On Undergraduate Research in an Applied Spatial Science Senior Level Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, David L.; Unger, Daniel R.; Hung, I-Kuai; Douglass, David

    2015-01-01

    A senior within a spatial science Ecological Planning capstone course designed an undergraduate research project to increase his spatial science expertise and to assess the hands-on instruction methodology employed within the Bachelor of Science in Spatial Science program at Stephen F Austin State University. The height of 30 building features…

  13. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  14. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Elementary Female Student Teachers' Choice of Science as a Major at College Level in Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlenga, Francis

    This article focuses on factors affecting elementary female student teachers' choice of science as a major at college level in Zimbabwe. In Sub-Saharan Africa, there has been an unprecedented expansion in education in the last 2 decades. This reflects the broad recognition that education contributes to national development. This expansion has not been matched with equal access and opportunity to education. The education of females still lags behind that of males in most developing countries, and in Sub-Saharan Africa in particular (Hyde, 1989). Fewer girls than boys study science at both secondary and college levels. The study took place in Zimbabwe at Mkoba Teachers' College. Two groups of elementary female student teachers participated in the study, namely science majors and nonscience majors. Ten science majors and nine nonscience majors took part in individual interviews. For focus group interviews, there were three groups of six each from science and nonscience majors. The study was conducted between May 2004 and July 2004. Out-of-school experiences, culture, and attitudes toward science emerged as factors affecting female student teachers' choice of science as a major. A number of implications have been discussed as well as suggestions for further research. Limitations of the study have been analyzed as well.

  15. Systems Science and Obesity Policy: A Novel Framework for Analyzing and Rethinking Population-Level Planning

    PubMed Central

    Matteson, Carrie L.; Finegood, Diane T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We demonstrate the use of a systems-based framework to assess solutions to complex health problems such as obesity. Methods. We coded 12 documents published between 2004 and 2013 aimed at influencing obesity planning for complex systems design (9 reports from US and Canadian governmental or health authorities, 1 Cochrane review, and 2 Institute of Medicine reports). We sorted data using the intervention-level framework (ILF), a novel solutions-oriented approach to complex problems. An in-depth comparison of 3 documents provides further insight into complexity and systems design in obesity policy. Results. The majority of strategies focused mainly on changing the determinants of energy imbalance (food intake and physical activity). ILF analysis brings to the surface actions aimed at higher levels of system function and points to a need for more innovative policy design. Conclusions. Although many policymakers acknowledge obesity as a complex problem, many strategies stem from the paradigm of individual choice and are limited in scope. The ILF provides a template to encourage natural systems thinking and more strategic policy design grounded in complexity science. PMID:24832406

  16. An investigation of gender and grade-level differences in middle school students' attitudes about science, in science process skills ability, and in parental expectations of their children's science performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Terri Renee'

    The primary purpose of the study was to examine different variables (i.e. science process skill ability, science attitudes, and parents' levels of expectation for their children in science, which may impinge on science education differently for males and females in grades five, seven, and nine. The research question addressed by the study was: What are the differences between science process skill ability, science attitudes, and parents' levels of expectation in science on the academic success of fifth, seventh, and ninth graders in science and do effects differ according to gender and grade level? The subjects included fifth, seven, and ninth grade students ( n = 543) and their parents (n = 474) from six rural, public elementary schools and two rural, public middle schools in Southern Mississippi. A two-way (grade x gender) multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to determine the differences in science process skill abilities of females and males in grade five, seven, and nine. An additional separate two-way multivariate analysis of variance (grade x gender) was also used to determine the differences in science attitudes of males and females in grade five, seven, and nine. A separate analysis of variance (PPSEX [parent's gender]) with the effects being parents' gender was used to determine differences in parents' levels of expectation for their childrens' performance in science. An additional separate analysis of variance (SSEX [student's gender]) with the effects being the gender of the student was also used to determine differences in parents' levels of expectation for their childrens' performance in science. Results of the analyses indicated significant main effects for grade level (p < .001) and gender (p < .001) on the TIPS II. There was no significant grade by gender interaction on the TIPS II. Results for the TOSRA also indicated a significant main effect for grade (p < .001) and the interaction of grade by sex ( p < .001). On variable ATT 5 (enjoyment of science lessons), males' attitudes toward science decreased across the grade levels; whereas, females decreased from grade five to seven, but showed a significant increase from grade seven to nine. Results from the analysis of variance with the parent's gender as the main effect showed no significant difference. The analysis of variance with student's gender as the main effect showed no significant difference.

  17. Assessing the energy and environmental performance of algae-mediated tertiary treatment of estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Colosi, Lisa M; Resurreccion, Eleazer P; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-02-01

    This study uses a systems-level modeling approach to illustrate a novel synergy between municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algaculture for production of bio-energy, whereby algae-mediated tertiary treatment provides efficient removal of unregulated, strongly estrogenic steroid hormones from the secondary effluent. Laboratory results from previously published studies suggested that algae-mediated treatment could deliver roughly 75-85% removal of a model estrogen (17?-estradiol) within typical algae pond residence times. As such, experimental results are integrated into a comprehensive life cycle assessment (LCA) framework, to assess the environmental performance of an algae-based tertiary treatment system relative to three conventional tertiary treatments: ozonation, UV irradiation, and adsorption onto granular activated carbon. Results indicate that the algae-mediated tertiary treatment is superior to the selected benchmarks on the basis of raw energy return on investment (EROI) and normalized energy use per mass of estrogenic toxicity removed. It is the only tertiary treatment system that creates more energy than it consumes, and it delivers acceptable effluent quality for nutrient and coliform concentrations while rendering a significant reduction in estrogenic toxicity. These results highlight the dual water and energy sustainability benefits that accrue from the integration of municipal wastewater treatment and large-scale algae farming. PMID:25537081

  18. Beyond The Prime Directive: The MAST Discovery Portal and High Level Science Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Abney, Faith; Donaldson, Tom; Dower, Theresa; Fraquelli, Dorothy A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Levay, Karen; Matuskey, Jacob; McLean, Brian; Quick, Lee; Rogers, Anthony; Shiao, Bernie; Thompson, Randy; Tseng, Shui-Ay; Wallace, Geoff; White, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    The Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) is a NASA-funded archive for a wide range of astronomical missions, primarily supporting space-based UV and optical telescopes. What is less well-known is that MAST provides much more than just a final resting place for primary data products and documentation from these missions. The MAST Discovery Portal is our new search interface that integrates all the missions that MAST supports into a single interface, allowing users to discover (and retrieve) data from other missions that overlap with your targets of interest. In addition to searching MAST, the Portal allows users to search the Virtual Observatory, granting access to data from thousands of collections registered with the VO, including large missions spanning the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., Chandra, SDSS, Spitzer, 2MASS, WISE). The Portal features table import/export, coordinate-based cross-matching, dynamic chart plotting, and the AstroView sky viewer with footprint overlays. We highlight some of these capabilities with science-driven examples. MAST also accepts High Level Science Products (HLSPs) from the community. These HLSPs are user-generated data products that can be related to a MAST-supported mission. MAST provides a permanent archive for these data with linked references, and integrates it within MAST infrastructure and services. We highlight some of the most recent HLSPs MAST has released, including the HST Frontier Fields, GALEX All-Sky Diffuse Radiation Mapping, a survey of the intergalactic medium with HST-COS, and one of the most complete line lists ever derived for a white dwarf using FUSE AND HST-STIS. These HLSPs generate substantial interest from the community, and are an excellent way to increase visibility and ensure the longevity of your data.

  19. Palynological and iridium anomalies at Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, south-central Saskatchewan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jarzen, D.M.; Orth, C.J.; Oliver, P.Q.

    1986-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in south-central Saskatchewan is marked by coincident anomalies in abundance of iridium and fern spores at the extinction level of a suite of Cretaceous pollen taxa. Evidence of disruption of the terrestrial flora includes the fern-spore abundance anomaly and local extinction of as much as 30 percent of angiosperm species. The reorganized earliest Tertiary flora is made up largely of surviving species that assumed new roles of dominance. Persistence of climatically sensitive taxa across the boundary indicates that if paleoclimate was altered by the terminal Cretaceous event, it returned quickly to the pre-event condition.

  20. Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Cerveny; Tor Kragas; Travis Gillham

    1997-07-10

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.

  1. Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Demetrois Yannimaras; Travis Gillham

    1998-04-15

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.

  2. Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Demetrios Yannimaras; Travis Gillham

    1998-07-14

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.

  3. Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Cerveny; Tor Kragas; Travis Gillham

    1998-01-13

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.

  4. 21 CFR 522.1885 - Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1885 Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension. (a) Specifications. Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate (Pregna-1,4-diene-3, 20-dione-11B, 17? 21-triol 21-(3,3, dimethyl...

  5. 21 CFR 522.1885 - Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension. 522... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1885 Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate suspension. (a) Specifications. Prednisolone tertiary butylacetate (Pregna-1,4-diene-3, 20-dione-11B, 17? 21-triol 21-(3,3, dimethyl...

  6. Tertiary Education in the Czech Republic: The Pathway to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesik, Richard; Gounko, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes recent policy proposals to reform Czech tertiary education. A brief overview of the evolution of Czech tertiary education presents the background against which emerging policy trends in education are examined. We relate the changes in tertiary education to the policy framework and recommendations of the OECD, underpinned by…

  7. What Aspects of Schooling Are Important? School Effects on Tertiary Entrance Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Gary N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify school effects on student performance for tertiary entrance in Australia, taking into account student-level predictors using longitudinal data from the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) study. It finds that aspects of schooling, such as positive attitudes to school and disciplinary…

  8. The Quality of Systematic Reviews of Effectiveness in Literacy Learning in English: A "Tertiary" Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torgerson, Carole J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent governments in the United Kingdom have introduced a number of initiatives aimed at improving the literacy levels of children. Policy and practice should be informed by rigorous evidence, and this evidence should be subjected to critical scrutiny. In the present paper the results of a "tertiary" review of systematic reviews in literacy…

  9. Tertiary Success for the Aboriginal Student: The Numerous Factors Impacting on the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eltchelebi, Wadda

    This paper presents an overview of Aboriginal education in the state of Victoria, Australia, as a frame for the role of the Aboriginal Tertiary Support Unit (ATSU) at La Trobe University, Bendigo. At the elementary and secondary levels, Aboriginal advocacy and support are provided by the Victorian Aboriginal Education Association, which promotes…

  10. Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater Effluents Page 1 of 6

    E-print Network

    Chen, Zhongping

    GU, APRIL Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater wastewater effluents L. Liu1 , D. S. Smith2 , M. Bracken3 , J.B. Neethling4 , H.D. Stensel5 and S. Murthy6 levels (e.g. TPwastewater treatment plants. A few previous studies (Benisch et al., 2007

  11. First Inversion: A Rationale for Implementing the "Flipped Approach" in Tertiary Music Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    For several reasons, current models of tertiary education seem unviable. A shifting educational landscape with rising student numbers, an increasingly diverse student cohort, and high levels of student disengagement have led to concerns about the continued relevance of "traditional" teaching and learning methods. At the same time, the…

  12. Chinese Tertiary English Educators' Perceptions of Foreign Teacher Involvement in Their Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleistein, Tasha Maria

    2013-01-01

    China continues to invite expatriate tertiary-level English language educators to teach. Foreign English language teachers and local Chinese English educators who wish to develop professionally have an ever-increasing body of research regarding Chinese culture, education, professional development, and intercultural communication; however, research…

  13. Adapting the Academic Motivation Scale for Use in Pre-Tertiary Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades…

  14. Conformation analysis and computation of energy barrier to rotation about Csbnd N bond in para-methylphenyl carbamate and its solvent dependence in comparison with tertiary carbamates and tertiary amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarresi-Alam, Ali Reza; Nowroozi, Alireza; Najafi, Parisa; Movahedifar, Fahimeh; Hajiabadi, Hossein

    2014-11-01

    Barrier to rotation about conjugated Csbnd N bond in p-Methyl phenyl carbamate (PMPC) was computed 14-16 kcal/mol at three levels of HF, B3LYP and MP2 using 6-311++G?? basis set. The solvent effect and energy barriers about Csbnd N bond in PMPC were compared to the case of tertiary carbamates and tertiary amides. Moreover, it is shown that in primary carbamates such as PMPC and tertiary amides isomerisation process passes through TS2 and TS1 respectively, while in tertiary carbamates goes through a combination of both TSs. Furthermore, X-ray analysis which is reported for the first time for primary aryl carbamates demonstrated that the inclusive plane of carbamate functional group is perpendicular to the plane of phenyl ring. The results of computations are completely in agreement with the X-ray data.

  15. Tertiary Education and Training in Australia, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Sourcing data from the National VET Provider Collection and the Higher Education Statistics Collection, this publication provides a summary of participation in tertiary education and training in Australia. It covers participation in Australian Qualifications Framework certificate I qualifications through to doctorates by research, as well as…

  16. Understanding Australian Aboriginal Tertiary Student Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Bennell, Debra; Anderson, Roz; Cooper, Inala; Forrest, Simon; Exell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a study of the experiences of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students, this paper presents an overview of the specific needs of these students as they enter and progress through their tertiary education. Extracts from a set of case studies developed from both staff and student interviews and an online…

  17. Incorporating Online Tools in Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steenkamp, Leon P.; Rudman, Riaan J.

    2013-01-01

    Students currently studying at tertiary institutions have developed a set of attitudes and aptitudes as a result of growing up in an IT and media-rich environment. These attitudes and aptitudes influence how they learn and in order to be effective, lecturers must adapt to address their learning preferences and use the online teaching tools that…

  18. Indigenous Students in the Tertiary Education Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandias, Susan; Fuller, Don; Larkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Important recent objectives of indigenous education policy in Australia have been aimed at redressing indigenous economic and social disadvantage through increasing student retention, progression and completion rates in both compulsory and post-compulsory education. The two sectors of the tertiary education system, vocational education and…

  19. Linguistic Resources Used in Grade 8 Students' Submicro Level Explanations--Science Items from TIMSS 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frändberg, Birgitta; Lincoln, Per; Wallin, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Explanations involving submicro levels of representation are central to science education, but known to be difficult for students in secondary school. This study examines students' written explanations of physical and chemical phenomena regarding matter and changes in matter, in a large-scale test. This is done in order to understand…

  20. A Study on Prospective Science Teachers' Knowledge and Achievement Levels in Mathematical Logic in Electricity-Related Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to reveal prospective science teachers' knowledge and achievement levels in electricity-related subjects. The data for the study were collected from 44 prospective teachers using three measurement tools. The data were then analyzed using software developed for the Probability and Possibility Calculation Statistics…

  1. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Record Book, Teacher's Edition: Winds and Weather. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of the Record Book for the unit "Winds and Weather" of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The correct answers to the questions from the student text are recorded. An introductory note to the teacher explains how to use the book. Answers are included for the activities…

  2. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Record Book, Student Guide: Winds and Weather. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the student's edition of the Record Book for "Winds and Weather" of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). Space is provided for answers to the questions from the text as well as for the optional excursions and the self evaluation. An introductory note to the student explains how to use the book.…

  3. Probing the Natural World, Level III, Teacher's Edition: Why You're You. Intermediate Science Curriculum Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonar, John R., Ed.; Hathway, James A., Ed.

    This is the teacher's edition of one of the eight units of the Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS) for level III students (grade 9). The chapters include basic information about heredity, activities, and optional "excursions." The answers to all activities are included. An introduction describes the work of Gregor Mendel and his…

  4. Increasing Higher Level Thinking Skills in Science of Gifted Students in Grades 1-4 through "Hands-On" Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dindial, Myrna J.

    This practicum was designed to increase higher level thinking skills of gifted students in primary school. The project sought to retrain students from recalling science information from the textbook to a more challenging and active form of learning through individual projects and small group and large group activities. Students were given…

  5. Effects of multisensory resources on the achievement and science attitudes of seventh-grade suburban students taught science concepts on and above grade level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Patrice Helen

    This research was designed to determine the relationships among students' achievement scores on grade-level science content, on science content that was three years above-grade level, on attitudes toward instructional approaches, and learning-styles perceptual preferences when instructional approaches were multisensory versus traditional. The dependent variables for this investigation were scores on achievement posttests and scores on the attitude survey. The independent variables were the instructional strategy and students' perceptual preferences. The sample consisted of 74 educationally oriented seventh-grade students. The Learning Styles Inventory (LSI) (Dunn, Dunn, & Price, 1990) was administered to determine perceptual preferences. The control group was taught seventh-grade and tenth-grade science units using a traditional approach and the experimental group was instructed on the same units using multisensory instructional resources. The Semantic Differential Scale (SDS) (Pizzo, 1981) was administered to reveal attitudinal differences. The traditional unit included oral reading from the textbook, completing outlines, labeling diagrams, and correcting the outlines and diagrams as a class. The multisensory unit included five instructional stations established in different sections of the classroom to allow students to learn by: (a) manipulating Flip Chutes, (b) using Electroboards, (c) assembling Task Cards, (d) playing a kinesthetic Floor Game, and (e) reading an individual Programmed Learning Sequence. Audio tapes and scripts were provided at each location. Students circulated in groups of four from station to station. The data subjected to statistical analyses supported the use of a multisensory, rather than a traditional approach, for teaching science content that is above-grade level. T-tests revealed a positive and significant impact on achievement scores (p < 0.0007). No significance was detected on grade-level achievement nor on the perceptual-preference effect. Furthermore, the students indicated significantly more positive attitudes when instructed with a multisensory approach on either grade-level or above-grade level science content (p < 0.0001). The findings supported using a multisensory approach when teaching science concepts that are new to and difficult for students (Martini, 1986).

  6. Attitudes and beliefs, about inquiry science, of middle level and secondary science teachers in northwest Arkansas and northwest Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockers, Jean E.

    A This study attempted to close gaps in the literature with regards to implementation of inquiry practices in secondary science classrooms. In addition, the areas and ways in which practice ties to beliefs and experiences in the area of inquiry were examined. This study introduces an instrument that could be used to assess teachers' attitudes and beliefs about inquiry teaching practices and potential barriers to teaching science using an inquiry approach. Because the efficacy of reform efforts rests largely with teachers, their voices need to be included in the design and implementation of inquiry---based curriculum. This study helps to clarify the need for future research to examine inquiry as a pedagogical approach. If we desire pre-service teachers to teach using an inquiry approach when they have their own classrooms, they must know how to plan, implement, and assess inquiry science lessons, not just have experienced "inquiry lessons" as a student. One unique finding in this study was in the area of licensure and teaching style. Other studies found that in general traditionally licensed teachers felt better prepared to teach. This study found that participants who were alternatively certified incorporated characteristics of inquiry less often than those with traditional certification. This indicates that more research is needed in the area of certification and the affect it may have on quality of instruction for specific content areas like science.

  7. Breakdown in the level of interest in science & technology among Japanese - from the data of public opinion survey -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masataka

    2005-12-01

    I will discuss about the situation of the level of interest in Science & Technology (S&T) among Japanese. The interest was at its peak in 1976 over past 30 years. It generally fell until the most recent survey in 2004. Of particular interest is a breakdown of the respondents by age. In 1976, people in their 20s reported the highest level of interest in S&T. Over time, that group's interest has waned. Now it is the age group with the lowest level of interest in S&T. I'm going to suggest how to improve people's interest in S&T. The way is to promote Science Communication.

  8. A Mixed Methods Study of the Relationship between Student Perceptions of Teacher-Student Interactions and Motivation in Middle Level Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Julie B.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the relationship between middle level science students' perceptions of teacher-student interactions and students' science motivation, particulary their efficacy, value, and goal orientation for learning science. In this sequential explanatory design, quantitative and qualitative data were collected in two phases,…

  9. Internal Formative Evaluation of Graduate Level Science Education at Temple University. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Barbara; And Others

    This study focuses on an evaluation of the graduate programs designed to prepare science educators at Temple University. An opinionnaire, which consists of 20 statements reflecting the Science Education faculty's positions on certain aims of the graduate program, was developed for this study. This opinionnaire was distributed to the faculty and to…

  10. Science Seeker: A New Model for Teaching Information Literacy to Entry-Level Biology Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petzold, Jacquelyn; Winterman, Brian; Montooth, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    In order to integrate library instruction seamlessly into an introductory biology course, two librarians collaborated with a biology faculty member to create a three-part series of instruction sessions known as the Science Seeker. The Science Seeker taught students about the structure of scientific information by tracing the path that discoveries…

  11. Practicable Taxonomy of Basic Skills of Science Practicals at Secondary Level for Their Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindhu, R. S.; Sharma, Reeta

    1998-01-01

    Explains a taxonomy of basic skills of science practicals that is used in the assessment of secondary science students. Details the assessment scheme which involves the evaluation of students through laboratory practical examinations, observational assessment, and written records of academic sessions. (DDR)

  12. Life Science Instruction and Its Relationship to Scientific Literacy at the Intermediate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitman, Alexis L.; Osaki, Susan Y.

    This study attempted to determine which combinations of student, teacher, curricular, and task factors characterize effective life science instruction, where effectiveness is defined as the acquisition of scientific literacy. The framework of scientific literacy used includes five teacher behavior components: (1) explaining science content; (2)…

  13. High School Science Reform: Taking SS&C to a Higher Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Bill G.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses important tenets of the Scope Sequence and Coordination (SS&C) project and presents the SS&C high school project designed specifically to achieve the National Science Education Standards. Specifies the scope, sequence, and coordination of the natural sciences in grades 9 through 12 in support of general goals taken from the National…

  14. Correlated Curriculum Program: An Experimental Program. Science Level 1 (9A, 9B, 10A).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loebl, Stanley, Ed.; And Others

    The unit plans in Correlated Science 1 are intended to be of use to the teacher in both lesson and team planning. The course in science was designed for optimum correlation with the work done in business, health, and industrial careers. Behavioral objectives, class routines, time allotments, student evaluation, and the design of the manual are…

  15. Country, School and Students Factors Associated with Extreme Levels of Science Literacy across 25 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alivernini, F.; Manganelli, S.

    2015-01-01

    A huge gap in science literacy is between students who do not show the competencies that are necessary to participate effectively in life situations related to science and technology and students who have the skills which would give them the potential to create new technology. The objective of this paper is to identify, for 25 countries, distinct…

  16. Unified Science Approach K-12, Proficiency Levels 13-21 and Semester Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oickle, Eileen M., Ed.

    Presented is the third part of the K-12 unified science materials used in the public schools of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Detailed descriptions are presented for the roles of students and teachers, purposes of bibliography, major concepts in unified science, processes of inquiry, scheme and model for scientific literacy, and program…

  17. Developing partnerships for implementing continental-scale citizen science programs at the local-level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, S. J.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2012-12-01

    Project BudBurst is a citizen science project focused on monitoring plant phenology that resides at the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON, Inc). A central question for Project BudBurst and other national outreach programs is: what are the most effective means of engaging and connecting with diverse communities throughout the country? How can continental scale programs like NEON's Project BudBurst engage audiences in such a way as to be relevant at both the local and continental scales? Staff with Project BudBurst pursued partnerships with several continental scale organizations: the National Wildlife Refuge System, the National Park Service, and botanic gardens to address these questions. The distributed nature of wildlife refuges, national parks, and botanic gardens around the country provided the opportunity to connect with participants locally while working with leadership at multiple scales. Project BudBurst staff talked with hundreds of staff and volunteers prior to setting a goal of obtaining and developing resources for several Refuge Partners, a pilot National Park partner, and an existing botanic garden partner during 2011. We were especially interested in learning best practices for future partnerships. The partnership efforts resulted in resource development for 12 Refuge partners, a pilot National Park partner, and 2 botanic garden partners. Early on, the importance of working with national level leaders to develop ownership of the partner program and input about resource needs became apparent. Once a framework for the partnership program was laid out, it became critical to work closely with staff and volunteers on the ground to ensure needs were met. In 2012 we began to develop an online assessment to allow our current and potential partners to provide feedback about whether or not the partnership program was meeting their needs and how the program could be improved. As the year progressed, the timeline for resource development became more of a suggestion than a set schedule. Maintaining flexibility was critical to the success of the partnerships. Unanticipated fieldwork, new priorities within organizations, and differing levels of involvement from partner staff, advisory boards, or Friends groups, led to varying resource development timelines. The distributed nature of and the willingness of partner staff and volunteers to implement Project BudBurst at their facilities have broadened the participation of the public in this program more than could have been accomplished alone. The new partners benefit from the free and customized education and outreach materials provided by Project BudBurst, while Project BudBurst benefits from the local knowledge and contacts with the public from the partner organizations.

