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Sample records for tesla magnetic field

  1. Nikola Tesla: the man behind the magnetic field unit.

    PubMed

    Roguin, Ariel

    2004-03-01

    The magnetic field strength of both the magnet and gradient coils used in MR imaging equipment is measured in Tesla units, which are named for Nikola Tesla. This article presents the life and achievements of this Serbian-American inventor and researcher who discovered the rotating magnetic field, the basis of most alternating-current machinery. Nikola Tesla had 700 patents in the United States and Europe that covered every aspect of science and technology. Tesla's discoveries include the Tesla coil, AC electrical conduction, improved lighting, newer forms of turbine engines, robotics, fluorescent light, wireless transmission of electrical energy, radio, remote control, discovery of cosmic radio waves, and the use of the ionosphere for scientific purposes. He was a genius whose discoveries had a pivotal role in advancing us into the modern era. PMID:14994307

  2. Field quality measurements of a 2-Tesla transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Velev, G.V.; Foster, W.; Kashikhin, V.; Mazur, P.; Oleck, A.; Piekarz, H.; Schlabach, P.; Sylvester, C.; Wake, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    A prototype 2-Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet for future hadron colliders was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, combined-function gradient-dipole magnet has a vertical pole aperture of 20 mm. To measure the magnetic field quality in such a small magnet aperture, a specialized rotating coil of 15.2 mm diameter, 0.69 m long was fabricated. Using this probe, a program of magnetic field quality measurements was successfully performed. Results of the measurements are presented and discussed.

  3. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L.; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J.; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A.; Aldeborgh, Hannah N.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting 13C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  4. Sampling Hyperpolarized Molecules Utilizing a 1 Tesla Permanent Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Tee, Sui Seng; DiGialleonardo, Valentina; Eskandari, Roozbeh; Jeong, Sangmoo; Granlund, Kristin L; Miloushev, Vesselin; Poot, Alex J; Truong, Steven; Alvarez, Julio A; Aldeborgh, Hannah N; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HP MRS) using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a technique that has greatly enhanced the sensitivity of detecting (13)C nuclei. However, the HP MRS polarization decays in the liquid state according to the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the nucleus. Sampling of the signal also destroys polarization, resulting in a limited temporal ability to observe biologically interesting reactions. In this study, we demonstrate that sampling hyperpolarized signals using a permanent magnet at 1 Tesla (1T) is a simple and cost-effective method to increase T1s without sacrificing signal-to-noise. Biologically-relevant information may be obtained with a permanent magnet using enzyme solutions and in whole cells. Of significance, our findings indicate that changes in pyruvate metabolism can also be quantified in a xenograft model at this field strength. PMID:27597137

  5. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. PMID:23763334

  6. Optical Signatures from Magnetic 2-D Electron Gases in High Magnetic Fields to 60 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, S.A.; Kikkawa, J.M.; Awschalom, D.D.; Smorchikova, I.P.; Samarth, N.

    1998-11-08

    We present experiments in the 60 Tesla Long-Pulse magnet at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Lab (NHMFL) focusing on the high-field, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) from modulation-doped ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se single quantum wells. High-speed charge-coupled array detectors and the long (2 second) duration of the magnet pulse permit continuous acquisition of optical spectra throughout a single magnet shot. High-field PL studies of the magnetic 2D electron gases at temperatures down to 350mK reveal clear intensity oscillations corresponding to integer quantum Hall filling factors, from which we determine the density of the electron gas. At very high magnetic fields, steps in the PL energy are observed which correspond to the partial unlocking of antiferromagnetically bound pairs of Mn2+ spins.

  7. Tuning magnetic disorder in diluted magnetic semiconductors using high fields to 89 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Crooker, Scott A; Samarth, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    We describe recent and ongoing studies at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos using the new '100 Tesla Multi-Shot Magnet', which is presently delivering fields up to {approx}89 T during its commissioning. We discuss the first experiments performed in this magnet system, wherein the linewidth of low-temperature photoluminescence spectra was used to directly reveal the degree of magnetic alloy disorder 'seen' by excitons in single Zn{sub 0.80}Cd{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.08}Se quantum wells. The magnetic potential landscape in II-VI diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is typically smoothed when the embedded Mn{sup 2+} spins align in an applied field. However, an important (but heretofore untested) prediction of current models of compositional disorder is that magnetic alloy fluctuations in many DMS compounds should increase again in very large magnetic fields approaching 100 T. We observed precisely this increase above {approx}70 T, in agreement with a simple model of magnetic alloy disorder.

  8. A high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet instrument for single-crystal scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo; Lang, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    Pulsed magnets have emerged as a viable approach at synchrotron x-ray facilities for studying materials in high magnetic fields. We are developing a new high-field (30 Tesla) pulsed magnet system for single-crystal x-ray diffraction studies. It consists of a single 18mm-bore solenoid, designed and built at Tohoku University using high-tensile-strength and high conductivity CuAg wires. A dual-cryostat scheme has been developed at Advanced Photon Source in order to cool the coil using liquid nitrogen and the sample using a closed-cycle cryostat independently. Liquid nitrogen cooling allows repetition rate of a few minutes for peak fields near 30 Tesla. This scheme is unique in that it allows the applied magnetic field to be parallel to the scattering plane. Time-resolved scattering data are typically collected using a fast one-dimensional strip detector. Opportunities and challenges for experiments and instrumentation will be discussed.

  9. Sub-tesla-field magnetization of vibrated magnetic nanoreagents for screening tumor markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chieh, Jen-Jie; Huang, Kai-Wen; Shi, Jin-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic nanoreagents (MNRs), consisting of liquid solutions and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with bioprobes, have been widely used in biomedical disciplines. For in vitro tests of serum biomarkers, numerous MNR-based magnetic immunoassay methods or schemes have been developed; however, their applications are limited. In this study, a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for screening tumor biomarkers based on the same MNRs as those used in other immunoassay methods. The examination mechanism is that examined tumor biomarkers are typically conjugated to the bioprobes coated on MNPs to form magnetic clusters. Consequently, the sub-Tesla-field magnetization (Msub-T) of MNRs, including magnetic clusters, exceeds that of MNRs containing only separate MNPs. For human serum samples, proteins other than the targeted biomarkers induce the formation of magnetic clusters with increased Msub-T because of weak nonspecific binding. In this study, this interference problem was suppressed by the vibration condition in the VSM and analysis. Based on a referenced Msub-T,0 value defined by the average Msub-T value of a normal person's serum samples, including general proteins and few tumor biomarkers, the difference ΔMsub-T between the measured Msub-T and the reference Msub-T,0 determined the expression of only target tumor biomarkers in the tested serum samples. By using common MNRs with an alpha-fetoprotein-antibody coating, this study demonstrated that a current VSM can perform clinical screening of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  10. A 0.5 Tesla Transverse-Field Alternating Magnetic Field Demagnetizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillinger, W. E.; Morris, E. R.; Finn, D. R.; Coe, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    We have built an alternating field demagnetizer that can routinely achieve a maximum field of 0.5 Tesla. It uses an amorphous magnetic core with an air-cooled coil. We have started with a 0.5 T design, which satisfies most of our immediate needs, but we can certainly achieve higher fields. In our design, the magnetic field is transverse to the bore and uniform to 1% over a standard (25 mm) paleomagnetic sample. It is powered by a 1 kW power amplifier and is compatible with our existing sample handler for automated demagnetization and measurement (Morris et al., 2009). It's much higher peak field has enabled us to completely demagnetize many of the samples that previously we could not with commercial equipment. This capability is especially needed for high-coercivity sedimentary and igneous rocks that contain magnetic minerals that alter during thermal demagnetization. It will also enable detailed automated demagnetization of high coercivity phases in extraterrestrial samples, such as native iron, iron-alloy and sulfide minerals that are common in lunar rocks and meteorites. Furthermore, it has opened the door for us to use the rock-magnetic technique of component analysis, using coercivity distributions derived from very detailed AF demagnetization of NRM and remanence produced in the laboratory to characterize the magnetic mineralogy of sedimentary rocks. In addition to the many benefits this instrument has brought to our own research, a much broader potential impact is to replace the transverse coils in automated AF demagnetization systems, which typically are limited to peak fields around 0.1 T.

  11. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challa, Pavan K.; Curtiss, O.; Williams, J. C.; Twieg, R.; Toth, J.; McGill, S.; Jákli, A.; Gleeson, J. T.; Sprunt, S. N.

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (QαβBαBβ) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field.

  12. Light scattering from liquid crystal director fluctuations in steady magnetic fields up to 25 tesla.

    PubMed

    Challa, Pavan K; Curtiss, O; Williams, J C; Twieg, R; Toth, J; McGill, S; Jákli, A; Gleeson, J T; Sprunt, S N

    2012-07-01

    We report on homodyne dynamic light scattering measurements of orientational fluctuation modes in both calamitic and bent-core nematic liquid crystals, carried out in the new split-helix resistive magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. The relaxation rate and inverse scattered intensity of director fluctuations exhibit a linear dependence on field-squared up to 25 tesla, which is consistent with strictly lowest order coupling of the tensor order parameter Q to field (Q(αβ)B(α)B(β)) in the nematic free energy. However, we also observe evidence of field dependence of certain nematic material parameters, an effect which may be expected from the mean field scaling of these quantities with the magnitude of Q and the predicted variation of Q with field. PMID:23005438

  13. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets. PMID:23252846

  14. Impairment of chondrocyte biosynthetic activity by exposure to 3-tesla high-field magnetic resonance imaging is temporary.

    PubMed

    Sunk, Ilse-Gerlinde; Trattnig, Siegfried; Graninger, Winfried B; Amoyo, Love; Tuerk, Birgit; Steiner, Carl-Walter; Smolen, Josef S; Bobacz, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The influence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices at high field strengths on living tissues is unknown. We investigated the effects of a 3-tesla electromagnetic field (EMF) on the biosynthetic activity of bovine articular cartilage. Bovine articular cartilage was obtained from juvenile and adult animals. Whole joints or cartilage explants were subjected to a pulsed 3-tesla EMF; controls were left unexposed. Synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs) was measured by using [35S]sulfate incorporation; mRNA encoding the cartilage markers aggrecan and type II collagen, as well as IL-1beta, were analyzed by RT-PCR. Furthermore, effects of the 3-tesla EMF were determined over the course of time directly after exposure (day 0) and at days 3 and 6. In addition, the influence of a 1.5-tesla EMF on cartilage sGAG synthesis was evaluated. Chondrocyte cell death was assessed by staining with Annexin V and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Exposure to the EMF resulted in a significant decrease in cartilage macromolecule synthesis. Gene expression of both aggrecan and IL-1beta, but not of collagen type II, was reduced in comparison with controls. Staining with Annexin V and TUNEL revealed no evidence of cell death. Interestingly, chondrocytes regained their biosynthetic activity within 3 days after exposure, as shown by proteoglycan synthesis rate and mRNA expression levels. Cartilage samples exposed to a 1.5-tesla EMF remained unaffected. Although MRI devices with a field strength of more than 1.5 T provide a better signal-to-noise ratio and thereby higher spatial resolution, their high field strength impairs the biosynthetic activity of articular chondrocytes in vitro. Although this decrease in biosynthetic activity seems to be transient, articular cartilage exposed to high-energy EMF may become vulnerable to damage. PMID:16831232

  15. Thirteen Tesla magnet constructed with MJR wire

    SciTech Connect

    Siddall, M.; Efferson, K.; Mcdonald, W.

    1983-05-01

    The authors have constructed an insert booster superconducting magnet of 20 mm clear bore and outside diameter of 100 mm and height 130 mm, wound and reacted from the Teledyne patented foraminous layered foil (jelly roll) wire fabricated by low cost, non-rebundled reduction to wire. This magnet was placed inside the 101 mm bore of a NbTi wound solenoid which was operated at 8.5 Tesla. The total field achieved was 13.0 Tesla with no training quench observed; although training was initially observed when the magnet was first tested alone up to 4.6 Tesla at American Magnets, Inc. (AMI). The magnet winding techniques utilize Airco's fiberglass type wire insulation, an AMI proprietary cement, argon atmosphere 700/sup 0/C for 100 hour reaction, followed by a postreaction potting impregnation. The MJR wire lot used (M22) was short sample tested and the Ln (J /SUB c/ ) -vs-H line intersected the insert magnet operating curve at 13.5 Tesla. The wire lot used has a 34 volume % copper external sheath for quench protection. The wire was fabricated with 15.4 volume % niobium and bronze/niobium ratio of 3.0 with 13.% Sn bronze.

  16. Magnetic field measurements of a clinical MR imager at 1.5 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhech, A.; Tellez, I.; Esteva, M.; Marrufo, O.; Jimenez, L.; Vazquez, F.; Taboada, J.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical environment is mandatory to run periodically measurements of uniformity of the magnetic field produced by the magnet to assure good image quality. The phase difference method was used to measure the magnetic field uniformity of the 1.5 T scanner of the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia MVS. The uniformity field values showed that the imager performance is reasonably good for clinical imaging. Some concern was raised since results may not be good enough for magnetic resonance spectroscopy runs.

  17. Orientational control of block copolymer microdomains by sub-tesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinadhan, Manesh; Choo, Youngwoo; Feng, Xunda; Kawabata, Kohsuke; di, Xiaojun; Osuji, Chinedum

    Magnetic fields offer a versatile approach to controlling the orientation of block copolymer (BCP) microdomains during self-assembly. To date however, such control has required the imposition of large magnetic fields (>3T), necessitating the use of complex magnet systems - either superconducting or very large conventional resistive magnets. Here we demonstrate the ability to direct BCP self-assembly using considerably smaller fields (<1T) which are accessible using simple rare-earth permanent magnets. The low field alignment is enabled by the presence of small quantities of mesogenic species that are blended into, and co-assemble with the liquid crystalline (LC) mesophase of the side-chain LC BCP under study. In situ SAXS experiments reveal a pronounced dependence of the critical alignment field strength on the stoichiometry of the blend, and the ability to generate aligned microdomains with orientational distribution coefficients exceeding 0.95 at sub-1 T fields for appropriate stoichiometries. The alignment response overall can be rationalized in terms of increased mobility and grain size due to the presence of the mesogenic additive. We use a permanent magnet to fabricate films with aligned nanopores, and the utility of this approach to generate complex BCP microdomain patterns in thin films by local field screening are highlighted. NSF DMR-1410568 and DMR-0847534.

  18. Generating Long Scale-Length Plasma Jets Embedded in a Uniform, Multi-Tesla Magnetic-Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, Mario; Kuranz, Carolyn; Rasmus, Alex; Klein, Sallee; Fein, Jeff; Belancourt, Patrick; Drake, R. P.; Pollock, Brad; Hazi, Andrew; Park, Jaebum; Williams, Jackson; Chen, Hui

    2013-10-01

    Collimated plasma jets emerge in many classes of astrophysical objects and are of great interest to explore in the laboratory. In many cases, these astrophysical jets exist within a background magnetic field where the magnetic pressure approaches the plasma pressure. Recent experiments performed at the Jupiter Laser Facility utilized a custom-designed solenoid to generate the multi-tesla fields necessary to achieve proper magnetization of the plasma. Time-gated interferometry, Schlieren imaging, and proton radiography were used to characterize jet evolution and collimation under varying degrees of magnetization. Experimental results will be presented and discussed. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-NA0001840, by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850, by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC, grant number DEFC52-08NA28616, and by NASA through Einstein Postdoctoral Fellowship grant number PF3-140111 awarded by the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  19. Phase modulated magnetoelectric delta-E effect sensor for sub-nano tesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, S.; Kirchhof, C.; Yarar, E.; Meyners, D.; Quandt, E.; Faupel, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a resonant micromechanical magnetic field sensor, which utilizes the magnetically induced change in elastic modulus, i.e., the delta-E effect. The sensor is based on magnetoelectric thin film composites, resulting in high sensitivity at room temperature and at low frequencies. The cantilever is electrically excited and read out by a 2 μm AlN piezoelectric layer. Depending on its magnetization, the 2 μm thin film of amorphous (Fe90Co10)78Si12B10 changes its elasticity, which results in a shift of the cantilever's resonance frequency. The sensor is operated in the first or second transversal bending mode at 7.6 kHz or 47.4 kHz. With a limit of detection of 140 pTHz-0.5 at 20 Hz under a magnetic bias field and 1 nTHz-0.5 without external bias field, this sensor exceeds all comparable designs by one order of magnitude.

  20. Direct measurement of kilo-tesla level magnetic field generated with laser-driven capacitor-coil target by proton deflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, K. F. F.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Morace, A.; Sakata, S.; Matsuo, K.; Kojima, S.; Lee, S.; Vaisseau, X.; Arikawa, Y.; Yogo, A.; Kondo, K.; Zhang, Z.; Bellei, C.; Santos, J. J.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.

    2016-02-01

    A kilo-tesla level, quasi-static magnetic field (B-field), which is generated with an intense laser-driven capacitor-coil target, was measured by proton deflectometry with a proper plasma shielding. Proton deflectometry is a direct and reliable method to diagnose strong, mm3-scale laser-produced B-field; however, this was not successful in the previous experiment. A target-normal-sheath-accelerated proton beam is deflected by Lorentz force in the laser-produced magnetic field with the resulting deflection pattern recorded on a radiochromic film stack. A 610 ± 30 T of B-field amplitude was inferred by comparing the experimental proton pattern with Monte-Carlo calculations. The amplitude and temporal evolutions of the laser-generated B-field were also measured by a differential magnetic probe, independently confirming the proton deflectometry measurement results.

  1. Aging and magnetism: Presenting a possible new holistic paradigm for ameliorating the aging process and the effects thereof, through externally applied physiologic PicoTesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Jerry; Sherlag, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    A new holistic paradigm is proposed for slowing our genomic-based biological clocks (e.g. regulation of telomere length), and decreasing heat energy exigencies for maintenance of physiologic homeostasis. Aging is considered the result of a progressive slow burn in small volumes of tissues with increase in the quantum entropic states; producing desiccation, microscopic scarring, and disruption of cooperative coherent states. Based upon piezoelectricity, i.e. photon-phonon transductions, physiologic PicoTesla range magnetic fields may decrease the production of excessive heat energy through target specific, bio molecular resonant interactions, renormalization of intrinsic electromagnetic tissue profiles, and autonomic modulation. Prospectively, we hypothesize that deleterious effects of physical trauma, immunogenic microbiological agents, stress, and anxiety may be ameliorated. A particle-wave equation is cited to ascertain magnetic field parameters for application to the whole organism thereby achieving desired homeostasis; secondary to restoration of structure and function on quantum levels. We hypothesize that it is at the atomic level that physical events shape the flow of signals and the transmission of energy in bio molecular systems. References are made to experimental data indicating the aspecific efficacy of non-ionizing physiologic magnetic field profiles for treatment of various pathologic states. PMID:26092501

  2. Measurement of the weighted peak level for occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields for 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI body scanners.

    PubMed

    Bonutti, F; Tecchio, M; Maieron, M; Trevisan, D; Negro, C; Calligaris, F

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to give a contribution to the construction of a comprehensive knowledge of the exposure levels to gradient magnetic fields (GMF) in terms of the weighed peak (WP), especially for 3 Tesla scanners for which there are still few works available in the literature. A new generation probe for the measurement of electromagnetic fields in the range of 1 Hz-400 kHz was used to assess the occupational exposure levels to the GMF for 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla MRI body scanners, using the method of the WP according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) approach. The probe was placed at a height of 1.1 m, close to the MRI scanners, where operators could stay during some medical procedures with particular issues. The measurements were performed for a set of typical acquisition sequences for body (liver) and head exams. The measured values of WP were in compliance with ICNIRP 2010 reference levels for occupational exposures. PMID:25987585

  3. The NHMFL 60 tesla, 100 millisecond pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, H.J.; Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Rogers, J.D.; Schillig, J.B.; Sims, J.R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H.J.

