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1

Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.  

PubMed

The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. PMID:14994307

Roguin, Ariel

2004-03-01

2

Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level  

E-print Network

- 1 - Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level March 22, 2012), the scientists achieved a whopping 100.75 tesla--a magnetic field nearly 100 times more powerful than a junkyard and insulators. The 100-tesla level is roughly equivalent to 2 million times Earth's magnetic field. #12;- 2

3

Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet  

SciTech Connect

A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

2005-09-01

4

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

E-print Network

NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

Weston, Ken

5

Measuring and shimming the magnetic field of a 4 Tesla MRI magnet  

E-print Network

The Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory (BMRL) of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) has ordered from the Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) a superconducting, self-shielded, solenoidal magnet with a maximum field of 4 Tesla...

Kyriazis, Georgios

2012-06-07

6

Magnetic Field Interactions of Orthodontic Wires during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) at 1.5 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Orthodontic appliances pose a potential risk during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to forces on metallic objects within the static magnetic field of MRI systems. The aim of the present investigation was to measure forces on orthodontic wires caused by the static magnetic field of a 1.5-Tesla MRI system, and to assess the safety hazards associated with these forces.

Dirk Schulze; Gerhard Adam; Bärbel Kahl-Nieke

2005-01-01

7

A complete digital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system at low magnetic field (0.1 Tesla)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new complete digital MRI system is developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals at low magnetic field (0.1 Tesla). The system is based on digital signal processor (DSP) that functions also as a controller and as an interface between the frequency translator and the digital synthesiser. The final system should be \\

Kosai RAOOF; A. Asfour; J. M. Fournier

2002-01-01

8

Overall critical current density of chevrel wires in magnetic fields up to 24 tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wires of Pb0.6Sn0.4Mo6S8 with a protective sheet of Niobium have been carefully drawn and the critical current density Jc has been measured on small coils in magnetic fields up to 24 tesla. At 1.9K, the overall JCO, exceeds 100 A\\/mm2 at 20 tesla and 60 A\\/mm2 at 24 tesla. These large values highlight the good sintering between all the grains.

M. Decroux; N. Cheggour; A. Gupta; V. Bouquet; R. Chevrel; J. A. A. J. Perenboom; Ø. Fischer

1996-01-01

9

Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

2013-01-01

10

Comparison of low-field (0.2 Tesla) and high-field (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to evaluate the reliability of low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we examined 22 patients using a 0.2-Tesla magnet unit in comparison with a 1.5-Tesla system. The MRI findings were compared with the intraoperative findings. Concerning the diagnosis of meniscal tears, the gradings of both systems differed only in three cases. The specificity was 97% (both systems), the sensitivity

B. Kladny; K. Glückert; B. Swoboda; W. Beyer; G. Weseloh

1995-01-01

11

Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla  

SciTech Connect

We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

Crooker, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Samarth, Nitin [PENN STATE U

2008-01-01

12

Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left

Ilse-Gerlinde Sunk; Siegfried Trattnig; Winfried B Graninger; Love Amoyo; Birgit Tuerk; Carl-Walter Steiner; Josef S Smolen; Klaus Bobacz

2006-01-01

13

Detection of pico-Tesla magnetic fields using magneto-electric sensors at room temperature  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of low-frequency (10{sup -2}-10{sup 3} Hz) minute magnetic field variations (10{sup -12} Tesla) at room temperature in a passive mode of operation would be critically enabling for deployable neurological signal interfacing and magnetic anomaly detection applications. However, there is presently no magnetic field sensor capable of meeting all of these requirements. Here, we present new bimorph and push-pull magneto-electric laminate composites, which incorporate a charge compensation mechanism (or bridge) that dramatically enhances noise rejection, enabling achievement of such requirements.

Zhai Junyi; Xing Zengping; Dong Shuxiang; Li Jiefang; Viehland, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

2006-02-06

14

High-temperature superconductor bulk magnets that can trap magnetic fields of over 17 tesla at 29K  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-grain high-temperature superconductors of the form RE-Ba-Cu-O (where RE is a rare-earth element) can trap magnetic fields of several tesla at low temperatures, and so can be used for permanent magnet applications. The magnitude of the trapped field is proportional to the critical current density and the volume of the superconductor. Various potential engineering applications for such magnets have emerged,

Masaru Tomita; Masato Murakami

2003-01-01

15

Normal-state transport in electron-doped La2-xCexCuO4 thin films in magnetic fields up to 40 Tesla  

E-print Network

Normal-state transport in electron-doped La2-xCexCuO4 thin films in magnetic fields up to 40 Tesla.17 are studied in magnetic fields up to 40 Tesla. For the whole doping region investigated, the negative, the upper critical mag- netic field Bc2 order of 100 Tesla 8 is too high to be achieved. The n-type HTSCs

Moshchalkov, Victor V.

16

Early clinical experience with high-field 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

Despite early concerns regarding potential tissue attenuation of signal and lack of inherent contrast, magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla has proved to be a valuable extension of magnetic resonance imaging. In this report, we review our initial experience in imaging of the central nervous system, abdomen, chest and pelvis. In the central nervous system, exquisite morphologic detail has been demonstrated. This has added both in terms of sensitivity and specificity to neuroradiologic diagnosis. In the chest and abdomen, despite problems with respiratory and cardiac motion, good morphologic detail can be obtained. In the thorax, our work has demonstrated the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to clearly define the relationship of masses to the hilum and mediastinum. Imaging of the great vessels with magnetic resonance imaging has also proved useful. In the abdomen, magnetic resonance imaging has been useful in looking at the extent of masses identified, in characterizing focal liver masses, and in staging a variety of neoplasms. The high contrast resolution and the ability to image in a variety of planes is particularly helpful in the pelvis. In the male pelvis our work has primarily dealt with staging extracapsular prostatic carcinoma. In the female pelvis, ascertaining the nature of adnexal masses and defining staging primary carcinomas and their response to therapy has been the major thrust of our efforts. Surface coils and other technical improvements will undoubtedly extend the range of application at high field. PMID:3562885

Kressel, H Y

1986-01-01

17

A Eight-Tesla Superconducting Magnet for Cyclotron Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Superconducting magnets have become broadly used for cyclotrons due to advantages of compactness and lower operation costs compared to conventional magnets. To gain benefits of higher magnetic fields beyond the 5 tesla cyclotron magnets which are under operation in several laboratories including the MSU\\/NSCL, a test magnet which can produce fields higher than 8 tesla was constructed. Our goal was

Jong-Won Kim

1994-01-01

18

Mental Rotation Studied by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging at High Field (4 Tesla): Performance and Cortical Activation  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the performance and cortical activation patterns during a mental rotation task (Shepard & Metzler, 1971) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMlU) at high field (4 Tesla). Twenty-four human subjects were imaged (fMRI group), whereas six additional subjects performed the task without being imaged (control group). All subjects were shown pairs of perspective drawings of 31, objects and asked

Georgios A. Tagaris; Seong-Gi Kim; John P. Strupp; Peter Andersen; Kamil U??urbil; Apostolos P. Georgopoulos

1997-01-01

19

Bohr quantum theory and (Tesla) magnetic monopoles  

E-print Network

In this work we apply Bohr (Old quantum atomic) theory for analysis of the magnetic monopoles problem. We reproduce exactly some basic elements of the Dirac magnetic monopoles theory, especially Dirac electric/magnetic charge quantization condition. Also, we suggest a new, effective, simply called Tesla model (for analogy with positions of the solenoids by Tesla inductive motor) of the magnetic monopole instead of usual effective Dirac model (half-infinite, very tinny solenoid) of the magnetic monopole. In our, i.e. Tesla model we use three equivalent very tiny solenoids connected in series with a voltage source. One end of any solenoid is placed at the circumference of a circle and solenoids are directed radially toward circle center. Length of any solenoid is a bit smaller than finite circle radius so that other end of any solenoid is very close to the circle center. Angles between neighbouring solenoids equal $120^{\\circ}$. All this implies that, practically, there is no magnetic field, or, magnetic pole, e.g. $S$, in the circle center, and that whole system holds only other, $N$ magnetic pole, at the ends of the solenoids at circle circumference.

Vladan Pankovic; Darko V. Kapor; Stevica Djurovic; Miodrag Krmar

2010-07-02

20

Analytical studies of advanced high-field designs: 20-tesla large-bore superconducting magnets  

SciTech Connect

Several emerging technologies have been combined in a conceptual design study demonstrating the feasibility of producing ultrahigh magnetic fields from large-bore superconducting solenoid magnets. Several designs have been produced that approach peak fields of 20-T in 2.0-m diameter inner bores. The analytical expressions comprising the main features of CONDUCTOR and ADVMAGNET, the two computer programs used in the design of these advanced magnets, are also discussed. These magnets and design techniques will make a paramount contribution to the national mirror-fusion endeavor and to the newly emerging field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) whole-body scanners.

Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

1983-09-30

21

Thermopower measurements in magnetic fields up to 17 tesla using the toggled heating method  

SciTech Connect

A dc method for thermopower (TP) measurements in magnetic fields up to 17 T in the temperature range from 3 K to 300 K is introduced. A special heating technique named {open_quote}{open_quote}seesaw heating,{close_quote}{close_quote} a method similar to ac methods, was developed and resulted in good thermal stability, better accuracy and a faster procedure. Chromel{endash}constantan thermocouples were utilized for measuring probes because of small and simple temperature dependence of magnetic field effect. Finding an empirical formula for all the calibration curves of TP of Chromel enable us to measure TP at any field and at any temperature. Finally, the experimental results on ErCo{sub 2} and LaRu{sub 2} are presented as test examples to demonstrate the possibilities and accuracy of our setup. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Resel, R.; Gratz, E. [Institute for Experimental Physics, Technical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Institute for Experimental Physics, Technical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Burkov, A.T. [A. F. Ioffe Physico--Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg 184021 (Russia)] [A. F. Ioffe Physico--Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Science, St. Petersburg 184021 (Russia); Nakama, T.; Higa, M.; Yagasaki, K. [Department of Physics, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-01 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-01 (Japan)

1996-05-01

22

Magnetization curves in underdoped cuprates measured at low T in fields up to 45 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Torque magnetometry is capable of resolving the weak diamagnetic which extends to temperatures TTc in hole-doped cuprate crystals. Recently, we reported^1 that the magnetization M above Tc scales accurately as the Nernst signal eN and remains robust to fields of 33 T. The results strongly support the scenario in which thermally created vortices destroy long-range phase coherence at Tc. We

Lu Li; Yayu Wang; Mike Naughton; S. Ono; Yoichi Ando; Nai Phuan Ong

2006-01-01

23

First test of a power-pulsed electronics system on a GRPC detector in a 3-Tesla magnetic field  

E-print Network

An important technological step towards the realization of an ultra-granular hadronic calorimeter to be used in the future International Linear Collider (ILC) experiments has been made. A 33X50 cm2 GRPC detector equipped with a power-pulsed electronics board offering a 1cm2 lateral segmentation was successfully tested in a 3-Tesla magnet operating at the H2 beam line of the CERN SPS. An important reduction of power consumption with no deterioration of the detector performance is obtained when the power-pulsing mode is applied. This important result shows that ultra-granular calorimeters for ILC experiments are not only an attractive but also a realistic option.

L. Caponetto; C. Combaret; C. de la Taille; F. Dulucq; R. Kieffer; I. Laktineh; N. Lumb; L. Mirabito; N. Seguin-Moreau

2011-11-23

24

Status of the NHMFL 60 tesla quasi-continuous magnet  

SciTech Connect

All components of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory`s (NHMFL) 60 T quasi-continuous magnet are now under construction, with complete delivery and installation expected in early 1996. This research magnet has a cold bore of 32 mm and will produce a constant 60 tesla for 100 ms plus a wide variety of other pulse shapes such as linear ramps, steps, crowbar decays, and longer flat-tops at lower fields. Fabrication and testing of prototype coils are described along with the layout, construction status, and protection philosophy of the 400 MW power supply. Examples of simulated pulse shapes are shown.

Campbell, L.J.; Boenig, H.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Schilig, J.B.; Sims, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schneider-Muntau, H.J. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1995-07-01

25

Magnet Design of a Prototype Structure for the X-ray FELs at TESLA  

E-print Network

Magnet Design of a Prototype Structure for the X-ray FELs at TESLA M. Tischer, J. Pflüger Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB, DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract XFEL undulators for the TESLA device is suggested so that both field integrals are trimmed close to zero for all gaps. TESLA­FEL 2000

26

The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet  

SciTech Connect

Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.)

1992-11-09

27

3Tesla versus 1.5Tesla Magnetic Resonance Diffusion and Perfusion Imaging in Hyperacute Ischemic Stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Clinical 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging systems are becoming widespread. No studies have examined differences between 1.5-tesla and 3-tesla imaging for the assessment of hyperacute ischemic stroke (<6 h from symptom onset). Our objective was to compare 1.5-tesla and 3-tesla diffusion and perfusion imaging for hyperacute stroke using optimized protocols. Methods: Three patients or their surrogate provided informed consent. Diffusion-weighted

Robert K. Kosior; Caitlin J. Wright; Jayme C. Kosior; Carol Kenney; James N. Scott; Richard Frayne; Michael D. Hill

2007-01-01

28

Prosthetic heart valves and annuloplasty rings: assessment of magnetic field interactions, heating, and artifacts at 1.5 Tesla.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to determine the magnetic resonance (MR) safety aspects and artifacts for three different heart valve prostheses and two different annuloplasty rings that have not been evaluated previously in association with the 1.5-T MR environment. Ex vivo testing was performed using previously described techniques for the evaluation of magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (gel-filled phantom and fluoroptic thermometry; 15 min of MR imaging at a whole body-averaged specific absorption rate of 1.2 W/kg), and artifacts (using T1-weighted, spin echo, and gradient echo pulse sequences). One heart valve prosthesis and one annuloplasty ring showed no magnetic field interactions. Two heart valve prostheses and one annuloplasty ring displayed relatively minor magnetic field interactions (i.e., deflection angle < or = 6 degrees, torque, +1). Heating was < or = 0.7 degrees C for the five different implants. Artifacts varied depending on the amount and type of metal used to make the implants. For the three heart valve prostheses and two annuloplasty rings, the lack of substantial magnetic field interactions and relatively minor hearing indicated that MR procedures may be conducted safetly in patients with these implants using MR systems operating with static magneticfields of 1.5 T or less. Notably, these findings essentially apply to 54 different heart valve prostheses and 37 different annuloplasty rings (i.e., based on the various models and sizes available for these implants). PMID:11777223

Shellock, F G

2001-01-01

29

Series tests of fine mesh photomultiplier tubes in magnetic fields of up to 1.2 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new lead\\/scintillating-fibre calorimeter (“SpaCal”) for the backward region of the H1 experiment at HERA (DESY) is equipped with fine mesh phototubes which operate in a magnetic field close to 1 T. A large sample of these tubes of the types Hamamatsu R5505 and R5506, and Hamamatsu R2490-05, have been tested in fields of up to 1.2T. We have investigated

R.-D. Appuhn; C. Arndt; E. Barrelet; R. Barschke; U. Bassler; T. Bipp; V. Boudry; F. Brasse; D. Bruncko; R. Buchholz; S. Chechelnitski; B. Claxton; G. Cozzika; J. Cvach; S. Dagoret-Campagne; W. D. Dau; H. Deckers; T. Deckers; F. Descamps; M. Dirkmann; J. Dowdell; V. Efremenko; E. Eisenhandler; A. N. Eliseev; G. Falley; J. Ferencei; M. Fleischer; B. Fominykh; K. Gadow; U. Goerlach; L. A. Gorbov; I. Gorelov; M. Grewe; L. Hajduk; A. Heck; I. Herynek; J. Hladkı; M. Hütte; H. Hutter; W. Janczur; J. Janoth; L. Jönsson; H. Kolanoski; V. Korbel; F. Kriván; D. Lacour; B. Laforge; F. Lamarche; M. P. J. Landon; J.-F. Laporte; F. Lehner; R. Maracek; K. Meier; A. Meyer; A. Migliori; F. Moreau; G. Müller; P. Murín; V. Nagovizin; T. C. Nicholls; D. Ozerov; E. Perez; J. P. Pharabod; R. Pöschl; A. Rostovtsev; C. Royon; K. Rybicki; R. Schediwy; S. Schleif; K. Schmitt; A. Schuhmacher; A. Semenov; V. Shekelyan; Y. Sirois; P. A. Smirnov; V. Solochenko; J. Špalek; S. Spielmann; H. Steiner; A. Stellberger; J. Stiewe; M. Tasevskı; V. Tchernyshov; K. Thiele; E. Tzamariudaki; S. Valkár; D. Vandenplas; G. Villet; K. Wacker; A. Walther; M. Weber; D. Wegener; T. Wenk; J. Žá?ek; A. Zhokin; K. Zuber

1998-01-01

30

Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

1977-01-01

31

Radio frequency magnetic field mapping of a 3 Tesla birdcage coil: Experimental and theoretical dependence on sample properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

The RF B1 distribution was studied, theoretically and experi- mentally, in phantoms and in the head of volunteers usin ga3T MRI system equipped with a birdcage coil. Agreement between numerical simulation and experiment demonstrates that B1 dis- tortion at high field can be explained with 3D full-Maxwell cal- culations. It was found that the B1 distribution in the transverse plane

Marcello Alecci; Christopher M. Collins; Michael B. Smith; Peter Jezzard

2001-01-01

32

Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

1977-01-01

33

2 Tesla class magnet fabrication using Bi2212 Ag-sheathed tape  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three test magnets of pancake-shaped coils using Bi-2212 tape were prepared by the wind-and-react technique. At liquid helium\\u000a temperature, 16 pancake coils which were stacked in a volume of l4? ?48?x 75H mm generated a magnetic field of 2.25 Tesla (T), which was within 1% of the calculated B0. The load lines of the magnet at every temperature from 4.2

S. Yuhya; M. Hiraoka

1995-01-01

34

Six tesla analyzing magnet for heavy-ion beam transport  

SciTech Connect

A superconducting analyzer magnet for particle beam deflection has been designed and is being fabricated for use at the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS). This six tesla magnet will provide 45/sup 0/ of deflection for the heavy-ion beams from the ATLAS tandem electrostatic accelerator and together with its twin will replace the existing conventional 90/sup 0/ analyzer magnet which will become inadequate when ATLAS is completed.

Smith, R.P.; Bollinger, L.; Erskine, J.; Genens, L.; Hoffman, J.

1980-01-01

35

Performance test of a LSO-APD PET module in a 9.4 Tesla magnet  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the future goals is to install a PET detector in a magnetic field for a combined PET\\/MRT device. Thus, in this study the influence of a 9.4 Tesla magnetic field on a small scintillation detector with avalanche photodiode (APD) readout was tested. The detector, comprising a 3.7×3.7×12.0 mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystal coupled to the 3 mm Ø

B. Pichler; E. Lorenz; R. Mirzoyan; W. Pimpl; F. Roder; M. Schwaiger; S. I. Ziegler

1997-01-01

36

Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

1993-02-01

37

Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

Mantsch, Paul M.

1988-07-08

38

Nikola Tesla: 145 years of visionary ideas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper gives a short review of Tesla's major inventions including the rotating magnetic field, the Tesla coil and transformer, and the power struggle between Edison's direct current systems and the Tesla-Westinghouse alternating current approach. It also looks at some of Tesla's visionary ideas

Jasmina Vujic; Aleksandar Marincic; Milos Ercegovac; Bratislav Milovanovic

2001-01-01

39

Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of Y Ba2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC(H) data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC(H). The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

Sinclair, J. W.; Zuev, Y. L.; Cantoni, C.; Wee, S. H.; Varanasi, C.; Thompson, J. R.; Christen, D. K.

2012-11-01

40

Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of YBa2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC.H/ data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC.H/. The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

Sinclair, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zuev, Yuri L [ORNL; Cantoni, Claudia [ORNL; Wee, Sung Hun [ORNL; Varanasi, C. V. [University of Dayton Research Institute; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL

2012-01-01

41

Bohr - Planck quantum theory, (Tesla) magnetic monopoles and fine structure constant  

E-print Network

In this work we apply Bohr-Planck (Old quantum atomic and radiation) theory, i.e. and quasi-classical methods for analysis of the magnetic monopoles and other problems. We reproduce exactly some basic elements of the Dirac magnetic monopoles theory, especially Dirac electric/magnetic charge quantization condition. Also, we suggest a new, effective, simply called Tesla model (for analogy with positions of the solenoids by Tesla inductive motor) of the magnetic monopole instead of usual effective Dirac model (half-infinite, very tinny solenoid) of the magnetic monopole. In our, i.e. Tesla model we use three equivalent tiny solenoids connected in series with a voltage source. One end of any solenoid is placed at the circumference of a circle and solenoids are directed radial toward circle center. Length of any solenoid is a bit smaller than finite circle radius so that other end of any solenoid is very close to the circle center. Angles between neighboring solenoids equal $120^{\\circ}$. All this implies that, practically, there is no magnetic field, or, magnetic pole, e.g. $S$, in the circle center, and that whole system holds only other, $N$ magnetic pole, at the ends of the solenoids at circle circumference. Finally, we reproduce relatively satisfactory value of the fine structure constant using Planck, i.e. Bose-Einstein statistics and Wien displacement law.

Vladan Pankovic; Darko V. Kapor; Stevica Djurovic; Miodrag Krmar

2010-07-02

42

RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.

Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

2005-09-01

43

Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)  

SciTech Connect

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

1998-08-22

44

Magnetic Field Problem: Measuring Current  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A cross section of two circular wire loops carrying the exact same current is shown above (position given in centimeters and magnetic field given in milli-Tesla). You can click-drag to read the magnitude of the magnetic field.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2007-03-03

45

Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

1976-01-01

46

Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

2014-04-01

47

Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.  

PubMed

This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0?7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0?=?7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (?T?=?8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX/RX applicator that supports MR imaging, MR thermometry and targeted RF heating in one device. PMID:23613896

Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

2013-01-01

48

Programmable infusion pump and catheter: evaluation using 3-tesla magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

Objective.? This study assessed 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) issues for a programmable infusion pump and associated catheters. Methods.? A programmable infusion pump and associated catheters (MedStream Programmable Infusion Pump, 40 mL; SureStream TI Coil-Reinforced Intraspinal Catheter; SureStream TI Connector; and SureStream Silicone Catheter; Codman and Shurtleff Inc., a Johnson & Johnson Company, Raynham, MA, USA) underwent evaluation for magnetic field interactions (deflection angle and torque), heating (transmit/receive body radiofrequency coil; whole-body averaged specific absorption rate, 3 W/kg for 15 min), functional changes (before and after MRI using eight different MRI conditions), and artifacts (T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences) at 3-Tesla. Results.? The programmable infusion pump and associated catheters exhibited minor magnetic field interactions. Heating was not excessive (? 1.9°), especially considering the experimental conditions used for this evaluation (ie, relatively high radiofrequency power/specific absorption rate level and use of a nonperfused phantom). The function of three out of six pumps was temporarily altered by exposures to 3-Tesla MRI conditions. Reset was achieved in each case. Artifacts were relatively large for the pump and minor for the catheter. Conclusions.? The programmable infusion pump and catheters will not pose increased risk to a patient examined using 3-Tesla MRI as long as specific safety guidelines are followed, which includes interrogation of the pump post-MRI to ensure proper settings. Artifacts for the programmable infusion pump may impact the diagnostic use of MRI if the area of interest is in the same area or near the device. PMID:22151092

Shellock, Frank G; Crivelli, Rocco; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

2008-07-01

49

Visualization of magnetic resonance-compatible needles at 1.5 and 0.2 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  For two types of passively visualizable magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible needles, the size of susceptibility artifacts was\\u000a investigated at 0.2 and 1.5 Tesla (T) and assessed regarding their suitability for needle visualization.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Phantom trials were performed using T1-weighted spin echo (SE), turbospin echo (TSE) and gradient echo (GE) sequences and\\u000a different angles ? between the needles and the main magnetic field

Christian Frahm; Hans-Björn Gehl; Uwe Hans Melchert; Hans-Dieter Weiss

1996-01-01

50

A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

2003-01-01

51

Computing in the Fast Lane Magnetic Fields of Dreams  

E-print Network

LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY MAGAZINE MAY 2008 #12;1663 los alamos science and technology Magnetic Field Laboratory-Los Alamos prepares the 100-tesla multi-shot magnet for an experiment. One of the most powerful, repeat-use magnets in the world, the 100-tesla is opening up new frontiers in the study

52

LBL (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) Program of 1 Meter Long, 50 mm Diameter Bore, Dipoles with Fields Greater Than 8 Tesla.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Model dipole superconducting magnets with central fields above 8 tesla are being developed for future multi-TeV colliding beam accelerators. The first three models are 1 meter long, have nominal 50 mm diameter cold bores, and utilize Nb-Ti superconductor ...

W. Hassenzahl, W. Gilbert, C. Taylor, R. Meuser

1983-01-01

53

3D calculations of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) 3 Tesla magnet  

SciTech Connect

A 20 TeV Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proton accelerator is being proposed by the High Energy Physics Community. One proposal would consist of a ring of magnets 164 km in circumference with a field strength of 3 Tesla and would cost 2.7 billion dollars. The magnet consists of stacked steel laminations with superconducting coils. The desired field uniformity is obtained for all fields from 0.2 to 3 Tesla by using three (or more) different pole shapes. These three different laminations are stacked in the order 1-2-3-1-2-3-... creating a truly three dimensional geometry. A three laminated stack 1-2-3 with periodic boundary conditions at 1 and 3 was assigned about 5000 finite elements per lamination and solved using the computer program TOSCA. To check the TOSCA results, the field of each of the three different shaped laminations was calculated separately using periodic boundary conditions and compared to the two dimensional field calculations using TRIM. This was done for a constant permeability of 2000 and using the B-H table for fully annealed 1010 steel. The difference of the field calculations in the region of interest was always less than +-.2%

Lari, R.J.

1984-01-01

54

Operating nanoliter scale NMR microcoils in a 1 tesla field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microcoil probes enclosing sample volumes of 1.2, 3.3, 7.0, and 81 nanoliters are constructed as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detectors for operation in a 1 tesla permanent magnet. The probes for the three smallest volumes utilize a novel auxiliary tuning inductor for which the design criteria are given. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and line width of water samples are measured. Based on the measured DC resistance of the microcoils, together with the calculated radio frequency (RF) resistance of the tuning inductor, the SNR is calculated and shown to agree with the measured values. The details of the calculations indicate that the auxiliary inductor does not degrade the NMR probe performance. The diameter of the wire used to construct the microcoils is shown to affect the signal line widths.

McDowell, Andrew F.; Adolphi, Natalie L.

2007-09-01

55

Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

2013-03-01

56

Progress in the manufacture of the cable-in-conduit Nb3Sn outsert coils for the 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet is being built in a collaborative effort between the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University and the Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Hybrid Magnet combines a resistive insert magnet with two Nb3Sn and one NbTi superconducting cable-in-conduit outsert coil to produce the required field on

Thomas A. Painter; John R. Miller; Leonard T. Summers; Alessandro Bonito-Oliva; A. L. Devernoe; Gary M. Ciancetta; Martin J. King; Juan Bascunan; Grigory Rutman; Robert M. Schaedler; Hrachoohi Boghosian; Alex Shapiro

1994-01-01

57

High field superconducting magnets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

2011-01-01

58

Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla  

SciTech Connect

Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

Solis, S. E. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, N.Y. 11973 (United States); Centro de Investigacion e Instrumentacion e Imagenologia Medica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O. [Centro de Investigacion e Instrumentacion e Imagenologia Medica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Mexico, DF 09340 (Mexico); Tomasi, D. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, N.Y. 11973 (United States)

2008-08-11

59

Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been developing the technology for using brittle superconductor in high-field accelerator magnets. HD1, the latest in a series of magnets, contains two, double-layer Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils. This single-bore dipole configuration, using the highest performance conductor available, was designed and assembled for a 16 tesla conductor/structure/pre-stress proof-of-principle. With the combination of brittle conductor and high Lorentz stress, considerable care was taken to predict the magnet's mechanical responses to pre-stress, cool-down, and excitation. Subsequent cold testing satisfied expectations: Training started at 13.6 T, 83% of 'short-sample', achieved 90% in 10 quenches, and reached its peak bore field (16 T) after 19 quenches. The average plateau, {approx}92% of 'short-sample', appeared to be limited by 'stick-slip' conductor motions, consistent with the 16.2 T conductor 'lift-off' pre-stress that was chosen for this first test. Some lessons learned and some implications for future conductor and magnet technology development are presented and discussed.

Lietzke, A.F.; Bartlett, S.; Bish, P.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Goli, M.; Hafalia, R.R.; Higley, H.; Hannaford, R.; Lau, W.; Liggens, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.; Swanson, J.

2003-10-01

60

Magnetic Fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page and its annex describes, in trivial terms, the physics of magnetic fields and the history of its discovery. Included is the work of Halley, Oersted, Ampere and Maxwell. It also describes a way of demonstrating it in the classroom, using a vu-graph projector. Later sections #5, #5a and #6 extend this to magnetic field lines and electromagnetism.

Stern, David

2005-01-04

61

Imaging pH phantoms using magnetization transfer technology at 1.5 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetization transfer (MT) is an important source of contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and is the basis of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging, which does not exist in our clinical MR scanner at 1.5 Tesla (T). Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging, a variant of CEST imaging, has been shown capable of detecting tissue acidosis during stroke at above

Maobin Wei; Zhiwei Shen; Gang Xiao; Renhua Wu; Qingchun Qiu; Yaowen Chen

2011-01-01

62

The measurement and analysis of the magnetic field of a synchrotron light source magnet  

E-print Network

In this thesis a unique system is used to measure the magnetic field of a superconducting synchrotron light source magnet. The magnet measured is a superferric dipole C-magnet designed to produce a magnetic field up to 3 Tesla in magnitude. Its...

Graf, Udo Werner

2012-06-07

63

Design study of 15-Tesla RHQT Nb3Al block type dipole magnet  

SciTech Connect

The design study of the block type 15-Tesla RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al dipole magnet, and its merits over Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are presented. The copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is now becoming commercially available for the application to the accelerator magnets. A 1 mm diameter RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand with filament size about 50 {mu}, non-copper Jc about 1000 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, copper ratio of 50%, can now be produced over several hundred meters. The stress and strain characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand are superior to the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand. Another advantage is that it can tolerate a longitudinal strain up to 0.55%. The RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable will have less chance of contamination of the stabilizer, compared to Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. These characteristics of the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al will be beneficial for designing and producing 15-Tesla dipole magnets. An example 15-Tesla magnet cross section, utilizing the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is presented. A systematic investigation on RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, its Rutherford cables, and building a small racetrack magnet for cable testing are proposed.

Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

2005-09-01

64

Advanced high-field coil designs: 20 TESLA  

SciTech Connect

This study of the technology required for producing large high-field coils has shown that, with some extensions to our present technological base, feasible designs are achievable. The resulting magnets could well make a paramount contribution to the national mirror-fusion endeavor.

Hoard, R.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Scanlan, R.M.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Leber, R.L.; Hickman, R.B.; Lee, J.D.

1983-08-08

65

Support system design incorporating carbon/epoxy tension straps for a four tesla, one meter bore, MRI magnet  

SciTech Connect

The Texas Accelerator Center (TAC) constructed a four tesla, one meter bore, MRI magnet. Graphite/epoxy tension straps with thermal intercepts at 77 K and 20 K were used for a safe, efficient, and cost effective support system. Sixteen straps were used to support the 10,400 kg cold mass. TAC used a superferric concept to restrict the fringe field. With proper alignment the attractive forces between the magnet and iron are designed to cancel. Therefore, easy adjustment for proper positioning of the magnet, and strength to withstand the magnetic forces due to any misalignment are requirements of the support system. Since the MRI magnet was shipped by truck, the support system had to withstand dynamic loads. The design conduction heat load to the cold mass is 0.05 W. Details of the support system are presented.

Watts, L.C. [RPM Engineering, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Boulios, K. [Texas Accelerator Center, The Woodlands, TX (United States); Hartwig, K.T. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31

66

Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dswley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. (JMT)

Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

1981-01-01

67

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-print Network

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

68

Travelling Wave Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla  

E-print Network

Waveguides have been successfully used to generate magnetic resonance images at 7 T with whole-body systems. The bore limits the magnetic resonance signal transmitted because its specific cut-off frequency is greater than the majority of resonant frequencies. This restriction can be overcome by using a parallel-plate waveguide whose cut-off frequency is zero for the transversal electric modes and it can propagate any frequency. To investigate the potential benefits for whole-body imaging at 3 T, we compare numerical simulations at 1.5 T, 3 T, 7 T, and 9 T via the propagation of the parallel-plate waveguide principal mode filled with a cylindrical phantom and two surface coils. B1 mapping was computed to investigate the feasibility of this approach at 3T. The point spread function method was used to measure the imager performance for the traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Human leg images were acquired to experimentally validate this approach. The principal mode shows very little field magni...

