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Sample records for test pattern generator

  1. Ring Counter Based ATPG for Low Transition Test Pattern Generation

    PubMed Central

    Begam, V. M. Thoulath; Baulkani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In test mode test patterns are applied in random fashion to the circuit under circuit. This increases switching transition between the consecutive test patterns and thereby increases dynamic power dissipation. The proposed ring counter based ATPG reduces vertical switching transitions by inserting test vectors only between the less correlative test patterns. This paper presents the RC-ATPG with an external circuit. The external circuit consists of XOR gates, full adders, and multiplexers. First the total number of transitions between the consecutive test patterns is determined. If it is more, then the external circuit generates and inserts test vectors in between the two test patterns. Test vector insertion increases the correlation between the test patterns and reduces dynamic power dissipation. The results prove that the test patterns generated by the proposed ATPG have fewer transitions than the conventional ATPG. Experimental results based on ISCAS'85 and ISCAS'89 benchmark circuits show 38.5% reduction in the average power and 50% reduction in the peak power attained during testing with a small size decoding logic. PMID:26075295

  2. A Single Input Change Test Pattern Generator for Sequential Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Lei, Shaochong; Shao, Zhibiao

    An optimized Built-In Self-Test technology is proposed in this paper. A simplified algebraic model is developed to represent the configurations of single input change circuits. A novel single input change sequence generation technique is designed. It consists of a modified scan shift register, a seed storage array and a series of XOR gates. This circuitry can automatically generate single input change sequences of more unique vectors. Experimental results based on the ISCAS-89 benchmark show that the proposed method can achieve high stuck-at fault coverage with low switching activity during test applications.

  3. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  4. Automatic test pattern generation for logic circuits using the Boolean tree

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong Taegwon.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an algorithm that can generate test patterns for combinational circuits and sequential logic circuits automatically. The new proposed algorithm generates a test pattern by using a special tree called a modified Boolean tree. In this algorithm, the construction of a modified Boolean tree is the most time-consuming step. Following the construction of a modified Boolean tree, a test pattern can be found by simply assigning a logic value 1 for even primary inputs and a logic value 0 for odd primary inputs of the constructed modified Boolean tree. The algorithm is applied to several benchmark circuits. The results showed the following: (1) for combinational circuits, the algorithm can generate test patterns 10-15% faster than the FAN algorithm, which is known as one of the most efficient algorithms to-date; (2) for sequential circuits, the algorithm shows more fault coverage than the nine valued algorithm.

  5. The Graphic Pattern Generation Test in Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Psychometric Properties and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Sunderaraman, Preeti; Sokolov, Elisaveta; Cines, Sarah; Sullo, Elizabeth; Orly, Aidan; Lerer, Bianca; Karlawish, Jason; Huey, Edward; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Design fluency tests, commonly used in both clinical and research contexts to evaluate nonverbal concept generation, have the potential to offer useful information in the differentiation of healthy versus pathological aging. While normative data for older adults are available for multiple timed versions of this test, similar data have been unavailable for a previously published untimed task, the Graphic Pattern Generation Task (GPG). Time constraints common to almost all of the available design fluency tests may cloud interpretation of higher level executive abilities, for example in individuals with slow processing speed. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the GPG and presents normative data in a sample of 167 healthy older adults (OAs) and 110 individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results suggest that a brief version of the GPG can be administered reliably, and that this short form has high test-retest and inter-rater reliability. Number of perseverations was higher in individuals with AD as compared to OAs. A cut-off score of 4 or more perseverations showed a moderate degree of sensitivity (76%) and specificity (37%) in distinguishing individuals with AD and OAs. Finally, perseverations were associated with nonmemory indices, underscoring the nonverbal nature of this error in OAs and individuals with AD. PMID:25679880

  6. A test of a dual central pattern generator hypothesis for subcortical control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, M A; Etnyre, B; Rodrigue, M L

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the nature of neural circuits involved in subcortical inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation mechanisms of locomotion. These circuits, called central pattern generators (CPGs), are believed to receive tonic input and generate rhythmically alternating sets of commands. Although CPGs have been theorized to exist in humans, their potential dual role in inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation is unclear. In the present study, nine participants walked on a treadmill, timing their heel-strikes to a metronome which varied the phase lag from 0.5 to 1.0 pi radians (0.1 pi intervals). A stimulus was delivered to the sural nerve and reflexes were measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremities through electromyography. The similarity between phase lag conditions for both temporal coordination (i.e., relative timing aspects between muscles and/or limbs) and reflex intensities suggested that they may be controlled by the same subcortical circuitry. Two plausible explanations exist: (1) a single CPG coordinates muscular contractions and phasically alters proprioceptive reflex modulation, as well as cutaneous input, using feed-forward control; (2) two separate circuits are strongly entrained, producing synchronous outputs for inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation. The out-of-phase task used in this study was limited in discerning such a difference, if it exists. PMID:10969197

  7. Resistive shorts characterization in CMOS standard cells for test pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, Andrzej; Potrykus, Bartosz

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an extended method of CMOS standard cells characterization for defect based voltage testing. Resistance of a short defect is taken into account while considering faulty behavior caused by this defect and finding the test vectors that detect this fault. Finally, all of found vectors are validated to check their effectiveness in fault covering and the optimal test sequence for all detectable faults is constructed. Experimental results for cells from industrial standard cell library are presented.

  8. Creative Test Generators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, F. D.

    1973-01-01

    A brief description of a test generating program which generates questions concerning the Fortran programming language in a random but guided fashion and without resorting to an item bank.'' (Author/AK)

  9. Starter/generator testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anon

    1994-10-01

    Sundstrand Aerospace and GE Aircraft Engines have studied the switched reluctance machine for use as an integral starter/generator for future aircraft engines. They have conducted an initial, low-power testing of the starter/generator, which is based on power inverters using IGBT-technology semiconductors, to verify its feasibility in the externally mounted version of the integral starter/generator. This preliminary testing of the 250-kW starter/generator reveals favorable results.

  10. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    2001-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator is intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter. Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic mode were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations resulted in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included a turbine inlet manifold, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  11. Fastrac Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesman, Tomas E.; Dennis, Jay

    1999-01-01

    A rocket engine gas generator component development test was recently conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This gas generator was intended to power a rocket engine turbopump by the combustion of Lox and RP-1. The testing demonstrated design requirements for start sequence, wall compatibility, performance, and stable combustion. During testing the gas generator injector was modified to improve distribution of outer wall coolant and the igniter boss was modified to investigate the use of a pyrotechnic igniter, Expected chamber pressure oscillations at longitudinal acoustic modes were measured for three different chamber lengths tested. High amplitude discrete oscillations occurred in the chamber-alone configurations when chamber acoustic modes coupled with feed-system acoustics modes. For the full gas generator configuration, which included the turbine inlet manifold simulator, high amplitude oscillations occurred only at off-design very low power levels. This testing led to a successful gas generator design for the Fastrac 60,000 lb thrust engine.

  12. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Also, apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  13. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  14. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  15. Optical Pattern Generator Using Excimer Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Bernhard F.

    1988-01-01

    Reticles (masks on enlarged scale) are needed for optical pattern transfer in the production of integrated semiconductor circuits. In order to meet present requirements for 5X reticles only a direct writing technique is feasible. This means direct exposing of photoresist either with light or an electron beam. Many of todays highly dense reticles require some 10 5 to 10 6 discrete exposures when generated with an optical pattern generator. Optical pattern generators normally use mercury arc lamps to expose positive photoresist, which in turn need 200 milliseconds for each of these discrete exposures, thus requiring to stop the table at every exposure position ("stop and go" mode). This results in running times of several days per reticle. Therefore most reticles are nowadays being manufactured with very expensive e-beam machines. In the early 80's we started the first experiments to expose photoresist with an excimer laser. In order to obtain the maximum gain in speed, the goal was to operate with only one excimer laser pulse per exposure, so that a fast "flash on the fly" operation with an optical pattern generator became true. Equipping a conventional optical pattern generator with an excimer laser as the light source, it has become possible to expose substrates coated with standard photoresist in the "flash on the fly" mode with only 13 nanoseconds per flash. So the thruput could be increased up to 25 times in comparison to a pattern generator equipped with a mercury lamp. A comparison of both operation modes will show that an immense increase of speed is possible, even when a ten years old M3600 pattern generator is used. This system is in function now with very high reliability since more than three years in our IC development line.

  16. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  17. Combinatorial Generation of Test Suites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvorak, Daniel L.; Barrett, Anthony C.

    2009-01-01

    Testgen is a computer program that generates suites of input and configuration vectors for testing other software or software/hardware systems. As systems become ever more complex, often, there is not enough time to test systems against all possible combinations of inputs and configurations, so test engineers need to be selective in formulating test plans. Testgen helps to satisfy this need: In response to a test-suite-requirement-specification model, it generates a minimal set of test vectors that satisfies all the requirements.

  18. Microwave generators simplify swept tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, C. E.; Hagins, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The utilization of the swept-frequency capability makes it possible to conduct any number of microwave tests. It is pointed out that today's microwave sweepers make such tests simple and straightforward. A filter test involving a high-pass filter with a cutoff frequency of 14.0 GHz is discussed, taking into account the use of a microwave sweeper operating in the range from 12 to 18 GHz. Attention is also given to swept-frequency amplifier testing, antenna swept-gain testing, and microwave antenna testing. With a sweep generator, it is simple to assemble a setup for testing amplifier small-signal gain, flatness, and rolloff.

  19. Intersecting Circuits Generate Precisely Patterned Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The developing retina generates spontaneous glutamatergic (stage III) waves of activity that sequentially recruit neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON and OFF RGCs). This activity pattern is thought to help establish parallel ON and OFF pathways in downstream visual areas. The circuits that produce stage III waves and desynchronize ON and OFF RGC firing remain obscure. Using dual patch clamp recordings, we find that ON and OFF RGCs receive sequential excitatory input from ON and OFF cone bipolar cells (CBCs), respectively. This input sequence is generated by crossover circuits, in which ON CBCs control glutamate release from OFF CBCs via diffusely stratified inhibitory amacrine cells. In addition, neighboring ON CBCs communicate directly and indirectly through lateral glutamatergic transmission and gap junctions, both of which are required for wave initiation and propagation. Thus, intersecting lateral excitatory and vertical inhibitory circuits give rise to precisely patterned stage III retinal waves. PMID:23830830

  20. Automatically generating extraction patterns from untagged text

    SciTech Connect

    Riloff, E.

    1996-12-31

    Many corpus-based natural language processing systems rely on text corpora that have been manually annotated with syntactic or semantic tags. In particular, all previous dictionary construction systems for information extraction have used an annotated training corpus or some form of annotated input. We have developed a system called AutoSlog-TS that creates dictionaries of extraction patterns using only untagged text. AutoSlog-TS is based on the AutoSlog system, which generated extraction patterns using annotated text and a set of heuristic rules. By adapting AutoSlog and combining it with statistical techniques, we eliminated its dependency on tagged text. In experiments with the MUC-4 terrorism domain, AutoSlog-TS created a dictionary of extraction patterns that performed comparably to a dictionary created by AutoSlog, using only preclassified texts as input.

  1. Test Generator for MATLAB Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joel

    2011-01-01

    MATLAB Automated Test Tool, version 3.0 (MATT 3.0) is a software package that provides automated tools that reduce the time needed for extensive testing of simulation models that have been constructed in the MATLAB programming language by use of the Simulink and Real-Time Workshop programs. MATT 3.0 runs on top of the MATLAB engine application-program interface to communicate with the Simulink engine. MATT 3.0 automatically generates source code from the models, generates custom input data for testing both the models and the source code, and generates graphs and other presentations that facilitate comparison of the outputs of the models and the source code for the same input data. Context-sensitive and fully searchable help is provided in HyperText Markup Language (HTML) format.

  2. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  3. New downhole steam generator tested

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1981-07-01

    Completion of 2 field tests of a new-model down-hole steam generator paves the way for further evaluation and development of a system destined to increase California's heavy oil production. Current air pollution restrictions there prevent installation of conventional steam generators in several areas of interest to oil operators. The current series of tests, conducted by Chemical Oil Recovery Co. (CORCO) of Bakersfield, California, follows an earlier prototype operation conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in conjunction with the US Department of Energy. The CORCO tests were conducted on the surface with the generator's output going into Tenneco Oil Exploration and Production Co.'s overland-Riokern Well No. 80, located in the Kern River field 4 miles north of Bakersfield. The first test was concluded with just under 1000 bbl of steam injected, less than planned due to a higher-than-expected injection pressure. The unit operated at less than 25% capacity because of the air compressor limitation. Compressor output was only 285 psi, not enough to inject the desired volumes into the reservoir. Test data shows that injection amounted to 150 bpd of 90 to 95% quality steam at 225-psi wellhead pressure. After injection, the well was shut in for 3 days to allow soaking, then put on production. Initial production was 40 bopd at 175 F.

  4. Temperature distortion generator for turboshaft engine testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, G. A.; Barth, R. L.; Biesiadny, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    The procedures and unique hardware used to conduct an experimental investigation into the response of a small-turboshaft-engine compression system to various hot gas ingestion patterns are presented. The temperature distortion generator described herein uses gaseous hydrogen to create both steady-state and time-variant, or transient, temperature distortion at the engine inlet. The range of transient temperature ramps produced by the distortion generator during the engine tests was from less than 111 deg K/sec (200 deg R/sec) to above 611 deg K/sec (1100 deg R/sec); instantaneous temperatures to 422 deg K (760 deg R) above ambient were generated. The distortion generator was used to document the maximum inlet temperatures and temperature rise rates that the compression system could tolerate before the onset of stall for various circumferential distortions as well as the compressor system response during stall.

  5. Downhole steam generator: field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Eson, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Excessive air pollution and heat losses up to 32% in the surface lines and out the stacks of conventional generators are reasons why conventional steam generation is efficient. These problems are addressed and overcome through the use of a direct-fired down-hole steam generator (DSG). By performing the combustion process at high pressure, and then adding water, a mixture of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and steam is discharged directly into the heavy oil reservoir. This study documents a series of field tests of a direct-fired DSG showing its ability to produce and inject high quality steam into heavy oil reservoirs without the need for expensive stack scrubbers to remove sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/), as well as sophisticated nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) control techniques. Results from the 6-in. diameter, 6-ft long, 7.1-mmBtu/hr DSG showed that corrosion can be controlled and production can be improved dramatically in actual field tests in California heavy oil reservoirs.

  6. Automatic optometer operates with infrared test pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornsweet, T. N.; Crane, H. D.

    1970-01-01

    Refractive strength of human eye is monitored by optometer that automatically and continuously images infrared test pattern onto the retina. Condition of focus of the eye at any instant is determined from optometer settings needed to maintain focus of the pattern on the retina.

  7. Test patterns and quality metrics for digital video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, Charles P.; Field, Bruce F.; Van Degrift, Craig

    1997-06-01

    Lossy video compression systems such as MPEG2 introduce picture impairments such as image blocking, color distortion and persistent color fragments, 'mosquito noise,' and blurring in their outputs. While there are video test clips which exhibit one or more of these distortions upon coding, there is need of a set of well-characterized test patterns and video quality metrics. Digital test patterns can deliver calibrated stresses to specific features of the encoder, much as the test patterns for analog video stress critical characteristics of that system. Metrics quantify the error effects of compression by a computation. NIST is developing such test patterns and metrics for compression rates that typically introduce perceptually negligible artifacts, i.e. for high quality video. The test patterns are designed for subjective and objective evaluation. The test patterns include a family of computer-generated spinning wheels to stress luminance-based macro-block motion estimation algorithms and images with strongly directional high-frequency content to stress quantization algorithms. In this paper we discuss the spinning wheel test pattern. It has been encoded at a variety of bit rates near the threshold for the perception of impairments. We have observed that impairment perceptibility depends on the local contrast. For the spinning wheel we report the contrast at the threshold for perception of impairments as a function of the bit rate. To quantify perceptual image blocking we have developed a metric which detects 'flats:' image blocks of constant (or near constant) luminance. The effectiveness of this metric is appraised.

  8. Testing Whether and When Abstract Symmetric Patterns Produce Affective Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bertamini, Marco; Makin, Alexis; Pecchinenda, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Symmetry has a central role in visual art, it is often linked to beauty, and observers can detect it efficiently in the lab. We studied what kind of fast and automatic responses are generated by visual presentation of symmetrical patterns. Specifically, we tested whether a brief presentation of novel symmetrical patterns engenders positive affect using a priming paradigm. The abstract patterns were used as primes in a pattern-word interference task. To ensure that familiarity was not a factor, no pattern and no word was ever repeated within each experiment. The task was to classify words that were selected to have either positive or negative valence. We tested irregular patterns, patterns containing vertical and horizontal reflectional symmetry, and patterns containing a 90 deg rotation. In a series of 7 experiments we found that the effect of affective congruence was present for both types of regularity but only when observers had to classify the regularity of the pattern after responding to the word. The findings show that processing abstract symmetrical shapes or random pattern can engender positive or negative affect as long as the regularity of the pattern is a feature that observers have to attend to and classify. PMID:23840892

  9. Performance testing of thermoelectric generators at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouklove, P.; Truscello, V.

    1974-01-01

    Results of life tests of thermoelectric generators ranging in output power from 800 microwatts to 170 watts. Emphasis is placed on the results obtained from tests of three advanced prototypes - a high-performance generator, a transit-type generator, and a ring converter. In addition, the results of life tests of a number of generators representing Nimbus, Pioneer, and Viking technology are presented.