    1992-11-09

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving. This report will discuss specifications and parameters of this magnet.

  4. Test results of a single aperture 10 tesla dipole model magnet for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Akira; Shintomi, Takakazu; Kimura, Nobuhiro

    1996-07-01

    A single aperture dipole magnet has been developed with a design magnetic field of 10 tesla by using Nb-Ti/Cu conductor to be operated at 1.8 K in pressurized super fluid helium. The magnet features double shell coil design by using high keystone Rutherford cable and compact non-magnetic steel collars to be adaptable in split/symmetric coil/collar design for twin aperture dipoles. A design central magnetic field of 10 tesla has been successfully achieved in excitation at 1.95 K in pressurized superfluid helium. Test results of the magnet with a summary of the design and fabrication will be presented.

  5. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid neon cooled magnet was designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors, tensile shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives, and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will consist of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  6. 3-Tesla High-Field Magnetic Resonance Neurography for Guiding Nerve Blocks and Its Role in Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jan; Dellon, Arnold Lee; Williams, Eric H; Belzberg, Allan J; Carrino, John A

    2015-11-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance (MR) neurography is a minimally invasive technique that affords targeting of small nerves in challenging areas of the human body for highly accurate nerve blocks and perineural injections. This cross-sectional technique uniquely combines high tissue contrast and high-spatial-resolution anatomic detail, which enables the precise identification and selective targeting of peripheral nerves, accurate needle guidance and navigation of the needle tip within the immediate vicinity of a nerve, as well as direct visualization of the injected drug for the assessment of appropriate drug distribution and documentation of the absence of spread to confounding nearby nerves. PMID:26499273

  7. Design and prototype fabrication of a 30 tesla cryogenic magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Swanson, M. C.; Brown, G. V.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-neon-cooled magnet has been designed to produce 30 teslas in steady operation. Its feasibility was established by a previously reported parametric study. To ensure the correctness of the heat transfer relationships used, supercritical neon heat transfer tests were made. Other tests made before the final design included tests on the effect of the magnetic field on pump motors; tensile-shear tests on the cryogenic adhesives; and simulated flow studies for the coolant. The magnet will be made of two pairs of coils, cooled by forced convection of supercritical neon. Heat from the supercritical neon will be rejected through heat exchangers which are made of roll-bonded copper panels and are submerged in a pool of saturated liquid neon. A partial mock-up coil was wound to identify the tooling required to wind the magnet. This was followed by winding a prototype pair of coils. The prototype winding established procedures for fabricating the final magnet and revealed slight changes needed in the final design.

  8. Poly-coil design for a 60 tesla quasi-stationary magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boenig, H. J.; Campbell, L. J.; Hodgdon, M. L.; Lopez, E. A.; Rickel, D. G.; Rogers, J. D.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J.

    1993-02-01

    Among the new facilities to be offered by the National Science Foundation through the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) are pulsed fields that can only be achieved at a national user facility by virtue of their strength, duration, and volume. In particular, a 44 mm bore pulsed magnet giving a 60 tesla field for 100 ms is in the final design stage. This magnet will be powered by a 1.4 GW motor-generator at Los Alamos and is an important step toward proving design principles that will be needed for the higher field quasi-stationary pulsed magnets that this power source is capable of driving.

  9. Optic Nerve Assessment Using 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun D.; Platt, Sean M.; Lystad, Lisa; Lowe, Mark; Oh, Sehong; Jones, Stephen E.; Alzahrani, Yahya; Plesec, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histologic findings in a case of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma with clinical evidence of optic nerve invasion. Methods With institutional review board approval, an enucleated globe with choroidal melanoma and optic nerve invasion was imaged using a 7-tesla MRI followed by histopathologic evaluation. Results Optical coherence tomography, B-scan ultrasonography, and 1.5-tesla MRI of the orbit (1-mm sections) could not detect optic disc invasion. Ex vivo, 7-tesla MRI detected optic nerve invasion, which correlated with histopathologic features. Conclusions Our case demonstrates the potential to document the existence of optic nerve invasion in the presence of an intraocular tumor, a feature that has a major bearing on decision making, particularly for consideration of enucleation. PMID:27239461

  10. Prospects for 6 to 10 tesla magnets for a TEVATRON upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Mantsch, Paul M.

    1988-07-08

    The first SSC physics is at least 10 years away. An upgrade of the Fermilab Tevatron will ensure the continuity of a vigorous high-energy physics program until the SSC turns on. Three basic proposals are under consideration: /bar p/p at 3 /times/ 10/sup 31/ --Increase luminosity by improvements to the p source. pp at 1 TeV and 2 /times/ 10/sup 32/--Move the main ring to a new tunnel, build a second Tevatron ring, and /bar p/p > 1.5 TeV and 7 /times/ 10/sup 30/--Replace the tevatron with a higher energy ring. The last two options requires about a hundred 6.6-tesla dipoles in addition to a ring of Tevatron strength (4.4 T) magnets. These higher-field magnets are necessary in both rings to lengthen the straight sections in order to realize the collision optics. The third option requires a ring of magnets of 6.6 T or slightly higher to replace the present Tevatron plus a number of special 8--9 tesla magnets. The viability of the high-energy option then depends on the practicality of sizable numbers of reliable 8--9 tesla dipoles as well as 800 6.6-tesla dipoles. The following develops a specification for an 8.8 T dipole, examines the design considerations and reviews the current state of high-field magnet development. 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Matching field effects at tesla-level magnetic fields in critical current density in high-Tc superconductors containing self-assembled columnar defects

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, J.; Zuev, Yuri L; Cantoni, Claudia; Wee, Sung Hun; Varanasi, C. V.; Thompson, James R; Christen, David K

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the superconductive transport properties of YBa2Cu3O7 films containing self-assembled columnar arrays of second phase SrZrO3 or BaSnO3 precipitates. A matching condition between columnar pinning sites (aligned at or near the c axis) and external magnetic flux, tilted with respect to them, is identified in the critical current JC.H/ data. The results for the material containing SrZrO3-based pins are analyzed within a simple intuitive model. At matching, the critical current is enhanced above the model prediction. In complementary contact-free investigations of BaSnO3-doped material, matching effects are observed over a wide range of temperatures in the field dependence of JC.H/. The deduced matching fields agree reasonably well with the densities of columnar pins directly observed by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. RHQT Nb3Al 15-Tesla magnet design study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Feasibility study of 15-Tesla dipole magnets wound with a new copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable is presented. A new practical long copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is presented, which is being developed and manufactured at the National Institute of Material Science (NIMS) in Japan. It has achieved a non-copper J{sub c} of 1000A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, with a copper over non-copper ratio of 1.04, and a filament size less than 50 microns. For this design study a short Rutherford cable with 28 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1 mm diameter will be fabricated late this year. The cosine theta magnet cross section is designed using ROXIE, and the stress and strain in the coil is estimated and studied with the characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. The advantages and disadvantages of the Nb{sub 3}Al cable are compared with the prevailing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable from the point of view of stress-strain, J{sub c}, and possible degradation of stabilizer due to cabling. The Nb{sub 3}Al coil of the magnet, which will be made by wind and react method, has to be heat treated at 800 degree C for 10 hours. As preparation for the 15 Tesla magnet, a series of tests on strand and Rutherford cables are considered.

  13. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; Awe, Thomas James; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B; Haill, Thomas A.; Jones, Peter Andrew; Argo, Jeffrey W; Dalton, Devon; Robertson, Grafton Kincannon; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Meissner, Joel; Milhous, Mark; Nguyen, Doan; Mielke, Chuck

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnostic lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.

  14. Pulsed-coil magnet systems for applying 10-30 Tesla Fields to cm-scale targets on Sandia's Z facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rovang, Dean C.; Lamppa, Derek C.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Owen, Albert; Mckenney, John; Johnson, Drew; Radovich, Shawn; Kaye, Ronald J.; McBride, Ryan D; Alexander, C. Scott; et al

    2014-12-04

    We have successfully integrated the capability to apply uniform, high magnetic fields (10–30 T) to high energy density experiments on the Z facility. This system uses an 8-mF, 15-kV capacitor bank to drive large-bore (5 cm diameter), high-inductance (1–3 mH) multi-turn, multi-layer electromagnets that slowly magnetize the conductive targets used on Z over several milliseconds (time to peak field of 2–7 ms). This system was commissioned in February 2013 and has been used successfully to magnetize more than 30 experiments up to 10 T that have produced exciting and surprising physics results. These experiments used split-magnet topologies to maintain diagnosticmore » lines of sight to the target. We then describe the design, integration, and operation of the pulsed coil system into the challenging and harsh environment of the Z Machine. We also describe our plans and designs for achieving fields up to 20 T with a reduced-gap split-magnet configuration, and up to 30 T with a solid magnet configuration in pursuit of the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion concept.« less

  15. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  16. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  17. Design and Evaluation of a Hybrid Radiofrequency Applicator for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and RF Induced Hyperthermia: Electromagnetic Field Simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and Proof-of-Concept at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm3 iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  18. Design and evaluation of a hybrid radiofrequency applicator for magnetic resonance imaging and RF induced hyperthermia: electromagnetic field simulations up to 14.0 Tesla and proof-of-concept at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lukas; Özerdem, Celal; Hoffmann, Werner; Santoro, Davide; Müller, Alexander; Waiczies, Helmar; Seemann, Reiner; Graessl, Andreas; Wust, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2013-01-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of a hybrid radiofrequency (RF) applicator that supports magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR controlled targeted RF heating at ultrahigh magnetic fields (B0≥7.0T). For this purpose a virtual and an experimental configuration of an 8-channel transmit/receive (TX/RX) hybrid RF applicator was designed. For TX/RX bow tie antenna electric dipoles were employed. Electromagnetic field simulations (EMF) were performed to study RF heating versus RF wavelength (frequency range: 64 MHz (1.5T) to 600 MHz (14.0T)). The experimental version of the applicator was implemented at B0 = 7.0T. The applicators feasibility for targeted RF heating was evaluated in EMF simulations and in phantom studies. Temperature co-simulations were conducted in phantoms and in a human voxel model. Our results demonstrate that higher frequencies afford a reduction in the size of specific absorption rate (SAR) hotspots. At 7T (298 MHz) the hybrid applicator yielded a 50% iso-contour SAR (iso-SAR-50%) hotspot with a diameter of 43 mm. At 600 MHz an iso-SAR-50% hotspot of 26 mm in diameter was observed. RF power deposition per RF input power was found to increase with B0 which makes targeted RF heating more efficient at higher frequencies. The applicator was capable of generating deep-seated temperature hotspots in phantoms. The feasibility of 2D steering of a SAR/temperature hotspot to a target location was demonstrated by the induction of a focal temperature increase (ΔT = 8.1 K) in an off-center region of the phantom. Temperature simulations in the human brain performed at 298 MHz showed a maximum temperature increase to 48.6C for a deep-seated hotspot in the brain with a size of (19×23×32)mm(3) iso-temperature-90%. The hybrid applicator provided imaging capabilities that facilitate high spatial resolution brain MRI. To conclude, this study outlines the technical underpinnings and demonstrates the basic feasibility of an 8-channel hybrid TX

  19. Design study of steady-state 30-tesla liquid-neon-cooled magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prok, G. M.; Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    A design for a 30-tesla, liquid-neon-cooled magnet was reported which is capable of continuous operation. Cooled by nonboiling, forced-convection heat transfer to liquid neon flowing at 2.8 cu m/min in a closed, pressurized heat-transfer loop and structurally supported by a tapered structural ribbon, the tape-wound coils with a high-purity-aluminum conductor will produce over 30 teslas for 1 minute at 850 kilowatts. The magnet will have an inside diameter of 7.5 centimeters and an outside diameter of 54 centimeters. The minimum current density at design field will be 15.7 kA/sq cm.

  20. Magnetization dynamics using ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudosa, Ioan

    Very short and well shaped magnetic field pulses can be generated using ultra-relativistic electron bunches at Stanford Linear Accelerator. These fields of several Tesla with duration of several picoseconds are used to study the response of magnetic materials to a very short excitation. Precession of a magnetic moment by 90 degrees in a field of 1 Tesla takes about 10 picoseconds, so we explore the range of fast switching of the magnetization by precession. Our experiments are in a region of magnetic excitation that is not yet accessible by other methods. The current table top experiments can generate fields longer than 100 ps and with strength of 0.1 Tesla only. Two types of magnetic were used, magnetic recording media and model magnetic thin films. Information about the magnetization dynamics is extracted from the magnetic patterns generated by the magnetic field. The shape and size of these patterns are influenced by the dissipation of angular momentum involved in the switching process. The high-density recording media, both in-plane and perpendicular type, shows a pattern which indicates a high spin momentum dissipation. The perpendicular magnetic recording media was exposed to multiple magnetic field pulses. We observed an extended transition region between switched and non-switched areas indicating a stochastic switching behavior that cannot be explained by thermal fluctuations. The model films consist of very thin crystalline Fe films on GaAs. Even with these model films we see an enhanced dissipation compared to ferromagnetic resonance studies. The magnetic patterns show that damping increases with time and it is not a constant as usually assumed in the equation describing the magnetization dynamics. The simulation using the theory of spin-wave scattering explains only half of the observed damping. An important feature of this theory is that the spin dissipation is time dependent and depends on the large angle between the magnetization and the magnetic

  1. A test of a 2 Tesla superconducting transmission line magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarz, Henryk; Carcagno, Ruben; Claypool, Brad; Foster, George W.; Hays, Steven L.; Huang, Yuenian; Kashikhin, Vladimir; Malamud, Ernest; Mazur, Peter O.; Nehring, Roger; Oleck, Andrew; Rabehl, Roger; Schlabach, Phil; Sylvester, Cosmore; Velev, Gueorgui; Volk, James; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    Superconducting transmission line magnet test system for an injector accelerator of a staged VLHC proton-proton colliding beam accelerator has been built and operated at Fermilab. The 1.5 m long, twin-aperture, combined function dipole magnet of 2 Tesla field is excited by a single turn 100 kA transmission line superconductor. The 100 kA dc current is generated using dc-dc switching converters powered by a bulk 240 kW supply. A pair of horizontally placed conventional leads facilitates transfer of this current to the magnet transmission line superconductor operating at liquid helium temperature. Fabrication of magnet components and magnet assembly work are described. The magnet test system and its operation are presented, and the performance is summarized.

  2. A 10 Kelvin 3 Tesla Magnet for Space Flight ADR Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, Jim; Shirron, Peter; Canavan, Edgar; DiPirro, Michael; Riall, Sara; Pourrahimi, Shahin

    2003-01-01

    Many future space flight missions are expected to use adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs) to reach detector operating temperatures well below one Kelvin. The goal is to operate each ADR with a mechanical cooler as its heat sink, thus avoiding the use of liquid cryogens. Although mechanical coolers are being developed to operate at temperatures of 6 Kelvin and below, there is a large efficiency cost associated with operating them at the bottom of their temperature range. For the multi-stage ADR system being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, the goal is to operate with a 10 Kelvin mechanical cooler heat sink. With currently available paramagnetic materials, the highest temperature ADR stage in such a system will require a magnetic field of approximately three Tesla. Thus the goal is to develop a small, lightweight three Tesla superconducting magnet for operation at 10 Kelvin. It is important that this magnet have a low current/field ratio. Because traditional NbTi magnets do not operate safely above about six Kelvin, a magnet with a higher Tc is required. The primary focus has been on Nb3Sn magnets. Since standard Nb3Sn wire must be coated with thick insulation, wound on a magnet mandrel and then reacted, standard Nb,Sn magnets are quite heavy and require high currents Superconducting Systems developed a Nb3Sn wire which can be drawn down to small diameter, reacted, coated with thin insulation and then wound on a small diameter coil form. By using this smaller wire and operating closer to the wire s critical current, it should be possible to reduce the mass and operating current of 10 Kelvin magnets. Using this "react-then-wind" technology, Superconducting Systems has produced prototype 10 Kelvin magnets. This paper describes the development and testing of these magnets and discusses the outlook for including 10 Kelvin magnets on space-flight missions.

  3. The Travelling-Wave Primate System: A New Solution for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Macaque Monkeys at 7 Tesla Ultra-High Field

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Tim; Mallow, Johannes; Plaumann, Markus; Luchtmann, Michael; Stadler, Jörg; Mylius, Judith; Brosch, Michael; Bernarding, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroimaging of macaques at ultra-high field (UHF) is usually conducted by combining a volume coil for transmit (Tx) and a phased array coil for receive (Rx) tightly enclosing the monkey’s head. Good results have been achieved using vertical or horizontal magnets with implanted or near-surface coils. An alternative and less costly approach, the travelling-wave (TW) excitation concept, may offer more flexible experimental setups on human whole-body UHF magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, which are now more widely available. Goal of the study was developing and validating the TW concept for in vivo primate MRI. Methods The TW Primate System (TWPS) uses the radio frequency shield of the gradient system of a human whole-body 7 T MRI system as a waveguide to propagate a circularly polarized B1 field represented by the TE11 mode. This mode is excited by a specifically designed 2-port patch antenna. For receive, a customized neuroimaging monkey head receive-only coil was designed. Field simulation was used for development and evaluation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was compared with data acquired with a conventional monkey volume head coil consisting of a homogeneous transmit coil and a 12-element receive coil. Results The TWPS offered good image homogeneity in the volume-of-interest Turbo spin echo images exhibited a high contrast, allowing a clear depiction of the cerebral anatomy. As a prerequisite for functional MRI, whole brain ultrafast echo planar images were successfully acquired. Conclusion The TWPS presents a promising new approach to fMRI of macaques for research groups with access to a horizontal UHF MRI system. PMID:26066653

  4. 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: A new standard in liver imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano

    2015-01-01

    An ever-increasing number of 3.0 Tesla (T) magnets are installed worldwide. Moving from the standard of 1.5 T to higher field strength implies a number of potential advantage and drawbacks, requiring careful optimization of imaging protocols or implementation of novel hardware components. Clinical practice and literature review suggest that state-of-the-art 3.0 T is equivalent to 1.5 T in the assessment of focal liver lesions and diffuse liver disease. Therefore, further technical improvements are needed in order to fully exploit the potential of higher field strength. PMID:26244063

  5. A Novel X-ray Diffractometer for the Florida Split Coil 25 Tesla Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengyu; Kovalev, Alexey; Suslov, Alexey; Siegrist, Theo

    2014-03-01

    At National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), we are developing a unique X-ray diffractometer for the 25 Tesla Florida Split Coil Magnet for scattering experiments under extremely high static magnetic fields. The X-ray source is a sealed tube (copper or molybdenum anode), connected to the magnet by an evacuated beam tunnel. The detectors are either an image plate or a silicon drift detector, with the data acquisition system based on LabVIEW. Our preliminary experimental results showed that the performance of the detector electronics and the X-ray generator is reliable in the fringe magnetic fields produced at the highest field of 25 T. Using this diffractometer, we will make measurements on standard samples, such as LaB6, Al2O3 and Si, to calibrate the diffraction system. Magnetic samples, such as single crystal HoMnO3 and stainless steel 301 alloys will be measured subsequently. The addition of X-ray diffraction to the unique split coil magnet will significantly expand the NHMFL experimental capabilities. Therefore, external users will be able to probe spin - lattice interactions at static magnetic fields up to 25T. This project is supported by NSF-DMR Award No.1257649. NHMFL is supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-1157490, the State of Florida, and the U.S. DoE.

  6. Magnet Design and Analysis of a 40 Tesla Long Pulse System Energized by a Battery Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. L.; Peng, T.; Wang, G. B.; Ding, T. H.; Han, X. T.; Pan, Y.; Li, L.