Vazquez, F; Marrufo, O; Rodriguez, A O

2013-01-01

69

Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and

A. J. E. Raaijmakers; B. W. Raaymakers; J. J. W. Lagendijk

2008-01-01

70

30 Tesla hybrid magnet facility at the Francis bitter national magnet laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The design, construction and testing of a hybrid magnet system which provides fields up to 30 T is described. The system consists of a superconducting magnet which generates 7.5 T in a 40 cm bore and a family of watercooled insert magnets operating at 10 mw. The superconducting magnet has an overall current density of nearly 6500 A\\/cm² and a

M. J. Leupold; J. R. Hale; Y. Iwasa; L. G. Rubin; R. J. Weggel

1981-01-01

71

Ultrahigh-Field MRI in Human Ischemic Stroke - a 7 Tesla Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using field strengths up to 3 Tesla (T) has proven to be a powerful tool for stroke diagnosis. Recently, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI at 7 T has shown relevant diagnostic benefits in imaging of neurological diseases, but its value for stroke imaging has not been investigated yet. We present the first evaluation of a clinically feasible stroke imaging protocol at 7 T. For comparison an established stroke imaging protocol was applied at 3 T. Methods In a prospective imaging study seven patients with subacute and chronic stroke were included. Imaging at 3 T was immediately followed by 7 T imaging. Both protocols included T1-weighted 3D Magnetization-Prepared Rapid-Acquired Gradient-Echo (3D-MPRAGE), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-FLAIR), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-T2-TSE), T2* weighted 2D Fast Low Angle Shot Gradient Echo (2D-HemoFLASH) and 3D Time-of-Flight angiography (3D-TOF). Results The diagnostic information relevant for clinical stroke imaging obtained at 3 T was equally available at 7 T. Higher spatial resolution at 7 T revealed more anatomical details precisely depicting ischemic lesions and periinfarct alterations. A clear benefit in anatomical resolution was also demonstrated for vessel imaging at 7 T. RF power deposition constraints induced scan time prolongation and reduced brain coverage for 2D-FLAIR, 2D-T2-TSE and 3D-TOF at 7 T versus 3 T. Conclusions The potential of 7 T MRI for human stroke imaging is shown. Our pilot study encourages a further evaluation of the diagnostic benefit of stroke imaging at 7 T in a larger study. PMID:22701525

Bauer, Miriam; Stengl, Katharina L.; Mutke, Matthias A.; Tovar-Martinez, Elena; Wuerfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Niendorf, Thoralf; Sobesky, Jan

2012-01-01

72

MAPPING HUMAN BRAIN FUNCTION WITH MRI AT 7 TESLA Xiaoping HU, Essa YACOUB, Josef PFEUFFER, Amir SCHUMEL,  

E-print Network

MAPPING HUMAN BRAIN FUNCTION WITH MRI AT 7 TESLA Xiaoping HU, Essa YACOUB, Josef PFEUFFER, Amir of the BOLD response to neural activity increase with the field strength. With the establishment of a 7 Tesla at a magnetic field strength that significantly exceeds 4 Tesla. Functional mapping using echo-planar imaging

73

Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles  

SciTech Connect

We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

1988-08-01

74

Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dawley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla - 10(4) Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. These experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, suggest that augmentation of the signal amplitude in the T-wave segment of the ECG may result from a superimposed electrical potential generated by aortic blood flow in the presence of a stationary magnetic field.

Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

1981-01-01

75

7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A closer look at substantia nigra anatomy in Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

A hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the progressive neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Dopaminergic denervation is commonly imaged using radiotracer imaging in target structures such as the striatum. Until recently, imaging made only a modest contribution to detecting neurodegenerative changes in the substantia nigra (SN) directly. Histologically, the SN is subdivided into the ventral pars reticulata and the dorsal pars compacta, which is composed of dopaminergic neurons. In humans, dopaminergic neurons, which are known to accumulate neuromelanin, form clusters of cells (nigrosomes) that penetrate deep into the SN pars reticulata (SNr). The SNr contains higher levels of iron than the SNc in normal subjects. Neuromelanin and T2*-weighted imaging therefore better detect the SNc and the SNr, respectively. The development of ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provided the increase in spatial resolution and in contrast that was needed to detect changes in SN morphology. 7T MRI allows visualization of nigrosome-1 as a hyperintense signal area on T2*-weighted images in the SNc of healthy subjects and its absence in PD patients, probably because of the loss of melanized neurons and the increase of iron deposition. This review is designed to provide a better understanding of the correspondence between the outlines and subdivisions of the SN detected using different MRI contrasts and the histological organization of the SN. The recent findings obtained at 7T will then be presented in relation to histological knowledge. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:25308960

Lehéricy, Stéphane; Bardinet, Eric; Poupon, Cyril; Vidailhet, Marie; François, Chantal

2014-11-01

76

Processing of polymers in high magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

Many organic molecules and polymers have an anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility, and thus can be aligned in high magnetic fields. The presence of liquid crystallinity allows cooperative motions of the individual molecules, and thus the magnetic energy becomes greater than the thermal energy at experimentally obtainable field strengths. This work has determined the effect of magnetic field alignment on the thermal expansion and mechanical properties of liquid crystalline thermosets in the laboratory. Further advances in magnet design are needed to make magnetic field alignment a commercially viable approach to polymer processing. The liquid crystal thermoset chosen for this study is the diglycidyl ether of dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene cured with the diamine sulfamilamide. This thermoset has been cured at field strengths up to 18 Tesla.

Douglas, E.P.; Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Earls, J.D.; Priester, R.D. Jr. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

1996-05-01

77

Crystal field and magnetic properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

Flood, D. J.

1977-01-01

78

Magnetic fields in astrophysics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evidence of cosmic magnetism is examined, taking into account the Zeeman effect, beats in atomic transitions, the Hanle effect, Faraday rotation, gyro-lines, and the strength and scale of magnetic fields in astrophysics. The origin of magnetic fields is considered along with dynamos, the conditions for magnetic field generation, the topology of flows, magnetic fields in stationary flows, kinematic turbulent

Ia. B. Zeldovich; A. A. Ruzmaikin; D. D. Sokolov

1983-01-01

79

Correlating Hemodynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging with high-field Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging in Stroke  

PubMed Central

Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct.

Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J.; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K.

2014-01-01

80

Always pushing the scientific envelope, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory holds numerous records for high magnetic fields and other key measures of the power and utility of the  

E-print Network

. · Tesla: Measure of magnetic field strength. The Earth's magnetic field is one twenty thousandth (.00005Always pushing the scientific envelope, the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory holds numerous records for high magnetic fields and other key measures of the power and utility of the instruments at our

Weston, Ken

81

Magnetic field effects on surgical ligation clips.  

PubMed

Magnetic forces exerted on surgical clips and the magnetic resonance imaging distortion they create in phantoms and rabbits at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 Tesla were investigated. Results are reported for both ligation and aneurysm clips manufactured from three types of stainless steel as well as titanium, tantalum and niobium metals. Paramagnetism and eddy currents were measured in a customized moving Gouy balance. Direct measurements of other magnetic forces were carried out in a 1.5T MRI system. The titanium and tantalum clips showed the least interaction with the magnetic field, both in terms of forces exerted and the observed image distortion with the larger clips generating the larger interactions. The strongest field distortions and attractive forces occurred with 17-7PH stainless steel clips. These interactions were ferromagnetic in origin and of sufficient strength to present significant risk to patients having this type of clip present during an MRI scan. PMID:3431354

Brown, M A; Carden, J A; Coleman, R E; McKinney, R; Spicer, L D

1987-01-01

82

Magnetic field sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

Silva, Nicolas

2012-09-01

83

FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17  

E-print Network

­i­ FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17 CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR THE FINAL FOCUS QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS FOR TESLA A a preliminary design of the superconducting final focusing quadrupole magnets for TESLA and all their associated The Tera Electron volts Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) is an electron/positron linear collider

84

FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17  

E-print Network

­i­ FEB 19, 2001 TESLA-2001-17 CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR THE FINAL FOCUS QUADRUPOLE MAGNETS FOR TESLA A a preliminary design of the superconducting final focusing quadrupole magnets for TESLA and all their associated Electron volts Superconducting Linear Accelerator (TESLA) is an electron/positron linear collider

85

Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography  

PubMed Central

The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically. PMID:24421652

Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

2013-01-01

86

Recurrent ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow: Correlation of surgical findings and 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography.  

PubMed

The authors describe the correlation between 3-Tesla magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) and surgical findings in two patients who underwent multiple previous failed ulnar nerve surgeries. MRN correctly localized the site of the abnormality. Prospectively observed MRN findings of perineural fibrosis, ulnar nerve re-entrapment abnormalities, medial antebrachial cutaneous neuroma and additional median nerve entrapment were confirmed surgically. PMID:24421652

Chhabra, Avneesh; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S; Carrino, John A; Dellon, A Lee

2013-01-01

87

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) is a collaboration between Florida State University, the University of Florida, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The DC Field Facilities are located at the main campus for the NHMFL in Tallahassee, Florida and are described in this paper. The DC Field Facility has a variety of resistive and superconducting magnets. The DC Field Facility infrastructure, the most powerful in the world, is able to provide 57 MW of continuous low noise DC power. Constant magnetic fields of up to 45 tesla in a 32 mm bore and 20 tesla in 195 mm bore are available at no charge to the user community. The users of the facility are selected by a peer reviewed process. Roughly 400 research groups visit the lab to conduct experiments each year. Experimental capabilities provided by the NHMFL are magneto-optics, millimeter wave spectroscopy, magnetization, dilatometry, specific heat, electrical transport, ultrasound, low to medium resolution NMR, EMR, and materials processing. Measurements of properties can be made on samples at temperatures from 20 mK to 1000 K, pressures from ambient to 10 GPa, orientation and currents from 1 pA to 10 kA.

Hannahs, S. T.; Palm, E. C.

2010-04-01

88

Exploring Magnetic Fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, students investigate the presence of magnetic fields around magnets, the sun and the earth. They will explore magnetic field lines, understand that magnetic lines of force show the strength and direction of magnetic fields, determine how field lines interact between attracting and repelling magnetic poles, and discover that the earth and sun have magnetic properties. They will also discover that magnetic force is invisible and that a "field of force" is a region or space in which one object can attract or repel another.

89

First operation of a liquid-argon TPC embedded in a magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have operated for the first time a liquid-argon TPC immersed in a magnetic field up to 0.55 tesla. We show that the imaging properties of the detector are not affected by the presence of the magnetic field. The magnetic bending of the ionizing particle allows one to discriminate their charge and estimate their momentum. These figures have up to

A. Badertscher; M. Laffranchi; A. Meregaglia; A. Rubbia

2005-01-01

90

Cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field (MC-1) is a kind of unique high energy density technique. It has characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising, and would have widely used in areas like high pressure physics, new material synthesis and ultrahigh magnetic field physics. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) has begun the experiment since 2011 and a primary experimental device had been set-up. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5 Tesla were set-up first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive initiated synchronously. The internal diameter of the liner is 97 mm, and its thickness is 1.5 mm. The movement of liner was recorded optically and a typical turnaround phenomenon was observed. From the photography results the liner was compressed smoothly and evenly and its average velocity was about 5-6 km/s. In the experiment a axial magnetic field of over 1400 Tesla has been recorded. The MC-1 process was numerical simulated by 1D MHD code MC11D and the simulations are in accord with the experiments.

Gu, Zhuowei; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Hengdi; Zhao, Shichao; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Song, Zhenfei; Tan, Fuli; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

2014-05-01

91

Magnetic fields of galaxies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current state of the understanding of the magnetic fields of galaxies is reviewed. A simple model of the turbulent dynamo is developed which explains the main observational features of the global magnetic fields of spiral galaxies. The generation of small-scale chaotic magnetic fields in the interstellar medium is also examined. Attention is also given to the role of magnetic

Aleksandr A. Ruzmaikin; Dmitrii D. Sokolov; Anvar M. Shukurov

1988-01-01

92

Facility Measures Magnetic Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Partly automated facility measures and computes steady near magnetic field produced by object. Designed to determine magnetic fields of equipment to be installed on spacecraft including sensitive magnetometers, with view toward application of compensating fields to reduce interfernece with spacecraft-magnetometer readings. Because of its convenient operating features and sensitivity of its measurements, facility serves as prototype for similar facilities devoted to magnetic characterization of medical equipment, magnets for high-energy particle accelerators, and magnetic materials.

Honess, Shawn B.; Narvaez, Pablo; Mcauley, James M.

1991-01-01

93

Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

2007-04-01

94

Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when subjected to high magnetic field. Devices that utilize an applied steady magnetic filed in it operation such as devices for blood component separation and diagnostic sensors have been developed.

Chen, Ching-Jen

2001-03-01

95

TESLA Superconducting Linear TESLA Collaboration  

E-print Network

Chapter 3 TESLA Superconducting Linear Collider TESLA Collaboration 275 #12;276 CHAPTER 3. TESLA LINEAR COLLIDER24-Oct-9615:40:35I-DEASMasterSeries3:Design Database:/home/sass/ideas_work/ideas_linac/TESLA of Technology, Dep. of Mathematics, Otakaari 1, SF-02150 Espoo: E. Somersalo IHEP, 142284 Protvino, Moscow

96

A single-stage photomultiplier/amplifier combination for use in intense magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The use of a single-stage photomultiplier followed by a low-noise amplifier has made it possible to obtain cosmic ray muon pulse height spectra from F2 type lead glass with a resolution closely comparable to that achieved with a conventional photomultiplier. Tests in axial magnetic fields show satisfactory behaviour over the range 0.05 Tesla to at least 1 Tesla. A further similar device designed for transverse field use has operated up to 0.8 Tesla at angles approaching 70/sup 0/ to the device longitudinal axis.

Rousseau, M.D.; Brown, R.M.; Edwards, M.; Jeffreys, P.; Sproston, M.

1983-02-01

97

Earths magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies of the Paleosecular Variation of lavas (PSVL) by the authors and others, shows that the variability of Earth's magnetic field over the last several million years is less than the variability of the present Earth's magnetic field. The present magnetic field is asymmetric between the northern and southern hemispheres. The dispersion in the southern hemisphere being much greater

N. Opdyke; V. Mejia

2003-01-01

98

Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet  

SciTech Connect

The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

2001-06-15

99

The Magnetic Field  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This demonstration of the magnetic field lines of Earth uses a bar magnet, iron filings, and a compass. The site explains how to measure the magnetic field of the Earth by measuring the direction a compass points from various points on the surface. There is also an explanation of why the north magnetic pole on Earth is actually, by definition, the south pole of a magnet.

Barker, Jeffrey

100

Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet  

E-print Network

Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet produces a magnetic field, B Set up a B field two ways: Moving electrically charged particles Current in a wire Intrinsic magnetic field Basic characteristic of elementary particles such as an electron #12;Magnetic Fields Magnetic field lines Direction

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

101

Design status of the US 100 tesla non-destructive magnet system  

SciTech Connect

A collaborative effort is now underway in the US between the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation to design, build, and use a 100 T non-destructive magnet for studying the properties of materials at high fields. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) at Tallahassee, Florida, and Los Alamos, New Mexico, where the magnet will be sited, is carrying out this task. This magnet will join other pulsed magnets at NHMFL, to provide magnetic fields at strengths, time durations, and volumes that are longer (in combination) than any now available. In particular, the goal for the 100 T magnet is a time duration above 80 T of about 15 ms in a cold bore of 24 mm. The present status of the design effort and various design issues are presented here.

Schneider-Muntau, H.; Eyssa, Y.; Pernambuco-Wise, P. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.; Boenig, H.; Campbell, L.J.; Eberl, K.R.; Parkin, D.M.; Schillig, J.; Sims, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-09-01

102

Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields and Proteins in Cell Membranes  

E-print Network

and Jacob Eberhardt2 1 Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, The University of MelbourneREVIEW Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields for exposures to low-frequency magnetic fields in the mili-Tesla range. No resonance frequencies or amplitude

Halgamuge, Malka N.

103

The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

van der Linden, Peter J. E. M.; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier

2010-06-01

104

The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

2010-06-23

105

7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Cortical Pathology in Multiple Sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Background Neocortical lesions (NLs) are an important pathological component of multiple sclerosis (MS), but their visualization by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains challenging. Objectives We aimed at assessing the sensitivity of multi echo gradient echo (ME-GRE) T2*-weighted MRI at 7.0 Tesla in depicting NLs compared to myelin and iron staining. Methods Samples from two MS patients were imaged post mortem using a whole body 7T MRI scanner with a 24-channel receive-only array. Isotropic 200 micron resolution images with varying T2* weighting were reconstructed from the ME-GRE data and converted into R2* maps. Immunohistochemical staining for myelin (proteolipid protein, PLP) and diaminobenzidine-enhanced Turnbull blue staining for iron were performed. Results Prospective and retrospective sensitivities of MRI for the detection of NLs were 48% and 67% respectively. We observed MRI maps detecting only a small portion of 20 subpial NLs extending over large cortical areas on PLP stainings. No MRI signal changes suggestive of iron accumulation in NLs were observed. Conversely, R2* maps indicated iron loss in NLs, which was confirmed by histological quantification. Conclusions High-resolution post mortem imaging using R2* and magnitude maps permits detection of focal NLs. However, disclosing extensive subpial demyelination with MRI remains challenging. PMID:25303286

van Gelderen, Peter; Merkle, Hellmuth; Chen, Christina; Lassmann, Hans; Duyn, Jeff H.; Bagnato, Francesca

2014-01-01

106

Magnetic Field Problem: Determining Current  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A wire carrying an unknown current out of the page is shown above. You may also double-click in the animation to create a field line. Assume that the distance given is in cm and B is given in milli Tesla.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2007-03-03

107

Cardiovascular alterations in Macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields: experimental observations and theoretical analysis  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous measurements were made of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the intraarterial blood pressure of adult male Macaca monkeys during acute exposure to homogeneous stationary magnetic fields ranging in strength up to 1.5 tesla. An instantaneous, field strength-dependent increase in the ECG signal amplitude at the locus of the T wave was observed in fields greater than 0.1 tesla. The temporal sequence of this signal in the ECG record and its reversibility following termination of the magnetic field exposure are consistent with an earlier suggestion that it arises from a magnetically induced aortic blood flow potential superimposed on the native T-wave signal. No measurable alterations in blood pressure resulted from exposure to fields up to 1.5 tesla. This experimental finding is in agreement with theoretical calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on blood flow in the major arteries of the cardiovascular system. 27 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

Tenforde, T.S.; Gaffey, C.T.; Moyer, B.R.; Budinger, T.F.

1983-01-01

108

A Single-Stage Photomultiplier\\/Amplifier Combination for Use in Intense Magnetic Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of a single-stage photomultiplier followed by a low-noise amplifier has made it possible to obtain cosmic ray muon pulse height spectra from F2 type lead glass with a resolution closely comparable to that achieved with a conventional photomultiplier. Tests in axial magnetic fields show satisfactory behaviour over the range 0.05 Tesla to at least 1 Tesla. A further

M. D. Rousseau; R. M. Brown; P. Jeffreys; M. Edwards; M. Sproston

1983-01-01

109

Prostate magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla: Is administration of hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide mandatory?  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the value of administration of hyoscine-N-butyl-bromide (HBB) for image quality magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate. METHODS: Seventy patients were retrospectively included in the study. Thirty-five patients were examined with administration of 40 milligrams of HBB (Buscopan®; Boehringer, Ingelheim, Germany); 35 patients were examined without HBB. A multiparametric MRI protocol was performed on a 3.0 Tesla scanner without using an endorectal coil. The following criteria were evaluated independently by two experienced radiologists on a five-point Likert scale: anatomical details (delineation between peripheral and transitional zone of the prostate, visualisation of the capsule, depiction of the neurovascular bundles); visualisation of lymph nodes; motion related artefacts; and overall image quality. RESULTS: Comparison of anatomical details between the two cohorts showed no statistically significant difference (3.9 ± 0.7 vs 4.0 ± 0.9, P = 0.54, and 3.8 ± 0.7 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.07) for both readers. There was no significant advantage regarding depiction of local and iliac lymph nodes (3.9 ± 0.6 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.07, and 3.8 ± 0.9 vs 4.1 ± 0.8, P = 0.19). Motion artefacts were rated as “none” to “few” in both groups and showed no statistical difference (2.3 ± 1.0 vs 1.9 ± 0.9, P = 0.19, and 2.3 ± 1.1 vs 1.9 ± 0.7, P = 0.22). Overall image quality was rated “good” in average for both cohorts without significant difference (4.0 ± 0.6 vs 4.0 ± 0.9, P = 0.78, and 3.8 ± 0.8 vs 4.2 ± 0.6, P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: The results demonstrated no significant effect of HBB administration on image quality. The study suggests that use of HBB is not mandatory for MRI of the prostate at 3.0 Tesla. PMID:23908696

Roethke, Matthias C; Kuru, Timur H; Radbruch, Alexander; Hadaschik, Boris; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

2013-01-01

110

Mapping Magnetic Field Lines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson about the magnetic field of a bar magnet. The lesson begins with an introductory discussion with learners about magnetism to draw out any misconceptions that may be in their minds. Then, learners freely experiment with bar magnets and various materials, such as paper clips, rulers, copper or aluminum wire, and pencils, to discover that magnets attract metals containing iron, nickel, and/or cobalt but not most other materials. Next, learners experiment with using a magnetic compass to discover how it is affected by the magnet and then draw the magnetic field lines of the magnet by putting dots at the location of the compass arrow. This is the first lesson in the first session of the Exploring Magnetism teacher guide.

111

The Magnetic Field  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage is part of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) "Windows to the Universe" program. It describes the nature and configuration of magnetic fields, which are the result of moving electric charges, including how they cause magnetic objects to orient themselves along the direction of the magnetic force points, which are illustrated as lines. Magnetic field lines by convention point outwards at the north magnetic pole and inward at the south magnetic pole. The site features text, scientific illustrations and an animation. Text and vocabulary are selectable for the beginning, intermediate, or advanced reader.

112

Magnetic Field Example 1  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Clicking on the different links below will produce different magnetic fields in the box above. The wires (perpendicular to the screen) or coils (in and out of the screen) are not visible, but you can determine what they are from the field. You can also click on a point to read off the magnetic field at that place.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2008-02-19

113

Magnetic Field Problem: Determining Magnetic Fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Two wires with current flowing through them perpendicular to the page are shown (position is given in meters and the integral is given in 10-10 Tesla-meters). Also shown is a choice of two detectors that displays the integral, . Choose a detector and observe readings. You may drag a detector from its original position if you wish.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2007-03-03

114

New measurements of magnetic field decay in 1 meter SSC-type dipoles  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies of magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles due to changes in magnetization currents caused by flux creep have used the assumed SSC injection energy of 1 TeV, or 0.33 tesla central dipole field, and an excitation to the storage field of 6.6 tesla. More recently, it has been decided to inject at 2 TeV, or 0.66 tesla and so more recent tests have been carried out at the new injection field, or at both the new and old fields. Additionally, the effect of temperature changes and excitation cycles on the field decay have been studied. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

1990-09-01

115

The U.S. NHMFL 100 tesla multi-shot magnet  

SciTech Connect

The design, analysis and fabrication progress of the 100 T Multi-Shot Magnet is described. The description includes the structural analysis of the outer coil set, the fabrication of the 100 T prototype coil 1, the fabrication of a coil 1 test shell, and the analysis of the electrical busbar assembly. Fabrication issues and their solutions are presented. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the U.S. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Coe, H. (Hideyoshi); Ellis, G. G. (Gretchen G.); Lesch, B. L. (Bernard L.); Sims, J. R. (James R.); Schillig, J. B. (Josef B.); Swenson, C. A. (Charles A.); Bacon, J. L. (James L.)

2001-01-01

116

Magnetic Field Distribution of Permanent Magnet Magnetized by Static Magnetic Field Generated by HTS Bulk Magnet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Demagnetized rare earth magnets (Nd-Fe-B) can be fully magnetized by scanning them in the intense static fields over 3 T of a HTS bulk magnet which was cooled to the temperature range lower than 77K with use of cryo-coolers and activated by the field of 5 T. We precisely examined the magnetic field distributions of magnetized permanent magnets. The magnetic

Tetsuo Oka; Nobutaka Kawasaki; Satoshi Fukui; Jun Ogawa; Takao Sato; Toshihisa Terasawa; Yoshitaka Itoh; Ryohei Yabuno

2012-01-01

117

Coronary Artery Flow Measurement Using Navigator Echo Gated Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Velocity Mapping at 3.0 Tesla  

PubMed Central

A validation study and early results for noninvasive, in vivo measurement of coronary artery blood flow using phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) at 3.0 Tesla is presented. Accuracy of coronary artery blood flow measurements by phase contrast MRI is limited by heart and respiratory motion as well as the small size of the coronary arteries. In this study, a navigator-echo gated, cine phase velocity mapping technique is described to obtain time-resolved velocity and flow waveforms of small diameter vessels at 3.0 Tesla. Phantom experiments using steady, laminar flow are presented to validate the technique and show flow rates measured by 3.0 Tesla phase contrast MRI to be accurate within 15% of true flow rates. Subsequently, in vivo scans on healthy volunteers yield velocity measurements for blood flow in the right, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries. Measurements of average, cross-sectional velocity were obtainable in 224/243 (92%) of the cardiac phases. Time-averaged, cross-sectional velocity of the blood flow was 6.8±4.3 cm/s in the LAD, 8.0±3.8 cm/s in the LCX, and 6.0±1.6 cm/s in the RCA. PMID:18036532

Johnson, Kevin; Sharma, Puneet; Oshinski, John

2009-01-01

118

Abstract: Quasistatic magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prototype switching system has been developed which can switch 20 kA at 230 V for short periods of time through inductive loads. High power silicon controlled rectifiers are used to switch the National Magnet Laboratory dc generators on and off into a liquid N2 cooled, low impedance high field magnet so that high fields can be generated for a

H. C. Praddaude; S. Foner

1979-01-01

119

Cosmic Magnetic Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the visible matter in the Universe is in a plasma state, or more specifically is composed of ionized or partially ionized gas permeated by magnetic fields. Thanks to recent advances on the theory and detection of cosmic magnetic fields there has been a worldwide growing interest in the study of their role on the formation of astrophysical sources

Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; Dal Pino

2006-01-01

120

High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers  

DOEpatents

A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

Smith, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Benicewicz, Brian C. (Los Alamos, NM); Douglas, Elliot P. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01

121

High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers  

DOEpatents

A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

1998-11-24

122

The use of high magnetic fields at the study of magnetism and superconductivity in intermetallic compounds  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic fields have a large impact on the magnetic and superconducting properties of solids. High magnetic fields are required to reach magnetic saturation along a hard magnetic direction in a variety of rare-earth intermetallics, to break the ferrimagnetic moment configuration in specific 3d-4f intermetallics, to quench the strongly correlated electron states in heavy fermion compounds, to reach the upper critical fields in several classes of superconductors, to study flux-pinning phenomena in the high-{Tc} superconductors, etc. In the present review, the attention is focused to the field interval 20--50 tesla. Experiments in this field range are the privilege of specialized high magnetic field laboratories. There is a lively activity in this area of research with the number of participating institutes continuously growing.

Franse, J.J.M.; Boer, F.R. de; Frings, P.H.; Visser, A. de [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab.] [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). Van der Waals-Zeeman Lab.

1994-03-01

123

Performance analysis of HD1: a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn dipole Magnet  

SciTech Connect

The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing technology for high field accelerator magnets from brittle conductors. HD1 is a single bore block dipole magnet using two, double-layer Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils. The magnet was tested in October 2003 and reached a bore peak field of 16 T (94.5% of short sample). The average quench current plateau appeared to be limited by 'stick slip' conductor motions. Diagnostics recorded quench origins and preload distributions. Cumulative deformation of the mechanical structure has been observed. Quench velocity in different field regions has been measured and compared with model predictions. The results obtained during the HD1 test are presented and discussed.

Mattafirri, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Bish, P.A.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lau, W.G.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.

2005-06-01

124

Experimental studies of axial magnetic fields generated in ultrashort-pulse laser-plasma interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quasistatic axial magnetic fields in plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses were measured by measuring the Faraday\\u000a rotation angle of the backscattered emission. The spatial distribution of the axial magnetic field was obtained with a peak\\u000a value as high as 170 Tesla. Theory suggests that the axial magnetic field is generated by dynamo effect in laser-plasma interaction.

Yutong Li; Jie Zhang; Liming Chen; Lizeng Zhao; Jiangfan Xia; Zhiyi Wei; Wenmian Jiang

2000-01-01

125

Field Accuracy Requirements for the Undulator Systems of the X-ray FEL's at TESLA  

E-print Network

-1000 keV tunable, 10-30 keV tunable, 10-30 keV tunable, 20-80 keV 390 440 460 X-FEL facility layout U3 Fig. 1. Schematic layout of the TESLA X-ray FEL facility. The facility consists of four planar undulators of the undulators, will be discussed and upper limits will be given. 1. Introduction The TESLA X-ray FEL facility

126

Magnetic Fields in Galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

Beck, Rainer

127

Interplanetary Magnetic Field Lines  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page provides information and a graphical exercise for students regarding the interaction between magnetic field lines and a plasma. The activity involves tracing a typical interplanetary magnetic field line, dragged out of a location on the Sun by the radial flow of the solar wind. This illustrates the way magnetic field lines are "frozen to the plasma" and the wrapping of field lines due to the rotation of the sun. This is part of the work "The Exploration of the Earth's Magnetosphere". A Spanish translation is available.

Stern, David

2005-04-27

128

Parahydrogen-enhanced zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear magnetic resonance, conventionally detected in magnetic fields of several tesla, is a powerful analytical tool for the determination of molecular identity, structure and function. With the advent of prepolarization methods and detection schemes using atomic magnetometers or superconducting quantum interference devices, interest in NMR in fields comparable to the Earth's magnetic field and below (down to zero field) has been revived. Despite the use of superconducting quantum interference devices or atomic magnetometers, low-field NMR typically suffers from low sensitivity compared with conventional high-field NMR. Here we demonstrate direct detection of zero-field NMR signals generated through parahydrogen-induced polarization, enabling high-resolution NMR without the use of any magnets. The sensitivity is sufficient to observe spectra exhibiting 13C-1H scalar nuclear spin-spin couplings (known as J couplings) in compounds with 13C in natural abundance, without the need for signal averaging. The resulting spectra show distinct features that aid chemical fingerprinting.

Theis, T.; Ganssle, P.; Kervern, G.; Knappe, S.; Kitching, J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

2011-07-01

129

Numerical field simulation for parallel transmission in MRI at 7 tesla  

E-print Network

Parallel transmission (pTx) is a promising improvement to coil design that has been demonstrated to mitigate B1* inhomogeneity, manifest as center brightening, for high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Parallel ...

Bernier, Jessica A. (Jessica Ashley)

2011-01-01

130

Magnetic Bar Field Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The EJS Magnetic Bar Field Model shows the field of a bar magnet and has a movable compass that reports the magnetic field values. The bar magnet model is built by placing a group of magnetic dipoles along the bar magnet. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting âOpen Ejs Modelâ from the pop-up menu item. The Magnetic Bar Field model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_em_MagneticBarField.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Christian, Wolfgang; Franciscouembre; Cox, Anne

2009-09-18

131

Static Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Floating-Zone Growth  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Heat and mass transfer in semiconductor float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone, originating from sources such as buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, differential rotation, or radio frequency heating. Because semiconductor melts are conducting, flows can be damped by the use of static magnetic fields to influence the interface shape and the segregation of dopants and impurities. An important objective is often the suppression of time-dependent flows and the ensuing dopant striations. In RF-heated Si-FZ - crystals, fields up to O.STesla show some flattening of the interface curvature and a reduction of striation amplitudes. In radiation-heated (small-scale) SI-FZ crystals, fields of 0.2 - 0.5 Tesla already suppress the majority of the dopant striations. The uniformity of the radial segregation is often compromised by using a magnetic field, due to the directional nature of the damping. Transverse fields lead to an asymmetric interface shape and thus require crystal rotation (resulting in rotational dopant striations) to achieve a radially symmetric interface, whereas axial fields introduce a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, are possible with axial static fields in excess of 1 Tesla. Strong static magnetic fields, however, can also lead to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, caused by the interaction of thermoelectric currents with the magnetic field.

Croll, Arne; Benz, K. W.