  18. Ultrasound evaluation of traumatic patient in a tertiary level hospital.

    PubMed

    Ara, R; Khan, N; Chakraborty, R K; Rima, S Z; Nahar, N; Islam, S M; Mahmud, S; Hossain, G A; Islam, S; Uddin, F

    2013-04-01

    This study was designed to assess the use of ultrasonography in evaluation of trauma patients to see any intraperitoneal collection, collection in pleural cavity, any vital organ injury or any localized collection in blunt trauma to abdomen. This cross sectional study was performed in patient having history of trauma who attended the Centre for Nuclear Medicine & Ultrasound (CNM&U), Mymensingh for ultrasonic evaluation. Ultrasonography scanning was done to see any intraperitoneal collection, pleural collection or vital organ injury. Vulnerable age, causes of trauma, types of organ injury and relation between ages & types of organ involved were also evaluated. Fifty patients were evaluated among those 44(88%) were male & 6(12%) were female. Ultrasonographic examination detected 26(52%) patients with intraperitoneal collection, 13(26%) patients with intraabdominal organ injury, 5(10%) patients with pleural collection. Liver (30%) is the mostly affected organ. It was also found that the most vulnerable age having trauma to abdomen was 11 to 30 (54%) years. The most common cause of trauma was road traffic accident (46%). Younger people were more vulnerable to liver and pancreatic injury, older people to splenic injury and middle aged to renal injury. Ultrasonography is a useful primary tool for evaluating traumatic patient specially to detect intraperitoneal collection and organ injury in country like Bangladesh where accidental injury is very common. PMID:23715345

  19. Threshold Concepts: Impacts on Teaching and Learning at Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Mira; Harlow, Ann

    2014-01-01

    This project explored teaching and learning of hard-to-learn threshold concepts in first-year English, an electrical engineering course, leadership courses, and in doctoral writing. The project was envisioned to produce disciplinary case studies that lecturers could use to reflect on and refine their curriculum and pedagogy, thereby contributing…

  20. School Emphasis on Academic Success: Exploring Changes in Science Performance in Norway between 2007 and 2011 Employing Two-Level SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsen, Trude; Gustafsson, Jan-Eric

    2014-01-01

    We study whether changes in school emphasis on academic success (SEAS) and safe schools (SAFE) may explain the increased science performance in Norway between TIMSS 2007 and 2011. Two-level structural equation modelling (SEM) of merged TIMSS data was used to investigate whether changes in levels of SEAS and SAFE mediate the changes in science

  1. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Written Argumentation Qualities: From the Perspectives of Socio- Scientific Issues, Epistemic Belief Levels and Online Discussion Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbilir, Erdinc; Cakiroglu, Jale; Ertepinar, Hamide

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between pre-service science teachers' written argumentation levels about socio-scientific issues and epistemic belief levels in an online discussion environment. A mixed-methods approach was used: 30 Turkish pre-service science teachers contributed with their written argumentations to four…

  2. Context, accuracy, and level of inclusion of nature of science concepts in current high school physics textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshamrani, Saeed Mohammed

    To improve K-12 students' images of the nature of science (NOS) through science textbooks, two issues must be addressed: (a) the level of NOS that ought to be included in science textbooks and (b) the treatment of this level in those textbooks. Science educators achieved a consensus level of agreement regarding what NOS aspects should be taught for K-12 science learners; however, there is a need for more clarification regarding the actual treatment of NOS in science textbooks. The purpose of this study is to investigate the NOS inclusion in high school physics textbooks. To be specific, this study examines the included NOS aspects, the frequency of NOS inclusion, the contexts exist for NOS inclusion, and the accuracy of NOS inclusion. This study utilized 12 science education studies to develop the Master Aspects of Nature of Science [MA-NOS] which includes 12 NOS aspects that ought to be included in K-12 science curriculum. The analyzed textbooks in this study are seven textbooks identified by The American Institute of Physics as the most widely used high school physics textbooks in the United States in 2005. These textbooks were used in teaching five academic levels: (a) Regular First-Year Physics, (b) Physics for Non-Science Students, (c) Honors Physics, (d) AP-B Physics, and (e) AP-C Physics. The researcher selected exclusively physics textbooks because physics is his main interest. To facilitate the content analysis of the selected textbooks, the study developed The Collection Data Coding Guide which includes six parts describing the MA-NOS aspects and the process of identifying and collecting data. For each NOS aspect, a description and one or more selected ideal indicators were provided to facilitate data collecting and judging the accuracy of NOS inclusion. This coding guide was reviewed for its content validity by two science educators who specialize in NOS. However, two types of reliability were conducted to identify the consistency of selecting NOS units, classifying contexts existing for NOS inclusion, identifying NOS elements, and judging NOS inclusion accuracy. The agreements over time "rate-rerate reliability" were 100%, 96.97%, 79.36%, and 100% respectively. However, the agreements among analysts "inter-rate reliability" were 100%, 92.3%, 66.7%, and 96.2% respectively. This study permitted eliminating, adding, or modifying NOS indicators through textbook analysis. At the end of this study, three indicators were eliminated, one was added, and one was modified. The final version of the coding guide includes 36 indicators representing the meaning of the ML-NOS. The findings of the first research question indicate that all NOS aspects are included in the textbooks except "there is a distinction between observations and inferences." However, the textbooks vary in their inclusion of NOS aspects; each textbook includes between five to 11 different NOS aspects. The results of the second question indicate that the frequencies of NOS inclusion range between 41 to 174 instances in the textbooks. The textbooks seem to include more NOS elements related to "scientific knowledge is tentative," "there is a distinction between scientific laws and theories," "scientific knowledge is empirically based," "the absence of a universal step-wise scientific method," "cooperation and collaboration in development of scientific knowledge," and "the role of experiment in science." The findings of the third research question indicate that 84.5% of the total included NOS elements in the textbooks are included through the main texts. 15.5% of the elements are included through figures, lab activities, boxed-in sections, and glossary sections; however, no elements are included through tables or charts. The results also indicate that more utilization of types of contexts beside the main text associates with more NOS inclusion. The results of the fourth question indicate that 14 NOS elements, with 2.3% of the total elements, are inaccurately included in

  3. The teacher's role in college level classes for non-science majors: A constructivist approach for teaching prospective science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abdullah Othman

    1997-12-01

    This interpretive research set out to investigate the characteristics of an exemplary college science instructor who endeavors to improve teaching and learning in a physical science course for prospective teachers. The course was innovative in the sense that it was designed to meet the specific needs of prospective elementary teachers who needed to have models of how to teach science in a way that employed materials and small group activities. The central purpose for this study is to understand the metaphors that Mark (a pseudonym), the chemistry instructor in the course, used as referents to conceptualize his roles and frame actions and interactions in the classroom. Within the theoretical frame of constructivism, human cognitive interests, and co-participation theories, an ethnographic research design, described by Erickson (1986), Guba and Lincoln (1989), and Gallagher (1991), was employed in the study. The main sources of data for this study were field notes, transcript analysis of interviews with the instructor and students, and analyses of videotaped excerpts. Additional data sources, such as student journals and the results of students' responses to the University/Community College Student Questionnaire which was developed by a group science education researchers at Florida State University, were employed to maximize that the assertions I constructed were consistent with the variety of data. Data analyses and interpretation in the study focused on identifying the aspects which the instructor and the researcher might find useful in reflecting to understand what was happening and why that was happening in the classroom. The analysis reveals how the instructor used constructivism as a referent for his teaching and the learning of his students. To be consistent with his beliefs and goals that prospective teachers should enjoy their journey of learning chemistry, Mark, the driver in the journey, used the roles of controller, facilitator, learner, and entertainer as referents for actions to create conducive learning environments. He was able to switch his actions based on which of the constituent metaphors he used as a referent to frame his actions and interactions, and thereby, to create an exciting environment for learning.

  4. Queuing Models of Tertiary Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Theodore

    1996-01-01

    Large scale scientific projects generate and use large amounts of data. For example, the NASA Earth Observation System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) project is expected to archive one petabyte per year of raw satellite data. This data is made automatically available for processing into higher level data products and for dissemination to the scientific community. Such large volumes of data can only be stored in robotic storage libraries (RSL's) for near-line access. A characteristic of RSL's is the use of a robot arm that transfers media between a storage rack and the read/write drives, thus multiplying the capacity of the system. The performance of the RSL's can be a critical limiting factor for the performance of the archive system. However, the many interacting components of an RSL make a performance analysis difficult. In addition, different RSL components can have widely varying performance characteristics. This paper describes our work to develop performance models of an RSL in isolation. Next we show how the RSL model can be incorporated into a queuing network model. We use the models to make some example performance studies of archive systems. The models described in this paper, developed for the NASA EODIS project, are implemented in C with a well defined interface. The source code, accompanying documentation, and also sample JAVA applets are available at: http://www.cis.ufl.edu/ted/

  5. Status of energy education at the secondary school level in the State of Alabama. [249 science teachers queried

    SciTech Connect

    McCarley, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and evaluate the status of energy education in the State of Alabama. Specifically, the study dealt with personal characteristics of the secondary school science teachers along with school characteristics and whether or not these characteristics related to teaching energy education, topics, methods, and procedures used in existing energy education programs. The sample consisted of 400 randomly selected secondary school science teachers in the State of Alabama; 249 questionnaires were returned. This instrument requested demographic information and information on the status of energy education as taught in the secondary school science classes in the State of Alabama. Nonparametric techniques were employed throughout the analysis procedure. Chi square was the statistical test used. The major findings were: (1) the sex, age, number of years of teaching experience, level of certification, and current enrollment in an advanced degree program were not related to the teaching of energy education; (2) the academic major of the teacher and the subject taught related to the teaching of energy education; (3) junior-high science teachers used more-varied teaching strategies than the senior-high science teachers; (4) the primary method of instruction was by integration into appropriate units; and (5) energy education was taught from one to ninety-nine days. The mean number of days was sixteen.

  6. Using a dynamic, introductory-level volcanoes class as a means to introduce non-science majors to the geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    At the University of California, San Diego, I teach a quarter-long, introductory Earth Science class titled "Volcanoes," which is, in essence, a functional class in volcanology designed specifically for non-majors. This large-format (enrollment ~ 85), lecture-based class provides students from an assortment of backgrounds an opportunity to acquire much-needed (and sometimes dreaded) area credits in science, while also serving as an introduction to the Earth Science major at UCSD (offered through Scripps Institution of Oceanography). The overall goal of the course is to provide students with a stimulating and exciting general science option that, using an inherently interesting topic, introduces them to the fundamentals of geoscience. A secondary goal is to promote general science and geoscience literacy among the general population of UCSD. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material. The majority of students in the class (>80%) are non-science majors and very few students (<3%) are Earth science degree-seeking students. In addition, only a handful of students have typically had any form of geology class beyond high school level Earth Science. Consequently, there are challenges associated with teaching the class. Perhaps most significantly, students have very little background—background that is necessary for understanding the processes involved in volcanic eruptions. Second, many non-science students have built-in anxieties with respect to math and science, anxieties that must be considered when designing curriculum and syllabi. It is essential to provide the right balance of technical information while remaining in touch with the audience. My approach to the class involves a dynamic lecture format that incorporates a wide array of multimedia, analogue demonstrations of volcanic processes, and small-group discussions of topics and concepts. In addition to teaching about volcanoes—a fascinating subject in and of itself—I take the opportunity in the first two weeks to introduce students to basic geology, including tectonics, earth materials, surface processes, and geologic time. In fact, this is a vital segment of the class, as the students need this background for the latter portions of the class. A side benefit is that students are provided with a "mini" education in geology whether they know it or not and take this knowledge with them into other classes, and ultimately, their futures. Student satisfaction is uniformly very high with this class. 100% of students agreed that the course material was intellectually stimulating; 95% of students agreed that they learned a great deal from the course; 100% of students stated that they would recommend the class to other students. Overall, the class highlights the role that non-major introductory-level geoscience classes, in particular ones with interesting topics, can serve in educating college-level students about Earth Science. They may also serve as a gateway into the Earth Sciences for students who previously had no such inclination.

  7. Peer-driven contraceptive choices and preferences for contraceptive methods among students of tertiary educational institutions in Enugu, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyoke, CA; Ezugwu, FO; Lawani, OL; Ugwu, GO; Ajah, LO; Mba, SG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the methods preferred for contraception, evaluate preferences and adherence to modern contraceptive methods, and determine the factors associated with contraceptive choices among tertiary students in South East Nigeria. Methods A questionnaire-based cross-sectional study of sexual habits, knowledge of contraceptive methods, and patterns of contraceptive choices among a pooled sample of unmarried students from the three largest tertiary educational institutions in Enugu city, Nigeria was done. Statistical analysis involved descriptive and inferential statistics at the 95% level of confidence. Results A total of 313 unmarried students were studied (194 males; 119 females). Their mean age was 22.5±5.1 years. Over 98% of males and 85% of females made their contraceptive choices based on information from peers. Preferences for contraceptive methods among female students were 49.2% for traditional methods of contraception, 28% for modern methods, 10% for nonpharmacological agents, and 8% for off-label drugs. Adherence to modern contraceptives among female students was 35%. Among male students, the preference for the male condom was 45.2% and the adherence to condom use was 21.7%. Multivariate analysis showed that receiving information from health personnel/media/workshops (odds ratio 9.54, 95% confidence interval 3.5–26.3), health science-related course of study (odds ratio 3.5, 95% confidence interval 1.3–9.6), and previous sexual exposure prior to university admission (odds ratio 3.48, 95% confidence interval 1.5–8.0) all increased the likelihood of adherence to modern contraceptive methods. Conclusion An overwhelming reliance on peers for contraceptive information in the context of poor knowledge of modern methods of contraception among young people could have contributed to the low preferences and adherence to modern contraceptive methods among students in tertiary educational institutions. Programs to reduce risky sexual behavior among these students may need to focus on increasing the content and adequacy of contraceptive information held by people through regular health worker-led, on-campus workshops. PMID:25114515

  8. Multi-Level Models of Internalizing Disorders and Translational Developmental Science: Seeking Etiological Insights that can Inform Early Intervention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Allen, Nicholas B; Dahl, Ronald E

    2015-07-01

    This commentary discusses the articles in this special section with an emphasis on the specific utility of multivariate, multi-level models in developmental psychopathology for ultimately contributing to both etiologic insights and translational advances. These issues are considered not only in terms of the specific papers, but also within a larger set of questions regarding the opportunities (and challenges) currently facing the field. We describe why we believe this an exciting time for integrative team-science approaches to tackle these challenges--a time that holds great promise for rapid advances in integrative developmental science that includes a biological level of mechanistic understanding. In order to facilitate this, we outline a range of approaches within both translational neuroscience and translational developmental science that can be used as frameworks for understanding how such research can provide etiologic insights regarding real-world targets at the level of social, behavioral, and affective processes that can be modified during key developmental windows of opportunity. We conclude that a "construct validity" framework, where biological data form a critical, but not privileged, component of key etiological mechanisms, combined with a developmental perspective on key period of sensitivity to intervention effects, is most likely to provide significant translational outcomes. PMID:25947071

  9. Artisticc: An Art and Science Integration Project to Enquire into Community Level Adaptation to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinden, J. P.; Baztan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The prupose of this paper is to present the "Adaptation Research a Transdisciplinary community and policy centered appoach" (ARTisticc) project. ARTisticc's goal is to apply innovative standardized transdisciplinary art and science integrative approaches to foster robust, socially, culturally and scientifically, community centred adaptation to climate change. The approach used in the project is based on the strong understanding that adaptation is: (a) still "a concept of uncertain form"; (b) a concept dealing with uncertainty; (c) a concept that calls for an analysis that goes beyond the traditional disciplinary organization of science, and; (d) an unconventional process in the realm of science and policy integration. The project is centered on case studies in France, Greenland, Russia, India, Canada, Alaska, and Senegal. In every site we jointly develop artwork while we analyzing how natural science, essentially geosciences can be used in order to better adapt in the future, how society adapt to current changes and how memories of past adaptations frames current and future processes. Artforms are mobilized in order to share scientific results with local communities and policy makers, this in a way that respects cultural specificities while empowering stakeholders, ARTISTICC translates these "real life experiments" into stories and artwork that are meaningful to those affected by climate change. The scientific results and the culturally mediated productions will thereafter be used in order to co-construct, with NGOs and policy makers, policy briefs, i.e. robust and scientifically legitimate policy recommendations regarding coastal adaptation. This co-construction process will be in itself analysed with the goal of increasing arts and science's performative functions in the universe of evidence-based policy making. The project involves scientists from natural sciences, the social sciences and the humanities, as well as artitis from the performing arts (playwriters, film directors) as well as the visual arts (photographs, designers, sculptor) working in France, Senegal, India, Russia, Greenland, Alaska, and Canada

  10. Lower Tertiary laterite on the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge and the Thulean land bridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    CORES of a lower Tertiary lateritic palaeosol resting on basalt were recovered1 from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 336 (Leg 38) on the north-east flank of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge (Fig. 1), a major aseismic oceanic ridge that, together with Iceland, forms the Icelandic transverse ridge 2. The transverse ridge extends from the West European continental margin to the East Greenland continental margin, forming the geographic boundary and a partial barrier to flow of water between the Norwegian-Greenland Sea to the north and the northern North Atlantic Ocean to the south. The palaeosol indicates that at least part of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge was above sea level during early Tertiary time3. Palaeogeographic and palaeooceanographic reconstructions suggest that it formed the main part of the Thulean land bridge that connected South-east Greenland and the Faeroe islands during the early Tertiary4. This report summarises the subsidence history of the Iceland-Faeroe Ridge relative to early Tertiary seafloor spreading, basaltic volcanism, and the development of the proposed Thulean land bridge. ?? 1978 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Disaster resilience in tertiary hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in Shandong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital disaster resilience can be defined as a hospital’s ability to resist, absorb, and respond to the shock of disasters while maintaining critical functions, and then to recover to its original state or adapt to a new one. This study aims to explore the status of resilience among tertiary hospitals in Shandong Province, China. Methods A stratified random sample (n =?50) was derived from tertiary A, tertiary B, and tertiary C hospitals in Shandong Province, and was surveyed by questionnaire. Data on hospital characteristics and 8 key domains of hospital resilience were collected and analysed. Variables were binary, and analysed using descriptive statistics such as frequencies. Results A response rate of 82% (n =?41) was attained. Factor analysis identified four key factors from eight domains which appear to reflect the overall level of disaster resilience. These were hospital safety, disaster management mechanisms, disaster resources and disaster medical care capability. The survey demonstrated that in regard to hospital safety, 93% had syndromic surveillance systems for infectious diseases and 68% had evaluated their safety standards. In regard to disaster management mechanisms, all had general plans, while only 20% had specific plans for individual hazards. 49% had a public communication protocol and 43.9% attended the local coordination meetings. In regard to disaster resources, 75.6% and 87.5% stockpiled emergency drugs and materials respectively, while less than a third (30%) had a signed Memorandum of Understanding with other hospitals to share these resources. Finally in regard to medical care, 66% could dispatch an on-site medical rescue team, but only 5% had a ‘portable hospital’ function and 36.6% and 12% of the hospitals could surge their beds and staff capacity respectively. The average beds surge capacity within 1 day was 13%. Conclusions This study validated the broad utility of a framework for understanding and measuring the level of hospital resilience. The survey demonstrated considerable variability in disaster resilience arrangements of tertiary hospitals in Shandong province, and the difference between tertiary A hospitals and tertiary B hospitals was also identified in essential areas. PMID:24661641

  12. Multi-Level Modeling of Dyadic Data in Sport Sciences: Conceptual, Statistical, and Practical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Fecteau, Marie-Claude; Perreault, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to present a series of conceptual, statistical, and practical issues in the modeling of multi-level dyadic data. Distinctions are made between distinguishable and undistinguishable dyads and several types of independent variables modeled at the dyadic level of analysis. Multi-level modeling equations are explained in a…

  13. Alternative Forms of Assessment in Elementary Science: The Interactive Effects of Reading, Race, Economic Level and the Elementary Science Specialist on Hands-On and Multiple-Choice Assessment of Science Process Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette Miele; Repa, J. Theodore

    The specific focus of this research was to determine how the outcomes on two alternative forms of assessment (multiple-choice and hands-on/manipulative) for science process skills were related when students were grouped on the basis of sex, race/ethnicity, and poverty level. Subjects were 1,381 fourth graders in a culturally diverse city school…

  14. ED20. Crisis or Opportunity? Earth and Space Science Education at the State and National Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Scientists and researchers, those often in oversight positions and often control of the purse strings, have historically not been kind to the Earth Systems Science (ESS) discipline. This is puzzling to those of us who are ESS educators because we know that to appreciate how our planet works it is necessary to integrate and apply all the disciplines of science. With our amazing technologies and the increasing demands of a growing population we are dramatically changing our home planet. Perhaps a crisis? As the last century ended we found ESS in the same minor league position it was in when the 20th Century started. During the review period of what was to become the National Science Education Standards (NSES) draft after draft, no matter what color the cover was, seemed to ignore, omit, or severely limit ESS topics in meteorology and oceanography. Once published the NSES became the basis for the science standards in many states with what many said were critical gaps. In the years following 1996 different groups have worked to correct the omissions they found by developing guides...Ocean Literacy: Essential Principles of Ocean Science K-12 and Climate Literacy: The Essential Principals of Climate Science. An observer on the side might have considered each effort one of lobbying to get attention, funding and materials. Each effort was clearly interested in making an impact where it mattered...in the classroom. Now our Opportunity! The NAS process for developing "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" presented ESS educators with a real opportunity and we can proudly say we made our voices heard. And while there is great enthusiasm for the framework and the Chapter 7 Earth and Space we face critically important work to bring real Earth Space Science Education into the K-12 classroom. The possibility of the standards to be developed from the Framework becoming Common Core for the majority of states following the course of ELA and mathematics requires that those who previously guarded their territory collaborate.

  15. Core Principles and Test Item Development for Advanced High School and Introductory University Level Food Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing-Kean, Claudine A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Programs supported by the Carl D. Perkins Act of 2006 are required to operate under the state or national content standards, and are expected to carry out evaluation procedures that address accountability. The Indiana high school course, "Advanced Life Science: Foods" ("ALS: Foods") operates under the auspices of the Perkins Act. However, no broad…

  16. COURSE OUTLINE FOR THIRD SIX WEEKS OF SCIENCE-LEVEL II, TALENT PRESERVATION CLASSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, TX.

    UNIT III (SIX WEEKS) CONCERNS PLANT LIFE, AND DEALS WITH THALLUS PLANTS, MOSSES, FERNS, AND SEED PLANTS. UNIT IV (SIX WEEKS) COVERS AIR AND SPACE, WITH SUBTOPICS ON ASTRONOMY AND WEATHER. "THE CHANGING EARTH," DEALING WITH GEOLOGY AND CONSERVATION, COMPRISES UNIT V (6WEEKS). THE LAST, UNIT VI (6 WEEKS), DEALS WITH CONSUMER SCIENCE--BIOLOGICAL AND…

  17. Classroom Learning Centers: Animals, Levels E-I. A Supplementary Approach for Teaching Science and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Ted G.; Richiger, Georgina M.

    This publication includes curriculum materials on animals for grades 4-6. The major purposes of this publication are to foster individualized and interdisciplinary science and art activities within elementary classrooms and to provide pupils and teachers with suggestions to encourage the use of zoos, animal parks, and natural history museums.…

  18. Student Perception of Metacognitive Activities in Entry-Level Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandall, Leah; Mamo, Martha; Speth, Carol; Lee, Don; Kettler, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A research study investigated student perception of the use of metacognitive activities in the classroom. The courses were large enrollment (n greater than 100) introductory Plant and Soil Sciences courses taught in the fall semester. The courses implemented activities such as concept sketches or conceptual modeling to help students develop their…

  19. Barriers and Supports for Continuing in Mathematics and Science: Gender and Educational Level Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Hackett, Gail; Smith, Philip L.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Fitzpatrick, Mary; Haag, Susan; Spencer, Dee

    2010-01-01

    This article presents three studies that provide an in-depth examination of STEM-related supports and barriers. These studies constructed an instrument to identify male and female perceptions of the barriers and supports for pursuing coursework and/or careers in mathematics and sciences domains; to pilot test and refine that instrument; and then…

  20. The Impact of APU Science Work at LEA and School Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne

    1984-01-01

    Questionnaires were sent to local education authorities in England to determine what the advisory/inspectorial staff and the working groups of teachers and schools know about the national assessments of science education conducted by the APU and how they were being used. (RM)

  1. Science for the Hearing Impaired. Teachers Guide. Introduction and Levels 3-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunal, Dennis W.; Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski

    Intended for use with hearing impaired students, ages 9 to 13 years, the curriculum guide is an adaptation of an existing commercially available school science program with the addition of new materials. Adaptation included reorganization of some materials; paraphrasing to aid the student with textual material; isolation of key words and phrases;…

  2. Comparing Panelists' Understanding of Standard Setting across Multiple Levels of an Alternate Science Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Mary A.; Lyon, Steven R.; Heh, Peter; Zigmond, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale assessment programs, including alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS), must provide evidence of technical quality and validity. This study provides information about the technical quality of one AA-AAS by evaluating the standard setting for the science component. The assessment was designed to have…

  3. Grade Level and Science Achievement: US Performance in Cross-National Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how international differences in age-grade distributions and grade effects contribute to science scores among 27 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. As shown in the 2006 Program for International Student Assessment, countries vary substantially in the grade distribution of 15-year-olds. The costs…

  4. Comparing Levels of School Performance to Science Teachers' Reports on Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative and basic qualitative study was to examine fifth and eighth grade science teachers' responses, perceptions of the role of technology in the classroom, and how they felt that computer applications, tools, and the Internet influence student understanding. The purposeful sample included survey and…

  5. Investigating the Transition into Third Level Science--Identifying a Student Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovatt, James; Finlayson, Odilla

    2013-01-01

    Research into student transition to and experience of first-year undergraduate study has been ongoing for many years. The corresponding research within the discipline of science has been less prolific and that which has been published tends to focus on using external factors such as previous grades, finances, travel time "etc." as predictors for…

  6. How Shall We Tell Our People? The Art and Science of Communicating Sea-Level Rise to Coastal Audiences (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Improved sea-level rise projections and translation into decision-relevant information (e.g., changed flood frequencies and elevations, increased rates in coastal erosion, salinity changes in coastal aquifers) are critical for coastal managers, planners, and local elected officials to feel more confident in bringing climate change and its related coastal impacts to the attention of their communities. Those who have done so or are considering doing so, however, are not just concerned with “getting the science right” or getting the most credible and relevant information. They immediately, and sometimes primarily, are concerned with the reactions of coastal residents, developers, and business interests to the prospects of potentially difficult and substantial changes in coastal land use, their property rights, and the potential loss of their homes and establishments. How to engage the public constructively in developing adaptation strategies is a largely unmet challenge for most coastal managers. Similarly, they have not been trained in how to effectively communicate an issue that is ripe with the potential for loss, danger, and social and legal conflict - more so than they already face. Better physical science on sea-level rise alone will not meet these needs. Meanwhile, the social sciences have only begun to study public attitudes toward local impacts and adaptation responses. This paper will summarize key insights available at this time and point to important research and education/training needs to better assist practitioners faced with developing and implementing coastal adaptation strategies.

  7. Comparing levels of school performance to science teachers' reports on knowledge/skills, instructional use and student use of computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Rebecca

    The purpose of this descriptive quantitative and basic qualitative study was to examine fifth and eighth grade science teachers' responses, perceptions of the role of technology in the classroom, and how they felt that computer applications, tools, and the Internet influence student understanding. The purposeful sample included survey and interview responses from fifth grade and eighth grade general and physical science teachers. Even though they may not be generalizable to other teachers or classrooms due to a low response rate, findings from this study indicated teachers with fewer years of teaching science had a higher level of computer use but less computer access, especially for students, in the classroom. Furthermore, teachers' choice of professional development moderated the relationship between the level of school performance and teachers' knowledge/skills, with the most positive relationship being with workshops that occurred outside of the school. Eighteen interviews revealed that teachers perceived the role of technology in classroom instruction mainly as teacher-centered and supplemental, rather than student-centered activities.

  8. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). 721...Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). ...identified generically as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN...