  10. Generation 1.5 Written Error Patterns: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Stephen M.; Miller, Donald

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to contribute to existing research on Generation 1.5 students, the current study uses quantitative and qualitative methods to compare error patterns in a corpus of Generation 1.5, L1, and L2 community college student writing. This error analysis provides one important way to determine if error patterns in Generation 1.5 student…

  11. Generating Spatiotemporal Joint Torque Patterns from Dynamical Synchronization of Distributed Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Pitti, Alexandre; Lungarella, Max; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Pattern generators found in the spinal cord are no more seen as simple rhythmic oscillators for motion control. Indeed, they achieve flexible and dynamical coordination in interaction with the body and the environment dynamics giving to rise motor synergies. Discovering the mechanisms underlying the control of motor synergies constitutes an important research question not only for neuroscience but also for robotics: the motors coordination of high dimensional robotic systems is still a drawback and new control methods based on biological solutions may reduce their overall complexity. We propose to model the flexible combination of motor synergies in embodied systems via partial phase synchronization of distributed chaotic systems; for specific coupling strength, chaotic systems are able to phase synchronize their dynamics to the resonant frequencies of one external force. We take advantage of this property to explore and exploit the intrinsic dynamics of one specified embodied system. In two experiments with bipedal walkers, we show how motor synergies emerge when the controllers phase synchronize to the body's dynamics, entraining it to its intrinsic behavioral patterns. This stage is characterized by directed information flow from the sensors to the motors exhibiting the optimal situation when the body dynamics drive the controllers (mutual entrainment). Based on our results, we discuss the relevance of our findings for modeling the modular control of distributed pattern generators exhibited in the spinal cord, and for exploring the motor synergies in robots. PMID:20011216

  12. Test Writing Made Simple: Generate Tests and Worksheets Electronically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodish, Erica

    1986-01-01

    Describes capabilities of test and worksheet generator software; discusses features to consider when evaluating the software for purchase; and presents reviews of eight test and worksheet generators: P.D.Q., Testmaster, Easy Quiz Maker, EA Mathematics Worksheet Generator, Mathematics Worksheet Generator, Earth Science Test Maker, Individualized…

  13. A hierarchical approach to test generation for CMOS VLSI circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weening, Edward Christiaan

    A hierarchical approach to the automatic test pattern generation for large digital VLSI circuits, fabricated in CMOS technology, is developed and implemented. The use of information on the circuit's hierarchy, which is readily available from most modern CAD (Computer Aided Design) systems, speeds up the test generation process considerably and enhances the quality of the tests generated. The hierarchical test generation tool can also be integrated in future CAD systems making test generation and testability enhancement during circuit design feasible. The hierarchical approach is described at the switch, functional, and behavioral level. A test pattern generation algorithm at the switch level is presented. Test generation and fault simulation algorithms both using OBDD (Ordered Binary Decision Diagram) functional descriptions of the circuit modules are presented. A test plan generation method at the behavioral level is presented. Practical results show that the hierarchical approach to test generation is more efficient than a conventional, non-hierarchical approach, especially for switch level faults. The results also show that the use of Design For Testability (DFT) circuitry is supported at the behavioral level.

  14. Vapor-Generator Wand Helps To Reveal Airflow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In vapor-generator wand, liquid propylene glycol flows into electrically heated stainless-steel tube. Liquid boils in heated tube, and emerging vapor forms dense, smoke-like fog used to make airflow patterns visible. Built in variety of sizes, suitable for uses ranging from tabletop demonstrations to research in wind tunnels. For best viewing, plume illuminated by bright, focused incandescent spotlight at right angle to viewing direction. Viewing further enhanced by coating walls of test chamber with flat, dark color to minimize reflections and increase contrast.

  15. Automated Test-Form Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.; Diao, Qi

    2011-01-01

    In automated test assembly (ATA), the methodology of mixed-integer programming is used to select test items from an item bank to meet the specifications for a desired test form and optimize its measurement accuracy. The same methodology can be used to automate the formatting of the set of selected items into the actual test form. Three different…

  16. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  17. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability.

    PubMed

    Perego, A M; Tarasov, N; Churkin, D V; Turitsyn, S K; Staliunas, K

    2016-01-15

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems. PMID:26824573

  18. Generator acceptance test and inspection report

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, B.R.

    1997-07-24

    This Acceptance Test Report(ATR) is the completed testing and inspection of the new portable generator. The testing and inspection is to verify that the generator provided by the vendor meets the requirements of specification WHC-S-0252, Revision 2. Attached is various other documentation to support the inspection and testing.

  19. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: temporal pattern of premotor activity.

    PubMed

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Morris, Lee G; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul A; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2006-07-01

    The central pattern generator for heartbeat in medicinal leeches constitutes seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons. Four identified pairs of heart interneurons make a staggered pattern of inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. Using extracellular recording from multiple interneurons in the network in 56 isolated nerve cords, we show that this pattern generator produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons. This pattern corresponds to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts, synchronous and peristaltic. We provide a quantitative description of the firing pattern of all the premotor interneurons, including phase, duty cycle, and intraburst frequency of this premotor activity pattern. This analysis identifies two stereotypical coordination modes corresponding to synchronous and peristaltic, which show phase constancy over a broad range of periods as do the fictive motor pattern and the heart constriction pattern. Coordination mode is controlled through one segmental pair of heart interneurons (switch interneurons). Side-to-side switches in coordination mode are a regular feature of this pattern generator and occur with changes in activity state of these switch interneurons. Associated with synchronous coordination of premotor interneurons, the ipsilateral switch interneuron is in an active state, during which it produces rhythmic bursts, whereas associated with peristaltic coordination, the ipsilateral switch interneuron is largely silent. We argue that timing and pattern elaboration are separate functions produced by overlapping subnetworks in the heartbeat central pattern generator. PMID:16611849

  20. Electronic load for testing power generating devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. B.; Stepfer, G.

    1968-01-01

    Instrument tests various electric power generating devices by connecting the devices to the input of the load and comparing their outputs with a reference voltage. The load automatically adjusts until voltage output of the power generating device matches the reference.

  1. Tests of pattern separation and pattern completion in humans-A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy Y; Gould, Rebecca L; Coulson, Mark C; Ward, Emma V; Howard, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    To systematically review the characteristics, validity and outcome measures of tasks that have been described in the literature as assessing pattern separation and pattern completion in humans. Electronic databases were searched for articles. Parameters for task validity were obtained from two reviews that described optimal task design factors to evaluate pattern separation and pattern completion processes. These were that pattern separation should be tested during an encoding task using abstract, never-before-seen visual stimuli, and pattern completion during a retrieval task using partial cues; parametric alteration of the degree of interference of stimuli or degradation of cues should be used to generate a corresponding gradient in behavioral output; studies should explicitly identify the specific memory domain under investigation (sensory/perceptual, temporal, spatial, affect, response, or language) and account for the contribution of other potential attributes involved in performance of the task. A systematic, qualitative assessment of validity in relation to these parameters was performed, along with a review of general validity and task outcome measures. Sixty-two studies were included. The majority of studies investigated pattern separation and most tasks were performed on young, healthy adults. Pattern separation and pattern completion were most frequently tested during a retrieval task using familiar or recognizable visual stimuli and cues. Not all studies parametrically altered the degree of stimulus interference or cue degradation, or controlled for potential confounding factors. This review found evidence that some of the parameters for task validity have been followed in some human studies of pattern separation and pattern completion, but no study was judged to have adequately met all the parameters for task validity. The contribution of these parameters and other task design factors towards an optimal behavioral paradigm is discussed and

  2. F-1 Engine Gas Generator Testing

    NASA Video Gallery

    The gas generator from an F-1 engine is test-fired at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., on Jan. 24, 2013. Data from the 30 second test will be used in the development of advance...

  3. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  4. Revised evaluation of steam generator testing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A scoping evaluation was made of various facility alternatives for test of LMFBR prototype steam generators and models. Recommendations are given for modifications to EBR-II and SCTI (Sodium Components Test Installation) for prototype SG testing, and for few-tube model testing. (DLC)

  5. An optical pattern classification using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiki, Yoshinori; Matsushita, Kenji; Shimizu, Eiji

    1990-07-01

    An optical pattern classification system is proposed which performs weighting and summation by the optical system using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). The system makes it possible to simplify the structure and to improve the processing speed. A trainable pattern classification system which performs weight modification by using a CGH matrix and a dot matrix liquid crystal display (LCD) as a shutter array is proposed. The trainable pattern classifier using a CGH matrix and LCD is described, and the experimental results are presented.

  6. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  7. Delay test generation for synchronous sequential circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devadas, Srinivas

    1989-05-01

    We address the problem of generating tests for delay faults in non-scan synchronous sequential circuits. Delay test generation for sequential circuits is a considerably more difficult problem than delay testing of combinational circuits and has received much less attention. In this paper, we present a method for generating test sequences to detect delay faults in sequential circuits using the stuck-at fault sequential test generator STALLION. The method is complete in that it will generate a delay test sequence for a targeted fault given sufficient CPU time, if such a sequence exists. We term faults for which no delay test sequence exists, under out test methodology, sequentially delay redundant. We describe means of eliminating sequential delay redundancies in logic circuits. We present a partial-scan methodology for enhancing the testability of difficult-to-test of untestable sequential circuits, wherein a small number of flip-flops are selected and made controllable/observable. The selection process guarantees the elimination of all sequential delay redundancies. We show that an intimate relationship exists between state assignment and delay testability of a sequential machine. We describe a state assignment algorithm for the synthesis of sequential machines with maximal delay fault testability. Preliminary experimental results using the test generation, partial-scan and synthesis algorithm are presented.

  8. Generating Test Templates via Automated Theorem Proving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kancherla, Mani Prasad

    1997-01-01

    Testing can be used during the software development process to maintain fidelity between evolving specifications, program designs, and code implementations. We use a form of specification-based testing that employs the use of an automated theorem prover to generate test templates. A similar approach was developed using a model checker on state-intensive systems. This method applies to systems with functional rather than state-based behaviors. This approach allows for the use of incomplete specifications to aid in generation of tests for potential failure cases. We illustrate the technique on the cannonical triangle testing problem and discuss its use on analysis of a spacecraft scheduling system.

  9. Generating circuit tests by exploiting designed behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Mark H.

    1988-12-01

    Generating tests for sequential devices is one of the hardest problems in designing and manufacturing digital circuits. This task is difficult primarily because internal components are accessible only indirectly, forcing a test generator to use the surrounding components collectively as a probe for detecting faults. This in turn forces the test generator to reason about complex interactions between the behaviors of these surrounding components. Current automated solutions are becoming ineffective as designs grow larger and more complex. Yet, despite the complexity, human experts remain remarkably successful, in part, because they use knowledge from many sources and use a variety of reasoning techniques. This thesis exploits several kinds of expert knowledge about circuits and test generation not used by the current algorithms. First, many test generation problems can be solved efficiently using operation relations, a novel representation of circuit behavior that connects internal component operations with directly executable circuit operations. Operation relations can be computed efficiently for sequential circuits that provide few operations at their interfaces by searching traces of simulated circuit behavior. Second, experts write test programs rather than test vectors because programs are a more readable and compact representation for tests than vectors are. Test programs can be constructed automatically by merging test program fragments using expert supplied goal-refined rules and domain independent planning techniques from artificial intelligence.

  10. Fringe patterns generated by micro-optical sensors for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Tamee, Kreangsak; Chaiwong, Khomyuth; Yothapakdee, Kriengsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2015-01-01

    We present a new result of pattern recognition generation scheme using a small-scale optical muscle sensing system, which consisted of an optical add-drop filter incorporating two nonlinear optical side ring resonators. When light from laser source enters into the system, the device is stimulated by an external physical parameter that introduces a change in the phase of light propagation within the sensing device, which can be formed by the interference fringe patterns. Results obtained have shown that the fringe patterns can be used to form the relationship between signal patterns and fringe pattern recognitions. PMID:24450752

  11. Self-Testing Quantum Random Number Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunghi, Tommaso; Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Lavigne, Quentin; Bowles, Joseph; Martin, Anthony; Zbinden, Hugo; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The generation of random numbers is a task of paramount importance in modern science. A central problem for both classical and quantum randomness generation is to estimate the entropy of the data generated by a given device. Here we present a protocol for self-testing quantum random number generation, in which the user can monitor the entropy in real time. Based on a few general assumptions, our protocol guarantees continuous generation of high quality randomness, without the need for a detailed characterization of the devices. Using a fully optical setup, we implement our protocol and illustrate its self-testing capacity. Our work thus provides a practical approach to quantum randomness generation in a scenario of trusted but error-prone devices.

  12. Self-testing quantum random number generator.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Tommaso; Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Lim, Charles Ci Wen; Lavigne, Quentin; Bowles, Joseph; Martin, Anthony; Zbinden, Hugo; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-04-17

    The generation of random numbers is a task of paramount importance in modern science. A central problem for both classical and quantum randomness generation is to estimate the entropy of the data generated by a given device. Here we present a protocol for self-testing quantum random number generation, in which the user can monitor the entropy in real time. Based on a few general assumptions, our protocol guarantees continuous generation of high quality randomness, without the need for a detailed characterization of the devices. Using a fully optical setup, we implement our protocol and illustrate its self-testing capacity. Our work thus provides a practical approach to quantum randomness generation in a scenario of trusted but error-prone devices. PMID:25933297

  13. Test generation for highly sequential circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Devadas, Srinivas; Newton, A. Richard

    1989-08-01

    We address the problem of generating test sequences for stuck-at faults in non-scan synchronous sequential circuits. We present a novel test procedure that exploits both the structure of the combinational logic in the circuit as well as the sequential behavior of the circuit. In contrast to previous approaches, we decompose the problem of sequential test generation into three subproblems of combinational test generation, fault-free state justification and fault-free state differentiation. We describe fast algorithms for state justification and state differentiation using the ON-sets and OFF-sets of flip-flop inputs and primary outputs. The decomposition of the testing problems into three subproblems rather than the traditional two, performing the justification and differentiation steps on the fault free rather than the faulty machine and the use of efficient techniques for cube intersection results in significant performance improvements over previous approaches.

  14. The thermoelectric generator test program at JPL.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapfer, G.; Rouklove, P.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the test results and analysis performed on data obtained from eight thermoelectric generators exhibiting a total combined operating time of about 21 years. Three (3) SNAP-19 type generators are discussed. Generator SN-20, the engineering model of the units presently operating on the Nimbus S/C, has been in operation for over 4 years and has shown drastic degradation after losing the internal cover gas. Generator SN-21, with more than four years of operating time, is operated in an air environment. The performance of this generator appears predictable and stable. For the last 2 years of operation generator degradation has been negligible. Generator SN-31, which utilizes the TAGS material for the P thermoelectric leg, is similar in design to the units to be used on the Pioneer S/C and has operated for over two years in an all-argon atmosphere.

  15. Using Test Generating Software for Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Aurora, Tarlok

    2007-04-01

    Assessment is an important part of teaching and learning. Designing suitable tests and quizzes for assessment is a time consuming task. With faculty's much commitment at work, sometimes it is not easy to find enough time to design a good test before the test day. Searching for and modifying older tests can take considerable amount of time. There is a need to develop a customized test bank that one could use to generate a quiz or test quickly before class time or before a test. A number of commercial software is available for e-learning that has this capability. Some of these are - Test Generator, Examview, Test Pro Developer etc. Application of Examview software in developing a test bank for physics will be presented. A physics test bank, with applications in other disciplines, can be gradually built over time and used to create a test or quiz quickly. Multiple scrambled versions of a single test (and answer sheets) can be created to discourage cheating in a large class setting. The presentation will show how to build a test bank.

  16. Digitally based pattern generator for an electron-beam welder

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, L.G. III

    1981-02-19

    A digitally based deflection generator for an electron-beam welder is presented. Up to seven patterns of any shape are stored in programmable read-only memory (PROM). The pattern resolution is 39% at frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 kHz and can be x-t, y-t, or x-y formed. Frequency and pattern selections may be chosen by the welder computer or manually selected on the front panel. The ability to repeatedly synchronize two waveforms of any shape and frequency enables an unlimited variety of welds.

  17. A movement pattern generator model using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Gander, R E; Wood, H C

    1992-07-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN's) allow a new approach to biological modeling. The main applications of ANN's have been geared towards the modeling of the association and learning mechanisms of the brain; only a few researchers have explored them for motor control. The fact that ANN's are based on biological systems indicates their potential application for a biological act such as locomotion. Towards this goal, we have developed a "movement pattern generator," using an ANN for generating periodic movement trajectories. This model is based on the concept of "central pattern generators." Jordan's sequential network, which is capable of learning sequences of patterns, was modified and used to generate several bipedal trajectories (or gaits), coded in task space, at different frequencies. The network model successfully learned all of the trajectories presented to it. The model has many attractive properties such as limit cycle behavior, generalization of trajectories and frequencies, phase maintenance, and fault tolerance. The movement pattern generator model is potentially applicable for improved understanding of animal locomotion and for use in legged robots and rehabilitation medicine. PMID:1516938

  18. MYSID TWO-GENERATION TEST GUIDELINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    McKenney, Charles L., Jr. In press. Mysid Two-Generation Test Guideline. OECD Expert Group on Invertebrate Testing for Endocrine Disruptors, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris, France. 17 p. (ERL,GB 1215).

    This guideline describes a two-generati...

  19. Testing and Troubleshooting Automatically Generated Source Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Joel

    1998-01-01

    Tools allowing engineers to model the real-time behavior of systems that control many types of NASA systems have become widespread. These tools automatically generate source code that is compiled, linked, then downloaded into computers controlling everything from wind tunnels to space flight systems. These tools save hundreds of hours of software development time and allow engineers with thorough application area knowledge but little software development experience to generate software to control the systems they use daily. These systems are verified and validated by simulating the real-time models, and by other techniques that focus on the model or the hardware. The automatically generated source code is typically not subjected to rigorous testing using conventional software testing techniques. Given the criticality and safety issues surrounding these systems, the application of conventional and new software testing and troubleshooting techniques to the automatically generated will improve the reliability of the resulting systems.