    2013-03-01

    A 40 tesla long pulse magnet and a battery bank as the power supply have been designed. This is now under construction at the Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center. The 22 mm bore magnet will generate smooth pulses with duration 1 s and rise time 0.5 s. The battery bank consists of 945 12V/200 Ah lead-acid battery cells. The magnet and battery bank were optimized by codes developed in-house and by ANSYS. The coil was made from soft copper with internal reinforcement by fiber-epoxy composite; it is divided into two sections connected in series. The inner section consists of helix coils with each layer reinforced by Zylon composite. The outer section will be wound from copper sheet and externally reinforced by carbon fiber composite.

  7. A 5 Tesla imaging magnet for imaging laboratory animals

    SciTech Connect

    Carolan, J.L.; Burns, W.A.; Green, M.A.

    1989-03-01

    This is a report on the construction of the first of a series of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) imaging magnets for laboratory animals. The first NCC magnet has a 33 centimeter warm bore with a design central induction of 5.5 T without active shielding and 5.0 T with active shielding. The magnet will be used for both imaging and spectroscopy of living animals. The active shield system is designed so that the 5 Gauss line is less than 3 meters from the magnet center when the magnet operates at design field. This permits the magnet to be used within an experimental space commonly available within a university building.

  8. Si-N membrane microcalorimetry: Thermal conductivity and specific heat of thin films from 2-500K in magnetic fields to 8 Tesla.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Barry

    2003-03-01

    Understanding the thermal behavior of mesoscopic systems and thin films is a critical issue of both fundamental and technological solid state science. Despite the wealth of knowledge in principle available from accurate measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity of thin films, there are relatively few results of this type, due to the difficulty of isolating the small heat capacities and thermal conductivities from the typically large background contribution of conventional apparatus. Our group at UC San Diego uses amorphous Si-N membranes to thermally isolate small samples from their environment and allow accurate thermal measurements. Recent work adds the ability to measure thermal conductivity of films as thin as 150 Angstrom over a broad temperature range [1] to our well-established techniques for measuring Cp of small samples.[2] Our microcalorimeter is also particularly well-suited for measurements of both Cp and k in high magnetic fields [3]. The micromachining techniques used to fabricate the calorimeter allow production of significant numbers of calorimeters with well-controlled dimensions and highly reproducible properties which facilitates studies of the thermal properties of thin film and tiny crystals. In this talk I will briefly review the fabrication of our microcalorimeter and the techniques for measuring Cp and k. I will present example data and results of numerical heat flow simulations used to further our understanding of heat flow in the microcalorimeter [1] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, J. J. Cherry and F. Hellman, Submitted to RSI, Sept. 2002 [2] D. W. Denlinger et al., Rev. Sci. Inst 65, 946-59 (1994) [3] B. L. Zink, B. Revaz, R. Sappey and F. Hellman, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1841 (2002)

  9. The Safety of MR Conditional Cochlear Implant at 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Ogura, Akio; Hayashi, Norio; Seino, Shinya; Kawai, Ryosuke; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Tsukasa; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the patients with the cochlear implant, only limited data have a mention for safety information in the instruction manual supplied by the manufacturers. Therefore, imaging operators require more detailed safety information for implant device. We conducted detailed examination about displacement force, torque, and demagnetizing of the cochlear implant magnet based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard using the PULSAR and CONCERTO (MED-EL) with 1.5 tesla MRI system. As a result, the displacement force and the torque of the implant magnet were less than the numerical values descried in the manual. Therefore, these have almost no effect on the body under the condition described in a manual. In addition, the demagnetizing factor of the cochlear implant magnet occurred by a change magnetic field. The demagnetization depended on the direction of a line of magnetic force of the static magnetic field and the implant magnet. In conclusion, the operator must warn the position of the patients on inducing in the magnet room. PMID:27546081

  10. Prototype of 10 Tesla Water Cooled Bitter-type Magnet System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W. J.; Riverva, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    A 1 Tesla water cooled Bitter-type magnetic system has been designed and is under construction at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). It is a scaled version of a 10 T Bitter-type magnet that will be used in dusty plasma experiments where dust larger than 500 nm diameter will be strongly magnetized. We present here the design methods used for both magnets, and discuss the design parameters that drive the magnet cooling and power storage bank subsystems. The pressure vessel and plasma vacuum chamber subsystems are then built with the aforementioned subsystems as constraints. To validate our design, magnetic field and temperature measurements within the prototype magnet are compared to finite element analysis (FEA) and analytical methods used for preliminary designing. This knowledge will be used to finalize the 10 T magnet design. Once operational, the 10 T magnet will be programmable to be on for at least ten seconds to several minutes, with up to 20 plasma events planned per day.

  11. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  12. Two-Slotted Surface Coil Array for Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 4 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Solis, S. E.; Hernandez, J. A.; Rodriguez, A. O.; Tomasi, D.

    2008-08-11

    Arrays of antennas have been widely accepted for magnetic resonance imaging applications due to their high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over large volumes of interest. A new surface coil based on the magnetron tube and called slotted surface coil, has been recently introduced by our group. This coil design experimentally demonstrated a significant improvement over the circular-shaped coil when used in the receive-only mode. The slotted coils formed a two-sheet structure with a 90 deg. separation and each coil had 6 circular slots. Numerical simulations were performed using the finite element method for this coil design to study the behaviour of the array magnetic field. Then, we developed a two-coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging to be operated at the resonant frequency of 170 MHz in the transceiver mode. Phantom images were acquired with our coil array and standard pulse sequences on a research-dedicated 4 Tesla scanner. Numerical simulations demonstrated that electromagnetic interaction between the coil elements is negligible, and that the magnetic field showed a good uniformity. In vitro images showed the feasibility of this coil array for standard pulses for high field magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan; Francis, Susan T; McGlone, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit's receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex. PMID:27154626

  14. Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.F.; Bartlett, S.; Bish, P.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Goli, M.; Hafalia, R.R.; Higley, H.; Hannaford, R.; Lau, W.; Liggens, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.; Swanson, J.

    2003-10-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been developing the technology for using brittle superconductor in high-field accelerator magnets. HD1, the latest in a series of magnets, contains two, double-layer Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils. This single-bore dipole configuration, using the highest performance conductor available, was designed and assembled for a 16 tesla conductor/structure/pre-stress proof-of-principle. With the combination of brittle conductor and high Lorentz stress, considerable care was taken to predict the magnet's mechanical responses to pre-stress, cool-down, and excitation. Subsequent cold testing satisfied expectations: Training started at 13.6 T, 83% of 'short-sample', achieved 90% in 10 quenches, and reached its peak bore field (16 T) after 19 quenches. The average plateau, {approx}92% of 'short-sample', appeared to be limited by 'stick-slip' conductor motions, consistent with the 16.2 T conductor 'lift-off' pre-stress that was chosen for this first test. Some lessons learned and some implications for future conductor and magnet technology development are presented and discussed.

  15. A unique 30 Tesla single-solenoid pulsed magnet instrument for x-ray studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Zahirul; Capatina, Dana; Ruff, Jacob; Das, Ritesh; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Narumi, Yasuo

    2011-03-01

    We present a dual-cryostat pulsed-magnet instrument at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) with unique capabilities. The dual-cryostat independently cools the solenoid (Tohoku design) using liquid nitrogen and the sample using a closed-cycle refrigerator, respectively. Liquid nitrogen (LN) cooling allows a repetition rate of seven minutes for peak fields of 30 Tesla. The system is unique in that the LN cryostat incorporates a double-funnel vacuum tube passing through the solenoid's bore preserving the entire angular range allowed by the magnet. This scheme is advantageous in that it allows the applied magnetic field to be parallel to the scattering plane complementing typical split-pair magnets with fields normal to the scattering plane. Performance of the coils along with preliminary x-ray diffraction and spectroscopic studies will be presented. Use of the APS is supported by the U. S. DOE, Office of Science, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The work was supported in part by ICC-IMR, Tohoku University.

  16. Pulsed Magnetic Fields for an XAS Energy Dispersive Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter van der; Mathon, Olivier; Neisius, Thomas

    2007-01-19

    Pulsed magnetic fields constitute an attractive alternative to superconducting magnets for many x-ray techniques. The ESRF ID24 energy dispersive beamline was used for pulsed magnetic field room temperature XMCD measurements on GdCo3. The signal has been measured up to a magnetic field of 5.5 Tesla without signs of deterioration.

  17. Design study of 15-Tesla RHQT Nb3Al block type dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Barzi, E.; Kashikin, V.; Kikuchi, A.; Novitski, I.; Takeuchi, T.; Wake, M.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab /NIMC, Tsukuba /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-09-01

    The design study of the block type 15-Tesla RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al dipole magnet, and its merits over Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets are presented. The copper stabilized RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand is now becoming commercially available for the application to the accelerator magnets. A 1 mm diameter RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strand with filament size about 50 {mu}, non-copper Jc about 1000 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2K, copper ratio of 50%, can now be produced over several hundred meters. The stress and strain characteristics of the Nb{sub 3}Al strand are superior to the Nb{sub 3}Sn strand. Another advantage is that it can tolerate a longitudinal strain up to 0.55%. The RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al Rutherford cable will have less chance of contamination of the stabilizer, compared to Nb{sub 3}Sn cable. These characteristics of the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al will be beneficial for designing and producing 15-Tesla dipole magnets. An example 15-Tesla magnet cross section, utilizing the RHQT Nb{sub 3}Sn strand is presented. A systematic investigation on RHQT Nb{sub 3}Al strands, its Rutherford cables, and building a small racetrack magnet for cable testing are proposed.

  18. Test Results of HD1b, an upgraded 16 Tesla Nb3Sn DipoleMagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.F.; Bartlett, S.E.; Bish, P.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich,D.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley,H.; Lau, W.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan,R.; Swanson, J.

    2005-04-16

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been developing high-field, brittle-superconductor, accelerator magnet technology, in which the conductor's support system can significantly impact conductor performance (as well as magnet training). A recent H-dipole coil test (HD1) achieved a peak bore-field of 16 Tesla, using two, flat-racetrack, double-layer Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. However, its 4.5 K training was slow, with an erratic plateau at {approx}92% of its un-degraded ''short-sample'' expectation ({approx}16.6 T). Quench-origins correlated with regions where low conductor pre-stress had been expected (3-D FEM predictions and variations in 300 K coil-size). The coils were re-assembled with minor coil-support changes and re-tested as ''HD1b'', with a 185 MPa average pre-stress (30 MPa higher than HD1, with a 15-20 MPa pole-turn margin expected at 17 T). Training started higher (15.1 T), and quickly reached a stable, negligibly higher plateau at 16 T. After a thermal cycle, training started at 15.4 T, but peaked at 15.8 T, on the third attempt, before degrading to a 15.7 T plateau. The temperature dependence of this plateau was explored in a sub-atmospheric LHe bath to 3.0 K. Magnet performance data for both thermal cycles is presented and discussed, along with issues for future high-field accelerator magnet development.

  19. A 4 Tesla Superconducting Magnet Developed for a 6 Circle Huber Diffractometer at the XMaS Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P. B. J.; Brown, S. D.; Bouchenoire, L.; Mannix, D.; Paul, D. F.; Lucas, C. A.; Kervin, J.; Cooper, M. J.; Arakawa, P.; Laughon, G.

    2007-01-19

    We report here on the development and testing of a 4 Tesla cryogen free superconducting magnet designed to fit within the Euler cradle of a 6 circle Huber diffractometer, allowing scattering in both the vertical and horizontal planes. The geometry of this magnet allows the field to be applied in three orientations. The first being along the beam direction, the second with the field transverse to the beam direction a horizontal plane and finally the field can be applied vertically with respect to the beam. The magnet has a warm bore and an open geometry of 180 deg. , allowing large access to reciprocal space. A variable temperature insert has been developed, which is capable of working down to a temperature of 1.7 K and operating over a wide range of angles whilst maintaining a temperature stability of a few mK. Initial ferromagnetic diffraction measurements have been carried out on single crystal Tb and Dy samples.

  20. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dswley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla = 10/sup 4/ Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. (JMT)

  1. Team one (GA/MCA) effort of the DOE 12 Tesla Coil Development Program. 12 Tesla ETF toroidal field coil helium bath cooled NbTi alloy concept

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    This report presents the conceptual design of an ETF compatible toroidal field coil, employing helium bath cooled NbTi alloy conductor. The ten TF-coil array generates a peak field of 11-1/2 tesla at 2.87 m radius, corresponding to a major axis field of 6.1 tesla. The 10 kA conductor is an uninsulated, unsoldered Rutherford cable, employing NbTiTa ally as developed in Phase I of this effort. The conductor is encased within a four element frame of stainless steel strips to provide hoop and bearing load support.

  2. Human cardiac 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 tesla

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Christopher T; Clarke, William T; Snyder, Carl; Vaughan, J Thomas; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) affords unique insight into cardiac energetics but has a low intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in humans. Theory predicts an increased 31P-MRS SNR at 7T, offering exciting possibilities to better investigate cardiac metabolism. We therefore compare the performance of human cardiac 31P-MRS at 7T to 3T, and measure T1s for 31P metabolites at 7T. Methods Matched 31P-MRS data were acquired at 3T and 7T, on nine normal volunteers. A novel Look-Locker CSI acquisition and fitting approach was used to measure T1s on six normal volunteers. Results T1s in the heart at 7T were: phosphocreatine (PCr) 3.05 ± 0.41s, γ-ATP 1.82 ± 0.09s, α-ATP 1.39 ± 0.09s, β-ATP 1.02 ± 0.17s and 2,3-DPG (2,3-diphosphoglycerate) 3.05 ± 0.41s (N = 6). In the field comparison (N = 9), PCr SNR increased 2.8× at 7T relative to 3T, the Cramer-Ráo uncertainty (CRLB) in PCr concentration decreased 2.4×, the mean CRLB in PCr/ATP decreased 2.7× and the PCr/ATP SD decreased 2×. Conclusion Cardiac 31P-MRS at 7T has higher SNR and the spectra can be quantified more precisely than at 3T. Cardiac 31P T1s are shorter at 7T than at 3T. We predict that 7T will become the field strength of choice for cardiac 31P-MRS. Magn Reson Med 72:304–315, 2014. © 2013 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:24006267

  3. Mapping quantal touch using 7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging and single-unit intraneural microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez Panchuelo, Rosa Maria; Ackerley, Rochelle; Glover, Paul M; Bowtell, Richard W; Wessberg, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Using ultra-high field 7 Tesla (7T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we map the cortical and perceptual responses elicited by intraneural microstimulation (INMS) of single mechanoreceptive afferent units in the median nerve, in humans. Activations are compared to those produced by applying vibrotactile stimulation to the unit’s receptive field, and unit-type perceptual reports are analyzed. We show that INMS and vibrotactile stimulation engage overlapping areas within the topographically appropriate digit representation in the primary somatosensory cortex. Additional brain regions in bilateral secondary somatosensory cortex, premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, insula and posterior parietal cortex, as well as in contralateral prefrontal cortex are also shown to be activated in response to INMS. The combination of INMS and 7T fMRI opens up an unprecedented opportunity to bridge the gap between first-order mechanoreceptive afferent input codes and their spatial, dynamic and perceptual representations in human cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12812.001 PMID:27154626

  4. Partial epilepsy: A pictorial review of 3 TESLA magnetic resonance imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Abud, Lucas Giansante; Thivard, Lionel; Abud, Thiago Giansante; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; dos Santos, Antonio Carlos; Dormont, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with serious consequences for patients and society. In many cases seizures are sufficiently disabling to justify surgical evaluation. In this context, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of the most valuable tools for the preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci. Because these lesions show a large variety of presentations (including subtle imaging characteristics), their analysis requires careful and systematic interpretation of MRI data. Several studies have shown that 3 Tesla (T) MRI provides a better image quality than 1.5 T MRI regarding the detection and characterization of structural lesions, indicating that high-field-strength imaging should be considered for patients with intractable epilepsy who might benefit from surgery. Likewise, advanced MRI postprocessing and quantitative analysis techniques such as thickness and volume measurements of cortical gray matter have emerged and in the near future, these techniques will routinely enable more precise evaluations of such patients. Finally, the familiarity with radiologic findings of the potential epileptogenic substrates in association with combined use of higher field strengths (3 T, 7 T, and greater) and new quantitative analytical post-processing techniques will lead to improvements regarding the clinical imaging of these patients. We present a pictorial review of the major pathologies related to partial epilepsy, highlighting the key findings of 3 T MRI. PMID:26375569

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Joo Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-09

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π/2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging without field cycling at less than earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Joo; Shim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kiwoong; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Hwang, Seong-min

    2015-03-01

    A strong pre-polarization field, usually tenths of a milli-tesla in magnitude, is used to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in ordinary superconducting quantum interference device-based nuclear magnetic resonance/magnetic resonance imaging experiments. Here, we introduce an experimental approach using two techniques to remove the need for the pre-polarization field. A dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique enables us to measure an enhanced resonance signal. In combination with a π / 2 pulse to avoid the Bloch-Siegert effect in a micro-tesla field, we obtained an enhanced magnetic resonance image by using DNP technique with a 34.5 μT static external magnetic field without field cycling. In this approach, the problems of eddy current and flux trapping in the superconducting pickup coil, both due to the strong pre-polarization field, become negligible.

  7. High-field magnetization of Dy2O3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The magnetization of powdered samples of Dy2O3 has been measured at temperatures between 1.45 deg and 4.2 K, in applied magnetic fields ranging to 7 Teslas. A linear dependence of magnetization on applied field is observable in high field region, the slope of which is independent of temperature over the range investigated. The extrapolated saturation magnetic moment is 2.77 + or - 0.08 Bohr magnetons per ion.

  8. Ultrahigh-Field MRI in Human Ischemic Stroke – a 7 Tesla Study

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Miriam; Stengl, Katharina L.; Mutke, Matthias A.; Tovar-Martinez, Elena; Wuerfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Niendorf, Thoralf; Sobesky, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using field strengths up to 3 Tesla (T) has proven to be a powerful tool for stroke diagnosis. Recently, ultrahigh-field (UHF) MRI at 7 T has shown relevant diagnostic benefits in imaging of neurological diseases, but its value for stroke imaging has not been investigated yet. We present the first evaluation of a clinically feasible stroke imaging protocol at 7 T. For comparison an established stroke imaging protocol was applied at 3 T. Methods In a prospective imaging study seven patients with subacute and chronic stroke were included. Imaging at 3 T was immediately followed by 7 T imaging. Both protocols included T1-weighted 3D Magnetization-Prepared Rapid-Acquired Gradient-Echo (3D-MPRAGE), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-FLAIR), T2-weighted 2D Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (2D-T2-TSE), T2* weighted 2D Fast Low Angle Shot Gradient Echo (2D-HemoFLASH) and 3D Time-of-Flight angiography (3D-TOF). Results The diagnostic information relevant for clinical stroke imaging obtained at 3 T was equally available at 7 T. Higher spatial resolution at 7 T revealed more anatomical details precisely depicting ischemic lesions and periinfarct alterations. A clear benefit in anatomical resolution was also demonstrated for vessel imaging at 7 T. RF power deposition constraints induced scan time prolongation and reduced brain coverage for 2D-FLAIR, 2D-T2-TSE and 3D-TOF at 7 T versus 3 T. Conclusions The potential of 7 T MRI for human stroke imaging is shown. Our pilot study encourages a further evaluation of the diagnostic benefit of stroke imaging at 7 T in a larger study. PMID:22701525

  9. 3.0 Tesla vs 1.5 Tesla breast magnetic resonance imaging in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Reni S; Chen, Christine; Vashi, Reena; Hooley, Regina J; Philpotts, Liane E

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare 3.0 Tesla (T) vs 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. METHODS: Upon Institutional Review Board approval, a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective review of 147 consecutive 3.0T MR examinations and 98 consecutive 1.5T MR examinations in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 7/2009 and 5/2010 was performed. Eleven patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the 3.0T group were excluded. Mammographically occult suspicious lesions (BIRADS Code 4 and 5) additional to the index cancer in the ipsilateral and contralateral breast were identified. Lesion characteristics and pathologic diagnoses were recorded, and results achieved with both systems compared. Statistical significance was analyzed using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: In the 3.0T group, 206 suspicious lesions were identified in 55% (75/136) of patients and 96% (198/206) of these lesions were biopsied. In the 1.5T group, 98 suspicious lesions were identified in 53% (52/98) of patients and 90% (88/98) of these lesions were biopsied. Biopsy results yielded additional malignancies in 24% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 14% of patients in the 1.5T group (33/136 vs 14/98, P = 0.07). Average size and histology of the additional cancers was comparable. Of patients who had a suspicious MR imaging study, additional cancers were found in 44% of patients in the 3.0T group vs 27% in the 1.5T group (33/75 vs 14/52, P = 0.06), yielding a higher positive predictive value (PPV) for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. CONCLUSION: 3.0T MR imaging detected more additional malignancies in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer and yielded a higher PPV for biopsies performed with the 3.0T system. PMID:24003354

  10. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S. Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-21

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  11. Rydberg EIT in High Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lu; Anderson, David; Miller, Stephanie; Raithel, Georg

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards an all-optical approach for measurements of strong magnetic fields using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Rydberg atoms in an atomic vapor. Rydberg EIT spectroscopy is a promising technique for the development of atom-based, calibration- and drift-free technology for high magnetic field sensing. In this effort, Rydberg EIT is employed to spectroscopically investigate the response of Rydberg atoms exposed to strong magnetic fields, in which Rydberg atoms are in the strong-field regime. In our setup, two neodymium block magnets are used to generate fields of about 0.8 Tesla, which strongly perturb the atoms. Information on the field strength and direction is obtained by a comparison of experimental spectra with calculated spectral maps. Investigations of magnetic-field inhomogeneities and other decoherence sources will be discussed.