  9. Eustatic control of tertiary hydrocarbon deposits, Central California borderline basins

    SciTech Connect

    Cousminer, H.L. )

    1994-04-01

    In the central California borderland basins, the Vail-Haq Cenozoic Global Eustatic Cycle appears to have influenced depositional patterns that have fundamental significance in the present distribution of hydrocarbon source and reservoir beds. Coupled with tectonic events, traps were created that now control the distribution of hydrocarbon accumulations. Seismic data combined with subsurface lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic, and log data from wells drilled on the central California outer continental shelf (OCS) were used to date and correlate Tertiary stratigraphic sequences in the Santa Maria, Bodega-La Honda, and Point Arena basins. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages also served to reconstruct each basin's paleobathymetric history. The west coast benthic foram stages, commerically used to solve subsurface stratigraphic problems for over 60 yr, occur with planktonic microfossil groups that now serve to calibrate the provincial stages with the absolute geologic time scale. The Miocene through Pliocene stratigraphic sequences in these three depocenters are markedly similar, and record a parallel marine onlap and offlap pattern that correlates closely with the Vail-Haq Cenozoic Global Eustatic Cycle. The highstand depositional cycles are generally dominated by organic-rich sediments of good to excellent are generally dominated by organic-rich sediments of good to excellent source-bed potential. Lowstand regressive to transgressive clastic deposits have good reservoir potential. The middle Miocene siliceous Monterey Formation was deposited during maximum Tertiary global sea levels and is present in all of these basins. In addition to being a prolific source bed, the Monterey is unique in that when diagnetically altered, it fractures and also becomes an excellent hydrocarbon reservoir.

  10. Level-2 Milestone 3244: Deploy Dawn ID Machine for Initial Science Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, D

    2009-09-21

    This report documents the delivery, installation, integration, testing, and acceptance of the Dawn system, ASC L2 milestone 3244: Deploy Dawn ID Machine for Initial Science Runs, due September 30, 2009. The full text of the milestone is included in Attachment 1. The description of the milestone is: This milestone will be a result of work started three years ago with the planning for a multi-petaFLOPS UQ-focused platform (Sequoia) and will be satisfied when a smaller ID version of the final system is delivered, installed, integrated, tested, accepted, and deployed at LLNL for initial science runs in support of SSP mission. The deliverable for this milestone will be a LA petascale computing system (named Dawn) usable for code development and scaling necessary to ensure effective use of a final Sequoia platform (expected in 2011-2012), and for urgent SSP program needs. Allocation and scheduling of Dawn as an LA system will likely be performed informally, similar to what has been used for BlueGene/L. However, provision will be made to allow for dedicated access times for application scaling studies across the entire Dawn resource. The milestone was completed on April 1, 2009, when science runs began running on the Dawn system. The following sections describe the Dawn system architecture, current status, installation and integration time line, and testing and acceptance process. A project plan is included as Attachment 2. Attachment 3 is a letter certifying the handoff of the system to a nuclear weapons stockpile customer. Attachment 4 presents the results of science runs completed on the system.

  11. Understanding How Low Oxygen Levels Promote Spread of Breast Cancer | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    One of the characteristics of most breast tumors is that regions can become starved for oxygen. This condition, known as hypoxia, is associated with an increased risk that the tumor will spread beyond the breast and eventually lead to death. New research results from the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC) has now identified key molecular events triggered by hypoxia and demonstrated how they might enable breast tumor cells to metastasize.

  12. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the...

  13. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the...

  14. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the...

  15. Alternatives in Education: A Liberal Policy for Australian Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Australia's "strange confusion in tertiary education" is discussed with regard to the difficulty of defining distinctions between universities and colleges of advanced education (CAE's), diplomas and degrees. The author proposes that all tertiary institutions be called universities and all degrees and diplomas abolished and replaced by…

  16. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  17. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the...

  18. Structural Diversity in Tertiary Education. Go8 Backgrounder 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Projections of future population and tertiary education participation indicate that Australia needs soon to start planning for another surge in school leavers entering tertiary education from 2015, together with increased demand for greater skills deepening by adult workers. Hence it is necessary to find cost-effective supply solutions that…

  19. The Returns of Investment in Tertiary Technological Education in Greece.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsamadias, Constantinos

    2002-01-01

    Return on investment was estimated from earnings data on Greek graduates of tertiary technological education and secondary education, using elaborate and Mincerian estimation models. Return rates were similar in both methods. Differences were greater for females. Both societal and individual investment in tertiary technological education was…

  20. Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-print Network

    Tertiary proton diagnostics in future inertial confinement fusion experiments S. Cremera) and C. P energetic up to 31 MeV tertiary protons produced during the final stage of inertial confinement fusion the elastic scattering of 14.1 MeV neutrons, is a source of very energetic protons capable of escaping from

  1. Graduate student involvement with designing inquiry-based Earth science field projects for the secondary-level classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Scherf, L.; Ward, S.; Cady, P.; Bromley, J.; Varner, R. K.; Froburg, E.

    2008-12-01

    In a secondary-level Earth System Science (ESS) curriculum, the most authentic learning is achieved through the inquiry-based application of real-world research methods in the context of modern understanding of the interconnected components of the Earth System (e.g. lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere). Following the intensive ESST-1 summer institute at UNH, during which teachers enhance their ESS content knowledge via interactions with UNH faculty, staff, and graduate students, each participating teacher is paired with one graduate student fellow for the duration of the school year. This graduate fellow provides a continuing link between the secondary-level school teaching environment and university resources, facilitating the implementation of new content knowledge and current scientific research methodology into the classroom setting. According to the National Science Education Standards (1), scientific inquiry is the central strategy for teaching science. "In successful science classrooms, teachers and students collaborate in the pursuit of ideas... Students formulate questions and devise ways to answer them, they collect data and decide how to represent it, they organize data to generate knowledge, and they test the reliability of the knowledge they have generated. As they proceed, students explain and justify their work to themselves and to one another, learn to cope with problems such as the limitations of equipment, and react to challenges posed by the teacher and by classmates." To speak to these goals, an ongoing local wetland field study has been conceptualized and implemented in three example classrooms (seventh grade general science, ninth grade physical science and tenth grade biology) in two school systems (Oyster River Middle School in Durham, NH and Berlin High School in Berlin, NH). These field studies were conducted using authentic scientific equipment to collect data, including a Li-Cor 840 infrared CO2 analyzer and handmade sediment coring devices. Students utilized GPS and Google Earth technology both to facilitate the generation of research questions and for accurate geographic location during their field studies. An emphasis was placed on maintaining organized records of observations and data using field notebooks. Every site visit was followed by teacher-guided data analyses, and students communicated their results through a variety of formats, including posters, written reports, and oral presentations. These authentic research experiences create an initial data set which may be referenced in future classroom studies, while effectively engaging students in ESS topics that meet national and state educational standards. (1) National Research Council, 1996.

  2. MO-C-18C-01: Radiation Risks at Level of Few CT Scans: How Real?- Science to Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M; Samei, E; Morgan, W; Goske, M; Shore, R

    2014-06-15

    There are controversies surrounding radiation effects in human population in the range of radiation doses encountered by patients resulting from one to several CT scans. While it is understandable why the effects from low levels of diagnostic radiation are controversial, the situation is complicated by the media which may distort the known facts. There is need to understand the state of science regarding low-level radiation effects and also to understand how to communicate the potential risk with patients, the public and media. This session will seek to come to a consensus in order to speak with one voice to the media and the public. This session will review radiation effects known so far from a variety of exposed groups since the nuclear holocaust, provide clarification where effects are certain and where they are not, at what level extrapolation is the only way and at what level there is weak but agreeable acceptance. We will depict where and why there is agreement among organizations responsible for studying radiation effects, and how to deal with situations where effects are uncertain. Specific focus on radiation effects in children will be provided.Finally, the session will attempt to bridge the communication gap from the science to how to be an effective communicator with patients, parents, and media about ionizing radiation. Learning Objectives: To have a clear understanding about certainties and uncertainties of radiation effects at the level of a few CT scans To understand the results and limitations from 3 major pediatric CT scientific studies on childhood exposures published recently. To understand successful strategies used in risk communication.

  3. Aitken, CGG. Zadora, G & Lucy, D. (2007) A Two-Level Model for Evidence Evaluation. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 52(2); 412-419.

    E-print Network

    Lucy, David

    2007-01-01

    of Forensic Sciences. 52(2); 412-419. A Two-Level Model for Evidence Evaluation Colin G.G. Aitken,1 Ph of Mathematics & Statistics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YF. KEYWORDS: forensic science, evidence for Forensic Statistics and Legal Rea- soning, The King's Buildings, The University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road

  4. A Comparison of Two Laboratory Methods for the Teaching of General Physical Science at the College Level: Vicarious Experimentation Versus Conventional Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Melvin Ouston

    Reported is a study comparing two laboratory teaching methods used with a college level general physical science course. The criterion instruments used were: (1) Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal; (2) The Sequential Test of Educational Progress; (3) Nelson-Denny Reading Test; (4) Welch Science Process Inventory; and (5) The Smith Appraisal…

  5. The concept of landscape education at school level with respect to the directions of the science of landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szcz?sna, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    School education is both a starting point for the development of various scientific disciplines (school educates future researchers) and the result of science. The landscape research is conducted within many scientific disciplines and has a long tradition. Lanscape education, which is the result of a scientific dimension, is implemented in primary school under the nature subject. Primary school education is the only level at which the geographical contents are carried out on landscape. The landscape is of interest to many disciplines: geography, architecture, social sciences and the arts. In recent years, there were many studies which contained an overview of the main strands of the science of landscape, presented the differences in the meaning of the concept and objectives of individual research disciplines. These studies have become the ground for the characterization of the concept of landscape education implemented in Polish school and its evaluation in terms of scientific achievements. A review of educational purposes, the basic content of education and achievements of students, demonstrate the influence of multiple scientific disciplines in school landscape education. The most significant share of the course content are achievements of geography disciplines, particularly: physical geography, environmental protection and landscape ecology. Other scientific fields: literature, art, psychology, sociology, and architecture do not have any impact on the school landscape education or their impact remains marginal.

  6. The impact of an introductory college-level biology class on biology self-efficacy and attitude towards science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Megan Elizabeth

    Self-efficacy theory was first introduced in a seminal article by Albert Bandura in 1977 entitled "Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change". Since its original introduction, self-efficacy has been a major focus of academic performance, anxiety, career development, and teacher retention research. Self-efficacy can be defined as the belief an individual possesses about their ability to perform a given task. Bandura proposed that self-efficacy should be measured at the highest level of specificity due to the fact that different people are efficacious in different areas. Interested in students' efficacy toward biology, Ebert-May, Baldwin, & Allred (1997) created and validated a survey to measure students' biology self-efficacy. Their survey was modeled after the guidelines for science literacy, and loaded to three sub-factors; methods of biology, generalization to other science courses, and application of the concepts. As self-efficacy theory has been related to effort expenditure and persistence (Bandura, 1977; 1997), one might think it would have some effect on students' attitudes toward the topic at hand. The current research investigated what changes in biology self-efficacy occurred after an introductory biology course with an inquiry based laboratory learning environment. In addition, changes in students' attitudes towards science were explored and how self-efficacy might affect them.

  7. Restructuring support staff classification levels for academic health sciences library positions.

    PubMed Central

    McCann, J C; Davis, S E; Trainor, D J; Waller, D K; Greenblatt, R B

    1990-01-01

    Nonprofessional library support staff traditionally hold what are considered to be low-paying, nonchallenging positions. These negative factors make retaining creative and productive employees difficult. This article outlines the approach taken at the Medical College of Georgia's Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library to devise a structure of library staff positions that becomes progressively more demanding. A new nine-level Library Staff Classification Plan resulted. This plan also enables and encourages employees to acquire more skills and to accept more responsibility in order to qualify for higher-level library positions or to advance their present position to receive comparable rewards. The plan expresses the level of responsibilities expected, the employee qualifications desired, and lists representative duties across the spectrum of typical library tasks. PMID:2393758

  8. Health hazards of tertiary amine catalysts.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, W N; Stephenson, R L

    1988-08-01

    Tertiary amine catalysts are widely employed in foundry and polyurethane foam manufacture operations. These highly reactive amines have been associated with graphic disturbances in vision and systemic health effects. Prominent among the reported effects on vision are mydriasis (dilated pupils), cycloplegia (loss of accommodation), and corneal edema, which may result in hazy (looking through smoke) or blurry (out of focus) vision and halo perception. Systemic symptoms, possibly due to a release of endogenous histamine, are consistent with pharmacologic actions of amines and have also been described. These symptoms, as well as the disturbances in vision, are transient. Nevertheless, employees who work with or around machinery, or drive vehicles, may be at an increased risk of accident and injury when experiencing these symptoms. PMID:3051334

  9. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    DOEpatents

    Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1989-01-01

    A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

  10. 'Tertiary' nuclear burning - Neutron star deflagration?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an 'octet' particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such 'tertiary' nuclear burning (here 'primary' is H-He and 'secondary' is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or 'dark' matter.

  11. Tertiary lymphoid structures in cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Goc, Jérémy; Giraldo, Nicolas A; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fridman, Wolf Herman

    2014-11-01

    Tertiary lymphoid structures (TLS) are ectopic lymphoid formations found in inflamed, infected, or tumoral tissues. They exhibit all the characteristics of structures in the lymph nodes (LN) associated with the generation of an adaptive immune response, including a T cell zone with mature dendritic cells (DC), a germinal center with follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and proliferating B cells, and high endothelial venules (HEV). In this review, we discuss evidence for the roles of TLS in chronic infection, autoimmunity, and cancer, and address the question of whether TLS present beneficial or deleterious effects in these contexts. We examine the relationship between TLS in tumors and patient prognosis, and discuss the potential role of TLS in building and/or maintaining local immune responses and how this understanding may guide therapeutic interventions. PMID:25443495

  12. Using seismology to raise science awareness in kindergarten and elementary levels, with the help of high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, F. L.; Silveira, G. M.; Moreira, G.; Afonso, I. P.; Maciel, B. A. P. C.; Melo, M. O.; Neto, R. P.; Gonçalves, M.; Marques, G.; Hartmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching students, aged from 4 up to 18 years old, is a challenging task. It continuously implies new strategies and new subjects adapted to all of them. This is even more evident, when we have to teach natural-hazards scientific aspects and safe attitudes toward risk. We often see that most of the high-school students (16 -18 years old) are not motivated for extra-curricular activities implying science and/or behaviours changes. But, they have a very positive response when we give them some responsibility. On top of that, we also realised that young children are quite receptive to the involvement of older students in the school environment Taking this into consideration, our project use the k12 students to prepare scientific activities and subjects, based in questions, which they need to answer themselves. The students need to answer those questions and, only then, adapt and teach the right answers to the different school-levels. With this approach, we challenged the students to solve three questions: How to use a SEP seismometer at school, and its data? How to set up a shaking table? How to introduce waves and vibrations contents to all ages of students? During the project they developed many science skills, and worked in straight cooperation with teachers, the parents association and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz. As a result, it was possible to reach all school students with the help of the k-12 ones. This is an outcome of the project W-Shake, a Parents-in-Science Initiative to promote the study of seismology and related subjects. This project, supported by the Portuguese "Ciência Viva" program, results from a direct cooperation between the parents association, science school-teachers and the seismology research group at Instituto Dom Luíz.

  13. Tertiary treatment for wastewater reuse based on the Daphnia magna filtration - comparison with conventional tertiary treatments.

    PubMed

    Serra, Teresa; Colomer, Jordi; Pau, Conxi; Marín, Maribel; Sala, Lluís

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary treatments are required to permit safe reuse of wastewater. The performance of a new biological tertiary treatment based on the filtration by a population of Daphnia magna was studied and compared with the performance of other conventional tertiary treatments such as coagulation-flocculation, settling tank, disc filtration, sand filtering and ultraviolet (UV) light. The analysis was based on the efficiency in the particle removal and Escherichia coli inactivation. The Daphnia magna treatment reduced the concentration of particles with diameters below 30 ?m by 35%, depending on abiotic parameters such as water temperature and the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The Daphnia magna filtration increased with water temperature for water temperatures >20 °C, while it remained constant for water temperatures <20 °C. Lower HRTs induced the growth of the Daphnia magna population, maintaining the same water quality. Furthermore, the Daphnia magna treatment inactivated E. coli in 1.2 log units. This inactivation was six times larger than that obtained by the conventional macrofiltration systems analyzed, although lower than the inactivation attained by UV light, which ranged between 1.5 and 4 log units. PMID:25116502

  14. PAGES News Vol.17 No 2 June 2009 ScienceHighlights:PaleoSeaLevel

    E-print Network

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    magnitude of sea level rise by the end of the 21st century (e.g., 0.26-0.59 m (IPCC, 2007) and 0.5-1.4 m in the IPCC Fourth Assess- ment Report (IPCC, 2007), and the model of Rahmstorf (2007) includes neither ice

  15. Glass science tutorial: Lecture No. 8, introduction cementitious systems for Low-Level Waste immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.F.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.; Mason, T.O.; Brough, A.

    1995-07-01

    This report presents details about cementitious systems for low-level waste immobilization. Topics discussed include: composition and properties of portland cement; hydration properties; microstructure of concrete; pozzolans; slags; zeolites; transport properties; and geological aspects of long-term durability of concrete.

  16. Diagnostic Assessment of Preparedness of Level One Sports Science Students for Biomechanics Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Sharon J.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the use of a diagnostic test to assess the preparedness of level one students for a sports biomechanics module. During their first week at university, a cohort of 108 students completed a diagnostic test at the end of their first lecture in sports biomechanics, with no prior notice. Upon…

  17. A Computer Network Protocol at the Application Level for Libraries and Other Information Science Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines the essential details of a computer network protocol at the application level for interchanging information between host computers in the community of libraries, book publishers, and bibliographic service centers. Control header structure is detailed, and a skeleton outline is given for 20 header field types and 15 control message types.…

  18. Wildfires and animal extinctions at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Robert K.

    2010-06-01

    Persuasive models of the ejection of material at high velocities from the Chicxulub asteroid impact marking the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary have led to the conclusion that upon return, that material, heated in passage through the upper atmosphere, generated a high level of infrared energy density over the Earth's surface. That radiant energy has been considered to be a direct source of universal wildfires, which were presumed to be a major cause of plant and animal species extinctions. The extinction of many animal species, especially the dinosaurs, has also been attributed to the immediate lethal effects of the radiation. I find that the absorption of the radiation by the atmosphere, by cloud formations, and by ejecta drifting in the lower atmosphere reduced the radiation at the surface to a level that cannot be expected to have generated universal fires. Although the reduced radiation will have likely caused severe injuries to many animals, such insults alone seem unlikely to have generated the overall species extinctions that have been deduced.

  19. A Comparative Study of the Quality of Teaching Learning Process at Post Graduate Level in the Faculty of Science and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahzadi, Uzma; Shaheen, Gulnaz; Shah, Ashfaque Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    The study was intended to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of Sargodha. This study was descriptive and quantitative in nature. The objectives of the study were to compare the quality of teaching learning process in the faculty of social science and science at University of…

  20. The Science and Communication Needed to Help Communities Plan for Sea Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2013-08-01

    From the shores of Bangladesh to the bayous of Louisiana, sea level rise will affect communities across the globe and will likely be exacerbated by other threats such as severe weather. Local and national decision makers face a myriad of challenges as they prepare for or adapt to changing coastal conditions while trying to manage increasing population and development along the coasts. In the United States alone, approximately 39% of the population lives in a coastal county.

  1. The Policy Determinants of Investment in Tertiary Education. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 576

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Joaquim Oliveira; Boarini, Romina; Strauss, Hubert; de la Maisonneuve, Christine; Saadi, Clarice

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses how policies and institutions affect private returns to invest in tertiary human capital, the ability of individuals to finance this investment and the institutional characteristics of tertiary education systems. Focusing on core tertiary education services, the paper presents new measures of private returns to tertiary

  2. Taking Social Media Science Myth Debunking to a Presidential Level (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuccitelli, D. A.; Cook, J.

    2013-12-01

    Climate science myths are often effective and pervasive because they are "sticky" - simple, concrete, and seemingly credible. For example, "there's no consensus" and "global warming stopped in 1998" are appealing myths because they present a simple alternative narrative to the threat posed by anthropogenic global warming. In order to effectively debunk these types of myths, sticky ideas must be replaced with even stickier and accurate alternative explanations. The seeming limitations of social media may actually be considered an asset, requiring that our messaging be simple, brief, and sticky. Here some examples of successful debunkings of scientific myths using social media are presented and examined. The 'no consensus' myth was effectively debunked through simple messaging of Cook et al. (2013), which found 97% consensus among papers taking a position in the peer-reviewed literature on human-caused global warming. This simple and sticky '97% consensus' has been communicated widely through social media, including twice by President Obama's Twitter account. The 'global warming stopped' myth has been frequently and effectively debunked by a simple animated graphic titled 'The Escalator', which has been used on the floor of the US Senate and in a PBS documentary. Here we examine how these debunkings via social media were successful, and how scientists can replicate their success. President Obama tweet of the 97% consensus message The Escalator

  3. System-Level Verification of Science Instruments Prior to Installation at TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbets, Dennis; Lystrup, Makenzie

    2014-07-01

    Science instruments for TMT will share many similarities with those built for large space observatories such as HST and JWST. They will be physically large, scientifically sophisticated and technologically complex. They will represent very significant investments of time and money by PI-led teams with common scientific interests, but from many academic institutions, industry partners and even nations. These teams will verify the basic functionality and performance of their instruments, but may not each have facilities to test the many complex interfaces to and interactions with the observatory. Once installed on the telescope and commissioned, the instruments will be expected to function for many years with very limited opportunities for servicing. These and other considerations argue that a common facility that provides reasonably high fidelity simulation of the TMT mechanical and optical environments, AO system interfaces, operations and data management systems and other critical functions would enable a confidence-building final step in the Integration and Test process. This poster illustrates how high-quality Ground Support Equipment was used to prepare seven instruments for Hubble, develop and validate wave-front sensing and control algorithms for James Webb, simulate the optical characteristics of JWST, conduct vibration and modal surveys, and produce performance data that were compared with predictions of integrated models. Analogous capabilities could be developed to support TMT, ensuring delivery of fully qualified instruments to the observatory.

  4. A Comparison of the Readability of Community College Social Science Textbooks with Student Reading Levels and the Effect on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertalan, John J.

    A determination of the reading grade placement levels (GPLs) and final course grades of community college students in relationship to the GPLs of their assigned social science textbooks was the focus of a study at Citrus Community College (Florida). Dale-Chall readability placement levels were calculated for eight textbooks used in 19 classes of…

  5. "G.P.S Matrices" programme: A method to improve the mastery level of social science students in matrices operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ken Voon

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this action research was to increase the mastery level of Form Five Social Science students in Tawau II National Secondary School in the operations of addition, subtraction and multiplication of matrices in Mathematics. A total of 30 students were involved. Preliminary findings through the analysis of pre-test results and questionnaire had identified the main problem faced in which the students felt confused with the application of principles of the operations of matrices when performing these operations. Therefore, an action research was conducted using an intervention programme called "G.P.S Matrices" to overcome the problem. This programme was divided into three phases. 'Gift of Matrices' phase aimed at forming matrix teaching aids. The second and third phases were 'Positioning the Elements of Matrices' and 'Strenghtening the Concept of Matrices'. These two phases were aimed at increasing the level of understanding and memory of the students towards the principles of matrix operations. Besides, this third phase was also aimed at creating an interesting learning environment. A comparison between the results of pre-test and post-test had shown a remarkable improvement in students' performances after implementing the programme. In addition, the analysis of interview findings also indicated a positive feedback on the changes in students' attitude, particularly in the aspect of students' understanding level. Moreover, the level of students' memory also increased following the use of the concrete matrix teaching aids created in phase one. Besides, teachers felt encouraging when conducive learning environment was created through students' presentation activity held in third phase. Furthermore, students were voluntarily involved in these student-centred activities. In conclusion, this research findings showed an increase in the mastery level of students in these three matrix operations and thus the objective of the research had been achieved.

  6. [Tertiary crowding in the lower front teeth. Two observations].

    PubMed

    Boersma, H

    1995-03-01

    Tertiary crowding, especially in the lower dentition, is shortly discussed. Two cases are illustrated that show the uncertainty regarding the often stated influence of the third molars in this respect. PMID:11837076

  7. DIRECT SYNTHESIS OF TERTIARY AMINES IN WATER USING MICROWAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct synthesis of tertiary amines is presented that proceeds expeditiously via N-alkylation of amines using alkyl halides in alkaline aqueous medium. This environmentally benign reaction is accelerated upon exposure to microwave irradiation resulting in shortened reaction tim...

  8. A multi-level differential item functioning analysis of trends in international mathematics and science study: Potential sources of gender and minority difference among U.S. eighth graders' science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xiaoyu

    Science is an area where a large achievement gap has been observed between White and minority, and between male and female students. The science minority gap has continued as indicated by the National Assessment of Educational Progress and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Studies (TIMSS). TIMSS also shows a gender gap favoring males emerging at the eighth grade. Both gaps continue to be wider in the number of doctoral degrees and full professorships awarded (NSF, 2008). The current study investigated both minority and gender achievement gaps in science utilizing a multi-level differential item functioning (DIF) methodology (Kamata, 2001) within fully Bayesian framework. All dichotomously coded items from TIMSS 2007 science assessment at eighth grade were analyzed. Both gender DIF and minority DIF were studied. Multi-level models were employed to identify DIF items and sources of DIF at both student and teacher levels. The study found that several student variables were potential sources of achievement gaps. It was also found that gender DIF favoring male students was more noticeable in the content areas of physics and earth science than biology and chemistry. In terms of item type, the majority of these gender DIF items were multiple choice than constructed response items. Female students also performed less well on items requiring visual-spatial ability. Minority students performed significantly worse on physics and earth science items as well. A higher percentage of minority DIF items in earth science and biology were constructed response than multiple choice items, indicating that literacy may be the cause of minority DIF. Three-level model results suggested that some teacher variables may be the cause of DIF variations from teacher to teacher. It is essential for both middle school science teachers and science educators to find instructional methods that work more effectively to improve science achievement of both female and minority students. Physics and earth science are two areas to be improved for both groups. Curriculum and instruction need to enhance female students' learning interests and give them opportunities to improve their visual perception skills. Science instruction should address improving minority students' literacy skills while teaching science.