  20. Alcohol LOX Steam Generator Test Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K.; Dommers, M.

    2004-10-01

    At the DLR test centre in Lampoldshausen there is a long experience in the development of rocket steam generators as a main subsystem for the altitude simulation. The rocket steam generators make it possible to supply the required quantities of steam at short notice with reduced investment and operating costs. The rocket steam generators are based on the combustion of liquid oxygen (LOX) and ethyl alcohol (ALC). The paper deals with the experience of the development of the steam generators and the operation at the altitude simulation P1.0 for satellite propulsion and P4.2 for altitude simulation of AESTUS upper stage engine.

  1. Test signal generation for analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiek, B.; Mathis, W.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper a new test signal generation approach for general analog circuits based on the variational calculus and modern control theory methods is presented. The computed transient test signals also called test stimuli are optimal with respect to the detection of a given fault set by means of a predefined merit functional representing a fault detection criterion. The test signal generation problem of finding optimal test stimuli detecting all faults form the fault set is formulated as an optimal control problem. The solution of the optimal control problem representing the test stimuli is computed using an optimization procedure. The optimization procedure is based on the necessary conditions for optimality like the maximum principle of Pontryagin and adjoint circuit equations.

  2. Formal methods for test case generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John (Inventor); De Moura, Leonardo Mendonga (Inventor); Hamon, Gregoire (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The invention relates to the use of model checkers to generate efficient test sets for hardware and software systems. The method provides for extending existing tests to reach new coverage targets; searching *to* some or all of the uncovered targets in parallel; searching in parallel *from* some or all of the states reached in previous tests; and slicing the model relative to the current set of coverage targets. The invention provides efficient test case generation and test set formation. Deep regions of the state space can be reached within allotted time and memory. The approach has been applied to use of the model checkers of SRI's SAL system and to model-based designs developed in Stateflow. Stateflow models achieving complete state and transition coverage in a single test case are reported.

  3. Central respiratory pattern generation in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Milsom, W K; Reid, S G; Meier, J T; Kinkead, R

    1999-11-01

    There are two components to breathing pattern generation the production of the pattern of neural discharge associated with individual breaths, and the pattern in which breaths are produced to effect ventilation. Bullfrogs typically breathe with randomly distributed breaths. When respiratory drive is elevated, breathing becomes more regular and often episodic. Studies on in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations of the adult bullfrog and in situ preparations of decerebrate, paralyzed, unidirectionally ventilated animals suggest that output from the central rhythm generator in frogs is conditional on receiving some input and that a host of central inputs remain even in the most reduced preparations. There appear to be descending inputs from sites in the dorsal brainstem just caudal to the optic chiasma that cluster breaths into episodes, a strong excitatory input caudal to this site but rostral to the origin of the Vth cranial nerve and, possibly, segmental rhythm generators throughout the medulla that are normally entrained to produce the normal breathing pattern. The data also suggest that the shape of the discharge pattern (augmenting, decrementing) and timing of outputs (alternating vs synchronous) associated with motor outflow during each breath are also dependent on the interconnections between these various sites. PMID:10665378

  4. Central pattern generator for vocalization: Is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one’s own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems. PMID:25050813

  5. Downhole steam generator subject of Sandia tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The first field test of a down-hole steam generator developed to inject hot steam directly into deeply buried heavy oil reservoirs began in mid-April near Long Beach, CA. The 23-ft-long, 6-in.-diameter generator, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, will produce up to 800 cu ft of 500 F steam a minute (1.2 MW thermal) at the bottom of a 2500-ft well. Goals of the test are to demonstrate the feasibility of operating the generator at realistic depths and to determine its overall performance and environmental impact. Development of the generator is part of the US Department of Energy's Project Deep Steam to identify techniques for recovering heavy oil from deeply buried (greater than 2500 ft) reservoirs.

  6. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  7. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  8. Modeling Scalable Pattern Generation in DNA Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter B.; Chen, Xi; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical framework for developing patterns in multiple dimensions using controllable diffusion and designed reactions implemented in DNA. This includes so-called strand displacement reactions in which one single-stranded DNA hybridizes to a hemi-duplex DNA and displaces another single-stranded DNA, reversibly or irreversibly. These reactions can be designed to proceed with designed rate and molecular specificity. By also controlling diffusion by partial complementarity to a stationary, cross-linked DNA, we can generate predictable patterns. We demonstrate this with several simulations showing deterministic, predictable shapes in space. PMID:25506295

  9. Computer-Based Arithmetic Test Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trocchi, Robert F.

    1973-01-01

    The computer can be a welcome partner in the instructional process, but only if there is man-machine interaction. Man should not compromise system design because of available hardware; the computer must fit the system design for the result to represent an acceptable solution to instructional technology. The Arithmetic Test Generator system fits…

  10. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  11. THE IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING OF INTERACTION PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a method for identifying and assessing the significance of interaction patterns among various chemicals and chemical classes of importance to regulatory toxicologists. To this end, efforts were made to assemble and evaluate experimental data on toxicologically...

  12. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  13. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  14. Generating patterns from fields of cells. Examples from Drosophila segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sanson, B

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila, a cascade of maternal, gap, pair-rule and segment polarity genes subdivides the antero/posterior axis of the embryo into repeating segmental stripes. This review summarizes what happens next, i.e. how an intrasegmental pattern is generated and controls the differentiation of specific cell types in the epidermis. Within each segment, cells secreting the signalling molecules Wingless (the homologue of vertebrate Wnt-1) and Hedgehog are found in narrow stripes on both sides of the parasegmental boundary. The Wingless and Hedgehog organizing activities help to establish two more stripes per segment that localize ligands for the Epidermal Growth Factor and the Notch signalling pathways, respectively. These four signals then act at short range and in concert to control epidermal differentiation at the single cell level across the segment. This example from Drosophila provides a paradigm for how organizers generate precise patterns, and ultimately different cell types, in a naïve field of cells. PMID:11743020

  15. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  16. Continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns across two generations.

    PubMed

    Raby, K Lee; Steele, Ryan D; Carlson, Elizabeth A; Sroufe, L Alan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns within a higher-risk longitudinal sample of 55 female participants born into poverty. Infant attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation when participants were 12 and 18 months as well as several decades later with participants' children. Paralleling earlier findings from this sample on the stability of attachment patterns from infancy to young adulthood, results provided evidence for intergenerational continuities in attachment disorganization but not security. Children of adults with histories of infant attachment disorganization were at an increased risk of forming disorganized attachments. Although changes in infant attachment patterns across the two generations were not correlated with individuals' caregiving experiences or interpersonal stresses and supports during childhood and adolescence, higher quality social support during adulthood was associated with intergenerational changes from insecure to secure infant-caregiver attachment relationships. PMID:26213155

  17. Continuities and Changes in Infant Attachment Patterns Across Two Generations

    PubMed Central

    Raby, K. Lee; Steele, Ryan D.; Carlson, Elizabeth A.; Sroufe, L. Alan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns within a higher-risk longitudinal sample of 55 female participants born into poverty. Infant attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation when participants were 12 and 18 months as well as several decades later with participants’ children. Paralleling earlier findings from this sample on the stability of attachment patterns from infancy to young adulthood, results provided evidence for intergenerational continuities in attachment disorganization but not security. Children of adults with histories of infant attachment disorganization were at an increased risk of forming disorganized attachments. Although changes in infant attachment patterns across the two generations were not correlated with individuals’ caregiving experiences or interpersonal stresses and supports during childhood and adolescence, higher quality social support during adulthood was associated with intergenerational changes from insecure to secure infant-caregiver attachment relationships. PMID:26213155

  18. Electron beam pattern generator sensitivity to target potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Junru; Hartley, John

    2005-11-01

    Electrostatic chucking is the plan of record for mask clamping in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In order to minimize mask distortion it is recommended by the EUV lithography community that identical electrostatic chucks be used in the mask patterning and metrology tools. The high voltages used in electrostatic chucking have the potential to establish voltages on the mask surface, which may influence the electron optical characteristics of the pattern generator to the detrimental imaging of the pattern. To understand the relationship between image degradation and mask surface voltages, we are modeling the interaction between mask potential and electron beam columns. The first system modeled consists entirely of electrostatic elements, and the second one is a more traditional electron beam lithography system with electrostatic and magnetic components. All of the working parameters of the systems were fixed to establish optimal imaging on the grounded mask. We then altered the potential on the mask surface and determined the impact on focus and deflection errors. The simulation results establish the relationship between the mask potential, focus and deflection errors. Detailed data of focus deflection error versus mask potential will be presented for these electron beam column configurations. When combined with ITRS roadmap specifications, these results set boundaries on mask and chuck configurations as well as grounding schemes. The results are also applicable to charged particle maskless lithography schemes as well as issues of substrate charging in both pattern generators and metrology tools.

  19. Use of design pattern layout for automatic metrology recipe generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabery, Cyrus; Page, Lorena

    2005-05-01

    As critical dimension control requirements become more challenging, due to complex designs, aggressive lithography, and the constant need to shrink,metrology recipe generation and design evaluation have also become very complex. Hundreds of unique sites must be measured and monitored to ensure good device performance and high yield. The use of the design and layout for automated metrology recipe generation will be critical to that challenge. The DesignGauge from Hitachi implements a system enabling arbitrary recipe generation and control of SEM observations performed on the wafer, based only on the design information. This concept for recipe generation can reduce the time to develop a technology node from RET and design rule selection, through OPC model calibration and verification, and all the way to high volume manufacturing. Conventional recipe creation for a large number of measurement targets requires a significant amount of engineering time. Often these recipes are used only once or twice during mask and process verification or OPC calibration data acquisition. This process of manual setup and analysis is also potentially error prone. CD-SEM recipe creation typically requires an actual wafer, so the recipe creation cannot occur until the scanner and reticle are in house. All of these problems with conventional CD SEM lead to increased development time and reduced final process quality. The new model of CD-SEM recipe generation and management utilizes design-to-SEM matching technology. This new technology extracts an idealized shape from the designed pattern, and utilizes the shape information for pattern matching. As a result, the designed pattern is used as basis for the template instead of the actual SEM image. Recipe creation can be achieved in a matter of seconds once the target site list is finalized. The sequence of steps for creating a recipe are: generate a target site list, pass the design polygons (GDS) and site list to the CD SEM, define references

  20. Stochastic Generation of Wind Patterns over Lake Geneva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Barry, C. E.; Razmi, A. M.; Lemmin, U.; Le Dantec, N.

    2011-12-01

    stochastic generator of wind-pattern indices, i.e., the INAR(1) model produces a sequence of integers, each of which corresponds to a wind pattern. For a given index, the aforementioned binned COSMO wind fields were sampled randomly to produce the stochastic wind-field sequence.

  1. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  2. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  3. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  4. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide test pattern phantom. 892.1420 Section 892.1420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern...

  6. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  7. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. PMID:26598733

  8. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  9. The generation of vertebral segmental patterning in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Senthinathan, Biruntha; Sousa, Cátia; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experimental manipulations in the chick embryo to assess whether the notochord, neural tube and spinal nerves influence segmental patterning of the vertebral column. Using Pax1 expression in the somite-derived sclerotomes as a marker for segmentation of the developing intervertebral disc, our results exclude such an influence. In contrast to certain teleost species, where the notochord has been shown to generate segmentation of the vertebral bodies (chordacentra), these experiments indicate that segmental patterning of the avian vertebral column arises autonomously in the somite mesoderm. We suggest that in amniotes, the subdivision of each sclerotome into non-miscible anterior and posterior halves plays a critical role in establishing vertebral segmentation, and in maintaining left/right alignment of the developing vertebral elements at the body midline. PMID:22458512

  10. Fault Simulation and Test Generation for Transistor Shorts Using Stuck-at Test Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higami, Yoshinobu; Saluja, Kewal K.; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shin-Ya; Takamatsu, Yuzo

    This paper presents methods for detecting transistor short faults using logic level fault simulation and test generation. The paper considers two types of transistor level faults, namely strong shorts and weak shorts, which were introduced in our previous research. These faults are defined based on the values of outputs of faulty gates. The proposed fault simulation and test generation are performed using gate-level tools designed to deal with stuck-at faults, and no transistor-level tools are required. In the test generation process, a circuit is modified by inserting inverters, and a stuck-at test generator is used. The modification of a circuit does not mean a design-for-testability technique, as the modified circuit is used only during the test generation process. Further, generated test patterns are compacted by fault simulation. Also, since the weak short model involves uncertainty in its behavior, we define fault coverage and fault efficiency in three different way, namely, optimistic, pessimistic and probabilistic and assess them. Finally, experimental results for ISCAS benchmark circuits are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. Custom pulse generator for RPC testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Castro, E.; Díaz, J.; Fonte, P.; Garzón, J. A.; Montes, N.; Zapata, M.

    2009-05-01

    We present a pulse generator able to generate pulses statistically similar to the ones produced by RPC cells. The device generates up to four arrays of fast and narrow random-like pulses. Polarity, maximum amplitudes, widths and pulse rate in each channel may be modified independently in order to simulate different RPC setups and environments. This portable and cost-effective pulse generator is a versatile instrument for testing FE-Electronics and different real detector features related with the signal propagation inside the detector. It has been developed in the framework of the ESTRELA project of the HADES experiment at GSI. ESTRELA (Electrically Shielded Timing RPC Ensemble for Low Angles) is part of the upgrade of the HADES experiment at GSI with the aim of constructing an RPC-based time-of-flight wall that will cover around 8 m 2 in order to cope with the high particle multiplicities expected for heavy nuclei collision systems such as Au+Au.

  12. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam generator inspections and tests. 229.114... Generators § 229.114 Steam generator inspections and tests. (a) Periodic steam generator inspection. Except as provided in § 229.33, each steam generator shall be inspected and tested in accordance...

  13. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam generator inspections and tests. 229.114... Generators § 229.114 Steam generator inspections and tests. (a) Periodic steam generator inspection. Except as provided in § 229.33, each steam generator shall be inspected and tested in accordance...

  14. 49 CFR 229.114 - Steam generator inspections and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam generator inspections and tests. 229.114... Generators § 229.114 Steam generator inspections and tests. (a) Periodic steam generator inspection. Except as provided in § 229.33, each steam generator shall be inspected and tested in accordance...

  15. Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion: Anatomical, Physiological, and Pathophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome. PMID:23403923

  16. Sequentially firing neurons confer flexible timing in neural pattern generators

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Alexander; Ermentrout, Bard

    2011-05-15

    Neuronal networks exhibit a variety of complex spatiotemporal patterns that include sequential activity, synchrony, and wavelike dynamics. Inhibition is the primary means through which such patterns are implemented. This behavior is dependent on both the intrinsic dynamics of the individual neurons as well as the connectivity patterns. Many neural circuits consist of networks of smaller subcircuits (motifs) that are coupled together to form the larger system. In this paper, we consider a particularly simple motif, comprising purely inhibitory interactions, which generates sequential periodic dynamics. We first describe the dynamics of the single motif both for general balanced coupling (all cells receive the same number and strength of inputs) and then for a specific class of balanced networks: circulant systems. We couple these motifs together to form larger networks. We use the theory of weak coupling to derive phase models which, themselves, have a certain structure and symmetry. We show that this structure endows the coupled system with the ability to produce arbitrary timing relationships between symmetrically coupled motifs and that the phase relationships are robust over a wide range of frequencies. The theory is applicable to many other systems in biology and physics.

  17. Spatial patterns of nonstationarity: does the statistical test matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, A. T.; Faloon, A.; Brumbelow, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    In many regions, extreme rainfalls are generated by large-scale weather features which are significantly larger than the separation among the set of rain gages in the region; it would be expected therefore that these rain gages would exhibit similar statistical behavior. When time series of extreme rainfalls measured at these gages are tested individually for nonstationarity, however, it is often found that any spatial pattern of the nonstationarity is poorly defined. The fact that extremes of rainfall at one location are increasing in time is not strongly predictive of the behavior of the extreme rainfall at neighboring rain gages, which may be increasing, decreasing or unchanging, when the individual time series are considered by themselves. Using rainfall data sets from the southern United States as a test case, we present work on detection of nonstationarity in rainfall extremes which takes into account the disparate answers individual tests of nonstationarity can give, given our assumption of larger-scale precipitation fields driving the behavior of point observations.

  18. Optimal Test Design with Rule-Based Item Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geerlings, Hanneke; van der Linden, Wim J.; Glas, Cees A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Optimal test-design methods are applied to rule-based item generation. Three different cases of automated test design are presented: (a) test assembly from a pool of pregenerated, calibrated items; (b) test generation on the fly from a pool of calibrated item families; and (c) test generation on the fly directly from calibrated features defining…

  19. Improved photomask accuracy with a high-productivity DUV laser pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öström, Thomas; Måhlén, Jonas; Karawajczyk, Andrzej; Rosling, Mats; Carlqvist, Per; Askebjer, Per; Karlin, Tord; Sallander, Jesper; Österberg, Anders

    2006-10-01

    A strategy for sub-100 nm technology nodes is to maximize the use of high-speed deep-UV laser pattern generators, reserving e-beam tools for the most critical photomask layers. With a 248 nm excimer laser and 0.82 NA projection optics, the Sigma7500 increases the application space of laser pattern generators. A programmable spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged with partially coherent optics to compose the photomask pattern. Image profiles are enhanced with phase shifting in the pattern generator, and features below 200 nm are reliably printed. The Sigma7500 extends the SLM-based architecture with improvements to CD uniformity and placement accuracy, resulting from an error budget-based methodology. Among these improvements is a stiffer focus stage design with digital servos, resulting in improved focus stability. Tighter climate controls and improved dose control reduce drift during mask patterning. As a result, global composite CD uniformity below 5 nm (3σ) has been demonstrated, with placement accuracy below 10 nm (3σ) across the mask. Self-calibration methods are used to optimize and monitor system performance, reducing the need to print test plates. The SLM calibration camera views programmed test patterns, making it possible to evaluate image metrics such as CD uniformity and line edge roughness. The camera is also used to characterize image placement over the optical field. A feature called ProcessEqualizer TM has been developed to correct long-range CD errors arising from process effects on production photomasks. Mask data is sized in real time to compensate for pattern-dependent errors related to local pattern density, as well as for systematic pattern-independent errors such as radial CD signatures. Corrections are made in the pixel domain in the advanced adjustments processor, which also performs global biasing, stamp distortion compensation, and corner enhancement. In the Sigma7500, the mask pattern is imaged with full edge addressability in each

  20. 21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of radiopaque or radioactive material sealed in a solid pattern intended to serve as a test for a performance characteristic of a nuclear medicine imaging device. (b) Classification. Class I (general...