  12. Aligning Paramecium caudatum with static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Guevorkian, Karine; Valles, James M

    2006-04-15

    As they negotiate their environs, unicellular organisms adjust their swimming in response to various physical fields such as temperature, chemical gradients, and electric fields. Because of the weak magnetic properties of most biological materials, however, they do not respond to the earth's magnetic field (5 x 10(-5) Tesla) except in rare cases. Here, we show that the trajectories of Paramecium caudatum align with intense static magnetic fields >3 Tesla. Otherwise straight trajectories curve in magnetic fields and eventually orient parallel or antiparallel to the applied field direction. Neutrally buoyant immobilized paramecia also align with their long axis in the direction of the field. We model this magneto-orientation as a strictly passive, nonphysiological response to a magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic components of the paramecia. We have determined the average net anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility, Deltachi(p), of a whole Paramecium: Deltachi(p) = (6.7+/- 0.7) x 10(-23) m(3). We show how the measured Deltachi(p) compares to the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibilities of the components in the cell. We suggest that magnetic fields can be exploited as a novel, noninvasive, quantitative means to manipulate swimming populations of unicellular organisms. PMID:16461406

  13. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard M.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Wilgen, John B.; Murphy, Bart L.

    2015-05-19

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a plurality of work-piece separators disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla for supporting and separating a plurality of work-pieces by a preselected, essentially equal spacing, so that, as a first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, a second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  15. A Study of Thermocurrent Induced Magnetic Fields in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Anthony C.; Cooley, Victoria

    2014-03-31

    The case of axisymmetric ILC type cavities with titanium helium vessels is investigated. A first order estimate for magnetic field within the SRF current layer is presented. The induced magnetic field is found to be not more than 1.4x10-8 Tesla = 0.14 milligauss for the case of axial symmetry. Magnetic fields due to symmetry breaking effects are discussed.

  16. Alterations in the rat electrocardiogram induced by stationary magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffey, C.T.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1981-01-01

    A field strength dependent increase in the amplitude of the T-wave signal in the rat electrocardiogram (ECG) was observed during exposure to homogeneous, stationary magnetic fields. For 24 adult Sprague-Dawley and Buffalo rats of both sexes, the T-wave amplitude was found to increase by an average of 408% in a 2.0 Tesla (1 Tesla - 10(4) Gauss) field. No significant magnetically induced changes were observed in other components of the ECG record, including the P wave and the QRS complex. The minimum field level at which augmentation of the T wave could be detected was 0.3 Tesla. The magnetically induced increase in T-wave amplitude occurred instantaneously, and was immediately reversible after exposure to fields as high as 2.0 Tesla. No abnormalities in any component of the ECG record, including the T wave, were noted during a period of 3 weeks following cessation of a continuous 5-h exposure of rats to a 1.5-Tesla field. The heart rate and breathing rate of adult rats were not altered during, or subsequent to, application of fields up to 2.0 Tesla. The effect of animal orientation within the field was tested using juvenile rats 3-14 days old. The maximum increase in T-wave amplitude was observed when subjects were placed with the long axis of the body perpendicular to the lines of magnetic induction. These experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, suggest that augmentation of the signal amplitude in the T-wave segment of the ECG may result from a superimposed electrical potential generated by aortic blood flow in the presence of a stationary magnetic field.

  17. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of a MEMS nano-Tesla ferromagnetic-piezoelectric magnetic sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Peng; Gollapudi, Sreenivasulu; Bidthanapally, Rao; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Petrov, Vladimir; Qu, Hongwei

    2016-06-01

    A self-biased MEMS magnetic sensor array with ferromagnetic-piezoelectric composites has been fabricated and characterized. The array with two Quartz-Nickel-Metglas cantilevers with nano-tesla sensitivity was fabricated by MEMS processes including silicon-quartz low temperature bonding, quartz wafer thinning, and electroplating of thick nickel thin films. Under self-biasing due to magnetization grading of ferromagnetic layer, magnetoelectric coefficients of 6.6 and 5.6 V/cm Oe and resolutions of ˜0.58 and ˜0.75 nT are obtained at the mechanical resonant frequencies of 191.5 and 184.8 Hz for the two sensors in the array, respectively. Such arrays have the potential for applications in biomagnetic imaging technologies including magneto-cardiography.

  19. Value of 3 Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for assessing liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Papalavrentios, Lavrentios; Sinakos, Emmanouil; Chourmouzi, Danai; Hytiroglou, Prodromos; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Constantinides, Manos; Drevelegas, Antonios; Talwalkar, Jayant; Akriviadis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data are available regarding the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the new generation 3 Tesla technology, and especially diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in predicting liver fibrosis. The aim of our pilot study was to assess the clinical performance of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of liver parenchyma for the assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods 18 patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD underwent DWI with 3 Tesla MRI. DWI was performed with single-shot echo-planar technique at b values of 0-500 and 0-1000 s/mm2. ADC was measured in four locations in the liver and the mean ADC value was used for analysis. Staging of fibrosis was performed according to the METAVIR system. Results The median age of patients was 52 years (range 23-73). The distribution of patients in different fibrosis stages was: 0 (n=1), 1 (n=7), 2 (n=1), 3 (n=5), 4 (n=4). Fibrosis stage was poorly associated with ADC at b value of 0-500 s/mm2 (r= -0.30, P=0.27). However it was significantly associated with ADC at b value of 0-1000 s/mm2 (r= -0.57, P=0.01). For this b value (0-1000 s/mm2) the area under receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.93 for fibrosis stage ≥3 and the optimal ADC cut-off value was 1.16 ×10-3 mm2/s. Conclusion 3 Tesla DWI can possibly predict the presence of advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. PMID:25608776

  20. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  1. Does Magnetic Resonance Brain Scanning at 3.0 Tesla Pose a Hyperthermic Challenge to Term Neonates?

    PubMed

    Cawley, Paul; Few, Karen; Greenwood, Richard; Malcolm, Paul; Johnson, Glyn; Lally, Pete; Thayyil, Sudhin; Clarke, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation 3-Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners offer improved neonatal neuroimaging, but the greater associated radiofrequency radiation may increase the risk of hyperthermia. Safety data for neonatal 3-T MR scanning are lacking. We measured rectal temperatures continuously in 25 neonates undergoing 3-T brain MR imaging and observed no significant hyperthermic threat. PMID:27318382

  2. Correlating Hemodynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging with high-field Intracranial Vessel Wall Imaging in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Weston; Donahue, Manus J.; van der Kolk, Anja G.; Rane, Swati; Strother, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Vessel wall magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field (7 Tesla) can be used to visualize vascular lesions noninvasively and holds potential for improving stroke-risk assessment in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We present the first multi-modal comparison of such high-field vessel wall imaging with more conventional (i) 3 Tesla hemodynamic magnetic resonance imaging and (ii) digital subtraction angiography in a 69-year-old male with a left temporal ischemic infarct. PMID:25426229

  3. Interaction mechanisms and biological effects of static magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanisms through which static magnetic fields interact with living systems are described and illustrated by selected experimental observations. These mechanisms include electrodynamic interactions with moving, ionic charges (blood flow and nerve impulse conduction), magnetomechanical interactions (orientation and translation of molecules structures and magnetic particles), and interactions with electronic spin states in charge transfer reactions (photo-induced electron transfer in photosynthesis). A general summary is also presented of the biological effects of static magnetic fields. There is convincing experimental evidence for magnetoreception mechanisms in several classes of lower organisms, including bacteria and marine organisms. However, in more highly evolved species of animals, there is no evidence that the interactions of static magnetic fields with flux densities up to 2 Tesla (1 Tesla [T] = 10{sup 4} Gauss) produce either behavioral or physiolocical alterations. These results, based on controlled studies with laboratory animals, are consistent with the outcome of recent epidemiological surveys on human populations exposed occupationally to static magnetic fields.

  4. World Record Magnetic Field 100T

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Ross; Mielke, Chuck; Rickel, Dwight

    2012-03-22

    Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory campus of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory have successfully produced the world's first 100 Tesla non-destructive magnetic field. The achievement was decades in the making, involving a diverse team of scientists and engineers. The 100 Tesla mark was reached at approximately 3:30 p.m. on March 22, 2012. A note about the sound you'll hear when the magnet is energized: The sound that the 100 T multi-shot magnet makes is due to the electrical current modulation from the 3 phase power converters (known as 12 pulse converters) and the harmonics associated with the chopping of the sinusoidal input power. The magnet vibrates at the electrical current frequencies multiplied by 12 (i.e. ~ 55 Hz x 12 = 660 Hz) hence making an audible sound. The generator is not run at full speed (1650 RPM instead of 1800 RPM) so the frequency is slightly lower than US Line frequency (i.e. 55 Hz instead of 60 Hz). A spectrograph of the sound from the magnet pulse shows the multiple harmonics as reddish horizontal bands as a function of time.

  5. Efficacy in Microbial Sterilization of Pulsed Magnetic Field Treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sterilization effects of the pulsed magnetic field with a maximum intensity of 11.37 Tesla were investigated on Escherichia coli AS 1.129, Staphylococcus aureus AS 1.89, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATTC 7552 and Bacillus subtilis AS 1.921. The well-regulated fluctuations of sterilization effects with m...

  6. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Ö.; Raaijmakers, A. J. E.; Klomp, D. W. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Luijten, P. R.; van den Berg, C. A. T.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (⩾7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B+1, local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B+1 and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR10g avg/(B+1)2 ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable.

  7. Characterization of transceive surface element designs for 7 tesla magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate: radiative antenna and microstrip.

    PubMed

    Ipek, O; Raaijmakers, A J E; Klomp, D W J; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2012-01-21

    Ultra-high field magnetic resonance (≥7 tesla) imaging (MRI) faces challenges with respect to efficient spin excitation and signal reception from deeply situated organs. Traditional radio frequency surface coil designs relying on near-field coupling are suboptimal at high field strengths. Better signal penetration can be obtained by designing a radiative antenna in which the energy flux is directed to the target location. In this paper, two different radiative antenna designs are investigated to be used as transceive elements, which employ different dielectric permittivities for the antenna substrate. Their transmit and receive performances in terms of B(+)(1), local SAR (specific absorption rate) and SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) were compared using extensive electromagnetic simulations and MRI measurements with traditional surface microstrip coils. Both simulations and measurements demonstrated that the radiative element shows twofold gain in B(+)(1) and SNR at 10 cm depth, and additionally a comparable SAR peak value. In terms of transmit performance, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 showed a 24% more favorable local SAR(10g avg)/(B(+)(1))(2) ratio than the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 90. In receive, the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 90 resulted in a 20% higher SNR for shallow depths, but for larger depths this difference diminished compared to the radiative element with a dielectric permittivity of 37. Therefore, to image deep anatomical regions effectively, the radiative antenna with a dielectric permittivity of 37 is favorable. PMID:22170777

  8. A 2-Tesla active shield magnet for whole body imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, F.J.; Elliott, R.T.; Hawksworth, D.G. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on the development and testing of a 2T superconducting Active Shield magnet, with a 0.99m diameter warm bore for whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy. The magnet and cryostat were designed to meet the same performance standards as existing MRI magnets, but with the volume of the stray field region reduced to less than 4% of that for an unshielded magnet. The 0.5 mT stray field contour is within 5m axially and 3m radially of the magnet center. The system weight is only 14 tonnes.

  9. Effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cyclotron motion coherence at high magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Kostyukevich, Yury; Hendrickson, Christopher L; Blakney, Greg T; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional code based on the particle-in-cell algorithm modified to account for the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field was applied to determine the effect of Z(1), Z(2), Z(3), Z(4), X, Y, ZX, ZY, XZ(2) YZ(2), XY and X(2)-Y(2) components of an orthogonal magnetic field expansion on ion motion during detection in an FT-ICR cell. Simulations were performed for magnetic field strengths of 4.7, 7, 14.5 and 21 Tesla, including experimentally determined magnetic field spatial distributions for existing 4.7 T and 14.5 T magnets. The effect of magnetic field inhomogeneity on ion cloud stabilization ("ion condensation") at high numbers of ions was investigated by direct simulations of individual ion trajectories. Z(1), Z(2), Z(3) and Z(4) components have the largest effect (especially Z(1)) on ion cloud stability. Higher magnetic field strength and lower m/z demand higher relative magnetic field homogeneity to maintain cloud coherence for a fixed time period. The dependence of mass resolving power upper limit on Z(1) inhomogeneity is evaluated for different magnetic fields and m/z. The results serve to set the homogeneity requirements for various orthogonal magnetic field components (shims) for future FT-ICR magnet design. PMID:26307725

  10. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel.

  11. Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

  12. Magnetic Field Stabilization for Magnetically Shielded Volumes by External Field Coils

    PubMed Central

    Brys, T.; Czekaj, S.; Daum, M.; Fierlinger, P.; George, D.; Henneck, R.; Hochman, Z.; Kasprzak, M.; Kohlik, K.; Kirch, K.; Kuzniak, M.; Kuehne, G.; Pichlmaier, A.; Siodmok, A.; Szelc, A.; Tanner, L.

    2005-01-01

    For highly sensitive magnetic measurements, e.g., a measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the magnetic field has to be stable in time on a level below picoTesla. One of several measures we employ to achieve this uses an external field coil system which can stabilize the ambient external field at a predefined value. Here we report on the construction and characterization of such a system in the magnetic test facility at PSI. The system actively stabilizes the field along the axis of the EDM experiment by means of four coils in a Helmholtz-like configuration. Additional coils serve to compensate for transverse ambient field components. Because of the long integration times in the EDM experiment (about 100 s or more) only slow disturbances have to be corrected for. The performance of the system has been measured using static and moving magnetic sources and suppression factors in excess of 200 have been observed. PMID:27308117

  13. Magnetic Field Stabilization for Magnetically Shielded Volumes by External Field Coils.

    PubMed

    Brys, T; Czekaj, S; Daum, M; Fierlinger, P; George, D; Henneck, R; Hochman, Z; Kasprzak, M; Kohlik, K; Kirch, K; Kuzniak, M; Kuehne, G; Pichlmaier, A; Siodmok, A; Szelc, A; Tanner, L

    2005-01-01

    For highly sensitive magnetic measurements, e.g., a measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the magnetic field has to be stable in time on a level below picoTesla. One of several measures we employ to achieve this uses an external field coil system which can stabilize the ambient external field at a predefined value. Here we report on the construction and characterization of such a system in the magnetic test facility at PSI. The system actively stabilizes the field along the axis of the EDM experiment by means of four coils in a Helmholtz-like configuration. Additional coils serve to compensate for transverse ambient field components. Because of the long integration times in the EDM experiment (about 100 s or more) only slow disturbances have to be corrected for. The performance of the system has been measured using static and moving magnetic sources and suppression factors in excess of 200 have been observed. PMID:27308117

  14. Effects of Magnetic Field on Biological Cells and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ching-Jen

    2001-03-01

    While there has been extensive research performed in the physics of magnetic fields and the physics and chemistry in life sciences, independent of each other, there has been a paucity of scientific research and development investigating the possible applications of magnetic fields in life sciences. The focus of this presentation is to present the stimulation mechanism by which magnetic fields affect (a) yeast cells (b) plant cells and (c) mammalian normal and cancer cells. Recently we have found that the Saccharomyces Cerevsa yeast growth increases by about 30to a 1 tesla field and the production of CO2 increases by about 30of yeast metabolism may be due to an increase in intercellular interaction and protein channel alignment, the introduction of an alteration in the DNA from the magnetic field exposure or a combination of these mechanisms. We also have found that the application of high magnetic fields (1 tesla and above) can have marked effects on the germination and growth of plants, especially corn, beans and peas. This finding has opened up the possibility of technology developments in botanical growth systems to accelerate seed germination and crop harvesting. Most recently we have investigated the application of high magnetic fields on leukemia, CaCoII and HEP G2 cancer cell lines. We found that when leukemia are exposed to a 12 tesla field for 2 hours has an increase in cell death by about 30that were not exposed to the magnetic field. Viability of CaCoII cells sandwiched between permanent magnets of maximum strength of 1.2 tesla was measured. A decrease in viable cells by 33unexposed cells. HSP 70 was measured for HEPG2 cells that were exposed to permanent magnetic field of 1.2 tesla for 40 minutes and for unexposed cells. It was found that the exposed cells produce 19 times more HSP70 compared to unexposed cells. Our results together with other investigators report suggest a strong evidence of a reduction in the cell growth rate for cancer cells when

  15. How do protozoa respond to intense magnetic fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    2005-03-01

    Most microorganisms such as Paramecium Caudatum, swim in helical paths in nature. In the absence of any external stimuli (e.g. obstacles, electric field, heat, etc.) the axes of these helical paths, which define the trajectories, are straight lines and are distributed in random directions. Our experiments reveal that these trajectories can be manipulated by applying intense DC magnetic fields of the order of several Tesla. Swimming paramecia, for example, align their trajectories with magnetic fields in excess of about 7 Tesla in fraction of a second. We will describe this phenomenon in fields up to 25 T. We will address whether this effect is an active or passive response to the magnetic torque exerted on the diamagnetically anisotropic structures in Paramecium. In addition we will present results for other species as they are obtained.

  16. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  17. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus. PMID:26520987

  18. Research of weak pulsed magnetic field system derived from the time, displacement, and static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiao-Dong; Qian, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    The accurate measurement of dynamic characteristics in weak magnetic sensors is urgently required as a greater number of applications for these devices are found. In this paper, a novel weak pulsed magnetic field system is presented. The underlying principle is to drive a permanent magnet passing another magnet rapidly, producing a pulsed weak magnetic field. The magnitude of the field can be adjusted by changing the velocity and distance between the two magnets. The standard value of the pulsed dynamic magnetic field can be traced back to the accurate measurement of time, displacement, and static magnetic field. In this study a detailed procedure for producing a pulse magnetic field system using the above method is outlined after which a theoretical analysis of the permanent magnet movement is discussed. Using the described apparatus a milli-second level pulse-width with a milli-Tesla magnetic field magnitude is used to study the dynamic characteristics of a giant magnetoresistance sensor. We conclude by suggesting possible improvements to the described apparatus.