  9. Freezing-Induced Perturbation of Tertiary Structure of a Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LU; BRAUN, LATOYA JONES; WANG, WEI; RANDOLPH, THEODORE W.; CARPENTER, JOHN F.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of pH and solution additives on freezing-induced perturbations in the tertiary structure of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy. In general, freezing caused perturbations in the tertiary structure of the mAb, which were reversible or irreversible depending on the pH or excipients present in the formulation. Protein aggregation occurred in freeze–thawed samples in which perturbations of the tertiary structure were observed, but the levels of protein aggregates formed were not proportional to the degree of structural perturbation. Protein aggregation also occurred in freeze–thawed samples without obvious structural perturbations, most likely because of freeze concentration of protein and salts, and thus reduced protein colloidal stability. Therefore, freezing-induced protein aggregation may or may not first involve the perturbation of its native structure, followed by the assembly processes to form aggregates. Depending on the solution conditions, either step can be rate limiting. Finally, this study demonstrates the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy as a valuable tool for screening therapeutic protein formulations subjected to freeze–thaw stress. PMID:24832730

  10. Species distribution and susceptibility profile of Candida species in a Brazilian public tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Species identification and antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out on 212 Candida isolates obtained from bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis, from cases attended at a Brazilian public tertiary hospital from January 1998 to January 2005. Findings Candida albicans represented 33% of the isolates, Candida parapsilosis 31.1%, Candida tropicalis 17.9%,Candida glabrata 11.8%, and others species 6.2%. In blood culture, C. parapsilosis was the most frequently encountered species (48%). The resistance levels to the antifungal azoles were relatively low for the several species, except for C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Amphotericin B resistance was observed in 1 isolate of C. parapsilosis. Conclusions The species distribution and antifungal susceptibility herein observed presented several epidemiological features common to other tertiary hospitals in Latin American countries. It also exhibited some peculiarity, such as a very high frequency of C. parapsilosis both in bloodstream infections and dialysis-associated peritonitis. C. albicans also occurred in an important number of case infections, in all evaluated clinical sources. C. glabrata presented a high proportion of resistant isolates. The data emphasize the necessity to carry out the correct species identification accompanied by the susceptibility tests in all tertiary hospitals. PMID:20044935

  11. Impacts of an Inquiry Teaching Method on Earth Science Students' Learning Outcomes and Attitudes at the Secondary School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Song-Ling; Chang, Chun-Yen

    This paper summarizes two companion studies that were designed to investigate the impacts of an inquiry teaching method on Earth science students' achievement and attitudes towards Earth science in secondary schools. Subjects were 557 students (9th grade) enrolled in 14 Earth science classes. Two Earth science units, including topics of astronomy…

  12. Training Master's-Level Graduate Students to Use Inquiry Instruction to Teach Middle-Level and High-School Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilman, Sharon Larimer; Hitt, Austin M.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Through the GK-12 program of the National Science Foundation, graduate student fellows in a coastal marine and wetland studies program were trained to present targeted science concepts to middle- and high-school classes through their own research-based lessons. Initially, they were taught to follow the 5-E learning cycle in lesson plan…

  13. Peripartum hysterectomy in a tertiary hospital in Western Sydney.

    PubMed

    Shamsa, A; Harris, A; Anpalagan, A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to review the incidence, indication, management and complications of peripartum hysterectomy (PH) in a tertiary level hospital over a decade. A retrospective review of all cases of PH performed at Westmead Hospital, Western Sydney, 2003-2012, was undertaken. PH was defined as hysterectomy performed after 20 weeks' gestation or any time after delivery but within 6 weeks' postpartum ( Awan et al. 2011 ). There were 56 cases of peripartum hysterectomy of 46,177 births, a rate of 1.22 per 1,000 births. The most common indication for PH was morbid adherence of the placenta (58.2%) followed by uterine atony. Having a history of both caesarean section and placenta praevia is highly associated with a morbidly adherent placenta in the index pregnancy (p = 0.002). The most common complication was coagulopathy followed by febrile illness and urinary tract injury. Our data showed previous caesarean section and placenta praevia to be associated with abnormal placentation, the leading indication for PH. Since there is an association between a planned caesarean hysterectomy and reduced amount of estimated blood loss and blood transfused, the knowledge of placentation and adequate preoperative planning and consideration for elective hysterectomy could be beneficial. The morbidity associated with PH is considerable. PMID:25264917

  14. Carbonate reservoirs at the Mesozoic-Tertiary unconformity, northeast Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.

    1988-08-01

    Carbonates at the Mesozoic-Tertiary unconformity in northeast Spain show four types/stages of evolution of reservoir properties: karstification, coastal reworking, Miocene organic buildups, and Pliocene burial. Subaerial exposure during Paleogene-early Miocene rifting developed a complex fracture-controlled paleokrast facies, showing up to three evolution levels with well-developed cavern and vuggy porosity (1). During the Miocene, the paleokrast profile was intensively reworked into a variety of breccias, conglomerates, and calcarenites in both alluvial and coastal depositional settings. Gravitational displacement of largely karstified hillsides was common. These reworked paleokarst deposits (2) present excellent reservoir properties. The Miocene formations onlap the karstified Mesozoic and the reworked facies; these formations include coral reefs and foramalgal buildups (3) with primary and secondary porosity. Finally, a late fracture event (attributed to the Pliocene) affected the buried and lithified paleokarst deposits and lower-middle Miocene formations (4). This fracture event is associated with vuggy corrosion, dolomitization, ore mineralization, and leaching of Mesozoic to middle Miocene carbonates. Several horizons with chalky microporosity are also tentatively related to this Pliocene event. These four phases of reservoir evolution are also recognized in northern Morocco and southern Italy.

  15. Epidemiologic study of ankle fractures in a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Matsumura, Bruno Akio Rodrigues; Dotta, Thiago De Angelis Guerra; Pontin, Pedro Augusto; dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the epidemiology of ankle fractures surgically treated at the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Medical records of patients admitted with foot and ankle fractures between 2006 and 2011 were revised. Seventy three ankle fractures that underwent surgical treatment were identified. The parameters analyzed included age, gender, injured side, AO and Gustilo & Anderson classification, associated injuries, exposure, need to urgent treatment, time to definitive treatment and early post-operative complications. Study design: retrospective epidemiological study. RESULTS: Male gender was predominant among subjects and the mean age was 27.5 years old. Thirty nine fractures resulted from traffic accidents and type B fracture according to AO classification was the most common. Twenty one were open fractures and 22 patients had associated injuries. The average time to definitive treatment was 6.5 days. Early post-operative complications were found in 21.3% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Ankle fractures treated in a tertiary hospital of a large city in Brazil affect young people victims of high-energy accidents and present significant rates of associated injuries and post-operative complications. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series. PMID:24868187

  16. Methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) misclassified.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, M A

    2001-05-01

    Methyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (MTBE) was introduced into motor fuels in 1992 to reduce carbon monoxide automotive emissions in areas where the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for CO were exceeded. At a meeting of the National Toxicology Program's Board of Scientific Counselors (2-3 December 1998), data were presented showing that exposure to MTBE caused increased incidence of liver tumors, renal adenomas, carcinomas and interstitial cell adenomas of the testes in male, and lymphomas and leukemia in female CD1 mice [National Toxicology Program, 1998]. Despite this evidence, the NTP Board defeated a motion to list MTBE as "Reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" by a vote of 6 to 5. This decision directly contravenes rules and procedures previously established by NTP for assessing carcinogenicity of chemical compounds. Good public health policy dictates that the NTP Board conduct another review of MTBE with proper consideration of the criteria that have been established for listing agents as carcinogens. Millions of Americans who are exposed daily to this chemical deserve an unbiased evaluation of carcinogenic agents being introduced into the environment. PMID:11333412

  17. The Tertiary tectonics of the southeast Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Honza, Eiichi )

    1990-06-01

    Most of the terranes in eastern Asia appear to be relics of arcs, oceanic islands, and subduction complexes. They have collided and accreted from the inner (northwestern) side in China since the Silurian. They are characterized by three stages of Pacific and Tethys evolution. The first collision is related to the Pacific domain in the Permian in which these movements are not clearly reconstructed. The second collision is related to the closure of the Paleo-Tethys in the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic. The third is related to closure of the Neo-Tethys and the subsequent collision of India in the Tertiary. Southeast Asia is in one of the most enigmatic plate boundaries in the world, forming many small plates, collisions, and consumptions. This complication is also suggested to be a result of the northward movement of Australia since its break-up from Gondwanaland in the Cretaceous. During their evolution, most of them have associated with arcs. These arcs also have formed superimpositions on the older exotic blocks of terranes. They are reconstructed on the base of the regular duration on the formation of arcs and backarc basins, which can be seen in the Western Pacific Arc Chain.

  18. Modeling complex RNA tertiary folds with Rosetta.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Clarence Yu; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Das, Rhiju

    2015-01-01

    Reliable modeling of RNA tertiary structures is key to both understanding these structures' roles in complex biological machines and to eventually facilitating their design for molecular computing and robotics. In recent years, a concerted effort to improve computational prediction of RNA structure through the RNA-Puzzles blind prediction trials has accelerated advances in the field. Among other approaches, the versatile and expanding Rosetta molecular modeling software now permits modeling of RNAs in the 100-300 nucleotide size range at consistent subhelical (~1 nm) resolution. Our laboratory's current state-of-the-art methods for RNAs in this size range involve Fragment Assembly of RNA with Full-Atom Refinement (FARFAR), which optimizes RNA conformations in the context of a physically realistic energy function, as well as hybrid techniques that leverage experimental data to inform computational modeling. In this chapter, we give a practical guide to our current workflow for modeling RNA three-dimensional structures using FARFAR, including strategies for using data from multidimensional chemical mapping experiments to focus sampling and select accurate conformations. PMID:25726460

  19. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A.

    1989-04-04

    A method is described for flooding of a subterranean petroleum bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery, comprising the steps of providing at least one production well having at least one inlet within the subterranean petroleum bearing formation, and at least one injection well having at least one outlet within the subterranean petroleum bearing formation, injecting into the petroleum bearing formation through the injection well, a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution having a pH in the range of from about 8.25 to about 9.25 comprising from about 0.25 to about 5 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate, from about 0.05 to about 1.0 weight percent of petroleum recovery surfactant, and from about 1 to about 20 weight percent of sodium chloride, based on the total weight of the aqueous flooding solution, withdrawing through at least one inlet of the production wells, an oil and water mixture comprising petroleum from the subterranean petroleum bearing formation and at least a portion of the low alkaline pH sodium bicarbonate aqueous flooding solution, and separating the oil from the aqueous oil and water mixture.

  20. Is It Possible to Teach Music Composition Today? A Search for the Challenges of Teaching Music Composition to Student Composers in a Tertiary Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mateos-Moreno, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Our aim is to identify the challenges of teaching music composition to today's students of composition at a tertiary or professional level. We undertake this by two different approaches: on one level, by establishing a context through reviewing literature on the teaching practices of three renowned teachers from the twentieth century; on a second…

  1. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  2. Use of tactual materials on the achievement of content specific vocabulary and terminology acquisition within an intermediate level science curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Brian H.

    In this quasi-experimental study, the researcher investigated the effectiveness of three tactual strategies and one non-tactual strategy of content specific vocabulary acquisition. Flash cards, task cards, and learning wheels served as the tactual strategies, and vocabulary review sheets served as a non-tactual strategy. The sample (n=85) consisted of all middle school students in a small high performing middle school located in the northern suburbs of New York City. All of the vocabulary words and terms came from the New York State Intermediate Level Science Core Curriculum. Pre-tests and post-tests were used to collect the data. A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted on the gain scores from each of the treatments. Multiple paired sample t-tests were conducted to analyze the results. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine if there was a variance between the academic achievement levels of the students, gender, and grade level for each of the treatments. All of the treatments significantly improved the science achievement of the students, but significance was found between them. Significance was found between the achievement groups with the above average students attaining a higher mean on the pre-test and post-test for each treatment, whereas the below average students had the lowest mean on both assessments. The sixth grade students showed significant improvement over the seventh grade students while using the flash cards (p=.004) and learning wheel (p=.007). During the learning wheel treatment, the males scored significantly better (p=.021) than the females on the pre-test and post-test. During the worksheet treatment, significance (p=.034) was found between gender and achievement group. The below average male students had the greatest gain from the pre-test to the post-test, but the post-test mean was still the lowest of the groups. Limitations, implications for future research and current practice are discussed. Key words are: flash cards, task cards, learning wheel, tactual strategy, vocabulary acquisition.

  3. Creating Infrastructure Resilience from Information Chaos: The City and County of San Francisco's Approach to Sea Level Rise Science and Adaptation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, D. H.; Pfeffer, W. T.; May, K.; Mote, P.; Cayan, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    During one 17 month period ending October 2013, three major reports on sea level rise from three highly respected science providers produced three differing, in some cases wildly divergent, estimates of sea level rise through the year 2100. These reports, by the National Research Council, the IPCC, and the National Climate Assessment, collectively flummoxed the lay reader seeking direction on sea level rise projections to incorporate into adaptation planning. Guidance documents soon emerged from state entities, including regulatory agencies, which caused further confusion. The City and County of San Francisco, surrounded by water on three sides, began developing City-wide sea level rise guidance in 2013. A Sea Level Rise Committee featuring representatives of key infrastructure managers met over a nine month period, and their work included an in-depth review of the science of sea level rise. To convert divergent scientific reports into "actionable science" required not only a close reading of each but extensive expert elicitation to tease out the meaning behind each of the numbers and the associated uncertainties. In the end, sufficient consistency between the differing projections, fortified by political exigencies, allowed a "scientific consensus" with actionable science value for the City to surface. The resulting document, "Guidance for Incorporating Sea Level Rise into Capital Planning in San Francisco," begins by providing a scientific underpinning for planning, guidelines for incorporating uncertainty - particularly for accommodating multiple projections for any particular time slice - and outlines a four step process for assessment and adaptation. It also relies on new state-of-the-art inundation maps produced as part of the SFPUC's capital improvement program. Together, the Guidance and associated tools provide a road map for successful assessment and adaptation to sea level rise. We will also draw lessons from the experience that may be of value to science leaders seeking to make contributions in the decision making domain.

  4. The City and County of San Francisco's Approach to Sea Level Rise Science and Adaptation Planning: Creating Infrastructure Resilience from Information Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, D. H.; Pfeffer, W. T.; May, K.; Mote, P.; Cayan, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    During one 17 month period ending October 2013, three major reports on sea level rise from three highly respected science providers produced three differing, in some cases wildly divergent, estimates of sea level rise through the year 2100. These reports, by the National Research Council, the IPCC, and the National Climate Assessment, collectively flummoxed the lay reader seeking direction on sea level rise projections to incorporate into adaptation planning. Guidance documents soon emerged from state entities, including regulatory agencies, which caused further confusion. The City and County of San Francisco, surrounded by water on three sides, began developing City-wide sea level rise guidance in 2013. A Sea Level Rise Committee featuring representatives of key infrastructure managers met over a nine month period, and their work included an in-depth review of the science of sea level rise. To convert divergent scientific reports into "actionable science" required not only a close reading of each but extensive expert elicitation to tease out the meaning behind each of the numbers and the associated uncertainties. In the end, sufficient consistency between the differing projections, fortified by political exigencies, allowed a "scientific consensus" with actionable science value for the City to surface. The resulting document, "Guidance for Incorporating Sea Level Rise into Capital Planning in San Francisco," begins by providing a scientific underpinning for planning, guidelines for incorporating uncertainty - particularly for accommodating multiple projections for any particular time slice - and outlines a four step process for assessment and adaptation. It also relies on new state-of-the-art inundation maps produced as part of the SFPUC's capital improvement program. Together, the Guidance and associated tools provide a road map for successful assessment and adaptation to sea level rise. We will also draw lessons from the experience that may be of value to science leaders seeking to make contributions in the decision making domain.

  5. Planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy and faunal turnover events during the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary along the Red Sea Coast, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obaidalla, N. A.

    2000-11-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal assemblages from the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary sedimentary sequence in Quseir (Hammadat section), Safaga (Wasif section) and Esh El-Mellaha (Esh El-Mellaha section) areas along the Red Sea Coast, provide a database for biostratigraphical subdivisions and marking of faunal changes. Ten planktonic foraminiferal zones were found. There are, from base to top, the Late Cretaceous Globotruncana ægyptiaca and Gansserina gansseri Zones and the Early Tertiary Parasubbotina pseudobulloides, Praemurica trinidadensis, P. uncinata, Morozovella angulata, Igorina pusilla, Globanomalina pseudomenardii, Morozovella velascoensis and M. edgari zones. Two intervals of non-deposition of sediments (hiatuses) in the study areas are recorded, indicating tectonic events. The first hiatus occurred all over the study areas near the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. The second hiatus is restricted to the Late Palæocene of the Safaga area. Two global planktonic foraminiferal faunal turnover events are identified, reflecting major palæoceanographic changes. The faunal turnover event I occurred near the M. angulata/I. pusilla boundary near the Palæocene/Eocene boundary. These turnovers are characterised by the appearance and disappearance of species and changes in relative abundance, diversity and richness of species. Oscillation in the mean sea level in the study areas during the Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary may be related to a true eustatic change in addition to the evidence for local tectonic control.

  6. Atoms and Molecules. 'O' Level. Teacher's Guide. Unit 2. ZIM-SCI, Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project. Year 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandizha, George

    The Zimbabwe Secondary School Science Project (ZIM-SCI) developed student study guides, corresponding teaching guides, and science kits for a low-cost science course which could be taught during the third year of secondary school without the aid of qualified teachers and conventional laboratories. This teaching guide, designed to be used in…

  7. Considerations and Recommendations for Implementing a Dual-Enrollment Program: Bridging the Gap between High School and College Level Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukes, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Dual-enrollment (DE) science courses offer a way to strengthen the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics pipeline between high school and college. These courses offer high school students the opportunity to experience college science in a more supported environment, allowing them to adjust to the different academic and social demands…

  8. High School Students Learning University Level Computer Science on the Web: A Case Study of the "DASK"-Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandell, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Computer science is becoming increasingly important in our society. Meta skills, such as problem solving and logical and algorithmic thinking, are emphasized in every field, not only in the natural sciences. Still, largely due to gaps in tuition, common misunderstandings exist about the true nature of computer science. These are especially…

  9. A Delphi study: Practitioners' perceptions of how the science curriculum is differentiated for academically gifted students at the middle school level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Jean Mary

    The purpose of this study was to identify, analyze, and compare the perceptions of selected district science educators and teachers of middle school science students regarding the following issues: (1) Current methods of differentiating science instruction for gifted middle school students. (2) Strengths of the current methods of differentiating science instruction for gifted middle school students. (3) Weaknesses of the current methods of differentiating science instruction for gifted middle school students. (4) The types of training/experience needed to prepare teachers to effectively differentiate science instruction for gifted middle school students. (5) The steps need to develop an effective differentiated science program at the middle school level. (6) Trends for the future development of differentiated science programs at the middle school level. The panel of educators was identified using the Delphi technique and asked to participate in the study by responding to the research questions. The responses to the first round were condensed into two lists of discrete statements, and in the second round, each group of panelists was asked to rank each statement on a Likert scale. A third round was sent to each group of panel members showing the median and interquartile ranges of the second round. Panelists could adjust their responses based on the results of the second round. The analysis of the data was computed using the computer program Statistics Package for the Social Sciences. Based on the data obtained, the following results and conclusions were determined. The coordinators and the teachers both considered training of teachers, strategies for differentiation, and future trends to be the most important considerations. The areas with the most differences were those dealing with the current methods of differentiating science instruction at the middle school level. There were several limitations identified in this study. Among them were the makeup of the sample of panelists and different definitions of the same term(s). If we are to address the needs of middle school students who are academically gifted in science, teachers and coordinators need to communicate more about expectations in the classroom and what is really happening.

  10. High level science products from deep ACS and WFC3/IR imaging over the CDF-S/GOODS-S region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Garth

    2013-10-01

    The CDF-S, with its extensive datasets that include the well-known HUDF, GOODS and CANDELS fields, is a remarkable resource for studying distant galaxies. CDF-S is a unique region in the sky. An astonishing 6 Msec of Hubble data {nearly 2600 orbits of WFC3 and ACS data alone}, 6 Msec of Spitzer IRAC images, and 4 Msec of Chandra data, plus ground-based spectra, imaging and, now, ALMA observations, make this one of Hubble's key legacy areas. Remarkably, while the major areas, HUDF, GOODS and CANDELS are available as high-level data products, over 40% { 1000 orbits} of HST data are unavailable to the community as high-level science products and catalogs in MAST. This includes several deep fields, including the parallel field HUDF09-2 which reaches as deep in ACS { 400 orbits} as the HUDF. We propose to use our extensive experience processing and delivering HST ACS and WFC3/IR datasets to STScI MAST to now deliver a complete processed and aligned dataset of all deep fields and the deeper, but as-yet-unused, SNe follow-up and parallel datasets across the CDF-S. The same will be done for the much smaller but similar dataset on the HDF-N region. These data products will add substantially to our understanding of the build up of galaxies to z 6 in the first Gyr during reionization, and their impact on reionization, the development of galaxies over the subsequent Gyr to to the peak of the star formation rate in the universe around 2-3 Gyr after the Big Bang at z 2-3, and the transition of early star-forming galaxies to the full splendor of the Hubble sequence since z 2. These Hubble Legacy Field datasets will be of great value as the Frontier Fields are used by the community.

  11. Curriculum Policy of the Graduate School of Maritime Sciences The Graduate School of Maritime Sciences at Kobe University will provide high-level

    E-print Network

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    , implementation, evaluation, and management of logistics systems. These systems are primarily based on maritime Logistics Sciences, and Marine Engineering. The Division of Maritime Management Sciences takes charge of education and research regarding the management and construction of maritime system to guarantee safety

  12. Recommended Standards for the Preparation and Certification of Teachers of Science at the Elementary and Middle/Junior High School Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    This document highlights areas of concern and proposes selected standards which, if implemented, could result in improved teacher preparation in the sciences and, ultimately, in improved learning experiences for children. These standards are intended to provide guidelines to institutions and agencies desiring to achieve minimal levels of quality…

  13. Prospective Turkish Elementary Science Teachers' Knowledge Level about the Greenhouse Effect and Their Views on Environmental Education in University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisoglu, Mustafa; Gürbüz, Hasan; Erkol, Mehmet; Akar, Muhammed Said; Akilli, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental factor of environmental education is teachers who are well-informed about environmental issues. This research aimed to determine prospective Turkish elementary science teachers' knowledge level about causes, consequences and reducing of the greenhouse effect and to investigate the effect of gender, information source and…

  14. Impediments To Change: An Application of Force-Field Analysis to Leader Master Teacher Training in an Elementary Level Science Systemic Reform Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Sharon H.

    2000-01-01

    Identifies Leader Master Teachers' (LMTs) perceptions of restraining and driving forces in the implementation of an elementary-level science systemic reform initiative. A group process technique utilizing Lewin's force-field analysis concept provided the framework for professional development activities for 124 LMTs. Categories of supporting and…

  15. A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) versus Class Room Lecture (RL) for Computer Science at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kausar, Tayyaba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with class room lecture and computer assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypothesis of…

  16. The equity imperative in tertiary education: Promoting fairness and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-06-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population membership or disabilities as well as academic and financial barriers are still standing in their way. The authors of this article propose a conceptual framework to analyse equity issues in tertiary education and document the scope, significance and consequences of disparities in tertiary education opportunities. They throw some light on the main determinants of these inequalities and offer suggestions about effective equity promotion policies directed towards widening participation and improving the chances of success of underprivileged youths in order to create societies which uphold humanistic values.

  17. Three-dimensional tertiary structure of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Sussman, J. L.; Suddath, F. L.; Quigley, G. J.; Mcpherson, A.; Wang, A. H. J.; Seeman, N. C.; Rich, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an analysis and interpretation of a 3-A electron density map of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA. Some earlier detailed assignments of nucleotide residues to electron density peaks are found to be in error, even though the overall tracing of the backbone conformation of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA was generally correct. A new, more comprehensive interpretation is made which makes it possible to define the tertiary interactions in the molecule. The new interpretation makes it possible to visualize a number of tertiary interactions which not only explain the structural role of most of the bases which are constant in transfer RNAs, but also makes it possible to understand in a direct and simple fashion the chemical modification data on transfer RNA. In addition, this pattern of tertiary interactions provides a basis for understanding the general three-dimensional folding of all transfer RNA molecules.

  18. Transforming Spatial Reasoning Skills in the Upper-Level Undergraduate Geoscience Classroom Through Curricular Materials Informed by Cognitive Science Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Dutrow, B. L.; Goodwin, L. B.; Hickson, T. A.; Tikoff, B.; Atit, K.; Gagnier, K. M.; Resnick, I.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial visualization is an essential skill in the STEM disciplines, including the geosciences. Undergraduate students, including geoscience majors in upper-level courses, bring a wide range of spatial skill levels to the classroom. Students with weak spatial skills may be unable to understand fundamental concepts and to solve geological problems with a spatial component. However, spatial thinking skills are malleable. As a group of geoscience faculty members and cognitive psychologists, we have developed a set of curricular materials for Mineralogy, Sedimentology & Stratigraphy, and Structural Geology courses. These materials are designed to improve students' spatial skills, and in particular to improve students' abilities to reason about spatially complex 3D geological concepts and problems. Teaching spatial thinking in the context of discipline-based exercises has the potential to transform undergraduate STEM education by removing one significant barrier to success in the STEM disciplines. The curricular materials we have developed are based on several promising teaching strategies that have emerged from cognitive science research on spatial thinking. These strategies include predictive sketching, making visual comparisons, gesturing, and the use of analogy. We have conducted a three-year study of the efficacy of these materials in strengthening the spatial skills of students in upper-level geoscience courses at three universities. Our methodology relies on a pre- and post-test study design, with several tests of spatial thinking skills administered at the beginning and end of each semester. In 2011-2012, we used a "business as usual" approach to gather baseline data, measuring how much students' spatial thinking skills improved in response to the existing curricula. In the two subsequent years we have incorporated our new curricular materials, which can be found on the project website: http://serc.carleton.edu/spatialworkbook/activities.html Structural Geology students exposed to the new curricular materials are better able to solve some spatially challenging structural geological problems than students from the baseline year. We are continuing to analyze data from the Mineralogy and Sedimentology/Stratigraphy courses and will have completed the analysis by AGU.