  1. Validation Testing of Hydrogen Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Barton; Toops, Todd J

    2007-12-01

    This report describes the results of testing performed by ORNL for Photech Energies, Inc. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the efficacy of Photech's hydrogen generation reactor technology, which produces gaseous hydrogen through electrolysis. Photech provided several prototypes of their proprietary reactor for testing and the ancillary equipment, such as power supplies and electrolyte solutions, required for proper operation of the reactors. ORNL measured the production of hydrogen gas (volumetric flow of hydrogen at atmospheric pressure) as a function of input power and analyzed the composition of the output stream to determine the purity of the hydrogen content. ORNL attempted measurements on two basic versions of the prototype reactors-one version had a clear plastic outer cylinder, while another version had a stainless steel outer cylinder-but was only able to complete measurements on reactors in the plastic version. The problem observed in the stainless steel reactors was that in these reactors most of the hydrogen was produced near the anodes along with oxygen and the mixed gases made it impossible to determine the amount of hydrogen produced. In the plastic reactors the production of hydrogen gas increased monotonically with input power, and the flow rates increased faster at low input powers than they did at higher input powers. The maximum flow rate from the cathode port measured during the tests was 0.85 LPM at an input power of about 1100 W, an electrolyte concentration of 20%. The composition of the flow from the cathode port was primarily hydrogen and water vapor, with some oxygen and trace amounts of carbon dioxide. An operational mode that occurs briefly during certain operating conditions, and is characterized by flashes of light and violent bubbling near the cathode, might be attributable to the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in the electrolyte solution.

  2. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-06-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits. PMID:18471902

  3. Analog electronic model of the lobster pyloric central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, A.; Brugioni, S.; Levi, R.; Rabinovich, M.; Selverston, A.; Abarbane, H. D. I.

    2005-01-01

    An electronic circuit intended to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of a simplified 3-cell model of the pyloric central pattern generator in California spiny lobster stomato gastric ganglion is presented. The model employs the synaptic phase locked loop (SPLL) concept where the frequency of oscillations of a postsynaptic cell is mainly controlled by the synaptic current which depends on the phase shift between the oscillations. The theoretical study showed that the system has a stable steady state with correct phase shifts between the oscillations and that this regime is stable when the frequency of the pacemaker cell is varied over a wide range. The main bifurcations in the system were studied analytically, in computer simulations, and in experiments with the electronic circuit. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the expectations of the theoretical model.

  4. Neural Patterns of the Implicit Association Test

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Graham F.; Boran, Lorraine; Smeaton, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT) is a reaction time based categorization task that measures the differential associative strength between bipolar targets and evaluative attribute concepts as an approach to indexing implicit beliefs or biases. An open question exists as to what exactly the IAT measures, and here EEG (Electroencephalography) has been used to investigate the time course of ERPs (Event-related Potential) indices and implicated brain regions in the IAT. IAT-EEG research identifies a number of early (250–450 ms) negative ERPs indexing early-(pre-response) processing stages of the IAT. ERP activity in this time range is known to index processes related to cognitive control and semantic processing. A central focus of these efforts has been to use IAT-ERPs to delineate the implicit and explicit factors contributing to measured IAT effects. Increasing evidence indicates that cognitive control (and related top-down modulation of attention/perceptual processing) may be components in the effective measurement of IAT effects, as factors such as physical setting or task instruction can change an IAT measurement. In this study we further implicate the role of proactive cognitive control and top-down modulation of attention/perceptual processing in the IAT-EEG. We find statistically significant relationships between D-score (a reaction-time based measure of the IAT-effect) and early ERP-time windows, indicating where more rapid word categorizations driving the IAT effect are present, they are at least partly explainable by neural activity not significantly correlated with the IAT measurement itself. Using LORETA, we identify a number of brain regions driving these ERP-IAT relationships notably involving left-temporal, insular, cingulate, medial frontal and parietal cortex in time regions corresponding to the N2- and P3-related activity. The identified brain regions involved with reduced reaction times on congruent blocks coincide with those of previous studies

  5. Two-stage Turing model for generating pigment patterns on the leopard and the jaguar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. T.; Liaw, S. S.; Maini, P. K.

    2006-07-01

    Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, which showed that flecks are the primitive pattern of the felid family and all other patterns including rosettes and blotches develop from it, we construct a Turing reaction-diffusion model which generates spot patterns initially. Starting from this spotted pattern, we successfully generate patterns of adult leopards and jaguars by tuning parameters of the model in the subsequent phase of patterning.

  6. Generational Patterns in Mexican Americans' Academic Performance in an Unwelcoming Political Context

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Danyel A. V.; Roosa, Mark W.; Knight, George P.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that immigrant students often do better academically than their U.S.-born peers from the same ethnic group but it is unclear whether this pattern holds for Mexican Americans. We examined the academic performance of four generations of Mexican American students from fifth to 10th grade looking for generation differences and explanations for them. Using data from 749 families, we tested a model with fifth grade variables that differed by generation as potential mediators linking student generation to 10th grade academic performance. Results showed that immigrants were academically behind at fifth grade but caught up by seventh. Only economic hardship mediated the long term relationship between student generation and 10th grade academic performance; maternal educational expectations and child language hassles, English usage, discrimination, and mainstream values helped explained the early academic deficit of immigrant children. The results identified potential targets for interventions to improve Mexican American students' academic performance. PMID:24578588

  7. Generation of Earth's First-Order Biodiversity Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Andrew Z.; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W.; Roy, Kaustuv

    2009-02-01

    The first-order biodiversity pattern on Earth today and at least as far back as the Paleozoic is the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), a decrease in richness of species and higher taxa from the equator to the poles. LDGs are produced by geographic trends in origination, extinction, and dispersal over evolutionary timescales, so that analyses of static patterns will be insufficient to reveal underlying processes. The fossil record of marine bivalve genera, a model system for the analysis of biodiversity dynamics over large temporal and spatial scales, shows that an origination and range-expansion gradient plays a major role in generating the LDG. Peak origination rates and peak diversities fall within the tropics, with range expansion out of the tropics the predominant spatial dynamic thereafter. The origination-diversity link occurs even in a "contrarian" group whose diversity peaks at midlatitudes, an exception proving the rule that spatial variations in origination are key to latitudinal diversity patterns. Extinction rates are lower in polar latitudes (≥60°) than in temperate zones and thus cannot create the observed gradient alone. They may, however, help to explain why origination and immigration are evidently damped in higher latitudes. We suggest that species require more resources in higher latitudes, for the seasonality of primary productivity increases by more than an order of magnitude from equatorial to polar regions. Higher-latitude species are generalists that, unlike potential immigrants, are adapted to garner the large share of resources required for incumbency in those regions. When resources are opened up by extinctions, lineages spread chiefly poleward and chiefly through speciation.

  8. A rule-based software test data generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deason, William H.; Brown, David B.; Chang, Kai-Hsiung; Cross, James H., II

    1991-01-01

    Rule-based software test data generation is proposed as an alternative to either path/predicate analysis or random data generation. A prototype rule-based test data generator for Ada programs is constructed and compared to a random test data generator. Four Ada procedures are used in the comparison. Approximately 2000 rule-based test cases and 100,000 randomly generated test cases are automatically generated and executed. The success of the two methods is compared using standard coverage metrics. Simple statistical tests showing that even the primitive rule-based test data generation prototype is significantly better than random data generation are performed. This result demonstrates that rule-based test data generation is feasible and shows great promise in assisting test engineers, especially when the rule base is developed further.

  9. Test Generation Algorithm for Fault Detection of Analog Circuits Based on Extreme Learning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jingyu; Tian, Shulin; Yang, Chenglin; Ren, Xuelong

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel test generation algorithm based on extreme learning machine (ELM), and such algorithm is cost-effective and low-risk for analog device under test (DUT). This method uses test patterns derived from the test generation algorithm to stimulate DUT, and then samples output responses of the DUT for fault classification and detection. The novel ELM-based test generation algorithm proposed in this paper contains mainly three aspects of innovation. Firstly, this algorithm saves time efficiently by classifying response space with ELM. Secondly, this algorithm can avoid reduced test precision efficiently in case of reduction of the number of impulse-response samples. Thirdly, a new process of test signal generator and a test structure in test generation algorithm are presented, and both of them are very simple. Finally, the abovementioned improvement and functioning are confirmed in experiments. PMID:25610458

  10. Test generation algorithm for fault detection of analog circuits based on extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingyu; Tian, Shulin; Yang, Chenglin; Ren, Xuelong

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel test generation algorithm based on extreme learning machine (ELM), and such algorithm is cost-effective and low-risk for analog device under test (DUT). This method uses test patterns derived from the test generation algorithm to stimulate DUT, and then samples output responses of the DUT for fault classification and detection. The novel ELM-based test generation algorithm proposed in this paper contains mainly three aspects of innovation. Firstly, this algorithm saves time efficiently by classifying response space with ELM. Secondly, this algorithm can avoid reduced test precision efficiently in case of reduction of the number of impulse-response samples. Thirdly, a new process of test signal generator and a test structure in test generation algorithm are presented, and both of them are very simple. Finally, the abovementioned improvement and functioning are confirmed in experiments. PMID:25610458

  11. HIV Testing Patterns among Urban YMSM of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Rajan, Sonali; Gwadz, Marya V.; Aregbesola, Temi

    2014-01-01

    The heightened level of risk for HIV infection among Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is driven by multilevel influences. Using cross-sectional data, we examined HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color in a high-HIV seroprevalence area (ages 16 to 21 years). Self-reported frequency of testing was high, with 42% of…

  12. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults. PMID:26810575

  13. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  15. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  16. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  17. 21 CFR 882.1430 - Electroencephalograph test signal generator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electroencephalograph test signal generator. 882.1430 Section 882.1430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Electroencephalograph test signal generator. (a) Identification. An electroencephalograph test signal generator is...

  18. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres. 53.22... Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 § 53.22 Generation of test atmospheres. (a) Table B-2 to subpart B of part 53 specifies preferred methods for generating test atmospheres and...

  19. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres. 53.22... Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 § 53.22 Generation of test atmospheres. (a) Table B-2 to subpart B of part 53 specifies preferred methods for generating test atmospheres and...

  20. 40 CFR 53.22 - Generation of test atmospheres.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres. 53.22... Characteristics of Automated Methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 § 53.22 Generation of test atmospheres. (a) Table B-2 to subpart B of part 53 specifies preferred methods for generating test atmospheres and...

  1. Mutual synchronization between structure and central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, Junichi; Iba, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    This paper shows an evaluating method of synchronization between a structure and Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), which are embedded in a controller designed for an active mass damper. A neural oscillator composing the CPGs has nonlinear and entrainment properties. Therefore, the proposed controller has possibility to exhibit the characteristic of robustness, when the structural parameters, i.e. stiffness or damping, are changed by earthquakes and the like. Our earlier studies have proposed the new controller and ascertained the efficacy of vibration suppression. However, there has been no study to evaluate the controller's above-mentioned properties. For tuning into practical application, the reliability and robustness along with the controller's vibration mitigation performance must be analyzed. In this paper, phase reduction theory is tried to appraise the synchronization between a structure and the CPGs. In this case, the synchronization between the target structure and a single neural oscillator constituting the CPGs is required to be investigated. Therefore, the single neural oscillator's the harmonization characteristic with sinusoidal input is firstly examined, and the synchronization region is expressed using phase response curves. In addition, the mutual synchronization between the structure and the single neural oscillator is studied under sinusoidal input using the result of the harmonization characteristic.

  2. Electronic Tongue Generating Continuous Recognition Patterns for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanxia; Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Buhot, Arnaud; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Livache, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In current protocol, a combinatorial approach has been developed to simplify the design and production of sensing materials for the construction of electronic tongues (eT) for protein analysis. By mixing a small number of simple and easily accessible molecules with different physicochemical properties, used as building blocks (BBs), in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the gold surface of a prism, an array of combinatorial surfaces featuring appropriate properties for protein sensing was created. In this way, a great number of cross-reactive receptors can be rapidly and efficiently obtained. By combining such an array of combinatorial cross-reactive receptors (CoCRRs) with an optical detection system such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), the obtained eT can monitor the binding events in real-time and generate continuous recognition patterns including 2D continuous evolution profile (CEP) and 3D continuous evolution landscape (CEL) for samples in liquid. Such an eT system is efficient for discrimination of common purified proteins. PMID:25286325

  3. Electronic tongue generating continuous recognition patterns for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanxia; Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Buhot, Arnaud; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Livache, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In current protocol, a combinatorial approach has been developed to simplify the design and production of sensing materials for the construction of electronic tongues (eT) for protein analysis. By mixing a small number of simple and easily accessible molecules with different physicochemical properties, used as building blocks (BBs), in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the gold surface of a prism, an array of combinatorial surfaces featuring appropriate properties for protein sensing was created. In this way, a great number of cross-reactive receptors can be rapidly and efficiently obtained. By combining such an array of combinatorial cross-reactive receptors (CoCRRs) with an optical detection system such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), the obtained eT can monitor the binding events in real-time and generate continuous recognition patterns including 2D continuous evolution profile (CEP) and 3D continuous evolution landscape (CEL) for samples in liquid. Such an eT system is efficient for discrimination of common purified proteins. PMID:25286325

  4. The Network Spinal Wave as a Central Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Donald M.; Lemberger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This article explains the research on a unique spinal wave visibly observed in association with network spinal analysis care. Since 1997, the network wave has been studied using surface electromyography (sEMG), characterized mathematically, and determined to be a unique and repeatable phenomenon. Methods: The authors provide a narrative review of the research and a context for the network wave's development. Results: The sEMG research demonstrates that the movement of the musculature of the spine during the wave phenomenon is electromagnetic and mechanical. The changes running along the spine were characterized mathematically at three distinct levels of care. Additionally, the wave has the mathematical properties of a central pattern generator (CPG). Conclusions: The network wave may be the first CPG discovered in the spine unrelated to locomotion. The mathematical characterization of the signal also demonstrates coherence at a distance between the sacral to cervical spine. According to mathematical engineers, based on studies conducted a decade apart, the wave itself is a robust phenomenon and the detection methods for this coherence may represent a new measure for central nervous system health. This phenomenon has implications for recovery from spinal cord injury and for reorganizational healing development. PMID:27243963

  5. Cellular basis for singing motor pattern generation in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer)

    PubMed Central

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The singing behavior of male crickets allows analyzing a central pattern generator (CPG) that was shaped by sexual selection for reliable production of species-specific communication signals. After localizing the essential ganglia for singing in Gryllus bimaculatus, we now studied the calling song CPG at the cellular level. Fictive singing was initiated by pharmacological brain stimulation. The motor pattern underlying syllables and chirps was recorded as alternating spike bursts of wing-opener and wing-closer motoneurons in a truncated wing nerve; it precisely reflected the natural calling song. During fictive singing, we intracellularly recorded and stained interneurons in thoracic and abdominal ganglia and tested their impact on the song pattern by intracellular current injections. We identified three interneurons of the metathoracic and first unfused abdominal ganglion that rhythmically de- and hyperpolarized in phase with the syllable pattern and spiked strictly before the wing-opener motoneurons. Depolarizing current injection in two of these opener interneurons caused additional rhythmic singing activity, which reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. The closely intermeshing arborizations of the singing interneurons revealed the dorsal midline neuropiles of the metathoracic and three most anterior abdominal neuromeres as the anatomical location of singing pattern generation. In the same neuropiles, we also recorded several closer interneurons that rhythmically hyper- and depolarized in the syllable rhythm and spiked strictly before the wing-closer motoneurons. Some of them received pronounced inhibition at the beginning of each chirp. Hyperpolarizing current injection in the dendrite revealed postinhibitory rebound depolarization as one functional mechanism of central pattern generation in singing crickets. PMID:23170234

  6. Neural basis of singing in crickets: central pattern generation in abdominal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2011-12-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cricket singing behavior have been the focus of several studies, but the central pattern generator (CPG) for singing has not been localized conclusively. To test if the abdominal ganglia contribute to the singing motor pattern and to analyze if parts of the singing CPG are located in these ganglia, we systematically truncated the abdominal nerve cord of fictively singing crickets while recording the singing motor pattern from a front-wing nerve. Severing the connectives anywhere between terminal ganglion and abdominal ganglion A3 did not preclude singing, although the motor pattern became more variable and failure-prone as more ganglia were disconnected. Singing terminated immediately and permanently after transecting the connectives between the metathoracic ganglion complex and the first unfused abdominal ganglion A3. The contribution of abdominal ganglia for singing pattern generation was confirmed by intracellular interneuron recordings and current injections. During fictive singing, an ascending interneuron with its soma and dendrite in A3 depolarized rhythmically. It spiked 10 ms before the wing-opener activity and hyperpolarized in phase with the wing-closer activity. Depolarizing current injection elicited rhythmic membrane potential oscillations and spike bursts that elicited additional syllables and reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. Our results disclose that the abdominal ganglion A3 is directly involved in generating the singing motor pattern, whereas the more posterior ganglia seem to provide only stabilizing feedback to the CPG circuit. Localizing the singing CPG in the anterior abdominal neuromeres now allows analyzing its circuitry at the level of identified interneurons in subsequent studies.