1999-01-01

132

Magnetic Fields, Flares & Forecasts  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 2D wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method is used to characterise the complexity of the distribution of the photospheric magnetic field of active regions. The WTMM method offers increased accuracy and reliability over previous fractal and multifractal methods. The multifractal spectrum of both quiet Sun and active region magnetic features are presented. It is shown that the multifractal nature

Paul A. Conlon; P. Kestener; R. McAteer; P. Gallagher

2009-01-01

133

HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Supcrconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and tcst of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil prestress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

Hafalia, A.R.; Barlett, S.E.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley, H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Myman, M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

2003-10-01

134

HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn DipoleMagnet  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Superconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and test of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil pre-stress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

Hafalia, A.R.; Bartlett, S.E.; Capsi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich,D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Highley,H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman,M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

2003-11-10

135

The First Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

We demonstrate that the Biermann battery mechanism for the creation of large scale magnetic fields can arise in a simple model protogalaxy. Analytic calculations and numerical simulations follow explicitly the generation of vorticity (and hence magnetic field) at the outward-moving shock that develops as the protogalactic perturbation collapses. Shear angular momentum then distorts this field into a dipole-like configuration. The magnitude of the field created in the fully formed disk galaxy is estimated to be 10^(-17) Gauss, approximately what is needed as a seed for the galactic dynamo.

George Davies; Lawrence M. Widrow

1999-12-14

136

Solar Wind Magnetic Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

Smith, E. J.

1995-01-01

137

Giant Coercive Fields of 2.5 Tesla in Nanostructured MnxGa Films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is a growing interest in designing new magnetic materials that are free of rare-earth elements. The magnetism of the Heusler ferrimagnet MnxGa [1] was found to be enhanced when fabricated with nanoscale structural disorder. Films of MnxGa (x=2 to 3) with thicknesses of 20 to 40 nm were grown using molecular beam epitaxy at 100 C then annealed at 400 C. Disordered films were grown on lattice mismatched Si (001) substrates, then compared to epitaxially grown films on desorbed GaAs (001) substrates. While the epitaxial films have small hysteresis in the magnetization with coercive fields in the range ?oHC = 10-2 - 10-1 T, the disordered films exhibited surprisingly wide hysteresis with record high coercive fields as large as ?oHC = 2.5 T. These magnitudes are comparable to those of rare-earth-based magnets. This hysteresis was also present in the anomalous Hall effect. The enhanced coercive field in the disordered material arises from a combination of the exceptionally large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and nanoscale structural disorder. These results point out a new opportunity for developing rare-earth-free magnetic materials. Discovery of this unusually high coercive field is outlined and its sources discussed. [1] J. Winterlik, et al., Phys. Rev. B 77, 054406 (2008).

Bennett, Steven; Nummy, Thomas; Cardinal, Thomas; Nowak, Welville; Heiman, Don

2012-02-01

138

Planetary magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past several years have seen dramatic developments in the study of planetary magnetic fields, including a wealth of new data, mainly from the Galilean satellites and Mars, together with major improvements in our theoretical modeling effort of the dynamo process believed responsible for large planetary fields. These dynamos arise from thermal or compositional convection in fluid regions of large

David J. Stevenson

2003-01-01

139

[Optimized magnetic resonance sequences and parameters with operative assisted images for radical prostatectomy at 3 tesla-magnetic resonance image].  

PubMed

The objective of our study was to optimize magnetic resonance image (MRI) sequences and parameters using operative assisted images (three-dimensional images) for radical prostatectomy at 3 tesla (T) MRI. Five healthy volunteers underwent MRI on the 3.0 T scanner. Various sequences and parameters [Cube (TE/TR = 18, 50, 90 ms/2000 ms), FIESTA (TE/TR/FA = 2.4 ms/5 ms/40 degrees, 90 degrees), fSPGR (TE/TR/FA = 2.3 ms/11.2 ms/20 degrees), slice thickness = 1.2 mm, matrix = 192 x 160] were respectively compared. Several structures of the pelvis (the central zones and transition zones of the prostate, the peripheral zones of the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum wall, bladder, muscle and fat) were determined. The signal intensities of these structures were measured on reformatted axial images and compared against several structures of the pelvis. Correlation with various sequences and parameters was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the contrast ratio (CR) and the presence of artifacts. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. With Cube (TE/TR = 50 ms/2000 ms), the average value of visual evaluation with artifacts was high, and SNR and CR were higher than for other sequence and parameters. Optimized MRI sequences and parameters were Cube (TE/TR = 50 ms/2000 ms) which provides improved SNR and CR and the presence of artifacts with operative assisted images for radical prostatectomy. These operative assisted images obtained from Cube (TE/TR = 50 ms/2000 ms) are likely to be useful for surgery. PMID:23964533

Shirase, Ryuji; Sakurai, Yuuki; Nagahama, Hiroshi; Harada, Kuniaki; Takashima, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Mitsuhiro; Harada, Kohei; Shishido, Hiroki; Imamura, Rui; Sakata, Motomichi; Hatakenaka, Masamitsu

2013-05-01

140

An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

1994-01-01

141

Real-time magnetic resonance imagingguided radiofrequency atrial ablation and visualization of lesion formation at 3 Tesla  

E-print Network

of lesion formation at 3 Tesla Gaston R. Vergara, MD,* Sathya Vijayakumar, MS,* Eugene G. Kholmovski, Ph. In this study, we report a novel 3-Tesla RT -RI based porcine RF ablation model and visuali- zation of lesion-Tesla RT MRI-based catheter ablation and lesion visualization system. METHODS RF energy was delivered

Utah, University of

142

Magnetic exchange bias of more than 1 Tesla in a natural mineral intergrowth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic exchange bias is a phenomenon whereby the hysteresis loop of a `soft' magnetic phase is shifted by an amount HE along the applied field axis owing to its interaction with a `hard' magnetic phase. Since the discovery of exchange bias fifty years ago, the development of a general theory has been hampered by the uncertain nature of the interfaces between the hard and soft phases, commonly between an antiferromagnetic phase and a ferro- or ferrimagnetic phase. Exchange bias continues to be the subject of investigation because of its technological applications and because it is now possible to manipulate magnetic materials at the nanoscale. Here we present the first documented example of exchange bias of significant magnitude (>1 T) in a natural mineral. We demonstrate that exchange bias in this system is due to the interaction between coherently intergrown magnetic phases formed through a natural process of phase separation during slow cooling over millions of years. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that these intergrowths have a known crystallographic orientation with a known crystallographic structure and that the interfaces are coherent.

McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Carter-Stiglitz, Brian; Harrison, Richard J.; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; McCammon, Catherine

2007-10-01

143

Graphene Magnetic Field Sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Graphene extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) devices have been fabricated and characterized in varying magnetic fields at room temperature. The atomic thickness, high carrier mobility and high current carrying capabilities of graphene are ideally suited for the detection of nanoscale sized magnetic domains. The device sensitivity can reach 10 mV\\/Oe, larger than state of the art InAs 2DEG devices of comparable size

Simone Pisana; Patrick M. Braganca; Ernesto E. Marinero; Bruce A. Gurney

2010-01-01

144

Preliminary evidence for white matter metabolite differences in marijuana-dependent young men using 2D J-resolved magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 4 Tesla  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic marijuana (MRJ) use is associated with altered cognition and mood state, altered brain metabolites, and functional and structural brain changes. The objective of this study was to apply proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare proton metabolite levels in 15 young men with MRJ dependence and 11 healthy non-using (NU) young men. Spectra were acquired at 4.0 Tesla

Marisa M. Silveri; John Eric Jensen; Isabelle M. Rosso; Jennifer T. Sneider; Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd

2011-01-01

145

Magnetic Field and Life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a lesson where learners explore magnetic forces, fields, and the relationship between electricity. Learners will use this information to infer how the Earth generates a protective magnetic field. The lesson models scientific inquiry using the 5E instructional model and includes teacher notes, prerequisite concepts, common misconceptions, student journal and reading. This is lesson seven in the Astro-Venture Geology Training Unit that were developed to increase students' awareness of and interest in astrobiology and the many career opportunities that utilize science, math and technology skills. The lessons are designed for educators to use with with the Astro-Venture multimedia modules.

146

Mapping Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropies of White Matter in vivo in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla  

PubMed Central

High-resolution magnetic resonance phase- or frequency- shift images acquired at high field show contrast related to magnetic susceptibility differences between tissues. Such contrast varies with the orientation of the organ in the field, but the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has made it possible to reproducibly image the intrinsic tissue susceptibility contrast. However, recent studies indicate that magnetic susceptibility is anisotropic in brain white matter and, as such, needs to be described by a symmetric second-rank tensor (?¯¯). To fully determine the elements of this tensor, it would be necessary to acquire frequency data at six or more orientations. Assuming cylindrical symmetry of the susceptibility tensor in myelinated white matter fibers, we propose a simplified method to reconstruct the susceptibility tensor in terms of a mean magnetic susceptibility, MMS = (?? + 2??)/3 and a magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, MSA = ?? ? ??, where ?? and ?? are susceptibility parallel and perpendicular to the white matter fiber direction, respectively. Computer simulations show that with a practical head rotation angle of around 20°–30°, four head orientations suffice to reproducibly reconstruct the tensor with good accuracy. We tested this approach on whole brain 1×1×1 mm3 frequency data acquired from five healthy subjects at 7 T. The frequency information from phase images collected at four head orientations was combined with the fiber direction information extracted from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to map the white matter susceptibility tensor. The MMS and MSA were quantified for regions in several large white matter fiber structures, including the corona radiata, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. MMS ranged from ?0.037 to ?0.053 ppm (referenced to CSF being about zero). MSA values could be quantified without the need for a reference and ranged between 0.004 and 0.029 ppm, in line with the expectation that the susceptibility perpendicular to the fiber is more diamagnetic than the one parallel to it. PMID:22561358

Li, Xu; Vikram, Deepti S; Lim, Issel Anne L; Jones, Craig K; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

2012-01-01

147

Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet  

SciTech Connect

A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

1999-03-18

148

Magnetic Field-Induced Superconductivity in the Ferromagnet URhGe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In several metals, including URhGe, superconductivity has recently been observed to appear and coexist with ferromagnetism at temperatures well below that at which the ferromagnetic state forms. However, the material characteristics leading to such a state of coexistence have not yet been fully elucidated. We report that in URhGe there is a magnetic transition where the direction of the spin axis changes when a magnetic field of 12 tesla is applied parallel to the crystal b axis. We also report that a second pocket of superconductivity occurs at low temperature for a range of fields enveloping this magnetic transition, well above the field of 2 tesla at which superconductivity is first destroyed. Our findings strongly suggest that excitations in which the spins rotate stimulate superconductivity in the neighborhood of a quantum phase transition under high magnetic field.

Lévy, F.; Sheikin, I.; Grenier, B.; Huxley, A. D.

2005-08-01

149

Transport in Two-Dimensional Electron Gas in Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field  

E-print Network

, Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8666 Japan bCore Research for Evolutionary Science and Technology (CREST) Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-0031 Japan Abstract the micropatterned DyCu islands is about 1µm. Strong magnetic field up to 5 Tesla applied parallel to the 2DEG plane

Katsumoto, Shingo

150

TESLA Report 1998-28 TESLA Report 1998-28  

E-print Network

TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 3 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 1 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 4 TESLA Report 1998-28 Page 2 #12;TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA Report 1998-28TESLA

151

Detection of lung tumors in mice using a 1-tesla compact magnetic resonance imaging system.  

PubMed

Due to their small size, lung tumors in rodents are typically investigated using high-field magnetic resonance (MR) systems (4.7 T or higher) to achieve higher signal-to-noise ratios, although low-field MR systems are less sensitive to susceptibility artifacts caused by air in the lung. We investigated the feasibility of detecting lung tumors in living, freely breathing mice with a 1-T compact permanent magnet MR system. In total, 4 mice were used, and MR images of mouse lungs were acquired using a T1-weighted three-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence without cardiac or respiratory gating. The delineation and size of lung tumors were assessed and compared with histopathological findings. Submillimeter lesions were demonstrated as hyperintense, relative to the surrounding lung parenchyma, and were delineated clearly. Among the 13 lesions validated in histopathological sections, 11 were detected in MR images; the MR detection rate was thus 84.6%. A strong correlation was obtained in size measurements between MR images and histological sections. Thus, a dedicated low-field MR system can be used to detect lung tumors in living mice noninvasively without gating. PMID:24743153

Wang, Fang; Akashi, Ken; Murakami, Yoshinori; Inoue, Yusuke; Furuta, Toshihiro; Yamada, Haruyasu; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

2014-01-01

152

Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory  

E-print Network

Using numerical simulations of quenched SU(2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eBc = 0.927(77) GeV^2 or Bc =(1.56 \\pm 0.13) 10^{16} Tesla. The condensation of the charged rho mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

V. V. Braguta; P. V. Buividovich; M. N. Chernodub; A. Yu. Kotov; M. I. Polikarpov

2011-04-19

153

On magnetic field ``reconstruction''  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Context: Solanki and colleagues have presented intriguing 3D “reconstructions” of magnetic fields from the vector polarimetry of the He I 1083 nm multiplet. Aims: In this Research Note I re-examine the reconstruction technique used. Methods: Using a simple dipole field, I examine the reconstruction technique as applied to the theoretical fields. I assume that the He line forms in two locations, (1) along the magnetic loops and (2) in a horizontal plane. Results: The planar interpretation can account for all aspects of the data, but the loop interpretation has geometrical and physical problems. Conclusions: The data by themselves are not sufficient to determine which picture is more applicable. Nevertheless I argue that the planar interpretation makes more physical sense and that the early reconstructions lead to spurious results. I suggest additional tests that might help constrain the problem further.

Judge, P. G.

2009-01-01

154

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Field Measurements  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This laboratory is designed for students to become familiar with the principles and detection techniques of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), examine the relationship between current and magnetic field in an electromagnet, and gain experience in the use of magnetic field measurement techniques.

2012-01-04

155

The Earth's Magnetic Field  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of the Windows to the Universe website provides information and images about Earth's magnetic field (the magnetosphere), including detailed information about the aurora borealis, magnets, and solar wind. Windows to the Universe is a user-friendly learning system pertaining to the Earth and Space sciences. The objective of this project is to develop an innovative and engaging website that includes a rich array of documents, including images, movies, animations, and data sets that explore the Earth and Space sciences and the historical and cultural ties between science, exploration and the human experience. Links at the top of each page allow users to navigate between beginner, intermediate and advanced levels.

Johnson, Roberta

2000-07-01

156

The Heliospheric Magnetic Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Heliospheric Magnetic Field (HMF) is the physical framework in which energetic particles and cosmic rays propagate. Changes in the large scale structure of the magnetic field lead to short- and long term changes in cosmic ray intensities, in particular in anti-phase with solar activity. The origin of the HMF in the corona is well understood and inner heliospheric observations can generally be linked to their coronal sources. The structure of heliospheric magnetic polarities and the heliospheric current sheet separating the dominant solar polarities are reviewed here over longer than a solar cycle, using the three dimensional heliospheric observations by Ulysses. The dynamics of the HMF around solar minimum activity is reviewed and the development of stream interaction regions following the stable flow patterns of fast and slow solar wind in the inner heliosphere is described. The complex dynamics that affects the evolution of the stream interaction regions leads to a more chaotic structure of the HMF in the outer heliosphere is described and discussed on the basis of the Voyager observations. Around solar maximum, solar activity is dominated by frequent transients, resulting in the interplanetary counterparts of Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs). These produce a complex aperiodic pattern of structures in the inner heliosphere, at all heliolatitudes. These structures continue to interact and evolve as they travel to the outer heliosphere. However, linking the observations in the inner and outer heliospheres is possible in the case of the largest solar transients that, despite their evolutions, remain recognizably large structures and lead to the formation of Merged Interaction Regions (MIRs) that may well form a quasi-spherical, "global" shell of enhanced magnetic fields around the Sun at large distances. For the transport of energetic particles and cosmic rays, the fluctuations in the magnetic field and their description in alternative turbulent models remains a very important research topic. These are also briefly reviewed in this paper.

Balogh, André; Erdõs, Géza

2013-06-01

157

Magnetic Fields, Flares & Forecasts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 2D wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method is used to characterise the complexity of the distribution of the photospheric magnetic field of active regions. The WTMM method offers increased accuracy and reliability over previous fractal and multifractal methods. The multifractal spectrum of both quiet Sun and active region magnetic features are presented. It is shown that the multifractal nature of the quiet Sun is significantly different from that of an active region. As such, a method is proposed to seperate the information corresponding to the multifractal spectrum of an active region from the surrounding quite Sun texture. The WTMM method and segmentation procedure are shown to detect the internal restructuring of active region magnetic features prior to flaring. We detect two thresholds (Haussdorf dimension > 1.2 and Holder Exponent > -0.7) as possible indicators for conditions favourable to flaring.

Conlon, Paul A.; Kestener, P.; McAteer, R.; Gallagher, P.

2009-05-01

158

Simulation and Measurement of the Fringe Field of the 1.5 Tesla BaBar Solenoid  

SciTech Connect

In the context of the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider and the BABAR detector with its 1.5 Tesla solenoid, we have calculated and measured the fringe field at the nearby beam elements and at the position of the photomultipliers external to the return iron but within a specially designed iron shield. The comparisons of these measurements with the simulations based on finite element analysis are remarkably good, within about 5 Gauss at the most critical beam element. The field at the photomultipliers is less than 1 Gauss, in agreement with the simulation. With a simple method of demagnetization of the shield, a maximum field of 0.6 Gauss is obtained.

London, Georges W

1998-11-17

159

Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials.  

PubMed

We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials-aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium-for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100?and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125?and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were <1.0, 1.0 and 2.0 mm in the entire treatable area, respectively, with 1.5 T. In the 3.0-T field, the errors with aluminum QFSs were <1.0 mm only around the center, while the errors with tungsten-tipped aluminum and titanium were >2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region. PMID:25034732

Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

2014-11-01

160

Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a critical magnetic field value. Growth conditions in which static magnetic fields rotational magnetic fields, and reduced gravitational levels can have a beneficial role will be described.

Volz, Martin

2004-01-01

161

Magnetic fields and cancer  

SciTech Connect

This letter is a response to an article by Savitz and Kaune, EHP 101:76-80. W-L wire code was applied to data from a 1988 Denver study, and an association was reported between high W-L wire code and childhood cancer. This author discusses several studies and provides explanations which weakens the argument that classification error resulted in an appreciable reduction in the association between W-L high wire code and childhood cancer. In conclusion, the fact that new wire code is only weakly correlated with magnetic field measurements (in the same manner as the original W-L wire code) suggests that the newly reported stronger association with childhood cancer is likely due to factors other than magnetic fields. Differential residential mobility and differential residential age are two possible explanations and are suggestive that the reported association may be false.

Jones, T.L.

1993-10-01

162

Magnetic Field of the Earth  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students can learn about how the magnetic field of the earth is similar to magnets. Go to the following link: Magnetic Field of the Earth 1. What makes the earth like a magnet? 2. How do we measure magnetism? Be sure to check out the fun games and activities on this web site too!! Now click on the following link and listen to a 2 minute presentation about magnetism: Pulse Planet Next go to ...

Merritt, Mrs.

2005-10-18

163

TESLA Report 1997-22 TESLA Report 1997-22  

E-print Network

TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12;TESLA Report 1997-22 #12

164

Detailing Radio Frequency Heating Induced by Coronary Stents: A 7.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Study  

PubMed Central

The sensitivity gain of ultrahigh field Magnetic Resonance (UHF-MR) holds the promise to enhance spatial and temporal resolution. Such improvements could be beneficial for cardiovascular MR. However, intracoronary stents used for treatment of coronary artery disease are currently considered to be contra-indications for UHF-MR. The antenna effect induced by a stent together with RF wavelength shortening could increase local radiofrequency (RF) power deposition at 7.0 T and bears the potential to induce local heating, which might cause tissue damage. Realizing these constraints, this work examines RF heating effects of stents using electro-magnetic field (EMF) simulations and phantoms with properties that mimic myocardium. For this purpose, RF power deposition that exceeds the clinical limits was induced by a dedicated birdcage coil. Fiber optic probes and MR thermometry were applied for temperature monitoring using agarose phantoms containing copper tubes or coronary stents. The results demonstrate an agreement between RF heating induced temperature changes derived from EMF simulations versus MR thermometry. The birdcage coil tailored for RF heating was capable of irradiating power exceeding the specific-absorption rate (SAR) limits defined by the IEC guidelines by a factor of three. This setup afforded RF induced temperature changes up to +27 K in a reference phantom. The maximum extra temperature increase, induced by a copper tube or a coronary stent was less than 3 K. The coronary stents examined showed an RF heating behavior similar to a copper tube. Our results suggest that, if IEC guidelines for local/global SAR are followed, the extra RF heating induced in myocardial tissue by stents may not be significant versus the baseline heating induced by the energy deposited by a tailored cardiac transmit RF coil at 7.0 T, and may be smaller if not insignificant than the extra RF heating observed under the circumstances used in this study. PMID:23185498

Santoro, Davide; Winter, Lukas; Muller, Alexander; Vogt, Julia; Renz, Wolfgang; Ozerdem, Celal; Grassl, Andreas; Tkachenko, Valeriy; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

2012-01-01

165

AC Magnetic Field Survey Report  

E-print Network

AC Magnetic Field Survey Report of Literature Building - 3000 University of California San Diego:..........................................................................................................2 ELF OR AC MAGNETIC FIELD CHARACTERISTICS:...............................................2 UNITS of California San Diego La Jolla, California PROJECT: AC Magnetic Field Survey SCOPE: The scope of this project

Krstic, Miroslav

166

The WIND magnetic field investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetic field experiment on WIND will provide data for studies of a broad range of scales of structures and fluctuation characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field throughout the mission, and, where appropriate, relate them to the statics and dynamics of the magnetosphere. The basic instrument of the Magnetic Field Investigation (MFI) is a boom-mounted dual triaxial fluxgate magnetometer and

R. P. Lepping; M. H. Ac?na; L. F. Burlaga; W. M. Farrell; J. A. Slavin; K. H. Schatten; F. Mariani; N. F. Ness; F. M. Neubauer; Y. C. Whang; J. B. Byrnes; R. S. Kennon; P. V. Panetta; J. Scheifele; E. M. Worley

1995-01-01

167

Magnetic Field Topology in Jets  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

2000-01-01

168

Low field magnetic resonance imaging  

DOEpatents

A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

2010-07-13

169

PBS: Tesla - Master of Lightning  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web site explores the life and legacy of Nikola Tesla, an important contributor to the field of electromagnetism. Although the significance of his work is often minimized, Tesla's work formed the basis of modern alternating current power systems and wireless transmission of energy. He was the first to receive a patent for the invention of the radio, though Marconi is more often given credit for the discovery. The web site includes interactive explorations of Tesla's key inventions and lesson plans for grades 6-12 on electric potential and conversion of electrical energy into mechanical energy. Users will also find selected articles on Tesla, timelines of electricity and radio, and a link to view selected Tesla patents.

2010-06-24

170

Quench problems of Nb3 Sn cosine theta high field dipole model magnets  

SciTech Connect

We have developed and tested several cosine theta high field dipole model magnets for accelerator application, utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn strands made by MJR method and PIT method. With Rutherford cables made with PIT strand we achieved 10.1 Tesla central field at 2.2 K operation, and 9.5 Tesla at 4.5 K operation. The magnet wound with the MJR cable prematurely quenched at 6.8 Tesla at 4.5 K due to cryo-instability. Typical quench behaviors of these magnets are described for both types of magnets, HFDA-04 of MJR and HFDA-05 of PIT. Their characteristics parameters are compared on d{sub eff}, RRR, thermal conductivity and others, together with other historical Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. It is suggested a larger RRR value is essential for the stability of the epoxy impregnated high field magnets made with high current density strands. It is shown that a magnet with a larger RRR value has a longer MPZ value and more stable, due to its high thermal conductivity and low resistivity.

Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

2004-12-01

171

NMR at low magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NMR provides outstanding information in chemistry and in medicine. But the equipment is expensive as high-field magnets are employed. Low-field NMR works with inexpensive permanent magnets. Until recently these did not provide fields sufficiently homogeneous for spectroscopy and were mostly used for relaxation measurements. Relaxation can also be measured outside the magnet, and small mobile NMR devices have been developed for non-destructive testing of large objects. Today small stray-field magnets and small magnets with homogeneous fields are available for relaxation analysis, imaging, and spectroscopy. Their availability is believed to be essential for shifting NMR analysis from a specialist's tool to a convenience tool.

Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico; Appelt, Stephan

2009-08-01

172

Effect of 1. 5 tesla nuclear magnetic resonance imaging scanner on implanted permanent pacemakers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with a permanent pacemaker are currently restricted from diagnostic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging because of potential adverse effects on the pacemaker by the magnet. Previous work has shown that NMR imaging will result in asynchronous pacing of the pulse generator within a given distance of the magnet. The radiofrequency signal generated by the system may also result in

David L. Hayes; David R. Holmes Jr.; Joel E. Gray

1987-01-01

173

Magnetic Fields in Irregular Galaxies  

E-print Network

Magnetic fields are an important component of the interstellar medium, especially in low-mass galaxies like irregulars where the magnetic pressure may be significant. However, few irregular galaxies have observed magnetic field structures. Using the VLA, the GBT, and the ATCA, we have observed several irregular galaxies in the radio continuum to determine their magnetic field structures. Here we report on our results for the galaxies NGC 4214 and NGC 1569.

Amanda A. Kepley; Stefanie Muehle; Eric M. Wilcots; John Everett; Ellen Zweibel; Timothy Robishaw; Carl Heiles

2007-08-24

174

Magnetic Fields in Protostellar Disks  

E-print Network

· Shear in disc may wind up field or drive MRI · Equipartition field in the minimum solar nebula to the shear in the disc? ­ which form of diffusion is dominant? logn/nH (s-1) M+ C+ m+ e He+ H+ H3 instability (MRI) ­ disc-driven winds Magnetic fields · Magnetic fields play an important role during star

Wardle, Mark

175

Imaging and analysis of lenticulostriate arteries using 7.0-Tesla magnetic resonance angiography.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyze human lenticulostriate arteries (LSAs) obtained non-invasively by 7.0-T MRI. A three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique was used with an investigational 7.0-T MRI scanner with a radio-frequency coil that was optimized and designed for angiographic purposes. We obtained images from 16 healthy volunteers (8 males and 8 females, mean age 21 +/- 2.7 years). For direct comparison of LSA images with digital subtraction angiography (DSA), we also obtained 7.0-T MRA and DSA images from one patient, a 27-year-old woman with a posterior fossa arteriovenous malformation (AVM). We then analyzed the characteristics of LSAs using a custom data analysis method with MatLab for quantitative analysis. Analysis of LSA images included shape and number of branches and origins, findings that are essential and useful for quantification of LSA abnormalities in both healthy controls and patients. Ultra-high-field MRA provided clear anatomic delineation of the LSAs, thereby suggesting that 7.0-T MRA may be a promising technique for microvascular imaging of the LSAs. PMID:19097221

Kang, Chang-Ki; Park, Cheol-Wan; Han, Jae-Yong; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Park, Chan-A; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Hong, Suk-Min; Kim, Young-Bo; Lee, Kendall H; Cho, Zang-Hee

2009-01-01

176

The Heliospheric Magnetic Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) is the extension of the coronal magnetic field carried out into the solar system by the solar wind. It is the means by which the Sun interacts with planetary magnetospheres and channels charged particles propagating through the heliosphere. As the HMF remains rooted at the solar photosphere as the Sun rotates, the large-scale HMF traces out an Archimedean spiral. This pattern is distorted by the interaction of fast and slow solar wind streams, as well as the interplanetary manifestations of transient solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections. On the smaller scale, the HMF exhibits an array of waves, discontinuities, and turbulence, which give hints to the solar wind formation process. This review aims to summarise observations and theory of the small- and large-scale structure of the HMF. Solar-cycle and cycle-to-cycle evolution of the HMF is discussed in terms of recent spacecraft observations and pre-spaceage proxies for the HMF in geomagnetic and galactic cosmic ray records.

Owens, Mathew J.; Forsyth, Robert J.

2013-11-01

177

Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

Wyntjes, Geert

2002-02-01

178

Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

1983-01-01

179

Development of high field superconducting magnet using in-situ V3Ga compound tape  

SciTech Connect

The newly developed in-situ V3Ga compound tape was wound into a pancake coil and its coil characteristics were investigated. The V3Ga tape, containing many fine filaments with a diameter of about 0.1 ..mu..m, is 0.185 mm in thickness and 5 mm in width, and the surface of the tape was covered with electroplated copper for stabilization. The coil consists of 14 double pancake molecules and has a bore diameter of 50 mm. The coil was tested in a Nb-Ti bias field magnet having a bore diameter of 145 mm, and generated a magnetic field of 14.4 Tesla at a coil current of 190 A and in a bias field of 9.9 Tesla. The other characteristics such as sweep rate dependences, flux jump phenomena, hysteresis and remanent field, were also investigated.

Oishi, K.; Takei, N.; Tanaka, Y.; Yamada, K.

1988-03-01

180

(version 6/26/06) Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

where the magnetic fields of the Earth and the bar magnet sum to zero. INTRODUCTION A magnetic field(version 6/26/06) Magnetic Fields GOALS (1) To visualize the magnetic fields produced by several to trace out the magnetic field lines of a single bar magnet on a large sheet of paper. (3) To calculate

Collins, Gary S.

181

Magnetic Propeller for Uniform Magnetic Field Levitation  

E-print Network

Three new approaches to generating thrust in uniform magnetic fields are proposed. The first direction is based on employing Lorentz force acting on partial magnetically shielded 8-shaped loop with current in external magnetic field, whereby a net force rather than a torque origins. Another approach, called a Virtual Wire System, is based on creating a magnetic field having an energetic symmetry (a virtual wire), with further superposition of external field. The external field breaks the symmetry causing origination of a net force. Unlike a wire with current, having radial energetic symmetry, the symmetry of the Virtual Wire System is closer to an axial wire. The third approach refers to the first two. It is based on creation of developed surface system, comprising the elements of the first two types. The developed surface approach is a way to drastically increase a thrust-to-weight ratio. The conducted experiments have confirmed feasibility of the proposed approaches.

Mark Krinker; Alexander Bolonkin

2008-07-12

182

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

and testing areas, magnet experiment cells, and laser laboratory areas. The laboratory is used 24 hours perNATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY NHMFL FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY SAFETY PROCEDURE SP-3 TITLE Dalton ______________________________________________________ ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, ENVIRONMENTAL, HEALTH

Weston, Ken

183

BTA Magnet Field Map Archive and MAD Model  

SciTech Connect

This note publishes some and information that has resided in private files. The attached tables were provided by Joseph Skelly from his archives. They show magnetic field measurements versus excitation current for the Booster to AGS transfer line quadrupoles and dipoles based on field measurements [we believe] were done by the Magnet Division. Also given are Ed Blesser's fifth order fits of field versus current. The results are given in 'Tesla' or T-M/M. These tables are attached to provide an archive of this data. The MAD model of the BTA line does have the same values as shown in the attached fits so the transfer was correct. MAD uses as its 'gradient' for quads Tesla per meter normalized to rigidity [B-rho]. The model of the BTA line in use uses the T-M/M given in the tables divided by the length to give T M which is then normalized by Brho. Thus, the input to the model appears to be correct. The original model is also attached as part of a memo by Skelly describing it.

Glenn,J.W.

2008-04-01

184

Understanding the Chromospheric Magnetic Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The chromospheric magnetic field is an important and essential component for understanding solar atmospheric fields. Due to the problems of polarization radiation transfer in the chromosphere and the low detective sensitivity of chromospheric spectrum lines, observations of chromospheric magnetic fields are very difficult, so studies of chromospheric fields are infrequent. However, the understanding of chromospheric fields is evolving. In this report, we summarize our current empirical knowledge and basic physical understanding of chromospheric fields. We concentrate on the comparison of magnetic fields in the photosphere and chromosphere, and then display their difference.

Jin, C. L.; Harvey, J. W.; Pietarila, A.