  19. Medical professionalism among clinical physicians in two tertiary hospitals, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Chunmei; Fu, Xinqiao

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate medical professional attitudes and behaviors in China and explore the influencing factors with a focus on hospital internal management, we developed a 13-item professional attitudes and 11-item behaviors inventory. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to 390 physicians mainly in four specialties in two tertiary Chinese hospitals in 2011. 306 completed questionnaires were collected. More than 90% of respondents agreed with at least nine of the 13 specific statements about principles. However, responses on behaviors were not necessarily consistent with those on attitudes. 80.3% of respondents reported that they usually or always participated in quality improvement activities and 48.2% reported that they usually or always participated in peer evaluations of colleagues' quality of care. Some 47.8% had encountered incompetent colleagues and 17.7% had encountered significant medical errors caused by colleagues. Among those who had encountered incompetence or significant medical errors, almost two thirds had never reported their concerns to the hospital or other relevant authorities. Half of the physicians did not obtain enough continuing medical education credits. Physicians' professional reported behaviors were influenced by their personal and professional characteristics, professional attitudes, and assessment of hospital internal management constitutions. For example, participation in decision-making had a significant role in professional reported behaviors of protecting patient confidentiality, improving quality of care, and self-regulation, with those sometimes or often participating in decision-making indicating higher levels of reported behaviors than those who seldom participated (odds ratios: 1.84; 4.31, 2.44; 3.31). The results showed Chinese physicians demonstrated positive attitudes to professionalism principles. However, their reported behaviors were at times inconsistent with their attitudes, especially in the areas of competence, quality improvement, and self-regulation. One of effective strategies to facilitate Chinese physicians' professionalism may be to improving hospital management. PMID:23102754

  20. Psychiatric Morbidity in Infertility Patients in a Tertiary Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pankaj; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gandhi, Raghu; Kapoor, Rohit; Sachdeva, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Context Infertility is regarded as a trigger for psychological morbidity. Infertile couples often suffer from anxiety, depression and lack of self confidence. Aims To study the demographic factors associated with infertility in a tertiary care setup and to determine the level of anxiety and depression associated with it by using standardized scales. The study protocol also included studying the various coping strategies employed by these patient groups. Settings and Design Case control study. Materials and Methods A prestructured questionnaire based study conducted for a span of 6 months. The study population included the patients attending the infertility and the family planning outpatient department. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Becks Depression Inventory (BDI). Brief COPE Inventory was applied to look for the various coping measures that are employed by the anxious and depressed patients. Statistical Analysis Data analysis was done using SPSS ver20. Results A total of 280 study subjects were included in the study; which included 140 women from the infertility clinic and 140 from the family planning OPD. A total of 56.4% (79/140) of the females were found to be suffering from depression and 68.9% (96/140) of the females were found to be suffering from anxiety and depression both. Seven risk factors were found to be significant for depression based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale and 6 risk factors were found to be significant based on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The most common coping method employed by depressed women was venting 72.2% (57/79) followed by behavioural disengagement 70.9% (56/79); whereas the most important coping method employed by the anxious and depressed women was behavioural disengagement 71.9% (69/96). Conclusion Anxiety and depression is common among patients suffering from infertility and measures should be taken to alleviate it. PMID:26500988

  1. The global Cretaceous-Tertiary fire: Biomass or fossil carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, Iain; Guenther, Frank

    1988-01-01

    The global soot layer at the K-T boundary indicates a major fire triggered by meteorite impact. However, it is not clear whether the principal fuel was biomass or fossil carbon. Forests are favored by delta value of C-13, which is close to the average for trees, but the total amount of elemental C is approximately 10 percent of the present living carbon, and thus requires very efficient conversion to soot. The PAH was analyzed at Woodside Creek, in the hope of finding a diagnostic molecular marker. A promising candidate is 1-methyl-7-isopropyl phenanthrene (retene,), which is probably derived by low temperature degradation of abietic acid. Unlike other PAH that form by pyrosynthesis at higher temperatures, retene has retained the characteristic side chains of its parent molecule. A total of 11 PAH compounds were identified in the boundary clay. Retene is present in substantial abundance. The identification was confirmed by analysis of a retene standard. Retene is characteristic of the combustion of resinous higher plants. Its formation depends on both temperature and oxygen access, and is apparently highest in oxygen-poor fires. Such fires would also produce soot more efficiently which may explain the high soot abundance. The relatively high level of coronene is not typical of a wood combustion source, however, though it can be produced during high temperature pyrolysis of methane, and presumably other H, C-containing materials. This would require large, hot, low O2 zones, which may occur only in very large fires. The presence of retene indicates that biomass was a significant fuel source for the soot at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. The total amount of elemental C produced requires a greater than 3 percent soot yield, which is higher than typically observed for wildfires. However, retene and presumably coronene imply limited access of O2 and hence high soot yield.

  2. Mainstreaming of Climate Change into the Ghanaian Tertiary Educational System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyarko, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of Climate Change has a far-reaching implication for economies and people living in the fragile Regions of Africa analysts project that by 2020, between 75 million and 250 million people will be exposed various forms of Climate Change Stresses. Education as a key strategy identified under Agenda 21 has been incorporated into the efforts of various educational institutions as a means of mitigating climate change and enhancing sustainability. Climate Change education offers many opportunities and benefits for educators, researchers, learners, and for wider society, but there are also many challenges, which can hinder the successful mainstreaming of climate change education. The study aims at understanding barriers for Climate Change Education in selected tertiary institutions in Ghana. The study was conducted among Geoscience Departments of the 7 main public universities of Ghana. The transcript analysis identified issues that hinders the mainstreaming of Climate Change, these includes existing levels of knowledge and understanding of the concept of climate change, appreciating the threshold concepts, ineffective teaching of Climate Change and some Departments are slow in embracing Climate Change as a discipline. Hence to develop strategies to mainstream climate change education it is important to recognise that increasing the efficiency and delivery of Climate Change education requires greater attention and coordination of activities and updating the educators knowledge and skill's. Various Ministries should be challenged to develop and integrate climate change into education policies. In the design of curriculum, there is a need to integrate Climate Change Education into curricula without compromising already overstretched programmes of study. There is a need to encourage and enhance innovative teaching approaches such as Problem-based learning (PBL) is an approach that challenges students to learn through engagement in a real problem. Institutions and Educator should be encouraged to undertake co-curricula activities and finding ways to practicalize Climate Change education.

  3. A retrospective look at students enrolled in an upper-level horse science class: factors that affect classroom performance.

    PubMed

    Douthit, T L; Bormann, J M; Kouba, J M

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze demographic variables and academic preparation of students to determine how these factors relate to student performance in ASI 521 Horse Science, an upper-level course offered in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry (ASI) at Kansas State University (KSU). Data were collected for 264 students enrolled in the course from 2008 to 2010. Students who took the course in 2008 received greater final percentages than those who took the course in subsequent years (P = 0.0016). Females tended to receive greater percentages than males (P = 0.096). Location of origin of students did not affect percentages earned (P > 0.26). Although class standing (P = 0.35) did not affect the final percentages that students earned, transfer students received lesser final percentages in the course (P = 0.020). If students were majoring in ASI, they fared better than those in other majors (P = 0.0097), but pre-veterinary medicine students performed similarly to non-pre-veterinary students (P = 0.49). Enrollment in the equine certificate program (which requires students to complete 20 credit hours of equine coursework) did not affect percentages earned (P = 0.89) nor did completion of any individual equine class before enrolling in ASI 521 (P > 0.19). Test scores earned on the American College Testing Program standardized test during high school were not reflective of classroom performance (P = 0.51), but KSU grade point average (GPA) was highly predictive (P < 0.0001), regardless of the term for which GPA was calculated. Students in the course took an identical comprehensive test at the beginning and end of the semester, and those test scores were also predictive of final percentage earned in ASI 521 (P ? 0.0002). In general, students with greater GPA performed better in ASI 521, so strategies aimed at improving classroom performance may best be targeted toward students with histories of poor academic performance. PMID:23478829

  4. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz?, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  5. The relationship between the teacher's experience, the teacher's college major, and the teacher's level of education in predicting classroom attitudes in high school science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Jose Manuel

    A review of the literature reveals few research has attempted to demonstrate if a relationship exists between the type of teacher training a science teacher has received and the perceived attitudes of his/her students. Some of the teacher preparation factors examined in this study include the college major chosen by the science teacher, the highest degree earned, the number of years of teaching experience, the type of science course taught, and the grade level taught by the teacher. This study examined how the various factors mentioned, could influence the behaviors which are characteristic of the teacher, and how these behaviors could be reflective in the classroom environment experienced by the students. The instrument used in the study was the Classroom Environment Scale (CES), Real Form. The measured classroom environment was broken down into three separate dimensions, with three components within each dimension in the CES. Multiple Regression statistical analyses examined how components of the teachers' education influenced the perceived dimensions of the classroom environment from the students. The study occurred in Miami-Dade County Florida, with a predominantly urban high school student population. There were 40 secondary science teachers involved, each with an average of 30 students. The total number of students sampled in the study was 1200. The teachers who participated in the study taught the entire range of secondary science courses offered at this large school district. All teachers were selected by the researcher so that a balance would occur in the sample between teachers who were education major versus science major. Additionally, the researcher selected teachers so that a balance occurred in regards to the different levels of college degrees earned among those involved in the study. Several research questions sought to determine if there was significant difference between the type of the educational background obtained by secondary science teachers and the students' perception of the classroom environment. Other research questions sought to determine if there were significant differences in the students' perceptions of the classroom environment for secondary science teachers who taught biological content, or non-biological content sciences. An additional research question sought to evaluate if the grade level taught would affect the students' perception of the classroom environment. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Promoting Higher Levels of Reflective Writing in Student Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne

    2009-01-01

    This paper traces the development over several years of an initiative involving student journals that was introduced into a tertiary science education course for pre-service teachers to promote enhanced learning of how to teach science. Very soon after introducing the journals into course work the lecturer began engaging in "unplanned" informal…

  7. Using Science Teaching Case Narratives to Evaluate the Level of Acceptance of Scientific Inquiry Teaching in Preservice Elementary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagler, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Education Standards have outlined flexible processes children perform when engaging in scientific inquiry. Cases narratives are a common component of many university science education courses but rarely are they used as a tool to evaluate the preservice teachers within these courses. This article describes the construction of…

  8. The Relationship Between the Retention Level of Orally and Visually Presented Science Material to Selected Fifth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Robert M.

    Two groups of fifth-grade pupils were equated on reading ability, I.Q., science ability, hearing, and eyesight. The groups selected were well above average in I.Q. and reading ability. Four selections, each of 400 to 500 words, from standard fifth-grade elementary science texts were presented by allowing students to read them or by reading them to…

  9. An investigation of communication patterns and strategies between international teaching assistants and undergraduate students in university-level science labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Barbara Elas

    This research project investigates communication between international teaching assistants and their undergraduate students in university-level chemistry labs. During the fall semester, introductory-level chemistry lab sections of three experienced non-native speaking teaching assistants and their undergraduate students were observed. Digital audio and video recordings documented fifteen hours of lab communication, focusing on the activities and interactions in the first hour of the chemistry laboratory sessions. In follow-up one-on-one semi-structured interviews, the participants (undergraduates, teaching assistants, and faculty member) reviewed interactions and responded to a 10-item, 7-point Likert-scaled interview. Interactions were classified into success categories based on participants' opinions. Quantitative and qualitative data from the observations and interviews guided the analysis of the laboratory interactions, which examined patterns of conversational listening. Analysis of laboratory communication reveals that undergraduates initiated nearly two-thirds of laboratory communication, with three-fourths of interactions less than 30 seconds in duration. Issues of gender and topics of interaction activity were also explored. Interview data identified that successful undergraduate-teaching assistant communication in interactive science labs depends on teaching assistant listening comprehension skills to interpret and respond successfully to undergraduate questions. Successful communication in the chemistry lab depended on the coordination of visual and verbal sources of information. Teaching assistant responses that included explanations and elaborations were also seen as positive features in the communicative exchanges. Interaction analysis focusing on the listening comprehension demands placed on international teaching assistants revealed that undergraduate-initiated questions often employ deixis (exophoric reference), requiring teaching assistants to demonstrate skills at disambiguating undergraduate discourse. Interaction analysis reinforced that successful undergraduate-teaching assistant communication depends on the coordination of verbal and visual channels of communication, with the physical objects of the chemistry lab environment playing a pivotal role in expressing information and in mutual understanding. These results have implications for the evaluation of English proficiency and the preparation of non-native speaking teaching assistants by pointing out that teaching assistant listening comprehension skills and the use of contextual artifacts contribute to successful communication and are areas that, to date, have been underrepresented in the research literature on international teaching assistant communication.

  10. Stimulation of pheomelanogenesis in cultured B16 melanoma cells by 4-tertiary butylcatechol.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, T; Halldin, M M; Fukuyama, K; Castagnoli, N; Gellin, G A; Epstein, W L

    1985-10-01

    Intermediates of pheomelanin in tissue cultured B16 melanoma cells were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography, and reduced glutathione (GSH), L-dopa, 2-[(L)-S-cysteinyl]-L-dopa (2-SCD) and 5-[(L)-S-cysteinyl]-L-dopa (5-SCD) were quantified. The effects of 4-tertiary butylcatechol (TBC), an antioxidant which causes skin depigmentation, on the levels of the intermediate were then examined. A concentration of 10(-4) M TBC increased the intracellular levels of GSH, 2-SCD and 5-SCD, whereas the L-dopa level was unchanged. The time-course of the increased intermediates corresponded to the elevation of glutathione-metabolizing enzyme activities previously reported by Kawashima et al. [J. invest. Derm. 82, 53 (1984)] in the same cell line exposed to 10(-4) M TBC. The findings establish chemical evidence that TBC stimulates pheomelanogenesis in melanocytes. PMID:4052096

  11. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  14. A New Synthesis of Tertiary Alkyl N-Arylcarbamates from Isocyanates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, William J.; Griffith, James R.

    1978-01-01

    The method involves the dissolution of a small piece of metallic lithium in a small quantity of tertiary alcohol followed by addition to a mixture of the isocyanate and the tertiary alcohol in ether. This should be useful in organic chemistry laboratory courses for the identification of tertiary alcohols. (Author/BB)

  15. 26 CFR 1.193-1 - Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses. 1.193....193-1 Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses. (a) In general. Subject to the limitations and... an amount equal to the qualified tertiary injectant expenses of the taxpayer. This deduction...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  17. A Comparison of Career Success between Graduates of Vocational and Academic Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Geel, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses whether tertiary education of different types, i.e., academic or vocational tertiary education, leads to more or less favorable labor market outcomes. We study the problem for Switzerland, where more than two thirds of the workforce gain vocational secondary degrees and a substantial number go on to a vocational tertiary degree…

  18. 40 CFR 721.10090 - Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tertiary amine salt of glycol... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10090 Tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (generic). (a) Chemical... as tertiary amine salt of glycol succinate (PMN P-01-595) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 26 CFR 1.193-1 - Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses. 1.193... (continued) § 1.193-1 Deduction for tertiary injectant expenses. (a) In general. Subject to the limitations... gross income an amount equal to the qualified tertiary injectant expenses of the taxpayer....

  20. The Private Internal Rates of Return to Tertiary Education: New Estimates for 21 OECD Countries. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 591

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boarini, Romina; Strauss, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    This study provides estimates of the private Internal Rates of Return (IRR) to tertiary education for women and men in 21 OECD countries, for the years between 1991 and 2005. IRR are computed by estimating labour market premia on cross-country comparable individual-level data. Labour market premia are then adjusted for fiscal factors and education…

  1. Why Do Staff of Joint-Use Libraries Sometimes Fail to Integrate? Investigating Cultures and Ethics in a Public-Tertiary Joint-Use Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Philip James

    2010-01-01

    Joint-use libraries have identified staff integration as a problem. Using focus groups, this project investigated the culture, professional ethics, and attitudes of staff in a public-tertiary joint-use library in Auckland, New Zealand. Findings show some difference in organizational cultures, but more variation at the lower level of roles and…

  2. Population-level assessments should be emphasized over community/ecosystem-level assessments. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 1535. [Concerning the impact of power plants on fish populations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, W.

    1980-01-01

    Arguments are presented in favor of emphasizing population-level assessments over community/ecosystem-level assessments. The two approaches are compared on each of four issues: (1) the nature of entrainment/impingement impacts; (2) the ability to forecast reliably for a single fish population as contrasted to the ability to forecast for an aquatic community or ecosystem; (3) practical considerations involving money, manpower, time, and the need to make decisions; and (4) the nature of societal and economic concerns. The conclusion on each of these four issues is that population-level assessments provide the optimal approach for evaluating the effects of entrainment and impingement mortality.

  3. Tertiary architecture of the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron.

    PubMed

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S; Fedorova, Olga; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Wang, Jimin; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2010-01-01

    Group II introns are large ribozymes that act as self-splicing and retrotransposable RNA molecules. They are of great interest because of their potential evolutionary relationship to the eukaryotic spliceosome, their continued influence on the organization of many genomes in bacteria and eukaryotes, and their potential utility as tools for gene therapy and biotechnology. One of the most interesting features of group II introns is their relative lack of nucleobase conservation and covariation, which has long suggested that group II intron structures are stabilized by numerous unusual tertiary interactions and backbone-mediated contacts. Here, we provide a detailed description of the tertiary interaction networks within the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group IIC intron, for which a crystal structure was recently solved to 3.1 A resolution. The structure can be described as a set of several intricately constructed tertiary interaction nodes, each of which contains a core of extended stacking networks and elaborate motifs. Many of these nodes are surrounded by a web of ribose zippers, which appear to further stabilize local structure. As predicted from biochemical and genetic studies, the group II intron provides a wealth of new information on strategies for RNA folding and tertiary structural organization. PMID:19952115

  4. Teaching the Attributes of Venture Teamwork in Tertiary Entrepreneurship Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotey, Bernice

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to demonstrate the characteristics of group work that are required to teach the attributes of real world venture teamwork in tertiary entrepreneurship programmes. Design/methodology/approach: One-tailed Spearman correlation analysis is used to assess the associations between students' grades in four group assessment tasks…

  5. Tertiary Educational Institutions for Teaching, Research and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amoo, Sikiru A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the quality of teaching and research in developing human resources to facilitate the development of tertiary education in the nation. It discusses the challenges and the roles of research in higher education. The author argues that the combination of content and pedagogical knowledge could help to develop human resources for…

  6. Tertiary climatic change in the marginal northeastern Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Addicott, W.O.

    1969-01-01

    Analysis of distributional patterns of shallow-water molluscan faunas of the middle latitudes of the marginal northeastern Pacific Ocean discloses a sharp reversal during the Miocene of the progressive climatic deterioration. A low point in the Tertiary cooling trend during the Oligocene was followed by climatic warming that culminated during the middle Miocene, as illustrated by a series of zoogeographic profiles.

  7. Pedagogical Practices of Reflection in Tertiary Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Wildschut, Liesbeth

    2008-01-01

    The three different perspectives on reflection in education are embedded in the philosophical traditions of pragmatism, critical social theory and Kant. We aimed to describe the pedagogical practices of reflection, and to develop a descriptive model of the practices of reflection in tertiary dance education which can be used by dance educators to…

  8. Tertiary architecture of the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group II intron

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Navtej; Keating, Kevin S.; Fedorova, Olga; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Wang, Jimin; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2010-05-03

    Group II introns are large ribozymes that act as self-splicing and retrotransposable RNA molecules. They are of great interest because of their potential evolutionary relationship to the eukaryotic spliceosome, their continued influence on the organization of many genomes in bacteria and eukaryotes, and their potential utility as tools for gene therapy and biotechnology. One of the most interesting features of group II introns is their relative lack of nucleobase conservation and covariation, which has long suggested that group II intron structures are stabilized by numerous unusual tertiary interactions and backbone-mediated contacts. Here, we provide a detailed description of the tertiary interaction networks within the Oceanobacillus iheyensis group IIC intron, for which a crystal structure was recently solved to 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure can be described as a set of several intricately constructed tertiary interaction nodes, each of which contains a core of extended stacking networks and elaborate motifs. Many of these nodes are surrounded by a web of ribose zippers, which appear to further stabilize local structure. As predicted from biochemical and genetic studies, the group II intron provides a wealth of new information on strategies for RNA folding and tertiary structural organization.

  9. Secret Cults in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria: An Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aluede, Raymond O. A.; Oniyama, Hope O.

    2009-01-01

    Cultism has remained a problem for tertiary institutions in Nigeria and the Larger Nigerian society since the first decade of the existence of university education in Nigeria. It has been worrisome to have children on campuses and several measures had been adopted to curb cultism some of such measures were the expulsion of the cultists caught and…

  10. Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmi, Jamil

    2003-01-01

    The principal set of challenges facing tertiary education today is that set which links it to the construction of knowledge societies. Governments, the private sector, and the World Bank have specific tasks to perform in meeting these challenges. Countries--depending upon whether or not they are transition economies, low-income countries, or small…

  11. TERTIARY INSTITUTIONS SERVICE CENTRE (Incorporated in Western Australia)

    E-print Network

    - Alternative Test for Adult Admission (1980 - 1991) STAT - Special Tertiary Admissions Test (1992 onwards you be using a non-Australian credit card, confirm with your bank that overseas transactions are acceptable before submission. If not acceptable, a bank draft in Australian Dollars would be required. Office

  12. Annual Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

    SciTech Connect

    Allen Fornea; Bruce Cerveny; Travis H. Gillham

    1997-09-30

    The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a tertiary recovery process that is both low cost and economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil by gravity drainage. In reservoirs with pronounced bed dip such as those found in West Hackberry and other Gulf Coast salt dome fields, reservoir performance has shown that gravity drainage recoveries average 80% to 90% of the original oil in place while waterdrive recoveries average 50% to 60% of the original oil in place. The target for tertiary oil recovery in the Double Displacement Process is the incremental oil between the 50% to 60% waterdrive recoveries and the 80% to 90% gravity drainage recoveries. Air injection on the west flank began in November of 1994. Although west flank air injection has increased reservoir pressure by 500 pounds per square inch (psi), production response has not yet occurred. The gas cap on the west flank has not expanded sufficiently to push the oil rim down to the nearest downstructure well.

  13. Competency Discourses: An Analysis of Secondary and Tertiary Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNaughton, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of a sample of assessment tasks used in New Zealand first-year clinical and final-year secondary school Biology and Chemistry National Certificate of Educational Achievement summative assessments was conducted to assess whether similarities and differences existed in secondary and tertiary competency discourses. Findings suggested…

  14. The Equity Imperative in Tertiary Education: Promoting Fairness and Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-01-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population…

  15. The Place of VET in the Tertiary Sector. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beddie, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The utilitarian spirit of Australian education has meant that since the nineteenth century the notion of tertiary education has embraced all post-school learning, delivered in sandstone universities or working men's institutes or on the job. This is not the definition the peak bodies TAFE (Technical and Further Education) Directors Australia (TDA)…

  16. Neoselachian (Chondrichthyes, Elasmobranchii) diversity across the CretaceousTertiary boundary

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    2004 Abstract Fishes are often thought to have passed through mass extinctions, including the Cretaceous­Tertiary (KT) event, relatively unscathed. We show that neoselachian sharks suffered a major extinction at the K/T boundary. Out of 41 families, 7 became extinct (17F12%). The proportional measure

  17. Food Insecurity: Is It an Issue among Tertiary Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallegos, Danielle; Ramsey, Rebecca; Ong, Kai Wen

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient access to food is known to compromise tertiary studies. Students often belong to groups known to have poor food security such as those renting or relying on government payments. The present study administered a cross-sectional survey incorporating the USDA food security survey module (FSSM) to 810 students at a metropolitan university…

  18. Rekindling Warm Embers: Teaching Aboriginal Languages in the Tertiary Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Mary-Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the teaching of Aboriginal languages in the tertiary sector of Australia, looking at the stronger languages taught in the university sector versus those languages under revival that tend to be taught in the TAFE sector. The paper summarises the status of courses offered state by state, and sets the scene with some historical…

  19. Reform and Development of Tertiary Education in Europe. Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moor, R. A.; Vedel, Doyer Georges

    Tertiary education policies in seven Western European and seven Southern European countries are evaluated in two reports. In the first report by R. A. de Moor, attention is focused on France, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. The evaluation and policy recommendations for the…

  20. Adults Studying Pure Mathematics in Adult Tertiary Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennison, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the experiences of a group of adults enrolled in the Pure Mathematics module of the Certificate IV in Adult Tertiary Preparation in 2000 at one of the Institutes of TAFE in Brisbane, Australia. Classroom learning experiences, exposure to technology, and the impact of returning to study on other facets of students' lives were…

  1. Design of a compliant passive magnetic bearing for use in SIRTF's Tertiary Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, David M.; Brereton, Margot; Dill, Harry; Sullivan, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A proposed baseline design for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility includes a Tertiary Mirror Assembly (TMA) which selectively redirects the telescope's converging science beam to each of several instruments. The TMA's mirror rotates on an axis coincident with the beam's axis, and is held steady during observation by a kinematic mount. A bearing has been designed whose compliance causes minimal interference with the precision of the kinematic mount, and which is well suited to the particular requirements of a cryogenic satellite such as SIRTF. The bearing suspends its rotor by taking advantage of the repulsion between a superconductor and a magnet. It potentially eliminates problems associated with mechanical bearings that arise in similar applications, such as lubricant loss or failure, bearing wear, and sensitivity to particulates, and does so without imposing the thermal load of a bearing heater or active magnetic bearing. The bearing shows promise of offering an alternative to ball bearings in cryogenic applications where some compliance is acceptable or advantageous.

  2. Formaldehyde formation from tertiary amine derivatives during chlorination.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Koji; Asami, Mari; Nakai, Takahiko; Ohkubo, Keiko; Echigo, Shinya; Akiba, Michihiro

    2014-08-01

    In May 2012, formaldehyde (FA) precursor contamination in the Tone River Basin led to the suspension of water supply to approximately 360,000 homes, which affected approximately 870,000 people in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. The discharge of industrial effluents containing hexamethylenetetramine (HMT), a tertiary amine and FA precursor, without proper treatment resulted in the formation of FA during chlorination at water purification plants. Tertiary amines are known to be the precursors of aldehydes upon chlorination. In this study, FA formation from 29 separate amine derivatives during chlorination was investigated to determine any other potential causes of this water quality accident. The FA formation yield also included FA formation by the autolysis of the target compounds as well as the chlorination of the autolysis products. The FA molar formation yield of HMT was the highest after 24h of chlorination (440%). Among the various tertiary amine derivatives containing N-methyl groups, tertiary amines and hydrazines were found to be strong FA precursors because the FA molar formation yields per N-methyl group ranged from 25% to 45% (with a mean of 38%) and from 35% to 45% (with a mean of 41%), respectively. Guanidines and sulfamides containing N-methyl groups were also FA precursors but they exhibited lower FA molar formation yields per N-methyl group. The FA molar formation yields of the remaining compounds were <4%. The FA formation yield of HMT was extremely high even on a per weight basis (95 wt.%). The FA weight formation yields of some tertiary amines and hydrazines were greater than 20 wt.%. PMID:24836388

  3. Lithological and hydrological characteristics of the tertiary hydrostratigraphic systems of the general separations area at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K. ); Harris, M.K.; Westbrook, T.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The General Separations Area (GSA) is an approximately 15-square-mile area near the geographic center of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is located in the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain physiographic province of South Carolina on the Aiken Plateau at an elevation of approximately 300 feet above mean sea level. The sedimentary sequence of the GSA comprises unconsolidated sediments ranging in age from Cretaceous to Holocene with isolated zones of consolidated sediments. The Tertiary sediments are composed of sand, silt, clay, and calcareous materials of varying composition. The alpha-numeric hydrostratigraphic nomenclature proposed by Aadland (1990) is used herein. The Tertiary-age lithostratigraphic sequence at the GSA is composed predominantly of terrigenous clastics interspersed with carbonate-rich clastics and limestones. The calcareous lithologies are discontinuous and divided into a lower and upper zone. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Coping with naturally high levels of soil salinity and boron in the westside of central California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the Westside of central California, over 200,000 ha exhibit naturally high levels of salinity and boron (B). The Coast Ranges of the west central California evolved from complex folding and faulting of sedimentary and igneous rocks of Mesozoic and Tertiary age. Cretaceous and Tertiary marine sedi...