  7. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data.

    PubMed

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Tulsky, David S; Gershon, Richard C

    2015-08-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test-retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3-85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5-85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  8. "MSTGen": Simulated Data Generator for Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    Multistage testing, or MST, was developed as an alternative to computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for applications in which it is preferable to administer a test at the level of item sets (i.e., modules). As with CAT, the simulation technique in MST plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of tests. "MSTGen," a new MST…

  9. CATGEN: A Computer Assisted Test Generator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures for generating multiple-choice exams in psychology using the Apple IIe computer and the Applewriter II text editing software are described. The model is simple to use and provides flexibility in sequencing the choice of items from an instructor generated pool. (Author/RM)

  10. Positive Selection Linked with Generation of Novel Mammalian Dentition Patterns.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Paulo; Philip, Siby; Maldonado, Emanuel; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    A diverse group of genes are involved in the tooth development of mammals. Several studies, focused mainly on mice and rats, have provided a detailed depiction of the processes coordinating tooth formation and shape. Here we surveyed 236 tooth-associated genes in 39 mammalian genomes and tested for signatures of selection to assess patterns of molecular adaptation in genes regulating mammalian dentition. Of the 236 genes, 31 (∼13.1%) showed strong signatures of positive selection that may be responsible for the phenotypic diversity observed in mammalian dentition. Mammalian-specific tooth-associated genes had accelerated mutation rates compared with older genes found across all vertebrates. More recently evolved genes had fewer interactions (either genetic or physical), were associated with fewer Gene Ontology terms and had faster evolutionary rates compared with older genes. The introns of these positively selected genes also exhibited accelerated evolutionary rates, which may reflect additional adaptive pressure in the intronic regions that are associated with regulatory processes that influence tooth-gene networks. The positively selected genes were mainly involved in processes like mineralization and structural organization of tooth specific tissues such as enamel and dentin. Of the 236 analyzed genes, 12 mammalian-specific genes (younger genes) provided insights on diversification of mammalian teeth as they have higher evolutionary rates and exhibit different expression profiles compared with older genes. Our results suggest that the evolution and development of mammalian dentition occurred in part through positive selection acting on genes that previously had other functions. PMID:27613398

  11. The generation of antiphase oscillations and synchrony by a rebound-based vertebrate central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chang; Merrison-Hort, Robert; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Borisyuk, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Many neural circuits are capable of generating multiple stereotyped outputs after different sensory inputs or neuromodulation. We have previously identified the central pattern generator (CPG) for Xenopus tadpole swimming that involves antiphase oscillations of activity between the left and right sides. Here we analyze the cellular basis for spontaneous left-right motor synchrony characterized by simultaneous bursting on both sides at twice the swimming frequency. Spontaneous synchrony bouts are rare in most tadpoles, and they instantly emerge from and switch back to swimming, most frequently within the first second after skin stimulation. Analyses show that only neurons that are active during swimming fire action potentials in synchrony, suggesting both output patterns derive from the same neural circuit. The firing of excitatory descending interneurons (dINs) leads that of other types of neurons in synchrony as it does in swimming. During synchrony, the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition is 7.9 ± 1 ms, shorter than that in swimming (41 ± 2.3 ms). The occasional, extra midcycle firing of dINs during swimming may initiate synchrony, and mismatches of timing in the left and right activity can switch synchrony back to swimming. Computer modeling supports these findings by showing that the same neural network, in which reciprocal inhibition mediates rebound firing, can generate both swimming and synchrony without circuit reconfiguration. Modeling also shows that lengthening the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition by increasing dIN synaptic/conduction delay can improve the stability of synchrony. PMID:24760866

  12. Testing the Generation of Jets in Young Stars with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L.; Codella, C.; Coffey, D.

    2015-12-01

    Jets are a crucial element in the star formation process, as they are thought to remove the excess angular momentum from the system. A firm detection of jet rotation could lend support to this statement. Jet rotation studies, however, are hindered by the requirement of simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution, and as a matter of fact, the rotation interpretation is still debated. Soon, however, the improved spatial resolution of ALMA will allow us to firmly establish rotation patterns. At the same time the new ALMA polarimetric capabilities will permit the determination of the magnetic configuration in the system. The ALMA combined search for rotation properties and magnetic fields will be a powerful test of the proposed jet generation mechanisms.

  13. The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test: Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Carlozzi, Noelle E.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Tulsky, David S.; Gershon, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    The NIH Toolbox Pattern Comparison Processing Speed Test was developed to assess processing speed. While initial validation work provides preliminary support for this test in both children and adults, more work is needed to ensure dependability and generalizability. Thus, this replication study examines descriptive data (including age effects), test–retest reliability, and construct validity in n = 4,859 participants ages 3–85 years (matched to 2010 census data). Although the Pattern Comparison was not appropriate for all 3 and 4 years old, by ages 5 and 6, more meaningful scores were apparent. There was evidence for convergent and discriminant validity. There was also a moderate practice effect (i.e., increase of 5.5 points) over a 1-week time frame. Pattern Comparison exhibits a number of strengths: it is appropriate for use across the lifespan (ages 5–85), it is short and easy to administer, and there is support for construct validity. PMID:26025230

  14. Discovering Visual Scanning Patterns in a Computerized Cancellation Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Ho-Chuan; Wang, Tsui-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an attention sequential mining mechanism for investigating the sequential patterns of children's visual scanning process in a computerized cancellation test. Participants had to locate and cancel the target amongst other non-targets in a structured form, and a random form with Chinese stimuli. Twenty-three…

  15. Status of the integrated topping cycle and MHD generator testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pian, C.C.P.; Dunton, A.W.; Schmitt, E.W.; Morrison, D.J.

    1993-12-31

    The status of the Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) MHD generator testing is presented. This generator is part of a 50 MW{sub t} prototypic powertrain that is currently undergoing proof-of-concept (POC) testing at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. Test objectives are to establish component lifetimes at prototypic operating conditions and to verify the design performance parameters. The ITC generator has completed Design Verification Testing and is now well into the POC duration test. To date (May 1, 1993), over 360 hours of the planned 1000 hours of testing has been completed. Generator testing is being performed at conditions representative of commercial power plant operating conditions. Prototypic generator channel hardware is performing very well. Based on test results obtained thus far, the prognosis is excellent for meeting all of the POC test objectives.

  16. Study on Noncontact Pulmonary Function Test Using Pattern Light Projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Hirooki; Koshiji, Kohji

    The pulmonary function test by spirometer is generally conducted. The test subjects, especially children, women and older people, feel uncomfortable as the mouthpiece and nasal plug must be attached to the face of them. We have studied the nonrestraint pulmonary function test using the dot matrix pattern projection in order to decrease the burden to the examinee. In our proposed system, the pattern light projector illuminates the thorax with the dot matrix pattern light. And the CCD camera takes a series of images of the dot matrix pattern. The three dimensional shape of the thorax surface can be calculated by the distribution of light dots. And the respiratory waveform is calculated by the time-series change of the three dimensional shape. The respiratory waveform of our system was similar to one of spirometer. Therefore, we clarified that our proposed system can equivalently measure the respiration with spirometer. And we compared the volume change of the three dimensional shape calculated by our system with the expired tidal volume measured by the expiration gas analyzer. And we examined the relationship between the expired tidal volume and the volume change of the thorax surface.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1333-90 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transient test cycle generation. 86...) Emission Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1333-90 Transient test cycle generation. (a) The heavy-duty transient engine cycles for...

  18. Adding Test Generation to the Teaching Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce-Lockhart, Michael; Norvell, Theodore; Crescenzi, Pierluigi

    2009-01-01

    We propose an extension of the Teaching Machine project, called Quiz Generator, that allows instructors to produce assessment quizzes in the field of algorithm and data structures quite easily. This extension makes use of visualization techniques and is based on new features of the Teaching Machine that allow third-party visualizers to be added as…

  19. Test-Aerosol Generator For Calibrating Particle Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogan, Paul A.; Adams, Alois J.; Schwindt, Christian J.; Hodge, Timothy R.; Mallow, Tim J.; Duong, Anh A.; Bukauskas, Vyto V.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus generates clean, stable aerosol stream for use in testing and calibrating laser-based aerosol-particle counter. Size and concentration of aerosol particles controlled to ensure accurate calibration. Cheap, widely available medical nebulizers used to generate aerosols.

  20. A Compartmental Lateral Inhibition System to Generate Contrasting Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rufino Ferreira, Ana S.; Hsia, Justin; Arcak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    We propose a lateral inhibition system and analyze contrasting patterns of gene expression. The system consists of a set of compartments interconnected by channels. Each compartment contains a colony of cells that produce diffusible molecules to be detected by the neighboring colonies. Each cell is equipped with an inhibitory circuit that reduces its production when the detected signal is sufficiently strong. We characterize the parameter range in which steady-state patterns emerge. PMID:26665158

  1. Penetration tests in next generation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, Filip; Voznak, Miroslav

    2012-06-01

    SIP proxy server is without any doubts centerpiece of any SIP IP telephony infrastructure. It also often provides other services than those related to VoIP traffic. These softswitches are, however, very often become victims of attacks and threats coming from public networks. The paper deals with a system that we developed as an analysis and testing tool to verify if the target SIP server is adequately secured and protected against any real threats. The system is designed as an open-source application, thus allowing independent access and is fully extensible to other test modules.

  2. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry for mechanical testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augulis, L.; Tamulevic̆ius, S.; Augulis, R.; Bonneville, J.; Goudeau, P.; Templier, C.

    2004-07-01

    The design, performance and principles of computerised control of an optical micro-electro-mechanical device combining microtensile device and electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to test both elastic and plastic properties of thin metallic, dielectric as well as multilayered freestanding films are presented. A piezo-actuated microtensile set up is synchronised with an ESPI to measure film elongation up to 70 μm in length with an accuracy of nearly 50 nm. No patterning or marking of the specimen surface is needed when using the ESPI and displacements can be measured at various points of the films. Tensile force is directly measured using a miniature load cell. Tensile tests of 10 μm aluminium and 50 μm polymer (Kapton ®) foils have been performed. The Young's moduli are calculated for both materials from the stress-strain curves.

  3. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  4. SSME seal test program: Test results for hole-pattern damper seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    The results consisting of direct and transverse force coefficients are presented for thirteen, hole-pattern, damper-seal configurations. The designation damper seal refers to a seal which uses a deliberately roughened stator nd smooth rotor, to increase the net damping force developed by a seal. The designation hole-pattern refers to a stator roughness pattern which is developed by a pattern of round holes while are milled into the stator. All seals tested use the same smooth rotor and have the same constant minimum clearance. The seal tests examined the following major design options: (1) hole-area density, i.e., the proportion of stator surface area consumed by holes; and (2) hole depth, particularly the ratio of hole depth to minimum clearance. In addition, limited data were taken to examine the influence of in-line versus staggered hole patterns and flat-bottomed versus spherical-bottomed holes.

  5. Improving physician practice efficiency by learning lab test ordering pattern.

    PubMed

    Cai, Peng; Cao, Feng; Ni, Yuan; Shen, Weijia; Zheng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The system of electronic medical records (EMR) has been widely used in physician practice. In China, physicians have the time pressure to provide care to many patients in a short period. Improving practice efficiency is a promising direction to mitigate this predicament. During the encounter, ordering lab test is one of the most frequent actions in EMR system. In this paper, our motivation is to save physician's time by providing lab test ordering list to facilitate physician practice. To this end, we developed weight based multi-label classification framework to learn to order lab test for the current encounter according to the historical EMR. Particularly, we propose to learn the physician-specific lab test ordering pattern as different physicians may have different practice behavior on the same population. Experimental results on the real data set demonstrate that physician-specific models can outperform the baseline. PMID:23920762

  6. 40 CFR 86.1333 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of the...: ER28AP14.006 Where: Max Test Speed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065. (ii) For Otto-cycle engines: ER28AP14.007 Where: Max Test Speed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40...

  7. SSME seal test program: Test results for smooth, hole-pattern and helically-grooved stators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1987-01-01

    All of the listed seals were tested in a liquid Halon test facility at high Reynolds numbers. In addition, a helically-grooved-stator seal was tested in an air seal facility. An analysis of the test results with comparisons to theoretical predictions supports the following conclusions: (1) For small seals, the Hirs' friction-factor model is more restricted than had been thought; (2) For smooth seals, predictions of stiffness and damping improve markedly as the radical clearance is reduced; (3) Friction-factor data for hole-pattern-seal stators frequently deviates from the Hirs model; (4) Predictions of stiffness and damping coefficients for hole-pattern-stator seals is generally reasonable; (5) Tests for the hole-pattern stators at reduced clearances show no clear optimum for hole-pattern seals with respect to either hole-area ratio or hole depth to minimum clearance ratios; (6) Tests of these hole-pattern stators show no significant advantage in net damping over smooth seals; (7) Tests of helically-grooved seal stators in Halon show reasonable agreement between theory and prediction for leakage and direct stiffness but poor agreement for the net damping coefficient.

  8. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning.

  9. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-24

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning. PMID:27391724

  10. HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Noelle R; Rajan, Sonali; Gwadz, Marya V; Aregbesola, Temi

    2014-12-01

    The heightened level of risk for HIV infection among Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) is driven by multilevel influences. Using cross-sectional data, we examined HIV testing patterns among urban YMSM of color in a high-HIV seroprevalence area (ages 16 to 21 years). Self-reported frequency of testing was high, with 42% of youth reporting testing at a greater frequency than recommended guidelines. There were no differences between less frequent and more frequent testers on sexual risk behaviors. Most (80%) youth cited reassurance of HIV-negative status as a reason for testing. Further, over half of the sample reported numerous other reasons for HIV testing, which spanned individual, partner, social, and structural levels of influence. Approximately half of respondents indicated that peers, family members, and counselors influenced their motivation to get tested. Of concern, their first HIV test occurred approximately 2 years after their first sexual experience with another male. These results indicate the need to consider developmental issues as well as comprehensive, multilevel efforts to ensure that YMSM of color test at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended frequency but not less than this or too frequently. PMID:24973260

  11. Model Based Analysis and Test Generation for Flight Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Schumann, Johann M.; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Lowry, Mike R.; Karsai, Gabor; Nine, Harmon; Neema, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We describe a framework for model-based analysis and test case generation in the context of a heterogeneous model-based development paradigm that uses and combines Math- Works and UML 2.0 models and the associated code generation tools. This paradigm poses novel challenges to analysis and test case generation that, to the best of our knowledge, have not been addressed before. The framework is based on a common intermediate representation for different modeling formalisms and leverages and extends model checking and symbolic execution tools for model analysis and test case generation, respectively. We discuss the application of our framework to software models for a NASA flight mission.

  12. Testing to Characterize the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward; Schreiber, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a high efficiency generator, is being considered for space missions. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated an engineering unit (EU), the ASRG EU, under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently undergoing extended operation testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. It has also undergone performance tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs. This paper summarizes and explains test results in the context of designing operating strategies for the generator during a space mission and notes expected differences between the EU performance and future generators.

  13. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  14. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  15. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  16. A random approach of test macro generation for early detection of hotspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-hyun; Kim, Chin; Kang, Minsoo; Hwang, Sungwook; Yang, Jae-seok; Harb, Mohammed; Al-Imam, Mohamed; Madkour, Kareem; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe

    2016-03-01

    Multiple-Patterning Technology (MPT) is still the preferred choice over EUV for the advanced technology nodes, starting the 20nm node. Down the way to 7nm and 5nm nodes, Self-Aligned Multiple Patterning (SAMP) appears to be one of the effective multiple patterning techniques in terms of achieving small pitch of printed lines on wafer, yet its yield is in question. Predicting and enhancing the yield in the early stages of technology development are some of the main objectives for creating test macros on test masks. While conventional yield ramp techniques for a new technology node have relied on using designs from previous technology nodes as a starting point to identify patterns for Design of Experiment (DoE) creation, these techniques are challenging to apply in the case of introducing an MPT technique like SAMP that did not exist in previous nodes. This paper presents a new strategy for generating test structures based on random placement of unit patterns that can construct more meaningful bigger patterns. Specifications governing the relationships between those unit patterns can be adjusted to generate layout clips that look like realistic SAMP designs. A via chain can be constructed to connect the random DoE of SAMP structures through a routing layer to external pads for electrical measurement. These clips are decomposed according to the decomposition rules of the technology into the appropriate mandrel and cut masks. The decomposed clips can be tested through simulations, or electrically on silicon to discover hotspots. The hotspots can be used in optimizing the fabrication process and models to fix them. They can also be used as learning patterns for DFM deck development. By expanding the size of the randomly generated test structures, more hotspots can be detected. This should provide a faster way to enhance the yield of a new technology node.

  17. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: pattern, strength, and dynamics of premotor synaptic input to leech heart motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2007-11-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) for heartbeat in medicinal leeches consists of seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons and one unidentified pair. Four of the identified pairs and the unidentified pair of interneurons make inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. The CPG produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons corresponding to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons, and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts, synchronous and peristaltic. Using extracellular recordings from premotor interneurons and voltage-clamp recordings of ipsilateral segmental motor neurons in 69 isolated nerve cords, we assessed the strength and dynamics of premotor inhibitory synaptic output onto the entire ensemble of heart motor neurons and the associated conduction delays in both coordination modes. We conclude that premotor interneurons establish a stereotypical pattern of intersegmental synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics that is invariant across coordination modes, despite wide variations among preparations. These data coupled with a previous description of the temporal pattern of premotor interneuron activity and relative phasing of motor neuron activity in the two coordination modes enable a direct assessment of how premotor interneurons through their temporal pattern of activity and their spatial pattern of synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics coordinate segmental motor neurons into a functional pattern of activity. PMID:17804574

  18. Model-Driven Test Generation of Distributed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easwaran, Arvind; Hall, Brendan; Schweiker, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel test generation technique for distributed systems. Utilizing formal models and formal verification tools, spe cifically the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) tool-suite from SRI, we present techniques to generate concurrent test vectors for distrib uted systems. These are initially explored within an informal test validation context and later extended to achieve full MC/DC coverage of the TTEthernet protocol operating within a system-centric context.