  19. Magnetic field measurements of the superEBIS superconducting magnet. Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Herschcovitch, A.; Kponou, A.; Clipperton, R.; Hensel, W.; Usack, F.

    1994-06-02

    SuperEBIS was designed to have a solenoidal magnetic field of a 5 Tesla strength with a 120 cm long bore. The field was specified to be straight within 1 part in 10000 within the bore, and uniform to within 1 part in 1000 within the central 90 cm. Magnetic field measurements were performed with a computerized magnetic field measuring setup that was borrowed from W. Sampson`s group. A preliminary test was made of a scheme to determine if the magnetic and mechanical axes of the solenoid coincided, and, if not, by how much.

  20. Genotoxic Effects of Superconducting Static Magnetic Fields (SMFs) on Wheat (Triticum aestivum) Pollen Mother Cells (PMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pingping; Yin, Ruochun; Chen, Zhiyou; Wu, Lifang; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-04-01

    The effects of superconducting static magnetic fields (SMFs) on the pollen mother cells (PMCs) of wheat were investigated in order to evaluate the possible genotoxic effect of such non-ionizing radiation. The seeds of wheat were exposed to static magnetic fields with either different magnetic flux densities (0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 Tesla) for 5 h or different durations (1, 3 and 5 h) at a magnetic flux density of 7 Tesla. The seeds were germinated at 23oC after exposure and the seedlings were transplanted into the field. The PMCs from young wheat ears were taken and slides were made following the conventional method. The genotoxic effect was evaluated in terms of micronucleus (MN), chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome and fragments in PMCs. Although the exposed groups of a low field intensity (below 5 Tesla) showed no statistically significant difference in the aberration frequency compared with the unexposed control groups and sham exposed groups, a significant increase in the chromosomal bridge, lagging chromosome, triple-polar segregation or micronucleus was observed at a field strength of 5 Tesla or 7 Tesla, respectively. The analysis of dose-effect relationships indicated that the increased frequency of meiotic abnormal cells correlated with the flux density of the magnetic field and duration, but no linear relationship was observed. Such statistically significant differences indicated a potential genotoxic effect of high static magnetic fields above 5 T.

  1. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  2. Fabrication and test results of a high field, Nb3Sn superconducting racetrack dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Benjegerdes, R.; Bish, P.; Byford, D.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hannaford, R.; Higley, H.; Jackson, A.; Lietzke, A.; Liggins, N.; McInturff, A.D.; O'Neill, J.; Palmerston, E.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2001-06-15

    The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Program is extending accelerator magnet technology to the highest possible fields. A 1 meter long, racetrack dipole magnet, utilizing state-of-the-art Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductor, has been built and tested. A record dipole filed of 14.7 Tesla has been achieved. Relevant features of the final assembly and tested results are discussed.

  3. Colonoscopy detects significantly more flat adenomas than 3-tesla magnetic resonance colonography: a pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Hüneburg, Robert; Kukuk, Guido; Nattermann, Jacob; Endler, Christoph; Penner, Arndt-Hendrik; Wolter, Karsten; Schild, Hans; Strassburg, Christian; Sauerbruch, Tilman; Schmitz, Volker; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and several efforts have been made to reduce its occurrence or severity. Although colonoscopy is considered the gold standard in CRC prevention, it has its disadvantages: missed lesions, bleeding, and perforation. Furthermore, a high number of patients undergo this procedure even though no polyps are detected. Therefore, an initial screening examination may be warranted. Our aim was to compare the adenoma detection rate of magnetic resonance colonography (MRC) with that of optical colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A total of 25 patients with an intermediate risk for CRC (17 men, 8 women; mean age 57.6, standard deviation 11) underwent MRC with a 3.0-tesla magnet, followed by colonoscopy. The endoscopist was initially blinded to the results of MRC and unblinded immediately after examining the distal rectum. Following endoscopic excision, the size, anatomical localization, and appearance of all polyps were described according to the Paris classification. Results: A total of 93 lesions were detected during colonoscopy. These included a malignant infiltration of the transverse colon due to gastric cancer in 1 patient, 28 adenomas in 10 patients, 19 hyperplastic polyps in 9 patients, and 45 non-neoplastic lesions. In 5 patients, no lesion was detected. MRC detected significantly fewer lesions: 1 adenoma (P = 0.001) and 1 hyperplastic polyp (P = 0.004). The malignant infiltration was seen with both modalities. Of the 28 adenomas, 23 (82 %) were 5 mm or smaller; only 4 adenomas 10 mm or larger (14 %) were detected. Conclusion: MRC does not detect adenomas sufficiently independently of the location of the lesion. Even advanced lesions were missed. Therefore, colonoscopy should still be considered the current gold standard, even for diagnostic purposes. PMID:26878043

  4. The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier

    2010-06-23

    We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

  5. The ESRF Miniature Pulsed Magnetic Field System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Peter J. E. M.; Strohm, Cornelius; Roth, Thomas; Detlefs, Carsten; Mathon, Olivier

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a portable system to provide pulsed magnetic fields on the ESRF X-ray beamlines. The complete system consists of a power supply, liquid Helium and liquid Nitrogen dewars with a siphon each, control electronics and a double cryostat for separate coil and sample cooling. The liquid nitrogen cooled solenoids reach a maximum field of 30 Tesla for a total pulse duration of one milisecond. They are constructed for optimised cooling rate after the pulse to obtain a high duty cycle, the repetition rate is five pulses per minute at maximum field. The sample is cooled in an independent Helium flow cryostat which is inserted into the bore of the magnet. The flow cryostat has a temperature range from 5 to 250 Kelvin with a direct contact between the sample and Helium flow. This overview gives a general presentation of the system and we will show recent results.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging investigation of the bone conduction implant – a pilot study at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Karl-Johan Fredén; Håkansson, Bo; Reinfeldt, Sabine; Rigato, Cristina; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to investigate if an active bone conduction implant (BCI) used in an ongoing clinical study withstands magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 1.5 Tesla. In particular, the MRI effects on maximum power output (MPO), total harmonic distortion (THD), and demagnetization were investigated. Implant activation and image artifacts were also evaluated. Methods and materials One implant was placed on the head of a test person at the position corresponding to the normal position of an implanted BCI and applied with a static pressure using a bandage and scanned in a 1.5 Tesla MRI camera. Scanning was performed both with and without the implant, in three orthogonal planes, and for one spin-echo and one gradient-echo pulse sequence. Implant functionality was verified in-between the scans using an audio processor programmed to generate a sequence of tones when attached to the implant. Objective verification was also carried out by measuring MPO and THD on a skull simulator as well as retention force, before and after MRI. Results It was found that the exposure of 1.5 Tesla MRI only had a minor effect on the MPO, ie, it decreased over all frequencies with an average of 1.1±2.1 dB. The THD remained unchanged above 300 Hz and was increased only at lower frequencies. The retention magnet was demagnetized by 5%. The maximum image artifacts reached a distance of 9 and 10 cm from the implant in the coronal plane for the spin-echo and the gradient-echo sequence, respectively. The test person reported no MRI induced sound from the implant. Conclusion This pilot study indicates that the present BCI may withstand 1.5 Tesla MRI with only minor effects on its performance. No MRI induced sound was reported, but the head image was highly distorted near the implant. PMID:26604836

  7. The U.S. NHMFL 100 tesla multi-shot magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C. N.; Coe, H.; Ellis, G. G.; Lesch, B. L.; Sims, J. R.; Schillig, J. B.; Swenson, C. A.; Bacon, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    The design, analysis and fabrication progress of the 100 T Multi-Shot Magnet is described. The description includes the structural analysis of the outer coil set, the fabrication of the 100 T prototype coil 1, the fabrication of a coil 1 test shell, and the analysis of the electrical busbar assembly. Fabrication issues and their solutions are presented. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the U.S. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Performance analysis of HD1: a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mattafirri, S.; Bartlett, S.E.; Bish, P.A.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Hafalia, A.R.; Lau, W.G.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2005-06-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing technology for high field accelerator magnets from brittle conductors. HD1 is a single bore block dipole magnet using two, double-layer Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils. The magnet was tested in October 2003 and reached a bore peak field of 16 T (94.5% of short sample). The average quench current plateau appeared to be limited by 'stick slip' conductor motions. Diagnostics recorded quench origins and preload distributions. Cumulative deformation of the mechanical structure has been observed. Quench velocity in different field regions has been measured and compared with model predictions. The results obtained during the HD1 test are presented and discussed.

  9. Cardiovascular alterations in Macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields: experimental observations and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Gaffey, C.T.; Moyer, B.R.; Budinger, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the intraarterial blood pressure of adult male Macaca monkeys during acute exposure to homogeneous stationary magnetic fields ranging in strength up to 1.5 tesla. An instantaneous, field strength-dependent increase in the ECG signal amplitude at the locus of the T wave was observed in fields greater than 0.1 tesla. The temporal sequence of this signal in the ECG record and its reversibility following termination of the magnetic field exposure are consistent with an earlier suggestion that it arises from a magnetically induced aortic blood flow potential superimposed on the native T-wave signal. No measurable alterations in blood pressure resulted from exposure to fields up to 1.5 tesla. This experimental finding is in agreement with theoretical calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on blood flow in the major arteries of the cardiovascular system. 27 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  10. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  11. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  12. Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

    2014-05-20

    A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

  13. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  14. Early Knee Changes in Dancers Identified by Ultra High Field 7 Tesla MRI

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Gregory; Diamond, Matthew; Nevsky, Gregory; Regatte, Ravinder R.; Weiss, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to determine whether a unique, ultra high-field 7 Tesla (T) MRI scanner could detect occult cartilage and meniscal injuries in asymptomatic female dancers. Materials and Methods This study had institutional review board approval. We recruited eight pre-professional female dancers and nine non-athletic, female controls. We scanned the dominant knee on a 7T MRI scanner using a 3D-FLASH sequence and a proton density, fast spin-echo sequence to evaluate cartilage and menisci, respectively. Two radiologists scored cartilage (International Cartilage Repair Society classification) and meniscal (Stoller classification) lesions. We applied two-tailed z- and t-tests to determine statistical significance. Results There were no cartilage lesions in dancers or controls. For the medial meniscus, the dancers compared to controls demonstrated higher mean MRI score (2.38±0.61 vs. 1.0±0.97, p<0.0001) and higher frequency of mean grade 2 lesions (88% vs. 11%, p<0.01). For the lateral meniscus, there was no difference in score (0.5±0.81 vs. 0.5±0.78, p=0.78) in dancers compared to controls. Discussion Asymptomatic dancers demonstrate occult medial meniscal lesions. Because this has been described in early osteoarthritis, close surveillance of dancers’ knee symptoms and function with appropriate activity modification may help maintain their long-term knee health. PMID:23346987

  15. ISOTHERMAL PHASE TRANSFORMATION CYCLING IN STEEL BY APPLICATION OF A HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation reversal via the application and removal of a large magnetic field was investigated. Because a large magnetic field can alter the phase equilibrium between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, volume fractions for each phase constituent can be modified at constant temperature by changing the magnetic field strength. In this research elevated temperature isothermal hold experiments were performed for 5160 steel. During the isothermal hold, the magnetic field was cycled between 0 and 30 Tesla. As companion experiments, temperature cycling and isothermal holds were performed without magnetic fields. The resulting microstructures were examined using optical and SEM metallography. These microstructures indicate that a portion of the microstructure experiences isothermal transformation cycling between austenite and ferrite due to the application and removal of the 30T (Tesla) magnetic field.

  16. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Mark E.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Douglas, Elliot P.

    1998-01-01

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  17. High magnetic field processing of liquid crystalline polymers

    DOEpatents

    Smith, M.E.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Douglas, E.P.

    1998-11-24

    A process of forming bulk articles of oriented liquid crystalline thermoset material, the material characterized as having an enhanced tensile modulus parallel to orientation of an applied magnetic field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field, by curing a liquid crystalline thermoset precursor within a high strength magnetic field of greater than about 2 Tesla, is provided, together with a resultant bulk article of a liquid crystalline thermoset material, said material processed in a high strength magnetic field whereby said material is characterized as having a tensile modulus parallel to orientation of said field of at least 25 percent greater than said material processed in the absence of a magnetic field.

  18. Multi circular-cavity surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain at 4 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. I.; Solis-Najera, S. E.; Vázquez, F.; Wang, R. L.; Tomasi, D.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Animal models in medical research has been used to study humans diseases for several decades. The use of different imaging techniques together with different animal models offers a great advantage due to the possibility to study some human pathologies without the necessity of chirurgical intervention. The employ of magnetic resonance imaging for the acquisition of anatomical and functional images is an excellent tool because its noninvasive nature. Dedicated coils to perform magnetic resonance imaging experiments are obligatory due to the improvement on the signal-to-noise ratio and reduced specific absorption ratio. A specifically designed surface coil for magnetic resonance imaging of monkey's brain is proposed based on the multi circular-slot coil. Numerical simulations of the magnetic and electric fields were also performed using the Finite Integration Method to solve Maxwell's equations for this particular coil design and, to study the behavior of various vector magnetic field configurations and specific absorption ratio. Monkey's brain images were then acquired with a research-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging system at 4T, to evaluate the anatomical images with conventional imaging sequences. This coil showed good quality images of a monkey's brain and full compatibility with standard pulse sequences implemented in research-dedicated imager.

  19. Estimation and reduction of temporal magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets using inductive and NMR feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Brian F.

    Powered magnets provide high magnetic fields that promise to significantly improve nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Higher fields increase NMR chemical shift resolution and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while decreasing quadrupolar line broadening in solids. High resolution NMR is typically performed using superconducting magnets, which are currently limited to 24 Tesla. Powered magnets can provide continuous fields up to 45 Tesla, significantly larger than that achievable by superconducting magnets. This will dramatically expand opportunities in the areas of material science, chemistry, and biology. However, temporal magnetic field fluctuations due to both the power supply and cooling water system currently render these magnets unsuitable for high resolution NMR. The focus of this dissertation is to design, synthesize, and verify a feedback control system that reduces temporal field fluctuations so that powered magnets can be used for high resolution NMR. Earlier studies have shown that feedback control using inductive measurements significantly reduces higher frequency field fluctuations associated with power supply ripple, but are limited in their ability to reduce lower frequency field fluctuations associated with variations in the cooling water system. Conversely, feedback control using NMR measurements are more conducive to reducing lower frequency field fluctuations and less successful at higher frequencies. Feedback control systems which use NMR measurements are often referred to as field-frequency locks (FFLs). Earlier studies have shown that FFLs can estimate and reduce lower frequency field fluctuations in superconducting magnets, but have limited ability to do the same in powered magnets. This dissertation investigates why such FFLs are limited in powered magnets, and demonstrates some alternative methods for estimating lower frequency field fluctuations using NMR measurements in powered magnets. A digital sampled-data feedback control

  20. HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn DipoleMagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Hafalia, A.R.; Bartlett, S.E.; Capsi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich,D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Highley,H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Nyman,M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2003-11-10

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Superconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and test of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil pre-stress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

  1. HD1: Design and Fabrication of a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Hafalia, A.R.; Barlett, S.E.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Goli, M.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hannaford, C.R.; Higley, H.; Lietzke, A.F.; Liggins, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.D.; Myman, M.; Sabbi, G.L.; Scanlan, R.M.; Swanson, J.

    2003-10-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Supcrconducting Magnet Group has completed the design, fabrication and tcst of HD1, a 16 T block-coil dipole magnet. State of the art Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor was wound in double-layer racetrack coils and supported by an iron yoke and a tensioned aluminum shell. In order to prevent conductor movement under magnetic forces up to the design field, a coil prestress of 150 MPa was required. To achieve this level without damaging the brittle conductor, the target stress was generated during cool-down to 4.2 K by exploiting the thermal contraction differentials between yoke and shell. Accurate control of the shell tension during assembly was obtained using pressurized bladders and interference load keys. An integrated 3D CAD model was used to optimize magnetic and mechanical design and analysis.

  2. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  3. Ultralow Magnetic Fields and Gravity Probe B Gyroscope Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, J. C.; Lockhart, J. M.; Muhlfelder, B.; Murray, D. O.; Taber, M. A.

    We describe the generation of an ultralow magnetic field of < 10-11Tesla in the flight dewar of the Gravity Probe B Relativity Mission. The field was achieved using expanded-superconducting-shield techniques and is maintained with the aid of a magnetic materials control program. A high performance magnetic shield system is required for the proper function of gyroscope readout. The readout system employs a dc SQUID to measure the London moment generated by the superconducting gyro rotor in order to resolve sub-milliarcsecond changes in the gyro spin direction. In addition to a low residual dc magnetic field, attenuation of external field variation is required to be 1012 at the gyro positions. We discuss the measurement of the dc magnetic field and ac attenuation factor and the performance of the readout system

  4. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  5. MAGNET ENGINEERING AND TEST RESULTS OF THE HIGH FIELD MAGNET R AND D PROGRAM AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect

    COZZOLINO,J.; ANERELLA,M.; ESCALLIER,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; JAIN,A.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; SOIKA,R.; WANDERER,P.

    2002-08-04

    The Superconducting Magnet Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has been carrying out design, engineering, and technology development of high performance magnets for future accelerators. High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) play a major role in the BNL vision of a few high performance interaction region (IR) magnets that would be placed in a machine about ten years from now. This paper presents the engineering design of a ''react and wind'' Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet that will provide a 12 Tesla background field on HTS coils. In addition, the coil production tooling as well as the most recent 10-turn R&D coil test results will be discussed.

  6. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  7. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  8. Static Magnetic Fields in Semiconductor Floating-Zone Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croll, Arne; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in semiconductor float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone, originating from sources such as buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, differential rotation, or radio frequency heating. Because semiconductor melts are conducting, flows can be damped by the use of static magnetic fields to influence the interface shape and the segregation of dopants and impurities. An important objective is often the suppression of time-dependent flows and the ensuing dopant striations. In RF-heated Si-FZ - crystals, fields up to O.STesla show some flattening of the interface curvature and a reduction of striation amplitudes. In radiation-heated (small-scale) SI-FZ crystals, fields of 0.2 - 0.5 Tesla already suppress the majority of the dopant striations. The uniformity of the radial segregation is often compromised by using a magnetic field, due to the directional nature of the damping. Transverse fields lead to an asymmetric interface shape and thus require crystal rotation (resulting in rotational dopant striations) to achieve a radially symmetric interface, whereas axial fields introduce a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, are possible with axial static fields in excess of 1 Tesla. Strong static magnetic fields, however, can also lead to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, caused by the interaction of thermoelectric currents with the magnetic field.

  9. Decreased chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes exposed to a strong static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Sipka, S; Szöllosi, I; Batta, Gy; Szegedi, Gy; Illés, A; Bakó, Gy; Novák, D

    2004-01-01

    The chemotaxis of human peripheral phagocytes, neutrophils and monocytes was examined in a strong static magnetic field (0.317+/-0.012 Tesla). The chemotaxis of the suspension of purified neutrophils and monocytes was tested in the Boyden chamber using C5a as a chemotactic signal. The chambers were placed into a temperature regulated (36.6 degrees C) equipment producing a strong static magnetic field (0.317 Tesla) for 60 minutes. The movement of cells proceeded into a nitrocellulose membrane toward the north-pole of the magnet, i.e. in the direction of the Earth's gravitational pull. The C5a induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils decreased significantly in the strong static magnetic field. Monocytes were not significantly effected. The strong static magnetic field decreased the chemotactic movement of neutrophils and this phenomenon may have implications when humans are exposed to magnetic resonance imaging for extended periods of time. PMID:15334831

  10. Magnetic exchange bias of more than 1 Tesla in a natural mineral intergrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Carter-Stiglitz, Brian; Harrison, Richard J.; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; McCammon, Catherine

    2007-10-01

    Magnetic exchange bias is a phenomenon whereby the hysteresis loop of a `soft' magnetic phase is shifted by an amount HE along the applied field axis owing to its interaction with a `hard' magnetic phase. Since the discovery of exchange bias fifty years ago, the development of a general theory has been hampered by the uncertain nature of the interfaces between the hard and soft phases, commonly between an antiferromagnetic phase and a ferro- or ferrimagnetic phase. Exchange bias continues to be the subject of investigation because of its technological applications and because it is now possible to manipulate magnetic materials at the nanoscale. Here we present the first documented example of exchange bias of significant magnitude (>1 T) in a natural mineral. We demonstrate that exchange bias in this system is due to the interaction between coherently intergrown magnetic phases formed through a natural process of phase separation during slow cooling over millions of years. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that these intergrowths have a known crystallographic orientation with a known crystallographic structure and that the interfaces are coherent.