  5. Building an electronic book on the Internet: ``CSEP -- an interdisciplinary syllabus for teaching computational science at the graduate level``

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, C.E.; Strayer, M.R.; Umar, V.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Computational Science Education Project was initiated in September 1991, by the Department of Energy to develop a syllabus for teaching interdisciplinary computational science. CSEP has two major activities. The writing and maintenance of an electronic book (e-book) and educational outreach to the computational science communities through presentations at professional society meetings, journal articles, and by training educators. The interdisciplinary nature of the project is intended to contribute to national technological competitiveness by producing a body of graduates with the necessary skills to operate effectively in high performance computing environments. The educational outreach guides and supports instructors in developing computational science courses and curricula at their institutions. The CSEP e-book provides valuable teaching material around which educators have built. The outreach not only introduces new educators to CSEP, but also establishes a synergistic relationship between CSEP authors, reviewers and users.

  6. Structural Biology for A-Level Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philip, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between the structure and function of proteins is an important area in biochemistry. Pupils studying A-level Biology are introduced to the four levels of protein structure (primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary) and how these can be used to describe the progressive folding of a chain of amino acid residues to a final,…

  7. Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management

    SciTech Connect

    David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

    2012-06-30

    Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

  8. Marine Science Teaching at the University Level. Report of the Unesco Workshop on University Curricula. Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science No. 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    A group of marine science education educators from several countries were requested to provide guidelines for the education and training of marine scientists and formulate recommended curricula in the following disciplines: marine biology (including fisheries biology), physical oceanography, and marine geology. Included in the report are: (1)…

  9. Levels of Cognitive Processes in a Non-Formal Science Education Program: Scouting's Science Merit Badges and the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Matthew; Garvey, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Boy Scout merit badge program provides non-formal educational experiences for boys from ages 10-17. This study analyzes the objectives of the twenty-three science related merit badges using the lens of the revised Bloom's taxonomy. Merit badges requirements serve as objectives for this program. The verbs in the requirements were…

  10. The effect of retesting on end-of-semester performance in high school chemistry at three levels of previous science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, George E.

    To determine the effect of retesting on student learning in chemistry, three questions were addressed by means of a 3 × 2 (achievement level X treatment) factorial design: (1) Does retesting affect differently the end-of-semester mastery of course objectives of students who are grouped according to their previous achievement in science? (2) Do students who are given an opportunity to take retests merely delay their studying and perform at a lower level on initial tests than nonretested students? (3) Is the procrastination of retested students (if it exists) affected by their achievement level? The results showed that for one of four units low ability students who were retested demonstrated greater learning gains than low ability students who were not retested, and that procrastination, if it was present, did not have significant effects on student learning at any achievement level. Results were discussed in terms of the students' room for improvement, motivation to improve, and ability to improve.

  11. Science Instructors' Views of Science and Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakas, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how college science faculty who teach introductory level undergraduate science courses including the fields of chemistry, biology, physics, and earth science, understand and define science and nature of science (NOS). Participants were seventeen science instructors from five different institutions in the…

  12. Critical Features of Visualizations of Transport through the Cell Membrane--an Empirical Study of Upper Secondary and Tertiary Students' Meaning-Making of a Still Image and an Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundgren, Carl-Johan; Tibell, Lena A. E.

    2010-01-01

    Images, diagrams, and other forms of visualization are playing increasingly important roles in molecular life science teaching and research, both for conveying information and as conceptual tools, transforming the way we think about the events and processes the subject covers. This study examines how upper secondary and tertiary students interpret…

  13. Energetics and cooperativity of tertiary hydrogen bonds in RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Silverman, S K; Cech, T R

    1999-07-01

    Tertiary interactions that allow RNA to fold into intricate three-dimensional structures are being identified, but little is known about the thermodynamics of individual interactions. Here we quantify the tertiary structure contributions of individual hydrogen bonds in a "ribose zipper" motif of the recently crystallized Tetrahymena group I intron P4-P6 domain. The 2'-hydroxyls of P4-P6 nucleotides C109/A184 and A183/G110 participate in forming the "teeth" of the zipper. These four nucleotides were substituted in all combinations with their 2'-deoxy and (separately) 2'-methoxy analogues, and thermodynamic effects on the tertiary folding DeltaG degrees ' were assayed by the Mg2+ dependence of electrophoretic mobility in nondenaturing gels. The 2'-deoxy series showed a consistent trend with an average contribution to the tertiary folding DeltaG degrees' of -0.4 to -0.5 kcal/mol per hydrogen bond. Contributions were approximately additive, reflecting no cooperativity among the hydrogen bonds. Each "tooth" of the ribose zipper (comprising two hydrogen bonds) thus contributes about -1.0 kcal/mol to the tertiary folding DeltaG degrees'. Single 2'-methoxy substitutions destabilized folding by approximately 1 kcal/mol, but the trend reversed with multiple 2'-methoxy substitutions; the folding DeltaG degrees' for the quadruple 2'-methoxy derivative was approximately unchanged relative to wild-type. On the basis of these data and on temperature-gradient gel results, we conclude that entropically favorable hydrophobic interactions balance enthalpically unfavorable hydrogen bond deletions and steric clashes for multiple 2'-methoxy substitutions. Because many of the 2'-deoxy derivatives no longer have the characteristic hydrogen-bond patterns of the ribose zipper motif but simply have individual long-range ribose-base or ribose-ribose hydrogen bonds, we speculate that the energetic value of -0.4 to -0.5 kcal/mol per tertiary hydrogen bond may be more generally applicable to RNA folding. PMID:10393544

  14. Use of Earth Observing Satellite Data for the Development of "Learning Exercises" for College-Level Science Courses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Armond T.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is based on experiences being gained through a project entitled "The Mississippi Community College Pilot Project". The project was labeled "pilot" because it is thought that lessons learned during the implementation of this project may aid similar endeavors in other states. The objective of the project is to provide curriculum enrichment and associated faculty enhancement through the use of earth observations data in biological and physical sciences courses. The premise underlying the objective is that information from earth observations from satellite and aircraft platforms provides an effective means of illustrating and explaining science topics/phenomena in a new and/or different perspective. It is also thought that the use of data acquired from space may also serve to captivate the students interest and/or inquisitiveness about the particular science issue.

  15. (Re)defining experiential science education at the middle school level to make cross-curricular connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Saswati

    This multi-case study is an examination of the role of experiential science education in middle school classrooms. A mixed method approach was used in this study, to examine issues related to experiential science education and how it pertains to student's attitudes towards learning science, teacher efficacy, and emergent curricula in four middle schools of Northeast Louisiana. Using the curricular framework of post-modernism, the researcher conceptualized a theoretical lens comprised of the experiential learning approaches of Citizen Science and Place-based education, with an aim of examining nuances of the discourse of scientific literacy surrounding a teacher-designed intervention. Surveys of Modified Student's Attitudes towards Science, and Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale were administered to students and teachers respectively, before and after the intervention. In addition to surveys, classroom observations were conducted before, during and after the intervention, and teachers were interviewed preceding and following the intervention. Also, ad hoc student focus group discussions were held at each school site, over a period of approximately three months. Quantitative analyses revealed that the components for student's attitudes towards science as well as teacher's sense of efficacy differed significantly by sites, and not by time. Qualitative findings were utilized to triangulate that the emergent curricular models in different teacher's classrooms indeed shaped the outcomes. In sites where the emergent curricula encompassed an open, dialogic and interactive form of discourse closer to a post-modern approach, both teachers and students seemed to excel and together shaped a rich, recursive, relational, and rigorous process of learning and integration of the intervention, within a small creative window situated in the transitional context of K-12 education.

  16. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Tertiary Structure Ensembles of Amyloid-? Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ball, K. Aurelia; Phillips, Aaron H.; Nerenberg, Paul S.; Fawzi, Nicolas L.; Wemmer, David E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The interplay of modern molecular simulation and high-quality nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments has reached a fruitful stage for quantitative characterization of structural ensembles of disordered peptides. Amyloid-? 1–42 (A?42), the primary peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease, and fragments such as A?21–30 are both classified as intrinsically disordered peptides (IDPs). We use a variety of NMR observables to validate de novo molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water to characterize the tertiary structure ensemble of A?42 and A?21–30 from the perspective of their classification as IDPs. Unlike the A?21–30 fragment that conforms to expectations of an IDP that is primarily extended, we find that A?42 samples conformations reflecting all possible secondary structure categories and spans the range of IDP classifications from collapsed structured states to highly extended conformations, making it an IDP with a far more heterogeneous tertiary ensemble. PMID:21797254

  17. Biopolitical science.

    PubMed

    Arnhart, Larry

    2010-03-01

    This article develops a theoretical framework for biopolitical science as a science of political animals. This science moves through three levels of deep political history: the universal political history of the species, the cultural political history of the group, and the individual political history of animals in the group. To illustrate the particular application of biopolitical science, this essay shows how this science would help us to understand Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863. PMID:20812796

  18. The tertiary structural changes in bacteriorhodopsin occur between M states: X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Sass, H J; Schachowa, I W; Rapp, G; Koch, M H; Oesterhelt, D; Dencher, N A; Büldt, G

    1997-01-01

    The tertiary structural changes occurring during the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) are assigned by X-ray diffraction to distinct M states, M1 and M2. Purple membranes (PM) of the mutant Asp96Asn at 15, 57, 75 and 100% relative humidity (r.h.) were studied in a parallel X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic investigation. Light-dependent conformational changes of BR-Asp96Asn are observed at high hydration levels (100 and 75% r.h.) but not in partially dehydrated samples (57 and 15% r.h.). The FTIR spectra of continuously illuminated samples at low and high hydration, despite some differences, are characteristic of the M intermediate. The changes in diffraction patterns of samples in the M2 state are of the same magnitude as those of wild-type samples trapped with GuaHCl in the M(G) state. Additional large changes in the amide bands of the FTIR spectra occur between M2 and M(G). This suggests, that the tertiary structural changes between M1 and M2 are responsible for the switch opening the cytoplasmic half-channel of BR for reprotonation to complete the catalytic cycle. These tertiary structural changes seem to be triggered by a charge redistribution which might be a common feature of retinal proteins also in signal transduction. PMID:9130693

  19. Learning in a Personal Context: Levels of Choice in a Free Choice Learning Environment in Science and Natural History Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamberger, Yael; Tal, Tali

    2007-01-01

    The study aims to characterize contextual learning during class visits to science and natural history museums. Based on previous studies, we assumed that "outdoor" learning is different from classroom-based learning, and free choice learning in the museums enhances the expression of learning in personal context. We studied about 750 students…

  20. An Analysis of Content and Task Dimensions of Science Items Designed to Measure Level of Concept Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Margaret L.; Voelker, Alan M.

    Content and task dimensions of science items were studied using factor analytic techniques. These items were developed to measure concept attainment using a completely crossed design with 30 concepts and 12 tasks. Conventional factor analyses were performed, separately for boys and girls, for concept scores and for task scores. Three-mode factor…

  1. Gender and Racial/Ethnic Differences in Self-Reported Levels of Engagement in High School Math and Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Sylvia; Guzman, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    While gender and racial/ethnic performance gaps in math and science have been well documented, we know little about how students feel while they are in these courses. Using a sample of 793 high school students who participated in the Experience Sampling Method of the Study of Youth and Social Development, this study examines the gender and…

  2. Sex, Grade-Level and Stream Differences in Learning Environment and Attitudes to Science in Singapore Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peer, Jarina; Fraser, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Learning environment research provides a well-established approach for describing and understanding what goes on in classrooms and has attracted considerable interest in Singapore. This article reports the first study of science classroom environments in Singapore primary schools. Ten scales from the What Is Happening In this Class?,…

  3. Major wildfires at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward; Wolbach, Wendy S.; Gilmour, Iain

    1991-01-01

    The current status of the reconstruction of major biomass fire events at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary is discussed. Attention is given to the sources of charcoal and soot, the identification of biomass and fossil carbon, and such ignition-related problems as delated fires, high atmospheric O2 content, ignition mechanisms, and the greenhouse-effect consequences of fire on the scale envisioned. Consequences of these factors for species extinction patterns are noted.

  4. General allylic C-H alkylation with tertiary nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jennifer M; Liu, Wei; Young, Andrew J; White, M Christina

    2014-04-16

    A general method for intermolecular allylic C-H alkylation of terminal olefins with tertiary nucleophiles has been accomplished employing palladium(II)/bis(sulfoxide) catalysis. Allylic C-H alkylation furnishes products in good yields (avg. 64%) with excellent regio- and stereoselectivity (>20:1 linear:branched, >20:1 E:Z). For the first time, the olefin scope encompasses unactivated aliphatic olefins as well as activated aromatic/heteroaromatic olefins and 1,4-dienes. The ease of appending allyl moieties onto complex scaffolds is leveraged to enable this mild and selective allylic C-H alkylation to rapidly diversify phenolic natural products. The tertiary nucleophile scope is broad and includes latent functionality for further elaboration (e.g., aliphatic alcohols, ?,?-unsaturated esters). The opportunities to effect synthetic streamlining with such general C-H reactivity are illustrated in an allylic C-H alkylation/Diels-Alder reaction cascade: a reactive diene is generated via intermolecular allylic C-H alkylation and approximated to a dienophile contained within the tertiary nucleophile to furnish a common tricyclic core found in the class I galbulimima alkaloids. PMID:24641574

  5. Late tertiary structure and stratigraphy of north Sinai continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Mart, Y.

    1981-06-01

    New seismic data provide information on the structural development and late Tertiary stratigraphy of the continental slope and rise off northern Sinai. The upper continental slope is characterized by a marginal plateau composed of a series of platforms or steps. The lower continental slope is smooth, except for a low ridge paralleling the western part. Numerous diapiric structures along the continental margin north of the Sinai Peninsula emerge from an evaporitic layer of late Tertiary age. The diapirs usually are aligned along west-northwest-trending faults. A salt ridge 90 km long produces a submarine ridge in the lower continental rise. Two main fault trends have been mapped. In the western part of the continental margin they trend west-northwest and, in the eastern part, northeast. These trends parallel the continental slopes of northern Sinai and southern Israel, respectively. The structural grain of the Sinai margin appears to be controlled by two main tectonic elements: (1) rejuvenated basement faults of the continent-ocean transition zone; and (2) salt diapirism due to loading of Messinian evaporites with Nile-derived upper Tertiary clastics.

  6. ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters 141 (1996) 227-236 Reconciliation of late Quaternary sea levels derived from coral

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    1996-01-01

    Quaternary sea levels derived from coral terraces at Huon Peninsula with deep sea oxygen isotope records John Abstract A major discrepancy between the Late Quatemary sea level changes derived from raised coral reef terraces at the Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea and from oxygen isotopes in deep sea cores is resolved

  7. Differential Item Functioning by Gender on a Large-Scale Science Performance Assessment: A Comparison across Grade Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holweger, Nancy; Taylor, Grace

    The fifth-grade and eighth-grade science items on a state performance assessment were compared for differential item functioning (DIF) due to gender. The grade 5 sample consisted of 8,539 females and 8,029 males and the grade 8 sample consisted of 7,477 females and 7,891 males. A total of 30 fifth grade items and 26 eighth grade items were…

  8. Why Small is Too Small a Term: Prevention Science for Health Disparities, Culturally Distinct Groups, and Community-Level Intervention.

    PubMed

    Henry, David; Fok, Carlotta Ching Ting; Allen, James

    2015-10-01

    Implications of the Advancing Small Sample Prevention Science Special Section are discussed. Efficiency and precision are inadequately considered in many current prevention-science methodological approaches. As a result, design and analytic practices pose difficulties for the study of contextual factors in prevention, which often involve small samples. Four primary conclusions can be drawn from the Special Section. First, contemporary statistical and measurement approaches provide a number of underutilized opportunities to maximize power. These strategies maximize efficiencies by optimizing design and resource allocation parameters, allowing for the detection of effects with small samples. Second, several alternative research designs provide both rigor and further optimize efficiencies through more complete use of available information, allowing study of important questions in prevention science for which only small samples may be accessible. Third, mixed methods hold promise for enhancing the utility of qualitative data in studies with small samples. Finally, Bayesian analytic approaches, through their use of prior information, allow for even greater efficiencies in work with small samples, and through their introduction in the routines of mainstream software packages, hold particular promise as an emergent methodology in prevention research. PMID:26228478

  9. The application of language-game theory to the analysis of science learning: Developing an interpretive classroom-level learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadibasir, Mohammad

    In this study an interpretive learning framework that aims to measure learning on the classroom level is introduced. In order to develop and evaluate the value of the framework, a theoretical/empirical study is designed. The researcher attempted to illustrate how the proposed framework provides insights on the problem of classroom-level learning. The framework is developed by construction of connections between the current literature on science learning and Wittgenstein's language-game theory. In this framework learning is defined as change of classroom language-game or discourse. In the proposed framework, learning is measured by analysis of classroom discourse. The empirical explanation power of the framework is evaluated by applying the framework in the analysis of learning in a fifth-grade science classroom. The researcher attempted to analyze how students' colloquial discourse changed to a discourse that bears more resemblance to science discourse. The results of the empirical part of the investigation are presented in three parts: first, the gap between what students did and what they were supposed to do was reported. The gap showed that students during the classroom inquiry wanted to do simple comparisons by direct observation, while they were supposed to do tool-assisted observation and procedural manipulation for a complete comparison. Second, it was illustrated that the first attempt to connect the colloquial to science discourse was done by what was immediately intelligible for students and then the teacher negotiated with students in order to help them to connect the old to the new language-game more purposefully. The researcher suggested that these two events in the science classroom are critical in discourse change. Third, it was illustrated that through the academic year, the way that students did the act of comparison was improved and by the end of the year more accurate causal inferences were observable in classroom communication. At the end of the study, the researcher illustrates that the application of the proposed framework resulted in an improved version of the framework. The improved version of the proposed framework is more connected to the topic of science learning, and is able to measure the change of discourse in higher resolution.

  10. Acid-neutralizing scenario after the Cretaceous-Tertiary impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruoka, Teruyuki; Koeberl, Christian

    2003-06-01

    Acid rain from the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary impact event should have caused significant damage to freshwater life, but only minor extinctions of freshwater species are actually observed. We propose a mechanism to neutralize the acid using larnite (?-Ca2SiO4), produced as a result of the specific lithology at the Chicxulub impact site. The impact vapor plume must have been enriched in calcium from the carbonate-rich target, leading to the crystallization of larnite. The acid-neutralizing capacity of the larnite grains would have been high enough to consume acid produced after the K-T event within several hours, reducing it to a level at which freshwater life would not have been affected, even if all the acid had precipitated instantaneously after the K-T impact. This scenario can explain some of the extinction selectivity at the K-T boundary.

  11. A Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction? Were most of Earth's species killed off?

    PubMed

    Briggs, J C

    1991-10-01

    For the past decade, the scientific and popular press have carried frequent articles about a catastrophic mass extinction that supposedly destroyed the majority of the earth's species, including the dinosaurs, approximately 65 million years ago. Since 1980, more than 2000 papers and books have dealt with some aspect of a mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. One authoritative estimate of the severity of the extinctions is that 60-80% of all the living species became extinct at this boundary (Raup 1988). There appears to be a general acceptance of the fact that such a great catastrophe did occur. Most of the argument among scientists now is devoted to the determination of the cause. In this article, I argue that the species changes at the K/T boundary were neither sudden nor catastrophic. They were most likely caused by a regression of sea level that led to a decrease in primary production. PMID:11538279

  12. A possible tsunami deposit at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in Pernambuco, northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertão, Gilberto A.; Martins, Paulo P.

    1996-07-01

    Interdisciplinarry and integrated investigations of a stratigraphic succession spanning the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary in Pernambuco (the Poty Quarry section, near Recife), northeastern Brazil, provides direct evidence for the hypothesis of an extraterrestrial bolide impact event. Discussions on the exact position of the K-T boundary point to an impact event in the earliest Danian. One particular bed at the base of the Maria Farinha Formation shows sedimentary characteristics and exotic (probably impact-derived) material which suggest the action of a tsunami wave. The distribution of iridium concentrations throughout the studied succession records a major peak of iridium (up to 69 times the background levels) at about 15-20 cm above the main tsunami bed.

  13. A Cretaceous-Tertiary mass extinction? Were most of Earth's species killed off?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    For the past decade, the scientific and popular press have carried frequent articles about a catastrophic mass extinction that supposedly destroyed the majority of the earth's species, including the dinosaurs, approximately 65 million years ago. Since 1980, more than 2000 papers and books have dealt with some aspect of a mass extinction at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. One authoritative estimate of the severity of the extinctions is that 60-80% of all the living species became extinct at this boundary (Raup 1988). There appears to be a general acceptance of the fact that such a great catastrophe did occur. Most of the argument among scientists now is devoted to the determination of the cause. In this article, I argue that the species changes at the K/T boundary were neither sudden nor catastrophic. They were most likely caused by a regression of sea level that led to a decrease in primary production.

  14. Adapting the academic motivation scale for use in pre-tertiary mathematics classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-09-01

    The Academic Motivation Scale ( ams) is a comprehensive and widely used instrument for assessing motivation based on the self-determination theory. Currently, no such comprehensive instrument exists to assess the different domains of motivation (stipulated by the self-determination theory) in mathematics education at the pre-tertiary level (grades 11 and 12) in Asia. This study adapted the ams for this use and assessed the properties of the adapted instrument with 1610 students from Singapore. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses indicated a five-factor structure for the modified instrument (the three original ams intrinsic subscales collapsed into a single factor). Additionally, the modified instrument exhibited good internal consistency (mean ? = .88), and satisfactory test-retest reliability over a 1-month interval (mean r xx = .73). The validity of the modified ams was further demonstrated through correlational analyses among scores on its subscales, and with scores on other instruments measuring mathematics attitudes, anxiety and achievement.

  15. The HST Frontier Fields: High-Level Science Data Products for the First 4 Completed Clusters, and Latest Data on the Remaining Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Borncamp, David; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Ogaz, Sara; Porterfield, Blair; Grogin, Norman A.; Robberto, Massimo; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2016-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The first four of these clusters are now complete, namely Abell 2744, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223, with each of these having been observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, using ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W). The remaining two clusters, Abell 370 and Abell S1063, are currently in progress. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including a total of 24 separate cumulative-depth data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth version 1.0 releases at the end of each completed epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The resulting high-level science products are delivered via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to the community on a rapid timescale to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  16. Enantioselective Synthesis of ?-Secondary and ?-Tertiary Piperazin-2-ones and Piperazines by Catalytic Asymmetric Allylic Alkylation

    PubMed Central

    Korch, Katerina M.; Eidamshaus, Christian; Behenna, Douglas C.; Nam, Sangkil; Horne, David

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric Pd-catalyzed decarboxylative allylic alkylation of differentially N-protected piperazin-2-ones allows for the synthesis of a variety of highly enantioenriched tertiary piperazine-2-ones. Deprotection and reduction affords the corresponding tertiary piperazines, which can be employed for the synthesis of medicinally important analogs. The introduction of these chiral tertiary piperazines resulted in imatinib analogs that exhibited comparable antiproliferative activity to that of their corresponding imatinib counterparts. PMID:25382664

  17. Interactive online simulations and curriculum for teaching and learning fundamental concepts in molecular science at the undergraduate level

    E-print Network

    Ashe, Colin Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The number of research disciplines that focus, at least in part, on the atomic or molecular level is rapidly increasing. As a result, the concepts that describe the behavior of atoms and molecules, known collectively as ...

  18. What Level of Education Matters Most for Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Joao; St. Aubyn, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    We decompose annual average years of schooling series for Portugal into different schooling levels series. By estimating a number of vector autoregressions, we provide measures of aggregate and disaggregate economic growth impacts of different education levels. Increasing education at all levels except tertiary has a positive and significant…

  19. Building the e-Science Grid in the UK: Middleware, Applications and Tools deployed at Level 2

    E-print Network

    Allan, R.; Baker, D.; Boyd, D.; Chohan, D.; Cox, S.; Eres, H.; Fowler, R.; Furmento, N.; Giddy, J.; Harmer, T.; Hayes, M.; Hill, N.; Hillier, J.; Jensen, J.; Keane, A.; Krznaric, M.; Lee, W.; McKeown, M.; Mills, A.; Newhouse, S.; Pickles, S.; Pinning, R.; Richards, A.; Saleem, A.; Watt, J.

    Allan,R. Baker,D. Boyd,D. Chohan,D. Cox,S. Eres,H. Fowler,R. Furmento,N. Giddy,J. Harmer,T. Hayes,M. Hill,N. Hillier,J. Jensen,J. Keane,A. Krznaric,M. Lee,W. McKeown,M. Mills,A. Newhouse,S. Pickles,S. Pinning,R. Richards,A. Saleem,A. Watt,J. Proceedings of the UK e-Science All Hands Meeting 2003 pp 532-539

  20. Safer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This column provides best safety practices for the science classroom and laboratory. In this month's issue, pregnancy policy in the laboratory is discussed. One can't ignore the fact that student and faculty pregnancies--and the resulting potential hazards in the science laboratory--exist at the high school level. Science teachers need to be…

  1. Role of Leadership in Narrowing the Gap between Science and Practice: Improving Treatment Outcomes at the Systems Level.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Sy Atezaz; Bloch, Richard M; Silver, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    It's been well documented that health care does not reliably transfer what we know from science into clinical practice. As a result, Americans do not always receive the care suggested by the scientific evidence. Despite the best intentions of a dedicated and skilled healthcare workforce, this can often lead to poor clinical outcomes. As research and technology rapidly advance, this gap between science and practice appears to be widening. There is an increasing public concern about a lack of access to appropriate treatment, pervasiveness of unsafe practices, and wasteful uses of precious health care resources leading to suboptimum treatment outcomes. Leadership has a critical role in creating and sustaining the environment that supports health services for individuals and populations that increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge. Leadership has some responsibility to improve outcomes by insuring effective use of evidence-based treatment guidelines; measurement-based care; knowledge and skills management; care coordination; and information technologies. This paper addresses leadership issues in these components of a system's ability to improve treatment outcomes. PMID:26031668

  2. Effects of discipline-based art education and interdisciplinary art education on artistic development and production, higher-level thinking, and attitudes toward science and social studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lisa Lessenberry

    This research was conducted to assess the effectiveness of discipline-based art education (DBAE) and interdisciplinary art (IA) teaching methods on art production, higher level thinking skills, and attitudes toward science and social studies. Two of the sixth-grade classes at a rural West Tennessee school were taught using the DBAE method and two were given the IA treatment. The evaluation of art production was two-fold using an Evaluation of Student Art Projects (Herberholz & Herberholz, 1994) which anonymously measured each group of projects on creativity, expressiveness, organization of elements and principles of art, craftsmanship, and how the artwork related to academic content. The second appraisal of art products involved emergent categorization with reference to Herberholz and Herberholz's (1994) categories of styles and student artistic development. Higher level thinking skills were determined from the Evaluation of Student Essays which measured academic knowledge, composition, and Bloom's higher level thinking stages of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Student attitudes toward social studies and science before and after treatment were measured using the Estes Attitude Survey (Estes, Johnstone, & Richards, 1975). T-tests, an analysis of variance (Anova) and data analysis were used to evaluate art production. T-tests were also used to evaluate student essays before and after each treatment. Analysis of data indicated no significant differences between the art products of students in DBAE or IA. There were no significant differences in the attitudes or higher level thinking skills between students undergoing the DBAE or IA treatment. The emergent categorization of art production showed that DBAE produced more overall creativity and originality than IA. The researcher believes that students can benefit from a combination of both methods.