  19. Results of the integrated topping cycle MHD generator testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pian, C.C.P.; Schmitt, E.W.

    1994-12-31

    The results of the Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) MHD generator tests are presented. This generator is part of a 50 MW{sub t} prototypic powertrain which recently completed proof-of-concept (POC) testing at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. POC duration testing was carried out at conditions representative of commercial power plant operation, in order to establish component lifetimes and to verify the design performance parameters. Over 500 hours of thermal and power testing was cumulated with the generator hardware before the program funding was terminated. A summary of the MHD generator performance characteristics and hardware evaluations is provided in the paper. A summary of the generator performance throughout the POC test series is presented. Included are comparisons of: (1) plasma electrical conductivities measured early in the Design Verification Test series and during the POC series, (2) measured generator performance with analytical predictions, and (3) internal wall leakage characteristics of the generator channel with and without iron oxide addition. The performance requirement of the ITC program, i.e., the demonstration of 1.5 MW{sub e} power output, was easily achieved. The ITC generator channel, nozzle, and diffuser accumulated more than 300 hours at nominal power conditions. The prototypic hardware performed well throughout the POC test series. Some problems did arise during the tests. but they were not life-threatening to the MHD generator. Corrective measures were implemented; they will be discussed in the full paper. The physical condition of the overall generator channel at the end of POC tests is good.

  20. Pattern generation with cesium atomic beams at nanometer scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, M.; Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Nowak, S.; Pfau, T.; Mlynek, J.

    1996-12-01

    We have demonstrated that a cesium atomic beam can be used to pattern a gold surface using a self assembling monolayer (SAM) as a resist. A 12.5 μm period mesh was used as a proximity mask for the atomic beam. The cesium atoms locally change the wetability of the SAM, which allows a wet etching reagent to remove the underlying gold in the exposed regions. An edge resolution of better than 100 nm was obtained. The experiment suggests that this method can either be used as a sensitive position detector with nanometer resolution in atom optics, or for nanostructuring in a resist technique.

  1. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  2. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres for wind... Testing Performance Characteristics of Methods for PM 10 § 53.42 Generation of test atmospheres for wind... of multiplets (doublets and triplets) in a test particle atmosphere shall not exceed 10 percent....

  3. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres for wind... Testing Performance Characteristics of Methods for PM10 § 53.42 Generation of test atmospheres for wind... of multiplets (doublets and triplets) in a test particle atmosphere shall not exceed 10 percent....

  4. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres for wind... Testing Performance Characteristics of Methods for PM 10 § 53.42 Generation of test atmospheres for wind... of multiplets (doublets and triplets) in a test particle atmosphere shall not exceed 10 percent....

  5. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres for wind... Testing Performance Characteristics of Methods for PM10 § 53.42 Generation of test atmospheres for wind... of multiplets (doublets and triplets) in a test particle atmosphere shall not exceed 10 percent....

  6. 40 CFR 53.42 - Generation of test atmospheres for wind tunnel tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Generation of test atmospheres for wind... Testing Performance Characteristics of Methods for PM10 § 53.42 Generation of test atmospheres for wind... of multiplets (doublets and triplets) in a test particle atmosphere shall not exceed 10 percent....

  7. Design driven test patterns for OPC models calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Imam, Mohamed

    2009-03-01

    In the modern photolithography process for manufacturing integrated circuits, geometry dimensions need to be realized on silicon which are much smaller than the exposure wavelength. Thus Resolution Enhancement Techniques have an indispensable role towards the implementation of a successful technology process node. Finding an appropriate RET recipe, that answers the needs of a certain fabrication process, usually involves intensive computational simulations. These simulations have to reflect how different elements in the lithography process under study will behave. In order to achieve this, accurate models are needed that truly represent the transmission of patterns from mask to silicon. A common practice in calibrating lithography models is to collect data for the dimensions of some test structures created on the exposure mask along with the corresponding dimensions of these test structures on silicon after exposure. This data is used to tune the models for good predictions. The models will be guaranteed to accurately predict the test structures that has been used in its tuning. However, real designs might have a much greater variety of structures that might not have been included in the test structures. This paper explores a method for compiling the test structures to be used in the model calibration process using design layouts as an input. The method relies on reducing structures in the design layout to the essential unique structure from the lithography models point of view, and thus ensuring that the test structures represent what the model would actually have to predict during the simulations.

  8. Tests and evaluation of multihundred watt thermoelectric generators at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouklove, P.

    1977-01-01

    The multihundred watt (MHW) thermoelectric generator, based on silicon-germanium thermoelectric technology, delivers a nominal power output of 150 watts with an efficiency of about 6%. The two Voyager space probes each use three such generators assembled in tandem on a boom. A total of seven MHW type thermoelectric generators were tested at JPL in support of the Voyager project. The tests consisted of: (1) parametric evaluation of the electrical characteristics of the devices over a wide range of output voltage for different values of input power, different operating ambients (air, vacuum), and different internal environments (argon, helium, xenon, mixture of these gases, and vacuum) at different pressures to allow evaluation of the influences of both gas and pressure on the performance of the generator; (2) tests to determine the transient behavior of the generators; and (3) operation of the generator in conjunction with the Voyager spacecraft.

  9. Testing of a direct drive generator for wind turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Sondergaard, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    The normal drive train of a wind turbine consists a gearbox and a 4 to 8 poles asynchronous generator. The gearbox is an expensive and unreliable components and this paper deals with testing of a direct drive synchronous generator for a gearless wind turbine. The Danish company Belt Electric has constructed and manufactured a 27 kW prototype radial flux PM-generator (DD600). They have used cheap hard ferrite magnets in the rotor of this PM-generator. This generator has been tested at Riso and the test results are investigated and analyzed in this paper. The tests have been done with three different load types (1: resistance; 2: diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance; 3: AC-capacitor, diode rectifier, DC-capacitor, resistance). 1 ref., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Patterns of rock fragment cover generated by tillage erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesen, Jean; Wesemael, Bas van; Govers, Gerard; Martinez-Fernandez, José; Desmet, Philippe; Vandaele, Karel; Quine, Timothy; Degraer, Greet

    1997-03-01

    Intensively cultivated areas in the upper part of the Guadalentin catchment (southeast Spain) show a systematic spatial pattern of surface rock fragment cover ( Rc). The objective of this paper is to quantify and to explain this spatial rock fragment cover pattern. Therefore, a map of an intensively cultivated area of 5 km 2 was digitised, and for each pixel total topographic curvature was calculated. Next, rock fragment cover was determined photographically at 35 sites with a range of total slope curvatures. A linear relation between total curvature and rock fragment cover was found, except for narrow concavities. It was hypothesised that this pattern can be explained by a significant net downslope movement of rock fragments and fine earth by tillage. The displacement distances of rock fragments by tillage with a duckfoot chisel were measured by monitoring the displacement of tracers (painted rock fragments and aluminium cubes) on 5 sites having different slopes. The rare of tillage erosion for one tillage pass with a duckfoot chisel, expressed by the diffusion constant ( k), equals 282 kg/m for up and downslope tillage and only 139 kg/m for contour tillage. Nomograms indicate that mean denudation rates in almond groves due to tillage erosion (3 to 5 tillage passes per year) can easily amount to 1.5-2.6 mm/year for contour tillage and up to 3.6-5.9 mm/year for up- and downslope tillage for a field, 50 m long and having a slope of 20%. These figures are at least one order of magnitude larger than reported denudation rates caused by water erosion in similar environments. Hence tillage erosion contributes significantly to land degradation. The downslope soil flux induced by tillage not only causes considerable denudation on topographic convexities (hill tops and spurs) and upper field boundaries but also an important sediment accumulation in topographic concavities (hollows and valley bottoms) and at lower field boundaries. Kinetic sieving (i.e. the upward migration

  11. Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, JM

    2004-01-30

    Elevated temperature gas generation tests have been conducted using neptunium dioxide produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet. These tests were performed to determine what effect elevated temperatures would have on the neptunium dioxide in comparison to neptunium dioxide tested at ambient temperature. The headspace gas compositions following storage at elevated temperatures associated with normal conditions of transport (NCT) have been measured. These test results show an increase in hydrogen generation rate at elevated temperature and significant removal of oxygen from the headspace gas. The elevated temperature gas generation tests described in this report involved heating small test vessels containing neptunium dioxide and measuring the headspace gas pressure and composition at the end of the test period. Four samples were used in these tests to evaluate the impact of process variables on the gas generation rate. Two samples were calcined to 600 degrees Celsius and two were calcined to 650 degrees Celsius. Each test vessel contained approximately 9.5 g of neptunium dioxide. Following exposure to 75 per cent relative humidity (RH) for five days, these samples were loaded in air and then heated to between 105 and 115 degrees Celsius for about one month. At the conclusion of the test period, the headspace gas of each container was analyzed using a micro-gas chromatograph installed in the glovebox where the experiments were conducted. The pressure, volume, and composition data for the headspace gas samples were used to calculate average H2 generation rates.

  12. Comparison of the reliability of multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials generated by pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimulation.

    PubMed

    Souza, G S; Schakelford, H B; Moura, A L A; Gomes, B D; Ventura, D F; Fitzgerald, M E C; Silveira, L C L

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials (mfVEP) elicited by pattern pulse stimulation with that of pattern reversal in producing reliable responses (signal-to-noise ratio >1.359). Participants were 14 healthy subjects. Visual stimulation was obtained using a 60-sector dartboard display consisting of 6 concentric rings presented in either pulse or reversal mode. Each sector, consisting of 16 checks at 99% Michelson contrast and 80 cd/m² mean luminance, was controlled by a binary m-sequence in the time domain. The signal-to-noise ratio was generally larger in the pattern reversal than in the pattern pulse mode. The number of reliable responses was similar in the central sectors for the two stimulation modes. At the periphery, pattern reversal showed a larger number of reliable responses. Pattern pulse stimuli performed similarly to pattern reversal stimuli to generate reliable waveforms in R1 and R2. The advantage of using both protocols to study mfVEP responses is their complementarity: in some patients, reliable waveforms in specific sectors may be obtained with only one of the two methods. The joint analysis of pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimuli increased the rate of reliability for central sectors by 7.14% in R1, 5.35% in R2, 4.76% in R3, 3.57% in R4, 2.97% in R5, and 1.78% in R6. From R1 to R4 the reliability to generate mfVEPs was above 70% when using both protocols. Thus, for a very high reliability and thorough examination of visual performance, it is recommended to use both stimulation protocols. PMID:22782556

  13. Morphodynamics and anabranching patterns generated in the Madeira River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Bonthius, C.; Abad, J. D.; Stevaux, J.; Filizola, N.; Frias, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Madeira River is the largest tributary in water discharge and sediment transport of the Amazon River. At present, this river is at the center of a controversial political discussion because the Brazilian government is building two hydroelectric plants on the Bolivia-Brazil border, flooding a long reach from near Cachuela Esperanza in the tributary Beni River, close to the Brazil-Bolivia border, up to Porto Velho. We present results from three field expeditions carried out in July-August 2011, December 2012 and March 2013. The main scope of this article is to disseminate the environmental threat suffered by the Madeira from regulation/disruption, and to present preliminary results on the geomorphologic characteristics of the Madeira channel and floodplain. Using historical radar and satellite imagery, the floodplain morpho-sedimentary units and morphology of the channel were assessed and quantified. Sediment bed and bank sampling, bathymetric surveys and velocity measurements were recorded using a single beam echo sounder and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), respectively. Velocity data were analyzed using TRDI's WinRiverII and a MATLAB-based software package Velocity Mapping Tool. We consider that the Madeira River offers some ideal conditions to provide information on critical conditions and geomorphologic thresholds in mega-rivers. The Madeira River has been classified as a simple to moderate anabranching low-sinuosity river. The Madeira flows through a relatively simple pattern, alternating straight reaches with others that exhibit an incipient tendency to anabranch. Single beam and ADCP data yields insight into the bathymetry and flow characteristics in the channel through straight, pseudo-meandering, and anabranching stretches. We studied in detail three selected three reaches zones where three primary mechanisms for anabranching were identified: a) branches upstream and downstream in box shape pseudo-meanders; b) simple branch patterns

  14. Computer-Assisted Generation of Patterns and Virtual Reality Techniques for Fashion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Mickael; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2009-03-01

    We present a methodology for the design of aesthetic patterns and their visualization on virtual clothes. Generated patterns are directly mapped on the dress of a virtual mannequin. Furthermore, patterns sets may be interactively mapped on the virtual dress using a specific 3D interaction technique called Back-and-Forth. Pattern generation involves different mathematical approaches such as iterated function systems (IFS) and nonlinear trajectory models. Both model parameters and color space exploration is performed through a simple user interface. This work contributes to promote both computer assistance in the context of mass customization for fashion design.

  15. Statistical Tests of the Apple IIe Random Number Generator Yield Suggestions from Generator Seeding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, John M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses flaws in the Apple IIe Applesoft random number generator, RND, and reports results of frequency and serial correlation tests of the generator. Suggestions of seeds that yield sequences of numbers which pass fundamental screening tests for randomness are presented. (Author/LRW)

  16. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  17. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    PubMed

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  18. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  19. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  20. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  1. Test Input Generation for Red-Black Trees using Abstraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visser, Willem; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Pelanek, Radek

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of test input generation for code that manipulates complex data structures. Test inputs are sequences of method calls from the data structure interface. We describe test input generation techniques that rely on state matching to avoid generation of redundant tests. Exhaustive techniques use explicit state model checking to explore all the possible test sequences up to predefined input sizes. Lossy techniques rely on abstraction mappings to compute and store abstract versions of the concrete states; they explore under-approximations of all the possible test sequences. We have implemented the techniques on top of the Java PathFinder model checker and we evaluate them using a Java implementation of red-black trees.

  2. MINET validation study using steam generator test data

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyle, G.J.; Guppy, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Three steam generator transient test cases that were simulated using the MINET computer code are described, with computed results compared against experimental data. The MINET calculations closely agreed with the experiment for both the once-through and the U-tube steam generator test cases. The effort is part of an ongoing effort to validate the MINET computer code for thermal-hydraulic plant systems transient analysis, and strongly supports the validity of the MINET models.

  3. Mechanisms of Left-Right Coordination in Mammalian Locomotor Pattern Generation Circuits: A Mathematical Modeling View

    PubMed Central

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized “hopping” pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left–right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  4. Mechanisms of left-right coordination in mammalian locomotor pattern generation circuits: a mathematical modeling view.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Bacak, Bartholomew J; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized "hopping" pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left-right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  5. CFFF testing of ceramic elements for MHD generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lineberry, J.T.; Christiansen, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    In September 1992, the POC test LMF5-J was concluded at the CFFF in accordance with the objectives as set for the western coal POC test program. During this activity, a {open_quotes}piggyback{close_quotes} type test was conducted for the Busek Company in partial fulfillment of a DOE Phase II SBIR. A near prototypical design, generator module that was designed and constructed by the Busek Co. was installed in the LMF upstream test train of the CFFF for this test. The module incorporated AlN{sub 2} (ceramic) sidebar elements. The objective of the SBIR Phase II was to evaluate the integrity of this material subject to long duration operation under typical coal-fired MHD generator conditions. A summary of the LMF5-J test at the CFFF and activities and test results relevant to the SBIR Phase II related to the Busek SBIR project are provided.

  6. Generation of nearly hemispherical and high gain azimuthally symmetric patterns with printed circuit antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung Yu; Alexopoulos, Nicolaos G.

    1987-08-01

    Patttern shaping techniques are discussed for printed circuit antennas such as microstrip dipoles and slot elements. Crossed printed circuit dipoles or a combination of a printed circuit dipole and a slot are employed. It is demonstrated that with the proper choice of substrate or substrate-superstrate parameters it is possible to generate: (1) nearly hemispherical patterns, (2) high-gain azimuthally symmetric patterns, and (3) nearly sec theta patterns.

  7. The generation effect: a test between single- and multifactor theories.

    PubMed

    Burns, D J

    1990-11-01

    Single- and multifactor accounts of the generation effect (better memory for internally generated items than for externally presented items) were tested. Single-factor theories suggest that generation induces either stimulus-response relational processing or response-oriented processing. Multifactor theories suggest that generation induces both types of processing. In the first three experiments subjects either read or generated responses, and the degree of categorical structure within the list was manipulated. When categorical structure was minimal, large generation effects were observed for free recall and recognition, but not for cued recall. When categorical structure was high, however, a generation effect was observed for cued recall but not for recognition or free recall. A fourth experiment was performed to eliminate an uninteresting interpretation of the results. It is argued that a multifactor account is needed to explain these findings. PMID:2148579

  8. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    PubMed Central

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment. PMID:26902520

  9. Central Pattern Generation and the Motor Infrastructure for Suck, Respiration, and Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Steven M.; Estep, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current report is to review experimental findings on centrally patterned movements and sensory and descending modulation of central pattern generators (CPGs) in a variety of animal and human models. Special emphasis is directed toward speech production muscle systems, including the chest wall and orofacial complex during…

  10. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment.

  11. From Central Pattern Generator to Sensory Template in the Evolution of Birdsong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and…

  12. Performance testing of thermoelectric generators at JPL. [for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouklove, P.; Truscello, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    Several thermoelectric generators, ranging in output power from 170 watts to microwatts, are undergoing testing at JPL. They represent a wide range of technologies using advanced PbTe, SiGe and cascaded PbTe and BiTe thermoelectric materials. Several of these generators are of an advanced concept while others are representative of the Nimbus, Transit, Viking and the multi-hundred-watt (MHW) technology. Of interest is the behavior of generators which have been tested for times in excess of 60,000 hours.