2014-10-01

185

Reconnection of Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1.1 The Sun E. R. Priest; 1.2 Earth's magnetosphere J. Birn; Part II. Basic Theory of MHD Reconnection: 2.1 Classical theory of two-dimensional reconnection T. G. Forbes; 2.2 Fundamental concepts G. Hornig; 2.3 Three-dimensional reconnection in the absence of magnetic null points G. Hornig; 2.4 Three-dimensional reconnection at magnetic null points D. Pontin; 2.5 Three-dimensional flux tube reconnection M. Linton; Part III. Basic Theory of Collisionless Reconnection: 3.1 Fundamentals of collisionless reconnection J. Drake; 3.2 Diffusion region physics M. Hesse; 3.3 Onset of magnetic reconnection P. Pritchett; 3.4 Hall-MHD reconnection A. Bhattacharjee and J. Dorelli; 3.5 Role of current-aligned instabilities J. Büchner and W. Daughton; 3.6 Nonthermal particle acceleration M. Hoshino; Part IV. Reconnection in the Magnetosphere: 4.1 Reconnection at the magnetopause: concepts and models J. G. Dorelli and A. Bhattacharjee; 4.2 Observations of magnetopause reconnection K.-H. Trattner; 4.3 On the stability of the magnetotail K. Schindler; 4.4 Simulations of reconnection in the magnetotail J. Birn; 4.5 Observations of tail reconnection W. Baumjohann and R. Nakamura; 4.6 Remote sensing of reconnection M. Freeman; Part V. Reconnection in the Sun's Atmosphere: 5.1 Coronal heating E. R. Priest; 5.2 Separator reconnection D. Longcope; 5.3 Pinching of coronal fields V. Titov; 5.4 Numerical experiments on coronal heating K. Galsgaard; 5.5 Solar flares K. Kusano; 5.6 Particle acceleration in flares: theory T. Neukirch; 5.7 Fast particles in flares: observations L. Fletcher; 6. Open problems J. Birn and E. R. Priest; Bibliography; Index.

Birn, J.; Priest, E. R.

2007-01-01

186

Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

Miller, G.

1987-12-01

187

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOEpatents

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21

188

Magnetic fields in massive stars  

E-print Network

Although indirect evidence for the presence of magnetic fields in high-mass stars is regularly reported in the literature, the detection of these fields remains an extremely challenging observational problem. We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

S. Hubrig

2007-03-09

189

The Galileo magnetic field investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Galileo Orbiter carries a complement of fields and particles instruments designed to provide data needed to shed light on the structure and dynamical variations of the Jovian magnetosphere. Many questions remain regarding the temporal and spatial properties of the magnetospheric magnetic field, how the magnetic field maintains corotation of the embedded plasma and the circumstances under which corotation breaks

M. G. Kivelson; K. K. Khurana; J. D. Means; C. T. Russell; R. C. Snare

1992-01-01

190

Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

2013-09-03

191

Mars Observer magnetic fields investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The magnetic fields experiment designed for the Mars Observer mission will provide definitive measurements of the Martian magnetic field from the transition and mapping orbits planned for the Mars Observer. The paper describes the instruments (which include a classical magnetometer and an electron reflection magnetometer) and techniques designed to investigate the nature of the Martian magnetic field and the Mars-solar wind interaction, the mapping of crustal magnetic fields, and studies of the Martian ionosphere, which are activities included in the Mars Observer mission objectives. Attention is also given to the flight software incorporated in the on-board data processor, and the procedures of data processing and analysis.

Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Wasilewski, P.; Lin, R. P.; Anderson, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Mcfadden, J.; Curtis, D. W.; Reme, H.; Cros, A.

1992-01-01

192

Polarized Electron-Nucleon Scattering at The TESLA-N Study-Group  

E-print Network

DESY TESLA-N Polarized Electron-Nucleon Scattering at TESLA The TESLA-N Study-Group http://www.ifh.de/hermes/future | THE BASIC IDEA | A Polarized Fixed-Target Experiment at TESLA Basic Idea: Use one arm of the TESLA collider 0 0 1 1 01 (north arm) Magnet TESLA Main Linac TESLA­N 250 GeV Electrons Separation Building

193

(Revised December 30, 2013) Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

of the points where the magnetic fields of the Earth and the bar magnet sum to zero. INTRODUCTION A magnetic(Revised December 30, 2013) Magnetic Fields GOALS (1) To visualize the magnetic fields produced compasses to trace out the magnetic field lines of a single bar magnet on a large sheet of paper. (3

Collins, Gary S.

194

[Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].  

PubMed

Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy. PMID:18383745

Hanzek, Branko; Jakobovi?, Zvonimir

2007-12-01

195

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOEpatents

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Hoard, Ronald W. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

196

High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films  

DOEpatents

High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

1994-05-10

197

High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities Elmar Vogel  

E-print Network

High gain proportional rf control stability at TESLA cavities Elmar Vogel Deutsches Elektronen) based on TESLA technology. Additional control loops improve the field regulation by treating repetitive loops is desirable for the strong suppression of nonpredictive and nonrepetitive disturbances. TESLA

198

Strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects on CVD-grown N.-C. Yeha,  

E-print Network

, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA bDepartment of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA Abstract Atomically resolved imaging effects. Additionally, the large and non-uniform strain induces pseudo-magnetic field up to 50 Tesla

Faraon, Andrei

199

Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: jumping from 1.5 to 3 tesla (preliminary experience).  

PubMed

Several attempts have been made at imaging the fetus at 3 T as part of the continuous search for increased image signal and better anatomical delineation of the developing fetus. Until very recently, imaging of the fetus at 3 T has been disappointing, with numerous artifacts impeding image analysis. Better magnets and coils and improved technology now allow imaging of the fetus at greater magnetic strength, some hurdles in the shape of imaging artifacts notwithstanding. In this paper we present the preliminary experience of evaluating the developing fetus at 3 T and discuss several artifacts encountered and techniques to decrease them, as well as safety concerns associated with scanning the fetus at higher magnetic strength. PMID:24671739

Victoria, Teresa; Jaramillo, Diego; Roberts, Timothy Paul Leslie; Zarnow, Deborah; Johnson, Ann Michelle; Delgado, Jorge; Rubesova, Erika; Vossough, Arastoo

2014-04-01

200

Magnetic response to applied electrostatic field in external magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We show, within QED and other possible nonlinear theories, that a static charge localized in a finite domain of space becomes a magnetic dipole, if it is placed in an external (constant and homogeneous) magnetic field in the vacuum. The magnetic moment is quadratic in the charge, depends on its size and is parallel to the external field, provided the charge distribution is at least cylindrically symmetric. This magneto-electric effect is a nonlinear response of the magnetized vacuum to an applied electrostatic field. Referring to the simple example of a spherically symmetric applied field, the nonlinearly induced current and its magnetic field are found explicitly throughout the space; the pattern of the lines of force is depicted, both inside and outside the charge, which resembles that of a standard solenoid of classical magnetostatics.

Adorno, T. C.; Gitman, D. M.; Shabad, A. E.

2014-04-01

201

Application of the double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device sensor to micro-tesla 1H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed an ultra-low field (ULF)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement system capable of working with a measurement field (Bm) of several micro-tesla and performed basic NMR studies with a double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device (DROS) instead of conventional dc-SQUIDs. DROS is a SQUID sensor utilizing a relaxation oscillation between a dc-SQUID and a relaxation circuit; the new unit consists of an inductor and a resistor, and is connected in parallel with the SQUID. DROS has a 10 times larger flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient (˜mV/?0) than that of the dc-SQUID, and this large transfer coefficient enables the acquisition of the SQUID signal with a simple flux-locked-loop (FLL) circuit using room temperature pre-amplifiers. The DROS second-order gradiometer showed average field noise of 9.2 ??0/?Hz in a magnetically shielded room (MSR). In addition, a current limiter formed of a Josephson junction array was put in a flux-transformer of DROS to prevent excessive currents that can be generated from the high pre-polarization field (Bp). Using this system, we measured an 1H NMR signal in water under 2.8 ?T Bm field and reconstructed a one-dimensional MR image from the 1H NMR signal under a gradient field BG of 4.09 nT/mm. In addition, we confirmed that the ULF-NMR system can measure the NMR signal in the presence of metal without any distortion by measuring the NMR signal of a sample wrapped with metal. Lastly, we have measured the scalar J-coupling of trimethylphosphate and were able to confirm a clear doublet NMR signal with the coupling strength J3[P,H] = 10.4 ± 0.8 Hz. Finally, because the existing ULF-NMR/MRI studies were almost all performed with dc-SQUID based systems, we constructed a dc-SQUID-based ULF-NMR system in addition to the DROS based system and compared the characteristics of the two different systems by operating the two systems under identical experimental conditions.

Kang, Chan Seok; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Jin-Mok; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong-Ho

2011-09-01

202

[Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].  

PubMed

Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

2013-01-16

203

Theory of fossil magnetic field  

E-print Network

Theory of fossil magnetic field is based on the observations, analytical estimations and numerical simulations of magnetic flux evolution during star formation in the magnetized cores of molecular clouds. Basic goals, main features of the theory and manifestations of MHD effects in young stellar objects are discussed.

Dudorov, Alexander E

2014-01-01

204

A 2 Tesla Full Scale High Performance Periodic Permanent Magnet Model for Attractive (228 KN) and repulsive Maglev  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two 214.5 cm. long high performance periodic (26 cm period) permanent magnet half-assemblies were designed and constructed for use as a wiggler using Nd-B-Fe and vanadium permendur as hard and soft magnetic materials by Field Effects, a division of Intermagnetics General Corporation. Placing these assemblies in a supporting structure with a 2.1 cm pole to pole separation resulted in a periodic field with a maximum value of 2.04 T. This is believed to be the highest field ever achieved by this type of device. The attractive force between the two 602 kg magnet assemblies is 228 kN, providing enough force for suspension of a 45,500 kg vehicle. If used in an attractive maglev system with an appropriate flat iron rail, one assembly will generate the same force with a gap of 1.05 cm leading to a lift to weight ratio of 38.6, not including the vehicle attachment structure. This permanent magnet compares well with superconducting systems which have lift to weight ratios in the range of 5 to 10. This paper describes the magnet assemblies and their measured magnetic performance. The measured magnetic field and resulting attractive magnetic force have a negative spring characteristic. Appropriate control coils are necessary to provide stable operation. The estimated performance of the assemblies in a stable repulsive mode, with eddy currents in a conducting guideway, is also discussed.

Stekly, Z. J. J.; Gardner, C.; Domigan, P.; Baker, J.; Hass, M.; McDonald, C.; Wu, C.; Farrell, R. A.

1996-01-01

205

Study the effect of magnetic field on gaseous flames using digital speckle pattern interferometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An experimental investigation on the behavior of gaseous flames in the presence of magnetic field by using digital speckle pattern interferometry is presented. Premixed, partially premixed and diffusion flames generated by butane torch burner were exposed to the magnetic field of 0.35 Tesla. Phase has been extracted from a single DSPI fringe pattern by the application of Riesz transform and the monogenic signal and from which refractive index and the temperature were calculated. Experimental results show that the temperature and the width of the flames are increased under the influence of magnetic gradient.

Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Shilpi; Kumar, Varun; Khan, Gufran S.; Shakher, Chandra

2014-10-01

206

On-chip SQUID measurements in the presence of high magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We report a low temperature measurement technique and magnetization data of a quantum molecular spin, by implementing an on-chip SQUID technique. This technique enables the SQUID magnetometery in high magnetic fields, up to 7 Tesla. The main challenges and the calibration process are detailed. The measurement protocol is used to observe quantum tunneling jumps of the S=10 molecular magnet, Mn12-tBuAc. The effect of transverse field on the tunneling splitting for this molecular system is addressed as well.

L. Chen; W. Wernsdorfer; C. Lampropoulos; G. Christou; I. Chiorescu

2010-07-21

207

A six-tesla superconducting dipole magnet design and development program for POPAE  

Microsoft Academic Search

POPAE, the proposed Proton-Proton Intersecting Storage Ring Facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, will require some 1400 superconducting 6.0 T DC dipole and quadrupole magnets. The dipoles are 6. 17 m long and consist of coils of rectangular cross section clamped directly onto the 6 cm inner diameter bore tube. Aluminum is used to support the coils, and they are

J. Bywater; M. H. Foss; L. E. Genens; L. G. Hyman; R. P. Smith; L. R. Turner; S. T. Wang; S. C. Snowdon; J. R. Purcell

1977-01-01

208

Chondrule magnetic properties  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The topics discussed include the following: chondrule magnetic properties; chondrules from the same meteorite; and REM values (the ratio for remanence initially measured to saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field). The preliminary field estimates for chondrules magnetizing environments range from minimal to a least several mT. These estimates are based on REM values and the characteristics of the remanence initially measured (natural remanence) thermal demagnetization compared to the saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field demagnetization.

Wasilewski, P. J.; Obryan, M. V.

1994-01-01

209

Micromegas TPC studies at high magnetic fields using the charge dispersion signal  

E-print Network

The International Linear Collider (ILC) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) transverse space-point resolution goal is 100 microns for all tracks including stiff 90 degree tracks with the full 2 meter drift. A Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) readout TPC can achieve the target resolution with existing techniques using 1 mm or narrower pads at the expense of increased detector cost and complexity. The new MPGD readout technique of charge dispersion can achieve good resolution without resorting to narrow pads. This has been demonstrated previously for 2 mm x 6 mm pads with GEMs and Micromegas in cosmic ray tests and in a KEK beam test in a 1 Tesla magnet. We have recently tested a Micromegas-TPC using the charge dispersion readout concept in a high field super-conducting magnet at DESY. The measured Micromegas gain was found to be constant within 0.5% for magnetic fields up to 5 Tesla. With the strong suppression of transverse diffusion at high magnetic fields, we measure a flat 50 micron resolution at 5 Tesla over t...

Dixit, A M; Bellerive, A; Boudjemline, K; Colas, P; Giganon, P; Giomataris, Ioanis; Lepeltier, V; Liu, S; Martin, J P; Sachs, K; Shin, Y; Turnbull, S; Dixit, Authors M.

2007-01-01

210

Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.  

PubMed

We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)??G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)??GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

Campanelli, Leonardo

2013-08-01

211

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY  

E-print Network

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY SUPPORTED BY: THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION and THE STATE OF FLORIDA OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA · LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Page 15 2005 ANNUAL REPORT #12;2005 ANNUAL REPORT National High magnetic Field Laboratory 2005 NHMFL

Weston, Ken

212

Determination of beam energy at TESLA using radiative return events  

E-print Network

Determination of beam energy at TESLA using radiative return events ARND HINZE DESY Zeuthen at TESLA. It was suggested to use this method to cross check and calibrate the magnet spectrometer used for measurement of the beam energy at TESLA. A preliminary assessment of the statistical and systematic errors

213

Evaluation of the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum using a 0.2-Tesla extremity magnetic resonance (MR) system: MR results compared to surgical findings.  

PubMed

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed using a dedicated-extremity MR system in detecting lesions of the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum. This retrospective study compared the MR results obtained in 47 patients that underwent MRI using a 0.2-Tesla extremity MR system (E-scan) to the surgical findings. MR images of the shoulder were obtained as follows: shoulder coil, T1-weighted, coronal-oblique and axial images; short Tau inversion recovery (STIR), coronal-oblique images; and T2-weighted, coronal-oblique, sagittal-oblique, and axial images. The MR examinations were interpreted by three highly experienced, musculoskeletal radiologists. Open surgical (N = 26) or arthroscopic (N = 21) procedures were performed within a mean time of 33 days after MRI. The surgical findings revealed rotator cuff tears in 28 patients and labral lesions in 9 patients. For the rotator cuff tears, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 89%, 100%, 100%, and 90%, respectively. For the labral lesions, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 89%, 95%, 80%, and 97%, respectively. The findings indicated that there was good agreement comparing the MR results obtained using the low-field extremity MR system to the surgical findings for determination of lesions of the rotator cuff and glenoid labrum. Notably, the statistical values determined for the use of this MR system were comparable to those reported in the peer-reviewed literature for the use of whole-body, mid- and high-field-strength MR systems. PMID:11747034

Shellock, F G; Bert, J M; Fritts, H M; Gundry, C R; Easton, R; Crues, J V

2001-12-01

214

Can we detect antimatter from other galaxies by the use of the Earth's magnetic field and the Moon as an absorber?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a search for antimatter in cosmic rays at energies between 1 and 10 TeV. The electric charge values, including their sign, would be determined by a magnetic analysis combined with an energy measurement. We suggest the use of the Earth's magnetic field, which affordsa bending power of ~ 100 Tesla x metre. The moon would serve as an

M. Urban; P. Fleury; R. Lestienne; F. Plouin

1990-01-01

215

TESLA Polarimeters  

E-print Network

We describe a study of high-energy Compton beam polarimeters for the future e+e- linear collider machine TESLA. A segment of the beam delivery system has been identified, which is aligned with the e+e- collision axis and which has a suitable configuration for high-quality beam polarization measurements. The laser envisaged for the polarimeter is similar to an existing facility at DESY. It delivers very short pulses in the 10 ps, 10-100uJ regime and operates with a pattern that matches the pulse and bunch structure of TESLA. This will permit very fast and accurate measurements and an expeditious tune-up of the spin manipulators at the low-energy end of the linac. Electron detection in the multi-event regime will be the principle operating mode of the polarimeter. Other possible operating modes include photon detection and single-event detection for calibration purposes. We expect an overall precision of dP/P=0.5% for the measurement of the beam polarization.

V. Gharibyan; N. Meyners; K. P. Schuler

2003-10-22

216

CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Structure of Magnetic  

E-print Network

CHAPTER 3. STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS 1 Chapter 3 Structure of Magnetic Fields Many of the most interesting plasmas are permeated by or imbedded in magnetic fields.1 As shown in Fig. 3.1, the magnetic field properties of magnetic fields in plasmas can be discussed without specifying a model for the plasma

Callen, James D.

217

3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging improves the prostate cancer detection rate in transrectral ultrasound-guided biopsy  

PubMed Central

The detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) using traditional biopsy guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is not satisfactory. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of 3-Tesla (3-T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and to investigate which subgroup of patients had the most evident improvement in PCa detection rate. A total of 420 patients underwent 3-T MRI examination prior to the first prostate biopsy and the positions of suspicious areas were recorded respectively. TRUS-guided biopsy regimes included systematic 12-core biopsy and targeted biopsy identified by MRI. Patients were divided into subgroups according to their serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, PSA density (PSAD), prostate volume, TRUS findings and digital rectal examination (DRE) findings. The ability of MRI to improve the cancer detection rate was evaluated. The biopsy positive rate of PCa was 41.2% (173/420), and 41 of the 173 (23.7%) patients were detected only by targeted biopsy in the MRI-suspicious area. Compared with the systematic biopsy, the positive rate was significantly improved by the additional targeted biopsy (P=0.0033). The highest improvement of detection rate was observed in patients with a PSA level of 4–10 ng/ml, PSAD of 0.12–0.20 ng/ml2, prostate volume >50 ml, negative TRUS findings and negative DRE findings (P<0.05). Therefore, it is considered that 3-T MRI examination could improve the PCa detection rate on first biopsy, particularly in patients with a PSA level of 4–10 ng/ml, PSAD of 0.12–0.20 ng/ml2, prostate volume of >50 ml, negative TRUS findings and negative DRE findings.

CHEN, JIE; YI, XIAO-LEI; JIANG, LI-XIN; WANG, REN; ZHAO, JUN-GONG; LI, YUE-HUA; HU, BING

2015-01-01

218

Magnetic Field Measurements in Beam Guiding Magnets  

E-print Network

Electromagnets used as beam guiding elements in particle accelerators and colliders require very tight tole-rances on their magnetic fields and on their alignment along the particle path. This article describes the methods and equipment used for magnetic measurements in beam transport magnets. Descriptions are given of magnetic resonance techniques, various induction coil methods, Hall generator measurements, the fluxgate magnetometer as well as the recently developed method of beam based alignment. References of historical nature as well as citations of recent work are given. The present commercial availability of the different sensors and asso-ciated equipment is indicated. Finally we shall try to analyze possible future needs for developments in those fields.

Henrichsen, K N

1998-01-01

219

Inter-observer agreement and diagnostic accuracy of myocardial perfusion reserve quantification by cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 3 Tesla in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography  

PubMed Central

Background Quantification of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) at 1.5 Tesla has been shown to correlate to invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD) and to yield good inter-observer agreement. However, little is known about quantitative adenosine-perfusion CMR at 3 Tesla and no data about inter-observer agreement is available. Aim of our study was to evaluate inter-observer agreement and to assess the diagnostic accuracy in comparison to quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Methods Fifty-three patients referred for coronary x-ray angiography were previously examined in a 3 Tesla whole-body scanner. Adenosine and rest perfusion CMR were acquired for the quantification of MPR in all segments. Two blinded and independent readers analyzed all images. QCA was performed in case of coronary stenosis. QCA data was used to assess diagnostic accuracy of the MPR measurements. Results Inter-observer agreement was high for all myocardial perfusion territories (??=?0.92 for LAD, ??=?0.93 for CX and RCA perfused segments). Compared to QCA receiver-operating characteristics yielded an area under the curve of 0.78 and 0.73 for RCA, 0.66 and 0.69 for LAD, and 0.52 and 0.53 for LCX perfused territories. Conclusions Inter-observer agreement of MPR quantification at 3 Tesla CMR is very high for all myocardial segments. Diagnostic accuracy in comparison to QCA yields good values for the RCA and LAD perfused territories, but moderate values for the posterior LCX perfused myocardial segments. PMID:23537061

2013-01-01

220

Ultrasensitive 3He magnetometer for measurements of high magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We describe a 3He magnetometer capable to measure high magnetic fields (B > 0.1 Tesla) with a relative accuracy of better than 10^-12. Our approach is based on the measurement of the free induction decay of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized 3He following a resonant radio frequency pulse excitation. The measurement sensitivity can be attributed to the long coherent spin precession time T2* being of order minutes which is achieved for spherical sample cells in the regime of motional narrowing where the disturbing influence of field inhomogeneities is strongly suppressed. The 3He gas is spin polarized in-situ using a new, non-standard variant of the metastability exchange optical pumping. We show that miniaturization helps to increase T2* further and that the measurement sensitivity is not significantly affected by temporal field fluctuations of order 10^-4.

Nikiel, A; Heil, W; Hehn, M; Karpuk, S; Maul, A; Otten, E; Schreiber, L M; Terekhov, M

2014-01-01

221

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G. Adriany, A. Shmuel, E. Yacoub, P.-F. van de Moortele, X. Hu, K. Ugurbil  

E-print Network

Perfusion-based High-Resolution Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla J. Pfeuffer, G was made possible by signal-to-noise gains at the high magnetic field of 7 Tesla and by using a novel RF

222

Influence of a stationary magnetic field on acetylcholinesterase in murine bone marrow cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thirty-minute exposure of mice to a homogeneous stationary magnetic field (SMF) of 1.4 Tesla at either 27° C or 37° C body temperature causes an inhibition of about 20 percent of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, E.C. 3.11.7) in murine bone marrow cells (BMC) after 3.5 and 2 h, respectively, at the two aforementioned body temperatures. The extent of enzyme inhibition is

S. Stegemann; K. I. Altman; H. Mühlensiepen; L. E. Feinendegent

1993-01-01

223

Static Magnetic Field Exposure Reproduces Cellular Effects of the Parkinson's Disease Drug Candidate ZM241385  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThis study was inspired by coalescing evidence that magnetic therapy may be a viable treatment option for certain diseases. This premise is based on the ability of moderate strength fields (i.e., 0.1 to 1 Tesla) to alter the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers and in turn modulate cellular signaling pathways. In particular, previous results from our laboratory (Wang et al.,

Zhiyun Wang; Pao-Lin Che; Jian Du; Barbara Ha; Kevin J. Yarema; Howard E. Gendelman

2010-01-01

224

A 3.5 Tesla Laboratory Electromagnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the design and construction of a laboratory electromagnet utilizing HTS coils in an iron yoke with a magnetic flux density of 3.5 Tesla in a 50-mm air-gap. With continuing improvement in the performance of HTS "BSCCO" wire, several niche HTS magnet applications have become viable at current wire prices. In this instance, the HTS conductor confers the advantages of high field strength combined with compact size and energy efficiency, in an electromagnet of a format suitable for many materials' characterization techniques, such as vibrating-sample magnetometry, for which the current magnet will be employed. The magnet employs four HTS coils, with a total of 1.6 km of BSCCO wire, which are conduction cooled using a single-stage Gifford-McMahon cryocooler, delivering approximately 25 W of cooling power at the target 35 K operating temperature; HTS current leads are utilized to minimize heat leak to the cryogenic environment.

Pooke, D. M.; Chamritski, V.; Gibson, S.; Fee, M.; King, T.; Staines, M. P.; Flower, N. E.; Buckley, R. G.

2004-06-01

225

Physiological effects of cigarette smoking in the limbic system revealed by 3 tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy.  

PubMed

Several studies and recent models of effects of nicotine, the main addictive and psychoactive component in tobacco, point to action of the drug on the limbic system during maintenance of addiction, either direct or indirect via projections from the ventral tegmental area. The objective of this study was to demonstrate physiological effects of cigarette smoking on the hippocampus and the grey matter of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the human brain with regard to addiction and withdrawal. This aim was achieved by group comparisons of results of magnetic resonance spectroscopy between non-smokers, smokers and smokers during withdrawal. 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers were measured with single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for total N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate and glutamine, choline-containing compounds, myo-inositol and total creatine in the right and the left hippocampus and in the right and the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Smokers were examined twice, first during regular cigarette smoking and second on the third day of nicotine withdrawal. The ratios to total creatine were used for better reliability. In our study, Glx/tCr was significantly increased and tCho/tCr was significantly decreased in the left cingulate cortex in smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.01, both). Six out of seven smokers showed normalization of the Glx/tCr in the left cingulate cortex during withdrawal. Although these results are preliminary due to the small sample size, our results confirm the assumption that cigarette smoking interferes directly or indirectly with the glutamate circuit in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:24643301

Mennecke, Angelika; Gossler, Andrea; Hammen, Thilo; Dörfler, Arnd; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Rösch, Julie; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Dölken, Marc; Thürauf, Norbert

2014-10-01

226

Preflare magnetic and velocity fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

1986-01-01

227

Functional MR imaging of the awake monkey in a novel vertical large-bore 7 Tesla setup J. Pfeuffer1  

E-print Network

Functional MR imaging of the awake monkey in a novel vertical large-bore 7 Tesla setup J. Pfeuffer1MRI BOLD signal [2,3]. Here we present the first results from a novel high field (7T), large- bore (60cm The 7 Tesla magnet has a 60 cm bore, an overall height of 6.40 m, and an empty weight of 80 tons

Jegelka, Stefanie

228

Bridgman Growth of GeSi Alloys in a Static Magnetic Field  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ge(0.95)Si(0.050 alloy crystals have been grown by the vertical Bridgman technique, both with and without an axial 5 Tesla magnetic field. The crystals were processed in a constant axial thermal gradient and the effects of graphite, hot pressed boron nitride, and pyrolitic boron nitride ampoule materials on interface shapes and macrosegregation profiles were investigated. The sample grown in a graphite ampoule at 5 Tesla exhibited a macroscopic axial concentration profile close to that of complete mixing and strong striation patterns. In samples grown in boron nitride ampoules, both with and without a 5 Tesla magnetic field applied, measured macroscopic axial concentration profiles were intermediate between those expected for a completely mixed melt and diffusion-controlled growth, and striation patterns were also observed. Possible explanations for the apparent inability of the magnetic field to reduce the flow velocities to below the growth velocities are discussed, and results of growth experiments in pyrolitic boron nitride ampoules are also described.

Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Vujisic, L.; Motakef, S.

1998-01-01

229

Streamer propagation in magnetic field  

E-print Network

The propagation of a streamer near an insulating surface under the influence of a transverse magnetic field is theoretically investigated. In the weak magnetic field limit it is shown that the trajectory of the streamer has a circular form with a radius that is much larger than the cyclotron radius of an electron. The charge distribution within the streamer head is strongly polarized by the Lorentz force exerted perpendicualr to the streamer velocity. A critical magnetic field for the branching of a streamer is estimated. Our results are in good agreement with available experimental data.

Zhuravlev, V N; Vagner, I D; Wyder, P

1997-01-01

230

AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M. [Endecon Engineering, San Ramon, CA (United States)

1997-12-31

231

Investigating Magnetic Force Fields  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this classroom activity, the students will investigate the magnetic pull of a bar magnet at varying distances with the use of paper clips. Students will hypothesize, conduct the experiment, collect the data, and draw conclusions that support their data. Each student will record the experiment and their findings in their science journals. As a class, students will compare each groups' data and their interpretation of the results.

Daryl ("Tish") Monjeau, Bancroft Elementary School, Minneapolis, MN

2012-03-18

232

Brain iron deposition in essential tremor: a quantitative 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study.  

PubMed

Studies have demonstrated brain iron deposition in neurodegenerative disease and in normal aging. Data on this topic are lacking in essential tremor (ET). The aim of our study was to investigate brain iron content in patients with ET, using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2*-relaxometry. We enrolled 24 patients with ET and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Subjects were examined using a 3T MRI scanner. The protocol included conventional MRI sequences and quantitative T2*-relaxometry. Whole-brain voxel-based analyses showed significant differences in T2* values in bilateral globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and in right dentate nucleus (P < .001 uncorrected). In the bilateral pallidum, differences survived family-wise-error (FWE) correction for multiple comparisons (P < .05). The present study provides the first evidence of increased brain iron accumulation in ET patients. Our results are suggestive of a possible involvement of motor systems outside of the cerebellum/cerebellar pathway and, more specifically, of the globus pallidus. PMID:23238868

Novellino, Fabiana; Cherubini, Andrea; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Morelli, Maurizio; Salsone, Maria; Arabia, Gennarina; Quattrone, Aldo

2013-02-01

233

Neutron scattering in magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The use of magnetic fields in neutron scattering experimentation is reviewed briefly. Two general areas of application can be distinguished. In one the field acts to change the properties of the scattering sample; in the second the field acts on the neutron itself. Several examples are discussed. Precautions necessary for high precision polarized beam measurements are reviewed. 33 references.

Koehler, W.C.

1984-01-01

234

Effects of non-parallel magnetic fields on hexagonal cell drift chambers  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the effect of magnetic field on drift velocity that was measured in a wire chamber with an hexagonal cell geometry and an argon-ethane (50:50 by weight) gas mixture. Using cosmic ray tracks, the drift time to distance correlation was studied as a function of magnetic field strength. Particular attention was paid to the corrections due to differing track entrance angles and differing angles of the magnetic field direction with respect to the wire axis. Spatial resolutions better than 180 [mu]m were achieved for field strengths up to 1.5 Tesla and angles between wire and field direction ranging from 0[degrees] to 30[degrees]. an argon-ethane mixture diluted with 60% helium showed less sensitivity to magnetic field effects, and only slightly worse resolution.

Mestayer, M.D.; Christo, S. (Southeastern Universities Research Association, Inc., Newport News, VA (United States). Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility); Tam, C.L. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)); Wang, K.; Hicks, R.S.; Miskimer, R.A. (Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States)); Hewitt, J.D.; Hersman, F.W. (New Hampshire Univ., Durham, NH (United States)); Dytman, S.A. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)); Grilfoyle, G.P. (Univ. of Richmond, Richmond, VA (United States))

1992-08-01

235

Crystal field and magnetic properties of ErH3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) times 10 to the minus 6 Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is of the order of 160 to 180 K.

Flood, D. J.

1977-01-01

236

Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

E-print Network

The quantum vacuum may become an electromagnetic superconductor in the presence of a strong external magnetic field of the order of 10^{16} Tesla. The magnetic field of the required strength (and even stronger) is expected to be generated for a short time in ultraperipheral collisions of heavy ions at the Large Hadron Collider. The superconducting properties of the new phase appear as a result of a magnetic-field-assisted condensation of quark-antiquark pairs with quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. We discuss similarities and differences between the suggested superconducting state of the quantum vacuum, a conventional superconductivity and the Schwinger pair creation. We argue qualitatively and quantitatively why the superconducting state should be a natural ground state of the vacuum at the sufficiently strong magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of the superconducting phase using both the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and an effective bosonic model based on the vector meson dominance (the rho-meson electrodynamics). We discuss various properties of the new phase such as absence of the Meissner effect, anisotropy of superconductivity, spatial inhomogeneity of ground state, emergence of a neutral superfluid component in the ground state and presence of new topological vortices in the quark-antiquark condensates.

M. N. Chernodub

2012-08-24

237

N-flationary magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is increasing interest in the role played by pseudo Nambu Goldstone bosons (pNGBs) in the construction of string-inspired models of inflation. In these models the inflaton is expected to be coupled to gauge fields, and will lead to the generation of magnetic fields that can be of cosmological interest. We study the production of such fields mainly focusing on the model of N-flation, where the collective effect of several pNGBs drives inflation. Because the fields produced are maximally helical, inverse cascade processes in the primordial plasma significantly increase their coherence length. We discuss under what conditions inflation driven by pNGBs can account for the cosmological magnetic fields observed. A constraint on the parameters of this class of inflationary scenarios is also derived by requiring that the magnetic field does not backreact on the inflating background.