  11. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  12. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  13. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  14. The effect on medical metal implants by magnetic fields of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Mesgarzadeh, M; Revesz, G; Bonakdarpour, A; Betz, R R

    1985-01-01

    Forces and torques, due to a 0.3 Tesla magnetic field were evaluated on ten hip prostheses and ten hemostat clips. Measurements were performed with an instrument utilizing the movement of a laser beam caused by the deflection of a cantilever. The results indicate effects, if any, to be smaller than the instrument's sensitivity which, at its highest, was 7 mg of force and 125 mg.cm of torque. PMID:4059940

  15. Gray Matter-Specific Changes in Brain Bioenergetics after Acute Sleep Deprivation: A 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study at 4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Plante, David T.; Trksak, George H.; Jensen, J. Eric; Penetar, David M.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Riedner, Brady A.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.; Harper, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A principal function of sleep may be restoration of brain energy metabolism caused by the energetic demands of wakefulness. Because energetic demands in the brain are greater in gray than white matter, this study used linear mixed-effects models to examine tissue-type specific changes in high-energy phosphates derived using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after sleep deprivation and recovery sleep. Design: Experimental laboratory study. Setting: Outpatient neuroimaging center at a private psychiatric hospital. Participants: A total of 32 MRS scans performed in eight healthy individuals (mean age 35 y; range 23-51 y). Interventions: Phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) were measured using 31P MRS three dimensional-chemical shift imaging at high field (4 Tesla) after a baseline night of sleep, acute sleep deprivation, and 2 nights of recovery sleep. Novel linear mixed-effects models were constructed using spectral and tissue segmentation data to examine changes in bioenergetics in gray and white matter. Measurements and Results: PCr increased in gray matter after 2 nights of recovery sleep relative to sleep deprivation with no significant changes in white matter. Exploratory analyses also demonstrated that increases in PCr were associated with increases in electroencephalographic slow wave activity during recovery sleep. No significant changes in β-NTP were observed. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that sleep deprivation and subsequent recovery-induced changes in high-energy phosphates primarily occur in gray matter, and increases in phosphocreatine after recovery sleep may be related to sleep homeostasis. Citation: Plante DT, Trksak GH, Jensen JE, Penetar DM, Ravichandran C, Riedner BA, Tartarini WL, Dorsey CM, Renshaw PF, Lukas SE, Harper DG. Gray matter-specific changes in brain bioenergetics after acute sleep deprivation: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 4 Tesla. SLEEP 2014

  16. An active antenna for ELF magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, John F.; Spaniol, Craig

    1994-01-01

    The work of Nikola Tesla, especially that directed toward world-wide electrical energy distribution via excitation of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances, has stimulated interest in the study of these resonances. Not only are they important for their potential use in the transmission of intelligence and electrical power, they are important because they are an integral part of our natural environment. This paper describes the design of a sensitive, untuned, low noise active antenna which is uniquely suited to modern earth-ionosphere cavity resonance measurements employing fast-Fourier transform techniques for near-real-time data analysis. It capitalizes on a little known field-antenna interaction mechanism. Recently, the authors made preliminary measurements of the magnetic fields in the earth-ionosphere cavity. During the course of this study, the problem of designing an optimized ELF magnetic field sensor presented itself. The sensor would have to be small, light weight (for portable use), and capable of detecting the 5-50 Hz picoTesla-level signals generated by the natural excitations of the earth-ionosphere cavity resonances. A review of the literature revealed that past researchers had employed very large search coils, both tuned and untuned. Hill and Bostick, for example, used coils of 30,000 turns wound on high permeability cores of 1.83 m length, weighing 40 kg. Tuned coils are unsuitable for modern fast-Fourier transform data analysis techniques which require a broad spectrum input. 'Untuned' coils connected to high input impedance voltage amplifiers exhibit resonant responses at the resonant frequency determined by the coil inductance and the coil distributed winding capacitance. Also, considered as antennas, they have effective areas equal only to their geometrical areas.

  17. ROLE FOR THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE RADIATION-INDUCED EFFLUX OF CALCIUM IONS FROM BRAIN TISSUE 'IN VITRO'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two independent laboratories have demonstrated that specific frequencies of electromagnetic radiation can cause a change in the efflux of calcium ions from brain tissue in vitro. Under a static magnetic field intensity of 38 microTesla (microT) due to the earth's magnetic field, ...

  18. Improved capacitive stress transducers for high-field superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, Christopher Pete; Holik, Eddie Frank, III; Jaisle, Andrew; McInturff, A.; McIntyre, P.

    2012-06-01

    High-field (12-18 Tesla) superconducting magnets are required to enable an increase in the energy of future colliders. Such field strength requires the use of Nb3Sn superconductor, which has limited tolerance for compressive and shear strain. A strategy for stress management has been developed at Texas A&M University and is being implemented in TAMU3, a short-model 14 Tesla stress-managed Nb3Sn block dipole. The strategy includes the use of laminar capacitive stress transducers to monitor the stresses within the coil package. We have developed fabrication techniques and fixtures, which improve the reproducibility of the transducer response both at room temperature and during cryogenic operation. This is a report of the status of transducer development.

  19. Rotational Resonance in milli-tesla fields detected by Field Cycling NMR.

    PubMed

    Reutter, S; Privalov, A; Buntkowsky, G; Fujara, F

    2012-02-01

    Rotational Resonance (R(2)) between different spin Zeeman levels in samples of adamantane C(10)H(16) (homonuclear R(2)) and a mixture of C(10)H(16) and C(10)D(16) (both homonuclear and heteronuclear R(2)) has been studied. A Field Cycling NMR instrument was used to match the external field frequency ν(0) to a fixed frequency of sample rotation ν(r) at ν(r) = 40, 50 or 60 kHz. Rotational Resonance is observed at rational frequency ratios of ν(0)/ν(r), such as 12, 23, 32 and 1. The method may prove to become a useful tool for the determination of spin-spin distances in condensed matter. PMID:22239819

  20. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  1. Magnetic torque study of Weyl semimetal compounds TaP and NbP up to 45 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Asaba, Tomoya; Tinsman, Colin; Yu, Fan; Lawson, Benjamin; Chen, Yulin; Li, Lu

    Weyl semimetal is a recently proposed new state in condensed matter physics, in which the bulk bands could have three dimensional linear dispersion but the degeneracy at the cross point is lifted into a pair of Weyl points with opposite chirality. Among the predicted candidates, Tantalum monophorspide (TaP) and Niobium monophorspide (NbP) have the simplest composition and do not require extrinsic tuning. Photoemission data is accumulating and the unique Fermi-arc surface state is observed. Magnetotransport experiments has shown highly anisotropic magnetoresistance and quantum oscillations has been observed. Because both linear dispersive bands and conventional bands exist in these materials, a detailed study of the electronic strucuture of the bulk is highly desirable. We use torque magnetometry to study quantum oscillations of TaP and NbP down to 300 mK, and up to 45 Tesla, with focus on the angular dependence of oscillation frequencies. Our comparison shows clear difference in geometry of different bulk bands in these materials. Besides, a discussion will be made on high field torque data since 45 Tesla is high enough to push several of the bands into quantum limit.

  2. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  3. Science up to 100 tesla

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    100 Tesla is the highest attainable field that can be held for milli-sec in a non-destructive magnet. The strongest steels turn soft under stresses of 4GPa, which is the magnetic pressure of 100 T. Until there is a breakthrough in materials, magnets having all the low temperature and high pressure trimmings will be limited to about 100 T. Within the field range 1-100 T far more resources are now devoted to producing the highest possible continuous fields (40+5 T) than to producing longer pulsed fields above 50 T. This illustrates that the utility of the field can be more important than the strength of the field to researchers in condensed matter. Discoveries are typically made in new territory, but this can be new combinations of pressure, temperature, and magnetic field, or new probes and new materials. If any activity has kept up with the proliferation of new experiments and new facilities in high magnetic field research it is the listing of experiments that could and should be done in high fields. Part of the reason for the vitality of high field research is that high fields provide a generic environment. Compared to particle accelerators and plasma machines a high field laboratory is a setting for generic science, like synchrotron light sources or neutron scattering centers. Although the latter two installations probes states, while a magnetic field creates a state. Because it is unrealistic to try to list all the science opportunities at high fields, the author list sources for lists in the public domain and gives a few examples.

  4. Effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on sciatic nerve regeneration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Cordeiro, P.G.; Seckel, B.R.; Miller, C.D.; Gross, P.T.; Wise, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    The effect of a high-intensity static magnetic field on peripheral nerve regeneration is evaluated in rat sciatic nerve. Forty-four rats underwent sciatic nerve repair using polyethylene nerve guides. Postoperatively, the animals were exposed to a 1-tesla magnetic field for 12 hours per day for 4 weeks with appropriate controls. Our results demonstrate that a 1-tesla static magnetic field has no statistically significant effect on nerve regeneration as determined by myelinated axon counts and electrophysiologic studies. Also, the specific orientation of the sciatic nerve with respect to the magnetic field has no influence on axonal growth or nerve conduction. Periods of restraint of 12 hours per day for 4 weeks significantly inhibit weight gain but have no effect on peripheral nerve regeneration.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of rodent spinal cord with an improved performance coil at 7 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Najera, S. E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of animal models provide reliable means to study human diseases. The image acquisition particularly determined by the radio frequency coil to detect the signal emanated from a particular region of interest. A scaled-down version of the slotted surface coil was built based on the previous results of a magnetron-type surface coil for human applications. Our coil prototype had a 2 cm total diameter and six circular slots and was developed for murine spinal cord at 7 T. Electromagnetic simulations of the slotted and circular coils were also performed to compute the spatially dependent magnetic and electric fields using a simulated saline-solution sphere. The quality factor of both coils was experimentally measured giving a lower noise figure and a higher quality factor for the slotted coil outperforming the circular coil. Images of the spinal cord of a rat were acquired using standard pulse sequences. The slotted surface coil can be a good tool for spinal cord rat imaging using conventional pulse sequences at 7 T.

  6. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  7. On the Subjective Acceptance during Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Klix, Sabrina; Els, Antje; Paul, Katharina; Graessl, Andreas; Oezerdem, Celal; Weinberger, Oliver; Winter, Lukas; Thalhammer, Christof; Huelnhagen, Till; Rieger, Jan; Mehling, Heidrun; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examines the subjective acceptance during UHF-CMR in a cohort of healthy volunteers who underwent a cardiac MR examination at 7.0T. Methods Within a period of two-and-a-half years (January 2012 to June 2014) a total of 165 healthy volunteers (41 female, 124 male) without any known history of cardiac disease underwent UHF-CMR. For the assessment of the subjective acceptance a questionnaire was used to examine the participants experience prior, during and after the UHF-CMR examination. For this purpose, subjects were asked to respond to the questionnaire in an exit interview held immediately after the completion of the UHF-CMR examination under supervision of a study nurse to ensure accurate understanding of the questions. All questions were answered with “yes” or “no” including space for additional comments. Results Transient muscular contraction was documented in 12.7% of the questionnaires. Muscular contraction was reported to occur only during periods of scanning with the magnetic field gradients being rapidly switched. Dizziness during the study was reported by 12.7% of the subjects. Taste of metal was reported by 10.1% of the study population. Light flashes were reported by 3.6% of the entire cohort. 13% of the subjects reported side effects/observations which were not explicitly listed in the questionnaire but covered by the question about other side effects. No severe side effects as vomiting or syncope after scanning occurred. No increase in heart rate was observed during the UHF-CMR exam versus the baseline clinical examination. Conclusions This study adds to the literature by detailing the subjective acceptance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging examinations at a magnetic field strength of 7.0T. Cardiac MR examinations at 7.0T are well tolerated by healthy subjects. Broader observational and multi-center studies including patient cohorts with cardiac diseases are required to gain further insights into the subjective

  8. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  9. Phonon spectroscopy in high magnetic fields: The B + center in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshko, S.; Dietsche, W.

    1996-05-01

    Normal-state tunnel junctions have been used for phonon spectroscopY in high magnetic fields for the first time. The binding energy of the positively charged acceptor B + in Si has been measured as a function of magnetic field up to 12 Tesla. It is found to increase linearly with magnetic field. This linear dependence originates from the energy increase of the lowest Landau level of the free heavy holes. It indicates that the magnetic field dependence of both the neutral and the positively charged acceptors are small.

  10. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: Numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braguta, V. V.; Buividovich, P. V.; Chernodub, M. N.; Kotov, A. Yu.; Polikarpov, M. I.

    2012-12-01

    Using numerical simulations of quenched SU (2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged ρ mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eBc = 0.927 (77) GeV2 or Bc = (1.56 ± 0.13) ṡ1016 Tesla. The condensation of the charged ρ mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  11. Spontaneous magnetic field generation in hypervelocity impacts. [of meteoroids onto lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srnka, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impacts of meteoroids onto early planetary surfaces may have generated short-lived magnetic fields. The high specific power densities of the impacts, plasma production in the ejecta clouds, and the chemically layered targets of the meteoroids are analyzed in describing the evolution of the magnetic fields. Durations from about one millionth of a minute to one minute, as well as strengths up to 100 tesla, are posited for the impact-generated magnetic fields. The analogy of magnetic-field generation in laser-target experiments is also mentioned. The acquisition of shock remanence and thermoremanence by the ejecta and nearby rock following impact is discussed.

  12. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  13. Scalarized photon analysis of spontaneous emission in the uniform magnetic field free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soln, Josip

    1990-04-01

    The recently developed concept of scalarized photons (formally photons of any polarization) is used to analyze the spontaneous emission in the uniform magnetic field free-electron laser in the microwave spectral region. With the electron beam energy of up to 10 MeV and the uniform magnetic field of up to 4 Tesla, the radiation (occurring with the fundamental and higher harmonic frequencies) can easily cover a 10- to 10,000 GHz spectral region.

  14. An additive manufacturing acrylic for use in the 32 Tesla all superconducting magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zachary

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is building a world record all superconducting magnet known as the "32T". It requires many thousands of parts, but in particular one kind is unusually expensive to manufacture, called "heater lead covers". These parts are traditionally made out of a glass filled epoxy known as G-10, and conventionally machined. The machining is the expensive portion, as there are many tight tolerance details. The proposal in this paper is to change the material and manufacturing method to additive manufacturing with the material called "RGD 430". The cost per part with traditional machining is approximately 1,500 each. The cost per part with additive manufacturing of RGD 430 is approximately 32.5 each. There will be at least 14 of this style of part on the completed 32T project. Thus the total cost for the project will be reduced from 21,000 to 455, a 98% cost savings. The additive manufacturing also allows the machine designers to expand the dimensions of the part to any shape possible. Through testing of the material it was found to follow the common polymer characteristics. Its linear elastic modulus at cryogenic temperatures approached 10 GPa. The yield strength was always over 100 MPa, when not damaged. The fracture mechanism was repeatable, and brittle in cryogenic environments. The geometric tolerancing of the additive manufacturing process are, as expected extremely precise. The final tolerances for dimensions in the profile of the printer are more precise than +/- 0.10mm. The final tolerances for dimensions in the thickness of the printer are more precise than +/-0.25mm. Before utilizing the material, there should be a few additional tests run on it to ensure it will work in-situ. Those tests are outside the scope of this thesis.

  15. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a

  16. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  17. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  18. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  19. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  20. High resolution T2(*)-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 3 Tesla using PROPELLER-EPI.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Martin; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-05-01

    We report the application of PROPELLER-EPI for high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging with sub-millimeter in-plane resolution on a clinical 3 Tesla scanner. Periodically rotated blades of a long-axis PROPELLER-EPI sequence were acquired with fast gradient echo readout and acquisition matrix of 320 × 50 per blade. Images were reconstructed by using 2D-gridding, phase and geometric distortion correction and compensation of resonance frequency drifts that occurred during extended measurements. To characterize these resonance frequency offsets, short FID calibration measurements were added to the PROPELLER-EPI sequence. Functional PROPELLER-EPI was performed with volunteers using a simple block design of right handed finger tapping. Results indicate that PROPELLER-EPI can be employed for fast, high resolution T2(*)-weighted imaging provided geometric distortions and possible resonance frequency drifts are properly corrected. Even small resonance frequency drifts below 10 Hz as well as non-corrected geometric distortions degraded image quality substantially. In the initial fMRI experiment image quality and signal-to-noise ratio was sufficient for obtaining high resolution functional activation maps. PMID:24439698

  1. Multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral metabolites in healthy dogs at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sooyoung; Song, Yumi; Lee, Kija; Lee, Youngwon; Choi, Hojung

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to measure the difference in levels of cerebral metabolites in the right and left hemispheres, gray (GM) and white matter (WM), imaging planes, and anatomical regions of healthy dogs to establish normal variations. Eight male Beagle dogs (1 to 4 years of age; mean age, 2 years) with no evidence of neurologic disease were studied. Using the multi-voxel technique on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner, metabolite values (N-acetyl aspartate [NAA], choline [Cho], creatine [Cr]) were obtained from the frontoparietal WM, parietal GM, temporal GM, occipital GM, thalamus, cerebellum, mid-brain, and pons. There was no significant difference in levels of these metabolites between the right and left in any locations or between the GM and WM in the cerebral hemispheres. However, there were significant differences in metabolite ratios within imaging planes. The NAA/Cr was lower in the cerebellum than other regions and the thalamus had a higher Cho/Cr and lower NAA/Cho ratio than in other regions. The spectral and metabolic values will provide a useful internal reference for clinical practice and research involving multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Measurement of metabolite values in the transverse plane is recommended for comparing levels of regional metabolites. PMID:26645339

  2. Multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral metabolites in healthy dogs at 1.5 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sooyoung; Song, Yumi; Lee, Kija; Lee, Youngwon

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to measure the difference in levels of cerebral metabolites in the right and left hemispheres, gray (GM) and white matter (WM), imaging planes, and anatomical regions of healthy dogs to establish normal variations. Eight male Beagle dogs (1 to 4 years of age; mean age, 2 years) with no evidence of neurologic disease were studied. Using the multi-voxel technique on a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner, metabolite values (N-acetyl aspartate [NAA], choline [Cho], creatine [Cr]) were obtained from the frontoparietal WM, parietal GM, temporal GM, occipital GM, thalamus, cerebellum, mid-brain, and pons. There was no significant difference in levels of these metabolites between the right and left in any locations or between the GM and WM in the cerebral hemispheres. However, there were significant differences in metabolite ratios within imaging planes. The NAA/Cr was lower in the cerebellum than other regions and the thalamus had a higher Cho/Cr and lower NAA/Cho ratio than in other regions. The spectral and metabolic values will provide a useful internal reference for clinical practice and research involving multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Measurement of metabolite values in the transverse plane is recommended for comparing levels of regional metabolites. PMID:26645339

  3. Characterization and manipulation of a high-magnetic field trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Eric; Raithel, Georg

    2012-06-01

    We report on the characterization of an efficient atom trap within a background magnetic field of 2.6 Tesla. Up to 10̂8 Rubidium atoms are recaptured from a cold atomic beam with a 2-3% collection efficiency, in a cigar-shaped volume and cooled with a six-beam optical molasses. The aspect ratio of the trap is measured as a function of the magnetic field curvature, which can be varied to produce a range of trap shapes. The trapping lineshape is both narrow and asymmetric, as is characteristic of laser-cooling of atoms or ions in an external trapping potential. Additional features of the high magnetic field trap include cooling onto hollow shell-like structures. Simulation results are also presented.