  13. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. PMID:2296575

  14. Measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement resolution of noise directivity patterns from acoustic flight tests was investigated. Directivity angle resolution is affected by the data reduction parameters, the aircraft velocity and flyover altitude, and by deviations of the aircraft from the desired flight path. Equations are developed which determine bounds for the lateral and longitudinal directivity angle resolution as a function of the nominal directivity angle. The equations are applied to a flight test data base and the effects of several flight conditions and data reduction parameters on the directivity angle resolution are presented. The maximum directivity angle resolution typically occurs when the aircraft is at or near the overhead position. In general, directivity angle resolution improves with decreasing velocity, increasing altitude, increasing sampling rate, decreasing block size, and decreasing block averages. Deviations from the desired ideal flight path will increase the resolution. For the flight experiment considered in this study, an average of two flyovers were required at each test condition to obtain an acceptable flight path. The ability of the pilot to maintain the flight track improved with decreasing altitude, decreasing velocity, and practice. Due to the prevailing wind conditions, yaw angles of as much as 20 deg were required to maintain the desired flight path.

  15. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of the... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065....

  16. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of the... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065....

  17. 40 CFR 86.1333-2010 - Transient test cycle generation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 1065. (2) Torque is normalized to the maximum torque at the rpm listed with it. Therefore, to.... The generation of the maximum torque curve is described in 40 CFR part 1065. (b) Example of the... engines: ER13JY05.001 Where: MaxTestSpeed = the maximum test speed as calculated in 40 CFR part 1065....

  18. A versatile waveform generator for testing neuroelectric signal processors.

    PubMed

    Kohn, A F

    1989-08-01

    A multi-channel waveform generator was designed for testing neuroelectric signal processors. Smooth transient signals that resemble action potentials or evoked potentials are generated by a second order switched capacitor filter excited by brief rectangular pulses. The choice of an integrated circuit switched capacitor filter simplified the design by circumventing some of the disadvantages of conventional active filters. The waveform generator is versatile, with several signal parameters being independently adjustable from front panel controls: duration, waveshape, latency, amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio. The generator has been used for testing evoked potential acquisition and processing systems, for evaluating the effects of analog filters on evoked potentials and for testing systems designed to detect and classify trains of multi-unit action potentials. PMID:2770339

  19. Long term tests of a SNAP-19 thermoelectric generator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouklove, P.; Truscello, V.

    1972-01-01

    Results of tests performed on a SNAP 19 thermoelectric generator, SN-20. The SN-20 generator was tested for approximately 37,000 hours using electrical heating to simulate the heat released by isotope decay. After 27,000 hours of operation the output power from the generator decreased to approximately 1/3 of the beginning of life value while the internal resistance increased by a factor of 5. Analysis of the test results, confirmed by preliminary metallographic examination, indicated that the output power degradation was the result of excessive sublimation of the thermoelectric material and loss of the hot junction bond due to the depletion of the internal cover gas. This also resulted in excessive junction temperatures. Comparison is made with the behavior observed from the two flight generators and a tentative conclusion is advanced as to the reason for their failure.

  20. Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

    2007-05-25

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: • Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. • Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. • Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE’s proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. • Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

  1. Performance results of a digital test signal generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.; Marina, M.; Parham, B.

    1993-01-01

    Performance results of a digital test signal-generator hardware-demonstration unit are reported. Capabilities available include baseband and intermediate frequency (IF) spectrum generation, for which test results are provided. Repeatability in the setting of a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when a baseband or an IF spectrum is being generated ranges from 0.01 dB at high SNR's or high data rates to 0.3 dB at low data rates or low SNR's. Baseband symbol SNR and carrier SNR (Pc/No) accuracies of 0.1 dB were verified with the built-in statistics circuitry. At low SNR's that accuracy remains to be fully verified. These results were confirmed with measurements from a demodulator synchronizer assembly for the baseband spectrum generation, and with a digital receiver (Pioneer 10 receiver) for the IF spectrum generation.

  2. Interactions between zebrafish pigment cells responsible for the generation of Turing patterns.

    PubMed

    Nakamasu, Akiko; Takahashi, Go; Kanbe, Akio; Kondo, Shigeru

    2009-05-26

    The reaction-diffusion system is one of the most studied nonlinear mechanisms that generate spatially periodic structures autonomous. On the basis of many mathematical studies using computer simulations, it is assumed that animal skin patterns are the most typical examples of the Turing pattern (stationary periodic pattern produced by the reaction-diffusion system). However, the mechanism underlying pattern formation remains unknown because the molecular or cellular basis of the phenomenon has yet to be identified. In this study, we identified the interaction network between the pigment cells of zebrafish, and showed that this interaction network possesses the properties necessary to form the Turing pattern. When the pigment cells in a restricted region were killed with laser treatment, new pigment cells developed to regenerate the striped pattern. We also found that the development and survival of the cells were influenced by the positioning of the surrounding cells. When melanophores and xanthophores were located at adjacent positions, these cells excluded one another. However, melanophores required a mass of xanthophores distributed in a more distant region for both differentiation and survival. Interestingly, the local effect of these cells is opposite to that of their effects long range. This relationship satisfies the necessary conditions required for stable pattern formation in the reaction-diffusion model. Simulation calculations for the deduced network generated wild-type pigment patterns as well as other mutant patterns. Our findings here allow further investigation of Turing pattern formation within the context of cell biology. PMID:19433782

  3. A Test Generation Framework for Distributed Fault-Tolerant Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodloe, Alwyn; Bushnell, David; Miner, Paul; Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2009-01-01

    Heavyweight formal methods such as theorem proving have been successfully applied to the analysis of safety critical fault-tolerant systems. Typically, the models and proofs performed during such analysis do not inform the testing process of actual implementations. We propose a framework for generating test vectors from specifications written in the Prototype Verification System (PVS). The methodology uses a translator to produce a Java prototype from a PVS specification. Symbolic (Java) PathFinder is then employed to generate a collection of test cases. A small example is employed to illustrate how the framework can be used in practice.

  4. Dynamic test input generation for multiple-fault isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Phil

    1990-01-01

    Recent work is Causal Reasoning has provided practical techniques for multiple fault diagnosis. These techniques provide a hypothesis/measurement diagnosis cycle. Using probabilistic methods, they choose the best measurements to make, then update fault hypotheses in response. For many applications such as computers and spacecraft, few measurement points may be accessible, or values may change quickly as the system under diagnosis operates. In these cases, a hypothesis/measurement cycle is insufficient. A technique is presented for a hypothesis/test-input/measurement diagnosis cycle. In contrast to generating tests a priori for determining device functionality, it dynamically generates tests in response to current knowledge about fault probabilities. It is shown how the mathematics previously used for measurement specification can be applied to the test input generation process. An example from an efficient implementation called Multi-Purpose Causal (MPC) is presented.

  5. Mosquito noise in MPEG-compressed video: test patterns and metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenimore, Charles P.; Libert, John M.; Roitman, Peter

    2000-06-01

    Mosquito noise is a time dependent video compression impairment in which the high frequency spatial detail in video images having crisp edges is aliased intermittently. A new synthetic test pattern of moving spirals or circles is described which generates mosquito noise (MN) under Motion Pictures Expert Group (MPEG) compression. The spiral pattern is one of several NIST-developed patterns designed to stress specific features of compression based on motion estimation and quantization. The 'Spirals' pattern has several spirals or circles superimposed on a uniform background. The frames are filtered to avoid interline flicker which may be confounded with MN. Motion of the spirals and changing luminance of the background can be included to reduce the correlation between successive frames. Unexpectedly, even a static pattern of spirals can induce mosquito noise due to the stochastic character of the encoder. We consider metrics which are specific to the impairment being measured. For mosquito noise, we examine two separable detectors: each consists of a temporal (frame-to-frame) computation applied to the output of a spatial impairment detector which is applied to each frame. The two spatial detectors are: FLATS, which detects level 8 X 8 pixel image blocks; and the root-mean-square (RMS) applied to the image differences between original and compressed frames. The test patterns are encoded at low bit rates. We examine the measured mosquito noise as a function of the Group-of-Pictures (GOP) pattern in the MPEG-2 encoding and find that the GOP structure defines the periodicities of the MN.

  6. Effects of Differences in Working Memory Capacity on Patterns of Word Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Mimpei; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Morioka, Shu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that WM (working memory) is concerned with word generation, but many points regarding the relationship between the individual differences of WM capacity and the patterns of word generation remain unclear. This study is to investigate these unclear points by using three types of word fluency task with different…

  7. Alcohol Consumption Patterns in Immigrant and Later Generation Mexican American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, M. Jean

    1987-01-01

    Immigrant Mexican women's drinking patterns were compared with those of Mexican women in Mexico, other United States Latinas, later-generation Mexican-American women, and male immigrants. Changes in the direction of greater permissiveness and rationalization of alcohol use among later-generation Mexican-American women are demonstrated. (JMM)

  8. Optical testing of cylindrical surfaces with computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Pei-ji

    2013-08-01

    Increasing demands for highly accurate cylinders require more high-precision testing techniques. The existing methods of testing cylindrical surfaces can not ensure the highly-accuracy, efficiency, convenience and the overall cost. In order to acquire highly accurate cylindrical surfaces conveniently at a low cost, a new Fizeau interferometric optical testing utilizing CGH which is fabricated onto a wedge-shaped substrate is designed. In this test, a slit filter is placed in the center of the cylindrical curvature to filter out the undesired diffraction orders which occur when the beam hits the CGH. Meanwhile, the front side of the wedge-shaped substrate is as the reference flat, and the CGH is written onto the inclined surface, so that the real fringe pattern can not be affected by its reflected beam. Moreover, the design of cylindrical surfaces under test tilting and off-center relative to the diffraction surface of the CGH results that the required rays for interference can be obtained effectively from the pinhole filter in the interferometer. Furthermore, high-accuracy CGH in this test can be processed by conventional microlithography equipments. Corresponding to a cylindrical surface with 60mm in diameter and f-number of 1/7, the test has been successfully designed and optimized in Zemax whose testing accuracy is prior to 0.0019λ. Better interference pattern can be obtained because all the other disturbing rays image outside of aperture in a radius of 2mm. Experiment shows the method is efficient and predominant.

  9. Automated Generation and Assessment of Autonomous Systems Test Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barltrop, Kevin J.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Horvath, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the issues concerning verification and validation testing of autonomous spacecraft routinely culminates in the exploration of anomalous or faulted mission-like scenarios using the work involved during the Dawn mission's tests as examples. Prioritizing which scenarios to develop usually comes down to focusing on the most vulnerable areas and ensuring the best return on investment of test time. Rules-of-thumb strategies often come into play, such as injecting applicable anomalies prior to, during, and after system state changes; or, creating cases that ensure good safety-net algorithm coverage. Although experience and judgment in test selection can lead to high levels of confidence about the majority of a system's autonomy, it's likely that important test cases are overlooked. One method to fill in potential test coverage gaps is to automatically generate and execute test cases using algorithms that ensure desirable properties about the coverage. For example, generate cases for all possible fault monitors, and across all state change boundaries. Of course, the scope of coverage is determined by the test environment capabilities, where a faster-than-real-time, high-fidelity, software-only simulation would allow the broadest coverage. Even real-time systems that can be replicated and run in parallel, and that have reliable set-up and operations features provide an excellent resource for automated testing. Making detailed predictions for the outcome of such tests can be difficult, and when algorithmic means are employed to produce hundreds or even thousands of cases, generating predicts individually is impractical, and generating predicts with tools requires executable models of the design and environment that themselves require a complete test program. Therefore, evaluating the results of large number of mission scenario tests poses special challenges. A good approach to address this problem is to automatically score the results

  10. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  11. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullara, D.; de Decker, Y.

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction-diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction-diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns.

  12. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    PubMed Central

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  13. Integrated circuit test-port architecture and method and apparatus of test-port generation

    DOEpatents

    Teifel, John

    2016-04-12

    A method and apparatus are provided for generating RTL code for a test-port interface of an integrated circuit. In an embodiment, a test-port table is provided as input data. A computer automatically parses the test-port table into data structures and analyzes it to determine input, output, local, and output-enable port names. The computer generates address-detect and test-enable logic constructed from combinational functions. The computer generates one-hot multiplexer logic for at least some of the output ports. The one-hot multiplexer logic for each port is generated so as to enable the port to toggle between data signals and test signals. The computer then completes the generation of the RTL code.

  14. NASA Fastrac Engine Gas Generator Component Test Program and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Henry J., Jr.; Sanders, Tim; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation consists of viewgraph which review the test program and the results of the tests for the Gas Generator (GG) component for the Fastrac Engine. Included are pictures of the Fastrac (MC-1) Engine and the GG, diagrams of the flight configuration, and schematics of the LOX, and the RP-1 systems and the injector assembly. The normal operating parameters are reviewed, as are the test instrumentation. Also shown are graphs of the hot gas temperature, and the test temperature profiles. The results are summarized.

  15. Generating realistic environments for cyber operations development, testing, and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Vincent H.; Gregorio-de Souza, Ian; Murphy, John P.

    2012-06-01

    Training eective cyber operatives requires realistic network environments that incorporate the structural and social complexities representative of the real world. Network trac generators facilitate repeatable experiments for the development, training and testing of cyber operations. However, current network trac generators, ranging from simple load testers to complex frameworks, fail to capture the realism inherent in actual environments. In order to improve the realism of network trac generated by these systems, it is necessary to quantitatively measure the level of realism in generated trac with respect to the environment being mimicked. We categorize realism measures into statistical, content, and behavioral measurements, and propose various metrics that can be applied at each level to indicate how eectively the generated trac mimics the real world.

  16. From social behavior to neural circuitry: steroid hormones rapidly modulate advertisement calling via a vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Remage-Healey, Luke; Bass, Andrew H

    2006-09-01

    Across vertebrates, androgens are rapidly elevated within minutes in response to aggressive or reproductive stimuli, yet it is unclear what the causal relationship is between fast androgen elevation and the ongoing (minute-by-minute) expression of behavior. This study tested the hypothesis that rapid increases in plasma steroid levels induce similarly rapid increases in both vocal behavior and the neurophysiological output of a central pattern generator that governs vocal behavior. In Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta), males call to attract females to their nesting sites, and both males and females vocalize in aggressive interactions. Previous field experiments with males showed that simulated territorial challenges produce rapid and concurrent elevations in ongoing calling behavior and circulating levels of the teleost-specific androgen 11-ketotestosterone (11kT), but not the glucocorticoid cortisol. The current field experiments showed that non-invasive (food) delivery of 11kT, but not cortisol, induced an elevation within 10 min in the ongoing calling behavior of males. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that intramuscular injections of either 11kT or cortisol, but neither testosterone nor 17-beta-estradiol, induced increases within 5 min in the output of the vocal pattern generator in males, whereas only cortisol had similarly fast effects in females. The field behavioral results support predictions generated by the challenge hypothesis and also parallel the 11kT-dependent modulation of the vocal pattern generator in males. The cortisol effect on the vocal pattern generator in both sexes predicts that glucocorticoids regulate vocalizations in non-advertisement contexts. Together, these experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that surges in circulating steroid levels play a causal role in shaping rapid changes in social behavior (vocalizations) through non-genomic-like actions on neural (vocal motor) circuits that directly encode behavioral

  17. Generating Reduced Tests for FSMs with Extra States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Adenilso; Petrenko, Alexandre; Yevtushenko, Nina

    We address the problem of generating tests from a deterministic Finite State Machine to provide full fault coverage even if the faults may introduce extra states in the implementations. It is well-known that such tests should include the sequences in the so-called traversal set, which contains all sequences of length defined by the number of extra states. Therefore, the only apparent opportunity to produce shorter tests is to find within a test suite a suitable arrangement of the sequences in the inescapable traversal set. We observe that the direct concatenation of the traversal set to a given state cover, suggested by all existing generation methods with full fault coverage, results in extensive test branching, when a test has to be repeatedly executed to apply all the sequences of the traversal set. In this paper, we state conditions which allow distributing these sequences over several tests. We then utilize these conditions to elaborate a method, called SPY-method, which shortens tests by avoiding test branching as much as possible. We present the results of the experimental comparison of the proposed method with an existing method which indicate that the resulting save can be up to 40%.

  18. Flow generation in a novel centrifugal diffuser test device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidos, P.

    1983-09-01

    Recognition of the need to develop optimum diffusers for advanced centrifugal compressors, resulted in the design and manufacture of a novel low-speed test facility for centrifugal diffuser testing. The CDTD was designed to allow the flow angle and wall boundary profiles into the test diffuser to be controlled by variable geometry in the flow generator. The present study reports on the design of the flow generator and the analysis of the internal flow using a NASA computer code (MERIDL). First test results are given and are compared with the results of a control volume analysis. The flow angle control technique was found to work effectively but to give somewhat smaller angles (by 4 deg) than were predicted. It was concluded that the information obtained would allow scaling of the device; however, an analysis code was needed which would accept the real physical boundary conditions.

  19. Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor Development and Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Lee, Jimmy; Robertson, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (AVGS) was the primary docking sensor for the Orbital Express mission. The sensor performed extremely well during the mission, and the technology has been proven on orbit in other flights too. Parts obsolescence issues prevented the construction of more AVGS units, so the next generation of sensor was designed with current parts and updated to support future programs. The Next Generation Advanced Video Guidance Sensor (NGAVGS) has been tested as a breadboard, two different brassboard units, and a prototype. The testing revealed further improvements that could be made and demonstrated capability beyond that ever demonstrated by the sensor on orbit. This paper presents some of the sensor history, parts obsolescence issues, radiation concerns, and software improvements to the NGAVGS. In addition, some of the testing and test results are presented. The NGAVGS has shown that it will meet the general requirements for any space proximity operations or docking need.