Anber, Mohamed M.; Sorbo, Lorenzo

2006-10-01

238

Field of the Magnetic Monopole  

E-print Network

This paper shows that based upon the Helmholtz decomposition theorem the field of a stationary magnetic monopole, assuming it exists, cannot be represented by a vector potential. Persisting to use vector potential in monopole representation violates fundamentals of mathematics. The importance of this finding is that the vector potential representation was crucial to the original prediction of the quantized value for a magnetic charge.

A. R. Hadjesfandiari

2007-01-19

239

Neutron in Strong Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

Relativistic world-line Hamiltonian for strongly interacting 3q systems in magnetic field is derived from the path integral for the corresponding Green's function. The neutral baryon Hamiltonian in magnetic field obeys the pseudomomentum conservation and allows a factorization of the c.m. and internal motion. The resulting expression for the baryon mass in magnetic field is written explicitly with the account of hyperfine, OPE and OGE (color Coulomb) interaction. The neutron mass is fast decreasing with magnetic field, losing 1/2 of its value at eB~0.25 GeV^2 and is nearly zero at eB~0.5 GeV^2. Possible physical consequences of the calculated mass trajectory of the neutron, M_n(B), are presented and discussed.

M. A. Andreichikov; B. O. Kerbikov; V. D. Orlovsky; Yu. A. Simonov

2013-12-08

240

Assessment of the right ventricle with cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla  

PubMed Central

Background Functional and morphologic assessment of the right ventricle (RV) is of clinical importance. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at 1.5T has become gold standard for RV chamber quantification and assessment of even small wall motion abnormalities, but tissue analysis is still hampered by limited spatial resolution. CMR at 7T promises increased resolution, but is technically challenging. We examined the feasibility of cine imaging at 7T to assess the RV. Methods Nine healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 7T using a 16-element TX/RX coil and acoustic cardiac gating. 1.5T served as gold standard. At 1.5T, steady-state free-precession (SSFP) cine imaging with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 was used; at 7T, fast gradient echo (FGRE) with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 and (1.3x1.3x4) mm3 were applied. RV dimensions (RVEDV, RVESV), RV mass (RVM) and RV function (RVEF) were quantified in transverse slices. Overall image quality, image contrast and image homogeneity were assessed in transverse and sagittal views. Results All scans provided diagnostic image quality. Overall image quality and image contrast of transverse RV views were rated equally for SSFP at 1.5T and FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.3x1.3x4)mm3. FGRE at 7T provided significantly lower image homogeneity compared to SSFP at 1.5T. RVEDV, RVESV, RVEF and RVM did not differ significantly and agreed close between SSFP at 1.5T and FGRE at 7T (p=0.5850; p=0.5462; p=0.2789; p=0.0743). FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.3x1.3x4) mm3 tended to overestimate RV volumes compared to SSFP at 1.5T (mean difference of RVEDV 8.2±9.3ml) and to FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 (mean difference of RVEDV 9.3±8.6ml). Conclusions FGRE cine imaging of the RV at 7T was feasible and provided good image quality. RV dimensions and function were comparable to SSFP at 1.5T as gold standard. PMID:23497030

2013-01-01

241

Review of magnetic field observations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent observations of magnetic fields in the magnetosphere are reviewed, and critical experiments and data are identified for theoretical analysis and interpretation. Quantitative studies of the solar wind interaction with the earth's magnetic field, regional measurements near the earth's equator at R = 2-8 R sub E, the polar cusp region of the geomagnetosphere, and structural models of the neutral sheet region in the geomagnetic tail are considered.

Ness, N. F.

1971-01-01

242

Chiral transition with magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We study the nature of the chiral transition for an effective theory with spontaneous breaking of symmetry, where charged bosons and fermions are subject to the effects of a constant external magnetic field. The problem is studied in terms of the relative intensity of the magnetic field with respect to the mass and the temperature. When the former is the smallest of the scales, we present a suitable method to obtain magnetic and thermal corrections up to ring order at high temperature. By these means, we solve the problem of the instability in the boson sector for these theories, where the squared masses, taken as functions of the order parameter, can vanish and even become negative. The solution is found by considering the screening properties of the plasma, encoded in the resummation of the ring diagrams at high temperature. We also study the case where the magnetic field is the intermediate of the three scales and explore the nature of the chiral transition as we vary the field strength, the coupling constants and the number of fermions. We show that the critical temperature for the restoration of chiral symmetry monotonically increases from small to intermediate values of the magnetic fields and that this temperature is always above the critical temperature for the case when the magnetic field is absent.

Alejandro Ayala; Luis Alberto Hernandez; Ana Julia Mizher; Juan Cristobal Rojas; Cristian Villavicencio

2014-04-25

243

Optical sensor of magnetic fields  

DOEpatents

An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

1986-03-25

244

TESLA superconducting RF cavity development: For the TESLA collaboration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997.

Koepke, Karl; Tesla Collaboration

1995-05-01

245

Liquid neon heat transfer as applied to a 30 tesla cryomagnet  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since superconducting magnets cooled by liquid helium are limited to magnetic fields of about 18 teslas, the design of a 30 tesla cryomagnet necessitates forced convection liquid neon heat transfer in small coolant channels. As these channels are too small to handle the vapor flow if the coolant were to boil, the design philosophy calls for suppressing boiling by subjecting the fluid to high pressures. Forced convection heat transfer data are obtained by using a blowdown technique to force the fluid vertically through a resistance-heated instrumented tube. The data are obtained at inlet temperatures between 28 and 34 K and system pressures between 28 to 29 bars. Data correlation is limited to a very narrow range of test conditions, since the tests were designed to simulate the heat transfer characteristics in the coolant channels of the 30 tesla cryomagnet concerned. The results can therefore be applied directly to the design of the magnet system.-

Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

1975-01-01

246

Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos  

SciTech Connect

In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra, E-mail: bidhanchandra.bag@visva-bharati.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731 235 (India)

2013-12-15

247

Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications  

SciTech Connect

The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

Larbalestier, D.C.

1991-12-31

248

Development of high temperature superconductors for magnetic field applications  

SciTech Connect

The key requirement for magnetic field applications of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials is to have conductors with high transport critical current density available for magnet builders. After 3 or 4 years of being without any such object, conductor makers have had recent success in producing simple conductor prototypes. These have permitted the construction of simple HTS magnets having self fields exceeding 1 tesla at 4K. Thus the scientific feasibility of making powerful HTS magnets has been demonstrated. Attention to the technological aspects of making HTS conductors for magnets with strong flux pinning and reduced superconducting granularity is now sensible and attractive. However, extrinsic defects such as filament sausaging, cracking, misaligned grains and other perturbation to long range current flow must be controlled at a low level if the benefit of intrinsic improvements to the critical current density is to be maintained in the conductor form. Due to the great complexity of the HTS materials, there is sometimes confusion as to whether a given sample has an intrinsically or extrinsically limited critical current density. Systematic microstructure variation experiments and resistive transition analysis are shown to be particularly helpful in this phase of conductor development.

Larbalestier, D.C.

1991-01-01

249

Magnetic fields in protoplanetary disks  

E-print Network

Magnetic fields likely play a key role in the dynamics and evolution of protoplanetary discs. They have the potential to efficiently transport angular momentum by MHD turbulence or via the magnetocentrifugal acceleration of outflows from the disk surface, and magnetically-driven mixing has implications for disk chemistry and evolution of the grain population. However, the weak ionisation of protoplanetary discs means that magnetic fields may not be able to effectively couple to the matter. I present calculations of the ionisation equilibrium and magnetic diffusivity as a function of height from the disk midplane at radii of 1 and 5 AU. Dust grains tend to suppress magnetic coupling by soaking up electrons and ions from the gas phase and reducing the conductivity of the gas by many orders of magnitude. However, once grains have grown to a few microns in size their effect starts to wane and magnetic fields can begin to couple to the gas even at the disk midplane. Because ions are generally decoupled from the magnetic field by neutral collisions while electrons are not, the Hall effect tends to dominate the diffusion of the magnetic field when it is able to partially couple to the gas. For a standard population of 0.1 micron grains the active surface layers have a combined column of about 2 g/cm^2 at 1 AU; by the time grains have aggregated to 3 microns the active surface density is 80 g/cm^2. In the absence of grains, x-rays maintain magnetic coupling to 10% of the disk material at 1 AU (150 g/cm^2). At 5 AU the entire disk thickness becomes active once grains have aggregated to 1 micron in size.

Mark Wardle

2007-04-07

250

Active Region Magnetic Fields. I. Plage Fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present observations taken with the Advanced Stokes Polarimeter (ASP) in active-region plages and study the frequency distribution of the magnetic field strength (B), inclination with respect to vertical ( gamma ), azimuthal orientation ( chi ), and filling factor (f). The most common values at disk center are B = 1400 G, gamma < 10 deg, no preferred east-west

V. Martinez Pillet; B. W. Lites; A. Skumanich

1997-01-01

251

Unambiguous identification of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles through quantitative susceptibility mapping of the nonlinear response to magnetic fields  

PubMed Central

Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles generate signal void regions on gradient echo images due to their strong magnetization. In practice, the signal void region might be indistinguishable from that generated by air. However, the response of SPIO to an externally applied magnetic field is non-linear. Magnetization of SPIO saturates at around 1 Tesla while magnetization of water and air increase linearly with field strength. Phantom experiment and mice experiments demonstrated the feasibility of a non-ambiguous identification of superparamagnetic contrast agents. PMID:20688448

Liu, Tian; Spincemaille, Pascal; de Rochefort, Ludovic; Wong, Richard; Prince, Martin; Wang, Yi

2010-01-01

252

Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

Yamada, R.; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, A.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab; Takeuchi, T.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab; Verweij, A.P.; /CERN; Wake, M.; Willering, G; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2006-08-01

253

Magnetic fields in O stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the last decade, large-scale, organized (generally dipolar) magnetic fields with strengths between 0.1 and 20 kG have been detected in dozens of OB stars. This contribution reviews the impact of such fields on the stellar winds of O-type stars, with emphasis on variability and X-ray emission.

Nazé, Y.

2014-11-01

254

Magnetization and rotation of MTG HTSC ring in magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetization of a melt-texture growth (MTG) HTSC ring has been studied. It is shown that the magnetic field inside the ring is larger than the external field under a certain range of external magnetic fields. We have also investigated the magnetic field dependence of the response of a detective coil near a rotating superconducting ring. The responses of the

E. V. Postrekhin; L. W. Zhou; K. J. Huang; C. B. Cai; S. M. Gong; Y. X. Fu

1996-01-01

255

Study on technology of high-frequency pulsed magnetic field strength measurement.  

PubMed

High-frequency transient weak magnetic field is always involved in researches about biomedical engineering field while common magnetic-field sensors cannot work properly at frequencies as high as MHz. To measure the value of MHz-level weak pulsed magnetic-field strength accurately, this paper designs a measurement and calibration method for pulsed magnetic-field. In this paper, a device made of Nonferromagnetic material was independently designed and applied to pulsed magnetic field measurement. It held an accurately relative position between the magnetic field generating coil and the detecting coil. By applying a sinusoidal pulse to the generator, collecting the induced electromotive force of the detector, the final magnetic field strength was worked out through algorithms written in Matlab according to Faraday's Law. Experiments were carried out for measurement and calibration. Experiments showed that, under good stability and consistency, accurate measurement of magnetic-field strength of a sinepulse magnetic-field can be achieved, with frequency at 0.5, 1, 1.5 MHz and strength level at micro-Tesla. Calibration results carried out a measuring relative error about 2.5%. PMID:23366106

Chen, Yi-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

2012-01-01

256

Effect of a magnetic field on crack length measurement of 9NI steel by unloading compliance method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials in high magnetic fields, it has not been clarified whether we can use the same formulas as ones used in a non-magnetic field. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the magnetic effect in the fracture toughness measurement of ferro-magnetic materials. As the first step, crack length was measured at 4 K by unloading compliance method in the testing of CT specimen of 9% nickel steel. The same formula was used in the magnetic field of 0 and 8 Tesla. They were compared with the length measured by optical fractography. The magnetic field had little effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method. The small amount of retained austenite in Q T heat-treated specimen did not exhibit a magnetic effect on the crack length measurement by the unloading compliance method.

Nagasaki, C.; Matsui, K.; Shibata, K.

2002-05-01

257

[Image distortion and artifacts caused by the use of a titanium aneurism clip in 1.5 tesla- and 3 tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: effect on 60cobalt stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning].  

PubMed

In gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) treatment planning, 1.5 tesla (T)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is normally used to identify the target lesion. Image artifacts and distortion arise in MRI if a titanium clip is surgically implanted in the brain to treat cerebral aneurysm. 3-T MRI scanners, which are increasingly being adopted, provide imaging of anatomic structures with better clinical usefulness than 1.5-T MRI machines. We investigated signal defects and image distortions both close to and more distant from the titanium clip in 1.5-T and 3-T MRI. Two kinds of phantoms were scanned using 1.5-T and 3-T MRI. Acquisitions with and without the clip were performed under the same scan parameters. No difference was observed between 1.5 T and 3 T in local decrease of signal intensity; however, image distortion was observed at 20 mm from the clip in 3 T. Over the whole region, the distortions caused by the clip were less than 0.3 mm and 1.6 mm under 1.5-T and 3-T MRI, respectively. The geometric accuracy of 1.5-T MRI was better than 3-T MRI and thus better for GKSRS treatment planning. 3-T MRI, however, appears less suitable for use in treatment planning. PMID:24953318

Nakazawa, Hisato; Yamamuro, Osamu; Uchiyama, Yukio; Komori, Masataka

2014-06-01

258

Magnetic field investigations on low cost missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic fields pervade all of space and provide important diagnostic information on the nature of processes occurring within and around solar system objects. Thus magnetic investigations are frequently included on planetary missions. Since spacecraft subsystems can generate magnetic fields that may interfere with the measurement of the ambient field, magnetic cleanliness programs are usually instituted to minimize such extraneous magnetic

R. C. Snare; C.T. Russell

1995-01-01

259

Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

2008-02-01

260

Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.  

PubMed

Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems. PMID:18263948

Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

2008-02-21

261

Improved Cerebral Time-of-Flight Magnetic Resonance Angiography at 7 Tesla - Feasibility Study and Preliminary Results Using Optimized Venous Saturation Pulses  

PubMed Central

Purpose Conventional saturation pulses cannot be used for 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography (TOF MRA) due to specific absorption rate (SAR) limitations. We overcome these limitations by utilizing low flip angle, variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) algorithm saturation pulses. Material and Methods Twenty-five neurosurgical patients (male n?=?8, female n?=?17; average age 49.64 years; range 26–70 years) with different intracranial vascular pathologies were enrolled in this trial. All patients were examined with a 7 Tesla (Magnetom 7 T, Siemens) whole body scanner system utilizing a dedicated 32-channel head coil. For venous saturation pulses a 35° flip angle was applied. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the delineation of arterial vessels in the Circle of Willis, delineation of vascular pathologies, presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue contrast and overall image quality of TOF MRA scans in consensus on a five-point scale. Normalized signal intensities in the confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter were measured and vessel-tissue contrasts were calculated. Results Ratings for the majority of patients ranged between good and excellent for most of the evaluated features. Venous saturation was sufficient for all cases with minor artifacts in arteriovenous malformations and arteriovenous fistulas. Quantitative signal intensity measurements showed high vessel-tissue contrast for confluence of venous sinuses, M1 segment of left middle cerebral artery and adjacent gray matter. Conclusion The use of novel low flip angle VERSE algorithm pulses for saturation of venous vessels can overcome SAR limitations in 7 Tesla ultra-high-resolution TOF MRA. Our protocol is suitable for clinical application with excellent image quality for delineation of various intracranial vascular pathologies. PMID:25232868

Wrede, Karsten H.; Johst, Soren; Dammann, Philipp; Ozkan, Neriman; Monninghoff, Christoph; Kraemer, Markus; Maderwald, Stefan; Ladd, Mark E.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

2014-01-01

262

Application of 3.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis in the Orthotopic Nude Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to successfully establish an orthotopic murine model using two different human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and to propose a 3.0 tesla MRI protocol for noninvasive characterization of this model. SW1990 and MIAPaca-2 tumor cells were injected into the pancreas of BALB/C nu/nu mice. Tumor growth rate and morphological information were assessed by 3.0 tesla MRI (T1WI, T2WI and DCE-MRI) and immunohistology. Proliferation of SW1990 was significantly faster than that of MIAPaca-2 (P=0.000), but MIAPaca-2 mice had a significantly shorter survival than SW1990 mice (41 days and 44 days respectively, P=0.027). MRI could reliably monitor tumor growth in both cell lines: the tumors exhibiting a spherical growth pattern showed a high-intensity signal, and the SW1990 group developed significantly larger tumors compared with the MIAPaCa-2 group. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in which tumor size was assessed using electronic calipers and an MRI scan (P=0.680). Both tumors showed a slow gradual enhancement pattern. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated tumor tissues showing high expression of Ki-67. This model closely mimics human pancreatic cancer and permits monitoring of tumor growth and morphological information by noninvasive 3.0 tesla MRI studies reducing the number of mice required. PMID:25048266

Wu, Li; Wang, Chen; Yao, Xiuzhong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Yanjun; Zhang, Haitao; Fu, Caixia; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Yingyi

2014-01-01

263

Application of 3.0 tesla magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis in the orthotopic nude mouse model of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to successfully establish an orthotopic murine model using two different human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and to propose a 3.0 tesla MRI protocol for noninvasive characterization of this model. SW1990 and MIAPaca-2 tumor cells were injected into the pancreas of BALB/C nu/nu mice. Tumor growth rate and morphological information were assessed by 3.0 tesla MRI (T1WI, T2WI and DCE-MRI) and immunohistology. Proliferation of SW1990 was significantly faster than that of MIAPaca-2 (P=0.000), but MIAPaca-2 mice had a significantly shorter survival than SW1990 mice (41 days and 44 days respectively, P=0.027). MRI could reliably monitor tumor growth in both cell lines: the tumors exhibiting a spherical growth pattern showed a high-intensity signal, and the SW1990 group developed significantly larger tumors compared with the MIAPaCa-2 group. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in which tumor size was assessed using electronic calipers and an MRI scan (P=0.680). Both tumors showed a slow gradual enhancement pattern. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated tumor tissues showing high expression of Ki-67. This model closely mimics human pancreatic cancer and permits monitoring of tumor growth and morphological information by noninvasive 3.0 tesla MRI studies reducing the number of mice required. PMID:25048266

Wu, Li; Wang, Chen; Yao, Xiuzhong; Liu, Kai; Xu, Yanjun; Zhang, Haitao; Fu, Caixia; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Yingyi

2014-10-30

264

Indoor localization using magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing hallways with different kinds of pillars, doors and elevators. All in all, this dissertation contributes the following: 1) provides a framework for understanding the presence of ambient magnetic fields indoors and utilizing them to solve the indoor localization problem; 2) develops an application that is independent of the user and the smart phones and 3) requires no other infrastructure since it is deployed on a device that encapsulates the sensing, computing and inferring functionalities, thereby making it a novel contribution to the mobile and pervasive computing domain.

Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

265

Safety Implications of High-Field MRI: Actuation of Endogenous Magnetic Iron Oxides in the Human Body  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMagnetic Resonance Imaging scanners have become ubiquitous in hospitals and high-field systems (greater than 3 Tesla) are becoming increasingly common. In light of recent European Union moves to limit high-field exposure for those working with MRI scanners, we have evaluated the potential for detrimental cellular effects via nanomagnetic actuation of endogenous iron oxides in the body.MethodologyTheoretical models and experimental data

Jon Dobson; Richard Bowtell; Ana Garcia-Prieto; Quentin Pankhurst; Igor Sokolov

2009-01-01

266

Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

2014-01-01

267

Mars Crustal Magnetic Field Remnants  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The radial magnetic field measured is color coded on a global perspective view that shows measurements derived from spacecraft tracks below 200 km overlain on a monochrome shaded relief map of the topography.

This image shows especially strong Martian magnetic fields in the southern highlands near the Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum regions, centered around 180 degrees longitude from the equator to the pole. It is where magnetic stripes possibly resulting from crustal movement are most prominent. The bands are oriented approximately east - west and are about 100 miles wide and 600 miles long, although the longest band stretches more than 1200 miles.

The false blue and red colors represent invisible magnetic fields in the Martian crust that point in opposite directions. The magnetic fields appear to be organized in bands, with adjacent bands pointing in opposite directions, giving these stripes a striking similarity to patterns seen in the Earth's crust at the mid-oceanic ridges.

These data were compiled by the MGS Magnetometer Team led by Mario Acuna at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

2001-01-01

268

Initial experience of 3 tesla endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging and 1H-spectroscopic imaging of the prostate  

Microsoft Academic Search

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: We sought to explore the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate at 3T, with the knowledge of potential drawbacks of MRI at high field strengths. MATERIAL AND METHOD: MRI, dynamic MRI, and 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging were performed in 10 patients with prostate cancer on 1.5T and 3T whole-body scanners. Comparable scan protocols were used,

J. J. Fütterer; Tom W. J. Scheenen; Henkjan J. Huisman; Dennis W. J. Klomp; Ferdi A. van Dorsten; J Alfred Witjes; Arend Heerschap; Jelle O. Barentsz

2004-01-01

269

Origin of primordial magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic fields of intensities similar to those in our galaxy are also observed in high redshift galaxies, where a mean field dynamo would not have had time to produce them. Therefore, a primordial origin is indicated. It has been suggested that magnetic fields were created at various primordial eras: during inflation, the electroweak phase transition, the quark-hadron phase transition (QHPT), during the formation of the first objects, and during reionization. We suggest here that the large-scale fields {approx}{mu}G, observed in galaxies at both high and low redshifts by Faraday rotation measurements (FRMs), have their origin in the electromagnetic fluctuations that naturally occurred in the dense hot plasma that existed just after the QHPT. We evolve the predicted fields to the present time. The size of the region containing a coherent magnetic field increased due to the fusion of smaller regions. Magnetic fields (MFs) {approx}10 {mu}G over a comoving {approx}1 pc region are predicted at redshift z{approx}10. These fields are orders of magnitude greater than those predicted in previous scenarios for creating primordial magnetic fields. Line-of-sight average MFs {approx}10{sup -2} {mu}G, valid for FRMs, are obtained over a 1 Mpc comoving region at the redshift z{approx}10. In the collapse to a galaxy (comoving size {approx}30 kpc) at z{approx}10, the fields are amplified to {approx}10 {mu}G. This indicates that the MFs created immediately after the QHPT (10{sup -4} s), predicted by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, could be the origin of the {approx}{mu}G fields observed by FRMs in galaxies at both high and low redshifts. Our predicted MFs are shown to be consistent with present observations. We discuss the possibility that the predicted MFs could cause non-negligible deflections of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and help create the observed isotropic distribution of their incoming directions. We also discuss the importance of the volume average magnetic field predicted by our model in producing the first stars and in reionizing the Universe.

Souza, Rafael S. de; Opher, Reuven [IAG, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2008-02-15

270

Magnetic field tomography, helical magnetic fields and Faraday depolarization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wide-band radio polarization observations offer the possibility to recover information about the magnetic fields in synchrotron sources, such as details of their three-dimensional configuration, that has previously been inaccessible. The key physical process involved is the Faraday rotation of the polarized emission in the source (and elsewhere along the wave's propagation path to the observer). In order to proceed, reliable methods are required for inverting the signals observed in wavelength space into useful data in Faraday space, with robust estimates of their uncertainty. In this paper, we examine how variations of the intrinsic angle of polarized emission ?0 with the Faraday depth ? within a source affect the observable quantities. Using simple models for the Faraday dispersion F(?) and ?0(?), along with the current and planned properties of the main radio interferometers, we demonstrate how degeneracies among the parameters describing the magneto-ionic medium can be minimized by combining observations in different wavebands. We also discuss how depolarization by Faraday dispersion due to a random component of the magnetic field attenuates the variations in the spectral energy distribution of the polarization and shifts its peak towards shorter wavelengths. This additional effect reduces the prospect of recovering the characteristics of the magnetic field helicity in magneto-ionic media dominated by the turbulent component of the magnetic field.

Horellou, C.; Fletcher, A.

2014-07-01

271

Magnetic Field Problem: Ampere's Law  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A wire with current flowing through it perpendicular to the page is shown (position is given in meters and the integral is given in 10-10 Tesla-meters). Also shown is a choice of two detectors that displays the integral,

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2007-03-03

272

Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow  

SciTech Connect

The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H. [Univ. of Tokushima (Japan)] [Univ. of Tokushima (Japan); Tenforde, T.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Health Div.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Health Div.

1996-04-01

273

A magnetically shielded room with ultra low residual field and gradient  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A versatile and portable magnetically shielded room with a field of (700 ± 200) pT within a central volume of 1 m × 1 m × 1 m and a field gradient less than 300 pT/m, achieved without any external field stabilization or compensation, is described. This performance represents more than a hundredfold improvement of the state of the art for a two-layer magnetic shield and provides an environment suitable for a next generation of precision experiments in fundamental physics at low energies; in particular, searches for electric dipole moments of fundamental systems and tests of Lorentz-invariance based on spin-precession experiments. Studies of the residual fields and their sources enable improved design of future ultra-low gradient environments and experimental apparatus. This has implications for developments of magnetometry beyond the femto-Tesla scale in, for example, biomagnetism, geosciences, and security applications and in general low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements.

Altarev, I.; Babcock, E.; Beck, D.; Burghoff, M.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Chupp, T.; Degenkolb, S.; Fan, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Kuchler, F.; Lauer, T.; Link, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M.; McAndrew, J.; Niessen, B.; Paul, S.; Petzoldt, G.; Schläpfer, U.; Schnabel, A.; Sharma, S.; Singh, J.; Stoepler, R.; Stuiber, S.; Sturm, M.; Taubenheim, B.; Trahms, L.; Voigt, J.; Zechlau, T.

2014-07-01

274

TESLA Report 2003-19 THE SHORT-RANGE TRANSVERSE WAKE  

E-print Network

TESLA Report 2003-19 THE SHORT-RANGE TRANSVERSE WAKE FUNCTION FOR TESLA ACCELERATING STRUCTURE T of a Free Electron Laser in TESLA project requires very short bunches. It results in a very long interaction calculate the short-range transverse wakefields of the TESLA linac accelerating structure. Wake fields

275

Magnetic fields around black holes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our Newtonian results are excellent approximations for slowly spinning black holes. We proceed to address the issue of the spin dependence of the Blandford & Znajek power. The result we choose to highlight is our finding that given the validity of our assumption for the dynamical behavior of the so-called plunge region in black hole accretors, rotating black holes produce maximum Poynting flux via the Blandford & Znajek process for a black hole spin parameter of about a [approximate] 0.8. This is contrary to the conventional claim that the maximum electromagnetic flux is achieved for highest black hole spin.

Garofalo, David A. G.

276

EXPLORER 10 MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic field measurements made by means of Explorer 10 over geocentric ; distances of 1.8 to 42.6R\\/sub e\\/ on March 25experiment on the same satellite are ; referenced in interpretations. The close-in data are consistent with the ; existence of a very weak ring current below 3R\\/sub e\\/ along the trajectory, but ; alternative explanations for the field deviations are

J. P. Heppner; N. F. Ness; C. S. Scearce; T. L. Skillman

1963-01-01

277

Transverse Magnetic Field Propellant Isolator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An alternative high voltage isolator for electric propulsion and ground-based ion source applications has been designed and tested. This design employs a transverse magnetic field that increases the breakdown voltage. The design can greatly enhance the operating range of laboratory isolators used for high voltage applications.

Foster, John E.

2000-01-01

278

Diffusion of magnetic field via turbulent reconnection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diffusion of astrophysical magnetic fields in conducting fluids in the presence of turbulence depends on whether magnetic fields can change their topology via reconnection in highly conducting media. Recent progress in understanding fast magnetic reconnection in the presence of turbulence is reassuring that the magnetic field behavior in computer simulations and turbulent astrophysical environments is similar, as far as

Reinaldo Santos de Lima; Alexander Lazarian; Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino; Jungyeon Cho

2010-01-01

279

Separation of magnetic field lines  

SciTech Connect

The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2012-11-15

280

Magnetic fields in the sun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

Mullan, D. J.

1974-01-01

281

MAXIMUM EFFICIENCY RF SHIMMING: THEORY AND INITIAL APPLICATION FOR HIP IMAGING AT 7 TESLA  

PubMed Central

Radiofrequency shimming with multiple channel excitation has been proposed to increase the transverse magnetic field uniformity and reduce specific absorption rate at high magnetic field strengths (? 7 Tesla) where high-frequency effects can make traditional single channel volume coils unsuitable for transmission. In the case of deep anatomic regions and power-demanding pulse sequences, optimization of transmit efficiency may be a more critical requirement than homogeneity per se. This work introduces a novel method to maximize transmit efficiency using multiple channel excitation and radiofrequency shimming. Shimming weights are calculated in order to obtain the lowest possible net radiofrequency power deposition into the subject for a given transverse magnetic field strength. The method was demonstrated in imaging studies of articular cartilage of the hip joint at 7 Tesla. We show that the new radiofrequency shimming method can enable reduction in power deposition while maintaining an average flip angle or adiabatic condition in the hip cartilage. Building upon the improved shimming, we further show the signal-to-noise ratio in hip cartilage at 7 Tesla can be substantially greater than that at 3 Tesla, illustrating the potential benefits of high field hip imaging. PMID:22714835

Deniz, Cem Murat; Brown, Ryan; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Zhu, Yudong

2012-01-01

282

Magnetic Field Line Simulation Using a Microcomputer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the implementation of a computer simulation of magnetic field lines. Discusses properties of magnetic fields and the calculation of magnetic fields at points. Provides a program listing (additional programs and teaching notes available from the author) and gives examples of several field plots. (JM)

Kirkup, L.

1986-01-01

283

The HMI Magnetic Field Pipeline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) will provide frequent full-disk magnetic field data after launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), currently scheduled for fall 2009. 16 megapixel line-of-sight magnetograms (Blos) will be recorded every 45 seconds. A full set of polarized filtergrams needed to determine the vector magnetic field requires 90 seconds. Quick-look data will be available within a few minutes of observation. Quick-look space weather and browse products must have identified users, and the list currently includes full disk magnetograms, feature identification and movies, 12-minute disambiguated vector fields in active region patches, time evolution of AR indices, synoptic synchronic frames, potential and MHD model results, and 1 AU predictions. A more complete set of definitive science data products will be offered about a day later and come in three types. "Pipeline” products, such as full disk vector magnetograms, will be computed for all data on an appropriate cadence. A larger menu of "On Demand” products, such as Non-Linear Force Free Field snapshots of an evolving active region, will be produced whenever a user wants them. Less commonly needed "On Request” products that require significant project resources, such as a high resolution MHD simulation of the global corona, will be created subject to availability of resources. Further information can be found at the SDO Joint Science Operations Center web page, jsoc.stanford.edu

Hoeksema, Jon Todd; Liu, Y.; Schou, J.; Scherrer, P.; HMI Science Team

2009-05-01

284

Applications of high dielectric materials in high field magnetic resonance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At high magnetic fields, radiation losses, wavelength effects, self-resonance, and the high resistance of components all contribute to losses in conventional RF MRI coil designs. The hypothesis tested here is that these problems can be combated by the use of high permittivity ceramic materials at high fields. High permittivity ceramic dielectric resonators create strong uniform magnetic fields in compact structures at high frequencies and can potentially solve some of the challenges of high field coil design. In this study NMR probes were constructed for operation at 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) and 900 MHz (21.1 Tesla) using inductively fed CaTiO3 (relative permittivity of 156-166) cylindrical hollow bore dielectric resonators. The designs showed the electric field is largely confined to the dielectric itself, with near zero values in the hollow bore, which accommodates the sample. The 600 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value greater than 2000. Experimental and simulation mapping of the RF field show good agreement, with the ceramic resonator giving a pulse width approximately 25% less than a loop gap resonator of similar inner dimensions. High resolution images, with voxel dimensions less than 50 microm3, have been acquired from fixed zebrafish samples, showing excellent delineation of several fine structures. The 900 MHz probe has an unmatched Q value of 940 and shows Q performance five times better than Alderman-Grant and loop-gap resonators of similar dimensions. High resolution images were acquired of an excised mouse spinal cord (25 microm 3) and an excised rat soleus muscle (20 microm3). The spatial distribution of electromagnetic fields within the human body can be tailored using external dielectric materials. Here, a new material is introduced with high dielectric constant and low background MRI signal. The material is based upon metal titanates, which can be made into geometrically formable suspensions in de-ionized water. The suspension's material properties are characterized from 100 to 400 MHz. Results obtained at 7 T show a significant increase in image intensity in areas such as the temporal lobe and base of the brain with the new material placed around the head, and improved performance compared to purely water-based gels.