  4. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  5. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  6. About the parametrizations utilized to perform magnetic moments measurements using the transient field technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, A. M.; Torres, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The experimental study of nuclear magnetic moments, using the Transient Field technique, makes use of spin-orbit hyperfine interactions to generate strong magnetic fields, above the kilo-Tesla regime, capable to create a precession of the nuclear spin. A theoretical description of such magnetic fields is still under theoretical research, and the use of parametrizations is still a common way to address the lack of theoretical information. In this contribution, a review of the main parametrizations utilized in the measurements of Nuclear Magnetic Moments will be presented, the challenges to create a theoretical description from first principles will be discussed.

  7. MIT 12 Tesla Coil test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, M. M.; Hoenig, M. O.

    1985-07-01

    Test results from the MIT 12 Tesla Coil experiment are presented. The coil was tested in the High Field Test Facility (HFTF) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in October 1984 and January 1985. The experiment measured the performance of an Internally Cooled, Cabled Superconductor (ICCS) of practical size, intended for use in magnetic fusion experiments. The MIT coil carried 15 kA at 11 T for 5 min with no sign of instability. A half turn length in a 10 T field was able to absorb a heat load in 4 msec of more than 200 mJ sub cm of cable volume while carrying a current of 12 kA. The MIT coil successfully met the performance requirements of the Department of Energy's 12 Tesla Coil Program.

  8. [Optimal imaging parameters and the advantage of cerebrospinal fluid flow image using time-spatial labeling inversion pulse at 3 tesla magnetic resonance imaging: comparison of image quality for 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Ozasa, Masaya; Yahata, Seiji; Yoshida, Ayako; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Abe, Kayoko

    2014-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) imaging by time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) technique is labeled by CSF with a selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse as internal tracer, thus making it possible to visualize CSF dynamics non-invasively. The purpose of this study was to clarify labeled CSF signals during various black blood time to inversion (BBTI) values at 3 tesla (T) and 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to determine appropriate CSF imaging parameters at 3 T MRI in 10 healthy volunteers. To calculate optimal BBTI values, ROIs were set in untagged cerebral parenchyma and CSF on the image of the CSF flow from the aqueduct to the fourth ventricle in 1.5 T and 3 T MRI. Visual evaluation of CSF flow also was assessed with changes of matrix and echo time (TE) at 3 T MRI. The mean BBTI value at null point of untagged CSF in 3 T MRI was longer than that of 1.5 T. The MR conditions of the highest visual evaluation were FOV, 14 cm×14 cm; Matrix, 192×192; and TE, 117 ms. CSF imaging using Time-SLIP at 3 T MRI is expected visualization of CSF flow and clarification of CSF dynamics in more detail by setting the optimal conditions because 3 T MRI has the advantage of high contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25672449

  9. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  10. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  11. Quench problems of Nb3 Sn cosine theta high field dipole model magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Ryuji; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2004-12-01

    We have developed and tested several cosine theta high field dipole model magnets for accelerator application, utilizing Nb{sub 3}Sn strands made by MJR method and PIT method. With Rutherford cables made with PIT strand we achieved 10.1 Tesla central field at 2.2 K operation, and 9.5 Tesla at 4.5 K operation. The magnet wound with the MJR cable prematurely quenched at 6.8 Tesla at 4.5 K due to cryo-instability. Typical quench behaviors of these magnets are described for both types of magnets, HFDA-04 of MJR and HFDA-05 of PIT. Their characteristics parameters are compared on d{sub eff}, RRR, thermal conductivity and others, together with other historical Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets. It is suggested a larger RRR value is essential for the stability of the epoxy impregnated high field magnets made with high current density strands. It is shown that a magnet with a larger RRR value has a longer MPZ value and more stable, due to its high thermal conductivity and low resistivity.

  12. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  13. Electron beam guiding by external magnetic fields in imploded fuel plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, T.; Sentoku, Y.; Nagatomo, H.; Sunahara, A.; Sakagami, H.; Fujioka, S.; Shiraga, H.; Endo, T.; FIREX project group

    2016-05-01

    For enhancing the core heating efficiency in fast ignition laser fusion, we proposed the fast electron beam by externally-applied the kilo-tesla (kT) class longitudinal magnetic field. We evaluated the imploded core and the magnetic field profiles formed through the implosion dynamics by resistive MHD radiation hydro code. Using those profiles, the guiding effect was evaluated by fast electron transport simulations, which shows that in addition to the feasible field configuration (moderate mirror ratio), the kT-class magnetic field is required at the fast electron generation point. In this case, the significant enhancement in heating efficiency is expected.

  14. Differential blood cell separation using a high gradient magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Roath, S; Melville, D

    1978-02-01

    A technique for the separation of erythrocytes from whole blood is described which exploits the magnetic property of haemoglobin in the reduced state. The technique is characterized by the use of a filter consisting of a cylinder, containing stainless steel wire mesh, placed between the jaws of an electro magnet. When activated, the electromagnet induces a magnetic field gradient in the vicinity of each of the constituent wires, sufficient to attract and trap erythrocytes in suspension. The number of erythrocytes captured varies with the applied field (0-1.4 Tesla in these experiments) and flow rate (1.9-12.9 x 10(-4) m s-1). The capture process does not cause haemolysis or observable surface damage to the erythrocytes and neither leucocytes nor platelets are retained by the filter. PMID:638075

  15. 3-D Numerical Field Calculations of CESR's Upgraded Superconducting Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwald, Zipi; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1997-05-01

    A 3-D numerical code( Z. Greenwald, ``BST.c 3-D Magnetic Field Calculation Numerical Code'', Cornell University Note 96-09) was used to calculate the spatial magnetic fields generated by a current carrying wire. In particular, the code calculates the fields of wire loops wrapped on a pipe similar to superconductive magnet structures. The arrangement and dimensions of the loops can be easily modified to create dipoles, quadrupoles, skew magnets etc., and combinations of the above. In this paper we show the calculated 3-D fields of ironless superconducting quadrupole dipole combination designed for CESR phase III upgrade (which will be manufactured by TESLA). Since the magnet poles are made of loops, the fields at the edges are not only distorted but have a component, B_z, in the z direction as well. This Bz field can cause X-Y coupling of the beam. In order to calculate the coupling, the particle trajectories through the whole magnet were computed. The code is also used to calculate local fields errors due to possible manufacturing imperfections. An example of a rotational error of one pole, and an example of an error in the winding width are shown.

  16. Differences in Velopharyngeal Structure during Speech among Asians Revealed by 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Movie Mode

    PubMed Central

    Nunthayanon, Kulthida; Honda, Ei-ichi; Shimazaki, Kazuo; Ohmori, Hiroko; Inoue-Arai, Maristela Sayuri; Kurabayashi, Tohru; Ono, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Different bony structures can affect the function of the velopharyngeal muscles. Asian populations differ morphologically, including the morphologies of their bony structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the velopharyngeal structures during speech in two Asian populations: Japanese and Thai. Methods. Ten healthy Japanese and Thai females (five each) were evaluated with a 3-Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner while they produced vowel-consonant-vowel syllable (/asa/). A gradient-echo sequence, fast low-angle shot with segmented cine and parallel imaging technique was used to obtain sagittal images of the velopharyngeal structures. Results. MRI was carried out in real time during speech production, allowing investigations of the time-to-time changes in the velopharyngeal structures. Thai subjects had a significantly longer hard palate and produced shorter consonant than Japanese subjects. The velum of the Thai participants showed significant thickening during consonant production and their retroglossal space was significantly wider at rest, whereas the dimensional change during task performance was similar in the two populations. Conclusions. The 3 T MRI movie method can be used to investigate velopharyngeal function and diagnose velopharyngeal insufficiency. The racial differences may include differences in skeletal patterns and soft-tissue morphology that result in functional differences for the affected structures. PMID:26273584

  17. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  18. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  19. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  20. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  1. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  2. Magnetic field modification of optical magnetic dipoles.

    PubMed

    Armelles, Gaspar; Caballero, Blanca; Cebollada, Alfonso; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Meneses-Rodríguez, David

    2015-03-11

    Acting on optical magnetic dipoles opens novel routes to govern light-matter interaction. We demonstrate magnetic field modification of the magnetic dipolar moment characteristic of resonant nanoholes in thin magnetoplasmonic films. This is experimentally shown through the demonstration of the magneto-optical analogue of Babinet's principle, where mirror imaged MO spectral dependencies are obtained for two complementary magnetoplasmonic systems: holes in a perforated metallic layer and a layer of disks on a substrate. PMID:25646869

  3. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  4. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  5. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  6. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  7. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  8. High-magnetic-field MHD-generator program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Eustis, R. H.; Mitchner, M.; Self, S. A.; Koester, J. K.; Kruger, C. H.

    1981-07-01

    Progress in an experimental and theoretical program designed to investigate MHD channel phenomena which are important at high magnetic fields is described. The areas of research include nonuniformity effects, boundary layers, Hall field breakdown, the effects of electrode configuration and current concentrations, and studies of steady-state combustion disk and linear channels in an existing 6 Tesla magnet of small dimensions. In the study of the effects of nonuniformities, experiments were performed to test a multi-channel, fiber optics diagnostic system that yields time-resolved temperature profiles in an MHD chanel. For the study of magneto-acoustic fluctuation phenomena, a one dimensional model was developed to describe the performance of a non-ideal MHD generator with a generalized electrical configuration. A two dimensional MHD computer code was developed which predicts the dependence on electrode and insulator dimensions of the onset of interelectrode Hall field breakdown, as initiated either by breakdown in the insulator or in the plasma.

  9. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  10. A 2 Tesla Full Scale High Performance Periodic Permanent Magnet Model for Attractive (228 KN) and repulsive Maglev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stekly, Z. J. J.; Gardner, C.; Domigan, P.; Baker, J.; Hass, M.; McDonald, C.; Wu, C.; Farrell, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two 214.5 cm. long high performance periodic (26 cm period) permanent magnet half-assemblies were designed and constructed for use as a wiggler using Nd-B-Fe and vanadium permendur as hard and soft magnetic materials by Field Effects, a division of Intermagnetics General Corporation. Placing these assemblies in a supporting structure with a 2.1 cm pole to pole separation resulted in a periodic field with a maximum value of 2.04 T. This is believed to be the highest field ever achieved by this type of device. The attractive force between the two 602 kg magnet assemblies is 228 kN, providing enough force for suspension of a 45,500 kg vehicle. If used in an attractive maglev system with an appropriate flat iron rail, one assembly will generate the same force with a gap of 1.05 cm leading to a lift to weight ratio of 38.6, not including the vehicle attachment structure. This permanent magnet compares well with superconducting systems which have lift to weight ratios in the range of 5 to 10. This paper describes the magnet assemblies and their measured magnetic performance. The measured magnetic field and resulting attractive magnetic force have a negative spring characteristic. Appropriate control coils are necessary to provide stable operation. The estimated performance of the assemblies in a stable repulsive mode, with eddy currents in a conducting guideway, is also discussed.

  11. Influence of strong static magnetic field on human cancer HT 1080 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodins, Juris; Korhovs, Vadims; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Buikis, Indulis; Ivanova, Tatjana

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate strong uniform magnetic field influence on the human cancer cells HT 1080. The cells were treated with magnetic field of intensity 1,16 Tesla and with anticancer agent - cis-platinum 0.025 mg/ml or vincristinum 2-3 ng/ml. The intact and the treated cell samples were incubated in a medium with acridine orange (AO). The magnetic field after 15 minutes of influence significantly increased cytoplasmic red fluorescence. Increased AO accumulation in lysosomes suggested to cancer cell metabolic activity stimulation.

  12. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  13. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  14. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:26860655

  15. Magnetic resonance elastography detected with a SQUID in microtesla magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Nathan; Koski, Kristie; Reimer, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    We have used a SQUID-based microtesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system to perform magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) experiments in a measurement field of 132 microtesla. Magnetic resonance elastography is based on MRI and measures three-dimensional displacement and strain fields in a sample. With appropriate data processing this allows for a quantitative map of the physical response of a material to an applied deformation. In the past, MRE experiments using conventional (1.5 tesla and above) MRI systems have demonstrated that MRE may be used as a non-invasive method for measuring stiffness of human tissues, which may aid in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer and other cancers. Our MRE experiment consists of applying a small axial deformation to a cylindrical sample of 0.5% agarose gel. For samples approximately 30 mm in height, we were able to measure displacements on the order of 500 micrometers. Supported by USDOE.

  16. Application of the double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device sensor to micro-tesla 1H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chan Seok; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Seong-Joo; Hwang, Seong-min; Kim, Jin-Mok; Yu, Kwon Kyu; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong-Ho

    2011-09-01

    We developed an ultra-low field (ULF)-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurement system capable of working with a measurement field (Bm) of several micro-tesla and performed basic NMR studies with a double relaxation oscillation superconducting quantum interference device (DROS) instead of conventional dc-SQUIDs. DROS is a SQUID sensor utilizing a relaxation oscillation between a dc-SQUID and a relaxation circuit; the new unit consists of an inductor and a resistor, and is connected in parallel with the SQUID. DROS has a 10 times larger flux-to-voltage transfer coefficient (˜mV/ϕ0) than that of the dc-SQUID, and this large transfer coefficient enables the acquisition of the SQUID signal with a simple flux-locked-loop (FLL) circuit using room temperature pre-amplifiers. The DROS second-order gradiometer showed average field noise of 9.2 μϕ0/√Hz in a magnetically shielded room (MSR). In addition, a current limiter formed of a Josephson junction array was put in a flux-transformer of DROS to prevent excessive currents that can be generated from the high pre-polarization field (Bp). Using this system, we measured an 1H NMR signal in water under 2.8 μT Bm field and reconstructed a one-dimensional MR image from the 1H NMR signal under a gradient field BG of 4.09 nT/mm. In addition, we confirmed that the ULF-NMR system can measure the NMR signal in the presence of metal without any distortion by measuring the NMR signal of a sample wrapped with metal. Lastly, we have measured the scalar J-coupling of trimethylphosphate and were able to confirm a clear doublet NMR signal with the coupling strength J3[P,H] = 10.4 ± 0.8 Hz. Finally, because the existing ULF-NMR/MRI studies were almost all performed with dc-SQUID based systems, we constructed a dc-SQUID-based ULF-NMR system in addition to the DROS based system and compared the characteristics of the two different systems by operating the two systems under identical experimental conditions.

  17. [Nikola Tesla in medicine, too].

    PubMed

    Hanzek, Branko; Jakobović, Zvonimir

    2007-12-01

    Using primary and secondary sources we have shown in this paper the influence of Nikola Tesla's work on the field of medicine. The description of his experiments conduced within secondary-school education programs aimed to present the popularization of his work in Croatia. Although Tesla was dedicated primarily to physics and was not directly involved in biomedical research, his work significantly contributed to paving the way of medical physics particularly radiology and high-frequency electrotherapy. PMID:18383745

  18. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  19. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  20. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)  G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)  GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  1. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Exploratory 7-Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy in Huntington's disease provides in vivo evidence for impaired energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    van den Bogaard, Simon J A; Dumas, Eve M; Teeuwisse, Wouter M; Kan, Hermien E; Webb, Andrew; Roos, Raymund A C; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2011-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative genetic disorder that affects the brain. Atrophy of deep grey matter structures has been reported and it is likely that underlying pathologic processes occur before, or in concurrence with, volumetric changes. Measurement of metabolite concentrations in these brain structures has the potential to provide insight into pathological processes. We aim to gain understanding of metabolite changes with respect to the disease stage and pathophysiological changes. We studied five brain regions using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) using a 7-Tesla MRI scanner. Localized proton spectra were acquired to obtain six metabolite concentrations. MRS was performed in the caudate nucleus, putamen, thalamus, hypothalamus, and frontal lobe in 44 control subjects, premanifest gene carriers and manifest HD. In the caudate nucleus, HD patients display lower NAA (p = 0.009) and lower creatine concentration (p = 0.001) as compared to controls. In the putamen, manifest HD patients show lower NAA (p = 0.024), lower creatine concentration (p = 0.027), and lower glutamate (p = 0.013). Although absolute values of NAA, creatine, and glutamate were lower, no significant differences to controls were found in the premanifest gene carriers. The lower concentrations of NAA and creatine in the caudate nucleus and putamen of early manifest HD suggest deficits in neuronal integrity and energy metabolism. The changes in glutamate could support the excitotoxicity theory. These findings not only give insight into neuropathological changes in HD but also indicate that MRS can possibly be applied in future clinical trails to evaluate medication targeted at specific metabolic processes. PMID:21614431

  3. Magnetic fields in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Åke; Rögnvaldsson, Örnólfur

    We have studied the fate of initial magnetic fields in the hot halo gas out of which the visible parts of galaxies form, using three-dimensional numerical MHD-experiments. The halo gas undergoes compression by several orders of magnitude in the subsonic cooling flow that forms the cold disk. The magnetic field is carried along and is amplified considerably in the process, reaching μG levels for reasonable values of the initial ratio of magnetic to thermal energy density.

  4. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  5. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  6. Cosmic Magnetic Fields - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielebinski, Richard; Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields have been known in antiquity. Aristotle attributes the first of what could be called a scientific discussion on magnetism to Thales, who lived from about 625 BC. In China “magnetic carts” were in use to help the Emperor in his journeys of inspection. Plinius comments that in the Asia Minor province of Magnesia shepherds' staffs get at times “glued” to a stone, a alodestone. In Europe the magnetic compass came through the Arab sailors who met the Portuguese explorers. The first scientific treatise on magnetism, “De Magnete”, was published by William Gilbert who in 1600 described his experiments and suggested that the Earth was a huge magnet. Johannes Kepler was a correspondent of Gilbert and at times suggested that planetary motion was due to magnetic forces. Alas, this concept was demolished by Isaac Newton,who seeing the falling apple decided that gravity was enough. This concept of dealing with gravitational forces only remains en vogue even today. The explanations why magnetic effects must be neglected go from “magnetic energy is only 1% of gravitation” to “magnetic fields only complicate the beautiful computer solutions”. What is disregarded is the fact that magnetic effects are very directional(not omni-directional as gravity) and also the fact that magnetic fields are seen every where in our cosmic universe.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  8. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Hoard, R.W.

    1994-05-10

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla are disclosed. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field. 4 figures.

  9. High-field magnets using high-critical-temperature superconducting thin films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Hoard, Ronald W.

    1994-01-01

    High-field magnets fabricated from high-critical-temperature superconducting ceramic (HTSC) thin films which can generate fields greater than 4 Tesla. The high-field magnets are made of stackable disk-shaped substrates coated with HTSC thin films, and involves maximizing the critical current density, superconducting film thickness, number of superconducting layers per substrate, substrate diameter, and number of substrates while minimizing substrate thickness. The HTSC thin films are deposited on one or both sides of the substrates in a spiral configuration with variable line widths to increase the field.