  20. Experiments with Test Case Generation and Runtime Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artho, Cyrille; Drusinsky, Doron; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Mike; Pasareanu, Corina; Rosu, Grigore; Visser, Willem; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Software testing is typically an ad hoc process where human testers manually write many test inputs and expected test results, perhaps automating their execution in a regression suite. This process is cumbersome and costly. This paper reports preliminary results on an approach to further automate this process. The approach consists of combining automated test case generation based on systematically exploring the program's input domain, with runtime analysis, where execution traces are monitored and verified against temporal logic specifications, or analyzed using advanced algorithms for detecting concurrency errors such as data races and deadlocks. The approach suggests to generate specifications dynamically per input instance rather than statically once-and-for-all. The paper describes experiments with variants of this approach in the context of two examples, a planetary rover controller and a space craft fault protection system.

  1. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  2. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  3. Benzene Generation Testing for Tank 48H Waste Disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T

    2005-05-13

    In support for the Aggregation option1, researchers performed a series of tests using actual Tank 48H slurries. The tests were designed to examine potential benzene generation issues if the Tank 48H slurry is disposed to Saltstone. Personnel used the archived Tank 48H sample (HTF-E-03-127, collected September 17, 2003) for the experiments. The tests included a series of three experiments (Tests A, B, and F) performed in duplicate, giving a total of six experiments. Test A used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}20:1 with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H. Test B used Tank 48H slurry mixed with {approx}2.7:1 with DWPF Recycle from Tanks 21H and 22H, while Test F used Tank 48H slurry as-is. Tests A and B occurred at 45 C, while Test F occurred at 55 C. Over a period of 8 weeks, personnel collected samples for analysis, once per week. Each sample was tested with the in-cell gamma counter. The researchers noted a decline in the cesium activity in solution which is attributed to temperature dependence of the complex slurry equilibrium. Selected samples were sent to ADS for potassium, boron, and cesium analysis. The benzene generation rate was inferred from the TPB destruction which is indirectly measured by the in-growth of cesium, potassium or boron. The results of all the analyses reveal no discernible in-growth of radiocesium, potassium or boron, indicating no significant tetraphenylborate (TPB) decomposition in any of the experiments. From boron measurements, the inferred rate of TPB destruction remained less than 0.332 mg/(L-h) implying a maximum benzene generation rate of <0.325 mg/(L-h).

  4. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  5. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  6. Note: A novel dielectric barrier discharge system for generating stable patterns in wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang; Dong, Lifang

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system with a meshed water electrode to generate stable square superlattice patterns (MSSP) in Ar/air mixture in a wide range of experimental environments. Discharge scenarios with the applied voltage increasing in the meshed DBD and ordinary DBD are presented respectively under the same experimental conditions. It is found that a square pattern and MSSP can be obtained stably and easily in meshed DBD, while no pattern emerges in ordinary DBD. MSSP can be formed when the Ar content is from 0% to 70%, and the corresponding applied voltage decreases with Ar content increasing. Results based on optical methods show that MSSP is generated by artificially designed electrodes together with nonlinear characteristics of DBD, which may account for why patterns in meshed DBD exist in a wide range.

  7. Note: A novel dielectric barrier discharge system for generating stable patterns in wide range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weibo; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang; Dong, Lifang

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system with a meshed water electrode to generate stable square superlattice patterns (MSSP) in Ar/air mixture in a wide range of experimental environments. Discharge scenarios with the applied voltage increasing in the meshed DBD and ordinary DBD are presented respectively under the same experimental conditions. It is found that a square pattern and MSSP can be obtained stably and easily in meshed DBD, while no pattern emerges in ordinary DBD. MSSP can be formed when the Ar content is from 0% to 70%, and the corresponding applied voltage decreases with Ar content increasing. Results based on optical methods show that MSSP is generated by artificially designed electrodes together with nonlinear characteristics of DBD, which may account for why patterns in meshed DBD exist in a wide range. PMID:27250476

  8. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yong; Noh, Junghyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.

  9. Steam generator tube integrity program leak rate tests. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.A.; Bickford, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    This interim report presents preliminary results on leak rate tests performed on through-wall defected Inconel 600 steam generator tubing. Tube defects included an EDM (electro-discharge machine) notch and IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracks) of various lengths. Tests were conducted at PWR operating temperatures with leakage of hot water/steam into air. A number of IGSCC cracks were unstable under the experiment conditions of these initial tests, continuing to grow until system capacity limitations resulted in decreased pressure differential. However, initial tesing also pointed to a need for reconfiguration of the test apparatus to sustain increased flow and, more importantly, alter the mode of control. The initial test configuration is based on flow control, with pressure differential across the specimen an independent variable. This often results in pressure increases too rapid to establish the initiation of crack instability. A reconfigured system based on pressure control with flow as an independent parameter is being recommended for future tests.

  10. Testing and Functions of the J2X Gas Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I, NASA s new solid rocket based crew launch vehicle, is a two stage in line rocket that has made its waytothe forefront of NASA s endeavors. The Ares I s Upper Stage (US) will be propelled by a J-2X engine which is fueled by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. The J-2X is a variation based on two of its predecessor s, the J-2 and J-2S engines. ET50 is providing the design support for hardware required to run tests on the J-2X Gas Generator (GG) that increases the delivery pressure of the supplied combustion fuels that the engine burns. The test area will be running a series of tests using different lengths and curved segments of pipe and different sized nozzles to determine the configuration that best satisfies the thrust, heat, and stability requirements for the engine. I have had to research the configurations that are being tested and gain an understanding of the purpose of the tests. I then had to research the parts that would be used in the test configurations. I was taken to see parts similar to the ones used in the test configurations and was allowed to review drawings and dimensions used for those parts. My job over this summer has been to use the knowledge I have gained to design, model, and create drawings for the un-fabricated parts that are necessary for the J-2X Workhorse Gas Generator Phase IIcTest.

  11. Testing a Student Generated Hypothesis Using Student Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Herle M.; Vaughan, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We describe an activity that allows students to experience the full process of a statistical investigation, from generating the research question, to collecting data and testing a hypothesis. Implementation of the activity is described both with and without use of clickers, handheld remotes that allow instant data collection.

  12. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  16. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  17. Automatic Generation of Tests from Domain and Multimedia Ontologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papasalouros, Andreas; Kotis, Konstantinos; Kanaris, Konstantinos

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an approach for generating tests in an automatic way. Although other methods have been already reported in the literature, the proposed approach is based on ontologies, representing both domain and multimedia knowledge. The article also reports on a prototype implementation of this approach, which…

  18. When does colonisation of a semi-arid hillslope generate vegetation patterns?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    Patterned vegetation occurs in many semi-arid regions of the world. Most previous studies have assumed that patterns form from a starting point of uniform vegetation, for example as a response to a decrease in mean annual rainfall. However an alternative possibility is that patterns are generated when bare ground is colonised. This paper investigates the conditions under which colonisation leads to patterning on sloping ground. The slope gradient plays an important role because of the downhill flow of rainwater. One long-established consequence of this is that patterns are organised into stripes running parallel to the contours; such patterns are known as banded vegetation or tiger bush. This paper shows that the slope also has an important effect on colonisation, since the uphill and downhill edges of an isolated vegetation patch have different dynamics. For the much-used Klausmeier model for semi-arid vegetation, the author shows that without a term representing water diffusion, colonisation always generates uniform vegetation rather than a pattern. However the combination of a sufficiently large water diffusion term and a sufficiently low slope gradient does lead to colonisation-induced patterning. The author goes on to consider colonisation in the Rietkerk model, which is also in widespread use: the same conclusions apply for this model provided that a small threshold is imposed on vegetation biomass, below which plant growth is set to zero. Since the two models are quite different mathematically, this suggests that the predictions are a consequence of the basic underlying assumption of water redistribution as the pattern generation mechanism. PMID:26547308

  19. Quantum random number generation for loophole-free Bell tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Morgan; Abellan, Carlos; Amaya, Waldimar

    2015-05-01

    We describe the generation of quantum random numbers at multi-Gbps rates, combined with real-time randomness extraction, to give very high purity random numbers based on quantum events at most tens of ns in the past. The system satisfies the stringent requirements of quantum non-locality tests that aim to close the timing loophole. We describe the generation mechanism using spontaneous-emission-driven phase diffusion in a semiconductor laser, digitization, and extraction by parity calculation using multi-GHz logic chips. We pay special attention to experimental proof of the quality of the random numbers and analysis of the randomness extraction. In contrast to widely-used models of randomness generators in the computer science literature, we argue that randomness generation by spontaneous emission can be extracted from a single source.

  20. Calculation of second-harmonic wave pattern generated by focused cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, A.; Kozawa, Y.; Sato, S.

    2010-03-01

    We calculated the second-harmonic wave pattern induced by focused cylindrically symmetric, polarized vector beams. The second-order nonlinear polarization was expressed for fundamental electric field components passed through a dielectric interface based on vector diffraction theory. Furthermore, the second-harmonic wave pattern was represented on the basis of the far-field approximate expression derived from the formulation of higher-order harmonic generation including a Green's function. For a (110) zinc selenide crystal, the calculated forward emission patterns of the second-harmonic wave were eight-figure shaped as observed in experiment.

  1. Automated Test Case Generation for an Autopilot Requirement Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Rungta, Neha; Feary, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Designing safety-critical automation with robust human interaction is a difficult task that is susceptible to a number of known Human-Automation Interaction (HAI) vulnerabilities. It is therefore essential to develop automated tools that provide support both in the design and rapid evaluation of such automation. The Automation Design and Evaluation Prototyping Toolset (ADEPT) enables the rapid development of an executable specification for automation behavior and user interaction. ADEPT supports a number of analysis capabilities, thus enabling the detection of HAI vulnerabilities early in the design process, when modifications are less costly. In this paper, we advocate the introduction of a new capability to model-based prototyping tools such as ADEPT. The new capability is based on symbolic execution that allows us to automatically generate quality test suites based on the system design. Symbolic execution is used to generate both user input and test oracles user input drives the testing of the system implementation, and test oracles ensure that the system behaves as designed. We present early results in the context of a component in the Autopilot system modeled in ADEPT, and discuss the challenges of test case generation in the HAI domain.

  2. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Developing the Persian version of the homophone meaning generation test

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimipour, Mona; Motamed, Mohammad Reza; Ashayeri, Hassan; Modarresi, Yahya; Kamali, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Finding the right word is a necessity in communication, and its evaluation has always been a challenging clinical issue, suggesting the need for valid and reliable measurements. The Homophone Meaning Generation Test (HMGT) can measure the ability to switch between verbal concepts, which is required in word retrieval. The purpose of this study was to adapt and validate the Persian version of the HMGT. Methods: The first phase involved the adaptation of the HMGT to the Persian language. The second phase concerned the psychometric testing. The word-finding performance was assessed in 90 Persian-speaking healthy individuals (20-50 year old; 45 males and 45 females) through three naming tasks: Semantic Fluency, Phonemic Fluency, and Homophone Meaning Generation Test. The participants had no history of neurological or psychiatric diseases, alcohol abuse, severe depression, or history of speech, language, or learning problems. Results: The internal consistency coefficient was larger than 0.8 for all the items with a total Cronbach’s alpha of 0.80. Interrater and intrarater reliability were also excellent. The validity of all items was above 0.77, and the content validity index (0.99) was appropriate. The Persian HMGT had strong convergent validity with semantic and phonemic switching and adequate divergent validity with semantic and phonemic clustering. Conclusion: The Persian version of the Homophone Meaning Generation Test is an appropriate, valid, and reliable test to evaluate the ability to switch between verbal concepts in the assessment of word-finding performance. PMID:27390705

  4. Oscillatory Pattern Generation of the Olfactory Center Using Pulse-Type Hardware Chaotic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ken; Hatano, Hirokazu; Saito, Minoru; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Oscillatory patterns of electrical activity are a ubiquitous feature in nervous systems. Oscillatory patterns play an important role in the processing of sensory information pattern recognition. For example, earlier reports describe that the oscillatory patterns in the olfactory center of the land slug are changed by odor stimuli to the tentacles. Olfactory processing has also been studied in relation to rabbits and land slugs through the construction and use of mathematical neural network models. However, a large-scale model is necessary for the study of a model which has sensory information recognition by the oscillatory pattern. Therefore, the construction of a hardware model that can generate oscillatory patterns is desired because nonlinear operations can be processed at higher speeds than the mathematical model. We are studying about the neural network using hardware neuron models to construct the olfactory center model of the living organisms. In the present study, we discuss about the oscillatory pattern generation of the olfactory center using pulse-type hardware chaotic neuron models. Our model shows periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations such as the olfactory center of living organisms by changing the synaptic connection weights.

  5. Improved Ant Algorithms for Software Testing Cases Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shunkun; Xu, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    Existing ant colony optimization (ACO) for software testing cases generation is a very popular domain in software testing engineering. However, the traditional ACO has flaws, as early search pheromone is relatively scarce, search efficiency is low, search model is too simple, positive feedback mechanism is easy to porduce the phenomenon of stagnation and precocity. This paper introduces improved ACO for software testing cases generation: improved local pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization, improved pheromone volatilization coefficient for ant colony optimization (IPVACO), and improved the global path pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization (IGPACO). At last, we put forward a comprehensive improved ant colony optimization (ACIACO), which is based on all the above three methods. The proposed technique will be compared with random algorithm (RND) and genetic algorithm (GA) in terms of both efficiency and coverage. The results indicate that the improved method can effectively improve the search efficiency, restrain precocity, promote case coverage, and reduce the number of iterations. PMID:24883391

  6. Improved ant algorithms for software testing cases generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shunkun; Man, Tianlong; Xu, Jiaqi

    2014-01-01

    Existing ant colony optimization (ACO) for software testing cases generation is a very popular domain in software testing engineering. However, the traditional ACO has flaws, as early search pheromone is relatively scarce, search efficiency is low, search model is too simple, positive feedback mechanism is easy to produce the phenomenon of stagnation and precocity. This paper introduces improved ACO for software testing cases generation: improved local pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization, improved pheromone volatilization coefficient for ant colony optimization (IPVACO), and improved the global path pheromone update strategy for ant colony optimization (IGPACO). At last, we put forward a comprehensive improved ant colony optimization (ACIACO), which is based on all the above three methods. The proposed technique will be compared with random algorithm (RND) and genetic algorithm (GA) in terms of both efficiency and coverage. The results indicate that the improved method can effectively improve the search efficiency, restrain precocity, promote case coverage, and reduce the number of iterations. PMID:24883391

  7. Solar Stirling power generation - Systems analysis and preliminary tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Wu, Y.-C.; Moynihan, P. I.; Day, F. D., III

    1977-01-01

    The feasibility of an electric power generation system utilizing a sun-tracking parabolic concentrator and a Stirling engine/linear alternator is being evaluated. Performance predictions and cost analysis of a proposed large distributed system are discussed. Design details and preliminary test results are presented for a 9.5 ft diameter parabolic dish at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Caltech) Table Mountain Test Facility. Low temperature calorimetric measurements were conducted to evaluate the concentrator performance, and a helium flow system is being used to test the solar receiver at anticipated working fluid temperatures (up to 650 or 1200 C) to evaluate the receiver thermal performance. The receiver body is designed to adapt to a free-piston Stirling engine which powers a linear alternator assembly for direct electric power generation. During the next phase of the program, experiments with an engine and receiver integrated into the concentrator assembly are planned.

  8. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  9. Generation of optical crystals and quasicrystal beams: Kaleidoscopic patterns and phase singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. F.; Liang, H. C.; Lin, Y. C.; Tzeng, Y. S.; Su, K. W.; Huang, K. F.

    2011-05-15

    We explore the feasibility of the generation of pseudonondiffracting optical beams related to crystal and quasicrystal structures. It is experimentally confirmed that optical crystal and quasicrystal beams can be remarkably generated with a collimated light to illuminate a high-precision mask with multiple apertures regularly distributed on a ring. We also found that exotic kaleidoscopic patterns can be exhibited with the high-order quasicrystal beams. More importantly, the structures of phase singularities in optical quasicrystal beams are manifested.

  10. Influence of next-generation sequencing and storage conditions on miRNA patterns generated from PAXgene blood.

    PubMed

    Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Altmann, Gabriela; Wuerstle, Maximilian; Meder, Benjamin; Galata, Valentina; Mueller, Sabine C; Sickert, Daniel; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Whole blood derived miRNA signatures determined by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) offer themselves as future minimally invasive biomarkers for various human diseases. The PAXgene system is a commonly used blood storage system for miRNA analysis. Central to all miRNA analyses that aim to identify disease specific miRNA signatures, is the question of stability and variability of the miRNA profiles that are generated by NGS. We characterized the influence of five different conditions on the genome wide miRNA expression pattern of human blood isolated in PAXgene RNA tubes. In detail, we analyzed 15 miRNomes from three individuals. The blood was subjected to different numbers of freeze/thaw cycles and analyzed for the influence of storage at -80 or 8 °C. We also determined the influence of blood collection and NGS preparations on the miRNA pattern isolated from a single individual, which has been sequenced 10 times. Here, five PAXGene tubes were consecutively collected that have been split in two replicates, representing two experimental batches. All samples were analyzed by Illumina NGS. For each sample, approximately 20 million NGS reads have been generated. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed an influence of the different conditions on the miRNA patterns. The effects of the different conditions on miRNA abundance are, however, smaller than the differences that are due to interindividual variability. We also found evidence for an influence of the NGS measurement on the miRNA pattern. Specifically, hsa-miR-1271-5p and hsa-miR-182-5p showed coefficients of variation above 100% indicating a strong influence of the NGS protocol on the abundance of these miRNAs. PMID:26207298