Haines, Kristina Noel

285

Spontaneous electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum in strong magnetic field: an evidence from the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using an extended Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model as a low energy effective model\\u000aof QCD, we support our earlier proposal that the QCD vacuum in a strong\\u000aexternal magnetic field (stronger than 10^{16} Tesla) experiences a spontaneous\\u000aphase transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The\\u000aunexpected superconductivity of, basically, empty space is induced by emergence\\u000aof quark-antiquark vector condensates with quantum numbers

M. N. Chernodub

2010-01-01

286

Large magnetic field instabilities induced by magnetic dipole transitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new mechanism that will limit very high magnetic fields which have been conjectured to exist in connection with some astrophysical phenomena. Low lying strongly interacting particles and resonances mixing with each other via magnetic dipole QED couplings force a vacuum instability for large external magnetic fields. These mixings limit fields to a few GeV2.

Myron Bander; H. R. Rubinstein

1992-01-01

287

Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Based on Earth's Magnetic Field  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes both the setup and the use of a system for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the Earth's magnetic field. Phase instability caused by temporal fluctuations of Earth's field can be successfully improved by using a reference signal from a separate Earth's field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer\\/magnetometer. In imaging, it is important to correctly determine the phase

Ales Mohoric; Gorazd Planinsic; Miha Kos; Andrej Duh; Janez Stepisnik

2004-01-01

288

The Giotto magnetic field investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Giotto spacecraft will carry sensors for investigating the interplanetary magnetic field while en route and the interaction between the solar wind magnetoplasma and Halley's Comet neutral gas outflow during close approach. Giotto will carry an outboard biaxial fluxgate system and inboard electronics. The instrumentation draws 1.2 kW and weighs 1.31 kg. Sampling rates will be 28\\/sec during close encounter,

F. M. Neubauer; G. Musmann; M. H. Acuna; L. F. Burlaga; N. F. Ness; F. Mariani; M. Wallis; E. Ungstrup; H. Schmidt

1983-01-01

289

MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS B. Fornberg,2  

E-print Network

MAGNETIC FIELD CONFINEMENT IN THE SOLAR CORONA. I. FORCE-FREE MAGNETIC FIELDS N. Flyer,1 B Axisymmetric force-free magnetic fields external to a unit sphere are studied as solutions to boundary value to the formation of an azimuthal rope of twisted magnetic field embedded within the global field, and to the energy

Fornberg, Bengt

290

Use of a radio frequency shield during 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: experimental evaluation  

PubMed Central

Radiofrequency (RF) shields have been recently developed for the purpose of shielding portions of the patient’s body during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. We present an experimental evaluation of a commercially available RF shield in the MRI environment. All tests were performed on 1.5 T and 3.0 T clinical MRI scanners. The tests were repeated with and without the RF shield present in the bore, for comparison. Effects of the shield, placed within the scanner bore, on the RF fields generated by the scanner were measured directly using tuned pick-up coils. Attenuation, by as much as 35 dB, of RF field power was found inside the RF shield. These results were supported by temperature measurements of metallic leads placed inside the shield, in which no measurable RF heating was found. In addition, there was a small, simultaneous detectable increase (?1 dB) of RF power just outside the edges of the shield. For these particular scanners, the autocalibrated RF power levels were reduced for scan locations prescribed just outside the edges of the shield, which corresponded with estimations based on the pick-up coil measurements. Additionally, no significant heating during MRI scanning was observed on the shield surface. The impact of the RF shield on the RF fields inside the magnet bore is likely to be dependent on the particular model of the RF shield or the MRI scanner. These results suggest that the RF shield could be a valuable tool for clinical MRI practices. PMID:25378957

Favazza, Christopher P; King, Deirdre M; Edmonson, Heidi A; Felmlee, Joel P; Rossman, Phillip J; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J; Watson, Robert E; Gorny, Krzysztof R

2014-01-01

291

Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

E-print Network

In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10^{16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

M. N. Chernodub

2010-11-11

292

Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 1016 Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

Chernodub, M. N.

2011-05-01

293

Electromagnetically superconducting phase of QCD vacuum induced by strong magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

In this talk we discuss our recent suggestion that the QCD vacuum in a sufficiently strong magnetic field (stronger than 10{sup 16} Tesla) may undergo a spontaneous transition to an electromagnetically superconducting state. The possible superconducting state is anisotropic (the vacuum exhibits superconductivity only along the axis of the uniform magnetic field) and inhomogeneous (in the transverse directions the vacuum structure shares similarity with the Abrikosov lattice of an ordinary type-II superconductor). The electromagnetic superconductivity of the QCD vacuum is suggested to occur due to emergence of specific quark-antiquark condensates which carry quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons. A Lorentz-covariant generalization of the London transport equations for the magnetic-field-induced superconductivity is given.

Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Federation Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

2011-05-23

294

Development Trends in High Field Magnet Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of high magnetic fields using low temperature superconductors (LTS) has become common place. However, large magnet sizes and associated high cooling costs have often precluded the full utilization of these research capabilities. Recent advances in internal Sn superconductors and cryogen free technology have opened up a new era in superconducting magnet development. Ultra-compact, laboratory sized magnets producing fields

R. Harrison; R. Bateman; J. Brown; F. Domptail; C. M. Friend; P. Ghoshal; C. King; A. Van der Linden; Z. Melhem; P. Noonan; A. Twin; M. Field; S. Hong; J. Parrell; Y. Zhang

2008-01-01

295

Comparing Magnetic Fields on Earth and Mars  

NASA Video Gallery

This animation compares the magnetic fields on Earth and Mars. The Earth has a large-scale planetary magnetic field that can protect it from space weather and other hazards. Mars, on the other hand...

296

Measurements of Solar Vector Magnetic Fields  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various aspects of the measurement of solar magnetic fields are presented. The four major subdivisions of the study are: (1) theoretical understanding of solar vector magnetic fields; (3) techniques for interpretation of observational data; and (4) techniques for data display.

Hagyard, M. J. (editor)

1985-01-01

297

Plasma stability in a dipole magnetic field  

E-print Network

The MHD and kinetic stability of an axially symmetric plasma, confined by a poloidal magnetic field with closed lines, is considered. In such a system the stabilizing effects of plasma compression and magnetic field ...

Simakov, Andrei N., 1974-

2001-01-01

298

What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)  

MedlinePLUS

What are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF) Electric and Magnetic Fields Electricity is an essential part of our lives. Electricity powers all sorts of things around us, from computers to refrigerators ...

299

Edison vs. Tesla  

ScienceCinema

As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

2014-01-07

300

Edison vs. Tesla  

SciTech Connect

As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

2013-11-20

301

Primordial magnetic field limits from cosmological data  

SciTech Connect

We study limits on a primordial magnetic field arising from cosmological data, including that from big bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background polarization plane Faraday rotation limits, and large-scale structure formation. We show that the physically relevant quantity is the value of the effective magnetic field, and limits on it are independent of how the magnetic field was generated.

Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue, Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Sethi, Shiv K. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Pandey, Kanhaiya [Raman Research Institute, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

2010-10-15

302

Magnetic-Field Processing of Industrial Effluents  

Microsoft Academic Search

• the field acts on pollutants in the colloidal state; and • the field influences the structure of the water. Magnetic treatment is simple, safe, and very inexpensive, but a patent search under the topic “Magnetic treatment of water and aqueous solutions” has shown that the existing devices and methods for using magnetic fields to process effluents containing heavy-metal ions

V. P. Malkin

2002-01-01

303

Magnetic field navigation in an indoor environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a method that has been developed to aid an inertial navigation system when GNSS signals are not available, by taking advantage of the uniqueness of magnetic field variations. Most indoor environments have many different features (ferrous structural materials or contents, electrical currents, etc.) which perturb the Earths natural magnetic field. The variations in the magnetic field in

William Storms; Jeremiah Shockley; John Raquet

2010-01-01

304

CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION  

E-print Network

Chapter 5 CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS THROUGH GYRORESONANCE EMISSION Stephen M. White This article reviews the use of gyroresonance emission at radio wavelengths to measure coronal magnetic fields probes of the magnetic field strength above active regions, and this unique capability is one

White, Stephen

305

Appendix E: Software MEASURING CONSTANT MAGNETIC FIELD  

E-print Network

E - 1 Appendix E: Software MEASURING CONSTANT MAGNETIC FIELD (THE HALL PROBE APPLICATION) Basics yourself with the equipment. The software package that works in tandem with your magnetic field sensor is written in LabVIEWTM. It allows you to measure and record magnetic field strength as a function

Minnesota, University of

306

Quenching of flames by magnetic fields (abstract)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of magnetic fields on combustion of alcohol with the aid of platinum catalysis have been studied to simulate in part the oxidation of organic matter in the living body, and it has been found that the combustion reactions are influenced by magnetic fields. It has also been observed that candle flames are pressed down by magnetic fields of

S. Ueno

1988-01-01

307

Applied Magnetic Field Enhances Arc Vapor Deposition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Applied magnetic field enhances performance of vaporization part of arc vapor deposition apparatus. When no magnetic field applied by external means, arc wonders semirandomly over cathode, with net motion toward electrical feedthrough. When magnetic field applied arc moves circumferentially around cathode, and downward motion suppressed.

Miller, T. A.; Loutfy, R. O.; Withers, J. C.

1993-01-01

308

TESLA-Report 2002-07 TESLA-Report 2002-07  

E-print Network

#12;#12;#12;#12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA-Report 2002-07 #12;TESLA

309

TESLA-Report 1993-33 TESLA-Report 1993-33  

E-print Network

#12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993-33 #12;TESLA-Report 1993

310

TESLA-Report 1995-11 TESLA-Report 1995-11  

E-print Network

#12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995-11 #12;TESLA-Report 1995

311

Effects of magnetic fields on fibrinolysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we investigated the possible effects of magnetic fields on the fibrinolytic process. Fibrin dissolution was observed and the fibrinolytic activities were evaluated. First, fibrinolytic processes in magnetic fields were investigated by the fibrin plate method. We gathered solutions from the dissolved fibrin, and measured mean levels of fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in solutions. Mean levels of FDPs exposed to 8 T magnetic fields were higher than those not exposed to fields. Second, we carried out an experiment to understand how fibrin oriented in a magnetic field dissolves. FDPs in solutions of dissolved fibrins in fibrin plates were assayed. The result was that fibrin gels formed in a magnetic field at 8 T were more soluble than those not formed in a magnetic field. A model based on the diamagnetic properties of macromolecules was explained, and changes of protein concentrations in a solution in gradient magnetic fields were predicted.

Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.; Tsuda, H.

1994-05-01

312

Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field  

E-print Network

We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

Xiuqing Huang

2008-12-10

313

Heliospheric magnetic fields and plasmas  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A survey of the existing literature on heliospheric physics, covering the period 1972-1982, is presented. Attention is given to observations and theories germane to the examination of the heliosphere as a large-scale astrophysical system that is part of the earth's environment. The literature includes data and models for magnetic sectors and the large-scale magnetic field, the large-scale plasma structure, and models and observed variations in the solar wind. Consideration is also devoted to the transient and corotating streams and shocks, the composition of the solar wind, and to MHD turbulence, waves, and discontinuities. More intensive investigations of the region near 1 AU are recommended, particularly to characterize the coronal source of the solar wind. The solar polar mission will be the first to provide radial measurements for comparisons with previous exclusively ecliptic measurements of solar activities.

Burlaga, L. F.

1983-01-01

314

The Giotto magnetic field investigation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Giotto spacecraft will carry sensors for investigating the interplanetary magnetic field while en route and the interaction between the solar wind magnetoplasma and Halley's Comet neutral gas outflow during close approach. Giotto will carry an outboard biaxial fluxgate system and inboard electronics. The instrumentation draws 1.2 kW and weighs 1.31 kg. Sampling rates will be 28/sec during close encounter, covering selectable ranges from 16 nT to 65,535 nT. In-flight calibration techniques are under development to ensure magnetic cleanliness will be obtained. Measurements are also planned of the inbound bow shock, the magnetosheath and the cometary ionopause. The data will be collected as close as 1000 km from the comet surface.

Neubauer, F. M.; Musmann, G.; Acuna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; Mariani, F.; Wallis, M.; Ungstrup, E.; Schmidt, H.

1983-01-01

315

Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer  

E-print Network

Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

Blackman, Eric G

2014-01-01

316

Magnetic field perturbations in the systems where only poloidal magnetic field is present*  

E-print Network

1 Magnetic field perturbations in the systems where only poloidal magnetic field is present* D In some plasma confinement systems the confinement is provided by a poloidal magnetic field (no toroidal magnetic field is present). Examples include FRC, levitated dipoles, and long diffuse pinches. We consider

317

Magnetic Fields1 Increasingly, instruments that generate large static magnetic fields (e.g., NMR spectrometers,  

E-print Network

Magnetic Fields1 Increasingly, instruments that generate large static magnetic fields (e.g., NMR spectrometers, MRI) are present in research laboratories. Such magnets typically have fields of 14,000 to 235,000 G (1.4 to 23.5 T), far above that of Earth's magnetic field, which is approximately 0.5 G

Shull, Kenneth R.

318

The magnetic field over the Southern African continent: from core to crustal magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Secular magnetic field evolutions do not proceed in a regular way all over the Earth. In some regions like Southern Africa, the field has been changing more rapidly than elsewhere. During the last five decades, the Earth's magnetic field has been represented in spherical harmonics from a series of measurements that were generally obtained at magnetic field observatories. Unfortunately, magnetic

Erwan Thébault; Pieter Kotze; Arnaud Chulliat; Fotini Vervelidou

2010-01-01

319

A Large Volume Double Channel 1H-X RF Probe for Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance at 0.0475 Tesla  

PubMed Central

In this work we describe a large volume 340 mL 1H-X magnetic resonance (MR) probe for studies of hyperpolarized compounds at 0.0475 T. 1H/13C and 1H/15N probe configurations are demonstrated with the potential for extension to 1H/129Xe. The primary applications of this probe are preparation and quality assurance of 13C and 15N hyperpolarized contrast agents using PASADENA (parahydrogen and synthesis allow dramatically enhanced nuclear alignment) and other parahydrogen-based methods of hyperpolarization. The probe is efficient and permits 62 ?s 13C excitation pulses at 5.3 Watts, making it suitable for portable operation. The sensitivity and detection limits of this probe, tuned to 13C, are compared with a commercial radio frequency (RF) coil operating at 4.7 T. We demonstrate that low field MR of hyperpolarized contrast agents could be as sensitive as conventional high field detection and outline potential improvements and optimization of the probe design for preclinical in vivo MRI. PASADENA application of this low-power probe is exemplified with 13C hyperpolarized 2-hydroxyethyl propionate-1-13C,2,3,3-d3. PMID:22706029

Coffey, Aaron M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Wilkens, Ken; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

2012-01-01

320

Non-Enhanced MR Imaging of Cerebral Aneurysms: 7 Tesla versus 1.5 Tesla  

PubMed Central

Purpose To prospectively evaluate 7 Tesla time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in comparison to 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) for delineation of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIA). Material and Methods Sixteen neurosurgical patients (male n?=?5, female n?=?11) with single or multiple UIA were enrolled in this trial. All patients were accordingly examined at 7 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla MRI utilizing dedicated head coils. The following sequences were obtained: 7 Tesla TOF MRA, 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA and 7 Tesla non-contrast enhanced MPRAGE. Image analysis was performed by two radiologists with regard to delineation of aneurysm features (dome, neck, parent vessel), presence of artifacts, vessel-tissue-contrast and overall image quality. Interobserver accordance and intermethod comparisons were calculated by kappa coefficient and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Results A total of 20 intracranial aneurysms were detected in 16 patients, with two patients showing multiple aneurysms (n?=?2, n?=?4). Out of 20 intracranial aneurysms, 14 aneurysms were located in the anterior circulation and 6 aneurysms in the posterior circulation. 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging was superior over 1.5 and 7 Tesla TOF MRA in the assessment of all considered aneurysm and image quality features (e.g. image quality: mean MPRAGE7T: 5.0; mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T: 4.3). Ratings for 7 Tesla TOF MRA were equal or higher over 1.5 Tesla TOF MRA for all assessed features except for artifact delineation (mean TOF7T: 4.3; mean TOF1.5T 4.4). Interobserver accordance was good to excellent for most ratings. Conclusion 7 Tesla MPRAGE imaging demonstrated its superiority in the detection and assessment of UIA as well as overall imaging features, offering excellent interobserver accordance and highest scores for all ratings. Hence, it may bear the potential to serve as a high-quality diagnostic tool for pretherapeutic assessment and follow-up of untreated UIA. PMID:24400100

Wrede, Karsten H.; Dammann, Philipp; Monninghoff, Christoph; Johst, Soren; Maderwald, Stefan; Sandalcioglu, I. Erol; Muller, Oliver; Ozkan, Neriman; Ladd, Mark E.; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc U.; Sure, Ulrich; Umutlu, Lale

2014-01-01

321

First results from a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in a Magnetic Field  

E-print Network

A small liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) was operated for the first time in a magnetic field of 0.55 Tesla. The imaging properties of the detector were not affected by the magnetic field. In a test run with cosmic rays a sample of through going and stopping muons was collected. The chamber with the readout electronics and the experimental setup are described. A few selected events were reconstructed and analyzed and the results are presented. The magnetic bending of the charged particle tracks allows the determination of the electric charge and the momentum, even for particles not fully contained in the drift chamber. These features are e.g. required for future neutrino detectors at a neutrino factory.

A. Badertscher; M. Laffranchi; A. Meregaglia; A. Mueller; A. Rubbia

2005-05-21

322

First results from a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in a Magnetic Field  

E-print Network

A small liquid argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr TPC) was operated for the first time in a magnetic field of 0.55 Tesla. The imaging properties of the detector were not affected by the magnetic field. In a test run with cosmic rays a sample of through going and stopping muons was collected. The chamber with the readout electronics and the experimental setup are described. A few selected events were reconstructed and analyzed and the results are presented. The magnetic bending of the charged particle tracks allows the determination of the electric charge and the momentum, even for particles not fully contained in the drift chamber. These features are e.g. required for future neutrino detectors at a neutrino factory.

Badertscher, A; Meregaglia, A; Müller, A; Rubbia, André

2005-01-01

323

First evidence of detecting surface nuclear magnetic resonance signals using a compact B-field sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The noninvasive detection and characterization of subsurface aquifer structures demands geophysical techniques. Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is the only technique that is directly sensitive to hydrogen protons and, therefore, allows for unambiguous detection of subsurface water. Traditionally, SNMR utilizes large surface coils for both transmitting excitation pulses and recording the groundwater response. Recorded data are thus a voltage induced by the time derivative of the secondary magnetic field. For the first time, we demonstrate that the secondary magnetic field in a SNMR experiment can be directly detected using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Conducting measurements at a test site in Germany, we demonstrate not only the ability to detect SNMR signals on the order of femtoTesla but also we are able to satisfy the observed data by inverse modeling. This is expected to open up completely new applications for this exciting technology.

Davis, Aaron C.; Dlugosch, Raphael; Queitsch, Matthias; Macnae, James C.; Stolz, Ronny; Müller-Petke, Mike

2014-06-01

324

Effects of static magnetic fields on light scattering in red chromatophore of goldfish scale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Light scattering in a guanine crystal plate of goldfish scales was observed with and without static magnetic field exposure. Under a microscopic image with dark-field-illumination, the structural color of the scale by guanine plates was observed, and isolated chromatophores showed a twinkling which was the intermittent light scattering of the light from the side. The light scattering was quenched by static magnetic fields of more than 0.26 tesla (T). The quenching was reversibly occurred when the applied external magnetic fields were changed between ambient fields and 5 T. The quenched light scattering did not improve when the magnetic field was decreased from 5 to 0.3 T. It recovered to the original twinkling state about one minute after reaching an ambient geomagnetic field level. The mechanism of the quenched light scattering was speculated to be concerned with the possible magnetic orientation of guanine crystal plates, which were sustained by protein fibers in the red chromatophore. The diamagnetic complex of guanine crystal plates and protein fibers are the candidates for the nanosized light scattering controller based on the magnetic orientation mechanism.

Iwasaka, M.

2010-05-01

325

Physics at TESLA  

E-print Network

The physics at a 500-800 GeV electron positron linear collider, TESLA, is reviewed. The machine parameters that impact directly on the physics are discussed and a few key performance goals for a detector at TESLA are given. Emphasis is placed on precision measurements in the Higgs and top sectors and on extrapolation to high energy scales in the supersymmetric scenario.

Grahame A. Blair

2001-04-25

326

Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization  

DOEpatents

In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

2000-12-19

327

Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields  

E-print Network

An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

2004-01-01

328

Magnetic field effects on microwave absorbing materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of this program was to gather information to formulate a microwave absorber that can work in the presence of strong constant direct current (DC) magnetic fields. The program was conducted in four steps. The first step was to investigate the electrical and magnetic properties of magnetic and ferrite microwave absorbers in the presence of strong magnetic fields. This included both experimental measurements and a literature survey of properties that may be applicable to finding an appropriate absorbing material. The second step was to identify those material properties that will produce desirable absorptive properties in the presence of intense magnetic fields and determine the range of magnetic field in which the absorbers remain effective. The third step was to establish ferrite absorber designs that will produce low reflection and adequate absorption in the presence of intense inhomogeneous static magnetic fields. The fourth and final step was to prepare and test samples of such magnetic microwave absorbers if such designs seem practical.

Goldberg, Ira; Hollingsworth, Charles S.; Mckinney, Ted M.

1991-01-01

329

TESLA Report 2003-32 FPGA based TESLA cavity SIMCON  

E-print Network

TESLA Report 2003-32 FPGA based TESLA cavity SIMCON DOOCS server design, implementation of the laboratory solution of the FPGA based TESLA cavity simulator and controller (SIMCON) is presented. The major is a first description of the working DOOCS server for the FPGA based TESLA cavity SIMCON (which is a part

330

Problems with magnetic field measurements on spacecrafts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper summarizes the difficulties and possible solutions to design and evaluate accurate vector magnetic field measurements on spacecrafts in the interplanetary magnetic field. Problems are discussed like calibration, boom mounted sensors and misalignment angles determination in flight. The application of a detailed magnetic cleanliness program as an example the comet Halley-Giotto spacecraft is demonstrated in detail. The use of

Günter Musmann

1988-01-01

331

Neutrinos with Mixing in Twisting Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

Transitions in a system of neutrinos with vacuum mixing and magnetic moments, propagating in matter and transverse magnetic field, are considered. It is shown that in the realistic case of magnetic field direction varying along the neutrino path qualitatively new phenomena become possible: permutation of neutrino conversion resonances, appearance of resonances in the neutrino-antineutrino ($\

E. Kh. Akhmedov; S. T. Petcov; A. Yu. Smirnov

1993-01-06

332

LCnote LCPHSM2005001 Determination of beam energy at TESLA using radiative  

E-print Network

LCPHSM2005001 Determination of beam energy at TESLA using radiative return events ARND HINZE DESY Zeuthen at TESLA. It was suggested to use this method to cross check and calibrate the magnet spectrometer used for measurement of the beam energy at TESLA. A preliminary assessment of the statistical and systematic errors

333

Discovery of magnetic fields in CPNs  

E-print Network

For the first time we have directly detected magnetic fields in central stars of planetary nebulae by means of spectro-polarimetry with FORS1 at the VLT. In all four objects of our sample we found kilogauss magnetic fields, in NGC 1360 and LSS1362 with very high significance, while in Abell36 and EGB5 the existence of a magnetic field is probable but with less certainty. This discovery supports the hypothesis that the non-spherical symmetry of most planetary nebulae is caused by magnetic fields in AGB stars. Our high discovery rate demands mechanisms to prevent full conservation of magnetic flux during the transition to white dwarfs.

S. Jordan; K. Werner; S. J. O'Toole

2004-10-21

334

Unique topological characterization of braided magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a topological flux function to quantify the topology of magnetic braids: non-zero, line-tied magnetic fields whose field lines all connect between two boundaries. This scalar function is an ideal invariant defined on a cross-section of the magnetic field, and measures the average poloidal magnetic flux around any given field line, or the average pairwise crossing number between a given field line and all others. Moreover, its integral over the cross-section yields the relative magnetic helicity. Using the fact that the flux function is also an action in the Hamiltonian formulation of the field line equations, we prove that it uniquely characterizes the field line mapping and hence the magnetic topology.

Yeates, A. R. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hornig, G. [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

2013-01-15

335

L-band superconducting cavities at KEK for TESLA  

Microsoft Academic Search

An attractive future application of superconducting cavities is a TeV energy superconducting linear collider (TESLA). The substantial merits of TESLA compared to a normal conducting linear collider are to loosening of alignment tolerance and less wake field due to the lower frequency (1.3 GHz). The final focus also is easier to obtain by having the electron\\/positron population in bunches. TESLA

K. Saito; S. Noguchi; E. Kako; M. Ono; T. Shishido; T. Tajima; M. Matsuoka; H. Miwa; T. Suzuki; H. Uniezawa

1993-01-01

336

Bipolar pulse field for magnetic refrigeration  

DOEpatents

A magnetic refrigeration apparatus includes first and second steady state magnets, each having a field of substantially equal strength and opposite polarity, first and second bodies made of magnetocaloric material disposed respectively in the influence of the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, and a pulsed magnet, concentric with the first and second steady state magnets, and having a field which cycles between the fields of the first and second steady state magnets, thereby cyclically magnetizing and demagnetizing and thus heating and cooling the first and second bodies. Heat exchange apparatus of suitable design can be used to expose a working fluid to the first and second bodies of magnetocaloric material. A controller is provided to synchronize the flow of working fluid with the changing states of magnetization of the first and second bodies. 2 figs.

Lubell, M.S.

1994-10-25

337

TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 TESLA FEL Report 1996-07  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-07 #12;TESLA FEL Report

338

TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-02 #12;TESLA FEL

339

TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04  

E-print Network

#12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1995-04 #12;TESLA FEL

340

TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10  

E-print Network

#12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-10 #12;TESLA FEL

341

TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 2000-02 #12;TESLA FEL

342

TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1997-02 #12;TESLA FEL

343

TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1999-03 #12;TESLA FEL

344

TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 TESLA FEL Report 1996-06  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report 1996-06 #12;TESLA FEL Report

345

TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16  

E-print Network

#12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-16 #12;TESLA FEL

346

TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13  

E-print Network

TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL-Report 1996-13 #12;TESLA FEL

347

High magnetic field MHD generator program. Final report, July 1, 1976-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical and experimental program was undertaken to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields. The areas studied were inhomogeneity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown and electrode configuration and current concentrations. In addition, a program was undertaken to study steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. The structure of the inhomogeneities in the Stanford M-2 was characterized and compared with theoretical results from a linearized perturbation analysis. General agreement was obtained and the analysis was used to compute stability regions for large size generators. The Faraday electrical connection was found to be more stable than the Hall or diagonal wall connections. Boundary layer profile measurements were compared with theoretical calculations with good agreement. Extrapolation of the calculations to pilot scale MHD channels indicates that Hartmann effects are important in the analysis of the sidewall, and Joule heating is important in calculating heat transfer and voltage drops for the electrode wall. Hall field breakdown was shown to occur both in the plasma and through the interelectrode insulator with the insulator breakdown threshold voltage lower than the plasma value. The threshold voltage was shown to depend on the interelectrode gap but was relatively independent of plasma conditions. Experiments were performed at 5.5 Tesla with both disk and linear MHD channels.

Eustis, R. H.; Kruger, C. H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S. A.; Koester, J. K.; Nakamura, T.

1980-04-01

348

Advances in Remote Sensing of Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In sharp contrast to stellar magnetic fields, geomagnetic fields have never been remotely sensed. If geomagnetic fields could be measured remotely at the nanotesla (nT) level or better, our understanding of the processes that produce these fields would advance markedly. Unlike characteristics such as topography and temperature, measurements of the magnetic field are determined almost exclusively in situ. The inability to remotely sense these fields has hindered their utility. The Remote Atmospheric Magnetics Workshop highlighted advances in this frontier area, focusing on lab- and field-based studies.

Purucker, Michael

2014-09-01

349

Franck-Hertz experiment in magnetic field  

E-print Network

The paper studies the impact of applied magnetic field on the inelastic collisions of electrons with argon atoms. In the electron-argon Franck-Hertz experiment, the influence of applied magnetic field emerges complicated features, and is equivalent to that of the temperature. In case the accelerating electric intensity becomes strong enough, enlarging magnetic flux density will be equivalent to the increasing of oven temperature. When the accelerating electric intensity is very weak and the applied magnetic field occupies a dominant position, enhancing magnetic flux density is identical with the decreasing of oven temperature. And the non-uniform distribution of applied magnetic field has an influence on the inelastic collision as well. The study claims that the influence of magnetic field variation is equivalent to that of temperature variety, and that it leads the electron energy to transfer obviously in the experiment.

Ying Weng; Zi-Hua Weng

2010-10-07

350

Magnetic Fields and Rotations of Protostars  

E-print Network

The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in the collapsing cloud core is studied using three-dimensional resistive MHD nested grid simulations. Starting with a Bonnor-Ebert isothermal cloud rotating in a uniform magnetic field, we calculate the cloud evolution from the molecular cloud core (n=10^4 cm^-3) to the stellar core (n \\simeq 10^22 cm^-3). The magnetic field strengths at the center of the clouds converge to a certain value as the clouds collapse, when the clouds have the same angular momenta but different strengths of the magnetic fields at the initial state. For 10^12 cm^-3 magnetic field from the collapsing cloud core, and the magnetic field lines, which are strongly twisted for n magnetic field lines are twisted and amplified again for nc > 10^16 cm^-3, because the magnetic field is recoupled with the warm gas. Finally, protostars at their formation epoch have 0.1-1kG of the magnetic fields, which are comparable to observations. The magnetic field strength of protostar slightly depends on the angular momentum of the host cloud. The protostar formed from the slowly rotating cloud core has a stronger magnetic field. The evolution of the angular momentum is closely related to the evolution of the magnetic field. The angular momentum in the collapsing cloud is removed by the magnetic effect. The formed protostars have 0.1-2 days of the rotation period at their formation epoch, which are slightly shorter than the observation. This indicates that the further removal mechanism of the angular momentum such as interaction between the protostar and disk, wind gas or jet is important in further evolution of the protostar.

Masahiro N. Machida; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka; Tomoaki Matsumoto

2007-02-07

351

Phase-based Regional Oxygen Metabolism in Magnetic Resonance Imaging at High Field  

E-print Network

OF TECHNOLOGY JUNE 2010 ©2010 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. All rights reserved. Signature of Author Professor of Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology Thesis Supervisor Accepted Tesla (3T). We also extended our method to high-field human imaging at 7 Tesla (7T), which allows us

352

Measuring T Tauri star magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stellar magnetic fields including a strong dipole component are believed to play a critical role in the early evolution of newly formed stars and their circumstellar accretion disks. It is currently believed that the stellar magnetic field truncates the accretion disk several stellar radii above the star. This action forces accreting material to flow along the field lines and accrete

Christopher M. Johns-Krull

2009-01-01

353

DC-based magnetic field controller  

DOEpatents

A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Morgan, John P,. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01

354

Proposed applications with implementation techniques of the upcoming renewable energy resource, The Tesla Turbine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent research has shown that tesla turbine can be one of the future efficient sources of renewable energy. Modern techniques used for designing of tesla turbine have given optimum results regarding efficiency and applications. In this paper we have suggested fully coordinated applications of tesla turbine in different fields particularly in power generation at both low level and high level generation. In Energy deficient countries the tesla turbine has wide range of applications and it can play an important role in energy management system. Our proposed applications includes, the use of tesla turbine as renewable energy resource using tesla turbine in distributed generation system use of tesla turbine at home for power generation use of tesla turbine in irrigation channels using tesla turbine in hybrid electric vehicles All applications are explained with the help of flow charts and block diagrams and their implementation techniques are also explained in details. The results of physical experiments and simulations are also included for some applications.

Usman Saeed Khan, M.; Maqsood, M. Irfan; Ali, Ehsan; Jamal, Shah; Javed, M.