  10. Magnetic field annealing for improved creep resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Ludtka, Gail M.; Ludtka, Gerard M.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Nicholson, Don M.; Rios, Orlando; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-12-22

    The method provides heat-resistant chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloys having improved creep resistance. A precursor is provided containing preselected constituents of a chromia- or alumina-forming Fe-, Fe(Ni), Ni(Fe), or Ni-based alloy, at least one of the constituents for forming a nanoscale precipitate MaXb where M is Cr, Nb, Ti, V, Zr, or Hf, individually and in combination, and X is C, N, O, B, individually and in combination, a=1 to 23 and b=1 to 6. The precursor is annealed at a temperature of 1000-1500.degree. C. for 1-48 h in the presence of a magnetic field of at least 5 Tesla to enhance supersaturation of the M.sub.aX.sub.b constituents in the annealed precursor. This forms nanoscale M.sub.aX.sub.b precipitates for improved creep resistance when the alloy is used at service temperatures of 500-1000.degree. C. Alloys having improved creep resistance are also disclosed.

  11. Apparatus and method for magnetically processing a specimen

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Kisner, Roger A; Jaramillo, Roger A

    2013-09-03

    An apparatus for magnetically processing a specimen that couples high field strength magnetic fields with the magnetocaloric effect includes a high field strength magnet capable of generating a magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla and a magnetocaloric insert disposed within a bore of the high field strength magnet. A method for magnetically processing a specimen includes positioning a specimen adjacent to a magnetocaloric insert within a bore of a magnet and applying a high field strength magnetic field of at least 1 Tesla to the specimen and to the magnetocaloric insert. The temperature of the specimen changes during the application of the high field strength magnetic field due to the magnetocaloric effect.

  12. Magnetic field synthesis for microwave magnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, F. R.

    1982-04-01

    The Microwave and Quantum Magnetics Group of the M.I.T. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science undertook a two-year research program directed at developing synthesis procedures that allow magnetostatic and/or magnetoelastic modes to be specially tailored for microwave signal processing applications that include magnetically tunable filters and limiters as well as delay lines that are either linearly dispersive or nondispersive over prescribed bandwidths. Special emphasis was given to devices employing thin films of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) that are blessed with spatially nonuniform dc magnetic fields.

  13. Magnetic field dependent photoluminescence studies of InGaAs/GaAs strained-single-quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.D.; Dawson, L.R.; Klem, J.F.; Lyo, S.K.; Heiman, D.; Liu, X.C.

    1994-08-01

    Magnetoluminescence determined conduction-band and valence-band dispersion curves are presented for n-type InGaAs/GaAs stained-single-quantum well structures. The magnetic field range was 0 to 30 tesla, and the temperature varied between 4.2 and 77.4 K.

  14. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  15. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  16. Assessment of the right ventricle with cardiovascular magnetic resonance at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional and morphologic assessment of the right ventricle (RV) is of clinical importance. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at 1.5T has become gold standard for RV chamber quantification and assessment of even small wall motion abnormalities, but tissue analysis is still hampered by limited spatial resolution. CMR at 7T promises increased resolution, but is technically challenging. We examined the feasibility of cine imaging at 7T to assess the RV. Methods Nine healthy volunteers underwent CMR at 7T using a 16-element TX/RX coil and acoustic cardiac gating. 1.5T served as gold standard. At 1.5T, steady-state free-precession (SSFP) cine imaging with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 was used; at 7T, fast gradient echo (FGRE) with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 and (1.3x1.3x4) mm3 were applied. RV dimensions (RVEDV, RVESV), RV mass (RVM) and RV function (RVEF) were quantified in transverse slices. Overall image quality, image contrast and image homogeneity were assessed in transverse and sagittal views. Results All scans provided diagnostic image quality. Overall image quality and image contrast of transverse RV views were rated equally for SSFP at 1.5T and FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.3x1.3x4)mm3. FGRE at 7T provided significantly lower image homogeneity compared to SSFP at 1.5T. RVEDV, RVESV, RVEF and RVM did not differ significantly and agreed close between SSFP at 1.5T and FGRE at 7T (p=0.5850; p=0.5462; p=0.2789; p=0.0743). FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.3x1.3x4) mm3 tended to overestimate RV volumes compared to SSFP at 1.5T (mean difference of RVEDV 8.2±9.3ml) and to FGRE at 7T with voxel size (1.2x1.2x6) mm3 (mean difference of RVEDV 9.3±8.6ml). Conclusions FGRE cine imaging of the RV at 7T was feasible and provided good image quality. RV dimensions and function were comparable to SSFP at 1.5T as gold standard. PMID:23497030

  17. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  18. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  19. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  20. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  1. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  2. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  3. Chondrule magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P. J.; Obryan, M. V.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: chondrule magnetic properties; chondrules from the same meteorite; and REM values (the ratio for remanence initially measured to saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field). The preliminary field estimates for chondrules magnetizing environments range from minimal to a least several mT. These estimates are based on REM values and the characteristics of the remanence initially measured (natural remanence) thermal demagnetization compared to the saturation remanence in 1 Tesla field demagnetization.

  4. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  5. Magnetic field structure of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently planet Mercury - an unexplored territory in our solar system - has been of much interest to the scientific community due to recent flybys of the spacecraft MESSENGER that discovered its intrinsic stationary and large-scale dipole like magnetic field structure with an intensity of ˜300nT confirming Mariner 10 observations. In the present study, with the observed constraint of Mercury's atmospheric magnetic field structure, internal magnetic field structure is modeled as a solution of magnetic diffusion equation. In this study, Mercury's internal structure mainly consists of a stable stratified fluid core and the convective mantle. For simplicity, magnetic diffusivity in both parts of the structure is considered to be uniform and constant with a value represented by a suitable averages. It is further assumed that vigorous convection in the mantle disposes of the electric currents leading to a very high diffusivity in that region. Thus, in order to satisfy observed atmospheric magnetic field structure, Mercury's most likely magnetic field structure consists of a solution of MHD diffusion equation in the core and a combined multipolar (dipole and quadrupole like magnetic field structures embedded in the uniform field) solution of a current free like magnetic field structure in the mantle and in the atmosphere. With imposition of appropriate boundary conditions at the core-mantle boundary for the first two diffusion eigen modes, in order to satisfy the observed field structure, present study puts the constraint on Mercury's core radius to be ˜2000km. From the estimated magnetic diffusivity and the core radius, it is also possible to estimate the two diffusion eigen modes with their diffusion time scales of ˜8.6 and 3.7 billion years respectively suggesting that the planet inherits its present-day magnetic field structure from the solar Nebula. It is proposed that permanency of such a large-scale magnetic field structure of the planet is attained during

  6. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  7. Experiments of cylindrical isentropic compression by ultrahigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Zhongyu; Zhang, Chunbo; Tang, Xiaosong; Tong, Yanjin; Zhao, Jianheng; Sun, Chengwei

    2015-09-01

    The high Explosive Magnetic Flux Implosion Compression Generator (EMFICG) is a kind of unique high energy density dynamic technique with characters like ultrahigh pressure and low temperature rising and could be suitable as a tool of cylindrical isentropic compression. The Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (IFP, CAEP) have developed EMFICG technique and realized cylindrical isentropic compression. In the experiments, a seed magnetic field of 5-6 Tesla were built first and compressed by a stainless steel liner which is driven by high explosive. The inner free surface velocity of sample was measured by PDV. The isentropic compression of a copper sample was verified and the isentropic pressure is over 100 GPa. The cylindrical isentropic compression process has been numerical simulated by 1D MHD code and the simulation results were compared with the experiments. Compared with the transitional X-ray flash radiograph measurement, this method will probably promote the data accuracy.

  8. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gerber, S; Jang, H; Nojiri, H; Matsuzawa, S; Yasumura, H; Bonn, D A; Liang, R; Hardy, W N; Islam, Z; Mehta, A; Song, S; Sikorski, M; Stefanescu, D; Feng, Y; Kivelson, S A; Devereaux, T P; Shen, Z-X; Kao, C-C; Lee, W-S; Zhu, D; Lee, J-S

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured with x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. We combined a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free-electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields of up to 28 tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops at temperatures below ~150 kelvin, is essentially two dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW appears around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature; in contrast, the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked. PMID:26541608

  9. Three-Dimensional Charge Density Wave Order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at High Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W.; Islam, Z.; Lee, W. -S.; Zhu, D.; Lee, J. -S.

    2015-11-20

    Charge density wave (CDW) correlations have been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsets around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate inplane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and hightemperature superconductivity are intimately linked.

  10. Three-dimensional charge density wave order in YBa2Cu3O6.67 at high magnetic fields

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerber, S.; Jang, H.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuzawa, S.; Yasumura, H.; Bonn, D. A.; Liang, R.; Hardy, W. N.; Islam, Z.; Mehta, A.; et al

    2015-11-20

    In this study, charge density wave (CDW) correlations have recently been shown to universally exist in cuprate superconductors. However, their nature at high fields inferred from nuclear magnetic resonance is distinct from that measured by x-ray scattering at zero and low fields. Here we combine a pulsed magnet with an x-ray free electron laser to characterize the CDW in YBa2Cu3O6.67 via x-ray scattering in fields up to 28 Tesla. While the zero-field CDW order, which develops below T ~ 150 K, is essentially two-dimensional, at lower temperature and beyond 15 Tesla, another three-dimensionally ordered CDW emerges. The field-induced CDW onsetsmore » around the zero-field superconducting transition temperature, yet the incommensurate in-plane ordering vector is field-independent. This implies that the two forms of CDW and high-temperature superconductivity are intimately linked.« less

  11. Magnetostriction and magnetic texture to 100.75 Tesla in frustrated SrCu2(BO3)2

    PubMed Central

    Jaime, Marcelo; Daou, Ramzy; Crooker, Scott A.; Weickert, Franziska; Uchida, Atsuko; Feiguin, Adrian E.; Batista, Cristian D.; Dabkowska, Hanna A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Strong geometrical frustration in magnets leads to exotic states such as spin liquids, spin supersolids, and complex magnetic textures. SrCu2(BO3)2, a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the archetypical Shastry–Sutherland lattice, exhibits a rich spectrum of magnetization plateaus and stripe-like magnetic textures in applied fields. The structure of these plateaus is still highly controversial due to the intrinsic complexity associated with frustration and competing length scales. We discover magnetic textures in SrCu2(BO3)2 via magnetostriction and magnetocaloric measurements in fields up to 100.75 T. In addition to observing low-field fine structure with unprecedented resolution, the data also reveal lattice responses at 73.6 T and at 82 T that we attribute, using a controlled density matrix renormalization group approach, to a unanticipated 2/5 plateau and to the long-predicted 1/2 plateau.

  12. Attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation by intense few-cycle circularly polarized UV laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-07-01

    Intense attosecond-magnetic-field pulses are predicted to be produced by intense few-cycle attosecond circularly polarized UV pulses. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H2+ are used to study the electronic dynamical process. Spinning attosecond circular electron wave packets are created on subnanometer molecular dimensions, thus generating attosecond magnetic fields of several tens of Teslas (105 G). Simulations show that the induced magnetic field is critically dependent on the pulse wavelength λ and pulse duration nτ (n is number of cycles) as predicted by a classical model. For ultrashort few-cycle circularly polarized attosecond pulses, molecular orientation influences the generation of the induced magnetic fields as a result of preferential ionization perpendicular to the molecular axis. The nonspherical asymmetry of molecules allows for efficient attosecond-magnetic-field-pulse generation.

  13. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  14. Development of a 50-T pulsed magnetic field facility by using an 1.5-MJ capacitor bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Y. H.; Kim, Yongmin

    2015-09-01

    Because DC magnets consume a huge amount of electricity (resistive DC magnet) or liquid helium (superconducting magnet), a capacitor-bank-driven pulsed magnet is known to be a cost-effective way of generating high magnetic fields. This type of pulsed magnet is normally operated at liquid nitrogen temperature and consumes little electric power to generate over 50 tesla (T) during a short transient time of less than 50 millisecond (ms). With modern fast data acquisition systems, almost all kinds of physical quantities, such as photoluminescence, magnetization or resistance can be measured during a short magnetic field pulse. We report a recently home-built capacitor-bankdriven pulsed magnetic field facility, in which a capacitor bank of 1.5-MJ maximum stored energy is utilized to generate pulsed magnetic fields up to 50 T with transient pulse time of 22 ms.

  15. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  16. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  17. Bridgman Growth of GeSi Alloys in a Static Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Vujisic, L.; Motakef, S.

    1998-01-01

    Ge(0.95)Si(0.050 alloy crystals have been grown by the vertical Bridgman technique, both with and without an axial 5 Tesla magnetic field. The crystals were processed in a constant axial thermal gradient and the effects of graphite, hot pressed boron nitride, and pyrolitic boron nitride ampoule materials on interface shapes and macrosegregation profiles were investigated. The sample grown in a graphite ampoule at 5 Tesla exhibited a macroscopic axial concentration profile close to that of complete mixing and strong striation patterns. In samples grown in boron nitride ampoules, both with and without a 5 Tesla magnetic field applied, measured macroscopic axial concentration profiles were intermediate between those expected for a completely mixed melt and diffusion-controlled growth, and striation patterns were also observed. Possible explanations for the apparent inability of the magnetic field to reduce the flow velocities to below the growth velocities are discussed, and results of growth experiments in pyrolitic boron nitride ampoules are also described.

  18. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  19. Crystal field and magnetic properties of ErH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) times 10 to the minus 6 Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is of the order of 160 to 180 K.

  20. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  1. High Spatial Resolution Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance at 7.0 Tesla in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy – First Experiences: Lesson Learned from 7.0 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Prothmann, Marcel; von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Töpper, Agnieszka; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Shahid, Etham; Graessl, Andreas; Rieger, Jan; Lysiak, Darius; Thalhammer, C.; Huelnhagen, Till; Kellman, Peter; Niendorf, Thoralf; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) provides valuable information in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) based on myocardial tissue differentiation and the detection of small morphological details. CMR at 7.0T improves spatial resolution versus today’s clinical protocols. This capability is as yet untapped in HCM patients. We aimed to examine the feasibility of CMR at 7.0T in HCM patients and to demonstrate its capability for the visualization of subtle morphological details. Methods We screened 131 patients with HCM. 13 patients (9 males, 56 ±31 years) and 13 healthy age- and gender-matched subjects (9 males, 55 ±31years) underwent CMR at 7.0T and 3.0T (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For the assessment of cardiac function and morphology, 2D CINE imaging was performed (voxel size at 7.0T: (1.4x1.4x2.5) mm3 and (1.4x1.4x4.0) mm3; at 3.0T: (1.8x1.8x6.0) mm3). Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was performed at 3.0T for detection of fibrosis. Results All scans were successful and evaluable. At 3.0T, quantification of the left ventricle (LV) showed similar results in short axis view vs. the biplane approach (LVEDV, LVESV, LVMASS, LVEF) (p = 0.286; p = 0.534; p = 0.155; p = 0.131). The LV-parameters obtained at 7.0T where in accordance with the 3.0T data (pLVEDV = 0.110; pLVESV = 0.091; pLVMASS = 0.131; pLVEF = 0.182). LGE was detectable in 12/13 (92%) of the HCM patients. High spatial resolution CINE imaging at 7.0T revealed hyperintense regions, identifying myocardial crypts in 7/13 (54%) of the HCM patients. All crypts were located in the LGE-positive regions. The crypts were not detectable at 3.0T using a clinical protocol. Conclusions CMR at 7.0T is feasible in patients with HCM. High spatial resolution gradient echo 2D CINE imaging at 7.0T allowed the detection of subtle morphological details in regions of extended hypertrophy and LGE. PMID:26863618

  2. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Reddig, Annika; Fatahi, Mahsa; Friebe, Björn; Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  3. Analysis of DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Cytotoxicity after 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Isolated Human Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guttek, Karina; Hartig, Roland; Godenschweger, Frank; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Ricke, Jens; Reinhold, Dirk; Speck, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The global use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is constantly growing and the field strengths increasing. Yet, only little data about harmful biological effects caused by MRI exposure are available and published research analyzing the impact of MRI on DNA integrity reported controversial results. This in vitro study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of 7 T ultra-high-field MRI on isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hence, unstimulated mononuclear blood cells were exposed to 7 T static magnetic field alone or in combination with maximum permissible imaging gradients and radiofrequency pulses as well as to ionizing radiation during computed tomography and γ-ray exposure. DNA double-strand breaks were quantified by flow cytometry and automated microscopy analysis of immunofluorescence stained γH2AX. Cytotoxicity was studied by CellTiter-Blue viability assay and [3H]-thymidine proliferation assay. Exposure of unstimulated mononuclear blood cells to 7 T static magnetic field alone or combined with varying gradient magnetic fields and pulsed radiofrequency fields did not induce DNA double-strand breaks, whereas irradiation with X- and γ-rays led to a dose-dependent induction of γH2AX foci. The viability assay revealed a time- and dose-dependent decrease in metabolic activity only among samples exposed to γ-radiation. Further, there was no evidence for altered proliferation response after cells were exposed to 7 T MRI or low doses of ionizing radiation (≤ 0.2 Gy). These findings confirm the acceptance of MRI as a safe non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool, but whether MRI can induce other types of DNA lesions or DNA double-strand breaks during altered conditions still needs to be investigated. PMID:26176601

  4. Magnetic field measurements of a superconducting undulator for a Harmonic Generation FEL experiment at the NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, L.; Ingold, G.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.; Sampson, W.; Robins, K.

    1993-07-01

    An 18mm period, 0.54 Tesla, 8mm gap superconducting undulator with both horizontal and vertical focusing has been built and tested. This magnet, which is fabricated in 25 cm length sections, is being tested for use in the radiator section (total magnet length of 1.5 m) of the Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser experiment at the National Synchrotron Light Source - Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Lab., in collaboration with Grumman Corp. The measurement system is outlined, sources and estimates of errors are described, and some magnetic field data are presented and discussed.

  5. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  6. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  7. Phase equilibria of Fe-C binary alloys in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Roger Dale

    The deployment of high flux magnetic processing in industry requires the ability to model the expected results of a proposed processing, and the current assumptions in the literature did not reflect the actual outcome in measurements of ductile iron. Simple binary iron-carbon alloys of less than one weight percent carbon were thermo-magnetically processed and then compared with Gibbs free energy phase transformation predictions. The data was used to quantify the change in the Gibbs free energy associated with the addition of a static high flux magnetic field, which is complicated by the change in magnetic response as the iron carbon alloys pass through the Curie point. A current common practice is to modify Gibbs free energy by -12J per mole per Tesla applied, as has been reported in the literature. This current prediction practice was employed in initial experiments for this work and the experimental data did not agree with these predicted values. This work suggests two specific influences that affect the model, chemistry and magnetic dipole changes. First, that the influence of alloying elements in the original chemistry, as the samples in the literature were a manganese alloy with 0.45 weight percent carbon, as well as not being precisely controlled for tramp elements that commonly occur in recycled material, created a change that was not predicted and therefore the temperatures were incorrect. Also, the phase transformation in a high flux magnetic field was measured to have a different response under warming versus cooling than the normal hysteresis under ambient magnetism. The change in Gibbs free energy for the binary alloys was calculated as -3J per mole per Tesla in warming, and -8J per mole per tesla in cooling. The change from these values to the -12J per mole per Tesla previously reported is attributed to the change in chemistry. This work attributes the published increase in physical properties to the Hall-Petch relation as a result of the finer product

  8. Muon g-2 at Fermilab: Magnetic Field Preparations for a New Physics Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiburg, Brendan; Muon g-2 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Muon g - 2 experiment at Fermilab will measure the muon's anomalous magnetic moment, aμ, to 140 parts-per-billion. Modern calculations for aμ differ from the current experimental value by 3.6 σ. Our effort will test this discrepancy by collecting 20 times more muons and implementing several upgrades to the well-established storage ring technique. The experiment utilizes a superconducting electromagnet with a 7-meter radius and a uniform 1.45-Tesla magnetic field to store ~104 muons at a time. The times, energies, and locations of the subsequent decay positrons are determined and combined with magnetic field measurements to extract aμ. This talk will provide a brief snapshot of the current discrepancy. The role and requirements of the precision magnetic field will be described. Recent progress to establish the required magnetic field uniformity will be highlighted.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  10. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.