  3. Collapse of florisitic diversity coincident with a fungal spike and iridium anomaly at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, V.; Raine, J. I.

    2003-04-01

    Analysis of pollen and spore assemblages from both terrestrial and near-shore marine sediments in New Zealand had revealed an instant, extensive destruction of land plants directly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) event, (Vajda et al., 2001). A recent palynological investigation, based on millimeter resolution sampling of the terrestrial KTB sediments at Moody Creek Mine, Greymouth coalfield, New Zealand has been carried out. The sediments were deposited in a terrestrial wetland environment and the KTB is defined within a coal seam. Preliminary results of the high-resolution investigation reveal a diverse vascular plant spore/pollen flora (>80 species) that was replaced by an assemblage impoverished in vascular plant pollen and spores, but rich in fungal spores. The "barren" layer is coincident with the extinction of several miospore taxa and contains an iridium abundance of 3ppb. The fungal spike covers 5 mm, and is followed by a 40-cm interval with abundant fern spores. The relative abundance of fern spores, increases from 25% below the boundary to 98% in the sediment following the KTB. We argue that the abrupt palynofloristic changes at this high southern palaeolatitude site are evidence of massive disruptions to terrestrial plant communities as a consequence of the Chicxulub impact. Palynofloristic evidence indicates that the complex mire and forest vegetation was totally devastated at the time of impact. Global cooling and several months with extremely low light levels following the impact, perhaps in combination with extensive wildfires would explain the devastation of the vegetation. The "barren" layer at the KTB corresponds to immediate post-impact conditions with low light levels and dust-related cooling unfavorable to forest growth but favoring saprophytic fungi. The recovery succession is initiated by opportunistic species of ground ferns, the plants best adapted to low light, lowered temperatures and high acidity. Vajda, V., Raine, I. &Hollis, C. (2001). Science, Vol. 294, p. 1700-1702.

  4. Tertiary siRNAs Mediate Paramutation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Miska, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, different small RNA-dependent gene silencing mechanisms act in the germline to initiate transgenerational gene silencing. Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) can initiate transposon and gene silencing by acting upstream of endogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which engage a nuclear RNA interference (RNAi) pathway to trigger transcriptional gene silencing. Once gene silencing has been established, it can be stably maintained over multiple generations without the requirement of the initial trigger and is also referred to as RNAe or paramutation. This heritable silencing depends on the integrity of the nuclear RNAi pathway. However, the exact mechanism by which silencing is maintained across generations is not understood. Here we demonstrate that silencing of piRNA targets involves the production of two distinct classes of small RNAs with different genetic requirements. The first class, secondary siRNAs, are localized close to the direct target site for piRNAs. Nuclear import of the secondary siRNAs by the Argonaute HRDE-1 leads to the production of a distinct class of small RNAs that map throughout the transcript, which we term tertiary siRNAs. Both classes of small RNAs are necessary for full repression of the target gene and can be maintained independently of the initial piRNA trigger. Consistently, we observed a form of paramutation associated with tertiary siRNAs. Once paramutated, a tertiary siRNA generating allele confers dominant silencing in the progeny regardless of its own transmission, suggesting germline-transmitted siRNAs are sufficient for multigenerational silencing. This work uncovers a multi-step siRNA amplification pathway that promotes germline integrity via epigenetic silencing of endogenous and invading genetic elements. In addition, the same pathway can be engaged in environmentally induced heritable gene silencing and could therefore promote the inheritance of acquired traits. PMID:25811365

  5. Fullerenes in the cretaceous-tertiary boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Heymann, D; Chibante, L P; Brooks, R R; Wolbach, W S; Smalley, R E

    1994-07-29

    High-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis of toluene extracts of samples from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sites in New Zealand has revealed the presence of C(60) at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 parts per million of the associated soot. This technique verified also that fullerenes are produced in similar amounts in the soots of common flames under ambient atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the C(60) in the K-T boundary layer may have originated in the extensive wildfires that were associated with the cataclysmic impact event that terminated the Mezozoic era about 65 million years ago. PMID:17752762

  6. Proximal Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary impact deposits in the Caribbean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Alan R.; Boynton, Willam V.

    1990-01-01

    Trace element, isotopic, and mineralogic studies indicate that the proposed impact at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary occurred in an ocean basin, although a minor component of continental material is required. The size and abundance of shocked minerals and the restricted geographic occurrence of the ejecta layer and impact-wave deposits suggest an impact between the Americas. Coarse boundary sediments at sites 151 and 153 in the Colombian Basin and 5- to 450-meter-thick boundary sediments in Cuba may be deposits of a giant wave produced by a nearby oceanic impact.

  7. Ignition of global wildfires at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Schneider, N. M.; Zahnle, K. J.; Latham, D.

    1990-01-01

    The recent discovery of an apparently global soot layer at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary indicates that global wildfires were somehow ignited by the impact of a comet or asteroid. It is shown here that the thermal radiation produced by the ballistic reentry of ejecta condensed from the vapor plume of the impact could have increased the global radiation flux by factors of 50 to 150 times the solar input for periods ranging from one to several hours. This great increase in thermal radiation may have been responsible for the ignition of global wildfires, as well as having deleterious effects on unprotected animal life.

  8. An exploration of gender differences in tertiary mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jane M.

    1989-02-01

    Data from 400 students in a tertiary mathematics course were analysed to explore gender differences on a number of variables associated with learning mathematics. It was concluded that while differences did occur on variables associated with confidence, self-concept, test anxiety and quantitative ability indicating a detrimental effect for women, compensating behaviour by women, including increased assignment work and tutorial attendance, resulted in comparable final course performance for women and men. These findings are discussed in light of participation rates of women in mathematics.

  9. Science. Predrafted Individual Short-Term Plan/Records (Secondary Level): Directions for Resource Teachers, Teachers and Aides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Merced, Comp.

    Developed by experienced migrant education teachers incorporating Sight and Sound Program concepts, this volume presents predrafted individual short-term Plan/Records for secondary level chemistry, biology, and physics, plus step-by-step directions for their use by Oregon resource teachers, classroom teachers, and aides. The approach assumes that…

  10. Macro-Level Approaches to HIV Prevention among Ethnic Minority Youth: State of the Science, Opportunities, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Guillermo; Lightfoot, Marguerita; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2013-01-01

    The HIV epidemic continues to disproportionately affect ethnic minority youth. These disconcerting health disparities indicate that although existing HIV preventive strategies for ethnic minority youth have been efficacious, they have not significantly reduced the impact of the epidemic in this population. Macro-level interventions, such as…

  11. The Message is in the Data (not the Medium): Results From a Secondary-level Environmental Science Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatland, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    I ran an extended (18 session) workshop during the 2007-2008 school year at a public Montessori elementary in Boulder Colorado. A reprise is running this year that extends to middle school students. The curriculum emphasis was on physical and environmental science, assembled in part using synoptic principles drawn from the National Research Council report "How People Learn". The curriculum was driven by story lines that began and ended in the students' zone of comprehension, in the interim extending through proximal development to open-ended inquiry. The workshop had four distinct purposes: i) Provide students an opportunity to problem-solve, ii) Break barriers between classroom learning and field science, iii) Determine what does and does not work with students at this age, iv) Begin building an alternative outreach path for professional scientists, specifically to avoid one-off presentation ('magic show') syndrome. New technology was incorporated in the workshop as needed--from thermochrons to virtual globes--but this was de- emphasized to keep focus on the subject matter. Data played a much stronger role particularly during early sessions where students were divided into 'phenomena' and 'scientist' groups in order to see both sides of the inquiry process. I present here workshop results, successes and failures, with two emphases: First on the idea that data can be an excellent way to build metacognitive skills in students around age 10. Second that-- with all due credit to Marshall McLuhan--the medium best serves by staying out of the way of the message.

  12. Undergraduate Biotechnology Students' Views of Science Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondston, Joanne Elisabeth; Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

    2010-01-01

    Despite rapid growth of the biotechnology industry worldwide, a number of public concerns about the application of biotechnology and its regulation remain. In response to these concerns, greater emphasis has been placed on promoting biotechnologists' public engagement. As tertiary science degree programmes form the foundation of the biotechnology…

  13. Regional prospectivity of Mesozoic and Tertiary in the eastern Adriatic and adjacent area

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.; Dolan, P.; Lunn, G. )

    1988-08-01

    Post-Hercynian deposits in the eastern Adriatic and the adjacent external zones of the Dinarides and Albanian Hellenides may be subdivided into four facies groups. (1) Permian-Lower Triassic clastics and carbonates with some evaporites, (2) Middle Triassic-lower Tertiary carbonate platform facies with associated continental margin deeper marine sequences, (3) Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary flysch, and (4) middle Tertiary molasse and postorogenic Neogene sediments. The Permian to lower Tertiary section was deposited during the complex Alpine cycle, while the upper Tertiary section is the product of post-Alpine deposition. This depositional history during markedly different tectonic regimes creates two groups of petroleum plays in the eastern Adriatic: (1) Alpine cycle plays in the Permian to lower Tertiary in the thrust-faulted and folded foreland of Adria and (2) post-Alpine plays in upper Tertiary postorogenic or late synorogenic basins. Around the Adriatic, the post-Alpine plays have so far proved the most successful. Major production occurs in the onshore Po basin and its extension beneath the Adriatic. Some of this production is from deep Alpine-cycle reservoirs, but the bulk is from the upper Tertiary-Quaternary. Similar horizons produce onshore and offshore the central-southern Adriatic coast of Italy. Major Tertiary production also occurs to the northeast in the Pannonian basin of Yugoslavia and Hungary from Miocene and younger sequences. Onshore Albania produces significant quantities of hydrocarbons; although data are scarce, much of this production is presumably from upper Tertiary molasse or lower Tertiary flysch.

  14. Portraying Real Science in Science Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijk, Esther M.

    2011-01-01

    In both formal and informal settings, not only science but also views on the nature of science are communicated. Although there probably is no singular nature shared by all fields of science, in the field of science education it is commonly assumed that on a certain level of generality there is a consensus on many features of science. In this…

  15. Deriving Accessible Science Books for the Blind Students of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios; Kacorri, Hernisa

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel integrated methodology for the development and production of accessible physics and science books from the elementary up to tertiary educational levels. This language independent approach adopts the Design-for-All principles, the available international standards for alternative formats and the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) Guidelines. Moreover it supports both static (embossed and refreshable tactile) and dynamic (based on synthetic speech and other sounds) accessibility. It can produce Tactile Books (Embossed Braille and Tactile Graphics), Digital Talking Books (or Digital Audio Books), Large Print Books as well as Acoustic-Tactile Books for the blind and visually impaired students as well as but for the print-disabled. This methodology has been successfully applied in the case of blind students of the Physics, Mathematics and Informatics Departments in the University of Athens.

  16. Altered gene expression in melanocytes exposed to 4-tertiary butyl phenol (4-TBP): upregulation of the A2b adenosine receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Le Poole, I C; Yang, F; Brown, T L; Cornelius, J; Babcock, G F; Das, P K; Boissy, R E

    1999-11-01

    Exposure to phenolic agents contributes to the development of occupational vitiligo. Proposed as a causative factor for leukoderma in vivo, the para-substituted phenol 4-tertiary butyl phenol was chosen to investigate early cellular events responsible for selective disappearance of melanocytes from the epidermis of individuals sensitive to such agents. To this end, differential display of melanocyte mRNA isolated from three separate cultures was performed following a 12 h exposure of cells to 250 microM 4-tertiary butyl phenol or to vehicle alone. Fragments of cDNA representing differentially expressed messages were cloned and subsequently confirmed by reverse dot blotting. Alignment analysis revealed that the L30 ribosomal protein was upregulated by the treatment, potentially reflecting altered levels of protein synthesis in response to stress. In addition, a gene sequence upregulated following exposure to 4-tertiary butyl phenol was identified as the A2b receptor (a P1 receptor for adenosine). Differential expression of this gene was confirmed in an RNase protection assay. By reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the gene was shown to be expressed in keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well. Flow cytometry confirmed differential expression in melanocytes and fibroblasts, but not in keratinocytes. Interestingly, it has been reported that P1 purinoceptor stimulation can induce apoptosis. This is in concordance with results reported elsewhere demonstrating induction of apoptosis by 4-tertiary butyl phenol in human melanocytes, as well as with morphologic changes observed in this study in cells exposed to 250 microM 4-tertiary butyl phenol for 72 h. In conclusion, differential display is useful to establish melanocyte components involved in the cellular response to phenolic agents. PMID:10571726

  17. Explaining the uptake of paediatric guidelines in a Kenyan tertiary hospital – mixed methods research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence-based standards for management of the seriously sick child have existed for decades, yet their translation in clinical practice is a challenge. The context and organization of institutions are known determinants of successful translation, however, research using adequate methodologies to explain the dynamic nature of these determinants in the quality-of-care improvement process is rarely performed. Methods We conducted mixed methods research in a tertiary hospital in a low-income country to explore the uptake of locally adapted paediatric guidelines. The quantitative component was an uncontrolled before and after intervention study that included an exploration of the intervention dose-effect relationship. The qualitative component was an ethnographic research based on the theoretical perspective of participatory action research. Interpretive integration was employed to derive meta-inferences that provided a more complete picture of the overall study results that reflect the complexity and the multifaceted ontology of the phenomenon studied. Results The improvement in health workers’ performance in relation to the intensity of the intervention was not linear and was characterized by improved and occasionally declining performance. Possible root causes of this performance variability included challenges in keeping knowledge and clinical skills updated, inadequate commitment of the staff to continued improvement, limited exposure to positive professional role models, poor teamwork, failure to maintain professional integrity and mal-adaptation to institutional pressures. Conclusion Implementation of best-practices is a complex process that is largely unpredictable, attributed to the complexity of contextual factors operating predominantly at professional and organizational levels. There is no simple solution to implementation of best-practices. Tackling root causes of inadequate knowledge translation in this tertiary care setting will require long-term planning, with emphasis on promotion of professional ethics and values and establishing an organizational framework that enhances positive aspects of professionalism. This study has significant implications for the quality of training in medical institutions and the development of hospital leadership. PMID:24613001

  18. Protein–Protein Interactions Mediated by Helical Tertiary Structure Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The modulation of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) by means of creating or stabilizing secondary structure conformations is a rapidly growing area of research. Recent success in the inhibition of difficult PPIs by secondary structure mimetics also points to potential limitations, because often, specific cases require tertiary structure mimetics. To streamline protein structure-based inhibitor design, we have previously described the examination of protein complexes in the Protein Data Bank where ?-helices or ?-strands form critical contacts. Here, we examined coiled coils and helix bundles that mediate complex formation to create a platform for the discovery of potential tertiary structure mimetics. Though there has been extensive analysis of coiled coil motifs, the interactions between pre-formed coiled coils and globular proteins have not been systematically analyzed. This article identifies critical features of these helical interfaces with respect to coiled coil and other helical PPIs. We expect the analysis to prove useful for the rational design of modulators of this fundamental class of protein assemblies. PMID:26302018

  19. Early Tertiary subsidence and sedimentary facies - Northern Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect

    Gumati, Y.D.; Kanes, W.H.

    1985-12-01

    The subsidence curves and subsidence rate curves for the Sirte basin, constructed from the stratigraphic record, show that subsidence was continuous throughout Late Cretaceous and Tertiary times, reaching a maximum during the Paleocene and Eocene, when a major reactivation of faults occurred. Shales and carbonates were deposited during all of the Late Cretaceous and Tertiary. Abrupt lateral facies changes occur from the platform areas toward the deeper troughs along with steep downdip thickening. The absence of upper Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic sediments suggests that the area was domed, faulted, and eroded during the late Mesozoic. As a result of crustal extension during the Paleocene, a marked lithologic and structural change occurred. The Heira Shale succeeded the Kalash Limestone in the Marada trough. Reactivation of the earlier faults, accompanied by an increase in the sediment supply from the south, caused these lower Paleocene shales to cover the entire area, with the exception of the old highs where carbonate deposition continued. An intercalation of shales and carbonates provides a sensitive indicator of change of depth and sediment type. 14 figures.

  20. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05?×?10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45?×?10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87?×?10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent. PMID:25483973

  1. Tertiary volcanic rocks from the Patagonian plateau, Argentina.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, M.; Alva Valdivia, L. M.; Chauvin, A.

    2007-05-01

    The Patagonian plateau basalts are a sequence of flat-lying Late Cretaceous through Tertiary basaltic and andesitic rocks exposed east of the Andes in dissected mesetas of Chilean and Argentine Patagonia. The plateau basalts cover a total area of 120,000 km2 between 40°S and 52°S. These igneous rocks rest on generally flat-lying older Mesozoic silicic volcanic or sedimentary rocks. Of major importance to the paleomagnetic investigation is the lack of significant tectonic disturbance of this portion of Patagonia from Late Cretaceous to present. 12 sites (107 cores) have been sampled in the Tertiary (Paleocene to Miocene) volcanic rocks between 43°S and 46°S in latitude and between 68°W and 70°W in longitude. Rocks are usually very fresh but, as they outcrop generally on top of the mesas, few hundred meters above the Plateau, remagnetization by lightning strikes is a major problem of the paleomagnetic analysis. Paleomagnetic, rock magnetic and paleointensity results will be presented.

  2. Pb isotopic tracers of the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction event

    SciTech Connect

    Galer, S.J.G.; Macdougall, J.D.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1989-11-01

    The global excess of Ir in sediments at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary has been attributed to either a meteorite impact or enhanced volcanism (e.g. Decan Traps). The isotropic composition of Pb associated with this Ir provides a test of these hypotheses because meteoritic Pb is isotopically quite distinct from Pb of volcanic or continental origin. Pb abundances and isotopic compositions of pelagic oozes from DSDP Site 577A (Shatsky Rise, NW Pacific) measured in this study show little change over the deposition interval of Ir-rich sediment ({approximately}10 cm). However, a Pb enriched layer with a more radiogenic isotopic composition is found in the basal {approximately}0.5 cm of the Tertiary. These observations appear to preclude the Ir excess in these sediments originating as impact fallout from a stony meteorite although an iron meteorite impactor cannot be excluded. Any Pb flux accompanying Ir in volcanogenic aerosols from the Decan Traps should be considerable. However, the boundary Pb spike does not isotopically resemble known Deccan Trap lavas. There is isotopic overlap with coal ash although the lack of correlation between soot and Pb abundance precludes any simple relationship between the two. Overall, any wind pattern changes following the K-T event were apparently short-lived as neither airborne sources of Pb nor their magnitude to the then central Pacific were affected while Ir enriched sediments were being laid down.

  3. Earth Science Education in Cameroon: a case study from the University of Buea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayonghe, S. N.

    1999-05-01

    Cameroon is a bilingual country with French and English being the official languages. This bicultural status is linked to pre-independence colonisation of the territory. Consequently, two educational systems exist in formal schools, colleges and the university sector. Studies of Earth Science Education curricula in these systems show completely divergent approaches in colleges and at the Tertiary level. An assessment of the factors that influence these divergences shows their relationship to the cultural background and to available expertise. From 1962 to 1992, Earth Science Education at the Tertiary level was limited to the unique University of Yaoundé and was based on the French system, even though the University served both systems. The curriculum was not related to the major priority needs of the country with respect to its natural or mineral resources and this handicap is being felt today. However, the creation in 1993 of six independent government universities in the country, with one — the University of Buea — being of an 'Anglo-Saxon' tradition, has resulted in the development of varied curricula in Earth Science Education in five of these universities. The varied approach is aimed at meeting manpower needs in priority areas of the subject in future. A comparison of the Earth Science curricula from 1993 to 1998 in the Universities of Yaoundé I, Douala and Buea is used to identify the divergent approaches and the expected advantages of each curriculum. A more detailed evaluation of the curriculum in the University of Buea is used to highlight the attempt being made to train geoscientists who will be capable of exploiting the natural resources of the country and equally ensure the conservation of the environment for future generations.

  4. The Singapore Global Schoolhouse: An Analysis of the Development of the Tertiary Education Landscape in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pak Tee; Tan, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to analyse the Singapore government's recent attempt to make Singapore a "Global Schoolhouse" by transforming its tertiary education sector. It aims to examine the government's attempt to promote greater diversity and autonomy in the tertiary education landscape; it also aims to examine the government's systems of state…

  5. Multiple Protein Sequence Alignment From Tertiary Structure Comparison: Assignment of Global and

    E-print Network

    Barton, Geoffrey J.

    Multiple Protein Sequence Alignment From Tertiary Structure Comparison: Assignment of Global of multiple protein sequence alignments from tertiary structure comparisons. A preliminary multiple sequence of the structures. A struc- ture comparison algorithm is applied to all pairs of proteins in the superimposed set

  6. Is It Ever Too Late to Study? The Economic Returns on Late Tertiary Degrees in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallsten, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the economic returns on tertiary degrees obtained in ages above 30 for individuals with upper-secondary schooling in light of current ideas on lifelong learning. Sweden is a case in point: Swedish tertiary education is open to older students, and labor market legislation supports employees who take a leave to study. The…

  7. Entrepreneurship Education in Delta State Tertiary Institution as a Means of Achieving National Growth and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined entrepreneurship education in Delta Sate tertiary institutions as a means of national growth and development. Two research questions were asked to guide the study. The population comprised all the 1,898 academic staff in eight tertiary institutions in the state. A sample of 800 lecturers was drawn through the multi stage and…

  8. Must a Developed Democratic State Fully Resource Any Tertiary Education for Its Citizens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholes, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    This article takes a parsimonious conception of a developed State operating under a minimalist conception of democracy and asks whether such a State must fully resource any tertiary (post-compulsory) education for its citizens A key public policy barrier to arguing an absolute obligation for the State to resource any tertiary education is…

  9. Tertiary Educators' Voices in Australia and South Africa: Experiencing and Engaging in African Music and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Music tertiary educators can foster positive experiences that promote diversity, enhance intercultural and cross-cultural understanding through our teaching. Through findings of interview data of tertiary music educators' understandings of multicultural music practice at two South African universities and at an Australia university, I used…

  10. A New Vision of Professional Development for Tertiary Teachers in Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudary, Imran Anjum

    2011-01-01

    Professional development for tertiary teachers in Pakistan is problematic. In most cases, it does not exist; and if it does, it is very brief, sporadic and traditional, and is conveyed off-site through top-down teacher training strategies. The Pakistani tertiary education sector is predominantly public in nature and consists of two main wings: the…

  11. Benchmarking Australian and New Zealand University Meta-Policy in an Increasingly Regulated Tertiary Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Brigid

    2014-01-01

    The agencies responsible for tertiary education quality assurance in Australia and New Zealand have established regulatory regimes that increasingly intersect with tertiary institution policy management. An examination of university meta-policies identified good practices guiding university policy and policy management. Most Australian and half of…

  12. Why Do Tertiary Education Graduates Regret Their Study Program? A Comparison between Spain and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucel, Aleksander; Vilalta-Bufi, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the determinants of regret of study program for tertiary education graduates in Spain and the Netherlands. These two countries differ in their educational system in terms of the tracking structure in their secondary education and the strength of their education-labor market linkages in tertiary education. Therefore, by…

  13. The School-Tertiary Interface in Mathematics: Teaching Style and Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Michael O. J.; Klymchuk, Sergiy

    2012-01-01

    Issues arising in the transition from secondary school to tertiary mathematics study are increasingly coming under scrutiny. In this paper, we analyse two practical aspects of the school-tertiary interface: teaching style; and assessment. We present some of the findings arising from a 2-year national project in New Zealand titled "Analysing the…

  14. Cost-Sharing Reform of Tertiary Education in China and Its Equity Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Catherine Yan

    2013-01-01

    China has made huge strides in expanding access to higher education since the 1980s. The main approach to achieve mass higher education was cost-sharing reforms of tertiary education. This article examines the policy reforms that affected tuition, fees and subsidies for tertiary students since the end of the 1980s and looks at the effects in terms…

  15. Transition and Tertiary Education: A Case Study of Mzuzu University, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zozie, Paxton Andrew; Kayira, Peter Benwell

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the role of guidance and counselling in Malawi in reducing dropout and easing the transition of students to tertiary education, as well as in helping them during their time in tertiary education. It begins by identifying key success factors in guidance and counselling services for learners in both developed and developing…

  16. Who Has to Pay for Their Education? Evidence from European Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Gieyoung; Kim, Chong-Uk

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we investigate a positive tertiary education externality in 18 European countries. Using a simple Cobb-Douglas-type production function with constant returns to scale, we find that there are positive spillover effects from tertiary education in European countries. According to our model prediction, on average, 72,000 new employed…

  17. Information Literacy: The Link between Secondary and Tertiary Education Project and Its Wider Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John; Irving, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The study reviews a research project which, inter alia, is constructing an information literacy framework linking secondary and tertiary education and arises out of research conducted in both the secondary and tertiary sectors. The Project is firmly situated in a Scottish context but draws on UK and indeed worldwide experience. It began in October…

  18. The genotype dependent presence of pyrrolizidine alkaloids as tertiary amine in Jacobaea vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Lotte; Cheng, Dandan; Mulder, Patrick P J; Vrieling, Klaas; van Veen, Johannes A; Klinkhamer, Peter G L

    2011-02-01

    Secondary metabolites such as pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. PAs can occur in plants in two forms: tertiary amine (free base) and N-oxide. PA extraction and detection are of great importance for the understanding of the role of PAs as plant defense compounds, as the tertiary PA form is known for its stronger influence on several generalist insects, whereas the N-oxide form is claimed to be less deterrent. We measured PA N-oxides and their reduced tertiary amines by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We show that the occurrence of tertiary PAs is not an artifact of the extraction and detection method. We found up to 50% of tertiary PAs in shoots of Jacobine - chemotype plants of Jacobaea vulgaris. Jacobine and its derivatives (jacoline, jaconine, jacozine and dehydrojaconine) may occur for more than 20% in reduced form in the shoots and more than 10% in the roots. For 22 PAs detected in F(2) hybrids (J. vulgaris × Jacobaea aquatica), we calculate the tertiary amine percentage (TA%=the tertiary amine concentration/(tertiary amine concentration+the corresponding N-oxide concentration) × 100). We found that the TA% for various PAs was genotype-dependent. Furthermore, TA% for the different PAs were correlated and the highest correlations occurred between PAs which share high structural similarity. PMID:21159354

  19. Roles of Long-Range Tertiary Interactions in Limiting Dynamics of the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme

    E-print Network

    Herschlag, Dan

    Roles of Long-Range Tertiary Interactions in Limiting Dynamics of the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme: We determined the effects of mutating the long-range tertiary contacts of the Tetrahymena group I between RNA dynamics and function, we turned to the Tetrahymena group I ribozyme. Much has been learned

  20. Problem-Based Learning in Tertiary Education: Teaching Old "Dogs" New Tricks?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Roland K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--The paper sets out to explore the challenges of problem-based learning (PBL) in tertiary education and to propose a framework with implications for practice and learning. Design/Methodology/Approach--A total of 18 tertiary students divided into three groups participated in the focus group discussions. A quantitative instrument was used as…

  1. Fishery Science Teaching at the University Level. Report of a Workshop on University Curricula in Fishery Science (Paris, France, May 5-8, 1980). Unesco Reports in Marine Sciences No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    As a result of the increasing human impacts upon global marine and aquatic resources, there is an increasing need to produce fishery science experts who can contribute to management, planning, and research. The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and Unesco cosponsored a workshop to examine the present status and problems in…

  2. Subchronic, reproductive, and maternal toxicity studies with tertiary butyl acetate (TBAC).

    PubMed

    Faber, Willem; Kirkpatrick, Daniel; Coder, Pragati; Li, Abby; Borghoff, Susan; Banton, Marcy

    2014-04-01

    Tertiary-butyl acetate (TBAC) was tested for subchronic toxicity in rats and mice and reproductive toxicity in rats at inhalation concentrations of 0, 100, 400 or 1600ppm. An oral maternal toxicity study was conducted in rats at dose levels of 0, 400, 800, 1000 and 1600mgkg(-1)d(-1). In the inhalation studies, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, gross pathology and the majority of body weight and feed consumption values were unaffected. Exposure to TBAC at concentrations of 400ppm and higher caused transient hyperactivity in mice and some evidence of increased motor activity counts in male rats at the 1600ppm exposure level. TBAC caused ?2u-globulin accumulation in male rat kidneys from all exposure groups and increased liver weights in 1600ppm rats and mice. Levels of thyroxin were decreased in male mice exposed to 1600ppm TBAC for 4weeks but otherwise thyroid endpoints were unaffected in rats and mice at either the 4 or 13weeks time points. There was no evidence or immunotoxicity or reproductive toxicity in rats. Pregnant rats receiving 1000mgkg(-1)d(-1) TBAC exhibited severe signs of acute neurotoxicity and decreased feed consumption and body weight gain. Fetal viability and growth were unaffected. PMID:24486531

  3. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration by Using a Model Carbonic Anhydrase Complex in Tertiary Amine Medium.