2013-06-01

355

Brain Activation in Response to Visually Evoked Sexual Arousal in Male-to-Female Transsexuals: 3.0 Tesla Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

PubMed Central

Objective This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to contrast the differential brain activation patterns in response to visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures in male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals who underwent a sex reassignment surgery. Materials and Methods A total of nine healthy MTF transsexuals after a sex reassignment surgery underwent fMRI on a 3.0 Tesla MR Scanner. The brain activation patterns were induced by visual stimulation with both male and female erotic nude pictures. Results The sex hormone levels of the postoperative MTF transsexuals were in the normal range of healthy heterosexual females. The brain areas, which were activated by viewing male nude pictures when compared with viewing female nude pictures, included predominantly the cerebellum, hippocampus, putamen, anterior cingulate gyrus, head of caudate nucleus, amygdala, midbrain, thalamus, insula, and body of caudate nucleus. On the other hand, brain activation induced by viewing female nude pictures was predominantly observed in the hypothalamus and the septal area. Conclusion Our findings suggest that distinct brain activation patterns associated with visual sexual arousal in postoperative MTF transsexuals reflect their sexual orientation to males. PMID:22563262

Oh, Seok-Kyun; Kim, Gwang-Won; Yang, Jong-Chul; Kim, Seok-Kwun; Kang, Heoung-Keun

2012-01-01

356

Assessment of Safety and Interference Issues of Radio Frequency Identification Devices in 0.3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was to evaluate two issues regarding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including device functionality and image artifacts for the presence of radio frequency identification devices (RFID) in association with 0.3?Tesla at 12.7?MHz MRI and computed tomography (CT) scanning. Fifteen samples of RFID tags with two different sizes (wristband and ID card types) were tested. The tags were exposed to several MR-imaging conditions during MRI examination and X-rays of CT scan. Throughout the test, the tags were oriented in three different directions (axial, coronal, and sagittal) relative to MRI system in order to cover all possible situations with respect to the patient undergoing MRI and CT scanning, wearing a RFID tag on wrist. We observed that the tags did not sustain physical damage with their functionality remaining unaffected even after MRI and CT scanning, and there was no alternation in previously stored data as well. In addition, no evidence of either signal loss or artifact was seen in the acquired MR and CT images. Therefore, we can conclude that the use of this passive RFID tag is safe for a patient undergoing MRI at 0.3 T/12.7?MHz and CT Scanning. PMID:24701187

Periyasamy, M.; Dhanasekaran, R.

2014-01-01

357

Progress in HTS trapped field magnets: J{sub c}, area, and applications  

SciTech Connect

Progress in trapped field magnets is reported. Single YBCO grains with diameters of 2 cm are made in production quantities, while 3 cm, 4 1/2 cm and 6 cm diameters are being explored. For single grain tiles: J{sub c} is approximately 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} for melt textured grains; J{sub c} is approximately 40,000 A/cm{sup 2} for light ion irradiation; and J{sub c} is approximately 85,000 A/cm{sup 2} for heavy ion irradiation. Using 2 cm diameter tiles bombarded by light ions, the authors have fabricated a mini-magnet which trapped 2.25 Tesla at 77K, and 5.3 Tesla at 65K. A previous generation of tiles, 1 cm x 1 cm, was used to trap 7.0 Tesla at 55K. Unirradiated 2.0 cm tiles were used to provide 8 magnets for an axial gap generator, in a collaborative experiment with Emerson Electric Co. This generator delivered 100 Watts to a resistive load, at 2265 rpm. In this experiment activation of the TFMs was accomplished by a current pulse of 15 ms duration. Tiles have also been studied for application as a bumper-tether system for the soft docking of spacecraft. A method for optimizing tether forces, and mechanisms of energy dissipation are discussed. A bus bar was constructed by welding three crystals while melt-texturing, such that their a,b planes were parallel and interleaved. The bus bar, an area of approximately 2 cm{sup 2}, carried a transport current of 1000 amps, the limit of the testing equipment available.

Weinstein, R.; Ren, Y.; Liu, J.; Sawh, R.; Parks, D.; Foster, C.; Obot, V.; Arndt, G.D.; Crapo, A. [Houston Univ., TX (United States); [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); [Texas Southern Univ., Houston, TX (United States); [Emerson Electric Co., Saint Louis, MO (United States)

1995-04-01

358

Progress in HTS trapped field magnets: J(sub c), area, and applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in trapped field magnets is reported. Single YBCO grains with diameters of 2 cm are made in production quantities, while 3 cm, 4 1/2 cm and 6 cm diameters are being explored. For single grain tiles: J(sub c) is approximately 10,000 A/cm(exp 2) for melt textured grains; J(sub c) is approximately 40,000 A/cm2 for light ion irradiation; and J(sub c) is approximately 85,000 A/cm(exp 2) for heavy ion irradiation. Using 2 cm diameter tiles bombarded by light ions, we have fabricated a mini-magnet which trapped 2.25 Tesla at 77K, and 5.3 Tesla at 65K. A previous generation of tiles, 1 cm x 1 cm, was used to trap 7.0 Tesla at 55K. Unirradiated 2.0 cm tiles were used to provide 8 magnets for an axial gap generator, in a collaborative experiment with Emerson Electric Co. This generator delivered 100 Watts to a resistive load, at 2265 rpm. In this experiment activation of the TFMs was accomplished by a current pulse of 15 ms duration. Tiles have also been studied for application as a bumper-tether system for the soft docking of spacecraft. A method for optimizing tether forces, and mechanisms of energy dissipation are discussed. A bus bar was constructed by welding three crystals while melt-texturing, such that their a,b planes were parallel and interleaved. The bus bar, an area of approximately 2 cm(exp 2), carried a transport current of 1000 amps, the limit of the testing equipment available.

Weinstein, Roy; Ren, Yanru; Liu, Jianxiong; Sawh, Ravi; Parks, Drew; Foster, Charles; Obot, Victor; Arndt, G. Dickey; Crapo, Alan

1995-01-01

359

Progress in HTS Trapped Field Magnets: J(sub c), Area, and Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Progress in trapped field magnets is reported. Single YBCO grains with diameters of 2 cm are made in production quantities, while 3 cm, 4 1/2 cm and 6 cm diameters are being explored. For single grain tiles: J(sub c) - 10,000 A/sq cm for melt textured grains; J(sub c) - 40,000 A/sq cm for light ion irradiation; and J(sub c) - 85,000 A/J(sub c) for heavy ion irradiation. Using 2 cm diameter tiles bombarded by light ions, we have fabricated a mini-magnet which trapped 2.25 Tesla at 77K, and 5.3 Tesla at 65K. A previous generation of tiles, 1 cm x 1 cm, was used to trap 7.0 Tesla at 55K. Unirradiated 2.0 cm tiles were used to provide 8 magnets for an axial gap generator, in a collaborative experiment with Emerson Electric Co. This generator delivered 100 Watts to a resistive load, at 2265 rpm. In this experiment, activation of the TFMs was accomplished by a current pulse of 15 ms duration. Tiles have also been studied for application as a bumper-tether system for the soft docking of spacecraft. A method for optimizing tether forces, and mechanisms of energy dissipation are discussed. A bus bar was constructed by welding three crystals while melt-texturing, such that their a,b planes were parallel and interleaved. The bus bar, of area approx. 2 sq cm, carried a transport current of 1000 amps, the limit of the testing equipment available.

Weinstein, Roy; Ren, Yanru; Liu, Jian-Xiong; Sawh, Ravi; Parks, Drew; Foster, Charles; Obot, Victor; Arndt, G. Dickey; Crapo, Alan

1995-01-01

360

Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in fall 2013. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of three identical satellites. The mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth's core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently in the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products for the Swarm user community. The setup of the Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. In case the Swarm satellites are already in orbit, a summary of the on-going mission operations activities will be given. More information on Swarm can be found at www.esa.int/esaLP/LPswarm.html.

Plank, G.; Floberghagen, R.; Menard, Y.; Haagmans, R.

2013-12-01

361

Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in 2013. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of 3 identical satellites. The Mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth's core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently in the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products for the Swarm user community. The setup of the Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. More information on Swarm can be found at www.esa.int/esaLP/LPswarm.html.

Plank, Gernot; Haagmans, Roger; Floberghagen, Rune; Menard, Yvon

2013-04-01

362

Comparing magnetic field extrapolations with measurements of magnetic loops  

E-print Network

We compare magnetic field extrapolations from a photospheric magnetogram with the observationally inferred structure of magnetic loops in a newly developed active region. This is the first time that the reconstructed 3D-topology of the magnetic field is available to test the extrapolations. We compare the observations with potential fields, linear force-free fields and non-linear force-free fields. This comparison reveals that a potential field extrapolation is not suitable for a reconstruction of the magnetic field in this young, developing active region. The inclusion of field-line-parallel electric currents, the so called force-free approach, gives much better results. Furthermore, a non-linear force-free computation reproduces the observations better than the linear force-free approximation, although no free parameters are available in the former case.

T. Wiegelmann; A. Lagg; S. K. Solanki; B. Inhester; J. Woch

2008-01-29

363

Inter-study reproducibility of arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of renal perfusion in healthy volunteers at 3 Tesla  

PubMed Central

Background Measurement of renal perfusion is a crucial part of measuring kidney function. Arterial spin labelling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL MRI) is a non-invasive method of measuring renal perfusion using magnetised blood as endogenous contrast. We studied the reproducibility of ASL MRI in normal volunteers. Methods ASL MRI was performed in healthy volunteers on 2 occasions using a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) perfusion preparation with a steady state free precession (True-FISP) pulse sequence. Kidney volume was measured from the scanned images. Routine serum and urine biochemistry were measured prior to MRI scanning. Results 12 volunteers were recruited yielding 24 kidneys, with a mean participant age of 44.1 ± 14.6 years, blood pressure of 136/82 mmHg and chronic kidney disease epidemiology formula estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD EPI eGFR) of 98.3 ± 15.1 ml/min/1.73 m2. Mean kidney volumes measured using the ellipsoid formula and voxel count method were 123.5 ± 25.5 cm3, and 156.7 ± 28.9 cm3 respectively. Mean kidney perfusion was 229 ± 41 ml/min/100 g and mean cortical perfusion was 327 ± 63 ml/min/100 g, with no significant differences between ASL MRIs. Mean absolute kidney perfusion calculated from kidney volume measured during the scan was 373 ± 71 ml/min. Bland Altman plots were constructed of the cortical and whole kidney perfusion measurements made at ASL MRIs 1 and 2. These showed good agreement between measurements, with a random distribution of means plotted against differences observed. The intra class correlation for cortical perfusion was 0.85, whilst the within subject coefficient of variance was 9.2%. The intra class correlation for whole kidney perfusion was 0.86, whilst the within subject coefficient of variance was 7.1%. Conclusions ASL MRI at 3.0 Tesla provides a repeatable method of measuring renal perfusion in healthy subjects without the need for administration of exogenous compounds. We have established normal values for renal perfusion using ASL MRI in a cohort of healthy volunteers. PMID:24484613

2014-01-01

364

Magnetic Fields in Clusters of Galaxies  

E-print Network

A brief overview about our knowledge on galaxy cluster magnetic fields is provided. Emphasize is given to the mutual dependence of our knowledge on relativistic particles in galaxy clusters and the magnetic field strength. Furthermore, we describe efforts to measure magnetic field strengths, characteristic length-scales, and power-spectra with reliable accuracy. An interpretation of these results in terms of non-helical dynamo theory is given. If this interpretation turns out to be correct, the understanding of cluster magnetic fields is directly connected to our understanding of intra-cluster turbulence.

Torsten A. Ensslin; Corina Vogt; Christoph Pfrommer

2005-01-17

365

Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

2002-07-29

366

Statistics of magnetic fields on OBA stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Starting from recent measurements, we studied the statistical properties of the magnetic fields of OBA stars. As one of the statistically significant characteristics of the magnetic field we use the average effective magnetic field of the star, < B>. We then investigated the distribution function f() of the magnetic fields of OBA stars. This function has a power-law dependence on , with an index of 2-3 and a fast decrease for ? 300 G for B-A stars and ? 80 G for O stars.

Kholtygin, A. F.; Hubrig, S.; Drake, N. A.; Sudnik, N. P.; Dushin, V. V.

2014-11-01

367

Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The experimental search for magnetic monopole particles has, so far, been in vain. Nevertheless, these elusive particles of magnetic charge have fuelled a rich field of theoretical study. Here, we created an approximation of a magnetic monopole in free space at the end of a long, nanoscopically thin magnetic needle. We experimentally demonstrate that the interaction of this approximate magnetic monopole field with a beam of electrons produces an electron vortex state, as theoretically predicted for a true magnetic monopole. This fundamental quantum mechanical scattering experiment is independent of the speed of the electrons and has consequences for all situations where electrons meet such monopole magnetic fields, as, for example, in solids. The set-up not only shows an attractive way to produce electron vortex states but also provides a unique insight into monopole fields and shows that electron vortices might well occur in unexplored solid-state physics situations.

Béché, Armand; van Boxem, Ruben; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Verbeeck, Jo

2014-01-01

368

Concentrator of magnetic field of light  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the recent decade metamaterials with magnetic permeability different than unity and unusual response to the magnetic field of incident light have been intensively explored. Existence of magnetic artificial materials created an interest in a scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of those metamaterials. We present a method of measuring magnetic responses of such elementary cells within a wide range of optical frequencies with single probes of two types. The first type probe is made of a tapered silica fiber with radial metal stripes separated by equidistant slits of constant angular width. The second type probe is similar to metal coated, corrugated, tapered fiber apertured SNOM probe, but in this case corrugations are radially oriented. Both types of probes have internal illumination with azimuthally polarized light. In the near-field they concentrate into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one.

Wróbel, Piotr; Stefaniuk, Tomasz; Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Szoplik, Tomasz

2012-05-01

369

Magnetic field screening effect in electroweak model  

E-print Network

It is shown that in the Weinberg-Salam model a magnetic field screening effect for static magnetic solutions takes place. The origin of that phenomenon is conditioned by features of the electro-weak interaction, namely, there is mutual cancellation of Abelian magnetic fields created by the SU(2) gauge fields and Higgs boson. The effect implies monopole charge screening in finite energy system of monopoles and antimonopoles. We consider another manifestation of the screening effect which leads to an essential energy decrease of magnetic solutions. Applying variational method we have found a magnetic field configuration with a topological azimuthal magnetic flux which minimizes the energy functional and possesses a total energy of order 1 TeV. We suppose that corresponding magnetic bound state exists in the electroweak theory and can be detected in experiment.

Bakry, A; Zhang, P M; Zou, L P

2014-01-01

370

Entangled states of trapped ions allow measuring the magnetic field gradient produced by a single atomic spin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose detecting the magnetic field gradient produced by the magnetic dipole moment of a single atom by using ions in an entangled state trapped a few ?m from the dipole. This requires measuring magnetic field gradients of order 10-13 tesla/?m. We discuss applications in determining magnetic moments of a wide variety of ion species, for investigating the magnetic substructure of ions with level structures that are not suitable for laser cooling and detection, and for studying exotic or rare ions, and molecular ions. The scheme may also be used for measuring spin imbalances of neutral atoms or atomic ensembles trapped by optical dipole forces. As the proposed method relies on techniques that are well established in ion trap quantum information processing, it is within reach of current technology.

Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Gerritsma, R.

2012-09-01

371

Numerical analysis of magnetic field in superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that the superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is more useful than the other systems of electric energy storage because of larger stored energy and higher efficiency. The other systems are the battery, the flywheel, the pumped-storage power station. Some models of solenoid type SMES are designed in U.S.A. and Japan. But a high magnetic field happens by the large scale SMES in the living environment, and makes the erroneous operations of the computer display, the pacemaker of the heart and the electronic equipments. We study some fit designs of magnetic shielding of the solenoidal type SMES for reduction of the magnetic field in living environment. When some superconducting shielding coils are over the main storage coil, magnetic field reduces remarkably than the case of non shielding coil. The calculated results of the magnetic field are obtained y the finite element method.

Kanamaru, Y. (Kanazawa Inst. of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921 (JP)); Amemiya, Y. (Chiba Inst. of Tech., Narashino (Japan))

1991-09-01

372

Field-enhanced diamagnetism in the pseudogap state of the cuprate Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta) superconductor in an intense magnetic field.  

PubMed

In hole-doped cuprates, Nernst experiments imply that the superconducting state is destroyed by spontaneous creation of vortices which destroy phase coherence. Using torque magnetometry on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+delta), we uncover a field-enhanced diamagnetic signal M above the transition temperature Tc that increases with applied field to 32 Tesla and scales just like the Nernst signal. The magnetization results above Tc distinguish M from conventional amplitude fluctuations and strongly support the vortex scenario for the loss of phase coherence at Tc. PMID:16384409

Wang, Yayu; Li, Lu; Naughton, M J; Gu, G D; Uchida, S; Ong, N P

2005-12-01

373

Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

2010-01-01

374

Electro-magnetically induced transparency in a static magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the electro- magnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomenon of atomic 87Rb at the room temperature with a static magnetic field lifting the degeneracy of all three involved hyperfine levels. Two collinearly propagating and linearly polarized laser fields (a probe field and a coupling field) are used to couple one hyperfine level (the upper level) of the 5P 1/2 state to two hyperfine levels (the lower levels) of the 5S 1/2 state, respectively. In the case of zero magnetic fields, we observed a deep EIT window with the contrast of about 66%. Here, the EIT window width is limited by both the spontaneous decay rate of the upper level and the coupling field intensity. When a magnetic field parallel to both laser beams is applied, the EIT window is split into three much narrower sub-windows with contrasts of about 32%. If the magnetic field is perpendicular to the laser beams, however, the EIT window is split into four much narrower sub-windows whose contrasts are 32% or 16%. This is because the decomposition of the linearly polarized optical fields strongly depends on the orientation of the used magnetic field. The underlying physics is that, in the limit of a weak probe field, an ideal degenerate three-level system can be split into three or four sets of independent three-level systems by a magnetic field due to the lifting of magnetic sublevels of the involved hyperfine levels. In this paper the absorption spectra corresponding to different magnetic field directions are clearly shown and compared. And a straightforward but effective theoretical method for analyzing the experimental results is put forward. Our theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

Wei, Xiao-Gang; Gao, Jin-Yue; Wu, Jin-Hui; Sun, Gui-Xia; Wang, Hai-Hua; Kang, Zhi-Hui; Shao, Zhuang; Jiang, Yun

2006-02-01

375

Destruction of magnetic surfaces by magnetic field irregularities: Part II  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work is a continuation of the paper by Rosenbluth et al. (Nucl. Fusion 6 (1966) 297) and concerns the investigation of problems associated with the condition for the existence of magnetic surfaces in closed systems of the stellarator type. The unperturbed geometry of the magnetic field is produced by a straight helical field. Exact equations for the motion

N. N. Filonenko; R. Z. Sagdeev; G. M. Zaslavskii

1967-01-01

376

Cosmic Magnetic Fields (IAU S259)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Preface K. G. Strassmeier, A. G. Kosovichev and J. E. Beckman; Organising committee; Conference photograph; Conference participants; Session 1. Interstellar magnetic fields, star-forming regions and the Death Valley Takahiro Kudoh and Elisabeta de Gouveia Dal Pino; Session 2. Multi-scale magnetic fields of the Sun; their generation in the interior, and magnetic energy release Nigel O. Weiss; Session 3. Planetary magnetic fields and the formation and evolution of planetary systems and planets; exoplanets Karl-Heinz Glassmeier; Session 4. Stellar magnetic fields: cool and hot stars Swetlana Hubrig; Session 5. From stars to galaxies and the intergalactic space Dimitry Sokoloff and Bryan Gaensler; Session 6. Advances in methods and instrumentation for measuring magnetic fields across all wavelengths and targets Tom Landecker and Klaus G. Strassmeier; Author index; Object index; Subject index.

Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Beckman, John E.

2009-06-01

377

SIMULATING MAGNETIC FIELDS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present self-consistent high-resolution simulations of NGC 4038/4039 (the 'Antennae galaxies') including star formation, supernova feedback, and magnetic fields performed with the N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code GADGET, in which magnetohydrodynamics are followed with the SPH method. We vary the initial magnetic field in the progenitor disks from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -4} G. At the time of the best match with the central region of the Antennae system, the magnetic field has been amplified by compression and shear flows to an equilibrium field value of {approx}10 {mu}G, independent of the initial seed field. These simulations are a proof of the principle that galaxy mergers are efficient drivers for the cosmic evolution of magnetic fields. We present a detailed analysis of the magnetic field structure in the central overlap region. Simulated radio and polarization maps are in good morphological and quantitative agreement with the observations. In particular, the two cores with the highest synchrotron intensity and ridges of regular magnetic fields between the cores and at the root of the southern tidal arm develop naturally in our simulations. This indicates that the simulations are capable of realistically following the evolution of the magnetic fields in a highly nonlinear environment. We also discuss the relevance of the amplification effect for present-day magnetic fields in the context of hierarchical structure formation.

Kotarba, H.; Karl, S. J.; Naab, T.; Johansson, P. H.; Lesch, H. [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Dolag, K.; Stasyszyn, F. A., E-mail: kotarba@usm.lmu.d [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

2010-06-20

378

Influence of the external magnetic field on pinch evolution and neutron production in plasma-focus discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the results of the study of the influence of the applied external axial magnetic field on the dynamics of pinch and neutron production are presented, following from measurements using x-ray, interferometry and neutron diagnostics performed on the plasma-focus PF-1000 device with deuterium as the filling gas at the current of 2 MA and neutron yield above 1010. The permanent magnets with a magnetic field of a few hundredths of tesla were used both inside the anode body and in front of the end of the dense column. This magnetic field decreases the neutron yield, depresses the implosion velocity and the velocity of the transformations of internal structures, stabilizes the pinch column, increases its axial symmetry and indirectly confirms the existence of internal closed currents inside the pinch structures.

Paduch, M.; Zielinska, E.; Kubes, P.; Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardt, J.; Kortanek, J.; Scholz, M.; Karpinski, L.

2013-11-01

379

Atoms in Crossed Electric and Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this dissertation, extensive experimental and theoretical work pertaining to three interesting aspects of the interaction of atoms with crossed electric and magnetic fields is presented. The first experiment discussed deals with the effects of weak crossed fields on sodium atoms. A fluorescence spectrum of laser excited sodium n = 11 states in an electric field of 2560 V/cm perpendicular to a magnetic field of 4.4 kG is presented, along with a comparison to theory. The data show the important effects of m-mixing and residual degeneracies which remain in the crossed fields. The next topic presented is the theoretical prediction of novel resonances, termed "quasi-Penning resonances," corresponding to electron states localized away from the nucleus at the Stark saddlepoint in strong crossed electric and magnetic fields. The stability and possibility for observation of these resonances is explored. Finally, extensive experimental maps of data are presented which compare laser induced ionization spectra of sodium atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields to spectra in an electric field atone. The experiment explores the energy region of the electric field saddlepoint, where quasi-Penning resonances are predicted to occur. The magnetic field is too weak for the observation of these resonances, but the experiment provides important groundwork for the understanding of future experiments in strong crossed fields. The magnetic field is seen to cause splitting of some transitions due to the interaction of the electron spin with the magnetic field. Also, magnetic field induced state mixing causes a redistribution of oscillator strengths leading to changes in peak heights and auto-ionizing line widths. On the whole, however, the effect of the weak crossed magnetic field on the sodium Stark spectra remains small.

Korevaar, Eric John

1987-09-01

380

Superconducting TESLA cavities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with an accelerating gradient of Eacc>=25 MV\\/m at a quality factor Q0>=5×109. The design goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set to the more moderate value of Eacc>=15 MV\\/m. In a first series of 27

B. Aune; R. Bandelmann; D. Bloess; B. Bonin; A. Bosotti; M. Champion; C. Crawford; G. Deppe; B. Dwersteg; D. A. Edwards; H. T. Edwards; M. Ferrario; M. Fouaidy; P.-D. Gall; A. Gamp; A. Gössel; J. Graber; D. Hubert; M. Hüning; M. Juillard; T. Junquera; H. Kaiser; G. Kreps; M. Kuchnir; R. Lange; M. Leenen; M. Liepe; L. Lilje; A. Matheisen; W.-D. Möller; A. Mosnier; H. Padamsee; C. Pagani; M. Pekeler; H.-B. Peters; O. Peters; D. Proch; K. Rehlich; D. Reschke; H. Safa; T. Schilcher; P. Schmüser; J. Sekutowicz; S. Simrock; W. Singer; M. Tigner; D. Trines; K. Twarowski; G. Weichert; J. Weisend; J. Wojtkiewicz; S. Wolff; K. Zapfe

2000-01-01

381

Homogenous BSCCO-2212 Round Wires for Very High Field Magnets  

SciTech Connect

The performance demands on modern particle accelerators generate a relentless push towards higher field magnets. In turn, advanced high field magnet development places increased demands on superconducting materials. Nb3Sn conductors have been used to achieve 16 T in a prototype dipole magnet and are thought to have the capability for {approx}18 T for accelerator magnets (primarily dipoles but also higher order multipole magnets). However there have been suggestions and proposals for such magnets higher than 20 T. The High Energy Physics Community (HEP) has identified important new physics opportunities that are enabled by extremely high field magnets: 20 to 50 T solenoids for muon cooling in a muon collider (impact: understanding of neutrinos and dark matter); and 20+ T dipoles and quadrupoles for high energy hadron colliders (impact: discovery reach far beyond present). This proposal addresses the latest SBIR solicitation that calls for grant applications that seek to develop new or improved superconducting wire technologies for magnets that operate at a minimum of 12 Tesla (T) field, with increases up to 15 to 20 T sought in the near future (three to five years). The long-term development of accelerator magnets with fields greater than 20 T will require superconducting wires having significantly better high-field properties than those possessed by current Nb{sub 3}Sn or other A15 based wires. Given the existing materials science base for Bi-2212 wire processing, we believe that Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212) round wires can be produced in km-long piece lengths with properties suitable to meet both the near term and long term needs of the HEP community. The key advance will be the translation of this materials science base into a robust, high-yield wire technology. While the processing and application of A15 materials have advanced to a much higher level than those of the copper oxide-based, high T{sub c} (HTS) counterparts, the HTS materials have the very significant advantage of an extremely high H{sub c2}. For this reason, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub y} (Bi-2212, or 2212) in the form of a multifilamentary Ag alloy matrix composite is beginning to attract the interest of the magnet community for future extremely high-field magnets or magnet-insert coils for 4.2K operation. Fig. 1 shows an example of excellent JE (engineering current density) in Bi-2212 round wire at fields up to 45 T, demonstrating the potential for high field applications of this material. For comparison, the Nb{sub 3}Sn wires used in magnets in the 16-18 T range typically perform with J{sub E} in the range 200-500 A/mm{sup 2}; the Bi-2212 wire retains this level of performance to fields at least as high as 45 T, and probably significantly higher. Bi-2212 conductors have in fact been used to generate a 25 T field in a superconducting insert magnet. These two factors- the very high field critical current performance of Bi-2212, and the already demonstrated capability of this material for high field magnets up to 25 T, strongly suggest this material as a leading contender for the next generation high field superconducting (HFS) wire. This potential was recognized by the US Academy of Science's Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science. Their report of the same name specifically calls out the high field potential for this material, and suggests that 30 T magnets appear feasible based on the performance of 2212. There are several requirements for HFS conductors. The most obvious is J{sub E} (B, T), the engineering current density at the field and temperature of operation. As shown in Fig. 1, Bi-2212 excels in this regard. Stability requirements for magnets dictate that the effective filament diameter should be less than 30 micrometers, something that Bi-2212 multifilamentary wire can uniquely satisfy among the HFS superconducting wire technologies. Additional requirements include mechanical properties that prevent stress limitation of J{sub E} at the operating conditions, resistive transition index (n-value) suffic

Dr. Scott Campbell

2012-06-30

382

Calculation of magnetic fields for engineering devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the methodology of magnet technology and its application to various engineering devices. Magnet technology has experienced a rapid growth in the past few years as a result of the advances made in superconductivity, numerical methods and computational techniques. Specifically, this paper concerns itself with: (a) Mathematical models for solving magnetic field problems; (b) The applicability, usefulness,

John S. Colonias

1976-01-01

383

The Evolution of the Earth's Magnetic Field.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the change of earth's magnetic field at the boundary between the outer core and the mantle. Measurement techniques used during the last 300 years are considered. Discusses the theories and research for explaining the field change. (YP)

Bloxham, Jeremy; Gubbins, David

1989-01-01

384

Coronal magnetic fields and the solar wind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current information is presented on coronal magnetic fields as they bear on problems of the solar wind. Both steady state fields and coronal transient events are considered. A brief critique is given of the methods of calculating coronal magnetic fields including the potential (current free) models, exact solutions for the solar wind and field interaction, and source surface models. These solutions are compared with the meager quantitative observations which are available at this time. Qualitative comparisons between the shapes of calculated magnetic field lines and the forms visible in the solar corona at several recent eclipses are displayed. These suggest that: (1) coronal streamers develop above extended magnetic arcades which connect unipolar regions of opposite polarity; and (2) loops, arches, and rays in the corona correspond to preferentially filled magnetic tubes in the approximately potential field.

Newkirk, G., Jr.

1972-01-01

385

Protecting SQUID metamaterials against stray magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as the basic, low-loss elements of thin-film metamaterials has one main advantage: their resonance frequency is easily tunable by applying a weak magnetic field. The downside, however, is a strong sensitivity to stray and inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In this work, we demonstrate that even small magnetic fields from electronic components destroy the collective, resonant behaviour of the SQUID metamaterial. We also show how the effect of these fields can be minimized. As a first step, magnetic shielding decreases any initially present fields, including the earth’s magnetic field. However, further measures such as improvements in the sample geometry have to be taken to avoid the trapping of Abrikosov vortices.

Butz, S.; Jung, P.; Filippenko, L. V.; Koshelets, V. P.; Ustinov, A. V.

2013-09-01

386

Graphene Nanoribbon in Sharply Localized Magnetic Fields  

E-print Network

We study the effect of a sharply localized magnetic field on the electron transport in a strip (ribbon) of graphene sheet, which allows to give results for the transmission and reflection probability through magnetic barriers. The magnetic field is taken as a single and double delta type localized functions, which are treated later as the zero width limit of gaussian fields. For both field configurations, we evaluate analytically and numerically their transmission and reflection coefficients. The possibility of spacial confinement due to the inhomogeneous field configuration is also investigated.

Abdulaziz D. Alhaidari; Hocine Bahlouli; Abderrahim El Mouhafid; Ahmed Jellal

2011-03-21

387

Results of stretched wire field integral measurements on the mini-undulator magnet -- comparison of results obtained from circular and translational motion of the integrating wire  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the multipole content of the Mini-Undulator magnet have been made with two different integrating wire techniques. Both measurements used 43 strand Litz wire stretched along the length of the magnet within the magnet gap. In the first technique, the wire motion was purely translational, while in the second technique the wire was moved along a circular path. The induced voltage in the Litz wire was input into a Walker integrator, and the integrator output was analyzed as a function of wire position for determination of the multipole content of the magnetic field. The mini-undulator magnet is a 10 period, 80 mm per period hybrid insertion device. For all the data contained herein the magnet gap was set at 49 mm. In the mini-undulator magnet, the iron poles are 18mm x 32mm x 86 mm, and the Samarium Cobalt permanent magnet blocks are 22mm x 21mm x 110mm. For this magnet, which is a shortened prototype for the NSLS Soft X-Ray Undulator Magnet, the undulator parameter K = 0.934 B (Tesla){lambda}(cm), and B(tesla) = 0.534/sinh({pi}Gap/{lambda}). At a gap of 49 mm, the magnetic field is 1590 Gauss.

Solomon, L.

1998-05-01

388

Measurements of Heme Relaxation and Ligand Recombination in Strong Magnetic Fields  

PubMed Central

Heme cooling signals and diatomic ligand recombination kinetics are measured in strong magnetic fields (up to 10 Tesla). We examined diatomic ligand recombination to heme model compounds (NO and CO), myoglobin (NO and O2), and horseradish peroxidase (NO). No magnetic field induced rate changes in any of the samples were observed within the experimental detection limit. However, in the case of CO binding to heme in glycerol and O2 binding to myoglobin, we observe a small magnetic field dependent change in the early time amplitude of the optical response that is assigned to heme cooling. One possibility, consistent with this observation, is that there is a weak magnetic field dependence of the non-radiative branching ratio into the vibrationally hot electronic ground state during CO photolysis. Ancillary studies of the “spin-forbidden” CO binding reaction in a variety of heme compounds in the absence of magnetic field demonstrate a surprisingly wide range for the Arrhenius prefactor. We conclude that CO binding to heme is not always retarded by unfavorable spin selection rules involving a double spin-flip superexchange mechanism. In fact, it appears that the small prefactor (~109s?1) found for CO rebinding to Mb may be anomalous, rather than the general rule for heme-CO rebinding. These results point to unresolved fundamental issues that underlie the theory of heme-ligand photolysis and rebinding. PMID:19588986

Zhang, Zhenyu; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Ye, Xiong; Yu, Anchi; Champion, Paul M.

2009-01-01

389

Extended Magnetization of Superconducting Pellets in Highly Inhomogeneous Magnetic Field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnetization of superconducting pellets is a worth point in the development of trapped flux superconducting motors. Experimental and simulated data have been reported extensively according to the framework of one or several pulses of a homogeneous magnetizing field applied to a pellet or a set of pellets. In case of cylindrical rotors of low power motors with radial excitation, however, the use of the copper coils to produce the starting magnetization of the pellets produces a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field which cannot be reduced to a 2D standard model. In this work we present an analysis of the magnetization of the superconducting cylindrical rotor of a small motor by using a commercial FEM program, being the rotor magnetized by the working copper coils of the motor. The aim of the study is a report of the magnetization obtained and theheat generated in the HTSC pellets.

Maynou, R.; López, J.; Granados, X.; Torres, R.; Bosch, R.

390

The Physics of Attraction and Repulsion: Magnetism and Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of new materials with improved magnetic properties completely changed the modern world in the past decades. Recent progress is predominantly due to a better understanding of magnetism that has gone far beyond compass needles rotating in a magnetic field and bar magnets attracting or repelling each other. New magnetic materials are used to build smaller and smaller read/write heads and hard disks with increased storage capacity, developments that are responsible the revolution in the computer industry. Another example is the field of magnetic levitation that became feasible for commercial applications with the discovery of new superconducting materials, and a prototype train is under development in Japan. In medicine, the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides an alternative to other (destructive) radiation techniques.

Nakotte, Heinz

2001-11-01

391

High concentration ferronematics in low magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We investigated experimentally the magneto-optical and dielectric properties of magnetic-nanoparticle-doped nematic liquid crystals (ferronematics). Our studies focus on the effect of the very small orienting bias magnetic field $B_{bias}$, and that of the nematic director pretilt at the boundary surfaces in our systems sensitive to low magnetic fields. Based on the results we assert that $B_{bias}$ is not necessarily required for a detectable response to low magnetic fields, and that the initial pretilt, as well as the aggregation of the nanoparticles play an important (though not yet explored enough) role.

T. Tóth-Katona; P. Salamon; N. Éber; N. Tomašovi?ová; Z. Mitróová; P. Kop?anskı

2014-09-05

392

High concentration ferronematics in low magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated experimentally the magneto-optical and dielectric properties of magnetic-nanoparticle-doped nematic liquid crystals (ferronematics). Our studies focus on the effect of the very small orienting bias magnetic field Bbias, and that of the nematic director pretilt at the boundary surfaces in our systems sensitive to low magnetic fields. Based on the results we assert that Bbias is not necessarily required for a detectable response to low magnetic fields, and that the initial pretilt, as well as the aggregation of the nanoparticles play an important (though not yet explored enough) role.

Tóth-Katona, T.; Salamon, P.; Éber, N.; Tomašovi?ová, N.; Mitróová, Z.; Kop?anskı, P.

2014-12-01

393

Comparison of the mean photospheric magnetic field and the interplanetary magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mean photospheric magnetic field of the sun seen as a star has been compared with the interplanetary magnetic field observed with spacecraft near the earth. Each change in polarity of the mean solar field is followed about 4 1\\/2 days later by a change in polarity of the interplanetary field (sector boundary). The scaling of the field magnitude from

A. Severny; J. M. Wilcox; P. H. Scherrer; D. S. Colburn

1970-01-01

394

Correlation properties of magnetosheath magnetic field fluctuations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The magnetosheath is characterized by a variety of low-frequency fluctuations, but their features and sources are different. Taking advantage of multipoint magnetic field measurements of the Cluster spacecraft, we present a statistical study to reveal properties of waves. We compute cross-correlation coefficients of magnetic field strengths as measured by pairs of the Cluster spacecraft and determine the correlation length of

O. Gutynska; J. Šafránková; Z. N?me?ek

2009-01-01

395

Magnetic fields, branes, and noncommutative geometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

We construct a simple physical model of a particle moving on the infinite noncommutative 2-plane. The model consists of a pair of opposite charges moving in a strong magnetic field. In addition, the charges are connected by a spring. In the limit of large magnetic field, the charges are frozen into the lowest Landau levels. Interactions of such particles include

Daniela Bigatti; Leonard Susskind

2000-01-01

396

Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field  

E-print Network

We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Pietro Giudice; Alessandro Papa

2011-09-29

397

Directional discontinuities in the interplanetary magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that the interplanetary magnetic field has different characteristics on different scales, and it is noted that a given physical theory may not be applicable or relevant on all scales. Four scales are defined in terms of time intervals on which the data may be viewed. Many discontinuities in the magnetic-field direction are seen on the mesoscale (˜

Leonard F. Burlaga

1969-01-01

398

Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

Cea, P.; Cosmai, L.; Giudice, P.; Papa, A.

399

Ground Vehicle Navigation Using Magnetic Field Variation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Earth's magnetic field has been the bedrock of navigation for centuries. The latest research highlights the uniqueness of magnetic field measurements based on position due to large scale variations as well as localized perturbations. These observable changes in the Earth's magnetic field as a function of position provide distinct information which can be used for navigation. This dissertation describes ground vehicle navigation exploiting variation in Earth's magnetic field using a self-contained navigation system consisting of only a magnetometer and magnetic field maps. In order to achieve navigation, effective calibration enables repeatable magnetic field measurements from different vehicles and facilitates mapping of the observable magnetic field as a function of position. A new modified ellipsoid calibration technique for strapdown magnetometers in large vehicles is described, as well as analysis of position measurement generation comparing a multitude of measurement compositions using existing and newly developed likelihood techniques. Finally, navigation solutions are presented using both a position measurement and direct incorporation of the magnetometer measurements via a particle filter to demonstrate road navigation in three different environments. Emphatically, the results affirm that navigation using magnetic field variation in ground vehicles is viable and achieves adequate performance for road level navigation.

Shockley, Jeremiah A.

400

Astrophysical magnetic fields and nonlinear dynamo theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current understanding of astrophysical magnetic fields is reviewed, focusing on their generation and maintenance by turbulence. In the astrophysical context this generation is usually explained by a self-excited dynamo, which involves flows that can amplify a weak ‘seed’ magnetic field exponentially fast. Particular emphasis is placed on the nonlinear saturation of the dynamo. Analytic and numerical results are discussed

Axel Brandenburg; Kandaswamy Subramanian

2005-01-01

401

Superconductor based sensor for monitoring magnetic field  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors propose a method for measurement of magnetic fields with the help of a HTSC (high temperature superconductor) based sensor in conjunction with a microcomputer. The same sensor may be used for monitoring current in a circuit under the influence of a controlled magnetic field acting perpendicular to the direction of the current flow. The theoretical basis is discussed.

S. C. Kar; S. P. Basu

1992-01-01

402

Fall in Earth's magnetic field is erratic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Earth's magnetic field has decayed by about 5\\\\% per century since measurements began in 1840. Directional measurements predate those of intensity by more than 250 years, and we combined the global model of directions with paleomagnetic intensity measurements to estimate the fall in strength for this earlier period (1590 to 1840 A.D.). We found that magnetic field strength was nearly

David Gubbins; Adrian L. Jones; Christopher C. Finlay

2006-01-01

403

Interplanetary stream magnetism: Kinematic effects. [solar magnetic fields and wind  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The particle density, and the magnetic field intensity and direction are calculated in corotating streams of the solar wind, assuming that the solar wind velocity is constant and radial and that its azimuthal variations are not two rapid. The effects of the radial velocity profile in corotating streams on the magnetic fields were examined using kinematic approximation and a variety of field configurations on the inner boundary. Kinematic and dynamic effects are discussed.

Burlaga, L. F.; Barouch, E.

1974-01-01

404

Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole  

DOEpatents

Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis. 10 figs.

Tatchyn, R.O.

1997-01-21

405

Permanent magnet edge-field quadrupole  

DOEpatents

Planar permanent magnet edge-field quadrupoles for use in particle accelerating machines and in insertion devices designed to generate spontaneous or coherent radiation from moving charged particles are disclosed. The invention comprises four magnetized rectangular pieces of permanent magnet material with substantially similar dimensions arranged into two planar arrays situated to generate a field with a substantially dominant quadrupole component in regions close to the device axis.

Tatchyn, Roman O. (Mountain View, CA)

1997-01-01

406

Quenching of flames by magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experiment has been demonstrated to show a phenomenon involving quenching of candle flames using magnetic fields. An electromagnet with a pair of columnar magnetic poles in which inner sidepieces were hollowed out was used. Magnetic fields of 1.5 T at the brim gave a gradient of 50–300 T\\/m in the direction perpendicular to the pole axis when the distance

S. Ueno

1989-01-01

407

Alignment of magnetic uniaxial particles in a magnetic field: Simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The numerical investigations of the process of alignment of magnetically uniaxial Nd-Fe-B powders in an applied magnetic field were carried out using the discrete element method (DEM). It is shown that magnetic alignment of ensemble of spherical particles provides extremely high degree of alignment, which is achieved in low magnetic fields. A model of formation of anisotropic particles as a combination of spherical particles is suggested. The influence of the shape anisotropy and friction coefficient on the alignment degree was analyzed. The increase in the friction coefficient leads to a decrease in the alignment degree; the simulation results are in qualitative agreement with experimental dependences. It is shown that in magnetic fields higher than 5 T, the calculated field dependences of the alignment degree quantitatively render the experimental data. The increase of about 6% in the alignment degree in the experiments with addition of internal lubricant can be explained by the decrease of 14% in friction coefficient.

Golovnia, O. A.; Popov, A. G.; Sobolev, A. N.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

2014-09-01

408

In vivo heating of magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic field.  

PubMed

We have evaluated heating capabilities of new magnetic nanoparticles. In in vitro experiments they were exposed to an alternating magnetic field with frequency 3.5 MHz and induction 1.5 mT produced in three turn pancake coil. In in vivo experiments rats with injected magnetic nanoparticles were also exposed to an ac field. An optimal increase of temperature of the tumor to 44 degrees C was achieved after 10 minutes of exposure. Obtained results showed that magnetic nanoparticles may be easily heated in vitro as well as in vivo, and may be therefore useful for hyperthermic therapy of cancer. PMID:15377087

Babincová, M; Altanerová, V; Altaner, C; Cicmanec, P; Babinec, P

2004-08-01

409

Reionization constraints on primordial magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We study the impact of the extra density fluctuations induced by primordial magnetic fields on the reionization history in the redshift range: $6 magnetic fields (strength, $B_0$, and power-spectrum index $n_{\\scriptscriptstyle \\rm B}$), reionization, and $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. We find that magnetic field strengths in the range: $B_0 \\simeq 0.05{-}0.3$ nG (for nearly scale-free power spectra) can significantly alter the reionization history in the above redshift range and can relieve the tension between the WMAP and quasar absorption spectra data. Our analysis puts upper-limits on the magnetic field strength $B_0 magnetic field constraints among those available from other cosmological observables.

Pandey, Kanhaiya L; Sethi, Shiv K; Ferrara, Andrea

2014-01-01

410

Measurement of AC magnetic field distribution using magnetic resonance imaging.  

PubMed

Electric currents are applied to body in numerous applications in medicine such as electrical impedance tomography, cardiac defibrillation, electrocautery, and physiotherapy. If the magnetic field within a region is measured, the currents generating these fields can be calculated using the curl operator. In this study, magnetic fields generated within a phantom by currents passing through an external wire is measured using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. A pulse sequence that is originally designed for mapping static magnetic field inhomogeneity is adapted. AC current in the form of a burst sine wave is applied synchronously with the pulse sequence. The frequency of the applied current is in the audio range with an amplitude of 175-mA rms. It is shown that each voxel value of sequential images obtained by the proposed pulse sequence is modulated similar to a single tone broadband frequency modulated (FM) waveform with the ac magnetic field strength determining the modulation index. An algorithm is developed to calculate the ac magnetic field intensity at each voxel using the frequency spectrum of the voxel signal. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can be used to calculate ac magnetic field distribution within a conducting sample that is placed in an MRI system. PMID:9368117

Ider, Y Z; Muftuler, L T

1997-10-01

411

The Magnetic Field in the Solar Atmosphere  

E-print Network

This publication provides an overview of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere with the focus lying on the corona. The solar magnetic field couples the solar interior with the visible surface of the Sun and with its atmosphere. It is also responsible for all solar activity in its numerous manifestations. Thus, dynamic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections and flares are magnetically driven. In addition, the field also plays a crucial role in heating the solar chromosphere and corona as well as in accelerating the solar wind. Our main emphasis is the magnetic field in the upper solar atmosphere so that photospheric and chromospheric magnetic structures are mainly discussed where relevant for higher solar layers. Also, the discussion of the solar atmosphere and activity is limited to those topics of direct relevance to the magnetic field. After giving a brief overview about the solar magnetic field in general and its global structure, we discuss in more detail the magnetic field in active regions, the quie...

Wiegelmann, Thomas; Solanki, Sami K

2014-01-01

412

BRIEF COMMUNICATION A 7 Tesla fMRI Study of Amygdala Responses to Fearful Faces  

E-print Network

BRIEF COMMUNICATION A 7 Tesla fMRI Study of Amygdala Responses to Fearful Faces Wietske van der field strength. In this study, the feasibility of fMRI in the amygdalae at 7 Tesla was investigated in a fearful face depends on stimulus duration. Keywords Amygdala Á fMRI Á 7 Tesla Á Fear Á Face perception

Hadjikhani, Nouchine

413

Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields  

E-print Network

We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales, which rises the possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger proper time method.

Gabriella Piccinelli; Angel Sanchez; Alejandro Ayala; Ana Julia Mizher

2013-11-03

414

Gigantic Internal Magnetic Fields in Nanosize Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Their Effect on Dark Exciton Recombintion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interaction of electron and hole spins with the spins of paramagnetic centers and the atomic nuclei is usually negligibly weak in bulk semiconductors because it is a contact interaction. However, in nanosize quantum dots this interaction, proportional to the square of the electron and hole wave functions at the nuclear or paramagnetic center position, grows dramatically, as the inverse of the volume of the quantum dot. As a result fluctuations of the effective random magnetic field of the nuclei acting on the electron spin can reach several Tesla, and in a crystal with a paramagnetic center this field can be several hundred Tesla. This field may be responsible for the radiative recombination of the optically forbidden Dark Exciton and for the temperature dependent Stokes shift observed in CdSe quantum dots in the 1.4 to 15 K region. Conversely, the electron and hole spins strongly affect the spins of the nuclei and paramagnetic defects as the inverse cube of the dot radius. This should lead to their coalignment and to a large NMR Knight shift in optically excited quantum dots.

Efros, Al. L.; Rosen, M.; Nirmal, M.; Bawendi, M. G.

1996-03-01

415

Bending of magnetic filaments under a magnetic field.  

PubMed

Magnetic beads and superparamagnetic (SP) colloid particles have successfully been employed for micromechanical manipulation of soft material, in situ probing of elastic properties, and design of smart materials (ferrogels). Here we derive analytical expressions for the equilibrium shape of magnetic fibers, considering two end-member cases, (a) SP or single-domain particles concentrated at the free end of cantilevered rods or tubes, and (b) filaments consisting of SP particles, with this case being mathematically equivalent to tubes containing SP particles. Our analysis yields also metastable equilibrium states (MES's), which only exist above a critical filament length, but become more stable with increasing magnetic field. The MES's for case (a) are, like the ground state, circular arcs, but more strongly bent. The multiform MES's in case (b), which comprise hairpin, sinuous, or even closed shapes, have recently been observed in experiments, too. We also study the effect of gravity on the balance between bending and magnetic energy, which leads to curves with inflection point if the influence of gravity is stronger than that of the magnetic field. Because of their simple experimental realization, case (a) magnetic filaments are deemed highly suitable for micromechanical experiments on long chains of polymer molecules. Another potential application of cantilevered magnetic filaments with magnetic material attached to the free end is in scanning probe microscopes. Because the magnetic field due to the magnetic tip is comparatively weak, the magnetization structure of the sample to be investigated would not be affected by the probe. Thus, for the examination of magnetically soft materials, probes in the form of magnetic filaments may hold advantages over tips usually employed in magnetic force microscopy. PMID:15697393

Shcherbakov, Valera P; Winklhofer, Michael

2004-12-01

416

‘Clean’ observations of magnetic field fluctuations on planetary surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic field measurements on planetary surfaces are disturbed by various internal and external sources. We discuss methods to reduce their influence on the quality of magnetic field experiments aboard surface stations. Our major emphasis is on terrestrial seismo-magnetic measurements, but magnetic cleanliness procedures for the ROSETTA lander magnetic field experiment is discussed too. We consider not only disturbing magnetic field

K. Schwingenschuh; G. Prattes; M. Delva; H. U. Eichelberger; G. Berghofer; W. Magnes; M. Vellante; P. Nenovski; V. Wesztergom; H. U. Auster; K.-H. Fornacon

2012-01-01

417

Casimir effect in external magnetic field  

E-print Network

In this paper we examine the Casimir effect for charged fields in presence of external magnetic field. We consider scalar field (connected with spinless particles) and the Dirac field (connected with 1/2-spin particles). In both cases we describe quantum field using the canonical formalism. We obtain vacuum energy by direct solving field equations and using the mode summation method. In order to compute the renormalized vacuum energy we use the Abel-Plana formula.

Marcin Ostrowski

2005-04-13

418

Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.  

PubMed

The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985. PMID:23787954

Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

2014-04-01

419

Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons  

E-print Network

Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

2013-01-01

420

Origin of magnetic fields in galaxies  

SciTech Connect

Microgauss magnetic fields are observed in all galaxies at low and high redshifts. The origin of these intense magnetic fields is a challenging question in astrophysics. We show here that the natural plasma fluctuations in the primordial Universe (assumed to be random), predicted by the fluctuation -dissipation theorem, predicts {approx}0.034 {mu}G fields over {approx}0.3 kpc regions in galaxies. If the dipole magnetic fields predicted by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem are not completely random, microgauss fields over regions > or approx. 0.34 kpc are easily obtained. The model is thus a strong candidate for resolving the problem of the origin of magnetic fields in < or approx. 10{sup 9} years in high redshift galaxies.

Souza, Rafael S. de; Opher, Reuven [IAG, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-03-15

421

Modeling solar force-free magnetic fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A class of nonlinear force-free magnetic fields is presented, described in terms of the solutions to a second-order, nonlinear ordinary differential equation. These magnetic fields are three-dimensional, filling the infinite half-space above a plane where the lines of force are anchored. They model the magnetic fields of the sun over active regions with a striking geometric realism. The total energy and the free energy associated with the electric current are finite and can be calculated directly from the magnetic field at the plane boundary using the virial theorem. In the study of solar magnetic fields with data from vector magnetographs, there is a long-standing interest in devising algorithms to extrapolate for the force-free magnetic field in a given domain from prescribed field values at the boundary. The closed-form magnetic fields of this paper open up an opportunity for testing the reliability and accuracy of algorithms that claim the capability of performing this extrapolation. The extrapolation procedure as an ill-posed mathematical problem is discussed.

Low, B. C.; Lou, Y. Q.

1990-03-01

422

Magnetic-field-controlled reconfigurable semiconductor logic.  

PubMed

Logic devices based on magnetism show promise for increasing computational efficiency while decreasing consumed power. They offer zero quiescent power and yet combine novel functions such as programmable logic operation and non-volatile built-in memory. However, practical efforts to adapt a magnetic device to logic suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio and other performance attributes that are not adequate for logic gates. Rather than exploiting magnetoresistive effects that result from spin-dependent transport of carriers, we have approached the development of a magnetic logic device in a different way: we use the phenomenon of large magnetoresistance found in non-magnetic semiconductors in high electric fields. Here we report a device showing a strong diode characteristic that is highly sensitive to both the sign and the magnitude of an external magnetic field, offering a reversible change between two different characteristic states by the application of a magnetic field. This feature results from magnetic control of carrier generation and recombination in an InSb p-n bilayer channel. Simple circuits combining such elementary devices are fabricated and tested, and Boolean logic functions including AND, OR, NAND and NOR are performed. They are programmed dynamically by external electric or magnetic signals, demonstrating magnetic-field-controlled semiconductor reconfigurable logic at room temperature. This magnetic technology permits a new kind of spintronic device, characterized as a current switch rather than a voltage switch, and provides a simple and compact platform for non-volatile reconfigurable logic devices. PMID:23364687

Joo, Sungjung; Kim, Taeyueb; Shin, Sang Hoon; Lim, Ju Young; Hong, Jinki; Song, Jin Dong; Chang, Joonyeon; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Rhie, Kungwon; Han, Suk Hee; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Johnson, Mark

2013-02-01

423

T2 Relaxometry Using 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain in Early- and Late-Onset Restless Legs Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background and Purpose Previous T2 relaxometry studies have provided evidence for regional brain iron deficiency in patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS). Measurement of the iron content in several brain regions, and in particular the substantia nigra (SN), in early- and late-onset RLS patients using T2 relaxometry have yielded inconsistent results. In this study the regional iron content was assessed in patients with early- and late-onset RLS using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and compared the results with those in controls. Methods Thirty-seven patients with idiopathic RLS (20 with early onset and 17 with late onset) and 40 control subjects were studied using a 3.0-tesla MRI with a gradient-echo sampling of free induction decay and echo pulse sequence. The regions of interest in the brain were measured independently by two trained analysts using software known as medical image processing, analysis, and visualization. The results were compared and a correlation analysis was conducted to investigate which brain areas were related to RLS clinical variables. Results The iron index in the SN was significantly lower in patients with late-onset RLS than in controls (p=0.034), while in patients with early-onset RLS there was no significant difference. There was no significant correlation between the SN iron index of the late-onset RLS group and clinical variables such as disease severity. Conclusions Late-onset RLS is associated with decreased iron content in the SN. This finding supports the hypothesis that regional brain iron deficiency plays a role in the pathophysiology of late-onset RLS. PMID:25045371

Moon, Hye-Jin; Chang, Yongmin; Lee, Yeong Seon; Song, Hee Jin; Chang, Hyuk Won; Ku, Jeonghun

2014-01-01

424

NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSSPRING EDITION VOLUME 13 N0. 2 2006  

E-print Network

read about the 35 tesla world record for our Florida-Bitter DC magnet technology. I highlight here what technology is on the march. This issue highlights recent developments in NMR spectroscopy: using quadrupolar is perhaps the heaviest magnet technology news of all: the lifting of a nine-ton outsert magnet into its

Weston, Ken

425

The Measurement of Magnetic Fields  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses five experimental methods used by senior high school students to provide an accurate calibration curve of magnet current against the magnetic flux density produced by an electromagnet. Compares the relative merits of the five methods, both as measurements and from an educational viewpoint. (JR)

Berridge, H. J. J.

1973-01-01

426

QCD vacuum structure in strong magnetic fields  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the response of the QCD vacuum to strong magnetic fields, using a potential model for the quark-antiquark interaction. We find that production of spin-polarized u¯ u pairs is energetically favorable for fields B > Bcrit ? 10 GeV2. We contrast the resulting uu condensate with the quark condensate which is present at zero magnetic field, and we estimate

Daniel Kabata; Kimyeong Leea; Erick Weinberg

427

Ohm's law for mean magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic fields associated with plasmas frequently exhibit small amplitude MHD fluctuations. It is useful to have equations for the magnetic field averaged over these fluctuations, the so-called mean field equations. Under very general assumptions it is shown that the effect of MHD fluctuations on a force-free plasma can be represented by one parameter in Ohm's law, which is effectively the coefficient of electric current viscosity.

Boozer, A.H.

1986-05-01

428

An Extraordinary Magnetic Field Map of Mars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft has completed two Mars years in nearly circular polar orbit at a nominal altitude of 400 km. The Mars crust is at least an order of magnitude more intensely magnetized than that of the Earth [1], and intriguing in both its global distribution and geometric properties [2,3]. Measurements of the vector magnetic field have been used to map the magnetic field of crustal origin to high accuracy [4]. We present here a new map of the magnetic field with an order of magnitude increased sensitivity to crustal magnetization. The map is assembled from > 2 full years of MGS night-side observations, and uses along-track filtering to greatly reduce noise due to external field variations.

Connerney, J. E. P.; Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lin, R. P.

2004-01-01

429

Ultrafast heating and magnetic switching with weak external magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The TbFeCo magneto-optical media with the coercivity of bigger than 1.0 kOe are used for the investigation of ultrafast heating and magnetic switching with the weak external magnetic field. It has been found that the laser-induced active region becomes larger with an external magnetic field because the boundary of the active region is magnetized with the assistance of the external field during the ultrafast heating. According to this physical phenomenon, the so called "mark expansion method" has been proposed for visual observation of ultrafast switching marks. Using this method, the ultrafast magnetic switching in TbFeCo media has been studied using 40 fs laser pulse with linear polarization. The result shows that the ultrafast magnetic switching can be implemented by the laser pulse with assistance of the weak external field of about 0.7 kOe. Further studies show that the area percentage of the magnetic mark expansion relative to its thermal mark decreases with the increasing of the laser pulse energy. There exists the threshold pulse energy that the active region is fully magnetized. The theoretical analysis of electron, spin, and lattice temperatures has been conducted to the active region of the media where the maximum spin temperature is close to the Curie temperature of the media. The result indicates that the media become active at 4.137 ps and the ultrafast heating plays a key role for the ultrafast magnetic switching. The weak external magnetic field provides sufficient driving force to control the magnetization direction in the media.

Li, J. M.; Xu, B. X.; Zhang, J.; Ye, K. D.

2013-01-01

430

Tuning permanent magnets with adjustable field clamps  

SciTech Connect

The effective length of a permanent-magnet assembly can be varied by adjusting the geometrical parameters of a field clamp. This paper presents measurements on a representative dipole and quadrupole as the field clamp is withdrawn axially or radially. The detailed behavior depends upon the magnet multipolarity and geometry. As a rule-of-thumb, a 3-mm-thick iron plate placed at one end plane of the magnet will shorten the length by one-third of the magnet bore radius.

Schermer, R.I.

1987-01-01

431

Particle Transport in Therapeutic Magnetic Fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles, in ferrofluids or as magnetic microspheres, offer magnetic maneuverability, biochemical surface functionalization, and magnetic relaxation under the influence of an alternating field. The use of these properties for clinical applications requires an understanding of particles, forces, and scalar transport at various length scales. This review explains the behavior of magnetic nano- and microparticles during magnetic drug targeting and magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and the microfluidic transport of these particles in bioMEMS (biomedical microelectromechanical systems) devices for ex vivo therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Magnetic particle transport, the momentum interaction of these particles with a host fluid in a flow, and thermal transport in a particle-infused tissue are characterized through the governing electrodynamic, hydrodynamic, and scalar transport equations.

Puri, Ishwar K.; Ganguly, Ranjan

2014-01-01

432

TESLA REPORT 2006-02 TESLA THESIS 2006-003  

E-print Network

TESLA REPORT 2006-02 TESLA THESIS 2006-003 WARSAW UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY Faculty of Electronics and Information Technology Institute of Electronic Systems Krzysztof Kamil Korzunowicz 185691 Bachelor of Science, quickly and cheaply evaluate the doses of neutrons and gammas in the Tesla Test Facility (TTF) tunnel

433

Magnetization, Low Field Instability and Quench of RHQT Nb(3)Al Strands  

SciTech Connect

Since 2005, we made and tested three RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, one with Nb matrix and two with Ta matrix, which are fully stabilized with Cu electroplating. We observed anomalously large magnetization curves extending beyond 1 to 1.5 Tesla with the F1 Nb matrix strand at 4.2 K, when we measured its magnetization with a balanced coil magnetometer. This problem was eliminated with the Ta matrix strands operating at 4.2 K. But with these strands a similar but smaller anomalous magnetization was observed at 1.9 K. We studied these phenomena with FEM. With the F1 Nb matrix strand, it is explained that at low external field, inter-filamentary coupling currents in the outer layers of sub-elements create a shielding effect. It reduces the inside field, keeps the inside Nb matrix superconductive, and stands against a higher outside field beyond the Hc of Nb. At an even higher external field, the superconductivity of the whole Nb matrix collapses and releases a large amount of energy, which may cause a big quench. Depending on the size of the energy in the strand or the cable, a magnet could quench, causing the low field instability. Some attempt to analyze the anomaly with FEM is presented.

Yamada, R.; Wake, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Velev, V.; /Fermilab

2009-01-01

434

The CMS Magnetic Field Map Performance  

E-print Network

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general-purpose detector designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive featuresinclude a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6 m diameter by 12.5 m long free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. During two major tests of the CMS magnet the magnetic flux density was measured inside the coil in a cylinder of 3.448 m diameter and 7 m length with a specially designed field-mapping pneumatic machine as well as in 140 discrete regions of the CMS yoke with NMR probes, 3-D Hall sensors and flux-loops. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet has been developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. A volume based representation of the magnetic field is used to provide the CMS simulation and reconstruction software with the magnetic field values. The value of the field at a given point of a volume is obtained by interpolation from a regular grid of values resulting from a TOSCA calculation or, when available, from a parameterization. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; V. Andreev; A. Ball; B. Curé; A. Hervé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; V. Karimaki; R. Loveless; M. Mulders; S. Popescu; L. I. Sarycheva; T. Virdee

2011-10-04

435

Prediction of DC magnetic fields for magnetic cleanliness on spacecraft  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetometry is among the most used techniques in space exploration, e.g. to study complex plasma interactions between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere, to map the planetary or interplanetary magnetic fields, or to retrieve information about the structural composition of planets. The success of each mission relies on the attainment of an adequate level of magnetic cleanliness at the

Axel Junge; Filippo Marliani

2011-01-01

436

Magnetic reconnection at the edge of Uranus's magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new modeling study sheds light on how the magnetosphere of Uranus compares to those of other planets. Magnetospheres around the inner planets Mercury and Earth are primarily driven by the solar wind—the charged particles spewed out from the Sun—through magnetic reconnection, in which the planet's magnetic field lines break and reconnect, releasing energy in the process.

Balcerak, Ernie

2014-09-01

437

Magnetic field induced transition in vanadium spinels.  

PubMed

We study vanadium spinels AV2O4 (A = Cd,Mg) in pulsed magnetic fields up to 65 T. A jump in magnetization at ?0H?40??T is observed in the single-crystal MgV2O4, indicating a field induced quantum phase transition between two distinct magnetic orders. In the multiferroic CdV2O4, the field induced transition is accompanied by a suppression of the electric polarization. By modeling the magnetic properties in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling characteristic of vanadium spinels, we show that both features of the field induced transition can be successfully explained by including the effects of the local trigonal crystal field. PMID:24483929

Mun, E D; Chern, Gia-Wei; Pardo, V; Rivadulla, F; Sinclair, R; Zhou, H D; Zapf, V S; Batista, C D

2014-01-10

438

Velocity-Magnetic Field Correlation of Pulsars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monte Carlo simulations of the evolution of pulsars are carried out in order to compare with the recent measurement of the pulsar transverse velocity by Lyne & Lorimer (1994). The new electron density distribution model of Taylor & Cordes (1993) is adopted in the simulation. Accurate pulsar o rbits in the Galactic gravitational field are calculated. It is found that the constant magnetic field model of pulsars can account for the new measurement of the pulsar transverse velocity, and the apparent correlat ion between the strength of the magnetic field and the transverse velocity of the pulsars. The present finding confirms the validity of the constant magnetic field model of pulsars, and consolidates the idea that the app arent correlation between the strength of the magnetic field and the transverse velocity of the pulsars is cau sed by observational selection effects.

Itoh, N.; Kotouda, T.

439

ASYMMETRIC DIFFUSION OF MAGNETIC FIELD LINES  

SciTech Connect

Stochasticity of magnetic field lines is important for particle transport properties. Magnetic field lines separate faster than diffusively in turbulent plasma, which is called superdiffusion. We discovered that this superdiffusion is pronouncedly asymmetric, so that the separation of field lines along the magnetic field direction is different from the separation in the opposite direction. While the symmetry of the flow is broken by the so-called imbalance or cross-helicity, the difference between forward and backward diffusion is not directly due to imbalance, but a non-trivial consequence of both imbalance and non-reversibility of turbulence. The asymmetric diffusion perpendicular to the mean magnetic field entails a variety of new physical phenomena, such as the production of parallel particle streaming in the presence of perpendicular particle gradients. Such streaming and associated instabilities could be significant for particle transport in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

Beresnyak, Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-04-20

440

Normal glow discharge in axial magnetic field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theory and results of mathematical modeling of a glow discharge in a parallel-plate configuration with axial magnetic field is presented. The model consists of continuity equations for electron and ion fluids, the Poisson equation for the self-consistent electric field. Numerical simulation results are presented for two-dimensional glow discharge at various initial conditions. The results are obtained for molecular nitrogen at pressure 1–5 Torr, emf of power supply 1–2 kV, and magnetic field induction B = 0–0.5 T. It is shown that in the presence of the axial magnetic field the glow discharge is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Nevertheless it is shown that in the in