    PubMed

    Sivanesan, Dharmalingam; Choi, Youngju; Lee, Jiyeon; Youn, Min Hye; Park, Ki Tae; Grace, Andrew Nirmala; Kim, Hak-Joo; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2015-12-01

    Globally, the elevation of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) levels due to the anthropogenic effect poses a serious threat to the ecosystem. Hence, it is important to control and/or mitigate the level of CO2 in the atmosphere, which necessitates novel tools. Herein, it is proposed to improve CO2 sequestration by using model complexes based on the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in aqueous tertiary amine medium. The effect of substituents on the model CA model complexes on CO2 absorption and desorption was determined by using a stopped-flow spectrophotometer to follow pH changes through coupling to pH indicator and a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR). The CO2 hydration rate constants were determined under basic conditions and compound 6, which contained a hydrophilic group, showed the highest absorption or hydration levels of CO2 (2.860×10(3) ?L?mol(-1) ?s(-1) ). In addition, CSTR results for the absorption and desorption of CO2 suggest that simple model CA complexes could be used in post-combustion processing. PMID:26564396

  4. ENVIROSUITE: USING STATE-OF-THE-ART SYNCHROTRON TECHNIQUES TO UNDERSTAND ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION SCIENCE ISSUES AT THE MOLECULAR LEVEL.

    SciTech Connect

    FITTS,J.P.; KALB,P.D.; FRANCIS,A.J.; FUHRMANN,M.; DODGE,C.J.; GILLOW,J.B.

    2004-03-01

    Although DOE's Environmental Management program has made steady progress in cleaning up environmental legacies throughout the DOE complex, there are still significant remediation issues that remain to be solved. For example, DOE faces difficult challenges related to potential mobilization of radionuclides (e.g., actinides) and other hazardous contaminants in soils, removal and final treatment of high-level waste and residuals from leaking tanks, and the long-term stewardship of remediated sites and engineered disposal facilities, to name just a few. In some cases, new technologies and technology applications will be required based on current engineering expertise. In others, however, basic scientific research is needed to understand the mechanisms of how contaminants behave under specific conditions and how they interact with the environment, from which new engineering solutions can emerge. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Stony Brook University, scientists have teamed to use state-of-the-art synchrotron techniques to help understand the basic interactions of contaminants in the environment. Much of this work is conducted at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), which is a user facility that provides high energy X-ray and ultraviolet photon beams to facilitate the examination of contaminants and materials at the molecular level. These studies allow us to determine how chemical speciation and structure control important parameters such as solubility, which in turn drive critical performance characteristics such as leaching. In one study for example, we are examining the effects of microbial activity on actinide contaminants under conditions anticipated at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. One possible outcome of this research is the identification of specific microbes that can trap uranium or other contaminants within the intracellular structure and help mitigate mobility. In another study, we are exploring the interaction of contaminants with soil and plant roots to better understand the mechanisms responsible for uptake. This effort will lead to improvements in phytoremediation, an innovative and cost-effective approach to the cleanup of large volumes of soil with low concentrations of contaminants. In a third effort, we are investigating molecular interactions of contaminants in high-level waste tanks with potential grouting materials for remediation of the West Valley, NY site to assess their suitability and long-term performance.

  5. Is Tertiary Education Expansion Observable in Private Returns to Education? (Evidence for Middle and Eastern European Countries)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Štefánik, Miroslav; Horvát, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article provides evidence about differences in the recent tertiary education expansion in Austria, Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia. Focusing on these differences, we have examined private returns to tertiary education acquired before and after the tertiary education expansion. We compare these returns as follows: Austria with…

  6. The science behind codes and standards for safe walkways: changes in level, stairways, stair handrails and slip resistance.

    PubMed

    Nemire, Kenneth; Johnson, Daniel A; Vidal, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Walkway codes and standards are often created through consensus by committees based on a number of factors, including historical precedence, common practice, cost, and empirical data. The authors maintain that in the formulation of codes and standards that impact pedestrian safety, the results of pertinent scientific research should be given significant weight. This article examines many elements of common walkway codes and standards related to changes in level, stairways, stair handrails, and slip resistance. It identifies which portions are based on or supported by empirical data; and which could benefit from additional scientific research. This article identifies areas in which additional research, codes, and standards may be beneficial to enhance pedestrian safety. PMID:26360223

  7. Optimization of effects-assessment of greenside darter (Etheostoma blennioides) exposed to tertiary treated municipal wastewater based on seasonal changes of reproductive endpoints.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Gerald R; Bennett, Charles J; Servos, Mark Roy; McMaster, Mark E

    2014-05-01

    The present study describes the seasonal changes in reproductive endpoints of the greenside darter (Etheostoma blennioides) and its implications for environmental monitoring. Fish collections conducted at the appropriate time for the site-specific sentinel fish species can provide a wide variety of population-level information including recruitment, reproduction, and energy storage. The objectives of the present study were to: 1) characterize seasonal changes in reproductive endpoints of the greenside darter (both sexes) to determine the appropriate period for monitoring of this sentinel species; and 2) evaluate the effect of exposure of this sentinel species to tertiary treated municipal effluent at the selected monitoring period. Based on the selected parameters (gonadosomatic index [GSI], liver somatic index [LSI], condition factor, and in vitro gonadal steroid production [testosterone (T) in both sexes; estradiol (E2) in females; and 11-ketotestosterone (11KT) in males]), the present study provides evidence for the value of collecting darters during recrudescence (late fall/early winter) to ensure temporal stability, minimum variability, and stable steroid production capacity. Darters exposed to tertiary treated municipal effluent tended to be larger and heavier relative to reference fish but did not demonstrate any consistent responses in terms of condition or relative liver size. No effect on gonadal development was observed, even though these tertiary-effluent-exposed fish demonstrated a significant reduction in the ability to produce hormones. The present study suggests that although fish exposed to tertiary treated effluent demonstrate no population-level effects, they are still responding at a physiological level. Documentation of the reproductive cycle of sentinel species allows for selection of the most appropriate sampling period to reduce variability and greatly enhances the reliability and interpretation of biological responses. PMID:24459008

  8. Tertiary care availability and adolescent pregnancy characteristics in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Kadri, Hanan M; Madkhali, Azza; Al-Kadi, Mohammed T; Bakhsh, Hanadi; Alruwaili, Nourah N; Tamim, Hani M

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we aimed to assess the rate of adolescent delivery in a Saudi tertiary health care center and to investigate the association between maternal age and fetal, neonatal, and maternal complications where a professional tertiary medical care service is provided. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed between 2005 and 2010 at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All primigravid Saudi women ?24 weeks gestation, carrying a singleton pregnancy, aged <35 years, and with no chronic medical problems were eligible. Women were divided into three groups based on their age, ie, group 1 (G1) <16 years, group 2 (G2) ?16 up to 19 years, and group 3 (G3) ?19 up to 35 years. Data were collected from maternal and neonatal medical records. We calculated the association between the different age groups and maternal characteristics, as well as events and complications during the antenatal period, labor, and delivery. Results The rates of adolescent delivery were 20.0 and 16.3 per 1,000 births in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Compared with G1 and G2 women, G3 women tended to have a higher body mass index, a longer first and second stage of labor, more blood loss at delivery, and a longer hospital stay. Compared with G1 and G2 women, respectively, G3 women had a 42% and a 67% increased risk of cesarean section, and had a 52% increased risk of instrumental delivery. G3 women were more likely to develop gestational diabetes or anemia, G2 women had a three-fold increased risk of premature delivery (odds ratio 2.81), and G3 neonates had a 50% increased overall risk of neonatal complications (odds ratio 0.51). Conclusion The adolescent birth rate appears to be low in central Saudi Arabia compared with other parts of the world. Excluding preterm delivery, adolescent delivery cared for in a tertiary health care center is not associated with a significantly increased medical risk to the mother, fetus, or neonate. The psychosocial effect of adolescent pregnancy and delivery needs to be assessed. PMID:24729733

  9. Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK): Exploring its Usefulness for Science Lecturers in Higher Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Sharon P.

    2015-03-01

    In the past 30 years, pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) frameworks have become important constructs in educational research undertaken in the school education system and a focus for research for curriculum and teacher education researchers. As regards science, PCK research has been plentiful, but thus far, the concept of PCK (significantly enhanced since its proposal) has only been validated in the school context (Kindergarten to Grade 12). Within this environment, however, it has proven to be a very useful construct for understanding teacher practice and contributing to the improvement of teacher education courses. Knowledge about whether PCK is useful as a conceptual framework for science lecturers (teachers) working in higher education is as yet unknown and represents a gap in the research literature; the research outlined here is a first step in exploring its usefulness in this context. This paper provides an analysis of data obtained from semi-structured interviews conducted with nine Australian science university lecturers from various disciplines and levels of seniority and experience of tertiary teaching, as well as an academic developer skilled in facilitating science academics' understanding of pedagogy in higher education. The research aimed to investigate the extent to which one version of a school-based science PCK framework resonated with the pedagogical thinking of university science lecturers and the ways in which it could influence their teaching practice.

  10. Total parathyroidectomy versus subtotal parathyroidectomy in the treatment of tertiary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ting-Min; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chen, Yen-Ta; Chou, Fong-Fu

    2012-05-01

    The purposes of this study are to evaluate the merits of surgical treatment, including subtotal parathyroidectomy (SP) and total parathyroidectomy (TP), in patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism (THPT) and compare the outcome of the two surgical options. Medical records of patients undergoing parathyroidectomy for THPT were retrospectively reviewed and long-term outcomes between the two groups were compared. Fourteen out of 488 renal transplantation recipients required parathyroidectomy for THPT during a 24-year follow-up period with a median follow-up of 35.5 [interquartile range (IQR), 19.3-133.3] months. All patients had hypercalcemia, whereas 13 had varying symptoms and one was asymptomatic. Median serum calcium level decreased from 12.4 (IQR, 11.9-12.6) mg/dL preoperatively to 8.9 (IQR, 8.1-9.4) mg/dL postoperatively (P = 0.001), whereas median intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) dropped from a preoperative level of 340.5 (IQR, 247-540) pg/mL to 55.1 (IQR, 24.4-66.4) pg/mL after surgery (P = 0.018). Comparison between patients receiving TP and SP revealed no difference in incidence of recurrence or permanent complications, whereas the former had significantly lower calcium levels (P = 0.048) and higher phosphorus levels (P = 0.017) compared with the latter. Moreover, a significant reduction in calcium level was noted in TP group on long-term follow-up compared with their immediately postoperative level (8.1 vs 9.0 mg/dL, respectively, P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant decrease in SP group. We concluded that parathyroidectomy is efficient and safe in treating THPT. Because TP would increase the risk of hypocalcemia, a less radical procedure (SP) is preferred. PMID:22546135

  11. A Highly Coupled Network of Tertiary Interactions in the SAM-I Riboswitch and Their Role in Regulatory Tuning.

    PubMed

    Wostenberg, Christopher; Ceres, Pablo; Polaski, Jacob T; Batey, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    RNA folding in vivo is significantly influenced by transcription, which is not necessarily recapitulated by Mg(2+)-induced folding of the corresponding full-length RNA in vitro. Riboswitches that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level are an ideal system for investigating this aspect of RNA folding as ligand-dependent termination is obligatorily co-transcriptional, providing a clear readout of the folding outcome. The folding of representative members of the SAM-I family of riboswitches has been extensively analyzed using approaches focusing almost exclusively upon Mg(2+) and/or S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-induced folding of full-length transcripts of the ligand binding domain. To relate these findings to co-transcriptional regulatory activity, we have investigated a set of structure-guided mutations of conserved tertiary architectural elements of the ligand binding domain using an in vitro single-turnover transcriptional termination assay, complemented with phylogenetic analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry data. This analysis revealed a conserved internal loop adjacent to the SAM binding site that significantly affects ligand binding and regulatory activity. Conversely, most single point mutations throughout key conserved features in peripheral tertiary architecture supporting the SAM binding pocket have relatively little impact on riboswitch activity. Instead, a secondary structural element in the peripheral subdomain appears to be the key determinant in observed differences in regulatory properties across the SAM-I family. These data reveal a highly coupled network of tertiary interactions that promote high-fidelity co-transcriptional folding of the riboswitch but are only indirectly linked to regulatory tuning. PMID:26343759

  12. Fullerenes in the cretaceous-tertiary boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Heymann, D.; Chibante, L.P.F.; Smalley, R.E. ); Brooks, R.R. ); Wolbach, W.S. )

    1994-07-29

    High-pressure liquid chromatography with ultraviolet-visible spectral analysis of toluene extracts of samples from two Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary sites in New Zealand has revealed the presence of C[sub 60] at concentrations of 0.1 to 0.2 parts per million of the associated soot. This technique verified also that fullerenes are produced in similar amounts in the soots of common flames under ambient atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the C[sub 60] in the K-T boundary layer may have originated in the extensive wildfires that were associated with the cataclysmic impact event that terminated the Mezozoic era about 65 million years ago.

  13. Clinical pharmacy service practice in a Chinese tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Huang, Jing-Jing; Chen, He-Feng; Xu, Bei-Ming

    2015-12-01

    Clinical pharmacy service is focused on the rationality and safety of medication therapy. Clinical pharmacists play an important role in designing therapeutic regimen, preventing medication errors, reducing the incidence of adverse drug reaction, and saving medical costs. Although clinical pharmacy service in China is in its early stage, its development is rapid. In this manuscript, the working model of clinical pharmacists in a Chinese tertiary hospital is introduced, including ward rounds, consultation, stewardship of antimicrobial therapy, drug adverse reaction monitoring, therapeutic drug monitoring, clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics, and training system. With the efforts of clinical pharmacists, there will be a significant increase in the optimization of medication therapy and a notable reduction in preventable adverse drug events as well as health-care cost in China. PMID:26457791

  14. Depositional relations of cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Rocks, Northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, C.M.

    1983-07-01

    Analysis of depositional environments, new paleontologic data, and analogy with depositional patterns observed in areas to the west all indicate the need for revision of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary stratigraphy in northeastern Alaska. In the Sadlerochit Mountains area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the northernderived (Ellesmerian), late Neocomian Kemik Sandstone Member and organic-rich pebble shale member of the Kongakut Formation unconformably overlie Jurassic and Triassic rocks. The unconformity, which is of midNeocomian age, is present throughout northernmost Alaska and passes southward into a conformable shelf sequence. After pebble shale deposition, the depositional pattern is simply one of progradational basin filling from a southern (Brookian) provenance. This pattern is represented in vertical sequence initially by deep-marine basinal deposits succeeded by prodelta slope shales, and ultimately by deltaic deposits that prograded to the east or northeast in a predictable fashion over most of the area.

  15. Updated Simulation Studies of Damage Limit of LHC Tertiary Collimators

    E-print Network

    Quaranta, Elena; Bruce, Roderik; Carra, Federico; Cerutti, Francesco; Gradassi, Paolo; Lechner, Anton; Redaelli, Stefano; Skordis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    The tertiary collimators (TCTs) in the LHC, installed in front of the experiments, in standard operation intercept fractions of 10?3 halo particles. However, they risk to be hit by high-intensity primary beams in case of asynchronous beam dump. TCT damage thresholds were initially inferred from results of destructive tests on a TCT jaw, supported by numerical simulations, assuming simplified impact scenarios with one single bunch hitting the jaw with a given impact parameter. In this paper, more realistic failure conditions, including a train of bunches and taking into account the full collimation hierarchy, are used to derive updated damage limits. The results are used to update the margins in the collimation hierarchy and could thus potentially have an influence on the LHC performance.

  16. Penile cancer: Perspective from a Canadian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Benjamin; Izawa, Jonathan; Pautler, Stephen; Chin, Joseph; Power, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is rare in North America; however, the morbidity can be devastating. This analysis represents the first reported penile cancer experience at a tertiary care centre in Canada. Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of all patients who received care at our centre for penile SCC from 2005 until the present time. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected for all patients. Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier methods with log-rank test and Cox regression for univariate and multivariate analysis, respectively. Results: We identified 42 patients who were treated at our centre for penile SCC. Of these, 29% underwent excisional biopsy, 38% had partial penectomy, and 33% had total penectomy. Five patients with high-risk tumours underwent modified inguinal lymph node dissection (ILND), while 7 patients had radical ILND for clinically palpable disease. Overall, the median cancer specific survival (CSS) was undefined, with a 60% survival at 102 months. However CSS was significantly correlated to pT stage, pN stage, and tumour grade. The median follow-up was 25 months (interquartile range: 11–48). Conclusion: These findings confirm the poor CSS of patients with positive lymph nodes in penile SCC. Patients with pN0 after ILND had a durable CSS. Risk factors for penile SCC were confirmed as elevated body mass index, positive smoking history, and lack of circumcision. This first epidemiologic report on penile SCC from a Canadian tertiary care centre should be expanded to other national centres. PMID:26644802

  17. Palaeomagnetic evidence for Tertiary counterclockwise rotation of Adria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, E.; Drobne, K.; ?osovi?, V.; Moro, A.

    2003-12-01

    With the aim of obtaining Tertiary palaeomagnetic directions for the Adriatic Foreland of the Dinaric nappe system, we carried out a palaeomagnetic study on platform carbonates from stable Istria, from the northwestern and the Central Dalmatia segment of imbricated Adria. Despite the weak to very weak natural remanences of these rocks, we obtained tectonically useful palaeomagnetic directions for 25 sites from 20 localities. All exhibit westerly declinations, both before and after tilt correction. Concerning the age of the magnetizations, we conclude that five subhorizontal and magnetite bearing Eocene localities from stable Istria are likely to carry primary remanence, whereas three tilted and hematite-bearing ones were remagnetized. In the northwestern segment of imbricated Adria the cluster of the mean directions improved after tectonic correction indicating pre-tilting magnetization. In contrast, Maastrichtian-Eocene platform carbonates from Central Dalmatian were remagnetized in connection with the late Eocene-Oligocene deformation or Miocene hydrocarbon migration. Based on the appropriate site/locality means, we calculate mean palaeomagnetic directions for the above three areas and suggest an alternative interpretation of the data of Kissel et al. [J. Geophys. Res. 100 (1995) 14999] for the flysch of Central Dalmatia. The four area mean direction define a regional palaeomagnetic direction of Dec=336°, Inc=+52°, k=107, ?95=9°. From these data we conclude that stable Istria, in close coordination with imbricated Adria, must have rotated by 30° counterclockwise in the Tertiary, relative to Africa and stable Europe. We suggest that the latest Miocene-early Pliocene counterclockwise rotations observed in northwestern Croatia and northeastern Slovenia were driven by that of the Adriatic Foreland, i.e. the rotation of the latter took place between 6 and 4 Ma.

  18. Positive tertiary appraisals and posttraumatic stress disorder in U.S. male veterans of the war in Vietnam: the roles of positive affirmation, positive reformulation, and defensive denial.

    PubMed

    Dohrenwend, Bruce P; Neria, Yuval; Turner, J Blake; Turse, Nicholas; Marshall, Randall; Lewis-Fernandez, Roberto; Koenen, Karestan C

    2004-06-01

    A 70.9% majority of the U.S. male veterans in a nationwide sample appraised the impact of their service in Vietnam on their present lives as mainly positive. A substantial minority, 41.7%, judged the effects to be highly salient. With controls on level of exposure to war-zone stressors measured with data from military records, the valence and salience of these appraisals are investigated in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other indicators of wartime and postwar functioning. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that mainly positive tertiary appraisals are affirmations of successful wartime and postwar adaptation rather than defensive denials related to maladaptive outcomes. The possibility that mainly positive tertiary appraisals also contribute to successful postwar adaptation is discussed. PMID:15279526

  19. Differences in eighth grade science student and teacher perceptions of students' level of input into academic planning and decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Jarrett Michael

    Teachers are expected to improve their planning, instruction, and assessment as they progress through their career. An important component to teachers knowing what to modify in their teaching style is being able to solicit meaningful feedback from students. This mixed-methods study was conducted to provide teachers with a quantitative method to collect data about their teaching using the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES). Phase 1 allowed students to provide anonymous feedback to their teachers that the teachers could later reflect upon in conjunction with the students' other feedback. Using measures of central tendencies, it was determined that of the five categories of the CLES the area of student negotiation was statistically different from the other categories. While eight teachers had sufficient (n>10) student data to be invited to participate in Phase 2, only five of the teachers choose to participate in a semi-structured interview to further examine the potential differences between teacher and student perception of student negotiation with the curriculum, instruction and assessment that occurs in the classroom. Coding the interview transcripts led to three categories: 1) teaching style (with themes including curriculum, instruction, and assessment, and sub themes of teacher centered and student centered); 2) external pressures (with themes of standards , standardized tests, and socioeconomic conditions); 3) effectiveness of student negotiation (with themes of positive effect or no effect on motivation). The five teachers who participated in Phase 2 had varying levels of awareness and willingness to adjust their classroom curriculum, instruction, and assessment to include student negotiation. All but one teacher, however, saw the value in increasing student negotiation in the classroom and desired to continue to change their teaching to include more student negotiation.

  20. Ophthalmic manifestations of acute and chronic leukemias presenting to a tertiary care center in India

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Jacob; John, M Joseph; Thomas, Satish; Kaur, Gurvinder; Batra, Nitin; Xavier, Wilson J

    2015-01-01

    Context: Screening for ocular manifestations of leukemia, although not a routine practice, is important as they may antedate systemic disease or form an isolated focus of its relapse. Aims: This study evaluates the spectrum of ocular manifestations in acute and chronic leukemias presenting to a tertiary care center in India. Settings and Design: Subjects of leukemia presenting to a tertiary care center in India. Subjects and Methods: A prospective, cross-sectional study looking at the spectrum of ocular manifestations in all inpatients of acute or chronic leukemia. Statistical Analysis Used: The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences for Windows software, version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA). Results: The study subjects (n = 96) comprised 61 males and 35 females whose age ranged from 18 months to 91 years (mean = 39.73, ±22.1). There were 79 adults and 17 children, 53 new and 43 existing patients, 68 acute and 28 chronic, 61 myeloid and 35 lymphoid patients. Ocular lesions were found in 42 patients (43.8%). The ocular manifestations of leukemia were significantly (P = 0.01467) more frequent in acute 35/68 (51.9%) than chronic 7/28 (25%) leukemias. Primary or direct leukemic infiltration was seen in 8 (8.3%) subjects while secondary or indirect involvement due to anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperviscosity, total body irradiation, and immunosuppression were seen in 42 (43.8%) subjects. Ocular changes were present in 37/79 (46.8%) adults and 5/17 (29.4%) children (P = 0.09460). Twenty-eight males (28/61) 45.9% and 14/35 (40%) females had ocular manifestations (P = 0.2874). The ocular manifestations were significantly (P = 0.01158) more frequent in myeloid leukemias 32/61 (52.9%) than lymphoid leukemias 10/35 (28.6%). Conclusions: Leukemic ophthalmic lesions were found in 42/96 (43.8%) patients. Ocular involvement is more often seen in adults, acute and myeloid leukemias. All the primary leukemic manifestations were seen in males. A periodic ophthalmic examination should be mandatory for all leukemic patients, as ocular changes are often picked up in asymptomatic patients. PMID:26576524